Science.gov

Sample records for incident benign prostatic

  1. Finasteride Reduces the Risk of Incident Clinical Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Kellogg; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Arnold, Kathryn B.; Messer, Karen; Till, Cathee; Thompson, Ian M.; Kristal, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence of clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) among older men, there remains a notable absence of studies focused on BPH prevention. Objective To determine if finasteride prevents incident clinical BPH in healthy older men. Design, setting, and participants Data for this study are from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. After excluding those with a history of BPH diagnosis or treatment, or an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) ≥8 at study entry, 9253 men were available for analysis. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The primary outcome was incident clinical BPH, defined as the initiation of medical treatment, surgery, or sustained, clinically significant urinary symptoms (IPSS >14). Finasteride efficacy was estimated using Cox proportional regression models to generate hazards ratios (HRs). Results and limitations Mean length of follow-up was 5.3 yr. The rate of clinical BPH was 19 per 1000 person-years in the placebo arm and 11 per 1000 person-years in the finasteride arm (p < 0.001). In a covariate-adjusted model, finasteride reduced the risk of incident clinical BPH by 40% (HR: 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.51–0.69; p < 0.001). The effect of finasteride on incident clinical BPH was attenuated in men with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (pinteraction = 0.04) but otherwise did not differ significantly by physical activity, age, race, current diabetes, or current smoking. The post hoc nature of the analysis is a potential study limitation. Conclusions Finasteride substantially reduces the risk of incident clinical BPH in healthy older men. These results should be considered in formulating recommendations for the use of finasteride to prevent prostate diseases in asymptomatic older men. PMID:22459892

  2. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  3. Cholesterol and Benign Prostate Disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael R.; Solomon, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association bet ween BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemi, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  4. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept.

  5. Pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Indudhara, R

    1994-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a benign neoplasm of the prostate seen in men of advancing age. Microscopic evidence of the disorder is seen in about 70% of men by 70 years of age, whereas symptoms requiring some form of surgical intervention occur in 30% of men during their lifetime. Although the exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia is not clear, it is well recognized that high levels of intraprostatic androgens are required for the maintenance of prostatic growth. In recent years, extensive surveys of patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate reveal an 18% incidence of morbidity that has essentially not changed in the past 30 years. This procedure is also the second highest reimbursed surgical therapy under Medicare. These findings have resulted in an intensive search for alternative therapies for prostatic hyperplasia. An alternative that has now been well defined is the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers to relax the prostatic urethra. This is based on findings that a major component of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms is spasm of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck, which is mediated by the alpha-adrenergic nerves. A second approach is to block androgens involved in maintaining prostate growth. Several such drugs are now available for clinical use, and we discuss their side effects and use. We also include the newer recommendations on evaluating benign prostatic hyperplasia that are cost-effective yet comprehensive. Images PMID:7528957

  6. Nationwide incidence and treatment pattern of benign prostatic hyperplasia in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Jeong Woo; Park, Juhyun; Seo, Seong Il; Chung, Jae Il; Yoo, Tag Keun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Korea and treatment patterns for 3 years after the diagnosis in a nationwide database. Materials and Methods We created a cohort of patients diagnosed of BPH between 2007 and 2011 from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment database, a nationwide database of reimbursement. The diagnosis of BPH was defined as having the diagnosis of BPH (N40.0 in International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision) as a primary or secondary diagnosis ≥2 times in 2008. The incidence of BPH in 2008 was calculated. Treatment patterns were determined in 3 months interval and traced for 3 years. The incidence and timing of surgery were also determined. For patients taking medications preoperatively, medication-free rate was calculated. Results The incidence of BPH was 2,105 per 100,000 men (mean age, 59.7±11.4 years), and increased with age. Surgery was performed for 7,955 patients (2.1%), half of the surgery being performed within the first 6 months. Transurethral resection of the prostate was the most commonly performed surgery. The proportion of treatment increased with age until the 7th decade of life. The patients taking medication for >1 year after the initial diagnosis was 21.4%. On average, 82% of patients became medication-free at postoperative 1 year. For patients taking preoperative anticholinergics, 1 year medication-free rate was 73.3%. Conclusions The incidence of BPH increased with age. Surgery was performed in 2.1% of patients. More than 4/5 patients discontinued medication after surgery, while patients taking preoperative anticholinergics were less likely to. PMID:27847916

  7. Incidence of benign prostate hypertrophy in Danish men with and without HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S; Pedersen, Court; Pedersen, Gitte; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2015-11-01

    Information on risk of benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) in HIV-infected men is sparse. We aimed to estimate the incidence of being diagnosed with BPH among HIV-infected men compared with an age and sex-matched comparison cohort from the background population. To exclude that family-associated risk factors influence risk of BPH diagnoses in families of HIV-infected individuals, we estimated risk of BPH in fathers of HIV-infected men and fathers of the comparison cohort. In a nationwide, population-based, matched cohort study, we calculated incidence rates and used Poisson regression models to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of being diagnosed with BPH, defined as the earliest of date of the second redeemed prescription of a drug used to treat BPH, the first registration of a BPH diagnosis in the Danish National Hospital Registry (DNHR) or the first registration of a surgical procedure for BPH in DNHR. We identified 4633 HIV-infected men, 46 330 comparison cohort individuals, 1585 fathers of HIV-infected men and 20 449 fathers of the comparison cohort. Incidence rate of being diagnosed with BPH was 37.0 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 31.5-43.1] per 10 000 person-years of follow-up among HIV-infected men and was not increased compared with the comparison cohort (IRR 1.04, 95% CI 0.88-1.22). Risk was not increased for fathers of HIV-infected men vs. fathers of the comparison cohort (IRR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87-1.12). Stratified analyses did not change the above results markedly. HIV-infected individuals do not have an increased risk of being diagnosed with BPH.

  8. [Large benign prostatic hiperplasia].

    PubMed

    Soria-Fernández, Guillermo René; Jungfermann-Guzman, José René; Lomelín-Ramos, José Pedro; Jaspersen-Gastelum, Jorge; Rosas-Nava, Jesús Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    the term prostatic hyperplasia is most frequently used to describe the benign prostatic growth, this being a widely prevalent disorder associated with age that affects most men as they age. The association between prostate growth and urinary obstruction in older adults is well documented. large benign prostatic hyperplasia is rare and few cases have been published and should be taken into account during the study of tumors of the pelvic cavity. we report the case of an 81-year-old who had significant symptoms relating to storage and bladder emptying, with no significant elevation of prostate specific antigen. this is a rare condition but it is still important to diagnose and treat as it may be related to severe obstructive uropathy and chronic renal failure. In our institution, cases of large prostatic hyperplasia that are solved by suprapubic adenomectomy are less than 3%.

  9. [The incidence of acute urinary retention as an indicator of the quality of care for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Apolikhin, O I; Sivkov, A V; Yanenko, E K; Katibov, M I; Zolotukhin, O V; Shaderkin, I A; Prosyannikov, M Yu; Voitko, D A; Tsoi, A A; Galiev, N A; Kastrikin, Yu V

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the incidence of acute urinary retention as an indicator of the quality of care for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia by the example of "Urology" Program implemented in the Voronezh region. As part of the program "Urology", the incidence of AUR was used as an indicator of quality of care for patients with BPH. Urological health care for patients with BPH was provided within a three-stage model. For each of the stages standardized packages of detailed methodological materials, including regional standards were developed. Over the 3 years of the program (2011-2013) questionnaire survey was conducted among 762 937 men 50-75 years old with 85.3-88.1% annual coverage of respondents. Over the past three years (2009-2012) there was consistent and statistically significant (p<0.05) decrease (from 11.27 to 1.5%) in the proportion of hospitalizations for AUR reaching a "plateau" (p>0.05) in 2012-2013. There was a significant correlation of AUR with the main indicators of effectiveness of BPH treatment: the structure of morbidity (prevalence of early BPH forms - groups 1 and 2), the number of surgical interventions, the frequency of complications (including surgical), general and specific costs for diagnosis and treatment of BPH. Acute urinary retention may be regarded as an integral indicator of the quality of care for patients with BPH.

  10. Benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect up to 30% of men in their early 70s, causing urinary symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. Symptoms can improve without treatment, but the usual course is a slow progression of symptoms, with acute urinary retention occurring in 1-2% of men with BPH per year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical, surgical, and herbal treatments? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to May 2005 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 43 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, alpha-blockers, beta-sitosterol plant extract, less-invasive surgical techniques, pygeum africanum, rye grass pollen extract, saw palmetto plant extracts, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, transurethral needle ablation, and transurethral resection.

  11. [Benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mourey, Loïc; Doumerc, Nicolas; Gaudin, Clément; Gérard, Stéphane; Balardy, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic diseases are extremely common, especially in older men. Amongst them, benign prostatic hypertrophy may affect significantly the quality of life of patients by the symptoms it causes. It requires appropriate care. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men after lung cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It affects preferentially older men. An oncogeriatric approach is required for personalised care.

  12. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Roehrborn, Claus G

    2005-01-01

    Despite the deceptively simple description of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), the actual relationship between BPH, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), benign prostatic enlargement, and bladder outlet obstruction is complex and requires a solid understanding of the definitional issues involved. The etiology of BPH and LUTS is still poorly understood, but the hormonal hypothesis has many arguments in its favor. There are many medical and minimally invasive treatment options available for affected patients. In the intermediate and long term, minimally invasive treatment options are superior to medical therapy in terms of symptom and flow rate improvement; tissue ablative surgical treatment options are superior to both minimally invasive and medical therapy. PMID:16985902

  13. [Phytotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Bracher, F

    1997-01-01

    Phytopharmaceutical agents have been used for a long time in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, until recently, it has been questioned whether phytotherapy is superior to a placebo treatment. In this article, the most widely used phytopharmaceutical agents, such as saw palmetto berry extracts, Radix urticae extracts, pumpkin seeds, pollen extracts and different phytosterols, are described. In addition, both in vitro and in vivo studies are discussed in an attempt to explain a possible mechanism of action. There are several new clinical studies which demonstrate a significant benefit compared with placebo treatment. Based on these results, the use of phytopharmaceutical agents for the treatment of mild to moderate symptomatic BPH seems to be well justified. So far, no significant inhibition of further prostate growth has been demonstrated. For this, a careful follow-up of the patients is necessary so as not to miss a deterioration and perhaps the need for an operation.

  14. A comparison of incidences of bladder neck contracture of 80- versus 180-W GreenLight laser photoselective vaporization of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Song, Zhenyu; Liu, Hui; Qiao, Liang; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Muwen; Song, Wei; Zhang, Dong; Jin, Xunbo; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-11-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) after GreenLight laser photoselective vaporization (PVP) of benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common complication. In the present study, data of patients received 80 or 180 W PVP were collected. Perioperative parameters, including applied energy, irradiation time, catheter removal time, and hospital stay, were recorded. Postoperative parameters, including maximum urinary flow rate, International Prostate Symptom Score, post-void residual volume, and incidences of BNC, were recorded at 3 and 12 months after operations. Bladder neck tissues were taken at 3 months after operations for immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis to examine the expressions of collagen I, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Sample size of patients was calculated with a power of 80 %. Chi-square test and one-way analysis of variance were performed as statistical methods. Three hundred twenty-six patients who received potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser and 256 who received X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) laser entered into the study. Perioperative parameters were comparable, except for shorter irradiation time in 180 W group (P = 0.032). Postoperative parameters were also similar, except for higher incidence of BNC in 80 W group at 3 months after operations (P = 0.022). Immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis showed higher expressions of collagen I, MMP-3, and TGF-β in 80 W group than in 180 W group. In conclusion, 80 W GreenLight laser showed a comparable efficacy with 180-W laser in PVP but showed a higher incidence of BNC in short term, which might be the result of up-regulated fibrotic factors in bladder neck triggered by lasers.

  15. Oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zabaiou, N; Mabed, D; Lobaccaro, J M; Lahouel, M

    2016-02-01

    To assess the status of oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia, a very common disease in older men which constitutes a public health problem in Jijel, prostate tissues were obtained by transvesical adenomectomy from 10 men with benign prostate hyperplasia. We measured the cytosolic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) and cytosolic enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase. The development of benign prostate hyperplasia is accompanied by impaired oxidative status by increasing levels of MDA, depletion of GSH concentrations and a decrease in the activity of all the antioxidant enzymes studied. These results have allowed us to understand a part of the aetiology of benign prostate hyperplasia related to oxidative stress.

  16. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: from Bench to Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Ju

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease, especially in old men, and often results in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This chronic disease has important care implications and financial risks to the health care system. LUTS are caused not only by mechanical prostatic obstruction but also by the dynamic component of obstruction. The exact etiology of BPH and its consequences, benign prostatic enlargement and benign prostatic obstruction, are not identified. Various theories concerning the causes of benign prostate enlargement and LUTS, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, growth factors, androgen receptor, epithelial-stromal interaction, and lifestyle, are discussed. Incomplete overlap of prostatic enlargement with symptoms and obstruction encourages focus on symptoms rather than prostate enlargement and the shifting from surgery to medicine as the treatment of BPH. Several alpha antagonists, including alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, have shown excellent efficacy without severe adverse effects. In addition, new alpha antagonists, silodosin and naftopidil, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors are emerging as BPH treatments. In surgical treatment, laser surgery such as photoselective vaporization of the prostate and holmium laser prostatectomy have been introduced to reduce complications and are used as alternatives to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open prostatectomy. The status of TURP as the gold standard treatment of BPH is still evolving. We review several preclinical and clinical studies about the etiology of BPH and treatment options. PMID:22468207

  17. [Histological changes of the prostate and acute urinary retention in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Bao, Qing-Bing; He, Guo-Hua; Liu, Guang-Yao; Zhang, Chang-Geng; Yang, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the roles of prostatic infarction, prostatic inflammation and the type of prostatic hyperplasia in acute urinary retention (AUR) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We retrospectively analyzed 102 cases of BPH, 49 complicated by AUR and the other 53 without AUR. We compared the incidences of prostatic infarction and prostatic inflammation, the types of prostatic hyperplasia, the patients' age, the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA), the prostate volume, and international prostate symptom score (IPSS) between the AUR and non-AUR groups. The PSA level was significantly increased in the AUR group as compared with the non-AUR group (P < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in the mean age, prostate volume and IPSS (P > 0.05). The type of prostatic hyperplasia showed no correlation with AUR. The incidence rate of AUR was 5.620 and 2.326 times higher in the BPH patients with prostatic infarction and prostatic inflammation respectively than in those without (P < 0.05). Prostatic infarction and prostatic inflammation are important risk factors of AUR in BPH patients.

  18. Finasteride for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Tacklind, James; Fink, Howard A; Macdonald, Roderick; Rutks, Indy; Wilt, Timothy J

    2010-10-06

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a non-malignant enlargement of the prostate in aging men, can cause bothersome urinary symptoms (intermittency, weak stream, straining, urgency, frequency, incomplete emptying). Finasteride, a five-alpha reductase inhibitor (5ARI), blocks the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, reduces prostate size, and is commonly used to treat symptoms associated with BPH. To compare the clinical effectiveness and harms of finasteride versus placebo and active controls in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). We searched The Cochrane Library (which includes CDSR (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews), DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects), HTA (Heath Technology Assessments), and CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and which includes EMBASE and MEDLINE), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information) and Google Scholar for randomized, controlled trials (RCTs). We also handsearched systematic reviews, references, and clinical-practice guidelines. Randomized trials in the English language with placebo and/or active arms with a duration of at least 6 months. JT extracted the data, which included patient characteristics, outcomes, and harms. Our primary outcome was change in a validated, urinary symptom-scale score, such as the AUA/IPSS. A clinically meaningful change was defined as 4 points. We also categorized outcomes by trial lengths of ≤ 1 year (short term) and > 1 year (long term). Finasteride consistently improved urinary symptom scores more than placebo in trials of > 1 year duration, and significantly lowered the risk of BPH progression (acute urinary retention, risk of surgical intervention, ≥ 4 point increase in the AUASI/IPSS). In comparison to alpha-blocker monotherapy, finasteride was less effective than either doxazosin or terazosin, but equally effective compared to tamsulosin. Both doxazosin and terazosin were significantly more

  19. Obesity and future prostate cancer risk among men after an initial benign biopsy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Andrew; Jankowski, Michelle; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Tang, Deliang; Rybicki, Benjamin A

    2013-05-01

    In general population studies, obesity has been associated with risk of high-grade prostate cancer, but little is known about obesity and future prostate cancer risk among men with an initial benign biopsy of the prostate; a high-risk population. Within a cohort of 6,692 men followed up after a biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with benign findings, a nested case-control study was conducted of 494 prostate cancer cases and controls matched on age, race, follow-up duration, biopsy versus TURP and date of procedure. Body mass index at the time of the initial procedure was abstracted from medical records, and initial biopsy specimens were reviewed for the presence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Obesity was associated with the presence of PIN in the initial benign specimen [OR = 2.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-4.11]. After adjustment for the matching variables, family history of prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at the initial procedure, the number of PSA tests and digital rectal examinations during follow-up, obesity (OR = 1.57; 95% CI, 1.07-2.30) at the time of the initial procedure was associated with prostate cancer incidence during follow-up. Risk associated with obesity was confined to cases with follow-up less than 1,538 days, the median duration of follow-up among cases (OR = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.09-3.48). Obesity is associated with the presence of PIN in benign specimens and with future prostate cancer risk after an initial benign finding. Obesity may be a factor to consider when planning clinical follow-up after a benign biopsy.

  20. [Modern pharmacotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław; Szkróbka, Witold; Herman, Zbigniew Stanisław

    2005-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is the most common medical problem affecting elderly men throughout the world. With increasing awareness of health issues amongst males, the morbidity caused by this disease is not longer being accepted as just part of growing old. Until about 10 years ago, surgery was the only effective treatment for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Now, many men suffering from this disorder may be effectively treated with a medical therapy. This article provides an overview of the efficacy and safety of 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists and herbal remedies, putting special emphasis on the current place of these agents in the modem therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Wherever possible, our opinion is based on the detailed analysis of the results of available clinical trials.

  1. Diagnosis and management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jonathan L

    2008-05-15

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common condition affecting older men. Typical presenting symptoms include urinary hesitancy, weak stream, nocturia, incontinence, and recurrent urinary tract infections. Acute urinary retention, which requires urgent bladder catheterization, is relatively uncommon. Irreversible renal damage is rare. The initial evaluation should assess the frequency and severity of symptoms and the impact of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. The American Urological Association Symptom Index is a validated instrument for the objective assessment of symptom severity. The initial evaluation should also include a digital rectal examination and urinalysis. Men with hematuria should be evaluated for bladder cancer. A palpable nodule or induration of the prostate requires referral for assessment to rule out prostate cancer. For men with mild symptoms, watchful waiting with annual reassessment is appropriate. Over the past decade, numerous medical and surgical interventions have been shown to be effective in relieving symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Alpha blockers improve symptoms relatively quickly. Although 5-alpha reductase inhibitors have a slower onset of action, they may decrease prostate size and alter the disease course. Limited evidence shows that the herbal agents saw palmetto extract, rye grass pollen extract, and pygeum relieve symptoms. Transurethral resection of the prostate often provides permanent relief. Newer laser-based surgical techniques have comparable effectiveness to transurethral resection up to two years after surgery with lower perioperative morbidity. Various outpatient surgical techniques are associated with reduced morbidity, but symptom relief may be less durable.

  2. Prostate Artery Embolization for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Mirakhur, Anirudh; McWilliams, Justin P

    2017-02-01

    Prostate artery embolization has garnered much attention as a promising treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. We aim to provide an up-to-date review of this minimally invasive technique, including discussion of potential benefits and technical challenges. Current evidence suggests it is a safe and effective option for patients with medication-refractory urinary obstructive symptoms who are poor surgical candidates or refuse surgical therapy. Larger, randomized studies with long-term follow-up data are needed for this technique to be formally established in the treatment paradigm for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimizing the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Elterman, Dean S.; Kaplan, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges facing primary care physicians and specialists as the population ages is the management of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). While as many as 18% of men in their 40s report bother from an enlarged prostate, that figure rises dramatically, whereby 50% of men in their 50s and 90% of men in their 90s will complain of bothersome symptoms related to an enlarged prostate. Studies have shown that BPH is a progressive disease, which if left untreated can result in worsening of symptoms, acute urinary retention and renal failure. Until about 20 years ago the only management option available to urologists was surgery. In the early 1990s medical therapy emerged as the predominant treatment for BPH. Therapy may be tailored to target symptoms and progression of disease. PMID:22496710

  4. Oxidative Stress Promotes Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Paz; Castro, Patricia; Ittmann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by increased tissue mass in the transition zone of the prostate, which leads to obstruction of urine outflow and significant morbidity in the majority of older men. Plasma markers of oxidative stress are increased in men with BPH but it is unclear whether oxidative stress and/or oxidative DNA damage are causal in the pathogenesis of BPH. METHODS Levels of 8-OH deoxyguanosine (8-OH dG), a marker of oxidative stress, were measured in prostate tissues from normal transition zone and BPH by ELISA. 8-OH dG was also detected in tissues by immunohistochemistry and staining quantitated by image analysis. Nox4 promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species. We therefore created and characterized transgenic mice with prostate specific expression of Nox4 under the control of the prostate specific ARR2PB promoter. RESULTS Human BPH tissues contained significantly higher levels of 8-OH dG than control transition zone tissues and the levels of 8-OH dG were correlated with prostate weight. Cells with 8-OH dG staining were predominantly in the epithelium and were present in a patchy distribution. The total fraction of epithelial staining with 8-OH dG was significantly increased in BPH tissues by image analysis. The ARR2PB-Nox4 mice had increased oxidative DNA damage in the prostate, increased prostate weight, increased epithelial proliferation, and histological changes including epithelial proliferation, stromal thickening, and fibrosis when compared to wild type controls. CONCLUSIONS Oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage are important in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:26417670

  5. Oxidative stress promotes benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Vital, Paz; Castro, Patricia; Ittmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by increased tissue mass in the transition zone of the prostate, which leads to obstruction of urine outflow and significant morbidity in the majority of older men. Plasma markers of oxidative stress are increased in men with BPH but it is unclear whether oxidative stress and/or oxidative DNA damage are causal in the pathogenesis of BPH. Levels of 8-OH deoxyguanosine (8-OH dG), a marker of oxidative stress, were measured in prostate tissues from normal transition zone and BPH by ELISA. 8-OH dG was also detected in tissues by immunohistochemistry and staining quantitated by image analysis. Nox4 promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species. We therefore created and characterized transgenic mice with prostate specific expression of Nox4 under the control of the prostate specific ARR2PB promoter. Human BPH tissues contained significantly higher levels of 8-OH dG than control transition zone tissues and the levels of 8-OH dG were correlated with prostate weight. Cells with 8-OH dG staining were predominantly in the epithelium and were present in a patchy distribution. The total fraction of epithelial staining with 8-OH dG was significantly increased in BPH tissues by image analysis. The ARR2PB-Nox4 mice had increased oxidative DNA damage in the prostate, increased prostate weight, increased epithelial proliferation, and histological changes including epithelial proliferation, stromal thickening, and fibrosis when compared to wild type controls. Oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage are important in the pathogenesis of BPH. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Guneyli, Serkan; Ward, Emily; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen Nehal; Trilisky, Igor; Peng, Yahui; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in middle-aged and older men and negatively affects the quality of life. An ultrasound classification for BPH based on a previous pathologic classification was reported, and the types of BPH were classified according to different enlargement locations in the prostate. Afterwards, this classification was demonstrated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The classification of BPH is important, as patients with different types of BPH can have different symptoms and treatment options. BPH types on MRI are as follows: type 0, an equal to or less than 25 cm3 prostate showing little or no zonal enlargements; type 1, bilateral transition zone (TZ) enlargement; type 2, retrourethral enlargement; type 3, bilateral TZ and retrourethral enlargement; type 4, pedunculated enlargement; type 5, pedunculated with bilateral TZ and/or retrourethral enlargement; type 6, subtrigonal or ectopic enlargement; type 7, other combinations of enlargements. We retrospectively evaluated MRI images of BPH patients who were histologically diagnosed and presented the different types of BPH on MRI. MRI, with its advantage of multiplanar imaging and superior soft tissue contrast resolution, can be used in BPH patients for differentiation of BPH from prostate cancer, estimation of zonal and entire prostatic volumes, determination of the stromal/glandular ratio, detection of the enlargement locations, and classification of BPH types which may be potentially helpful in choosing the optimal treatment.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Guneyli, Serkan; Ward, Emily; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen Nehal; Trilisky, Igor; Peng, Yahui; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in middle-aged and older men and negatively affects the quality of life. An ultrasound classification for BPH based on a previous pathologic classification was reported, and the types of BPH were classified according to different enlargement locations in the prostate. Afterwards, this classification was demonstrated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The classification of BPH is important, as patients with different types of BPH can have different symptoms and treatment options. BPH types on MRI are as follows: type 0, an equal to or less than 25 cm3 prostate showing little or no zonal enlargements; type 1, bilateral transition zone (TZ) enlargement; type 2, retrourethral enlargement; type 3, bilateral TZ and retrourethral enlargement; type 4, pedunculated enlargement; type 5, pedunculated with bilateral TZ and/or retrourethral enlargement; type 6, subtrigonal or ectopic enlargement; type 7, other combinations of enlargements. We retrospectively evaluated MRI images of BPH patients who were histologically diagnosed and presented the different types of BPH on MRI. MRI, with its advantage of multiplanar imaging and superior soft tissue contrast resolution, can be used in BPH patients for differentiation of BPH from prostate cancer, estimation of zonal and entire prostatic volumes, determination of the stromal/glandular ratio, detection of the enlargement locations, and classification of BPH types which may be potentially helpful in choosing the optimal treatment. PMID:27015442

  8. Current Laser Treatments for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hwancheol; Song, Sang Hoon

    2010-01-01

    The latest technical improvements in the surgical armamentarium are remarkable. In particular, advancements in the urologic field are so exceptional that we could observe the flare-up of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and laser prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) and holmium laser prostatectomy are the most generalized options for laser surgery of BPH, and both modalities have shown good postoperative results. In comparison to transurethral prostatectomy (TURP), they showed similar efficacy and a much lower complication rate in randomized prospective clinical trials. Even in cases of large prostates, laser prostatectomy showed comparable efficacy and safety profiles compared to open prostatectomy. From a technical point of view, PVP is considered to be an easier technique for the urologist to master. Furthermore, patients can be safely followed up in an outpatient clinic. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) mimics open prostatectomy because the adenomatous tissue is peeled off the surgical capsule in both procedures. Therefore, HoLEP shows notable volume reduction of the prostate similar to open prostatectomy with fewer blood transfusions, shorter hospital stay, and cost reduction regardless of prostate size. Outcomes of laser prostatectomy for BPH are encouraging but sometimes are unbalanced because safety and feasibility studies were reported mainly for PVP, whereas long-term data are mostly available for HoLEP. We need longer-term randomized clinical data to identify the reoperation rate of PVP and to determine which procedure is the ideal alternative to TURP and open prostatectomy for each patient. PMID:21165192

  9. Clinical characteristics of bladder urothelial tumors in male patients--the influences of benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nian-Zhao; Chen, Jun; Ma, Lin; Xu, Zhi-Shun

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of bladder urothelial tumors in male patients. The clinical characteristics of 356 patients with newly diagnosed bladder urothelial tumors from July 2005 to January 2010 were analyzed. Characteristics of different age groups were compared. Furthermore, tumor characteristics were analyzed to define the relationship, if any, with benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement. For bladder urothelial tumors, the percentage of carcinoma increased significantly with increasing age (P < 0.001), and differences were found among 3 age groups in the distribution of high grade carcinoma (P = 0.012). Especially in non-muscle-invasive carcinoma, the percentage of high grade carcinoma increased significantly with increasing age (P = 0.006), with significant differences between the ≤50 years group and the 51-69 years group and ≥70 years group (P = 0.031, P = 0.002). Interestingly, compared with non-benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement patients, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement patients were more frequently diagnosed with poorly differentiated tumors, and logistic regression confirmed associations between benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and unfavorable carcinoma, controlling for age (P = 0.009). Age is an unfavorable influence on the clinical characteristics of bladder urothelial tumors in men, and it was observed that the percentage of unfavorable tumors increased with age. Interestingly, noticeable changes of tumor differentiation appeared at the age of 50 years, and it was indicated that the natural history of carcinoma appeared to differ according to benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement statuses. There was a tendency for the men, who were diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement, to present with unfavorable carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Microwave thermotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard M; Monga, Manoj; Elliott, Sean P; Macdonald, Roderick; Langsjoen, Jens; Tacklind, James; Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-09-12

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been the gold-standard treatment for alleviating urinary symptoms and improving urinary flow in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the morbidity of TURP approaches 20%, and less invasive techniques have been developed for treating BPH. Preliminary data suggest that microwave thermotherapy, which delivers microwave energy to produce coagulation necrosis in prostatic tissue, is a safe, effective treatment for BPH. To assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of microwave thermotherapy techniques for treating men with symptomatic benign prostatic obstruction. Randomized controlled trials were identified from The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, bibliographies of retrieved articles, reviews, technical reports, and by contacting relevant expert trialists and microwave manufacturers. All randomized controlled trials evaluating transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT) for men with symptomatic BPH were eligible for this review. Comparison groups could include transurethral resection of the prostate, minimally invasive prostatectomy techniques, sham thermotherapy procedures, and medications. Outcome measures included urinary symptoms, urinary function, prostate volume, mortality, morbidity, and retreatment. Two review authors independently identified potentially relevant abstracts and then assessed the full papers for inclusion. Two review authors independently abstracted study design, baseline characteristics, and outcomes data and assessed methodological quality using a standard form. We attempted to obtain missing data from authors or sponsors, or both. In this update, we identified no new randomized comparisons of TUMT that provided evaluable effectiveness data. Fifteen studies involving 1585 patients met the inclusion criteria, including six comparisons of microwave thermotherapy with TURP, eight comparisons with sham thermotherapy procedures, and one comparison with an alpha

  11. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical manifestations and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Santos Dias, José

    2012-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a very common condition, related to aging and causing symptoms, called lower urinary tract symptoms. On account of its huge prevalence, it is important for clinicians who are involved in the management of patients with BPH to be aware of the very strict recommendations for BPH evaluation. In this article, we describe the different steps and procedures doctors should follow to evaluate these patients; symptoms and signs of BPH are reviewed, as well as the clinical evaluation steps and examinations available. The basic evaluation of the patients with BPH should include, according to the recommendations of the most relevant international guidelines, lower urinary tract symptoms evaluation with appropriate symptom scores, digital rectal examination, voiding charts, prostate-specific antigen and creatinine measurement, urinalysis, and imaging of the urinary tract.

  12. Baldness, benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer and androgen levels.

    PubMed

    Faydaci, Gökhan; Bilal, Eryildirim; Necmettin, Penpegül; Fatih, Tarhan; Asuman, Orçun; Uğur, Kuyumcuoğlu

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. BPH, prostate cancer and androgenic alopecia (AA) were somehow androgen dependent and affect large population of elderly men. A total of 152 patients, 108 patients with BPH and 44 patients with prostate cancer were included in the study. We measured serum total, free and bioavailable testosterone, FSH, LH, prolactin, estradiol, albumin and SHBG levels. Baldness classification was based on Norwood's classification and we categorised baldness as vertex and frontal baldness. The frequency of AA in BPH and prostate cancer groups were not different. We looked for some correlation between the two groups with respect to AA and hormone levels. We did not find any correlation between AA and total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone or SHBG levels in both groups. This prospective study with selected small group of patients showed that there is no difference of male pattern baldness in BPH and prostate cancer patients and also there is no correlation between pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels.

  13. Emerging drug therapies for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Travis L; Andriole, Gerald L

    2006-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate gland caused by increases in number of both epithelial and stromal cells. Clinically, BPH leads to voiding dysfunction, which is most often referred to as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Historically, the only treatments for LUTS due to BPH were watchful waiting or surgery (transurethral or open prostatectomy). However, over the last 20 years medical therapy has taken a prominent role in the management of BPH. Current medical treatments for BPH include alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonists, inhibitors of the 5-alpha reductase enzyme and various phytotherapies. These agents are generally effective and safe; however, many patients are unable to tolerate the side effects or are refractory to medical management and require surgery. In light of this, many potential new therapies for the treatment of BPH are under development. Some represent a variation of current treatments, whereas others target novel molecular pathways within the prostate. The aim of this review is to examine current pharmacotherapies as well as to highlight emerging drugs that may improve our treatment of patients with LUTS secondary to BPH.

  14. Dutasteride/tamsulosin: in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-05-01

    The 5α-reductase inhibitor dutasteride and the α(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist tamsulosin are available as a fixed-dose combination for use in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and an enlarged prostate. Dutasteride 0.5 mg/day plus tamsulosin 0.4 mg/day improved lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) to a significantly greater extent than dutasteride or tamsulosin alone in men with BPH, moderate to severe LUTS and an increased risk of disease progression, according to the results of the randomized, double-blind, multinational CombAT trial. The mean change from baseline in the total International Prostate Symptom Score was significantly greater with dutasteride plus tamsulosin than with dutasteride or tamsulosin alone after 2 years (primary endpoint) and 4 years of therapy. After 4 years' therapy in the CombAT trial, the time to first acute urinary retention or BPH-related surgery (primary endpoint) significantly favoured men with symptomatic BPH who were receiving dutasteride plus tamsulosin versus those receiving tamsulosin alone, with no significant difference between recipients of dutasteride plus tamsulosin and recipients of dutasteride alone. In the CombAT trial, health-related quality of life and treatment satisfaction were improved to a significantly greater extent with dutasteride plus tamsulosin than with dutasteride or tamsulosin alone. Combination therapy with oral dutasteride plus tamsulosin was generally well tolerated in patients with symptomatic BPH in the CombAT trial.

  15. [Expressions of the androgen receptor in normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rui; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ying-Hao; Xu, Chuan-Liang; Gao, Xu; Jiao, Li

    2010-11-01

    To study the expressions of the androgen receptor (AR) in the normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (PCa), and investigate the relationship of AR with prostatic hyperplasia and PCa. The expressions of AR were detected in 15 normal prostate, 20 benign prostatic hyperplasia and 40 PCa samples by immunofluorescent staining, real-time PCR and Western blotting. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed no statistically significant differences in the expressions of AR between the normal prostate and prostatic hyperplasia groups (P < 0.05), while immunofluorescent staining exhibited an increase of the expression in the BPH tissues. All the three methods showed that the AR expression was significantly higher in the PCa than in the normal prostate and prostatic hyperplasia groups (P < 0.05), in the well differentiated than in the poorly differentiated tumor, and in the early than in the advanced stage (P < 0.05), but the lowest in the hormone-refractory PCa (HRPC) tissue. The expression of AR is higher in PCa than in normal prostate and prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and is correlated with the pathological grade and clinical stage of PCa.

  16. Holmium laser treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: an update.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, Brian R; Miller, Nicole L; Lingeman, James E

    2007-01-01

    The surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia is a dynamic, evolving field. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate has been one of the most rigorously analyzed interventions for benign prostatic hyperplasia. In the 12 months since July 2005, a number of important studies have been published concerning this technique. In the 12-month period of this review, there have been a number of articles published on holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. Among these are five randomized controlled trials. These studies emphasize the unique advantages of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate over other surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate is a more efficient procedure than competitor techniques, when grams of tissue removed per unit time are quantified. Additionally, holmium laser enucleation of the prostate is associated with a reduced length of catheterization and hospitalization when compared with other surgical therapies for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Outcome measures for men undergoing holmium laser enucleation of the prostate are in many cases superior to those of other modalities. It is likely that the completeness of adenoma removal with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate confers many of these advantages.

  17. Risk stratification for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Fabio; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Novara, Giacomo

    2017-03-18

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) represents an important public health problem in ageing men due to frequently associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which may impair quality of life. BPH is also a progressive disease, mainly characterized by a worsening of LUTS over time, and in some patients by the occurrence of serious outcomes such as acute urinary retention and need for BPH-related surgery. The management of BPH and LUTS in men should move forward its focus on symptom control only. Indeed, the goals of therapy for BPH are not only to improve bothersome LUTS but also to identify those patients at risk of unfavourable outcomes in order to optimize their management and reduce complications. Risk stratification and tailored treatment should improve the reductions in both symptoms and the long-term consequences of BPH and BPH treatments. To do this, clinicians need to know possible factors that may support the develop of PBH and possible risks due to the BPH itself.

  18. Saw palmetto and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Gong, Edward M; Gerber, Glenn S

    2004-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common health issue that affects 8% of all men at the age of 40, 60% of men in their 70s, and 90% of those greater than 80 years of age. One-fourth of these men will develop moderate to severe lower urinary tract symptoms that greatly affect their quality of life. Recent evidence suggests that the use of saw palmetto leads to improvements in urinary function for those suffering from BPH. The favorable comparison of saw palmetto with tamsulosin, a well-known first line agent in the treatment of urinary tract symptoms, demonstrates promise towards a beneficial effect of this herbal agent, with very few, if any, adverse effects. However, what degree of this beneficial activity is due to placebo effects is yet to be determined. In addition, the precise mechanism of action of saw palmetto in men with BPH remains unclear.

  19. Transurethral microwave hyperthermia in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovich, Zbigniew; Ameye, Filip; Baert, Luc

    1992-09-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease affecting past middle-aged males. Surgical treatment has been successfully used since the early 1900s. Currently, nonsurgical treatment modalities are under intensive study in BPH patients who have relative contraindications to surgery. Transurethral microwave hyperthermia (TUHT) is one of these modalities under study. TUHT has been applied in five to ten treatment sessions. The treatments were well tolerated with no major toxicity being reported. In BPH patients with predominance of median lobe or median bar enlargement the treatment efficacy was reduced to 30%. The effectiveness of TUHT was of particular importance in patients who had urinary retention. In the group 72% had normal voiding for 12 months or longer. A strong correlation between applied temperature and response to treatment was demonstrated. Current efforts are directed toward optimization of technique and treatment schedule. A phase III prospective randomized trial is required to define the role of TUHT in the management of BPH patients.

  20. Pygeum africanum for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wilt, T; Ishani, A; Mac Donald, R; Rutks, I; Stark, G

    2002-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate, can lead to obstructive and irritative lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The pharmacologic use of plants and herbs (phytotherapy) for the treatment of LUTS associated with BPH has been growing steadily. The extract of the African prune tree, Pygeum africanum, is one of the several phytotherapeutic agents available for the treatment of BPH. To investigate the evidence whether extracts of Pygeum africanum (1) are more effective than placebo in the treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), (2) are as effective as standard pharmacologic BPH treatments, and (3) have less side effects compared to standard BPH drugs. Trials were searched in computerized general and specialized databases (MEDLINE (1966-2000), EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Phytodok), by checking bibliographies, and by contacting relevant manufacturers and researchers. Trials were eligible if they (1) were randomized (2) included men with BPH (3) compared preparations of Pygeum africanum (alone or in combination) with placebo or other BPH medications (4) included clinical outcomes such as urologic symptom scales, symptoms, or urodynamic measurements. Eligibility was assessed by at least two independent observers. Information on patients, interventions, and outcomes were extracted by at least two independent reviewers using a standard form. The main outcome measure for comparing the effectiveness of Pygeum africanum with placebo and standard BPH medications was the change in urologic symptoms scale scores. Secondary outcomes included change in urologic symptoms including nocturia and urodynamic measures (peak and mean urine flow, prostate size). The main outcome measure for adverse effects was the number of men reporting adverse effects. A total of 18 randomized controlled trials involving 1562 men met inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Only one of the studies reported a method of treatment allocation concealment, though 17

  1. Phenotypic characterization of the infiltrating immune cells in normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mahmoud-Rezk A; Al-Assiri, Mana; Musalam, Adel O

    2009-04-01

    Immune cell infiltrate is a constant feature in normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma. This study elaborates on the cells of the immune system present in normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma. Here, we hypothesized that "the development of benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma is associated with numeric alterations of the immune cell infiltrate". A total of 50 transurethral prostatic resection specimens, each entailing normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and high grade prostatic adenocarcinoma were evaluated for the density and phenotype of the immune cells using immunohistological methods and mouse monoclonal antibodies decorating T cells (CD3), histiocytes (CD68) and B lymphocytes (CD20). Immune cell infiltrate was composed of T cells, histiocytes and B-lymphocytes. CD(+)3 T lymphocytes and CD68(+) cells were the predominant cell populations. We observed variations in the density of the immune cells among the normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and high grade prostatic adenocarcinoma. Compared with normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia had a statistically significant high density of immune cells (3.4+/-0.4versus 13.5+/-1.0, P<0.00). In contrast, a significant decrease in the counts of these cells was observed in high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma compared to benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia (13.5+/-1.0 versus 5.2+/-0.3, P<0.01). The increased density of immune cells (predominantly CD(+)3 T cells) in benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia suggests that the initial response to cellular damage is mediated by cell-mediated immunity. The decreased density of immune cells in high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma may reflect immunosuppression. The underlying mechanisms of these numeric variations are open for further investigations.

  2. Review of Prostate Anatomy and Embryology and the Etiology of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Aaron, LaTayia; Franco, Omar E; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-08-01

    Prostate development follows a common pattern between species and depends on the actions of androgens to induce and support ductal branching morphogenesis of buds emerging from the urogenital sinus. The human prostate has a compact zonal anatomy immediately surrounding the urethra and below the urinary bladder. Rodents have a lobular prostate with lobes radiating away from the urethra. The human prostate is the site of benign hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and prostatitis. The rodent prostate has little naturally occurring disease. Rodents can be used to model aspects of human benign hyperplasia, but care should be taken in data interpretation and extrapolation to the human condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prostate development and growth in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Timms, Barry G; Hofkamp, Luke E

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia [BPH] in elderly men has intrigued anatomists, pathologists and scientists for centuries. Studies of morbid anatomy, clinical observations and contemporary cellular biology have contributed to an evolving interpretation of the causality of the disease. Insights into the detailed microanatomy and ductal architecture of the prostate during stages of fetal and early postnatal development suggest that mechanisms involved in the early growth period become aberrantly expressed in elderly men. Age, hormones and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are all contributing factors to the pathogenesis of BPH. Control of the microenvironment in normal and abnormal growth is a multifactorial process. Susceptibility to the disease may include clinical comorbid diseases, region-specific changes in cell-cell interactions and a variety of signaling pathways including a novel hypothesis regarding the role of the primary cilium as a regulator of signal transduction mechanisms. Recent work in animal models has shown that there are region-specific differences within the prostate that may be significant because of the dynamic and intricate interplay between the epithelium and mesenchyme. Because of the focal nature of BPH a closer examination of normal morphogenesis patterns, which defines the gland's architecture, may facilitate a detailed understanding of the atypical growth patterns.

  4. Effect of dutasteride on clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia in asymptomatic men with enlarged prostate: a post hoc analysis of the REDUCE study.

    PubMed

    Toren, Paul; Margel, David; Kulkarni, Girish; Finelli, Antonio; Zlotta, Alexandre; Fleshner, Neil

    2013-04-15

    To assess the role of dutasteride in preventing clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia in asymptomatic men with larger prostates. Post hoc analysis of four year, double blind Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) study 1617 men randomised to dutasteride or placebo with a prostate size >40 mL and baseline International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) <8. Subjects who took medications for benign prostatic hyperplasia were excluded at study entry. Placebo or dutasteride 0.5 mg daily. Comparison of risk of clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia at four years (defined as a ≥ 4 point worsening on IPSS, acute urinary retention, urinary tract infection, or surgery related to benign prostatic hyperplasia). 825 participants took placebo, 792 took dutasteride. A total of 464 (29%) experienced clinical progression benign prostatic hyperplasia, 297(36%) taking placebo, 167 (21%) taking dutasteride (P<0.001). The relative risk reduction was 41% and the absolute risk reduction 15%, with a number needed to treat (NNT) of 7. Among men who had acute urinary retention and surgery related to benign prostatic hyperplasia, the absolute risk reduction for dutasteride was 6.0% and 3.8%, respectively. On multivariable regression analysis adjusting for covariates, dutasteride significantly reduced clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia with an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.59, P<0.001). Analysis of time to first event yielded a hazard ratio of 0.673 (P<0.001) for those taking dutasteride. Sexual adverse events were most common and similar to prior reports. Further prospective studies may be warranted to demonstrate generalisability of these results. This study is the first to explore the benefit of treating asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men with an enlarged prostate. Dutasteride significantly decreased the incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia clinical progression.

  5. Effect of dutasteride on clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia in asymptomatic men with enlarged prostate: a post hoc analysis of the REDUCE study

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Paul; Margel, David; Kulkarni, Girish; Finelli, Antonio; Zlotta, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of dutasteride in preventing clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia in asymptomatic men with larger prostates. Design Post hoc analysis of four year, double blind Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) study Participants 1617 men randomised to dutasteride or placebo with a prostate size >40 mL and baseline International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) <8. Subjects who took medications for benign prostatic hyperplasia were excluded at study entry. Interventions Placebo or dutasteride 0.5 mg daily. Main outcome measures Comparison of risk of clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia at four years (defined as a ≥4 point worsening on IPSS, acute urinary retention, urinary tract infection, or surgery related to benign prostatic hyperplasia). Results 825 participants took placebo, 792 took dutasteride. A total of 464 (29%) experienced clinical progression benign prostatic hyperplasia, 297(36%) taking placebo, 167 (21%) taking dutasteride (P<0.001). The relative risk reduction was 41% and the absolute risk reduction 15%, with a number needed to treat (NNT) of 7. Among men who had acute urinary retention and surgery related to benign prostatic hyperplasia, the absolute risk reduction for dutasteride was 6.0% and 3.8%, respectively. On multivariable regression analysis adjusting for covariates, dutasteride significantly reduced clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia with an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.59, P<0.001). Analysis of time to first event yielded a hazard ratio of 0.673 (P<0.001) for those taking dutasteride. Sexual adverse events were most common and similar to prior reports. Limitations Further prospective studies may be warranted to demonstrate generalisability of these results. Conclusions This study is the first to explore the benefit of treating asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men with an enlarged prostate. Dutasteride significantly decreased the incidence of

  6. Lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction: are these conditions related to vascular dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shogo; Tsounapi, Panagiota; Shimizu, Takahiro; Honda, Masashi; Inoue, Keiji; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-09-01

    Although the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction is poorly understood and thought to be multifactorial, it has been traditionally recognized that these conditions increase with age. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between cardiovascular disease and lower urinary tract symptoms as well as benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction in elderly patients. Age might activate systemic vascular risk factors, resulting in disturbed blood flow. Hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis are also linked to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. In the present review, we discuss the relationship between decreased pelvic blood flow and lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest possible common mechanisms underlining these urological conditions.

  7. Investigation of granulomatous prostatitis incidence following intravesical BCG therapy

    PubMed Central

    Balasar, Mehmet; Doğan, Metin; Kandemir, Abdulkadir; Taskapu, Hakan Hakki; Cicekci, Faruk; Toy, Hatice; Gurbuz, Recai

    2014-01-01

    In the present manuscript, we studied the incidence of granulomatous prostatitis in the prostatectomy specimen of the patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) after superficial bladder cancer treatment with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and were diagnosed with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). The clinical data and histopathological specimen records of 472 patients who underwent TUR-P due to BPH diagnosis, obtained over a period of 6 years in the urology department of Private Konya Hospital, Konya, Turkey, were studied retrospectively. The cases were divided into two groups as (Group I) who did not undergo any treatment and as (Group II) who underwent BCG treatment. The frequency and the clinical course of the cases with granulomatous prostatitis were studied histopathologically. There were in total 472 patients who underwent TUR-P. Out of the 459 patients who did not undergo BCG treatment (Group I), the histopathological specimen records of 262 (57%) was BPH, of 197 (43%) BPH + chronic prostatitis. Of the second group, 13 cases underwent intravesical BCG treatment before surgical intervention due to superficial bladder CA diagnosis. In this group 4 of the cases were diagnosed as (30%) BPH, 9 as (70%) chronic prostatitis + BPH. 6 out of the 9 chronic prostatitis cases were chronic prostatitis, 2 caseous granulomatous prostatitis, 1 non-caseous granulomatous prostatitis. Granulomatous prostatitis cases should require no specific therapy. Conclusion: In patients with obstruction complaints following intravesical BCG treatment, granulomatous prostatitis should also be considered and treatment plans should be made accordingly. PMID:25035779

  8. [Occult cancer in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Duarte, C; Aguillón, J; Rodríguez, H

    1991-05-01

    The results of a prospective study undertaken in 29 patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are presented. Transrectal ultrasound, ultrasound-guided biopsy and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were utilized in the search for hidden cancer of the prostate. However, no cancer was detected in any patient. Very high values of PSA were found, particularly in patients with an indwelling catheter. Transrectal ultrasound yielded no false negatives and no complications were observed.

  9. Risk of Incident Antidepressant-Treated Depression Associated with Use of 5α-Reductase Inhibitors Compared with Use of α-Blockers in Men with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Population-Based Study Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Katrina Wilcox; Divan, Hozefa A; Nickel, J Curtis; Jick, Susan S

    2017-05-01

    To estimate the risk of incident antidepressant-treated depression in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) who were prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) compared with those prescribed an active comparator, α-blockers (ABs). Retrospective cohort study with a nested case-control analysis. United Kingdom's Clinical Practice Research Datalink. A total of 77,732 men with a diagnosis of BPH who received a prescription for a 5-ARI only and/or AB between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2013. Of these men, 2842 had a first-time (incident) diagnosis of depression and received a prescription for an antidepressant within 90 days of the depression diagnosis date (cases); 11,333 controls without a diagnosis of depression were matched to the cases for the case-control analysis. Exposures were classified as 5-ARI only, 5ARI + AB, or AB only. We calculated incidence rates of antidepressant-treated depression and compared rates among users of 5-ARIs only and 5-ARIs + ABs with rates among users of ABs only (i.e., incidence rate ratios [IRRs]). We also calculated odds ratios (ORs) to estimate the risk of incident depression with use of 5-ARIs only and 5-ARIs + ABs compared with ABs only. In this population of men with BPH, the risk of depression was not increased with use of 5-ARIs only (IRR 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-1.04) or 5-ARIs + ABs (IRR 1.04, 95% CI 0.89-1.21) compared with use of ABs only. In the case-control analysis, exposure to 5-ARIs only (adjusted OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-1.01) or 5-ARIs + ABs (adjusted OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.73-1.10) was not associated with the risk of treated depression compared with exposure to ABs only, and results remained null regardless of number of prescriptions or timing of exposure. The risk of incident antidepressant-treated depression increased with longer duration of BPH, independent of study drug exposure. In this population of men with treated BPH, use of 5-ARIs, alone or in combination with ABs, did not increase the

  10. Depot medroxyprogesterone in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Onu, P E

    1995-01-01

    The effects of depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA), a 5 alpha-reductase, luteinizing-hormone release and human androgen receptor adhesion inhibitor, were assessed in 80 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomized to DMPA 150 mg single-dose intramuscular injection or placebo in a similar fashion. The following changes were seen with DMPA after 3 months (duration of DMPA effect): (1) serum testosterone reached castration levels within 3 days as compared to no changes in the placebo group; (2) the prostate volume was reduced by 25% compared to a 3% decrease with placebo (p < 0.001); (3) maximum urinary-flow rates increased by 3.7 ml/s compared to placebo (p < 0.001); (4) total urinary symptom scores decreased by 4.9 points compared to a nonsignificant decrease with placebo (p < 0.005). There was a 2.5-point decrease in irritative symptoms (urinary frequency, nocturia and urgency) as compared to a nonsignificant decrease with placebo (p < 0.005). After 3 months, the urinary symptoms and urodynamic changes were reversed but significantly greater than the baseline values (p < 0.001). The prostates showed regrowth to the initial sizes within 18-36 weeks. DMPA was better tolerated, except for a higher incidence of impotence, decreased libido and ejaculatory disorders, than in the placebo group. The quality of life is improved with DMPA since it did not produce hot flashes. It was concluded that single-dose DMPA 150 mg is a safe and effective treatment for prostatic obstruction where potency is a secondary consideration.

  11. Interactions between benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer in large prostates: a retrospective data review.

    PubMed

    Al-Khalil, Shadi; Boothe, David; Durdin, Trey; Sunkara, Sowmya; Watkins, Phillip; Yang, Shengping; Haynes, Allan; de Riese, Werner

    2016-01-01

    To study the interaction between benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). In this study, we performed a chart review of a cohort of 448 biopsy naive men. These men received a multi-core biopsy at our institution due to increased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) serum levels (>4 ng/ml) and/or suspicious findings on digital rectal examination in the years between 2008 and 2013. Utilizing PSA and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate volume, we obtained the PSA density (PSAD) for each individual. PSAD was calculated by dividing serum PSA concentration by TRUS prostate volume. Large prostates >65 g may secrete enough PSA to have a PSAD above the suggested cutoff of 0.15, yet 50 % patients have no histologic evidence of PCa, whereas prostates <35 g and an elevated PSAD of above 0.15 will have histologic evidence of PCa 70 % of the time. These results suggest that BPH in large prostates may be protective of PCa. The interaction of the different prostate zones, in particular the transition zone and peripheral zone, may play a significant role in the phenomenon observed in this study. However, sampling error may introduce bias that 12-16 core biopsies in larger prostates may be more likely missing the cancer lesion.

  12. SPINK1 Promoter Variants Are Associated with Prostate Cancer Predisposing Alterations in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    WINCHESTER, DANYELLE; RICKS-SANTI, LUISEL; MASON, TSHELA; ABBAS, MUNEER; COPELAND, ROBERT L.; BEYENE, DESTA; JINGWI, EMMANUEL Y.; DUNSTON, GEORGIA M.; KANAAN, YASMINE M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim Several studies reported that patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) experienced a 10% increased incidence of prostate cancer (PCa) after the first 5 years of diagnosis. We investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter of Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal Type 1 (SPINK1) and the increased risk of BPH and PCa. Materials and Methods We genotyped three SNPs in a cases-control study, including BPH and PCa cases. Multiple logistic regression models were applied to analyze clinical and genotypic data. Results We found an inverse association between SNP rs10035432 and BPH under the log-additive (p=0.007) model. No association was found between these SNPs and PCa risk. However, we observed a possible association between rs1432982 and lower-grade PCa (p=0.05) under the recessive model. Conclusion SPINK1 promoter variants are likely to be associated with the risk of BPH. PMID:26124326

  13. A large, benign prostatic cyst presented with an extremely high serum prostate-specific antigen level.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Kuang; Pemberton, Richard

    2016-01-08

    We report a case of a patient who presented with an extremely high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level and underwent radical prostatectomy for presumed prostate cancer. Surprisingly, the whole mount prostatectomy specimen showed only small volume, organ-confined prostate adenocarcinoma and a large, benign intraprostatic cyst, which was thought to be responsible for the PSA elevation. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. A huge benign prostatic hyperplasia presenting with renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Basatac, Cem; Cicek, Mehmet Cagatay

    2015-01-01

    Although transurethral resection of the prostate is still standard of care in many patients suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia, traditional open prostatectomy (OP) seems as a widely applied method in larger glands. In spite of the fact that holmium laser enucleation can be performed in large glands, upper limits of prostate size in this method are not clearly identified in the current literature. In this case, we aim to report feasibility and efficacy of OP in huge prostate size measured as 680 ml by transrectal ultrasound and review the current literature. PMID:26034239

  15. Chronic Prostate Inflammation is Associated with Severity and Progression of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Risk of Acute Urinary Retention.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J Curtis; Roehrborn, Claus G; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Freedland, Stephen J; Moreira, Daniel M

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated associations between histological prostate inflammation, and the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms in men randomized to placebo in the REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) study in a 4-year period. The association of acute and chronic inflammation detected on baseline biopsies and benign prostatic hyperplasia related parameters, including I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and prostate volume, at multiple time points during 4 years in men randomized to placebo enrolled in the REDUCE prostate cancer prevention study was analyzed with the Student t-test. The association of inflammation with newly developed benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia progression in patients with existing benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms was analyzed with univariable and multivariable Cox models. Acute and chronic inflammation was seen in baseline negative biopsies of 641 (15.6%) and 3,216 (78.3%) of the 4,109 men in the study. Chronic but not acute inflammation was associated with slightly higher baseline I-PSS (0.6 difference, p = 0.001) and larger prostate volume (3.2 cc difference, p <0.001), a difference noted throughout the study interval. The presence of acute and chronic inflammation was not associated with the incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms in men without those conditions at baseline or the progression of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms at baseline. However, an association was observed with more severe inflammation. Chronic inflammation at baseline was associated with an increased risk of acute urinary retention (HR 1.6-1.8, p = 0.001). Our longitudinal evaluation of REDUCE patients randomized to placebo for 4 years confirmed that chronic inflammation is associated with severity and the

  16. The histology of prostate tissue following prostatic artery embolization for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lopes, George; Mattedi, Romulo; Antunes, Alberto A; Carnevale, Francisco C; Cerri, Giovanni G; Srougi, Miguel; Alves, Venancio A; Leite, Katia R M

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is believed to be a safe procedure with a low risk of adverse side effects. Artery embolization is a viable treatment option in patients who are refractory to the classic noninvasive treatments. Knowledge of the histological characteristics of prostate tissue following the procedure is still limited. In this study, we describe the microscopic aspects of the prostate following PAE for BPH. Two patients underwent transurethral resections of the prostate (TURP) after PAE. Embolizations were performed under local anesthesia with an initial pelvic angiography to evaluate the iliac vessels and the prostate arteries using a 2.8 French microcatheter. The prostate was embolized with 300-500 µm Microspheres (Embosphere ®), using complete blood stasis as the end point. The prostate tissues were analyzed histologically to characterize the effects of the embolization. The embolic material within the prostate tissue was easily identified as homogeneous, bright eosin-red spheroids filling the vessel lumens. Ischemic necrosis surrounded or not by chronic inflammatory reactions containing macrophages were considered as a result of the artery embolization. Also, some aspects related to the healing process were observed being fibrotic nodules surrounded by glands with squamous metaplasia of the epithelial lining the most important. In the remaining sections, due to the precocious surgical intervention, the classic findings of BPH were still present with the glandular and stromal hyperplasia associated with nonspecific chronic prostatitis. This is the first description of prostate histology in BPH patients treated by PAE, a new procedure that is being used increasingly as a therapeutic intervention. The recognition of the changes caused by this new modality of treatment has become a very important differential in a chronic granulomatous reaction of the prostate

  17. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rongbin; Li, Jijun; Johnson, Cameron W.; Rassoulian, Cyrus; Olumi, Aria F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common proliferative abnormality of the prostate affecting elderly men throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing BPH, although whether anti-diabetic medications preventing the development of BPH remains to be defined. We have previously found that stromally expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes benign prostatic epithelial cell proliferation through paracrine mechanisms. Here, we seek to understand if metformin, a first line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells through reducing the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and regulating cell cycle. Methods BPE cell lines BPH-1 and P69, murine fibroblasts3T3 and primary human prostatic fibroblasts were cultured and tested in this study. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of IGF-1R was determined by western-blot and immunocytochemistry. The level of IGF-1 secretion in culture medium was measured by ELISA. Results Metformin (0.5-10mM, 6-48h) significantly inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and P69 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin for 24 hours lowered the G2/M cell population by 43.24% in P69 cells and 24.22% in BPH-1 cells. On the other hand, IGF-1 (100ng/mL, 24h) stimulated the cell proliferation (increased by 28.81% in P69 cells and 20.95% in BPH-1 cells) and significantly enhanced the expression of IGF-1R in benign prostatic epithelial cells. Metformin (5mM) abrogated the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells induced by IGF-1. In 3T3 cells, the secretion of IGF-1 was significantly inhibited by metformin from 574.31pg/ml to 197.61pg/ml. The conditioned media of 3T3 cells and human prostatic fibroblasts promoted the proliferation of epithelial cells and the

  18. Dutasteride reduces prostate size and prostate specific antigen in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Page, Stephanie T; Hirano, Lianne; Gilchriest, Janet; Dighe, Manjiri; Amory, John K; Marck, Brett T; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2011-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia and hypogonadism are common disorders in aging men. There is concern that androgen replacement in older men may increase prostate size and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We examined whether combining dutasteride, which inhibits testosterone to dihydrotestosterone conversion, with testosterone treatment in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia reduces androgenic stimulation of the prostate compared to testosterone alone. We conducted a double-blind, placebo controlled trial of 53 men 51 to 82 years old with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate volume 30 cc or greater and serum total testosterone less than 280 ng/dl (less than 9.7 nmol/l). Subjects were randomized to daily transdermal 1% T gel plus oral placebo or dutasteride for 6 months. Testosterone dosing was adjusted to a serum testosterone of 500 to 1,000 ng/dl. The primary outcomes were prostate volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging, serum prostate specific antigen and androgen levels. A total of 46 subjects completed all procedures. Serum testosterone increased similarly into the mid-normal range in both groups. Serum dihydrotestosterone increased in the testosterone only but decreased in the testosterone plus dutasteride group. In the testosterone plus dutasteride group prostate volume and prostate specific antigen (mean ± SEM) decreased 12% ± 2.5% and 35% ± 5%, respectively, compared to the testosterone only group in which prostate volume and prostate specific antigen increased 7.5% ± 3.3% and 19% ± 7% (p = 0.03 and p = 0.008), respectively, after 6 months of treatment. Prostate symptom scores improved in both groups. Combined treatment with testosterone plus dutasteride reduces prostate volume and prostate specific antigen compared to testosterone only. Coadministration of a 5α-reductase inhibitor with testosterone appears to spare the prostate from androgenic stimulation during testosterone replacement in older

  19. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    PubMed

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P < 0.01) compared with PC and prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P < 0.05). Men (33%) with BPH had PSA antibodies by ELISA and Western blot. These discoveries may find clinical application in differential diagnosis among prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Serenoa repens for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tacklind, James; MacDonald, Roderick; Rutks, Indy; Wilt, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate, can lead to obstructive and irritative lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The pharmacologic use of plants and herbs (phytotherapy) for the treatment of LUTS associated with BPH is common. The extract of the berry of the American saw palmetto, or dwarf palm plant, Serenoa repens (also known by its botanical name of Sabal serrulatum), is one of several phytotherapeutic agents available for the treatment of BPH. Objectives This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of Serenoa repens in the treatment of LUTS consistent with BPH. Search strategy Trials were searched in computerized general and specialized databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library), by checking bibliographies, and by handsearching the relevant literature. Selection criteria Trials were eligible if they (1) randomized men with symptomatic BPH to receive preparations of Serenoa repens (alone or in combination) for at least four weeks in comparison with placebo or other interventions, and (2) included clinical outcomes such as urologic symptom scales, symptoms, and urodynamic measurements. Eligibility was assessed by at least two independent observers. Data collection and analysis Information on patients, interventions, and outcomes was extracted by at least two independent reviewers using a standard form. The main outcome measure for comparing the effectiveness of Serenoa repens with placebo or other interventions was the change in urologic symptom-scale scores. Secondary outcomes included changes in nocturia and urodynamic measures. The main outcome measure for side effects or adverse events was the number of men reporting side effects. Main results In this update 9 new trials involving 2053 additional men (a 64.8% increase) have been included. For the main comparison - Serenoa repens versus placebo - 3 trials were added with 419 subjects and 3 endpoints (IPSS, peak urine flow, prostate size

  1. Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Todd J; Manigault, Kendra R; McBurrows, Niesha N; Wray, Tiffany L; Woodard, Laresa M

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy, is a nonmalignant adenomatous overgrowth of the periurethral prostate gland commonly seen in aging men. Historically, it has been assumed that the pathophysiology of lower urinary tract symptoms in men is the result of bladder outlet obstruction associated with prostate enlargement. Symptoms such as urinary hesitancy, incomplete bladder emptying, dribbling or prolonged urination, nocturia, urinary urgency, and/or urge incontinence are common. Understanding the differential diagnosis and ordering appropriate laboratory tests are essential in accurately identifying a BPH diagnosis. Management can be broken down into medical or pharmacological and surgical therapies. This article aims to provide an overview of BPH and its management in older adults.

  2. Plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate vs plasmakinetic resection of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia: comparison of outcomes according to prostate size in 310 patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-Hui; Shen, Ji-Hong; Guan, Run-Yun; Li, Hao; Wang, Jia

    2014-10-01

    To compare the safety and efficiency of plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate (PKEP) with that of plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Three hundred ten patients diagnosed to have BPH were randomized to undergo either PKEP or PKRP. The perioperative data and postoperative outcomes followed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery were recorded and compared in the groups classified according to the baseline prostate volume: ≤ 60 mL and >60 mL. There were no significant differences in the preoperative data. Compared with PKRP, PKEP costs longer operative time (56.1 ± 14.6 vs 41.3 ± 9.6 min; P < .001) for prostate volume ≤ 60 mL, but reduced operative time (75.6 ± 12.3 vs 88.7 ± 14.3 minutes; P <.001) and caused less blood loss (167.6 ± 44.4 vs 225.7 ± 49.5 mL; P < .001) for prostate volume >60 mL. However, regardless of prostate size, the incidence of transient incontinence after PKEP was higher. The postoperative improvement among these groups in International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life, and maximal flow rate was similar at 24-month follow-up. PKEP and PKRP are both safe and effective treatments for BPH independent of prostate size. Despite that the incidence of transient incontinence after PKEP was higher, PKEP was significantly superior to PKRP in operative time and blood loss for prostate volume >60 mL and may become the modern alternative to PKRP for large BPH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prostatic Artery Embolization for Enlarged Prostates Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. How I Do It

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco C.; Antunes, Alberto A.

    2013-12-15

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has emerged as an alternative to surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patient selection and refined technique are essential for good results. Urodynamic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging are very important and technical limitations are related to elderly patients with tortuous and atherosclerotic vessels, anatomical variations, difficulty visualizing and catheterizing small diameter arteries feeding the prostate, and the potential risk of bladder and rectum ischemia. The use of small-diameter hydrophilic microcatheters is mandatory. Patients can be treated safely by PAE with low rates of side effects, reducing prostate volume with clinical symptoms and quality of life improvement without urinary incontinence, ejaculatory disorders, or erectile dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach with urologists and interventional radiologists is essential to achieve better results.

  4. Phytotherapeutic Agents for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Passi, Neelima Dhingra

    2016-06-20

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) the most common condition in aging men is the non malignant enlargement of the prostate gland with increase in numbers of both epithelial and stromal cells within the periurethal transition zone of the prostate. Sources of symptoms in patient with BPH appear to be both static and dynamic component. Management of BPH has undergone a rapid evolution over the past decade to aid men with lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to bladder outlet obstruction. Treatment of clinical BPH aims to improve symptoms, prevent urinary tract infections, avoid renal insult, relief obstruction and improve bladder emptying.Prostate cancer patients and those with benign prostatic hyperplasia are increasingly exploring the use of plant derived non-nutritive compounds with protective or disease preventive properties, especially due to long term side effects of pharmacological treatment and risk of mortality associated with surgical procedures. Phytotherapeutic preparations are plant extracts with different components obtained by different extraction procedures. Numerous mechanisms of action have been postulated for mono and combination plant extracts. This article give a brief account of rationale and efficacy of various existing phytotherapeutic agents in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia, including the herbs which hold the potential promise are also mentioned , although much research is still required.

  5. Stromal Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Normal Prostate, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-01-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa, much more attention has been focused on epithelial AR roles. However, accumulating evidence indicates that stromal AR is also irreplaceable and plays critical roles in prostate disease progression. Herein, we summarize the roles of stromal AR in the development of normal prostate, BPH, and PCa, with evidence from the recent results of in vitro cell line studies, tissue recombination experiments, and AR knockout animal models. Current evidence suggests that stromal AR may play positive roles to promote BPH and PCa progression, and targeting stromal AR selectively with AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, may allow development of better therapies with fewer adverse effects to battle BPH and PCa. PMID:25432062

  6. Clinical value of prostate segmentation and volume determination on MRI in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Brian; Türkbey, Barış; Truong, Hong; Bernardo, Marcelino; Periaswamy, Senthil; Choyke, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a nonmalignant pathological enlargement of the prostate, which occurs primarily in the transitional zone. BPH is highly prevalent and is a major cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in aging males, although there is no direct relationship between prostate volume and symptom severity. The progression of BPH can be quantified by measuring the volumes of the whole prostate and its zones, based on image segmentation on magnetic resonance imaging. Prostate volume determination via segmentation is a useful measure for patients undergoing therapy for BPH. However, prostate segmentation is not widely used due to the excessive time required for even experts to manually map the margins of the prostate. Here, we review and compare new methods of prostate volume segmentation using both manual and automated methods, including the ellipsoid formula, manual planimetry, and semiautomated and fully automated segmentation approaches. We highlight the utility of prostate segmentation in the clinical context of assessing BPH.

  7. Clinical value of prostate segmentation and volume determination on MRI in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Brian; Türkbey, Barış; Truong, Hong; Bernardo, Marcelino; Periaswamy, Senthil; Choyke, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a nonmalignant pathological enlargement of the prostate, which occurs primarily in the transitional zone. BPH is highly prevalent and is a major cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in aging males, although there is no direct relationship between prostate volume and symptom severity. The progression of BPH can be quantified by measuring the volumes of the whole prostate and its zones, based on image segmentation on magnetic resonance imaging. Prostate volume determination via segmentation is a useful measure for patients undergoing therapy for BPH. However, prostate segmentation is not widely used due to the excessive time required for even experts to manually map the margins of the prostate. Here, we review and compare new methods of prostate volume segmentation using both manual and automated methods, including the ellipsoid formula, manual planimetry, and semiautomated and fully automated segmentation approaches. We highlight the utility of prostate segmentation in the clinical context of assessing BPH. PMID:24675166

  8. [The conservative treatment of early-stage benign prostatic hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Kumanov, Kh; Stoianova, V; Lilov, A; Kaloianov, D

    1993-01-01

    After outlining the methods currently used in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) treatment, data defining some etiological aspects of the disease are briefly analyzed. Initial experience had with the treatment of early stage BPH using Permixon--a drug exerting effect on alpha-2 reductase--is described. The results in a series of twenty-seven patients presenting BPH are encouraging.

  9. [A meta-analysis of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chu-Biao; Li, Ju-Cong; Yuan, Ping-Qing; Hong, Ying-Qia; Lu, Bin; Zhao, Shan-Chao

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP)/open prostatectomy (OP) in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We searched Medline, Cochrane Library, Embase, Wanfang and CBM for randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing HoLEP with TURP/OP. Comparable data were extracted from eligible studies and pooled for meta-analysis using RevMan5.1. Nine RCTs were included in this study, 6 comparing HoLEP with TURP, and the other 3 comparing HoLEP with OP. Meta-analysis showed that, compared with TURP, HoLEP was associated with shorter hospital stay and catheterization time, less hemoglobin loss, longer operative time, and better improvement in international prostate symptom score (IPSS) , peak urinary flow rate (Qmax) and post void residual (PVR) , but the incidences of postoperative urethral stricture and urinary incontinence had no statistically significant difference between the two. Compared with OP, HoLEP showed shorter hospital stay and catheterization time, a lower rate of blood transfusion, longer operative time, and removal of fewer tissues, but the two procedures exhibited no significant differences in either the improvement of IPSS and Qmax or the incidence of urethral stricture. HoLEP is a minimally invasive technique, safe and highly effective for the treatment of BOO secondary to BPH, with its advantages of lower peri-operative morbidity and faster recovery over TURP and OP. However, more high-quality RCTs with larger sample sizes and longer follow-ups need to be carried out to obtain better evidence.

  10. The Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype Promotes Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Paz; Castro, Patricia; Tsang, Susan; Ittmann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by increased tissue mass in the transition zone of the prostate, which leads to obstruction of urine outflow and considerable morbidity in a majority of older men. Senescent cells accumulate in human tissues, including the prostate, with increasing age. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines is increased in these senescent cells, a manifestation of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Multiplex analysis revealed that multiple cytokines are increased in BPH, including GM-CSF, IL-1α, and IL-4, and that these are also increased in senescent prostatic epithelial cells in vitro. Tissue levels of these cytokines were correlated with a marker of senescence (cathepsin D), which was also strongly correlated with prostate weight. IHC analysis revealed the multifocal epithelial expression of cathepsin D and coexpression with IL-1α in BPH tissues. In tissue recombination studies in nude mice with immortalized prostatic epithelial cells expressing IL-1α and prostatic stromal cells, both epithelial and stromal cells exhibited increased growth. Expression of IL-1α in prostatic epithelial cells in a transgenic mouse model resulted in increased prostate size and bladder obstruction. In summary, both correlative and functional evidence support the hypothesis that the senescence-associated secretory phenotype can promote the development of BPH, which is the single most common age-related pathology in older men. PMID:24434012

  11. Long-Term Followup after Electrocautery Transurethral Resection of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kallenberg, F.; Hossack, T. A.; Woo, H. H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. For decades, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been the “gold standard” operation for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) but is based mainly on historic data. The historic data lacks use of validated measures and current TURP differs significantly from that performed 30 years ago. Methods. Men who had undergone TURP between 2001 and 2005 were reviewed. International prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL) and peak urinary flow rate (Qmax⁡), and postvoid residual (PVR) were recorded. Operative details and postoperative complications were documented. Patients were then invited to attend for repeat assessment. Results. 91 patients participated. Mean follow-up time was 70 months. Mean follow-up results were IPSS—7; QoL—1.5; Qmax⁡—23 mL/s; PVR—45 mL. These were an improvement from baseline of 67%, 63%, 187%, and 80%, respectively. Early complication rates were low, with no blood transfusions, TUR syndrome, or deaths occurring. Urethral stricture rate was higher than anticipated at 14%. Conclusion. This study shows modern TURP still produces durable improvement in voiding symptoms which remains comparable with historic studies. This study, however, found a marked drop in early complications but, conversely, a higher than expected incidence of urethral strictures. PMID:22162679

  12. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and subsequent risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, D; Chokkalingam, A P; Gridley, G; Nyren, O; Johansson, J E; Adami, H O; Silverman, D; Hsing, A W

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the risk of bladder cancer in a cohort of 79 280 Swedish men hospitalised for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register between 1964 and 1983 and followed until 1989 via multiple record linkages with nationwide data on cancer registry, death and emigration. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), the ratios of the observed to the expected numbers of incident bladder cancers, were used to calculate the risk associated with BPH. The expected number was calculated by multiplying the number of person-years by the age-specific cancer incidence rates in Sweden for each 5-year age group and calendar year of observation. Analyses were stratified by BPH treatment, latency, calendar year and presence of genitourinary (GU) comorbid conditions. After excluding the first 3 years of follow-up after the index hospitalisation, we observed 506 incident bladder cancer cases during follow-up in the cohort. No overall increased risk of bladder cancer was apparent in our main analysis involving the entire BPH cohort. However, among BPH patients with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), there was an increased risk in all follow-up periods; SIRs of bladder cancer during years 4–6 of follow-up was 1.22 (95% confidence interval=1.02–1.46), 1.32 for 7–9 years of follow-up, and 1.47 for 10–26 years of follow-up. SIRs of bladder cancer among TURP-treated BPH patients were particularly elevated among those with comorbid conditions of the GU tract (e.g., stone, infection, etc.); 1.72, 1.74 and 2.01 for 4–6, 7–9, 10–26 years of follow-up, respectively, and also for those whose diagnoses occurred before 1975, when TURP was more likely to be performed by a urologist than a general practitioner: 1.87, 1.90 and 1.74, respectively. These findings suggest that BPH overall is not associated with bladder cancer risk. However, among men treated with TURP, particularly those with other comorbid GU tract conditions, risk of

  13. Association between prostatic resistive index and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Baykam, Mehmet Murat; Aktas, Binhan Kagan; Bulut, Suleyman; Ozden, Cuneyt; Deren, Tagmac; Tagci, Suleyman; Gokkaya, Cevdet Serkan; Memis, Ali

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship between prostatic resistive index (RI) and cardiovascular system (CVS) risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The study included 120 patients who were attending our outpatient clinic with lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The clinical, laboratory, anthropometric data, and CVS risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, history of CVS events, and smoking) of the patients were evaluated regarding the association between prostate RI level by regression analyses. The prostatic RI levels of the patients were measured using power Doppler imaging. In univariate regression analysis, there were statistically significant relationships between prostatic RI levels and the patients' age, International Prostate Symptom Score, hip circumference, fasting blood glucose, prostate specific antigen, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total prostate volume, uroflowmetric maximal flow rate, and all investigated CVS risk factors (p < 0.05). The prostatic RI levels were found to be associated with fasting blood glucose and total prostate volume, and also with CVS risk factors including only metabolic syndrome and cigarette smoking in the multivariate regression analysis. Our results showed that prostatic RI level is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and smoking among the investigated CVS risk factors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Androgenetic alopecia as an early marker of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Angel; Buendía-Eisman, Agustín; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María Teresa; Girón-Prieto, María Sierra; Jimenez-Pacheco, Antonio; Calonje, Jaime Eduardo; Naranjo-Sintes, Ramón; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando; Serrano Ortega, Salvio

    2012-03-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and benign prostatic hyperplasia are both androgen-dependent entities that respond to the blocking of 5-alpha-reductase. The objective of this study was to determine whether prostatic volumes and urinary flow changes were higher in patients with early-onset AGA than in healthy control subjects. This was an observational case-control study of 87 men: 45 with early-onset AGA diagnosed in the dermatology department and 42 control subjects. End-point variables were prostatic volume, measured by transrectal ultrasound, and urinary flow, measured by urinary flowmetry. A hormone study was performed on all participants, and the International Prostate Symptom Score and International Index of Erectile Function score were determined. The groups did not significantly differ in mean age (cases, 52.7 years vs control subjects, 49.8 years; P = .12). Patients with AGA had significantly higher mean prostate volume (29.65 vs 20.24 mL, P < .0001), International Prostate Symptom Score (4.93 vs 1.23, P < .0001), and prostate-specific antigen value (1.53 vs 0.94 ng/mL, P < .0001) and significantly lower maximum urinary flow (14.5 vs 22.45 mL/s, P < .0001) versus control subjects. Binary logistic regression analysis showed a strong association between the presence of AGA and benign prostatic hyperplasia after adjusting for age, urinary volume, urination time, International Prostate Symptom Score, abdominal obesity, glucose levels, systolic blood pressure, insulin levels, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (odds ratio = 5.14, 95% confidence interval 1.23-47.36, P = .041). The study of larger sample sizes would facilitate stratified analyses according to the Ebling type of androgenetic alopecia. There is a relationship between the presence of AGA and prostate growth-associated urinary symptoms, likely attributable to their pathophysiological similarity. This study suggests that early-onset AGA may be an early marker of urinary/prostatic symptomatology. Future

  15. High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are present in benign prostate tissues before development of HPV associated prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Wendy K; Ngan, Christopher C; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Swift, Joshua; Lutze-Mann, Louise; Shang, Fei; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2017-01-01

    Although high risk HPVs are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer it is not known if they have a causal role. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential role of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in prostate cancer. The aims are (i) to investigate the presence and confirm the identity of high risk HPVs in benign prostate tissues prior to the development of HPV positive prostate cancer in the same patients, and (ii) to determine if HPVs are biologically active. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify HPVs in specimens from 52 Australian men with benign prostate biopsies who 1 to 10 years later developed prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the expression of HPV E7 oncoproteins, cytokeratin and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We used RNASeq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify possible HPV RNA sequences in prostate cancer. HPV screening using standard PCR was conducted on 28 of the 52 sets of benign and later prostate cancers. HPV L1 genes were identified in 13 (46%) benign and 8 (29%) of 28 later prostate cancers in the same patients. HPV E7 genes were identified in 23 (82%) benign and 19 (68%) of 28 subsequent prostate cancers in the same patients. The same HPV types were present in both the benign and subsequent prostate cancers in 9 sets of specimens. HPV type 16 was identified in 15% of benign and 3% of prostate cancers. HPV type 18 was identified in 26% of benign and 16% of prostate cancers. Small numbers of HPV types 45, 47, 76 and 115 were also identified. High confidence RNA-Seq evidence for high risk HPV types 16 and 18 was identified in 12 (2%) of the 502 TCGA prostate cancer transcriptomes. High risk HPV E7 oncoprotein was positively expressed in 23 (82%) of 28 benign prostate specimens but only in 8 (29%) of 28 of the later prostate cancer specimens. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.001). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was more highly expressed in 26

  16. Effect of Phellius linteus water extract on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Sun; Chun, Sung-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases among elderly men. As the old-age population is increasing recently, it is to our interest to observe the growing BPH within them. In BPH, the dihydrotestosterone (DHT) acts as promotes prostate growth. It inhibits enzyme 5α-reductase that is involved in the conversion of testosterone to the DHT activity which reduces the excessive prostate growth. Through experiments, the effects of Phellius linteus water extract performed on the BPH rats were induced by testosterone treatments. For 12 weeks, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with testosterone for the induction of BPH. Rats were divided into four experimental groups: the not treated group (N), the testosterone injection and D.W treatment group (TN), the testosterone injection and Phellinus linteus treatment group (TP) and testosterone injection and finasteride treatment group (TF). Prostate weight, volume and weight ratio in the TP group and the TF group were significantly lower than the TN group. Testosterone and DHT levels in the TN group were significantly higher than that of the N group. And the TP group was significantly decreased than that of the TN group. While prostates of control rats revealed severe acinar gland atrophy and stromal proliferation; the TP and TF groups showed trophic symptoms and were lined by flattened epithelial cells, thus, the stromal proliferation is relatively low as compared to the TN group. These suggest that Phellinus linteus water extracts may be an useful remedy for treating the benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23766877

  17. Kidney transplant complications from undiagnosed benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Lubetzky, Michelle; Ajaimy, Maria; Kamal, Layla; de Boccardo, Graciela; Akalin, Enver; Kayler, Liise

    2015-06-01

    It is estimated that approximately 50% of males over 50 have benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). BPH is underappreciated in anuric patients with end stage renal disease, and failure of diagnosis in this population can lead to complications after kidney transplantation. A single-center retrospective review of male patients over 50 yr of age transplanted from January 1, 2010, until September 30, 2013, was performed. Outcomes assessed were as follows: graft survival, urinary retention, discharge with Foley catheter, and urinary tract infection (UTI). Of 147 patients, 17.0% were diagnosed with BPH before transplant, 19.0% received a BPH diagnosis after transplant, and 64% did not have BPH. Compared to those without BPH, a post-transplant BPH diagnosis was associated with urinary retention during the transplant admission (0% vs. 46.4%, p < 0.01), discharge with Foley catheter (0% vs. 21.4%, p < 0.01), readmission related to urinary retention (0% vs. 46.4%, p < 0.01), and UTI (18.0% vs. 64.3%, p < 0.01). Patients with prior diagnosis of BPH and on therapy had similar outcomes to those without BPH. Following kidney transplant, urinary tract complications are more common in patients with BPH; however, being on medical therapy prior to transplantation diminishes the incidence of these complications significantly. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Progesterone receptor in the prostate: A potential suppressor for benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, RuiQi; Yu, Yue; Dong, Xuesen

    2017-02-01

    Advanced prostate cancer undergoing androgen receptor pathway inhibition (ARPI) eventually progresses to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), suggesting that (i) androgen receptor (AR) blockage is incomplete, and (ii) there are other critical molecular pathways contributing to prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Although most PCa occurs in the epithelium, prostate stroma is increasingly believed to play a crucial role in promoting tumorigenesis and facilitating tumor progression. In the stroma, sex steroid hormone receptors such as AR and estrogen receptor-α are implicated to have important functions, whereas the progesterone receptor (PR) remains largely under-investigated despite the high sequence and structural similarities between PR and AR. Stromal progesterone/PR signaling may play a critical role in PCa development and progression because not only progesterone is a critical precursor for de novo androgen steroidogenesis and an activator of mutant androgen receptors, but also PR functions in a ligand-independent manner in various important pathways. In fact, recent progress in our understanding of stromal PR function suggests that this receptor may exert an inhibitory effect on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), reactive stroma development, and PCa progression. These early findings of stromal PR warrant further investigations as this receptor could be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in PCa management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [The current approach to the management of benign hypertrophy of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Abbou, C C; Salomon, L; Chopin, D; Ravery, V; Haillot, O

    1996-01-01

    Epidemiology. The incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has increased in proportion to the life expectancy and has become the third leading cause of health expenditure in industrialized countries. Eighty per cent of men are treated for benign prostatic hyperplasia during their lifetime. In Europe, the mean age of diagnosis is 65 years. The clinical symptoms are assessed by the IPSS score (International Prostate Symptom Score) and by the maximum flow rate, where frank dysuria is defined as a flow rate of less than 10 ml/sec. Physiology. The prostate contains equal proportions of glandular epithelial structures and fibromuscular connective tissue stroma. The glandular prostate is innervated by cholinergic nerves, while the smooth muscle of the stroma and the urethra are innervated by adrenergic nerves. BPH arises in the transitional zone (fairly glandular). Androgen deprivation (castration, antiandrogens, progestogens, 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors) induces a 30% reduction of the prostatic volume (especially epithelial). BPH could be due to reactivation of the embryonic potential of the stroma. Certain growth factors appear to be involved in BPH. Inflammatory and immunological phenomena may also be involved. Evaluation. Plan of clinical interview, clinical examination and laboratory and radiological data. A 40-year-old man has one chance in 30 of being operated for benign prostatic hyperplasia if he lives to the age of 80. Medical treatments have been developed since 1980 which inhibit the course of BPH and minimize some of the clinical symptoms: plant extracts, alpha-blockers, 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors. Conventional surgical treatments, open prostatectomy and endoscopic resection, have been completed by laser therapy, thermotherapy and cryotherapy.

  20. Role of inflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia development among Han Chinese: A population-based and single-institutional analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jimeng; Zhang, Limin; Zou, Lujia; Hu, Mengbo; Fan, Jie; Cai, Yehua; Xu, Gang; Fang, Jie; Ding, Qiang; Jiang, Haowen

    2015-12-01

    To explore whether asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis is associated with prostatic enlargement beyond that of benign prostatic hyperplasia patients without asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, and whether asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis affects long-term outcomes of transurethral resection of the prostate. The present study involved 106 benign prostatic hyperplasia patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate. Clinical and pathological parameters were compared between those with benign prostatic hyperplasia associated with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis and those with benign prostatic hyperplasia alone. A total of 55 patients (52%) were found to have benign prostatic hyperplasia and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, whereas 51 patients (48%) had benign prostatic hyperplasia alone. The prostate volume of the benign prostatic hyperplasia/asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis group was significantly larger than the benign prostatic hyperplasia alone group: 68.1 cm3 (interquartile range 45.7-86.3) versus 44.1 cm3 (interquartile range 30.9-72.1), P = 0.036. In terms of histopathological analysis, benign prostatic hyperplasia/asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis patients were more likely to show mild (53%), focal (67%) and stromal (40%) prostatic inflammation in our study. Furthermore, statistically significant differences of International Prostate Symptom Score were found 3 years after transurethral resection of the prostate, with benign prostatic hyperplasia/asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis patients reporting higher (worse) scores than benign prostatic hyperplasia alone patients (P = 0.025). Chronic prostatic inflammatory process might progressively conduce to benign prostatic hyperplasia development, which can also result in prostate enlargement and worsen long-term postoperative International Prostate Symptom Scores. Multicenter studies with larger cohorts and longer follow-up periods are required to confirm these

  1. Increased Infiltrated Macrophages in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohai; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Jiang, Qi; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Lu, Tianjing; Li, Lei; Xia, Shujie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-01-01

    Infiltrated macrophages may play important roles in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We found increased macrophages infiltration in human and mouse BPH tissues. By establishing a co-culture transwell system, we found increased migration of macrophages and proliferation of prostate stromal cells during co-culture. Importantly, stromal androgen receptor (AR) could enhance the migration of macrophages and macrophage-mediated stromal cell proliferation. We identified CCL3 as an AR downstream player, and found CCL3 levels were notably increased in human and mouse BPH prostates. Ablation of prostate stromal AR in a mouse BPH model significantly reduced CCL3 expression levels in prostates. Consistently, targeting AR via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9§, or neutralization of CCL3 with an antibody, resulted in suppression of macrophage migration and prostate stromal cell growth. Our study provides mechanistic insights on the regulation of prostate stromal cells by macrophages via stromal AR/CCL3 signaling pathways, which could potentially allow the development of therapeutic approaches for battling BPH with persistent inflammation. PMID:22474290

  2. Holmium laser for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Portia; Bose, Sanchita; Lerner, Lori B

    2016-08-01

    Holmium laser ablation of the prostate (HoLAP) is a surgical approach for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Limited evidence suggests laser ablation/vaporization is inferior to enucleation with respect to reoperation rates. Our objective was to determine if properly performed laser ablation results in outcomes similar to enucleation. A total of 198 patients with moderate to severe lower urinary tract symptoms and/or acute urinary retention had holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) or HoLAP between 2008 and 2014. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer, prior pelvic radiation, or bladder cancer involving the bladder neck or prostatic urethra were excluded. All procedures involved residents and were supervised by one experienced surgeon. The decision to perform HoLAP versus HoLEP was made intraoperatively. Demographics, pre, peri and postoperative data were collected. A total of 169 men were analyzed: 54 had HoLAP and 115 had HoLEP. Mean follow up was 27.16 months for HoLAP, and 38.18 months for HoLEP. As expected, the HoLEP group had larger prostates, longer mean operative times, and greater reduction in total PSA. There was no difference in the net change of flow rate between groups. Both HoLEP and HoLAP are appropriate surgical interventions for the management of BPH, when properly performed. Our findings suggest that adequate ablation of prostatic adenoma results in similar 2 year outcomes as enucleation.

  3. Urinary microbiota in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Meng, Hongzhou; Zhou, Feng; Ni, Xiaofeng; Shen, Shengrong; Das, Undurti N

    2015-04-25

    Inflammation is associated with promotion of the initiation of various malignancies, partly due to bacterial infection-induced microenvironmental changes. However, the exact association between microbiota in urine, seminal fluid and the expressed prostatic secretions and benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostate cancer is not clear. In the present study, we investigated the type of microbiota in the expressed prostatic secretions (EPS) of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method using universal bacterial primers. In order to understand the possible association between various bacteria and prostate cancer, quantitative real-time PCR assay was performed to quantify the amount of strains of bacteria in urine, EPS and seminal fluid. The prostate cancer group had a significantly increased number of Bacteroidetes bacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes bacteria, Lachnospiraceae, Propionicimonas, Sphingomonas, and Ochrobactrum, and a decrease in Eubacterium and Defluviicoccus compared to the BPH group. The number of Escherichia coli in the prostate cancer group was significantly decreased in urine and increased in the EPS and seminal fluid, while the number of Enterococcus was significantly increased in the seminal fluid with little change in urine and EPS. Based on these results, we suggest that there are significant changes in the microbial population in EPS, urine and seminal fluid of subjects with prostate cancer and BPH, indicating a possible role for these bacteria in these two conditions.

  4. Prostatic urethral lift: A minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Cindy; Chin, Peter; Rashid, Prem; Woo, Henry H

    2015-03-01

    Prostatic urethral lift (PUL) is a minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The procedure may be performed under local, spinal, or general anesthesia. The PUL procedure involves the delivery of implants that retract obstructing prostate lobes. Unlike other benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment options including pharmacological therapy, and the current invasive gold-standard transurethral resection of the prostate, the PUL procedure achieves quantifiable improvements in functional outcomes and quality of life, in the absence of major adverse events. Furthermore, improvement in LUTS may be attained while preserving erectile and ejaculatory function. Adverse effects associated with the PUL procedure are mild to moderate, and are transient in nature. The PUL procedure provides an alternative for men seeking treatment for bothersome LUTS, with fewer side-effects.

  5. Prostatic urethral lift: A minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Cindy; Chin, Peter; Rashid, Prem; Woo, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic urethral lift (PUL) is a minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The procedure may be performed under local, spinal, or general anesthesia. The PUL procedure involves the delivery of implants that retract obstructing prostate lobes. Unlike other benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment options including pharmacological therapy, and the current invasive gold-standard transurethral resection of the prostate, the PUL procedure achieves quantifiable improvements in functional outcomes and quality of life, in the absence of major adverse events. Furthermore, improvement in LUTS may be attained while preserving erectile and ejaculatory function. Adverse effects associated with the PUL procedure are mild to moderate, and are transient in nature. The PUL procedure provides an alternative for men seeking treatment for bothersome LUTS, with fewer side-effects. PMID:26157759

  6. Therapeutic options in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2009-01-01

    Current theraputic options for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are reviewed. Therapeutic options for mild lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), as defined by the American Urological Association, are generally treated medically. Moderate to severe LUTS can be treated medically or with surgical therapy. Current medical and surgical treatments for LUTS secondary to BPH are reviewed and evolving treatments are explored. PMID:19936164

  7. Laser Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Dosimetric and Thermodynamic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvari, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most commonly occurring neoplastic disease in the aging human male. Currently, surgical treatment of BPH is the primary therapeutic method. However, due to surgical complications, less invasive methods of treatment are desirable. In recent years, thermal coagulation of the hyperplastic prostate by a laser has received a considerable amount of attention. Nevertheless, the optimum laser irradiation parameters that lead to a successful and safe treatment of BPH have not been determined. This dissertation studies the physics of laser coagulation of prostate from both basic science and practical perspectives. Optical properties of prostatic tissue are determined over a spectrum of wavelengths. Knowledge of these properties allows for selection of appropriate laser wavelengths and provides a basis for performing dose equivalency studies among various types of lasers. Furthermore, knowledge of optical properties are needed for development of computer simulation models that predict the extent of thermal injury during laser irradiation of prostate. A computer model of transurethral heating of prostate that can be used to guide the clinical studies in determining an optimum dosimetry is then presented. Studies of the effects of non-laser heating devices, optical properties, blood perfusion, surface irrigation, and beam geometry are performed to examine the extent of heat propagation within the prostate. An in vitro model for transurethral laser irradiation of prostate is also presented to examine the effects of an 810 nm diode laser, thermal boundary conditions, and energy deposition rate during Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Results of these studies suggest that in the presence of laminar irrigation, the convective boundary condition is dominated by thermal diffusion as opposed to the bulk motion of the irrigation fluid. Distinct phases of thermal events are also identified during the laser irradiation. The in vivo studies of

  8. Inhibition effects of chlorogenic acid on benign prostatic hyperplasia in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Chen, Huaguo; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Xingdong; Hu, Enming; Jiang, Zhengmeng

    2017-08-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects and explore mechanisms of chlorogenic acid against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in mice. Benign prostatic hyperplasia model was induced in experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate (7.5mg/kg/d) consecutively for 14 d. A total of 60 mice were randomly divided into six groups: (Group 1) normal control group, (Group 2) benign prostatic hyperplasia model control group, (Group 3) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with finasteride at a dose of 1mg/kg, (Group 4) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with chlorogenic acid at dose levels of 0.8mg/kg (low dose group), (Group 5) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with chlorogenic acid at dose levels of 1.6mg/kg (medium dose group) and (Group 6) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with chlorogenic acid at dose levels of 3.2mg/kg (high dose group). Animals were sacrificed on the scheduled termination, pick out the eyeball to get blood, then prostates were weighed and prostatic index were determined. Then the serum acid phosphatase (ACP), prostatic acid phosphatase (PACP) and typeⅡ5-alpha-reductase (SRD5A2) levels were measured and observed morphological changes of the prostate. Comparing with benign prostatic hyperplasia model group, the high and medium dose of chlorogenic acid could significantly reduce prostate index and levels of acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase and typeⅡ5-alpha-reductase (P<0.05 or P<0.01). These findings were supported by histopathological observations of prostate tissues. Histopathological examination also indicated that chlorogenic acid treatment at the high and medium doses inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia. The results indicated that chlorogenic acid exhibited restraining effect on benign prostatic hyperplasia model animals, and its mechanism might be related to inhibit typeⅡ5-alpha reductase activity. Copyright © 2017

  9. Expression of the KAI1 protein in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T.; Ichikawa, T.; Tamaru, J.; Mikata, A.; Akakura, K.; Akimoto, S.; Imai, T.; Yoshie, O.; Shiraishi, T.; Yatani, R.; Ito, H.; Shimazaki, J.

    1996-01-01

    The KAI1 gene, recently identified as a metastatic suppressor gene for prostate cancer, was cloned and was revealed to be identical to the C33/IA4/ R2/4R9 gene. The expression of KAI1 protein was examined immunohistochemically in the tissues from 14 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia and 46 cases of prostate cancer using mouse monoclonal anti-human C33 antibody. In benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, KAI1 protein was uniformly expressed in the glandular cell membrane at cell-to-cell borders. The KAI1 protein in the tissues of untreated prostate cancer was also located at similar sites to those of benign prostatic hyperplasia, but the percentage of strongly positive cancer cells was correlated inversely to the Gleason pattern (P < 0.0001, one-way analysis of variance). There was also a statistically inverse correlation between the percentage of KAI1-positive cancer cells and the clinical stage (chi 2 = 9.6; P = 0.0081). In 4 cancer death cases relapsed from endocrine therapy, KAI1 protein was not stained in either primary or metastatic foci. These results indicate that the expression of KAI1 protein correlates to tumor characteristics in prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8909232

  10. Surgical therapy for benign prostatic hypertrophy/bladder outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvam, Nikesh

    2014-04-01

    Monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with endoscopic electrocautery remains the gold standard surgical technique for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) by which all new procedures are compared. We reviewed the current literature, and international urological guidelines and consensus opinion on various surgical options for BPH and present a brief overview of alternative techniques including bipolar TURP, transurethral incision of the prostate, transurethral vaporization of the prostate, laser prostatectomy (with holmium, thulium and potassium titanyl phosphate greenlight lasers) and open prostatectomy (with mention of new techniques including laparoscopic and robotic prostatectomy). Emerging, experimental and less established techniques are also described including endoscopic heat generation (transurethral microwave thermotherapy, radiofrequency transurethral needle ablation of the prostate, high intensity focused ultrasound, hot water induced thermotherapy, pulsed electromagnetic radiofrequency), injection therapy (transurethral ethanol ablation and botulinum toxin) and mechanical devices (intraprostatic stents and urethral lift devices). Despite a plethora of surgical options, none have realistically improved outcomes in the long-term compared with TURP. Improvements have been made on improving surgical morbidity and time in hospital. Questions remain in this area, including what specific elements of bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) result in damage to the urinary tract, how does BPH contribute to BOO and how much prostate volume reduction is necessary to relieve BOO or lower urinary tract symptoms. Given these unanswered questions and the multitude of procedures available, it is clear that appropriate counselling is necessary in all men who undergo BPH surgery.

  11. [Drugs for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Caprino, L

    2000-06-01

    Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) usually occurs in males 45-50 old and progressively involves 75% of the male population over 75 years of age. The clinical manifestations of BPH are related primarily to bladder outlet obstructions resulting from enlargement (mechanical component) of the prostate gland, and from extrinsic and intrinsic sympathetic activation of alpha-adrenoceptors (dynamic component) present in the prostatic muscle tissue, prostatic urethra, bladder base and neck. Several drugs have been employed in the last decades: LHRH analogs (Leuprorelin and Goserelin) which can reduce the testicular production of androgens with reduction in prostate size; Serenoa repens for its anti-androgenic and anti-estrogenic activities; Finasteride (5-alpha-reductase inhibitor) which blocks the conversion of testosterone into the more active dihydrotestosterone. Finally, the alpha 1 blocking agents (Terazosin, Doxazosin, Tamsulosin) that improve urinary symptoms by acting on dynamic component. Clinical improvements derive from their antagonist action on alpha 1 adrenergic receptors which mediate contraction of the prostate gland, proximal urethra, bladder base and neck, with the consequent reduction of urethral pressure, bladder outlet resistance, and increase of urinary flow. Due to its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, as well as the clinical results obtained, Terazosin, alpha 1 blocker, appears to be particularly useful in the treatment of patients with mild- to moderate symptomatic BPH.

  12. Comparison between prostate volume and intravesical prostatic protrusion in detecting bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A K M S; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rashid, M M; Rahman, H; Islam, A K M A; Jahan, M U

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the correlation of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) and prostate volume (PV) with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). This study was conducted in the department of urology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, between July 2009 to September 2010. Fifty benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were included in the study. Their evaluation consisted of history along with International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), digital rectal examination (DRE), transabdominal ultrasonography to measure prostate volume, intravesical prostatic protrusion & post voidal residual (PVR) urine and pressure-flow studies to detect bladder outflow obstruction (BOO). Statistical analysis included Unpaired 't' test, Chi-square test and Spearman's Rank correlation test. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the correlation of PV and IPP with BOO. Mean prostate volume was significantly larger in bladder outlet obstructed patients (P<0.05). Mean IPP was significantly greater in obstructed patients (P<0.001). Area under ROC curve was 0.700 for PV and 0.821 for IPP. Prostate volume & intravesical prostatic protrusion measured through transabdominal ultrasonography are noninvasive and accessible method that significantly correlates with bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and the correlation of IPP is much more stronger than that of prostate volume.

  13. Energy Delivery Systems for Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee asked the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) to conduct a health technology assessment on energy delivery systems for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition BPH is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate gland and the most common benign tumour in aging men. (1) It is the most common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and is an important cause of diminished quality of life among aging men. (2) The primary goal in the management of BPH for most patients is a subjective improvement in urinary symptoms and quality of life. Until the 1930s, open prostatectomy, though invasive, was the most effective form of surgical treatment for BPH. Today, the benchmark surgical treatment for BPH is transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), which produces significant changes of all subjective and objective outcome parameters. Complications after TURP include hemorrhage during or after the procedure, which often necessitates blood transfusion; transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome; urinary incontinence; bladder neck stricture; and sexual dysfunction. A retrospective review of 4,031 TURP procedures performed by one surgeon between 1979 and 2003 showed that the incidence of complications was 2.4% for blood transfusion, 0.3% for TUR syndrome, 1.5% for hemostatic procedures, 2.8% for bladder neck contracture, and 1% for urinary stricture. However, the incidence of blood transfusion and TUR syndrome decreased as the surgeon’s skills improved. During the 1990s, a variety of endoscopic techniques using a range of energy sources have been developed as alternative treatments for BPH. These techniques include the use of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser), radiofrequency, microwave, and ultrasound, to heat prostate tissue and cause coagulation or vaporization. In addition

  14. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: age-related tissue-remodeling.

    PubMed

    Untergasser, Gerold; Madersbacher, Stephan; Berger, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Aging and androgens are the two established risk factors for the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE), which can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in elderly men. BPH, consisting of a nodular overgrowth of the epithelium and fibromuscular tissue within transition zone and periurethral areas, is first detectable around the fourth decade of life and affects nearly all men by the ninth decade. The pathogenesis of BPH is still largely unresolved, but multiple partially overlapping and complementary theories have been proposed, all of which seem to be operative at least to some extent. In addition to nerve-, endocrine- and immune system, local para- and luminocrine pleiotrope mechanisms/factors are implicated in the prostatic tissue-remodeling process. Prostate tissue-remodeling in the transition zone is characterized by: (i) hypertrophic basal cells, (ii) altered secretions of luminal cells leading to calcification, clogged ducts and inflammation, (iii) lymphocytic infiltration with production of proinflammatory cytokines, (iv) increased radical oxygen species (ROS) production that damages epithelial and stromal cells, (v) increased basic fibroblast (bFGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1) production leading to stromal proliferation, transdifferentiation and extracellular matrix production, (vi) altered autonomous innervation that decreases relaxation and leads to a high adrenergic tonus, (vii) and altered neuroendocine cell function and release of neuroendocrine peptides (NEP). This review summarizes the multifactorial nature of prostate tissue remodeling in elderly men with symptomatic BPH with a particular focus on changes of cell-cell interactions and cell functions in the human aging prostate.

  15. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Xenophon K; Giotis, Christos; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Verginadis, Ioannis I; Simos, Yannis V; Peschos, Dimitrios; Evangelou, Angelos M

    2011-12-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) has been treated with various types of electromagnetic radiation methods such as transurethral needle ablation (TUNA), interstitial laser therapy (ILC), holmium laser resection (HoLRP). In the present study, the effects of a noninvasive method based on the exposure of patients with BPH to a pulsative EM Field at radiofrequencies have been investigated. Twenty patients with BPH, aging 68-78 years old (y.o), were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group (10 patients, 74.0 ± 5.7 y.o) treated with the α-blocker Alfusosin, 10 mg/24 h for at least 4 weeks, and the electromagnetic group (10 patients, 73.7 ± 6.3 y.o) exposed for 2 weeks in a very short wave duration, pulsed electromagnetic field at radiofrequencies generated by an ion magnetic inductor, for 30 min daily, 5 consecutive days per week. Patients of both groups were evaluated before and after drug and EMF treatment by values of total PSA and prostatic PSA fraction, acid phosphate, U/S estimation of prostate volume and urine residue, urodynamic estimation of urine flow rate, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). There was a statistically significant decrease before and after treatment of IPSS (P < 0.02), U/S prostate volume (P < 0.05), and urine residue (P < 0.05), as well as of mean urine flow rate (P < 0.05) in patients of the electromagnetic group, in contrast to the treatment group who had only improved IPSS (P < 0.05). There was also a significant improvement in clinical symptoms in patients of the electromagnetic group. Follow-up of the patients of this group for one year revealed that results obtained by EMFs treatment are still remaining. Pulsed electromagnetic field at radiofrequencies may benefit patients with benign prostate hyperplasia treated by a non-invasive method.

  16. Androgen receptor and immune inflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kouji; Li, Lei; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) are frequent diseases in middle-aged to elderly men worldwide. While both diseases are linked to abnormal growth of the prostate, the epidemiological and pathological features of these two prostate diseases are different. BPH nodules typically arise from the transitional zone, and, in contrast, PCa arises from the peripheral zone. Androgen deprivation therapy alone may not be sufficient to cure these two prostatic diseases due to its undesirable side effects. The alteration of androgen receptor-mediated inflammatory signals from infiltrating immune cells and prostate stromal/epithelial cells may play key roles in those unwanted events. Herein, this review will focus on the roles of androgen/androgen receptor signals in the inflammation-induced progression of BPH and PCa. PMID:26594314

  17. Prostatic cancer/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Subcellular distribution of estradiol/androgen receptors.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Edith L; Mercado, E; Calzada, L

    2005-01-01

    Six microsomal population of estradiol and androgen receptors have been characterized in human benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). Estradiol receptor (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) were extracted using 0.6 M KCL and determined by the dextran-coated charcoal method. ER and AR levels were smaller in BPH plasma membranes (PM) than in Pca cases. For functions 3, 4, 6, the ER values in PCa were 25-38% less with regard to BPH ER values. Whereas in PCa, AR values obtained in all fractions were higher when compared to BPH AR values. In benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostatic cancer, ER and AR levels were significantly higher in the nuclear fraction. In the nuclear fraction, ER and AR levels in BPH and PCa were significantly different. The subcellular distribution of AR and ER in BPH and PCa constitutes a reservation mechanism and processing a receptors for their continued growth.

  18. Nutritional status and nutritional habits of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer - preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Goluch-Koniuszy, Zuzanna; Rygielska, Magda; Nowacka, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    The ageing in men, the most frequent pathologic lesions affecting the prostatic gland in this period are benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC), the course of which may be influenced by the improper nutritional status of patients and their nutritional habits. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the nutritional status and eating habits of men diagnosed and treated for one of the above diseases. MATERIAL AND METODS: The nutritional status of 30 male patients with clinically confirmed and treated disease of the prostatic gland, including 15 men (aged 51-75 years) with BPH and 15 men (aged 51-73 years) with PC, was evaluated based on their BMI, WC, WHR, and WHtR parameters. In turn, the energy and nutritive value of 90 daily food rations (DFRs) was evaluated. Finally, calculations were made for the Key's index of diet atherogenicity, resultant Glycemic Index (GI) and Glycemic Load (GL). Higher values of the BMI, WC, WHR and WHtR parameters were noted in the men with PC, they were also characterized by a higher incidence of peripheral subcutaneous obesity and visceral obesity. The DFRs of the men were characterized by a low energy value and by a low intake of available carbohydrates, dietary fi ber, K, Ca, Mg, vitamins D and C, and fl uids at a simultaneously high intake of total and animal protein, cholesterol, Na, P, Fe, Cu as well as vitamins B2 and PP. The contribution of energy derived from the basic nutrients diverged from the recommended values. In addition, the DFRs were characterized by high values of Key's index and 24-h GL. Differences in meeting the RDA for selected nutrients between the analysed groups of men were statistically significant. The improper nutritional status of the men may result from their incorrect nutritional habits which fail to improve their health status, and even predispose them to the development of some diet-dependent diseases. In view of that, both correction of diets of the surveyed men, as well as

  19. ROPE Registry Project to Determine the Safety and Efficacy of Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE) for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Secondary to Benign Prostatic Enlargement (LUTS BPE).

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Caused by Benign Prostatic Enlargement (LUTS BPE); Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE); Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP); Open Prostatectomy; Laser Enucleation or Ablation of the Prostate

  20. Dutasteride for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Christopher; Kapoor, Anil

    2013-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related phenomenon associated with prostatic enlargement and bladder outlet obstruction that can cause significant lower urinary tract symptoms that greatly affect quality of life. Dutasteride is a selective inhibitor of type 1 and type 2 isoforms of 5-α-reductase, an enzyme responsible for the conversion of testosterone to 5-α-dihydrotestosterone, approved as a treatment for symptomatic BPH. This article will cover the efficacy and safety of dutasteride in the treatment of BPH, with focus on landmark trials conducted on this drug. Medical literature on the use of dutasteride in men with BPH were identified by searching databases since 1996 (including MEDLINE and EMBASE) as well as bibliographies from published literature, clinical trial registries and manufacturer and federal drug regulatory websites. Dutasteride is an effective, safe and well-tolerated treatment either as monotherapy or in combination with an α-blocker, for the management of symptomatic BPH to improve symptoms, reduce the risk of acute urinary retention and risk for BPH-related surgery. A new prostate-specific antigen baseline should be established after 6 months of therapy for clinical decision making. The relationship between dutasteride and high-grade prostate cancer is not clear, and dutasteride is not approved for prostate cancer chemoprevention.

  1. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: An overview of existing treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Neelima; Bhagwat, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common condition in aging men, associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A better understanding of the prostate physiology, function, and pathogenesis has led to the development of promising agents, useful in the management of LUTS in men. The specific approach used to treat BPH depends upon number of factors like age, prostrate size, weight, prostate-specific antigen level, and severity of the symptoms. 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the production of dihydrotestosterone within the prostate, which results in decreased prostate volume, increased peak urinary flow rate, improvement of symptoms, decreased risk of acute urinary retention, and need for surgical intervention. α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) antagonists decrease LUTS and increase urinary flow rates in men with symptomatic BPH, but do not reduce the long-term risk of urinary retention or need for surgical intervention. Clinical efficacy of either 5α-reductase inhibitor or α1-AR antagonist has been further improved by using combination therapy; however, long-term outcomes are still awaited. Many more potential new therapies are under development that may improve the treatment of BPH. This article gives a brief account of rationale and efficacy of different treatment options presently available in the management of BPH. PMID:21455413

  2. HOTAIR genetic variants are associated with prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Mohammad; Habibi, Mohsen; Noroozi, Rezvan; Rakhshan, Azadeh; Sarrafzadeh, Shaghayegh; Sayad, Arezou; Omrani, Mir Davood; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2017-05-20

    Prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) are heterogeneous disorders with a wide array of clinical presentations and high prevalence among men. Several protein coding genes as well as non-coding genes have been shown to contribute in prostate cancer and BPH risk. Among non-coding genes whose contribution in tumorigenesis has been identified is HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR). In the present study we aimed at identification of the associations between three HOTAIR polymorphisms (rs12826786, rs1899663 and rs4759314) and risk of prostate cancer and BPH by the means of tetra-primer ARMS-PCR in a population of 128 Iranian prostate cancer patients, 143 BPH patients and 250 normal male controls. The study showed that rs1899663 T allele was associated with BPH risk. Comparison between prostate cancer and BPH groups showed that rs1899663 is associated with cancer risk in co-dominant, dominant and recessive inheritance models. The rs12826786 T allele was significantly more presented in both BPH and prostate cancer groups compared with healthy subjects. This SNP was associated with both BPH and prostate cancer risk in co-dominant and recessive models. However, rs4759314 showed no significant difference in allele or genotype frequencies between three mentioned groups. In addition, some haplotypes within this gene were associated with increased prostate cancer and BPH risk. Consequently, HOTAIR can be suggested as a risk locus for prostate cancer and BPH in Iranian population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Methylation in benign prostate and risk of disease progression in men subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Rundle, Andrew; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Mitrache, Nicoleta; Do, Kieu C.; Jankowski, Michelle; Chitale, Dhananjay A.; Trudeau, Sheri; Belinsky, Steven A.; Tang, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    In DNA from prostate tumors, methylation patterns in gene promoter regions can be a biomarker for disease progression. It remains unclear whether methylation patterns in benign prostate tissue—prior to malignant transformation—may provide similar prognostic information. To determine whether early methylation events predict prostate cancer outcomes, we evaluated histologically benign prostate specimens from 353 men who eventually developed prostate cancer and received “definitive” treatment [radical prostatectomy (58%) or radiation therapy (42%)]. Cases were drawn from a large hospital-based cohort of men with benign prostate biopsy specimens collected between 1990 and 2002. Risk of disease progression associated with methylation was estimated using time-to-event analyses. Average follow-up was over 5 years; biochemical recurrence (BCR) occurred in 91 cases (26%). In White men, methylation of the APC gene was associated with increased risk of BCR, even after adjusting for standard clinical risk factors for prostate cancer progression (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 2.26; 95%CI 1.23–4.16). APC methylation was most strongly associated with a significant increased risk of BCR in White men with low prostate specific antigen at cohort entry (HR = 3.66; 95%CI 1.51–8.85). In additional stratified analyses, we found that methylation of the RARB gene significantly increased risk of BCR in African American cases who demonstrated methylation of at least one of the other four genes under study (HR = 3.80; 95%CI 1.07–13.53). These findings may have implications in the early identification of aggressive prostate cancer as well as reducing unnecessary medical procedures and emotional distress for men who present with markers of indolent disease. PMID:26860439

  4. Potential of telmisartan in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Ishola, Ismail Ogunbayode; Anunobi, Charles C; Tijani, Kehinde Habeeb; Afolayan, Olasunmbo; Udokwu, Victoria U

    2017-07-20

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common health problem in ageing men. This study was carried out to investigate the protective effect of telmisartan on testosterone-induced BPH in rats. Fifty-four male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were randomly divided into nine groups (n = 6) and orally treated for 28 consecutive days: group 1 - vehicle normal, olive oil (10 mL/kg); group 2 - BPH model control (10 mL/kg); groups 3-5 - telmisartan (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg, respectively); group 6 - pioglitazone (20 mg/kg); group 7 - celecoxib (20 mg/kg); group 8 - combination of telmisartan (5 mg/kg) and pioglitazone (20 mg/kg); group 9 - combination of telmisartan (5 mg/kg) and celecoxib (20 mg/kg). Animals in groups 2-9 were given testosterone propionate in olive oil (3 mg/kg) subcutaneously 15 min after pretreatments. On day 29, blood was collected for the estimation of serum testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The prostates were excised, weighed and subjected to biochemical and histological studies. Testosterone injection induced significant increase in prostatic index, serum testosterone and PSA suggesting BPH as well as increased prostate oxidative stress which were ameliorated with the pretreatment of rats with telmisartan or co-administration of celecoxib and pioglitazone. Histological examination showed that testosterone disrupted the morphology of the prostate epithelial cells evidenced in the involution of the epithelial lining of the acini into the lumen indicating BPH which was reversed by telmisartan. Findings from this study showed that telmisartan alone or in combination with pioglitazone prevented the development of testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  5. Comparison of the response to treatment between Asian and Caucasian men with benign prostatic hyperplasia: long-term results from the combination of dutasteride and tamsulosin study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung-Ha; Lee, Seung Hwan; Roehrborn, Claus G; Siami, Paul F; Major-Walker, Kim; Wilson, Timothy H; Montorsi, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    The Combination of Avodart and Tamsulosin study was a 4-year, randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy and safety of dutasteride and tamsulosin, alone or in combination, in men with moderate-to-severe benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this post-hoc investigation, we analyzed primary and secondary end-points from the Combination of Avodart and Tamsulosin study in Asian (n = 325) and Caucasian men (n = 4259). The incidence of acute urinary retention or benign prostatic hyperplasia-related surgery did not differ significantly between treatment groups in the Asian subpopulation. In Caucasian men, the incidence of acute urinary retention/benign prostatic hyperplasia-related surgery was significantly lower in the combination therapy group compared with the tamsulosin monotherapy group (P < 0.001), but not compared with dutasteride monotherapy. Combination therapy significantly increased the time to benign prostatic hyperplasia clinical progression and resulted in improved International Prostate Symptom Score, maximum urinary flow rate, quality of life, and reduced prostate volume in Asian and Caucasian men who received combination therapy compared with tamsulosin monotherapy. Combination therapy also significantly improved (P < 0.05) time to benign prostatic hyperplasia clinical progression, International Prostate Symptom Score, maximum urinary flow rate and quality of life versus dutasteride in the Caucasian subpopulation. The adverse-event profile was comparable between subpopulations. In conclusion, Asian and Caucasian men respond similarly to these treatments, despite apparent racial differences in 5α-reductase activity.

  6. Technical Aspects of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myong; Lee, Hahn-Ey

    2013-01-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is a minimally invasive procedure and a size-independent treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with excellent long-term surgical outcome. HoLEP has become an alternative to conventional transurethral resection of the prostate or open prostatectomy owing to its efficacy and safety. Although HoLEP is known to have a steep learning curve, very few articles have addressed the technical aspects of HoLEP. Herein, we described detailed techniques and tips for HoLEP as performed at Seoul National University Hospital in a step-by-step manner with extensive review of the literature. PMID:24044089

  7. Canine prostate models in preclinical studies of minimally invasive interventions: part II, benign prostatic hyperplasia models

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Canine prostate is widely used as animal model in the preclinical evaluation of emerging therapeutic interventions. Spontaneous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is common in adult intact male dogs with two distinct pathological types: glandular and complex form of prostatic hyperplasia. The complex form of prostatic hyperplasia, usually occurring in older dogs, represents an ideal model because of its unique pathologic feature, including not only glandular hyperplasia but also an increase in prostate stromal components. The limited commercial availability of adult dogs with spontaneous BPH motivates experimentally induced BPH in young dogs. Hormone-induced canine BPH model has been well established with various hormonal treatment regimens and administration approaches. The goal of this review is to provide the veterinary background in spontaneous BPH in dogs, summarize the techniques in hormonal induction of canine BPH, and highlight the pathological and clinical limitations of the canine models that may lead to distinct therapeutic responses compared to clinical trials in humans. PMID:28725598

  8. Ursolic acid reduces prostate size and dihydrotestosterone level in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shin, In-Sik; Lee, Mee-Young; Jung, Da-Young; Seo, Chang-Seob; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by hyperplasia of prostatic stromal and epithelial cells, which can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. The prevalence of BPH increases in an age-dependent manner. We investigated the protective effect of ursolic acid in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate (TP), for a period of four weeks. Ursolic acid was administrated daily by oral gavage at a dose level of 5mg/kg during the four weeks of TP injections. Animals were sacrificed on the scheduled termination, before prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. TP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in the serum and prostate were also measured. BPH-induced animals displayed an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate. However, ursolic acid treatment resulted in significant reductions in prostate weight and testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, compared with BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also showed that ursolic acid treatment suppressed TP-induced prostatic hyperplasia. These findings indicate that ursolic acid may effectively inhibit the development of BPH and it may be a useful agent in BPH treatment.

  9. Trends in Simple Prostatectomy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pariser, Joseph J; Packiam, Vignesh T; Adamsky, Melanie A; Bales, Gregory T

    2016-08-01

    The definitive treatment for symptomatic large volume (>80 mL) benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is simple prostatectomy (SP). This can be performed by utilizing a retropubic, suprapubic, or a combined approach. The latter two approaches allow for the management of concomitant bladder diverticulum or stones through the same incision. Each approach affords unique technical strengths and weaknesses that must be considered in light of patient characteristics and concomitant pathology. SP allows for removal of the entire prostatic adenoma while obviating some of the neurovascular and continence issues that can arise from radical prostatectomy. Concerns with SP include its relatively high perioperative morbidity, notably bleeding. Therefore, there is increasing interest in less invasive options, including enucleation procedures and minimally invasive SP. This review presents an update regarding trends and outcomes of SP, as well as the effectiveness and popularity of alternative treatments.

  10. A signaling network in phenylephrine-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Yanagihara, Yutaka; Kikugawa, Tadahiko; Ji, Mihee; Tanji, Nozomu; Masayoshi, Yokoyama; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown etiology characterized by prostatic enlargement and coinciding with distinctive alterations in tissue histomorphology. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of BPH, we conducted a DNA microarray study using a previously described animal model in which chronic alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation by repeated administration of phenylephrine evokes histomorphological changes in the rat prostate that resemble human BPH. Bioinformatic tools were applied to microarray data obtained from prostate tissue to construct a network model of potentially relevant signal transduction pathways. Significant involvement of inflammatory pathways was demonstrable, including evidence for activation of a TGF-beta signaling cascade. The heterodimeric protein clusterin (apolipoprotein J) was also identified as a prominent node in the network. Responsiveness of TGF-beta signaling and clusterin gene and protein expression were confirmed independently of the microarray data, verifying some components of the model. This is the first attempt to develop a comprehensive molecular network for histological BPH induced by adrenergic activation. The study also implicated clusterin as a novel biochemical target for therapy.

  11. Water-induced thermotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Cioanta, I; Muschter, R

    2000-12-01

    Water-induced thermotherapy (WIT), administered by the Thermoflex System, represents a novel minimally invasive technique for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The Thermoflex System consists of an extracorporeal heat source and a proprietary closed-loop catheter system. Water, heated to 60 degrees C, is continuously circulated through the catheter to a treatment balloon, which conducts thermal energy to targeted prostatic tissue. The combination of heat and compression reduces the heat sink effect of the circulating blood, thus enhancing the thermal energy transfer to the compressed tissue. WIT treatment is performed using only topical urethral anesthetic, in a single 45-minute session. The 2-year follow-up data from a European multicenter study consisting of 125 patients showed an improvement in peak urine flow of 87.4% (from baseline 8.7 +/- 1.9 to 16.3 +/- 9.1 mL/s) and in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of -54.2% (from baseline 24 +/- 5 to 11 +/- 5). Patient tolerance of WIT was rated as "excellent" or "good" in 91.8% of the procedures. WIT is efficacious, simple, and inexpensive, has few side effects, and does not need special probes to monitor prostate or rectum temperature; thus, it can be used in hospitals, outpatient clinics, and doctors' offices.

  12. Rates of prostate surgery and acute urinary retention for benign prostatic hyperplasia in men treated with dutasteride or finasteride.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Josephina G; Bezemer, Irene D; Driessen, Maurice T; Vasylyev, Averyan; Roehrborn, Claus G; Penning-van Beest, Fernie J A; Herings, Ron M C

    2016-08-31

    Previous studies have suggested a greater benefit for various outcomes in men diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) who are treated with dutasteride than for men treated with finasteride. This study investigates whether the rates of BPH-related prostate surgery and acute urinary retention (AUR) differ between dutasteride and finasteride users in the Netherlands. From the PHARMO Database Network, men aged ≥50 years with a dispensing of dutasteride or finasteride with or without concomitant alpha-blocker treatment between March 1, 2003 and December 31, 2011 were selected. The incidence of BPH-related prostate surgery and AUR was determined during dutasteride or finasteride treatment and stratified by type of initial BPH-treatment (5-ARI monotherapy or combination with alpha-blocker) and prescriber (general practitioner (GP) or urologist). Comparison of the incidence of BPH-related prostate surgery and AUR between the treatment groups was done by Cox proportional hazard regression. 11,822 dutasteride users and 5,781 finasteride users were identified. Most users started treatment in combination with an alpha-blocker. Overall, dutasteride users had a lower risk of BPH-related prostate surgery was lower among dutasteride users than finasteride users (HR: 0.75; 95 % CI: 0.56-0.99). This lower risk among dutasteride users was also seen when stratifying by monotherapy or combination therapy (HR: 0.73; 95 % CI: 0.54-0.98 for monotherapy and HR: 0.85; 95 % CI: 0.74-0.97 for combination therapy). However, the association was only present among men treated by urologists. For AUR the rates were low and no statistical significant difference was observed between dutasteride and finasteride users. The risk of undergoing BPH-related prostate surgery was lower among men using dutasteride compared to men using finasteride. The association was observed for monotherapy as well as combination therapy, however, only among men who received their prescription from a

  13. High power diode laser vaporization of the prostate: preliminary results for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ali; Cam, Kamil; Tekin, Ali; Memik, Omur; Coban, Soner; Ozer, Yavuz

    2009-09-01

    Vaporization techniques using lasers have gained wide acceptance for benign prostatic hyperplasia as an alternative to transurethral prostate resection. The high power, 980 nm wavelength diode laser is a new promising alternative with a more rapid ablation rate and excellent hemostatic properties, as shown in ex vivo and in vivo animal models. We prospectively evaluated vaporization efficiency of the high power, 980 nm diode laser for bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. A total of 47 consecutive patients were included in the study. Inclusion criteria were maximal flow rate 12 ml per second or less with voided volume 150 ml or greater, International Prostate Symptom Score 12 or greater and quality of life score 3 or greater. Patients with a history of neurogenic voiding dysfunction, chronic prostatitis, or prostate or bladder cancer were excluded from analysis. Preoperative maximal flow rate, post-void residual urine, International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life, International Index of Erectile Function-5, prostate specific antigen and prostate volume were compared with values at 3 and 6 months. Complications were assessed. Month 3 assessment revealed that the mean +/- SD International Prostate Symptom Score decreased significantly from 21.93 +/- 4.88 to 10.31 +/- 3.79 (p = 0.0001). The mean maximal flow rate increased significantly from 8.87 +/- 2.18 to 17.51 +/- 4.09 ml per second (p = 0.0001). Quality of life score changed considerably compared to baseline. All of these values showed slight improvement at month 6. There was no deterioration in erectile function according to the International Index of Erectile Function-5 short form. Post-void residual urine decreased significantly. Prostate volume and prostate specific antigen reductions were also significant. The most common postoperative complications were retrograde ejaculation (13 of 41 patients or 31.7%) and irritative symptoms (11 of 47 or 23.4%), which subsided in the

  14. Serum sialic acid and prostate-specific antigen in differential diagnosis of benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romppanen, Jarkko; Haapalainen, Terhi; Punnonen, Kari; Penttilä, Ilkka

    2002-01-01

    In order to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the serum total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in differential diagnosis between benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer, the serum total sialic acid (TSA) was measured and logistic regression (LR) models were built. Significantly higher serum PSA (p<0.001) concentrations were observed in patients with prostate cancer compared to control subjects, but no statistically significant differences were found in serum TSA concentrations between these groups. Serum PSA reliably discriminated patients with prostate cancer from control subjects, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) being 0.991 (0.010). When serum PSA was in the gray zone, from 4 to 10 microg/l, the diagnostic accuracy of PSA in discriminating patients with prostate cancer from BPH patients was very poor, AUC being 0.563 (0.132). However, using the same set of patients the LR model combining serum PSA, free to total PSA ratio and TSA values, as well as digital rectal examination results, had good diagnostic accuracy in discriminating the prostate cancer patients from patients with BPH, the area under the ROC curve being 0.895 (0.054). The present data suggest that the logistic regression model combining laboratory measurements and results of the clinical examination may be a useful adjunct in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant prostate disease.

  15. Heme oxygenase levels and metaflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Vanella, Luca; Castelli, Tommaso; Cimino, Sebastiano; Reale, Giulio; Urzì, Daniele; Li Volti, Giovanni; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Motta, Fabio; Caltabiano, Rosario; Puzzo, Lidia; Sorrenti, Valeria; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between intra-prostatic levels of heme oxygenase (HO), metaflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue in patients with MetS and moderate-severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Between January 2012 and June 2013, 132 consecutive patients, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate for moderate-severe LUTS, secondary to clinical BPH, were enrolled. Prostate samples were investigated for the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate, according to the Irani score, and for HO-1 and HO-2 levels measurements. Patients were evaluated for the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) defined by the International Diabetes Federation. We observed that subjects with MetS exhibited greater Irani score (3.0 vs. 2.0; p < 0.05), Irani grade (2.0 vs. 1.0; p < 0.05) and lower value of HO-1 (4.55 vs. 6.01; p < 0.05) and HO-2 (0.81 vs. 2.66; p < 0.05). HO-1 (3.91 vs. 5.67; p < 0.05) and HO-2 (1.06 vs. 1.37; p < 0.05) were significantly reduced in patients with high intra-prostatic inflammation (Irani score ≥4). At the multivariate logistic regression analysis, HO-1 reduction (OR 0.588; p < 0.01), waist circumference (OR 1.09; p < 0.01), triglycerides (OR 1.013; p < 0.05) and HDL (OR 0.750; p < 0.05) were independent predictors of high intra-prostatic inflammation. We also found that HO-1 reduction (OR 0.598; p < 0.01) and the presence of MetS (OR 34.846; p < 0.01) were associated with Irani score ≥4. MetS-induced inflammation may play a key role in BPH. In detail, prostate metaflammation is inversely related to intra-prostatic HO-1 levels, serum HDL and positively with triglycerides.

  16. Korean clinical practice guideline for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Choi, Hun; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Heon; Yang, Seong Ok; Oh, Chul Young; Cho, Young Sam; Kim, Kyoung Woo

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the Korean Urological Association organized the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Guideline Developing Committee composed of experts in the field of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the participation of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine and the Korean Continence Society to develop a Korean clinical practice guideline for BPH. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide current and comprehensive recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of BPH. The committee developed the guideline mainly by adapting existing guidelines and partially by using the de novo method. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2009 to 2013 by using medical search engines including data from Korea. Based on the published evidence, recommendations were synthesized, and the level of evidence of the recommendations was determined by using methods adapted from the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Meta-analysis was done for one key question and four recommendations. A draft guideline was reviewed by expert peer reviewers and discussed at an expert consensus meeting until final agreement was achieved. This evidence-based guideline for BPH provides recommendations to primary practitioners and urologists for the diagnosis and treatment of BPH in men older than 40 years. PMID:26966724

  17. Association of ANRIL gene polymorphisms with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Mohammad; Pouresmaeili, Farkhondeh; Omrani, Mir Davood; Habibi, Mohsen; Sarrafzadeh, Shaghayegh; Noroozi, Rezvan; Rakhshan, Azadeh; Sayad, Arezou; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2017-05-01

    Prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) are heterogeneous disorders with high prevalence among men. The antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus codes for a long noncoding RNA whose participation in cancer has been elucidated. We analyzed rs1333045, rs4977574, rs1333048 and rs10757278 genotypes from this locus in 125 prostate cancer patients, 125 BPH patients as well as 220 normal age-matched subjects by means of tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR method. The rs1333045 showed no significant difference in allele or genotype frequencies between three groups. However, the other three single nucleotide polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with BPH and prostate cancer risk. Antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus possibly participates in the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  18. Prostate Cancer Detection at Rebiopsy After an Initial Benign Diagnosis: Results Using Sextant Extended Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Katia Ramos Moreira; Camara‐Lopes, Luiz Heraldo; Cury, José; Dall’Oglio, Marcos F.; Sañudo, Adriana; Srougi, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sextant prostate biopsy remains the standard technique for the detection of prostate cancer. It is well known that after a diagnosis of small acinar proliferation (ASAP) or high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), the possibility of finding cancer is approximately 40% and 30%, respectively. OBJECTIVE We aim to analyze follow-up biopsies on patients who initially received a benign diagnosis after exclusion of HGPIN and ASAP. METHODS From July 2000 to December 2003, 1177 patients were submitted to sextant extended prostate biopsy in our hospital. The mean patient age was 65.5 years old, and the median number of fragments collected at biopsy was 13. HGPIN and ASAP were excluded from our study. We only considered patients who had a diagnosis of benign at the first biopsy and were subjected to rebiopsies up until May 2005 because of a maintained suspicion of cancer. RESULTS Cancer was initially detected in 524 patients (44.5%), and the diagnosis was benign in 415 (35.3%). Rebiopsy was indicated for 76 of the latter patients (18.3%) because of a persistent suspicion of cancer. Eight cases of adenocarcinoma (10.5%) were detected, six (75%) at the first rebiopsy. Six patients were submitted to radical prostatectomy, and all tumors were considered clinically significant. CONCLUSION Our data indicate that in extended prostate biopsy, the first biopsy detects more cancer, and the first, second, and third rebiopsies after an initial benign diagnosis succeed in finding cancer in 7.9% (6/55), 5.9% (1/15) and 20% (1/4) of patients, respectively. PMID:18568243

  19. Prostate cancer detection at rebiopsy after an initial benign diagnosis: results using sextant extended prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Leite, Katia Ramos Moreira; Camara-Lopes, Luiz Heraldo; Cury, José; Dall'oglio, Marcos F; Sañudo, Adriana; Srougi, Miguel

    2008-06-01

    Sextant prostate biopsy remains the standard technique for the detection of prostate cancer. It is well known that after a diagnosis of small acinar proliferation (ASAP) or high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), the possibility of finding cancer is approximately 40% and 30%, respectively. We aim to analyze follow-up biopsies on patients who initially received a benign diagnosis after exclusion of HGPIN and ASAP. From July 2000 to December 2003, 1177 patients were submitted to sextant extended prostate biopsy in our hospital. The mean patient age was 65.5 years old, and the median number of fragments collected at biopsy was 13. HGPIN and ASAP were excluded from our study. We only considered patients who had a diagnosis of benign at the first biopsy and were subjected to rebiopsies up until May 2005 because of a maintained suspicion of cancer. Cancer was initially detected in 524 patients (44.5%), and the diagnosis was benign in 415 (35.3%). Rebiopsy was indicated for 76 of the latter patients (18.3%) because of a persistent suspicion of cancer. Eight cases of adenocarcinoma (10.5%) were detected, six (75%) at the first rebiopsy. Six patients were submitted to radical prostatectomy, and all tumors were considered clinically significant. Our data indicate that in extended prostate biopsy, the first biopsy detects more cancer, and the first, second, and third rebiopsies after an initial benign diagnosis succeed in finding cancer in 7.9% (6/55), 5.9% (1/15) and 20% (1/4) of patients, respectively.

  20. Comparative analysis of resected prostate weight in diabetic and non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia Patients.

    PubMed

    Moudi, Emadoddin; Akbarzadeh-Pasha, Abazar

    2017-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common benign tumor in men. The etiology of BPH is still unresolved and multiple systems are likely to be involved. The effects of diabetes on urinary system are a risk factor for BPH. We then assessed the effects of diabetes on the parameters related to BPH, especially weight and volume. This study was conducted on patients with BPH who underwent surgery during 2010-2013. The patients' demographic and clinical data including age, height, weight, history of diabetes, abdominal sonography, prostate-specific antigen(PSA), fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride, and cholesterol, resected sample weight, and pathological diagnosis were extracted. The mean age of all 225 patients (35 (15.6%) diabetic patients and 190 (84.4%) non-diabetic patients) who entered the study was 71.5±8.7 years. The patients were divided in to 3 body mass index (BMI) groups: 48 (21.3%) were normal, 151 (67.1%) were overweight and 26 (11.6%) were obese. The mean weight of resected prostate was higher in diabetic patients (22.9±6.9 vs 21.7±14.3, P=0.02). The resected prostate weight had a significant relationship with BMI (P=0.001), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (P=0.001), and prostate volume sonography (P=0.001). No significant relationship was detected between resected prostate weight with age, FBS and triglyceride however, it is significant with cholesterol. We concluded that diabetes has a role in the development and progression of BPH with effect on prostate weight and volume. As well, BMI is a risk factor in BPH progression.

  1. Evaluation of transurethral ethanol ablation of prostate for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Faruque, M S; Alam, M K; Ullah, M A; Rahman, M H; Kibria, M G; Haque, M M; Haque, M A; Joarder, A I; Paul, B K

    2012-04-01

    Evaluating short-term (03 months) efficacy and safety of transurethral intraprostatic injection of absolute ethanol to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This intervention study was conducted to evaluate 30 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia treated by transurethral injection of dehydrated ethanol. Mean age was 69.96 years. Endoscopic injection of 6-13.5 ml ethanol was carried out at 4-8 sites in the prostate. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximum flow rate, prostate volume, postvoid residual and side effects or complications were measured postoperatively. Mean IPSS (SD) improved significantly from 18.43 ± 2.38 preoperatively to 6.80 ± 1.34 at 03 months of follow-up, mean peak urinary flow rate increased from 7.33 ± 1.19 ml/s to 16.31 ± 1.69 ml/s after 3 months, mean residual urine volume had decreased from 54.16 ± 30.93 ml to 17.01 ± 9.59 ml after 3 months (p<0.05). The prostate volume decreased from 44.66 ± 9.52 gm preoperatively to 32.46 ± 7.78 gm after 3 months (statistically significant at 5% level). There were no intra-operative complications but post-operative haematuria occurred in two patients, urinary retention occurred in two patients after removal of the catheter. Urinary tract infection developed in one patient. Transurethral ethanol ablation of prostate appears to be safe and cost effective. No occurrence of retrograde ejaculation was detected. The short-term effects of ethanol injection at prostate were satisfactory and acceptable as a minimally invasive therapeutic modality in selected patients.

  2. Adiponectin deficiency contributes to the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shi; Xu, Huan; Gu, Meng; Liu, Chong; Wang, Qiong; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Peng, Yubing; Cai, Zhikang; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is increasing among obese individuals, but few studies have fully explained the underlying mechanisms. We aimed to elucidate the relationship between obesity and BPH. Herein, we show that in prostatic epithelial and stromal cells, adiponectin exerts multifunctional effects including anti-proliferation, blocking of G1/S-phase progression and the promotion of apoptosis via inhibiting the MEK-ERK-p90RSK axis. Furthermore, we found that a high-fat diet (HFD) led to adiponectin deficiency and microscopic BPH in a mouse model of obesity. And an adiponectin supplement protected the obese mice from microscopic BPH. The present study provides evidence that adiponectin is a protective regulator in the development and progression of BPH and that adiponectin deficiency causally links BPH with obesity. PMID:28256562

  3. Adiponectin deficiency contributes to the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia in obesity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shi; Xu, Huan; Gu, Meng; Liu, Chong; Wang, Qiong; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Peng, Yubing; Cai, Zhikang; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Zhong

    2017-03-03

    The incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is increasing among obese individuals, but few studies have fully explained the underlying mechanisms. We aimed to elucidate the relationship between obesity and BPH. Herein, we show that in prostatic epithelial and stromal cells, adiponectin exerts multifunctional effects including anti-proliferation, blocking of G1/S-phase progression and the promotion of apoptosis via inhibiting the MEK-ERK-p90RSK axis. Furthermore, we found that a high-fat diet (HFD) led to adiponectin deficiency and microscopic BPH in a mouse model of obesity. And an adiponectin supplement protected the obese mice from microscopic BPH. The present study provides evidence that adiponectin is a protective regulator in the development and progression of BPH and that adiponectin deficiency causally links BPH with obesity.

  4. Serenoa repens extract in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Geavlete, Petrisor; Multescu, Razvan; Geavlete, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    We are experiencing a revival of interest in phytotherapeutic agents, both in Europe and North America, especially as a consequence of patients’ dissatisfaction with the adverse effects of the medical alternatives. One of the most frequently prescribed and studied such agents is Serenoa repens extract, derived from the berry of the dwarf palm tree. We aimed to review the most important published data regarding this type of treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia. A review of the existing articles regarding the use of Serenoa repens extracts for benign prostatic hyperplasia was performed. The articles were analysed with regard to their relevance, scientific value and the size of the evaluated series. Multiple mechanisms of action have been attributed to this extract, including antiandrogenic action, an anti-inflammatory/anti-oedematous effect, prolactin signal modulation, and an antiproliferative effect exerted through the inhibition of growth factors. Regarding efficacy, European Association of Urology guidelines state that Serenoa repens extracts significantly reduce nocturia in comparison with placebo. However, the guideline committee is unable to make specific recommendations about phytotherapy of male lower urinary tract symptoms owing to the heterogeneity of the products and the methodological problems associated with meta-analyses. Most of the published trials regarding Serenoa repens phytotherapy demonstrate a significant improvement of urinary status and a favourable safety profile. Also, some authors have credited it with giving a significant improvement in erectile function and decreasing complications following transurethral resection of the prostate, especially bleeding. The results of phytotherapy with Serenoa repens extracts are very promising. More high-quality, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required in order to demonstrate without doubt the true therapeutic value of these products. Particular attention must be focused on

  5. Analysis of Urinary Prostate-Specific Antigen Glycoforms in Samples of Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Jen; Tzai, Tzong-Shin; Chen, Chein-Hung; Yang, Wen-Horng; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Glycans of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer were found to be different from that in benign disease. It is difficult to analyze heterogeneous PSA glycoforms in each individual specimen because of low protein abundance and the limitation of detection sensitivity. We developed a method for prostate cancer diagnosis based on PSA glycoforms. Specific glycoforms were screened in each clinical sample based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with ion accumulation. To look for potential biomarkers, normalized abundance of each glycoform in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and in prostate cancer was evaluated. The PSA glycoform, Hex5HexNAc4NeuAc1dHex1, and monosialylated, sialylated, and unfucosylated glycoforms differed significantly between the prostate cancer and BPH samples. The detection sensitivity (87.5%) and specificity (60%) for prostate cancer identification are higher than those of the serum PSA marker. As low as 100 amol PSA could be detected with the ion accumulation method which has not been reported before. The improved detection specificity can help reduce unnecessary examinations. PMID:27065039

  6. Role of laser therapy in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T.; Sharpe, Brent A.; Aronoff, David B.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2001-05-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in males older than 50 years of age. 75-80% of this population is considered to have some degree of BPH causing clinical symptoms and requiring urological treatment. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) is currently the standard surgical treatment modality for BPH. In an attempt to minimize the need for hospitalization and the associated perioperative and postoperative morbidity, alternatives have been sought. Various types of laser techniques such as interstitial laser coagulation and side-firing technology have been proposed. Numerous studies have shown that laser procedures safely and effectively reduce the volume of the prostate. Intra- and postoperative bleeding are nearly unknown complications for laser procedures, whereas this is the most relevant complication for the TUR-P. Due to significant tissue edema after laser treatment, patients commonly show delayed time to void adequately and, therefore, catheter drainage is often necessary for 3 to 21 days. Retrograde ejaculation is reported to occur less (0- 10%) compared to TUR-P (greater than 60%). Urinary tract infections are very common after interstitial laser coagulation. Although not many long-term clinical data are available, various studies have shown that BPH patients improve in symptom score, flow rate and post-void residual up to 3 years after laser treatment. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently used laser techniques as well as the long-term clinical data compared to TUR-P.

  7. Suppression of benign prostate hyperplasia by Kaempferia parviflora rhizome

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kazuya; Hayashi, Hirotaka; Matsumura, Shinichi; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Kaempferia parviflora rhizome is used as a folk medicine in Thailand for the treatment of various symptoms. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of extract from K. parviflora rhizome against 5α-reductase (5αR) were subjected. Furthermore, the effects of the extract from K. parviflorar hizome in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were studied using the model mice. Materials and Methods: Preparations of extracts from the rhizomes of K. parviflora, Curcuma zedoaria and Zingiber officinale, and methoxyflavones isolated from K. parviflora was used for 5αR inhibition assay. The effects of K. parviflora extract on growth suppression for the prostates and seminal vesicles were performed based on the Hershberger's method. The K. parviflora extract was administered to castrated mice for 14 days. Results: K. parviflora extract showed more potent inhibitory activity on 5αR than C. zedoaria and Z. officinale extracts. The active principles were identified as 3,5,7,3’,4’-pentamethoxyflavone and 5,7,3’,4’-tetramethoxyflavone by activity guided fractionation. Furthermore, K. parviflora extract suppressed the weights of prostates and seminal vesicles in BPH model rats by daily administration for 14 days. Conclusion: These results indicate that K. parviflora extract can be a promising agent for the treatment of BPH. PMID:24174827

  8. Suppression of benign prostate hyperplasia by Kaempferia parviflora rhizome.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Hayashi, Hirotaka; Matsumura, Shinichi; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2013-10-01

    Kaempferia parviflora rhizome is used as a folk medicine in Thailand for the treatment of various symptoms. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of extract from K. parviflora rhizome against 5α-reductase (5αR) were subjected. Furthermore, the effects of the extract from K. parviflorar hizome in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were studied using the model mice. Preparations of extracts from the rhizomes of K. parviflora, Curcuma zedoaria and Zingiber officinale, and methoxyflavones isolated from K. parviflora was used for 5αR inhibition assay. The effects of K. parviflora extract on growth suppression for the prostates and seminal vesicles were performed based on the Hershberger's method. The K. parviflora extract was administered to castrated mice for 14 days. K. parviflora extract showed more potent inhibitory activity on 5αR than C. zedoaria and Z. officinale extracts. The active principles were identified as 3,5,7,3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone and 5,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone by activity guided fractionation. Furthermore, K. parviflora extract suppressed the weights of prostates and seminal vesicles in BPH model rats by daily administration for 14 days. These results indicate that K. parviflora extract can be a promising agent for the treatment of BPH.

  9. Urinary prostate-specific antigen: predictor of benign prostatic hyperplasia progression?

    PubMed

    Pejcic, Tomislav P; Tulic, Cane Dz; Lalic, Natasa V; Glisic, Biljana D; Ignjatovic, Svetlana D; Markovic, Biljana B; Hadzi-Djokic, Jovan B

    2013-04-01

    Urinary prostate-specific antigen (uPSA) can be used as additional parameter of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) progression. From January 2001 to December 2011, uPSA was determined in 265 patients with benign prostate. Based on total prostate volume (TPV), the patients with benign prostate were divided in two groups: TPV < 31 mL and TPV ≥ 31 mL. Additional three groups were formed upon MTOPS study criteria: non- progressive BPH group (TPV < 31 mL, PSA < 1.6 ng/mL, age < 62 yrs), intermediate group (one, or two parameters {TPV, PSA, age} increased) and progressive BPH group (TPV ≥ 31 ml, PSA ≥ 1.6 ng/mL, age ≥ 62 yrs). Average uPSA values in the groups TPV < 31 mL and TPV ≥ 31 mL were 119.3 ± 124.5 and 255.5 ± 204.9 ng/mL, respectively and they were significantly different (p < 0.0001). Average uPSA values in the non- progressive BPH group, intermediate group and progressive BPH group were 86.8 ± 82.4 ng/mL, 166.6 ± 164.9 ng/mL and 274.9 ± 208.3 ng/mL, respectively and they were significantly different (p < 0.0001). The level of uPSA correlated significantly with TPV (r = 0.32, p < 0.0001). The cut off uPSA level of 150 ng/mL discriminates the patients with non-progressive BPH and progressive BPH with specificity of 0.83 and sensitivity of 0.67. The level of uPSA reflects prostatic hormonal activity and correlates with TPV, PSA and age. UPSA level ≥ 150 ng/mL can be used as additional predictive parameter of BPH progression.

  10. Computed Tomography of the Prostate Gland in Healthy Intact Dogs and Dogs with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pasikowska, J; Hebel, M; Niżański, W; Nowak, M

    2015-10-01

    To date, there is only scarce data on the evaluation of the prostate gland in dogs using computed tomography (CT). The aims of our study were to describe CT features of BPH in dogs and to determine the size of the prostate gland in healthy male dogs and dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) through CT. Additionally, we aimed to compare and establish the most useful parameters for CT measurements of the prostate in patients with BPH. The study population consisted of 20 healthy intact male dogs and 20 male intact dogs with confirmed BPH. Pre- and post-contrast CT studies were evaluated. The most common CT features in dogs with recognized BPH were symmetrical prostatomegaly and heterogeneity of the prostatic parenchyma. The mean prostatic density (D) was 56HU (±4.39) in pre-contrast CT images and 84HU (±8) in post-contrast images in dogs with BPH. The mean prostatic length (L) was 43.87 mm (±11), the mean width (W) amounted to 48.95 mm (±8.76) and the mean height (H) reached 44.9 mm (±9.48) in clinically affected patients. The mean ratios were: rL - 2,12 (±0.5); rW - 2.39 (±0.53) and rH - 2.16 (±0.39) in the BPH group. The prostate should be considered to be enlarged when rL exceeds 3.05; rW exceeds 3.38 and rH exceeds 2.94. Our findings indicated that CT is a useful tool in diagnosing prostate disorders, including BPH. The heterogeneity, density and ratios of prostatic length, width and height can be useful parameters in the diagnosis of BPH. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Telomerase activity in needle biopsies from prostate cancer and benign prostates.

    PubMed

    Wymenga, L F; Wisman, G B; Veenstra, R; Ruiters, M H; Mensink, H J

    2000-04-01

    Telomerase activation is thought to be essential for the immortality of cancer cells. It may be a prognostic factor in small volume well differentiated prostate cancers and hence a guide for the aggressiveness of the approach. The length of the chromosome tips (telomeres) are maintained by a specific enzyme (telomerase) independently of the normal cell division cycle. Although telomerase is not expressed in most normal human tissues, it is expressed in most human tumours. For the detection of telomerase in small prostate needle biopsy samples a recently developed telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay was used. The aim of the present study was: to measure telomerase activity in human prostate samples, and to evaluate the applicability of this assay on specimens from a prostate biopsy. From 36 patients referred for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) or suspicion of having prostate cancer a total of 288 prostate biopsy samples were obtained (8 in each patient). When the digital rectal examination was abnormal and/or when the PSA level was elevated in L.U.T.S., or asymptomatic patients' tissue samples were obtained by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsies. Samples were tested for telomerase activity by a modified TRAP and forwarded for histology. In 19 out of 36 patients prostate cancer was diagnosed on histology. In 11 of these 19 tumours substantial telomerase activity was detected, whereas only very low telomerase activity existed in 2 of 17 samples from benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) patients. In this small series the relative telomerase activity in prostate cancer correlated with histopathological grade. Our results show the applicability of a TRAP assay to measure telomerase activity in small needle biopsied prostate samples. In poorly differentiated and metastatic cancer we observed that levels of telomerase activity were high. To establish accuracy and to distinguish the 'relative good from the ugly' further study is needed.

  12. Evolution of the use of the holmium laser for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilling, Peter J.; Cass, Carol B.; Cresswell, Michael D.; Kennett, Katie M.; Mackey, Michael; Fraundorfer, Mark R.; Kabalin, John N.

    1997-05-01

    The holmium laser is becoming an important tool in the urologists' armamentarium. In this manuscript the evolution of laser resection of the prostate using the holmium wavelength is described. This technique represents a significant advance in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia and allows even very large prostates to be safely and efficiently managed transurethrally.

  13. Lower urinary tract symptoms in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients: orchestrated by chronic prostatic inflammation and prostatic calculi?.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Kyu In; Koh, Jun Sung; Min, Ki Ouk; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine the relationship between chronic prostatic inflammation and prostatic calculi, and clinical parameters of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study was based on 225 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate for BPH. Chronic inflammation was graded as 0 (n = 44), I (n = 54), II (n = 88) or III (n = 39) according to severity. Prostatic calculi were classified into types A (n = 66), B (n = 44), M (n = 77) and N (n = 38). The relationship between inflammation and calculus type was analyzed, and clinical parameters of BPH were compared for each group. There was no correlation between severity of inflammation and calculus type. Prostatic volume increased with the severity of inflammation and showed significant differences between G2, G3 and G0. The International Prostate Symptom Score also increased with increasing inflammation. There was no significant difference between each clinical parameter according to calculus type. Prostatic calculi had no significant association with chronic inflammation and clinical parameters of BPH. Chronic inflammation was associated with the volume of the prostate and storage symptoms; thus, it is not only presumed to be related to the progression of BPH, but may also be one of the causes of lower urinary tract symptoms. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Photoselective Vaporization for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, James M.; Whelan, J. Paul; Hopkins, Robert B.; Burke, Natasha; Woods, Edward A.; McIsaac, Gary P.; O’Reilly, Daria J.; Xie, Feng; Sehatzadeh, Shayan; Levin, Leslie; Mathew, Suja P.; Patterson, Lisa L.; Goeree, Ron; Tarride, Jean-Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background As an alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) provides a bloodless, relatively painless relief of lower urinary tract symptoms for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Following a review of the evidence in 2006, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee recommended that a study be conducted to evaluate PVP in Ontario. Objectives To compare the clinical effectiveness, safety, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of PVP compared to conventional TURP for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in Ontario. Methods A prospective, nonrandomized trial was conducted in 3 Ontario centres. Consenting subjects were assessed at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months following surgery. Outcome measures included International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), peak urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual (PVR) volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using the EuroQol 5 Domain questionnaire, and the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) score. Adverse events, resource utilization, and productivity losses were also assessed. Cost-effectiveness and budget impact analyses were completed using data from the study. Results Between February 2008 and August 2010, 164 subjects were enrolled in the study (n = 140 for PVP and n = 24 for TURP). Treatment outcomes were similar between the 2 groups at 6 months, with the IPSS decreasing similarly over time (P = 0.718). For other treatment outcomes (Qmax, PSA, HRQOL, SHIM) both treatments provided similar benefit over time; only changes in PVR volume favoured PVP (P = 0.018). The majority of PVP patients were managed on an outpatient basis, with only 7.1% requiring admission (all TURP subjects were inpatients). At 6 months, PVP was less costly than TURP ($3,891 versus $4,863; P = 0.001), with similar quality-adjusted life-years (0.448 versus 0.441; P = 0.658). PVP remained the most cost-effective treatment

  15. Tamsulosin versus terazosin for benign prostatic hyperplasia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dong, ZhiLong; Wang, ZhiPing; Yang, KeHu; Liu, YaLi; Gao, WenHui; Chen, WenYuan

    2009-08-01

    The effectiveness and safety of tamsulosin and terazosin for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) was evaluated by literature review. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Chinese biomedicine literature database (CBM), reference lists of reports, and reviews were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), or quasi-RCTs of tamsulosin versus terazosin in BPH. Twelve studies involving 2,816 men were included. Outcomes included international prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL), maximum urinary flow rate (Q(max)), average urinary flow rate (Q(ave)), residual volume, prostate volume, and adverse effect (dizziness, severe hypotension, dry mouth). Relative risk was calculated for dichotomous data. Sensitivity analyses assessed the influence of baseline symptom severity. We found that tamsulosin is better than terazosin when assessed by IPSS (weighted mean difference (WMD)=-1.24 95% CI [- 1.98, -0.51], there was no significant difference between the two groups in QOL (WMD=0.04 95% CI [-0.16, 0.24]), Qmax (WMD=-0.38 95% CI [-1.18, 0.41]), Q(ave) (WMD=-0.39 95% CI [- 0.84, 0.06]), residual volume (WMD=-4.32 95% CI [-10.96, 2.33]), and prostate volume (WMD=-0.28 95% CI [- 3.37, 2.81]). Fewer patients receiving tamsulosin experienced dizziness (relative risk (RR) -0.38 95% CI [0.30, 0.48]), severe hypotension (RR=0.16 95% CI [0.04, 0.68]), and dry mouth (RR=0.14 95% CI [0.03, 0.77]), compared with patients receiving terazosin. Many of the high quality RCTs showed beneficial effects of tamsulosin in terms of improving IPSS. However, whether tamsulosin proves more efficacious than terazosin in long term therapy requires confirmation by additional large sample, high quality trials.

  16. The Functional Role of Reactive Stroma in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Isaiah G.; Rowley, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The human prostate gland is one of the only internal organs that continue to enlarge throughout adulthood. The specific mechanisms that regulate this growth, as well as the pathological changes leading to the phenotype observed in the disease benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), are essentially unknown. Recent studies and their associated findings have made clear that many complex alterations occur, involving persistent and chronic inflammation, circulating hormonal level deregulation, and aberrant wound repair processes. BPH has been etiologically characterized as a progressive, albeit discontinuous, hyperplasia of both the glandular epithelial and stromal cell compartments coordinately yielding an expansion of the prostate gland and clinical symptoms. Interestingly, the inflammatory and repair responses observed in BPH are also key components of general wound repair in post-natal tissues. These responses include altered expression of chemokines, cytokines, matrix remodeling factors, chronic inflammatory processes, altered immune surveillance and recognition, as well as the formation of a prototypical ‘reactive’ stroma which is similar to that observed across various fibroplasias and malignancies of a variety of tissue sites. Stromal tissue, both embryonic mesenchyme, and adult reactive stroma myofibroblasts, has been shown to exert potent and functional regulatory control over epithelial proliferation and differentiation as well as immunoresponsive modulation. Thus, the functional biology of a reactive stroma, within the context of an adult disease typified by epithelial and stromal aberrant hyperplasia, is critical to understand within the context of prostate disease and beyond. The mechanisms that regulate reactive stroma biology in BPH represent targets of opportunity for new therapeutic approaches that may extend to other tissue contexts. Accordingly, this review seeks to address the dissection of important factors, signaling pathways, genes, and other

  17. Prospective evaluation of ambulatory laser vaporization of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Berquet, Gaetan; Corbel, Luc; Della Negra, Emmanuel; Huet, Romain; Trifard, François; Codet, Yann; Boulière, Fabien; Verhoest, Grégory; Vincendeau, Sébastien; Bensalah, Karim; Mathieu, Romain

    2015-07-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is an alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate in the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Our objective was to prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of ambulatory photoselective vaporization of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia. We prospectively collected data of all consecutive patients who underwent ambulatory PVP with the Greenlight(®) laser 180-W XPS at two centers between May 2012 and June 2013. Patients' characteristics, perioperative data, postoperative outcomes, complications, and patient's satisfaction were evaluated. Successful ambulatory care procedure was defined as the ability to leave the hospital in the evening of the operation. The ambulatory procedure was intended in 134 patients. Mean age was 67 years. Mean prostate volume was 54 ml, and Median American Society Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 2. Ambulatory procedure was successful in 121 patients (90%). At 3 months, International Prostate Symptom Score (7.3 ± 4.9), maximal urinary flow rate (20.8 ± 7.6 ml/s), postvoid residual urine (19.2 ± 71 ml), and quality of life (1.6 ± 1.4) were significantly improved (P < 0.001). Fourteen patients (10.5%) had complications that were all minor (Clavien ≤ 2). Two patients had to be readmitted to the hospital. The majority of patients (89%) were satisfied with ambulatory care. Failure to complete ambulatory procedure was mostly related to logistical problem (70% of the cases). Ambulatory PVP is feasible with functional results and complications comparable to that of traditional hospitalization. Ambulatory care yields high patient's satisfaction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Molecular classification of benign prostatic hyperplasia: A gene expression profiling study in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hata, Junya; Satoh, Yuichi; Akaihata, Hidenori; Hiraki, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Soichiro; Haga, Nobuhiro; Ishibashi, Kei; Aikawa, Ken; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    To characterize the molecular features of benign prostatic hyperplasia by carrying out a gene expression profiling analysis in a rat model. Fetal urogenital sinus isolated from 20-day-old male rat embryo was implanted into a pubertal male rat ventral prostate. The implanted urogenital sinus grew time-dependently, and the pathological findings at 3 weeks after implantation showed epithelial hyperplasia as well as stromal hyperplasia. Whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray analysis utilizing approximately 30 000 oligonucleotide probes was carried out using prostate specimens during the prostate growth process (3 weeks after implantation). Microarray analyses showed 926 upregulated (>2-fold change, P < 0.01) and 3217 downregulated genes (<0.5-fold change, P < 0.01) in benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens compared with normal prostate. Gene ontology analyses of upregulated genes showed predominant genetic themes of involvement in development (162 genes, P = 2.01 × 10(-4) ), response to stimulus (163 genes, P = 7.37 × 10(-13) ) and growth (32 genes, P = 1.93 × 10(-5) ). When we used both normal prostate and non-transplanted urogenital sinuses as controls to identify benign prostatic hyperplasia-specific genes, 507 and 406 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Functional network and pathway analyses showed that genes associated with apoptosis modulation by heat shock protein 70, interleukin-1, interleukin-2 and interleukin-5 signaling pathways, KIT signaling pathway, and secretin-like G-protein-coupled receptors, class B, were relatively activated during the growth process in the benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. In contrast, genes associated with cholesterol biosynthesis were relatively inactivated. Our microarray analyses of the benign prostatic hyperplasia model rat might aid in clarifying the molecular mechanism of benign prostatic hyperplasia progression, and identifying molecular targets for benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment.

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of estrogen receptors in prostate and clinical correlation in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gangkak, Goto; Mittal, Alka; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Ajay; Mehta, Jayanti

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Estrogens act through interaction with 2 receptor subtypes, ER alpha (ERα) and ER beta (ERβ), in human prostate. The aim of the present study was to semiquantitatively assess the differential expression of ER subtypes in human benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by use of immunocytochemistry (IHC) methods and to explore their relationship with various measures of BPH. Materials and Methods A total of 45 patients with BPH undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate and 22 patients with bladder cancer with normal prostate undergoing surveillance cystoscopy were studied as cases and controls, respectively. Quantitative immunolabeling of ER subtypes was scored by use of a semiquantitative scale. Also, correlations were assessed between ER levels in prostate and various measures of BPH. Results Overall, we found strong immunostaining for ERα in stroma and for ERβ in epithelium, respectively. The IHC score for ERα differed significantly between BPH patients and controls in both stroma (p≤0.001) and epithelium (p=0.008), respectively. The ERβ IHC score was also significantly higher in the epithelium of BPH patients (p=0.01). Also, we found a significant correlation between prostatic ER levels and various clinical measures of BPH. Conclusions ERs may play an important role in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:28261681

  20. Testosterone metabolism of fibroblasts grown from prostatic carcinoma, benign prostatic hyperplasia and skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikert, H.U.; Hein, H.J.; Romijn, J.C.; Schroeder, F.H.

    1982-02-01

    The metabolism of (1,2,6,7-3H)testosterone was assessed in fibroblast monolayers derived from tissue of 5 prostates with benign hyperplasia (BPH), 4 prostates with carcinoma (PC), and 3 biopsy samples of skin, 2 nongenital skin (NG) and 1 genital skin. The following metabolites could be identified: androstanedione androstenedione, dihydrotestosterone, androsterone, epiandrosterone, androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol and androstane-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. Testosterone was metabolized much more rapidly in fibroblasts originating from prostatic tissue than in fibroblasts derived from NG. A significantly higher formation of 5 alpha-androstanes and 3 alpha-hydroxysteroids could be observed in fibroblasts from BPH as compared to PC. 17-ketosteroid formation exceeded 5 alpha-androstane formation in BPH, whereas 5 alpha-reduction was the predominant pathway in fibroblasts grown from PC and NG. Since testosterone metabolism in fibroblasts of prostatic origin therefore resembles in many aspects that in whole prostatic tissue, fibroblasts grown from prostatic tissues might be a valuable tool for further investigation of the pathogenesis of human BPH and PC.

  1. [Sexual readaptation after the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Goriunov, V G; Davidov, M I

    1997-01-01

    Sexual function was studied in 818 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after surgical treatment of this disease. Before surgery, sexual activity was absent in 276 examinees. After surgery 4.3% of them retained erection, 95.7% remained impotent. 542 patients before operations were sexually active. Surgical treatment of BPH (transurethral resection, transvesical adenomectomy) creates grounds for deterioration of sexual function and risk of erection loss. Thus, 77 operated patients had no erection, 176 had weak libido, 159--insufficient erection, 244 retrograde ejaculation, 188 painful orgasm. Transurethral resection led to a complete loss of copulative function in 5.3% of patients, transvesical adenomectomy--in 9.9%. Sexual readaptation after transurethral resection and transvesical adenomectomy has been improved due to a special complex developed by the authors. This complex consists of 14 therapeutic and prophylactic procedures.

  2. [Status of phytotherapeutic drugs in treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Dreikorn, K; Schönhöfer, P S

    1995-03-01

    Phytotherapeutic preparations are still commonly used for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) in Germany; in recent years there has even been an increase in their use, so that sales now amount to more than DM 220 millions per year. The preparations most frequently used are extracts of Hypoxis rooperi, the roots of the stinging nettle, the fruits of the saw palmetto, pumpkin seeds and rye pollen. The suggested mechanisms of action have not been documented by scientific observation. This applies especially to the blocking effect on 5 alpha-reductase postulated with the doses used. Moreover, a critical analysis of the data available suggests that the effects of phytotherapy are no better than those of placebo treatment. Further studies are urgently needed, to compare the effects of phytotherapy with those of chemically defined drugs (alpha 1-receptor antagonists, 5 alpha-reductase blocker) that seem to have a beneficial influence on the pathomechanism underlying symptomatic BPH.

  3. Prostate Stem Cells in the Development of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer: Emerging Role and Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Akhilesh; Gupta, Sharad; Mistry, Bhavesh; Gupta, Sarita

    2013-01-01

    Benign Prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) are the most common prostatic disorders affecting elderly men. Multiple factors including hormonal imbalance, disruption of cell proliferation, apoptosis, chronic inflammation, and aging are thought to be responsible for the pathophysiology of these diseases. Both BPH and PCa are considered to be arisen from aberrant proliferation of prostate stem cells. Recent studies on BPH and PCa have provided significant evidence for the origin of these diseases from stem cells that share characteristics with normal prostate stem cells. Aberrant changes in prostate stem cell regulatory factors may contribute to the development of BPH or PCa. Understanding these regulatory factors may provide insight into the mechanisms that convert quiescent adult prostate cells into proliferating compartments and lead to BPH or carcinoma. Ultimately, the knowledge of the unique prostate stem or stem-like cells in the pathogenesis and development of hyperplasia will facilitate the development of new therapeutic targets for BPH and PCa. In this review, we address recent progress towards understanding the putative role and complexities of stem cells in the development of BPH and PCa. PMID:23936768

  4. The comparison between vitamin d concentration in upper silesia patients with prostate cancer and with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, K; Braczkowski, R S; Skrzypek, M; Stryjewski, P J; Kuczaj, A; Al-Srory, G

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that vitamin D has a protective effect against the development of cancer, which may also be related to prostate cancer. Low serum vitamin D concentration has also been demonstrated in benign prostate hyperplasia. We compared serum vitamin D concentration in two groups of Polish men with prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia. Each group comprised 30 patients. The concentration was determined by ELISA. To assess the difference between the study population, non-parametric Mann Whitney U test was used. The results revealed that patients with prostate cancer are deficient in vitamin D (median =25.3, quartiles q1 - q3: 13.4 -33.4). The concentration of vitamin D in the group of patients with prostate cancer was lower than in the group of benign prostatic hyperplasia with vitamin D deficiency (median =34.8, quartiles q1 - q3: 17.9 – 44.3). Vitamin D concentration in Polish men with prostate cancer is lower compared to patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  5. Trends and attitudes in surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nora G; Xue, Hui; Lerner, Lori B

    2012-04-01

    Surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has changed over the past 15 years with newer techniques emerging such as laser therapy that can be used with anticoagulation, an increasing issue with modern patients. We sought to evaluate current trends in procedure utilization based on age, location, type of practice, and experience. We also hoped to determine what factors influence surgeons' decisions to choose or reject particular surgical techniques. A 90-item on-line survey was sent via electronic mail to the American Urological Association (AUA), Veterans Administration, Society for Government Service Urologists, and Endourological Society. Data concerning utilization of 12 BPH surgical techniques were analyzed and compared to the surgeons' demographics using categorical data analysis and logistic regression. Of approximately 5500 urologists contacted, 600 urologists replied with 570 currently performing BPH surgery. The two procedures that continue to be utilized by urologists are open prostatectomy (OP) at 78% and monopolar transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) at 73%. When stratified by urologist age and year of residency completion, there were no differences in procedure utilization. There were no differences in types of procedures utilized between AUA sections except in the Northeastern AUA section which utilized less monopolar TURP and the New York section which utilized less photoselective vaporization (PVP). Higher volume surgeons were more likely to perform holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), diode laser vaporization of the prostate, holmium laser ablation of the prostate (HoLAP), and thulium laser ablation. There were no trends for low volume surgeons. There were no differences in types of procedures performed in full time academic versus non-academic settings except for robotic prostatectomy and button TURP which were utilized more often in academic settings. Urologists were more likely to accept a technique that

  6. Acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun; Peng, Weina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a non-malignant enlargement of the prostate commonly encountered in older men. BPH has been treated with acupuncture inside and outside China, but its effects are uncertain. This review aims to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for BPH. Methods and analysis Seven databases will be searched from their inception: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the VIP Database and Wanfang Database. Randomised controlled clinical trials using acupuncture to treat BPH will be included. Outcome measures included urological symptom scores, urodynamic measures and quality-of-life scales. Adverse events will be assessed and reported for safety evaluation. Study selection and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. Quality assessment (assessment of risk of bias) and data synthesis will be implemented using Review Manager (RevMan) software (V.5.2.3). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not necessary because this systematic review will not include specific patient data. Updates will be conducted if there is enough new evidence that may cause any change in review conclusions. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42014013645. PMID:25838507

  7. Diagnosis and management of benign prostatic hyperplasia in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Tanguay, Simon; Awde, Murray; Brock, Gerald; Casey, Richard; Kozak, Joseph; Lee, Jay; Nickel, J. Curtis; Saad, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and its clinical manifestation as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), is a major health concern for aging men. There have been significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of BPH in recent years. There has been a renewed interest in medical therapies and less invasive surgical techniques. As a consequence, the treatment needs of men with mild to moderate LUTS without evidence of prostate cancer can now be accomplished in a primary care setting. There are differences in the way urologists and primary care physicians approach the evaluation and management of LUTS due to BPH, which is not reflected in Canadian Urological Association (CUA) and American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines. A “shared care” approach involving urologists and primary care physicians represents a reasonable and viable model for the care of men suffering from LUTS. The essence of the model centres around educating and communicating effectively with the patient on BPH. This article provides primary care physicians with an overview of the diagnostic and management strategies outlined in recent CUA and AUA guidelines so that they may be better positioned to effectively deal with this patient population. It is now apparent that we must move away from the urologist as the first-line physician, and allow primary care physicians to accept a new role in the diagnosis and management of BPH. PMID:19543429

  8. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and bladder outlet obstruction may affect up to 30% of men in their early 70s. Symptoms can improve without treatment, but the usual course is a slow progression of symptoms, with acute urinary retention occurring in 1% to 2% of men with BPH per year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical, herbal, and surgical treatments? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 63 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, alpha-blockers, beta-sitosterol plant extract, Pygeum africanum, rye grass pollen extract, saw palmetto plant extracts, transurethral electrovaporisation, transurethral Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, transurethral needle ablation, and transurethral resection (including transurethral resection versus transurethral incision, and transurethral resection versus visual laser ablation/laser vaporisation). PMID:21871136

  9. Urological disorders in men: urinary incontinence and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan W; Miller, Mindi S

    2011-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are 2 common urogenital problems in men. UI is associated with involuntary leakage of urine and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of urgency, frequency, and nocturia. Types of UI include functional, urge, stress, and overflow. Treatment for UI is based on the type of incontinence, patient-specific factors, and treatment preferences of both patients and health care providers. Options for the management of UI include environmental modifications, disposable incontinence products, pelvic floor exercises, pharmacotherapy, surgically implanted devices, and intermittent catheterization. BPH may be also associated with LUTS. Patient symptoms, assessed with a measurement tool such as the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUASI), serve as the basis for determining treatment. Management approaches for BPH include pharmacotherapy, surgery, and minimally invasive procedures. Anticholinergic drugs as well as α-receptor antagonists and 5-α reductase inhibitors, either alone or in combination, are effective and useful for LUTS unresponsive to traditional pharmacotherapy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) can eliminate symptoms of BPH but is associated with relatively more complications than other available surgical and minimally invasive procedures.

  10. Inflammation in Benign Prostate Tissue and Prostate Cancer in the Finasteride Arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    PubMed

    Murtola, Teemu J; Gurel, Bora; Umbehr, Martin; Lucia, M Scott; Thompson, Ian M; Goodman, Phyllis J; Kristal, Alan R; Parnes, Howard L; Lippman, Scott M; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Peskoe, Sarah B; Barber, John R; Drake, Charles G; Nelson, William G; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    A previous analysis of the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) reported 82% overall prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation and identified a link between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer and serum PSA. Here, we studied these associations in the PCPT finasteride arm. Prostate cancer cases (N = 197) detected either on a clinically indicated biopsy or on protocol-directed end-of-study biopsy, and frequency-matched controls (N = 248) with no cancer on an end-of-study biopsy were sampled from the finasteride arm. Inflammation in benign prostate tissue was visually assessed using digital images of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. In the finasteride arm, 91.6% of prostate cancer cases and 92.4% of controls had at least one biopsy core with inflammation in benign areas (P < 0.001 for difference compared with placebo arm). Overall, the odds of prostate cancer did not differ by prevalence [OR, 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-1.84] or extent (P trend = 0.68) of inflammation. Inflammation was not associated with higher-grade disease (prevalence: OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.43-2.69). Furthermore, mean PSA concentration did not differ by the prevalence or extent of inflammation in either cases or controls. The prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation was higher in the finasteride than placebo arm of the PCPT, with no association with higher-grade prostate cancer. Finasteride may attenuate the association between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer. Moreover, the missing link between intraprostatic inflammation and PSA suggests that finasteride may reduce inflammation-associated PSA elevation. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Inflammation in benign prostate tissue and prostate cancer in the finasteride arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Murtola, Teemu J.; Gurel, Bora; Umbehr, Martin; Lucia, M. Scott; Thompson, Ian M.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Kristal, Alan R.; Parnes, Howard L.; Lippman, Scott M.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Barber, John R.; Drake, Charles G.; Nelson, William G.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous analysis of the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) reported 82% overall prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation and identified a link between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer and serum PSA. Here we studied these associations in the PCPT finasteride arm. Methods Prostate cancer cases (N=197) detected either on a clinically indicated biopsy or on protocol-directed end-of-study biopsy, and frequency-matched controls (N=248) with no cancer on an end-of-study biopsy were sampled from the finasteride arm. Inflammation in benign prostate tissue was visually assessed using digital images of H&E stained sections. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results In the finasteride arm, 91.6% of prostate cancer cases and 92.4% of controls had at least one biopsy core with inflammation in benign areas; p < 0.001 for difference compared to placebo arm. Overall, the odds of prostate cancer did not differ by prevalence (OR=0.90, 95% CI 0.44-1.84) or extent (P-trend=0.68) of inflammation. Inflammation was not associated with higher-grade disease (prevalence: OR=1.07, 95% CI 0.43-2.69). Furthermore, mean PSA concentration did not differ by the prevalence or extent of inflammationin either cases or controls. Conclusion The prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation was higher in the finasteride than placebo arm of the PCPT, with no association with higher-grade prostate cancer. Impact Finasteride may attenuate the association between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer. Moreover, the missing link between intraprostatic inflammation and PSA suggests that finasteride may reduce inflammation-associated PSA elevation. PMID:26715424

  12. Melatonin pharmacotherapy for nocturia in men with benign prostatic enlargement.

    PubMed

    Drake, M J; Mills, I W; Noble, J G

    2004-03-01

    Nocturia is a common condition often attributed in aging men to benign prostatic enlargement. Older adults are prone to nocturnal sleep disturbance, of which disturbed circadian rhythm may be a component since it improves with nighttime administration of melatonin. This study was designed to investigate melatonin as a potential treatment for nocturia associated with bladder outflow obstruction in older men. A total of 20 men with urodynamically confirmed bladder outflow obstruction and nocturia were entered into a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled crossover study assessing the effect of 2 mg controlled release melatonin at night on nocturia. Symptoms were assessed at baseline and after each 4-week treatment period using a frequency volume chart, the International Prostate Symptom Score and symptom problem index. Maximum urinary flow rate and post-void residual urine volume were also assessed. Baseline frequency of nocturia was 3.1 episodes per night. There were 7 men (35%) with detrusor overactivity and 10 (50%) had nocturnal polyuria. Melatonin and placebo caused a decrease in nocturia of 0.32 and 0.05 episodes per night (p = 0.07) and a decrease in the nocturia bother score of 0.51 and 0.05, respectively (p = 0.008). Nocturia responder rates (a reduction from baseline of at least -0.5 episodes per night) differed between the active medication and placebo groups (p = 0.04). Daytime urinary frequency, International Prostate Symptom Score, relative nocturnal urine volume, maximum urinary flow rate and post-void residual were unaffected by melatonin treatment. Melatonin treatment is associated with a significant nocturia response rate, improvement in nocturia related bother and a good adverse effect profile. However, it is uncertain whether the observed changes in this study are clinically significant.

  13. [Greenlight-XPS laser vaporization, the new standard of treatment in men with myasthenia gravis and benign prostatic obstruction]?

    PubMed

    Husillos-Alonso, Adrián; Simón-Rodríguez, Carlos; Bolufer-Moragues, Eduardo; López-Martín, Leticia; Carbonero-García, Manuel; González-Enguita, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Patients with Benign Prostatic Obstruction (BPO) and Myasthenia Gravis (MG) treated with Transurethral Resection of the prostate (TURP) show a high incidence of urinary incontinence due to unnoticed damage to muscle fibres of the external sphincter. Photoselective laser vaporization could be an alternative treatment based on the hypothesis that using Laser as energy source in the treatment of BPH prevents sphincter damage because the energy is not transmitted outside the fiber tip. We report the case of a man diagnosed of MG and symptomatic BPO treated satisfactorily with photoselective laser vaporization (GreenLight-XPS). Patient did not experienced postoperative secondary incontinence. Laser photoselective vaporization (GreenLight-XPS) could be the standard treatment for men with MG and BPO, whose prostate volume is less than 60 cc who are candidates for surgical treatment. Despite the extremely low incidence of these cases, further investigations are needed to confirm this affirmation.

  14. Convective Water Vapor Energy for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    DeLay, Kenneth Jackson; McVary, Kevin T

    2016-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) refers to proliferation of smooth muscle and epithelial cells within the transition zone of the prostate. Half of men over 40 develop histologic BPH. About half of men with BPH develop an enlarged prostate gland, called benign prostatic enlargement; among these, about half develop some degree of bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder outlet obstruction and changes in smooth muscle tone and resistance may result in lower urinary tract symptoms, including storage disturbances (such as daytime urinary urgency, frequency, and nocturia) and voiding disturbances (such as urinary hesitancy, weak urinary stream, straining to void, and prolonged voiding).

  15. [Changes in prostatic circulation in response to laser therapy and magnetic therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The results of preoperative preparation were analysed in 59 patients with prostatic benign hyperplasia (PBH) subjected to TUR. Treatment outcomes were assessed by transrectal ultrasound (color Doppler mapping) in two groups of patients. Group 1 received combined therapy including transrectal laser radiation of the prostate, group 2--transrectal magnetotherapy. The analysis showed that laser radiation reduced insignificantly the size of the prostate and adenomatous node, improved microcirculation and circulation in the prostate. This resulted in relief of inflammation and reduction of the number of postoperative inflammatory complications. Transrectal magnetotherapy has a positive effect on vascularization and hemodynamics of the prostate, local immunity, contamination of the tissues with pathogenic flora.

  16. Serum GADD45a methylation is a useful biomarker to distinguish benign vs malignant prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Reis, I M; Ramachandran, K; Speer, C; Gordian, E; Singal, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer results in a large number of unnecessary prostate biopsies. There is a need for specific molecular markers that can be used in combination with PSA to improve the specificity of PSA screening. We examined GADD45a methylation in blood DNA as a molecular marker for prostate cancer diagnosis. Methods: The study included 82 men, with PSA levels >4 ng ml−1 and/or abnormal digital rectal exam, who underwent prostate biopsy. We compared GADD45a methylation in DNA from serum and buffy coat in 44 patients (22 prostate cancer and 22 benign). GADD45a methylation in serum DNA was examined in 82 patients (34 cancer and 48 benign). Results: There was no significant difference in buffy coat GADD45a methylation between cancer and benign patients. Serum GADD45a methylation was significantly higher in cancer than in benign patients. Classification and regression tree predictive model for prostate cancer including risk groups defined by PSA, free circulating DNA (fcDNA) level and GADD45a methylation yielded specificity of 87.5%, sensitivity of 94.1% and receiver operator characteristic curve area of 0.937. Conclusions: Serum GADD45a methylation in combination with PSA and fcDNA level was useful in distinguishing benign from prostate cancer patients. PMID:26171936

  17. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer differentiation via platelet to lymphocyte ratio.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Mehmet; Yildirim, Mehmet Erol; Gul, Murat; Kilic, Ozcan; Ceylan, Kadir; Goktas, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to evaluate NLR and PLR inflammation markers in PCa and BPH. Clinical and pathological data such as age, prostate volume, PSA, NLR, and PLR levels of 201 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Pathological sample results of these patients were categorized either as benign or malign. The benign group consisted of chronic prostatitis and BPH and the malign group of PCa. The PSA levels were divided into three categories as PSA: 0-4 ng/ml, PSA: 4-10 ng/ml, and 10 ng/ml and above. In the benign category, the mean PLR values for PSA: 0-4 ng/ml is 131.8 ± 31.2, for PSA: 4-10 ng/ml 124.7 ± 83.9 and 10 ng/ml and above 124 ± 53 in chronic prostatitis group and in the BPH group for PSA: 4-10 ng/ml 120.3 ± 45.1, for PSA: 4-10 ng/ml 126 ± 54.2, and 10 ng/ml and above 191.4 ± 176.1. In the malign category, the mean PLR values of PCa patients is for PSA: 0-4 ng/ml 122.8 ± 43.8, for PSA: 4-10 ng/ml 123 ± 43.8, and above 10 ng/ml 179.1 ± 94. Related to the variables of age, NLR, and mean prostate volume, there were no statistically significant differences. Statistically significant differences were observed in the mean PLR values only if the PSA level was 10 ng/ml and above (p: 0.044) in the BPH and PCa groups. The correlation of the PCa Gleason score and PSA, NLR and PLR parameters in the malign category revealed no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). Effective malign and benign differentiation of prostate pathologies based on noninvasive inflammation biomarkers such NLR and PLR necessitate clinical studies with larger patient series.

  18. MRI evaluation of benign prostatic hyperplasia: Correlation with international prostate symptom score.

    PubMed

    Guneyli, Serkan; Ward, Emily; Peng, Yahui; Nehal Yousuf, Ambereen; Trilisky, Igor; Westin, Charles; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived prostate parameters and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) type with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). In all, 61 patients (median age, 60; range, 41-81 years) who underwent preoperative MRI and prostatectomy were included in this retrospective study. The MRI-based parameters including total prostate volume (TPV), transition zone (TZ) volume (TZV), TZ index, intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP), the anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFMS) distance, prostatic urethral angle, bladder wall thickness, urethral wall thickness, urethral compression, urethral wall changes, and BPH type were correlated with total IPSS, IPSS-storage symptom (IPSS-ss), IPSS-voiding symptom (IPSS-vs), and responses to the individual IPSS questions using Spearman (ρ) or Pearson (r) correlation coefficients, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and multiple linear regression. TPV (r = 0.414, P = 0.001), TZV (r = 0.405, P = 0.001), IPP (r = 0.270, P = 0.04), and AFMS distance (r = 0.363, P = 0.004) correlated with total IPSS. In multiple linear regression analysis, TZV was the only predictor for total IPSS (P = 0.001), IPSS-ss (P < 0.001), IPSS-vs (P = 0.03), and the scores for the IPSS questions 1 (P = 0.03) and 4 (P = 0.001). TPV was a predictor of the scores for questions 2 (P = 0.003), 3 (P = 0.009), and 7 (P < 0.001). Several MRI-derived prostate measurements (TPV, TZV, IPP, AFMS distance) correlated with total IPSS. TZV was the only predictor for total IPSS based on multiple regression analysis. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:917-925. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Therapeutic efficacy of Cernilton in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with histological prostatitis after transurethral resection of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaoqiang; Kong, Xiangjie; Qian, Yu; Xu, Ding; Liu, Hailong; Zhu, Yunkai; Guan, Wenbing; Zheng, Junhua; Wang, Zhong; Qi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was to prospectively evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of Cernilton in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with histological prostatitis after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Materials and methods: One hundred patients with histological prostatitis were recruited from January 2007 to January 2013. All patients were divided into groups A (mild), B (moderate), and C (severe) based on symptom severity, and then randomly subgrouped into Cernilton group and control group. Patients in Cernilton group were treated with Cernilton for 3 months after TURP, while patients in control group received placebo. A series of patient indicators were evaluated before, perioperatively (peri), and after TURP. Results: The assessed indicators remained unchanged peri-TURP as compared to those before surgery. 6 months after TURP, indicators remained stable in group A, and significant differences were observed in the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) in group B and in the storage symptom score (Ss), quality of life (QoL) and IEFF-5 in group C. In addition, there were significant differences in Ss, QoL and IEFF-5 between Cernilton group and control group. Conclusion: In BPH patients with histological prostatitis after TURP, Cernilton can improve the lower urinary tract symptoms and sexual dysfunction depending on the grade of prostatitis. PMID:26379934

  20. Therapeutic efficacy of Cernilton in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with histological prostatitis after transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoqiang; Kong, Xiangjie; Qian, Yu; Xu, Ding; Liu, Hailong; Zhu, Yunkai; Guan, Wenbing; Zheng, Junhua; Wang, Zhong; Qi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study was to prospectively evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of Cernilton in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with histological prostatitis after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). One hundred patients with histological prostatitis were recruited from January 2007 to January 2013. All patients were divided into groups A (mild), B (moderate), and C (severe) based on symptom severity, and then randomly subgrouped into Cernilton group and control group. Patients in Cernilton group were treated with Cernilton for 3 months after TURP, while patients in control group received placebo. A series of patient indicators were evaluated before, perioperatively (peri), and after TURP. The assessed indicators remained unchanged peri-TURP as compared to those before surgery. 6 months after TURP, indicators remained stable in group A, and significant differences were observed in the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) in group B and in the storage symptom score (Ss), quality of life (QoL) and IEFF-5 in group C. In addition, there were significant differences in Ss, QoL and IEFF-5 between Cernilton group and control group. In BPH patients with histological prostatitis after TURP, Cernilton can improve the lower urinary tract symptoms and sexual dysfunction depending on the grade of prostatitis.

  1. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  2. The Correlation Between Prostate Volume in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Relation to Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kardasevic, Amel; Milicevic, Snjezana

    2016-12-01

    The exact etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has not yet been determined, and the etiology of erectile dysfunction (ED) is often multicausal and includes organic and/or psychogenic causes, as well as their combinations. Although the relation of BPH, and thus the volume of the prostate (VP) with ED is indisputable, precise mechanisms of integration are still under examination. The objective was to evaluate the correlation between prostate volume and degree of erectile dysfunction in patients with symptoms of lower urinary tract caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. Material and Methods. 150 subjects with BPH, and before starting the BPH treatment, which can affect the sexual function, were divided into three groups: 50 patients with prostate volume of 30 to 40 ml (group A), 50 patients with a volume of 40 to 60 ml (group B) and 50 patients with prostate volume above 60 ml (group C). Quantification of erectile function is performed in all respondents by International Index of Erectile Function with five questions (IIEF-5). The mean IIEF-5 in group A was 20.52 points with a standard deviation of 3.22, in group B 17.08 points with a standard deviation of 4.10, while in group C 10.78 points, with a standard deviation of 3.29. Comparing the results of a statistical analysis from all three groups of patients with the degree of ED, Group A had the highest value of IIEF-5, group C the lowest mean value of IIEF-5. The results of ANOVA (F=96.375, p=0.000) indicated that there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between groups at high values of IIEF-5. Additional analysis by Turkey test revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the first and second groups (p=0.000 <0.05), the first and third groups (p=0.000 <0.05) and the second and third groups (p=0.000 <0.05). Results of Fisher's exact test (p=0.000) confirmed that there was a statistically significant relationship (p<0

  3. The Correlation Between Prostate Volume in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Relation to Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kardasevic, Amel; Milicevic, Snjezana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The exact etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has not yet been determined, and the etiology of erectile dysfunction (ED) is often multicausal and includes organic and/or psychogenic causes, as well as their combinations. Although the relation of BPH, and thus the volume of the prostate (VP) with ED is indisputable, precise mechanisms of integration are still under examination. Goal: The objective was to evaluate the correlation between prostate volume and degree of erectile dysfunction in patients with symptoms of lower urinary tract caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. Material and Methods. 150 subjects with BPH, and before starting the BPH treatment, which can affect the sexual function, were divided into three groups: 50 patients with prostate volume of 30 to 40 ml (group A), 50 patients with a volume of 40 to 60 ml (group B) and 50 patients with prostate volume above 60 ml (group C). Quantification of erectile function is performed in all respondents by International Index of Erectile Function with five questions (IIEF-5). Results: The mean IIEF-5 in group A was 20.52 points with a standard deviation of 3.22, in group B 17.08 points with a standard deviation of 4.10, while in group C 10.78 points, with a standard deviation of 3.29. Comparing the results of a statistical analysis from all three groups of patients with the degree of ED, Group A had the highest value of IIEF-5, group C the lowest mean value of IIEF-5. The results of ANOVA (F=96.375, p=0.000) indicated that there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between groups at high values of IIEF-5. Additional analysis by Turkey test revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the first and second groups (p=0.000 <0.05), the first and third groups (p=0.000 <0.05) and the second and third groups (p=0.000 <0.05). Results of Fisher’s exact test (p=0.000) confirmed that there was a statistically

  4. 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX-2) is expressed in benign prostatic epithelium and reduced in prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shappell, S B; Boeglin, W E; Olson, S J; Kasper, S; Brash, A R

    1999-07-01

    Human 15S-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX-2) is a recently identified lipoxygenase that has approximately 40% sequence identity to the known human 5S-, 12S-, and 15S-lipoxygenases. 15-LOX-2 has a limited tissue distribution, with mRNA detected in prostate, lung, skin, and cornea, but not in numerous other tissues, including peripheral blood leukocytes. In the current study, we have characterized the distribution of 15-LOX-2 in the human prostate by immunohistochemistry, demonstrated the ability of benign prostate tissue to form 15S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15S-HETE) from exogenous arachidonic acid (AA), and begun characterizing possible alterations in 15-LOX-2 in prostate adenocarcinoma. Incubation of benign prostate tissue with [14C]AA resulted in formation of [14C]15-HETE, as determined by reverse- and straight-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. 15-HETE was the major AA metabolite formed. By immunohistochemistry, 15-LOX-2 is located in secretory cells of peripheral zone glands and large prostatic ducts and somewhat less uniformly in apical cells of transition and central zone glands. 15-LOX-2 was not detected in the basal cell layer, stroma, ejaculatory ducts, seminal vesicles, or transitional epithelium. Immunostaining of 18 radical prostatectomy specimens showed a loss of 15-LOX-2 in the majority of prostate adenocarcinomas; 14 of 18 cases showed loss of 15-LOX-2 in >25% of the tumor (mean, 74.9% negative for 15-LOX-2; range, 38.9% to 100%). Incubation of paired pure benign and pure malignant prostate tissue from the same radical prostatectomies showed that 15-HETE formation was markedly reduced (>90%) or undetectable in incubations of prostate adenocarcinoma. 15-LOX-2 is a novel human lipoxygenase with a limited tissue distribution that is strongly expressed in benign prostate glandular epithelium and lost to a variable degree in the majority of prostate adenocarcinomas.

  5. Comparison of outpatient versus inpatient transurethral prostate resection for benign prostatic hyperplasia: Comparative, prospective bi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Park, Jae Young; Shim, Ji Sung; Lee, Jeong Gu; Moon, Du Geon; Yoo, Jeong woo; Choi, Hoon; Bae, Jae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We compare the symptomatic relief with urodynamic parameter change and operative safety of the outpatient transurethral resection in saline (TURIS-V) technique with inpatient transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: This prospective cohort comparison study enrolled patients who needed BPH surgery. Between January 2010 and June 2011, outpatient TURIS-V was performed at 1 centre and the results of the treatment were compared with inpatient TURP performed at a separate hospital. Preoperative characteristics, including prostate volume, were similar in both groups. Perioperative data and any treatment complications were recorded. The analysis compared postoperative outcomes, including a 6-month postoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a quality of life (QoL) evaluation and a record of any changes in uroflowmetry findings, between the 2 groups. Results: In the TURIS-V patient group, 75 patients agreed to be in the study. Of these, 69 ultimately complete the study. In the TURP group, 76 patients agreed and 71 of these completed the study. Both study groups were well-matched for age, IPSS, QoL and uroflowmetry findings. The TURIS-V group experienced both shorter operation times (54.6 vs. 74.8 minutes) and shorter catheterization times (2.2 vs. 4.2 days) when compared to the TURP group. There were comparable improvements in the 6-month postoperative IPSS, QoL, and uroflowmetry findings between the 2 groups. There were also equally low incidence rates of procedural complications. Conclusions: Both TURIS-V and TURP relieve lower urinary tract symptoms in a similar way, with great efficacy and safety. Overall, TURIS-V had shorter operative and catheterization times compared to TURP. Notwithstanding the paper’s limitations (non- randomized cohort comparison with possible selection or surgeon bias and small heterogeneous sample size), TURIS-V can be performed safely even in

  6. Prostate Artery Embolization for Complete Urinary Outflow Obstruction Due to Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Simon Chun Ho; Cho, Carmen Chi Min; Hung, Esther Hiu Yee; Chiu, Peter Ka Fung; Yee, Chi Hang; Ng, Chi Fai

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of PAE in weaning of catheter and relieving obstructive urinary symptoms in patients with acute urinary retention (AUR) due to benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and failed trial without catheter (TWOC). In this prospective study approved by the institutional review board, a signed informed consent was obtained. Eighteen consecutive patients with AUR due to BPH and failed TWOC were recruited. Nineteen consecutive patients with BPH but without AUR were recruited as a control. Patients with CTA evidence of arterial occlusion or significant stenosis along the prostate artery access path were excluded. PAE was performed using microspheres (100-300 μm diameter). Outcome assessment included successful weaning of catheter in 2 weeks, procedure-related complications, change of symptomatology and urodynamic findings at 1 month as compared to baseline, percent non-perfused prostate volume, and prostate volume reduction on MRI at 2 weeks. Two patients in the study group and four in the control group were excluded due to arterial pathology. Embolization of bilateral prostate arteries was achieved in all patients in both the groups (100%). There was no complication. The catheter was successfully weaned in 87.5% (14/16) of patients within 14 days in the treatment group. There was no significant difference in patient demographics, prostate characteristics, and all outcome assessment parameters between both the groups. PAE was probably safe and effective in weaning of catheter and relieving obstructive urinary symptoms in patients due to BPH, with treatment outcomes comparable to those without AUR.

  7. Oxidative stress and body composition in prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Sebastiano; Favilla, Vincenzo; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Galvano, Fabio; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Giofrè, Salvatore Vincenzo; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio; DI Rosa, Alessandro; Madonia, Massimo; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the role of body composition and oxidative stress measured by total thiol groups (TTG) levels in prostate specimens of patients affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or prostate cancer (PCa). From January 2011 to January 2013, a cohort of 150 consecutive male patients who underwent first prostate biopsy were enrolled. Twelve-core needle biopsy was performed as standard procedure, while twelve more needle tissue cores matched with the previous group were also collected for glutathione determination. After definitive diagnosis, measurement of glutathione was performed in the correspondent one matched prostatic sample where PCa or BPH were identified. A day after the prostatic biopsy, body composition was estimated by air plethysmography (BOD POD®). A significant difference of TTG was observed in BPH and PCa patients; 34 nanomole (nmol) reagent sulfihydrylc (RSH)/ mg protein vs. 1.1 nmol RSH/ mg protein respectively (p<0.05). In BPH patients, a negative correlation was found between TTG and age (r=-0.46; p<0.05), while, in PCa patients, a positive correlation was observed between TTG and fat mass (FM) (r=0.76; p<0.01) and waist circumference (WC) (r=0.49; p<0.05). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed TTG to be negatively associated with age (β-coefficient=-0.4; p<0.05) in BPH patients and positively with FM (β-coefficient=3.4; p<0.01) and WC (β-coefficient=2.7; p<0.05) in PCa patients. Aging determines a progressive reduction of TTG in BPH patients, while in PCa subjects glutathione concentrations are significantly lower and FM and WC are associated with an unbalance of its levels. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of MENT on primary cell cultures from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Patricia; Sánchez, Catherine; Contreras, Héctor R; Vergara, Jorge; Acevedo, Cristian; Cabezas, Juan; Huidobro, Christian; Noé, Gabriela; Castellón, Enrique A

    2009-12-01

    7-alpha-Methyl-19-Nortestosterone (MENT) is a synthetic androgen more potent than testosterone (T) and cannot be reduced at 5-alpha position. No important effects of MENT on prostate growth have been reported. However, little is known about the effect of MENT on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or prostate carcinoma (CaP). We evaluate the effect of MENT, T and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on secretion, proliferation and gene expression of primary cell cultures from human BPH and CaP. Moreover, the effect of these androgens was examined in the presence of finasteride to determine the influence of the 5-alpha reductase (5-AR) activity on the androgenic potency. BPH and CaP primary cultures were treated with 0, 1, 10 and 100 nM of T, MENT or DHT during 24 and 48 h. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was measured by micro particles immunoassay and proliferation rate by spectrophotometric assay (MTT) and by the immunochemical detection of the proliferation marker Ki-67. Gene expression of FGF8b (androgen sensitive gene) was evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed that MENT treatments increased PSA secretion and proliferation rate with a potency ranged between T and DHT. Similar effects of MENT were observed in both BPH and CaP cultures. The studies with finasteride showed that in BPH and CaP cells, the conversion of T into DHT significantly contributes to its effect on the proliferation and PSA secretion, and corroborated the resistance of MENT to the 5-AR. The effect of MENT on the gene expression of FGF8b in CaP cells was similar to T and lower than DHT. It is concluded that MENT increases proliferative and secretory activities and gene expression on pathological prostate cells although in less extent than the active metabolite DHT. Furthermore, the fall of endogenous concentration of T during MENT treatment anticipates that this androgen will be of low impact for the prostate.

  9. Intravesical prostatic protrusion is a risk factor for bladder stone in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Hong Seok; Cheon, Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Moon, Du Geon

    2014-11-01

    To assess the risk factor that influences bladder stone formation in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We reviewed the data of 271 consecutive patients with BPH who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate between January 2008 and December 2012. Patients were classified into 2 groups based on the presence of a bladder stone: Group 1 had a bladder stone and group 2 did not. Univariate analysis was performed to determine the association between the presence of bladder stone and the patients' age, body mass index, International Prostate Symptom Score, total prostate volume (TPV), transitional zone volume, intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP), uroflow parameters, and urodynamic parameters. The overall rate of bladder stone in patients with BPH was 9.9%. The patients' body mass index, International Prostate Symptom Score, and urodynamic parameters did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. The patients' age, TPV, transitional zone volume, and IPP were all significantly higher and the Qmax was significantly lower in group 1 than that in group 2. Multivariate analysis revealed that age (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.089; P = .020), IPP (HR = 1.145; P <.001), and Qmax (HR = 0.866; P = .019) significantly affected the presence of bladder stone in patients with BPH. A predictive model using logistic regression for bladder stone in BPH patients was defined as follows: probability = 1/[1 + exp (-8.499 + 0.085 (age) + 0.009 (TPV) + 0.136 (IPP) - 0.143 (Qmax))] with area under the curve of 0.850 obtained from the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. This study demonstrated that older age, longer IPP, and lower Qmax are independent factors that associated with the presence of bladder stone in patients with BPH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic Determinants of Metabolism and Benign Prostate Enlargement: Associations with Prostate Volume.

    PubMed

    Giri, Ayush; Edwards, Todd L; Motley, Saundra S; Byerly, Susan H; Fowke, Jay H

    2015-01-01

    Prostate enlargement leading to clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and obesity. The genetic basis of this association is unclear. Our objective was to evaluate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with metabolic disorders are also associated with prostate volume (PV). Participants included 876 men referred for prostate biopsy and found to be prostate cancer free. PV was measured by transrectal ultrasound. Samples were genotyped using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip platform. Multivariable adjusted linear regression models were used to evaluate SNPs (additive coding) in relation to natural-log transformed (log) PV. We compared SNP-PV results from biopsy-negative men to 442 men with low-grade prostate cancer with similar levels of obesity and PV. Beta-coefficients from the discovery and replication samples were then aggregated with fixed effects inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. SNP rs11736129 (near the pseudo-gene LOC100131429) was significantly associated with log-PV (beta: 0.16, p-value 1.16x10(-8)) after adjusting for multiple testing. Other noteworthy SNPs that were nominally associated (p-value < 1x10(-4)) with log-PV included rs9583484 (intronic SNP in COL4A2), rs10146527 (intronic SNP in NRXN3), rs9909466 (SNP near RPL32P31), and rs2241606 (synonymous SNP in SLC12A7). We found several SNPs in metabolic loci associated with PV. Further studies are needed to confirm our results and elucidate the mechanism between these genetic loci, PV, and clinical BPH.

  11. Prostatic Artery Embolization as a Primary Treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Preliminary Results in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Antunes, Alberto Azoubel; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Mauricio da; Oliveira Cerri, Luciana Mendes de; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Marcelino, Antonio Sergio Zafred; Freire, Geraldo Campos; Moreira, Airton Mota; Srougi, Miguel; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-04-15

    Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) typically occurs in the sixth and seventh decades, and the most frequent obstructive urinary symptoms are hesitancy, decreased urinary stream, sensation of incomplete emptying, nocturia, frequency, and urgency. Various medications, specifically 5-{alpha}-reductase inhibitors and selective {alpha}-blockers, can decrease the severity of the symptoms secondary to BPH, but prostatectomy is still considered to be the traditional method of management. We report the preliminary results for two patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH, successfully treated by prostate artery embolization (PAE). The patients were investigated using the International Prostate Symptom Score, by digital rectal examination, urodynamic testing, prostate biopsy, transrectal ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine volume complemented the investigation at 30, 90, and 180 days after PAE. The procedure was performed under local anesthesia; embolization of the prostate arteries was performed with a microcatheter and 300- to 500-{mu}m microspheres using complete stasis as the end point. One patient was subjected to bilateral PAE and the other to unilateral PAE; they urinated spontaneously after removal of the urethral catheter, 15 and 10 days after the procedure, respectively. At 6-month follow-up, US and MRI revealed a prostate reduction of 39.7% and 47.8%, respectively, for the bilateral PAE and 25.5 and 27.8%, respectively, for the patient submitted to unilateral PAE. The early results, at 6-month follow-up, for the two patients with BPH show a promising potential alternative for treatment with PAE.

  12. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a paradigm shift in benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Holmium laser enucleation (HoLEP) was developed in the 1990s as a more efficient and cost effective method of benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery than laser vaporization and resection techniques. As a true anatomical enucleation it mimics open prostatectomy and is as durable. There is a significant body of level 1 evidence in support of HoLEP, including 2 meta-analyses and 14 randomized trials which compare HoLEP with a number of other procedures. This review describes the development of and summarizes the evidence for HoLEP. PMID:24082919

  13. Benign Conditions That Mimic Prostate Carcinoma: MR Imaging Features with Histopathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kitzing, Yu Xuan; Prando, Adilson; Varol, Celi; Karczmar, Gregory S; Maclean, Fiona; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging combines anatomic and functional imaging techniques for evaluating the prostate and is increasingly being used in diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. A wide spectrum of anatomic and pathologic processes in the prostate may masquerade as prostate cancer, complicating the imaging interpretation. The histopathologic and imaging findings of these potential mimics are reviewed. These entities include the anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, central zone, periprostatic vein, periprostatic lymph nodes, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), atrophy, necrosis, calcification, hemorrhage, and prostatitis. An understanding of the prostate zonal anatomy is helpful in distinguishing the anatomic entities from prostate cancer. The anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, and central zone are characteristic anatomic features of the prostate with associated low T2 signal intensity due to dense fibromuscular tissue or complex crowded glandular tissue. BPH, atrophy, necrosis, calcification, and hemorrhage all have characteristic features with one or more individual multiparametric MR imaging modalities. Prostatitis constitutes a heterogeneous group of infective and inflammatory conditions including acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis, infective and noninfective granulomatous prostatitis, and malacoplakia. These entities are associated with variable clinical manifestations and are characterized by the histologic hallmark of marked inflammatory cellular infiltration. In some cases, these entities are indistinguishable from prostate cancer at multiparametric MR imaging and may even exhibit extraprostatic extension and lymphadenopathy, mimicking locally advanced prostate cancer. It is important for the radiologists interpreting prostate MR images to be aware of these pitfalls for accurate interpretation. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015.

  14. Benign Conditions That Mimic Prostate Carcinoma: MR Imaging Features with Histopathologic Correlation1

    PubMed Central

    Kitzing, Yu Xuan; Prando, Adilson; Varol, Celi; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Maclean, Fiona; Oto, Aytekin

    2017-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging combines anatomic and functional imaging techniques for evaluating the prostate and is increasingly being used in diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. A wide spectrum of anatomic and pathologic processes in the prostate may masquerade as prostate cancer, complicating the imaging interpretation. The histopathologic and imaging findings of these potential mimics are reviewed. These entities include the anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, central zone, periprostatic vein, periprostatic lymph nodes, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), atrophy, necrosis, calcification, hemorrhage, and prostatitis. An understanding of the prostate zonal anatomy is helpful in distinguishing the anatomic entities from prostate cancer. The anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, and central zone are characteristic anatomic features of the prostate with associated low T2 signal intensity due to dense fibromuscular tissue or complex crowded glandular tissue. BPH, atrophy, necrosis, calcification, and hemorrhage all have characteristic features with one or more individual multiparametric MR imaging modalities. Prostatitis constitutes a heterogeneous group of infective and inflammatory conditions including acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis, infective and noninfective granulomatous prostatitis, and malacoplakia. These entities are associated with variable clinical manifestations and are characterized by the histologic hallmark of marked inflammatory cellular infiltration. In some cases, these entities are indistinguishable from prostate cancer at multiparametric MR imaging and may even exhibit extraprostatic extension and lymphadenopathy, mimicking locally advanced prostate cancer. It is important for the radiologists interpreting prostate MR images to be aware of these pitfalls for accurate interpretation. PMID:26587887

  15. Transurethral enucleation of prostate with button electrode plasmakinetic vaporization for the treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Huang, Jianhua; Wang, Guangchun; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in aged men. In this study, we investigated the efficacy and safety of transurethral enucleation of prostate with button electrode plasmakinetic vaporization for the treatment of BPH. 60 patients diagnosed with BPH who were treated in our hospital from August to December, 2014 by enucleation with button electrode were retrospectively reviewed, and operation time, urinary catheter indwelling time, continuous bladder irrigation time, operation related complications, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life assessment (QOL), perioperative hemoglobin and electrolytes were recorded. All the operations were completed successfully. The operation time and urinary catheter indwelling time were 45.3 ± 16.2 min and 1.72 ± 0.32 d, respectively. During the follow-up, urethral stricture (n = 1), and urinary incontinence (n = 2) were found with recovery after 1-month training. Postoperative PVR at 1, 3 and 6 months significantly decreased compared with preoperative ones (P < 0.05). IPSS, Qmax, QOL at 1, 3 and 6 months improved significantly (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in serum hemoglobin, sodium and potassium before and after the operation. Thus, the study proved that enucleation of prostate with button electrode was efficient and safe, which was worth being recommended. PMID:28008957

  16. Potential efficacy of some african plants in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giorgio I; Cimino, Sebastiano; Salamone, Costanza; Madonia, Massimo; Favilla, Vincenzo; Castelli, Tommaso; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Traditional medicine is very popular in Africa and it is considered as an alternative form of health care. Plants and vegetables used in folk and traditional medicine have gained wide acceptance as one of the main sources of prophylactic and chemopreventive drug discovery and this is due to the evidence of particular biological and biochemical characteristics of each plants extracts. The role of these compounds in urological field may be explained by the antiinflammatory effect through interference with prostaglandin metabolism, alteration of lipid peroxidation, direct inhibition of prostate growth and moreover through an antiandrogenic or antiestrogenic effect and a decrease of the availability of sex hormone-binding globulin. Since Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer are two of the most diffuse diseases of aging male and considering that standard medical therapy is accompanied with different side effects, the emerging use of African plants may be justified. This review takes a look at some African plants extracts properties and their relative urological application. Different biomolecular mechanisms of action are promising, suggesting a real application in reducing prostate cells proliferation.

  17. Role of GPR30 in estrogen-induced prostate epithelial apoptosis and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Liang; Xu, Jia-Wen; Zhu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Lin; Xu, Jian-Bang; Sun, Qing; Cao, Xiao-Nian; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Xu, Ruo-Shui; Huang, Jie-Hong; Jiang, Fu-Neng; Zhuo, Yang-Jia; Xiao, Bai-Quan; Liu, Yun-Zhong; Yuan, Dong-Bo; Sun, Zhao-Lin; He, Hui-Chan; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhong, Wei-De; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2017-06-03

    Several studies have implicated estrogen and the estrogen receptor (ER) in the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated that estrogen (17β-estradiol, or E2)-induced activation of the G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) triggered Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum, increased the mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, and thus induced prostate epithelial cell (PEC) apoptosis. Both E2 and the GPR30-specific agonist G1 induced a transient intracellular Ca(2+) release in PECs via the phospholipase C (PLC)-inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate (IP3) pathway, and this was abolished by treatment with the GPR30 antagonist G15. The release of cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3 in response to GPR30 activation were observed. Data generated from the analysis of animal models and human clinical samples indicate that treatment with the GPR30 agonist relieves testosterone propionate (TP)-induced prostatic epithelial hyperplasia, and that the abundance of GPR30 is negatively associated with prostate volume. On the basis of these results, we propose a novel regulatory mechanism whereby estrogen induces the apoptosis of PECs via GPR30 activation. Inhibition of this activation is predicted to lead to abnormal PEC accumulation, and to thereby contribute to BPH pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sex Steroid Metabolism in Benign and Malignant Intact Prostate Biopsies: Individual Profiling of Prostate Intracrinology

    PubMed Central

    Gianfrilli, Daniele; Pierotti, Silvia; Leonardo, Costantino; Ciccariello, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    In vitro studies reveal that androgens, oestrogens, and their metabolites play a crucial role in prostate homeostasis. Most of the studies evaluated intraprostatic hormone metabolism using cell lines or preprocessed specimens. Using an ex vivo model of intact tissue cultures with preserved architecture, we characterized the enzymatic profile of biopsies from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or cancer (PC), focusing on 17β-hydroxy-steroid-dehydrogenases (17β-HSDs) and aromatase activities. Samples from 26 men who underwent prostate needle core biopsies (BPH n = 14; PC n = 12) were incubated with radiolabeled 3H-testosterone or 3H-androstenedione. Conversion was evaluated by TLC separation and beta-scanning of extracted supernatants. We identified three major patterns of conversion. The majority of BPHs revealed no active testosterone/oestradiol conversion as opposed to prostate cancer. Conversion correlated with histology and PSA, but not circulating hormones. Highest Gleason scores had a higher androstenedion-to-testosterone conversion and expression of 17β-HSD-isoenzymes-3/5. Conclusions. We developed an easy tool to profile individual intraprostatic enzymatic activity by characterizing conversion pathways in an intact tissue environment. In fresh biopsies we found that 17β-HSD-isoenzymes and aromatase activities correlate with biological behaviour allowing for morphofunctional phenotyping of pathology specimens and clinical monitoring of novel enzyme-targeting drugs. PMID:25184140

  19. Relationship Between Second to Fourth Digit Ratios and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Aging Men

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, Hanumanthaiah Honnamachanahalli; Madhusudhana, Heragu Rangegowda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common prostate disease, characterized by benign enlargement of the prostate gland in aging men. Testosterone is said to be the major factor in development of BPH. The relative length of 2nd and 4th digit (2D:4D) is a marker for prenatal androgen exposure. A low 2D:4D ratio is associated with a high prenatal androgen exposure. The main objective of this study was to assess the causal relationship between the 2D:4D ratio and incidence of BPH. Materials and Methods Thirty five patients with BPH were compared with 35 non BPH subjects and 35 controls recruited from general population for measures of 2D:4D ratio. BPH status was determined by clinical & radiological evaluation. Both hands of all the participants were scanned and their second and fourth digit lengths were measured and the ratio calculated. Results In the present study, 2D:4D ratio was lower in BPH patients compared to non BPH subjects in both hands. Compared with controls, BPH patients had lower 2D:4D ratio in the right hand, but the difference between the groups in left hand 2D:4D ratios was not significant. Compared with controls, non BPH subjects had higher 2D:4D ratio in the left hand, but the difference between the groups in right hand 2D:4D ratios was not significant. Conclusion Results of the present study indicate that individuals with lower 2D:4D ratios are at a higher risk of developing BPH and those with higher 2D:4D ratios are at a lower risk of developing BPH compared to the general population. PMID:26155515

  20. Localization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in the human prostate: pathological expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nassis, L; Frauman, A G; Ohishi, M; Zhuo, J; Casley, D J; Johnston, C I; Fabiani, M E

    2001-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common hyperplastic disease in man and it is characterized by increased cellular growth (stromal and epithelial hyperplasia) and enhanced local sympathetic tone, both of which are known to be augmented by activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in other tissues. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is an integral component of the RAS that is responsible for the production of the active peptide angiotensin II from the inactive precursor angiotensin I. The present study was undertaken to map the anatomical localization of ACE protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in the normal human prostate and to establish whether their expression is pathologically altered in BPH. Human prostate samples were obtained at post-mortem and histologically defined as normal or hyperplastic. ACE protein binding/expression was determined by in vitro autoradiography and immunohistochemistry using the ACE-specific radioligand [125I]-MK351A and a mouse anti-ACE polyclonal antibody, respectively, whereas the spatiotemporal distribution of ACE mRNA was determined by in situ hybridization using 35S-labelled oligonucleotide probes. ACE protein was localized to the glandular epithelium in the human prostate. ACE binding and immunostaining were increased in BPH compared with normal (non-hyperplastic) prostate specimens [X-ray film autoradiography: normal 873+/-48 dpm/mm2 (n=8) vs. BPH 1631+/-274 dpm/mm2 (n=6), p<0.05; emulsion autoradiography: normal 3.1+/-0.5 grains/mm2 (n=6) vs. BPH 32.8+/-8.6 grains/mm2 (n=5), p<0.01]. ACE mRNA was also localized to glandular epithelial cells in the human prostate with a significant increase in ACE mRNA expression in BPH compared with the normal prostate [normal 11.04+/-2.03 grains/cell (n=220 cells total) vs. BPH 22.29+/-1.34 grains/cell (n=198 cells total), p<0.05]. The findings of the present study suggest that ACE is localized to the glandular epithelium of the human prostate and that its

  1. Amelioration of testosterone induced benign prostatic hyperplasia by Prunus species.

    PubMed

    Jena, Ashish Kumar; Vasisht, Karan; Sharma, Neetika; Kaur, Ramdeep; Dhingra, Mamta Sachdeva; Karan, Maninder

    2016-08-22

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common urological disorder of men. The ethnomedicinal use of an African plant Prunus africana (Hook.f.) Kalkman (Pygeum) in treating men's problems made it a popular remedy all over the globe for the treatment of BPH and related disorders. However, rampant collections made from the wild in Africa have pushed the plant to Appendix II of CITES demanding conservation of the species. In the present study, the aim was to unearth the protective effect of bark of different species of Prunus against BPH. The five selected Indian plants of family Rosaceae viz. Prunus amygdalus Stokes, Prunus armeniaca L., Prunus cerasoides Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don, Prunus domestica L. and Prunus persica (L.) Batsch were evaluated against P. africana (Hook.f.) Kalkman for a suitable comparison of efficacy as antiBPH agents. The antiBPH activity was evaluated in testosterone (2mg/kg/day, s.c, 21 days) induced BPH in Wistar rats. The parameters studied were body weights; histopathological examination, immunohistochemistry (PCNA) and biochemical estimations of the prostate; supported by prostatic index, testicular index, creatinine, testosterone levels; antioxidant and anti-inflammatory evaluation. The study also included chemical profiling using three markers (β-sitosterol, docosyl ferulate and ursolic acid) and estimation of β-sitosterol content through GC. The Prunus species showed the presence of all the three markers in their TLC fingerprint profile and maximum amount of β-sitosterol by GC was observed in P. domestica. Interestingly, all the species exhibited significant amelioration in testosterone induced parameters with P. domestica showing the most encouraging effect as indicated from histopathological examination, immunohistochemistry and biochemical studies. The Prunus species further showed remarkable anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity signifying their role in interfering with various possible factors involved in BPH. These findings are

  2. [Dutasteride (Avodart): a novel 5-alpha reductase inhibitor for treatment of benign prostate hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Vanden Bossche, M; Sternon, J

    2005-01-01

    Dutasteride (Avodart), a novel dual 5-alpha reductase inhibitor is effective for the treatment of benign prostate hypertrophy, of more than 30 cc because the reduction of the level of dihydrotestosterone. By reducing prostatic volume, dutasteride improves moderate to severe symptoms and flow rate. It allows a reduction of disease progression by reducing the rate of acute urinary retention and need for surgery.

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channels were differentially expressed in human normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Dong, Mei; Tang, He; Wang, Na; Zhang, Jin; Yan, Changqing; Jiao, Xiaocui; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Chuan

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are expressed not only in excitable cells but also in numerous metastatic cells, particularly in certain types of cancer cells. In some types of cancer, including prostate cancer, the expression of VGSCs is associated with cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. However, the detailed expression profiles of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic cancer remain controversial. In the present study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to systematically detect all subtypes of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer cells. The expression profile of VGSC α subunits was observed to differ between these cell types. Nav1.5 was the major isoform expressed in normal human prostate tissue, while Nav1.5 and Nav1.2 were the predominant isoforms in BPH tissue. However, in PC-3 and LNCaP cells, two typical prostate cancer cell lines, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were abundantly expressed. By comparing the relative expression levels of Nav1.5, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 in these cells, the mRNA levels of Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were identified to be 6- to 27-fold higher in PC-3 and LNCaP cells than in either normal or BPH samples (P<0.05); however, Nav1.5 mRNA levels were relatively lower compared with those of Nav1.6 or Nav1.7 in all cells analyzed. To confirm whether Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 expression in cancer cells was functional, a patch-clamp technique was used to record whole-cell currents. A tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current was successfully recorded in PC-3 cells, but not in LNCaP cells. It was concluded that although all types of VGSC α subunits exhibited low expression levels in normal prostate and BPH cells, both Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were significantly upregulated in the prostate cancer cell lines, suggesting these subtypes may be potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for certain types of prostate cancer in humans.

  4. Thulium laser vaporesection versus transurethral electrovaporization of the prostate in high-risk patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaowei; Shen, Zhoujun; Tu, Fanzhuo; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Fukang; Shao, Yuan; Wang, Haofei; Zhong, Shan; Xu, Chen

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of the thulium laser vaporesection and transurethral electrovaporization of the prostate for the treatment of high-risk patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. From September 2009 to March 2011, 98 consecutive patients with symptomatic bladder outlet obstruction caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia received either thulium laser vaporesection of the prostate (n=42) or transurethral electrovaporization of the prostate (n=56) at our institution. Functional follow-up included measurement of International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life score, maximal urinary flow rate, and post-voiding residual urine volume. All complications were recorded. Thulium laser vaporesection of the prostate was slightly superior to transurethral electrovaporization of the prostate in catheterization time (2.1±0.9 vs. 4.5±1.3 days, p<0.0001) and postoperative hospital stay (4.4±1.8 vs. 6.6±2.0 days, p<0.0001). Within the observation period, both groups had a significant improvement from baseline in subjective or objective success rates; however, no significant difference was found between the two groups. Peri- and postoperative complications were fewer in the thulium laser group. Thulium laser vaporesection of the prostate is as effective as transurethral electrovaporization of the prostate in managing high-risk patients, with sufficient tissue ablation and acceptable hemostasis, and has the advantage of less morbidity and shorter catheter time and postoperative hospital stay.

  5. Emerging drugs for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dominique; Chughtai, Bilal; Kini, Mitali; Te, Alexis

    2017-09-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition affecting over 50% of men as they reach their 5(th) decade of life. This leads to a number of sequelae such as lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary retention and a decrease in quality of life. Currently, the available treatments for BPH are alpha blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. Clinical studies have demonstrated these medical options are effective in alleviating a patient's symptoms, however there are a number of side effects. There is a paucity of information regarding long-term use of these medications. The purpose of this review is to identify potential and emerging medications for the treatment of BPH. Areas covered: Articles used in this review were retrieved from Pubmed, Google and through searching the PharmaProjects database over the last 10 years, giving the reader an in-depth knowledge about the current pharmacological agents available and other potential treatments for BPH. Expert opinion: The new paradigm of BPH treatment depends on addressing a patient's specific constellation of symptoms. This allows to tailor therapy of increasing efficacy and reduce adverse events that our patients have by increasing dosage.

  6. A comparison of virtual touch tissue quantification and digital rectal examination for discrimination between prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhi; Ji, Ping; Mao, Hongwei; Hu, Jianqun

    2012-03-01

    Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) is a new, promising technique for detecting the stiffness of tissues. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of VTTQ and digital rectal examination (DRE) in discrimination between prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). VTTQ was performed in 209 prostate nodular lesions of 107 patients with BPH and suspected prostate cancer before the prostate histopathologic examination. The shear wave velocity (SWV) at each nodular lesion was quantified by implementing an acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI). The performance of VTTQ and DRE in discrimination between prostate cancer and BPH was compared. The diagnostic value of VTTQ and DRE for prostate cancer was evaluated in terms of the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy. Prostate cancer was detected in 57 prostate nodular lesions by histopathologic examination. The SWV values (m/s) were significantly greater in prostate cancer and BPH than in normal prostate (2.37 ± 0.94, 1.98 ± 0.82 vs. 1.34 ± 0.47). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for VTTQ (SWV>2.5m/s) to differentiate prostate nodules as benign hyperplasia or malignancy was 0.86, while it was 0.67 for DRE. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 71.93 %, 87.5 %, 68.33 %, 89.26 %, 83.25 %, respectively for VTTQ (SWV>2.5m/s), whereas they were 33.33 %, 81.57 %, 40.43 %, 76.54 %, 68.42 % respectively for DRE. VTTQ can effectively detect the stiffness of prostate nodular lesions, which has a significantly higher performance than DRE in discrimination between prostate cancer and BPH.

  7. Five-year outcomes of thulium vapoenucleation of the prostate for symptomatic benign prostatic obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gross, A J; Orywal, A K; Becker, B; Netsch, C

    2017-04-12

    To assess the 5-year outcomes of thulium vapoenucleation of the prostate (ThuVEP) in patients with benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) retrospectively. Five-hundred patients were treated with ThuVEP between January 2007 and January 2010 at our institution. Patients were reassessed 1 and 5-years after ThuVEP with International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Quality of Life (QoL), urinary peak flow (Qmax), postvoid residual volume (PVR), PSA and prostate volume. Patient data were expressed as median (interquartile range). One-hundred and thirty-one patients completed the 5-year follow-up. According to preoperative prostate volume, patients were divided into two groups: group A (<60 ml, n = 80) and B (≥60 ml, n = 51). IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR improved significantly at discharge and continued to do so during 5-year follow-up (p ≤ 0.001). At 1-year follow-up, prostate volume had decreased significantly (50 vs. 13 mL, p < 0.001) corresponding to a prostate volume reduction of 80.8%. PSA was significantly reduced at 5-year (0.72 µg/l) follow-up compared to preoperative PSA (3.39 µg/l, p ≤ 0.001). PSA-reduction (total 77.1%) at 5-year follow-up was significantly different between group A (70.2%) and B (83.5%) (p ≤ 0.006). IPSS was significantly lower in group B than in A (2.5 vs. 6, p < 0.001) at 5-year follow-up. Bladder neck contractures (n = 4) and urethral strictures (n = 4) occurred in 3.1% of the patients each. Three patients (2.3%) were re-treated for regrowth of prostatic tissue. ThuVEP is a durable procedure with regard to micturition improvement and PSA-reduction. The reintervention rate after ThuVEP was low during long-term follow-up.

  8. A risk-benefit assessment of treatment with finasteride in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Ekman, P

    1998-03-01

    As an androgen target organ, the prostate gland has the almost unique characteristic of being less sensitive to testosterone than to its metabolite 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT). The conversion of testosterone to 5 alpha-DHT is induced by the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase. By blocking the activity of 5 alpha-reductase, the androgenic stimulation of the prostate gland can be significantly reduced. The first drug with such capacity to be introduced on the market was finasteride. Following the administration of this drug to men, serum 5 alpha-DHT levels were reduced by approximately 80%. Large phase III trials have demonstrated the efficacy of finasteride in treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). While in some patients the drug was poorly effective, other patients showed significant improvements. The mean reduction in size of the prostate gland was 20 to 25% after 6 months of therapy, and this effect was maintained as long as the patient was on the drug, at least up to the end of a 6-year follow-up period. Prostatic symptom scores were improved by a mean of 30%, while urinary flow was only improved by a mean of 1.5 ml/sec (15%). In a recent double-blind, placebo-controlled study comparing the alpha-blocker terazosin with finasteride, significant improvement was demonstrated for the alpha-blocker, while finasteride produced little improvement overall and was not significantly more effective than placebo in treating moderately symptomatic BPH. However, a subanalysis of this study showed that while finasteride was poorly effective in patients with small prostate glands, a significant improvement was apparent in those with glands larger than 40 ml. There is some evidence that early intervention with finasteride can reduce the number of surgical procedures that are required, at least over a 2-year period. Finasteride is very well tolerated. However, since 5 alpha-DHT potentiates erectile capacity, a 3 to 4% incidence of impotence has been reported, as well as

  9. Hi-tech of the prostate: interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf; Hofstetter, Alfons G.; Hessel, Stefan F. F.; Keiditsch, Ernst; Rothenberger, Karl-Heinz; Schneede, Peter; Frank, Klaus H.

    1992-06-01

    We report on the new technique of interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate (ILCP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Basic experiments by use of a Nd:YAG laser in combination with a newly designed fiber tip homogeneously distributing the laser irradiation have been performed in potato, muscle, liver, and surgically removed human BPH-tissue to determine the volume of coagulation. The coagulation zone surrounding the probe was well defined and homogeneous. The size was dependent on laser power and irradiation time. Carbonization was never present except in darker tissues irradiated with high energy. Volume and time resolved measurements correlated well with the size of coagulation. 10 W and 5 minutes, for example, resulted in a coagulation zone of 17 X 15 mm. Comparable results have been seen in in-vivo experiments in surgically exposed canine prostates. Specimen for macroscopic and microscopic examination were taken immediately after treatment and after 5 and 35 days. The well demarked coagulation necrosis of the early stage resulted in cystic degeneration and fibrosis in the later stages. This was combined with shrinkage and reduction in volume. The urothelium of the urethra, the external sphincter and the rectum showed no damage. Until now, 15 patients suffering from obstructive symptoms due to BPH have been treated with interstitial laser coagulation. The probes were inserted from the perineum into the center of each lateral lobe of the prostate by transrectal ultrasound guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic control. Dependent on the size of the prostate irradiation, time was 5 to 10 minutes per lobe at a power setting of 5 to 10 W.

  10. Bipolar Button Transurethral Enucleation of Prostate in Benign Prostate Hypertrophy Treatment: A New Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Giulianelli, Roberto; Gentile, Barbara; Albanesi, Luca; Tariciotti, Paola; Mirabile, Gabriella

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transurethral bipolar enucleation with a button electrode (B-TUEP) for the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Between July 2011 and March 2012, a single surgeon performed 50 B-TUEP. Preoperative and postoperative assessments included prostate-specific antigen, International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5), quality of life (QoL) index, uroflowmetry with postvoiding residual (PVR) urinary volume, and prostate volume measured by transrectal ultrasonography. Intraoperatively, we evaluated B-TUEP time (enucleation and resection time). Perioperatively, we evaluated hemoglobin dosage, bladder irrigation time, catheterization time, acute urinary retention events, length of stay, patient readmission, and any endoscopic retreatments. Three months after surgery, 82% of the patients presented a significant improvement in maximum urine flow (Qmax; P <.001). At 6 and 12 months, 80% and 83.3% of patients maintained the significant improvement (P <.001). The secondary end points IPSS, QoL, IIEF-5, and PVR presented a statistically significant improvement compared with baseline values. No significant change in hemoglobin values was observed before and after surgery. Bladder irrigation time was comprised between 24 and 36 hours for about 80% of patients. In one case, second-look hemostatic endoscopy was needed. Length of stay after surgery was <48 hours in 88% of cases. Readmission was required for 6% of patients for hematuria, and 6 months later, 2 other patients developed bladder neck contracture treated with transurethral incision of the prostate. B-TUEP using the Gyrus PK system is a rapid and safety technique with optimal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcomes of transurethral resection of the prostate in benign prostatic hyperplasia comparing prostate size of more than 80 grams to prostate size less than 80 grams.

    PubMed

    Joshi, H N; De Jong, I J; Karmacharya, R M; Shrestha, B; Shrestha, R

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a condition occurring in elderly men in which the prostate gland is enlarged, hence the condition also known as benign enlargement of prostate. Benign hyperplasia can lead to both obstructive and irritative symptoms. Transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) still remains the gold standard modality of surgical treatment of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms due to Benign hyperplasia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of TURP in large prostate (>80 grams) in comparison to small prostate (<80 grams) in terms of efficacy, safety and complications. A total of 65 cases included in this prospective study, which were operated by a single surgeon with conventional monopolar TURP using standard technique. Intra -operative and post-operative complications, pre and post- operative quality of life (QoL) and international prostate symptom score (IPSS), operative time, time to removal of catheter and hospital stay were evaluated between small and large prostate gland volumes. Out of 65 cases, 30 were with large prostate size i.e. 80 grams or more (group 1), and 35 cases were with small prostate size than 80 grams size (group 2). Mean age was 71.8 SD ± 6.9 years in group 1 and 68.2 SD ± 12.7 years in group 2. The mean preoperative volume of prostate was 88.8 grams (range 80-115 grams) in group 1 and 40.3 (range 20-65 grams) in group 2. The mean preoperative post void residual volume of urine (PVRU) was 244 ml SD ± 190.8 ml in group 1 and 117 ml ± 70.3 ml in group 2. Mean resection time in group 1 was 110 (range 90-130) minutes and in group 2 it was 90 minutes (range 55-115) minutes. There were quite satisfactory improvements in IPSS and QoL. No significant complications were observed except TUR syndrome in 2 cases from group 2, which were managed well in postoperative period. With meticulous resection and intra-operative haemostasis using continuous out flow resectoscope, conventional monopolar TURP is equally safe

  12. Clinical evaluation of prostate cancer gene 3 score in diagnosis among Chinese men with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Reilly, Kathleen H; Zhang, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common diagnosed cancer in men. Due to the low specificity of current diagnosis methods for detecting prostate cancer, identification of new biomarkers is highly desirable. The study was conducted to determine the clinical utility of the prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) assay to predict biopsy-detected cancers in Chinese men. The study included men who had a biopsy at The Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiao Tong University from January 2013 to December 2013. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were used to test PCA3 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) mRNA. The diagnostic accuracy of the PCA3 score for predicting a positive biopsy outcome was studied using sensitivity and specificity, and it was compared with PSA. The probability of a positive biopsy increased with increasing PCA3 scores. The mean PCA3 score was significantly higher in men with prostate cancer (198.03, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 74.79-321.27) vs benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) (84.31, 95 % CI 6.47-162.15, P < 0.01). The PCA3 score (cutoff 35) had a sensitivity of 85.7 % and specificity of 62.5 %. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed higher areas under the ROC curve for the PCA3 score vs PSA, but without statistical significance. Increased PCA3 in biopsy tissue correlated with prostate cancer and the PCA3 assay may improve the diagnosis efficacy as the PCA3 score being independent of PSA level. The diagnostic significance of urinary PCA3 testing should be explored in future study to determine the prediction value in guiding biopsy decision as the clinical relevance of current study was limited for PCA3 testing based on biopsy tissue in a limited number of Chinese men.

  13. Pulsed electromagnetic field with or without exercise therapy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Elgohary, Hany M; Tantawy, Sayed A

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field with or without exercise therapy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty male patients aged 55-65 years with benign prostatic hyperplasia were invited to participate in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to Group A (n=20; patients who received pulsed electromagnetic field in addition to pelvic floor and aerobic exercises), Group B (n=20; patients who received pulsed electromagnetic field), and Group C (n=20; patients who received placebo electromagnetic field). The assessments included post-void residual urine, urine flow rate, prostate specific antigen, white blood cells count, and International Prostate Symptom Score were weighed, before and after a 4-week intervention. [Results] There were significant differences in Group A and B in all parameters. Group C showed non-significant differences in all measured variables except for International Prostate Symptom Score. Among groups, all parameters showed highly significant differences in favor of Group A. There were non-significant differences between Group A and B and significant difference between Groups A and C and between Groups B and C. [Conclusion] The present study demonstrated that electromagnetic field had a significant impact on the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Accordingly, electromagnetic field can be utilized alone or in combination with other physiotherapy modalities. Moreover, clinicians should have the capacity to perceive the advantages accomplished using extra treatment alternatives. Electromagnetic field is a safe, noninvasive method and can be used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. Hydrodynamic cavitation kills prostate cells and ablates benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue.

    PubMed

    Itah, Zeynep; Oral, Ozlem; Perk, Osman Yavuz; Sesen, Muhsincan; Demir, Ebru; Erbil, Secil; Dogan-Ekici, A Isin; Ekici, Sinan; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2013-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is a physical phenomenon characterized by vaporization and bubble formation in liquids under low local pressures, and their implosion following their release to a higher pressure environment. Collapse of the bubbles releases high energy and may cause damage to exposed surfaces. We recently designed a set-up to exploit the destructive nature of hydrodynamic cavitation for biomedical purposes. We have previously shown that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill leukemia cells and erode kidney stones. In this study, we analyzed the effects of cavitation on prostate cells and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue. We showed that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill prostate cells in a pressure- and time-dependent manner. Cavitation did not lead to programmed cell death, i.e. classical apoptosis or autophagy activation. Following the application of cavitation, we observed no prominent DNA damage and cells did not arrest in the cell cycle. Hence, we concluded that cavitation forces directly damaged the cells, leading to their pulverization. Upon application to BPH tissues from patients, cavitation could lead to a significant level of tissue destruction. Therefore similar to ultrasonic cavitation, we propose that hydrodynamic cavitation has the potential to be exploited and developed as an approach for the ablation of aberrant pathological tissues, including BPH.

  15. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Most Common Types of Prostate Diseases Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) Prostatitis Prostate cancer For men over the ... the prostate disease most often encountered is benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). If you have BPH, your prostate has ...

  16. [Clinical management of patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia in Spain].

    PubMed

    Cozar, J M; Solsona, E; Brenes, F; Fernández-Pro, A; León, F; Molero, J M; Pérez, J F; Rodríguez, M P; Huerta, A; Pérez-Escolano, I

    2011-01-01

    To identify clinical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Spain and its associated health care resources. A qualitative cross-sectional study was conducted through telephone interviews to general practitioners (GP) and urologists. Information about diagnosis, pharmacologic treatment and follow-up was collected. Results were clustered according to the key variables considered as drivers of clinical practice patterns: BPH diagnosis, severity classification, treatment initiation and follow up of patients. 153 GP and 154 urologists participated in the study. 7 different clinical patterns were identified in primary care (PC). Resource use during diagnosis is relatively homogeneous, reporting a range of 2.0 to 2.6 visits employed and being the most frequent test performed PSA and urine test. Follow-up is heterogeneous; frequency of follow-up visits oscillates from 3.2 to 7.0 visits/patient/year and type of tests performed is different among patterns and within the same pattern. In Urology, 3 clinical patterns were identified. Resource use is homogeneous in the diagnosis and in the follow-up; urologists employed 2 visits in diagnosis and a range of 2.1 to 3.2 visits/patient/year in the follow-up. The most frequent tests both in diagnosis and follow-up are PSA and digital test. BPH management shows variability in PC, identifying 7 different clinical practice patterns with different resource use during the follow-up among patterns and within the same pattern. The implementation of clinical guidelines could be justified to reduce heterogeneity. Copyright © 2011 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 2, Insights into the Technical Rationale.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    Rationale of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia is conventionally believed to include two parts: shrinkage of the enlarged prostate gland as a result of PAE-induced ischemic infarction and potential effects to relax the increased prostatic smooth muscle tone by reducing the number and density of α1-adrenergic receptor in the prostate stroma. This review describes new insights into the likely mechanisms behind PAE, such as ischemia-induced apoptosis, apoptosis enhanced by blockage of androgens circulation to the embolized prostate, secondary denervation following PAE, and potential effect of nitric oxide pathway immediately after embolization. Studies on therapeutic mechanisms in PAE may shed light on potentially new treatment strategies and development of novel techniques.

  18. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 2, Insights into the Technical Rationale

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Fei Crisóstomo, Verónica Báez-Díaz, Claudia Sánchez, Francisco M.

    2016-02-15

    Rationale of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia is conventionally believed to include two parts: shrinkage of the enlarged prostate gland as a result of PAE-induced ischemic infarction and potential effects to relax the increased prostatic smooth muscle tone by reducing the number and density of α{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor in the prostate stroma. This review describes new insights into the likely mechanisms behind PAE, such as ischemia-induced apoptosis, apoptosis enhanced by blockage of androgens circulation to the embolized prostate, secondary denervation following PAE, and potential effect of nitric oxide pathway immediately after embolization. Studies on therapeutic mechanisms in PAE may shed light on potentially new treatment strategies and development of novel techniques.

  19. [Six-o'clock tunnel holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a modified procedure for benign prostate hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Gu, Mieng; Cai, Zhi-kang; Chen, Qi; Chen, Yan-bo; Wang, Zhong

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a modified method of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP)--6-o'clock tunnel HoLEP for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We included 112 cases of BPH in this study, 57 treated by 6-o'clock tunnel HoLEP (experimental group) and the other 55 by conventional HoLEP (control group). We compared the operation time, volume of the resected prostatic tissue, intraoperative blood transfusion, volume of bladder irrigation solution, postoperative hemoglobin change, and incidence of urinary incontinence between the two groups. Statistically significant differences were observed between the experimental and control groups in the operation time ([56.01 ± 8.62] min vs [68.65 ± 9.08] min), cases of intraoperative blood transfusion (0 vs 2), volume of bladder irrigation solution ([27.51 ± 3.67] L vs [36.89 ± 6.47] L), postoperative hemoglobin decrease ([10.70 ± 2.50] g/L vs [12.60 ± 3.30] g/L), and cases of postoperative stress-induced urinary incontinence (2 vs 7) (all P <0.05). One-month follow-up revealed smooth urination in both groups of patients but no true urinary incontinence or secondary bleeding in either. Modified 6-o'clock tunnel HoLEP can significantly reduce the operation time, bladder irrigation, and intraoperative bleeding, and therefore can be used as a safe and effective option for the treatment of BPH.

  20. Safety and efficiency of thulium laser prostate resection for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in large prostates.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-bin; Zhuo, Jian; Sun, Xiao-wen; Pang, Kun; Shao, Yi; Liang, Sheng-jie; Cui, Di; Zhao, Fu-jun; Yu, Jun-jie; Xia, Shu-jie

    2014-05-01

    Thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique (TmLRP-TT) dissects whole prostatic lobes off the surgical capsule, similar to peeling a tangerine. The present study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of TmLRP-TT for older symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with large prostates during 18 months of follow-up. A prospective analysis of 95 consecutive patients with large prostates (>80 ml) who underwent surgical treatment using TmLRP-TT was carried out. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 18 months postoperatively by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Q max), postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF-5), urine analysis, and urine culture. Perioperative complications were recorded and graded by the modified Clavien classification system (CCS). Mean preoperative prostate volume was 106.81 ± 24.79 ml. TmLRP-TT was successfully completed in all patients. The mean operative duration, catheterization time, and hospital stay were 95.36 ± 27.06 min, 2.25 ± 0.9 days, and 5.39 ± 1.18 days, respectively. The decrease in mean hemoglobin level was 1.23 ± 0.72 g/dl, and that in mean serum sodium level was 0.71 ± 2.56 mmol/l. Within the observation period of 18 months, the patients showed an improvement in IPSS (20.01 ± 7.08 vs. 4.96 ± 3.68), QoL (4.10 ± 1.16 vs. 1.23 ± 1.30), Q max (8.14 ± 3.81 ml/s vs. 18.33 ± 2.56 ml/s) and PVR (102.70 ± 70.64 ml vs. 20.28 ± 30.02 ml), compared with baseline values (P < 0.001). IIEF-5 remained stable. Minor complications occurred in 10 (10.52 %) of 95 patients (Clavien grade 1, 9.47 % and grade 2, 1.05 %). There were no severe complications requiring reintervention (Clavien grade 3, 0 % and grade 4, 0 %). TmLRP-TT is a safe and effective surgical endoscopic technique associated with a low complication rate in large prostates as assessed during an 18-month follow

  1. Incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania after introduction of the Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme.

    PubMed

    Smailyte, G; Aleknaviciene, B

    2012-12-01

    In Lithuania, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is offered to healthy asymptomatic men as a screening test in the population-based Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme (EPCDP). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of prostate cancer before and after introduction of the EPCDP in Lithuania. Prostate cancer incidence and mortality data from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry were analysed for the period 1990-2008. Age-specific incidence and mortality data were adjusted to the European Standard Population. There have been extraordinary changes in the incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania following introduction of the EPCDP, and there is strong evidence that these changes are the result of increased detection rates, especially in men of screening age. Further observation of changes in prostate cancer incidence and mortality in Lithuania may help to determine the extent to which PSA testing at the population level influences incidence and mortality in the general population.

  2. Differential Gene Expression in Benign Prostate Epithelium of Men with and without Prostate Cancer: Evidence for a Prostate Cancer Field Effect

    PubMed Central

    Risk, Michael C; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Coleman, Ilsa; Dumpit, Ruth F; Kristal, Alan R; LeMeur, Nolwenn; Gentleman, Robert C; True, Lawrence D; Nelson, Peter S; Lin, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Background Several malignancies are known to exhibit a “field-effect” whereby regions beyond tumor boundaries harbor histological or molecular changes that are associated with cancer. We sought to determine if histologically benign prostate epithelium collected from men with prostate cancer exhibits features indicative of pre-malignancy or field effect. Methods Prostate needle biopsies from 15 men with high grade(Gleason 8–10) prostate cancer and 15 age- and BMI-matched controls were identified from a biospecimen repository. Benign epithelia from each patient were isolated by laser capture microdissection. RNA was isolated, amplified, and used for microarray hybridization. Quantitative PCR(qPCR) was used to determine the expression of specific genes of interest. Alterations in protein expression were analyzed through immunohistochemistry. Results Overall patterns of gene expression in microdissected benign-associated benign epithelium (BABE) and cancer-associated benign epithelium (CABE) were similar. Two genes previously associated with prostate cancer, PSMA and SSTR1, were significantly upregulated in the CABE group(FDR <1%). Expression of other prostate cancer-associated genes, including ERG, HOXC4, HOXC5 and MME, were also increased in CABE by qRT-PCR, although other genes commonly altered in prostate cancer were not different between the BABE and CABE samples. The expression of MME and PSMA proteins on IHC coincided with their mRNA alterations. Conclusion Gene expression profiles between benign epithelia of patients with and without prostate cancer are very similar. However, these tissues exhibit differences in the expression levels of several genes previously associated with prostate cancer development or progression. These differences may comprise a field effect and represent early events in carcinogenesis. PMID:20935156

  3. Holmium laser for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: old wine in a new bottle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia affect 70% of men older than 70 years. Complications are common problems and a significant cause of morbidity in this population, placing a considerable burden on health services. In the early 1990s laser treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia became widely used after the introduction of the side-firing neodym: YAG laser. However, because of technical limitations and inferior results compared to classical transurethral resection of the prostate many Urologists became desinterested in this device. With the introduction of the holmium: YAG laser a new laser generation became available for use in Urology. Beside several other applications the holmium: YAG laser can be used for incision, ablation, resection, and more recently enucleation of the prostate. In this paper we reviewed the current literature regarding the holmium: YAG laser resection and enucleation of the prostate compared to transurethral resection of the prostate and open prostatectomy. The holmium: YAG laser technique is an effective and durable surgical alternative to standard transurethral resection of the prostate. Interestingly, enucleation of the prostate with this device seems to be a safe and effective procedure for large prostatic adenomas, it may become an attractive alternative to open prostatectomy.

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor and interleukin-6 in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia: association with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Paul Friedrich; Seklehner, Stephan; Brustmann, Hermann; Lusuardi, Lukas; Riedl, Claus R

    2015-04-01

    This study prospectively investigated the immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and a possible association of these conditions with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis National Institutes of Health (NIH) category IV. The study included 139 consecutive patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and transvesical enucleation of the prostate (n = 82) or radical prostatectomy (n = 57). To characterize inflammatory changes the criteria proposed by Irani et al. [J Urol 1997;157:1301-3] were used. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was studied by a standard immunohistochemical method. Results were correlated with tumour, node, metastasis stage, Gleason scores, total prostate-specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Score and body mass index. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was significantly higher in neoplastic prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue of prostate cancer patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.04, respectively). Prostate cancer patients with prostatitis showed significantly higher IL-2R expression than those without inflammation (p < 0.03). In patients with BPH, expression of IL-2R as well as IL-6 was higher in patients with prostatitis than in those without (p < 0.01 and p < 0.02, respectively). IL-2R and IL-6 expression was significantly higher in prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue. Patients with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV showed significantly greater activity.

  5. Stromal Response to Prostate Cancer: Nanotechnology-Based Detection of Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein Partners Distinguishes Prostate Cancer Associated Stroma from That of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S. Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  6. Stromal response to prostate cancer: nanotechnology-based detection of thioredoxin-interacting protein partners distinguishes prostate cancer associated stroma from that of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  7. [CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF PROSTATE BIOPSY IN PATIENTS RECEIVING DUTASTERIDE FOR BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA].

    PubMed

    Endo, Takumi; Kamiya, Naoto; Yano, Masashi; Oka, Ryo; Lee, Fung Ching; Utsumi, Takanobu; Kamijima, Syuichi; Nishimi, Daisuke; Takanami, Masaharu; Hiruta, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Dutasteride is a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. Dutasteride lowers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, which may lead to delays in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). This study investigated patients who underwent prostate biopsy (PBx) while receiving dutasteride to investigate whether this agent affects the diagnosis and treatment of PCa. PBx was performed on six patients receiving dutasteride for > 3 months at our medical institutions between January 2010 and June 2013. No patients underwent PBx before dutasteride administration. We performed PBx both for patients with high initial PSA levels and for those with elevated PSA levels with or without initial PSA decline after dutasteride administration. We also investigated clinicopathological findings. Mean age at the start of administration was 69.5 ± 5.9 years (range, 59-77 years), mean duration of administration was 14.1 ± 7.4 months (range, 4.0-23.5 months), mean prostate volume at the start of administration was 70.4 ± 30.7 ml (range, 18.8-104.6 ml), and mean PSA level at the start of administration was 7.7 ± 3.3 ng/ml (range, 4.9-14.2 ng/ml). PSA density was 0.098 ± 0.045 ng/ml/cm3 (range, 0.042-0.181 ng/ml/cm3), and PSA level at PBx was 5.4 ± 2.7 ng/ml (range, 2.5-10.7 ng/ml). We detected three PCa patients, and clinical stage in each case was cT1cN0M0. Radical retropubic prostatectomy was performed in two cases, and androgen-deprivation therapy was performed in one case. All PCa were detected in the early clinical stage. No delays in detection or treatment of PCa were seen in any cases. Careful observation of PSA levels is simple and useful for detecting PCa in patients under dutasteride administration.

  8. Effects of silodosin and tamsulosin on the urethra and cardiovascular system in young and old dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Tomiyama, Yoshitaka; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Hoyano, Yuji; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Yamazaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-06-24

    We examined whether the effects (efficacy on the urethra and hypotension) of silodosin (alpha(1A)-adrenoceptor antagonist) and tamsulosin (alpha(1A+1D)-adrenoceptor antagonist) in dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia altered with age. We used young and old dogs, diagnosed as having benign prostatic hyperplasia by veterinarian's palpation. Under anesthesia, the increase in intraurethral pressure evoked by hypogastric nerve stimulation was measured, together with the level of systemic mean blood pressure. Each drug was administered intravenously in progressively increasing doses. At the end of the experiment, the prostate was isolated from each dog, then weighed and investigated pathologically to confirm benign prostatic hyperplasia. The wet weight of the prostate was greater in old dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia than in young dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia. By light microscopy, hyperplasia in the prostatic epithelium was confirmed in both groups. Silodosin (0.3-300 microg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited the hypogastric nerve stimulation-induced increase in intraurethral pressure (without significant hypotensive effects) in both young and old dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Tamsulosin (0.3-300 microg/kg) also dose-dependently inhibited the intraurethral pressure increase in both groups, but it had a hypotensive effect that was significantly greater in old than in young dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia. In conclusion, as regards the effect of silodosin on intraurethral pressure, potency was similar between young and old dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia, and it was without significant hypotensive effects. We therefore suggest that silodosin might be a good medication for lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia in all age groups.

  9. Clinical decision support system for early detection of prostate cancer from benign hyperplasia of prostate.

    PubMed

    Ghaderzadeh, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    There has been a growing research interest in the use of intelligent methods in medical informatics studies. Intelligent computer programs were implemented to aid physicians and other medical professionals in making difficult medical decisions. Prostate Neoplasia problems including benign hyperplasia and cancer of prostate are very common and cause significant delay in recovery and often require costly investigations before coming to its diagnosis. The conventional approach to build medical diagnostic system requires the formulation of rules by which the input data can be analyzed. But the formulation of such rules is very difficult with large sets of input data. Realizing the difficulty, a number of quantitative mathematical and statistical models including pattern classification technique such as Artificial neural networks (ANN), rolled based system, discriminate analysis and regression analysis has been applied as an alternative to conventional clinical and medical diagnostic. Among the mathematical and statistical modeling techniques used in medical decision support, Artificial neural networks attract many attentions in recent studies and in the last decade, the use of neural networks has become widely accepted in medical applications. This is manifested by an increasing number of medical devices currently available on the market with embedded AI algorithms, together with an accelerating pace of publication in medical journals, with over 500 academic publications year featuring Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs).

  10. Dutasteride: an evidence-based review of its clinical impact in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition affecting older men. Bothersome symptoms can progress to serious complications such as acute urinary retention (AUR) requiring surgical intervention. Dutasteride, a dual 5-alfa-reductase (5AR) inhibitor (5ARI), is a recently introduced therapy for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this article is to review the evidence for the treatment of BPH with dutasteride. Evidence from large clinical studies shows that men with an enlarged prostate achieve a measurable decrease in prostate volume by up to 26% after 4 years of treatment with dutasteride and urinary symptoms improve after 6 months of treatment. This is achieved by rapid suppression (through inhibition of 5AR) of the principal androgen (dihydrotestosterone or DHT) responsible for stimulating prostatic growth. Evidence suggests that dutasteride treatment results in a reduction in risk (rather than delay) of the most serious complications including episodes of AUR and the need for BPH-related surgery. Early symptom relief has been achieved with the combination of an alfa blocker and dutasteride. There is good evidence that dutasteride is well tolerated; side effects limited to sexual dysfunction (reduced libido, impotence, and gynecomastia) are more common compared with placebo but occur with a similar incidence to finasteride, another 5ARI. No pharmacoeconomic evidence from studies with dutasteride has so far been published. In conclusion, dutasteride is a valuable treatment option in men with moderate to severe BPH. Reductions in prostate volume lead to symptom relief and serious complications appear to be reduced.

  11. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a method for identifying benign and malignant prostate biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Ling, Yuting; Lang, Stephen; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Objectives. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. Digital rectal examination (DRE) - a known clinical tool based on alteration in the mechanical properties of tissues due to cancer has traditionally been used for screening prostate cancer. Essentially, DRE estimates relative stiffness of cancerous and normal prostate tissue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) are new optical imaging techniques capable of providing cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure as well as elastogram in vivo and in real time. In this preliminary study, OCE was used in the setting of the human prostate biopsies ex vivo, and the images acquired were compared with those obtained using standard histopathologic methods. Methods. 120 prostate biopsies were obtained by TRUS guided needle biopsy procedures from 9 patients with clinically suspected cancer of the prostate. The biopsies were approximately 0.8mm in diameter and 12mm in length, and prepared in Formalin solution. Quantitative assessment of biopsy samples using OCE was obtained in kilopascals (kPa) before histopathologic evaluation. The results obtained from OCE and standard histopathologic evaluation were compared provided the cross-validation. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for OCE (histopathology was a reference standard). Results. OCE could provide quantitative elasticity properties of prostate biopsies within benign prostate tissue, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical hyperplasia and malignant prostate cancer. Data analysed showed that the sensitivity and specificity of OCE for PCa detection were 1 and 0.91, respectively. PCa had significantly higher stiffness values compared to benign tissues, with a trend of increasing in stiffness with increasing of malignancy. Conclusions. Using OCE, microscopic resolution elastogram is promising in diagnosis of human prostatic diseases. Further studies using this technique to improve the

  12. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3-6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients' mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function.

  13. Early results and complications of prostatic arterial embolization for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lebdai, Souhil; Delongchamps, Nicolas Barry; Sapoval, Marc; Robert, Grégoire; Amouyal, Gregory; Thiounn, Nicolas; Karsenty, Gilles; Ruffion, Alain; de La Taille, Alexandre; Descazeaud, Aurélien; Mathieu, Romain

    2016-05-01

    To review current knowledge on clinical outcomes and peri-operative complications of prostatic arterial embolization (PAE) in patients treated for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) related to benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). A systematic review of the literature published from January 2008 to January 2015 was performed on PubMed/MEDLINE. Fifty-seven articles were identified, and four were selected for inclusion in this review. Only one randomized clinical trial compared transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) to PAE. At 3 months after the procedure, mean IPSS reduction from baseline ranged from 7.2 to 15.6 points. Mean urine peak-flow improvement ranged from +3.21 ml/s to +9.5 ml/s. When compared to TURP, PAE was associated with a significantly lower IPSS reduction 1 and 3 months after the procedure. A trend toward similar symptoms improvement was however reported without statistical significance from 6 to 24 months. Major complications were rare with one bladder partial necrosis due to non-selective embolization. Mild adverse events occurred in 10 % of the patients and included transient hyperthermia, hematuria, rectal bleeding, painful urination or acute urinary retention. Further comparative studies are mandatory to assess post-operative rates of complications, especially acute urinary retention, after PAE and standard procedures. Early reports suggest that PAE may be a promising procedure for the treatment of patients with LUTS due to BPO. However, the low level of evidence and short follow-up of published reports preclude any firm conclusion on its mid-term efficiency. Further clinical trials are warranted before any use in clinical practice.

  14. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3–6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients’ mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function. PMID:25652616

  15. Do Black NonHispanic Men Produce Less Prostate Specific Antigen in Benign Prostate Tissue or Cancer Compared to White NonHispanic Men with Gleason Score 6 (Grade Group 1) Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Epstein, Jonathan I; Cote, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated prostate specific antigen production by benign prostate tissue and Gleason score 3+3=6 (Grade Group 1) prostate cancer in black and white nonHispanic men. We used Gleason score 3+3=6 (Grade Group 1) cases to assess prostate specific antigen production by benign prostate tissue in cases with low volume cancer that did not influence prostate specific antigen and in those with high volume cancer in which gland weight did not influence prostate specific antigen. We then created age, prostate specific antigen and prostate weight adjusted cohorts to demonstrate tumor volume per 1 ng/ml prostate specific antigen and 1 μg prostate specific antigen mass. Prostate specific antigen density and prostate specific antigen mass density were used to adjust for prostate weight. Comparison of 58 black and 301 white men with low volume cancer demonstrated equal prostate specific antigen production by benign prostate tissue. Comparison of 30 black and 75 white men with high volume cancer indicated that prostate specific antigen was being driven by cancer volume, with lower prostate specific antigen production in black men. In the cohort of 54 black and 134 white men matched by age, prostate specific antigen and prostate weight, tumor volume per 1 ng/ml prostate specific antigen or 1 μg prostate specific antigen mass adjusted for prostate weight was 25% and 26% higher in black men, respectively. Benign prostate tissue produces equal amounts of prostate specific antigen in black and white men. Gleason score 3+3=6 (Grade Group 1) prostate cancer produces less prostate specific antigen in black men. These data should be considered for lowering prostate specific antigen and its derivatives in determining biopsy thresholds and for adjusting values for active surveillance criteria in black men. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Five-Year Follow-Up Study of Transurethral Plasmakinetic Resection of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yangyang; Dong, Xuecheng; Wang, Guangchun; Huang, Jianhua; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To explore the long-term clinical efficacy and safety of transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patients and Methods: A total of 550 patients with BPH who had undergone PKRP from October 2006 to September 2009 were enrolled in this study. All patients were evaluated at baseline and follow-up (3, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 months postoperatively) by peak flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual (PVR), quality of life (QoL), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Operative details and postoperative complications regarded as safety outcomes were documented. Results: A total of 467 patients completed the 5-year follow-up. The mean duration of surgery was 36.43 minutes, mean catheterization time was 48.81 hours, mean hospital stay was 4.21 days. At 60 months postoperatively, the mean Qmax increased from 6.94 mL/s at baseline to 19.28 mL/s, the mean PVR decreased from 126.33 mL to 10.45 mL, the mean IPSS score decreased from 15.79 to 7.51, the mean QoL score decreased from 4.36 to 1.91, and the mean OABSS score decreased from 6.39 to 3.65 (P < 0.001), respectively. In perioperative complications, the blood transfusion rate was 2.7%, urinary tract infection rate was 3.6%; no transurethral resection syndrome (TUR syndrome) occurred. In late complications, urethral stricture rate was 5.4%, recurrent bladder outlet obstruction rate was 2.1%, and the reoperation rate was 4.5%. Conclusions: PKRP is based on conventional monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and uses a bipolar plasmakinetic system. Our results indicate that the long-term clinical efficacy and safety of PKRP for BPH are remarkable. In particular, the incidence of urethral stricture, recurrent bladder outlet obstruction, and reoperation is low. We suggest that PKRP is a reliable minimally invasive technique that may be the preferred procedure for the treatment of

  17. Postoperative Lower Urinary Tract Storage Symptoms: Does Prostate Enucleation Differ from Prostate Vaporization for Treatment of Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia?

    PubMed

    Elkoushy, Mohamed A; Elshal, Ahmed M; Elhilali, Mostafa M

    2015-10-01

    To assess the degree of postoperative storage symptoms after GreenLight™ laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and its predictors. A retrospective review was performed for patients who underwent HoLEP or PVP for non catheter-dependent patients with BPH. Patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually by International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), quality of life index, peak flow rate, residual urine volume, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Moderate or severe storage symptoms were defined as IPSS storage subscore ≥ 9. Of 1673 laser procedures, a total of 1100 procedures met the inclusion criteria including 809 HoLEPs and 291 PVPs. The HoLEP group had significantly larger preoperative prostates and longer operative time. In the HoLEP group, postoperative IPSS was significantly better than in the PVP group at all follow-up points (P<0.05). Storage subscore was significantly higher after PVP and did not improve until 6 months postoperatively when it became comparable with that of the HoLEP group. The number of patients with IPSS-storage score ≥ 9 were significantly higher in the PVP group at 1 and 3 months follow-up (37.3% vs 15.1%, P<0.001) and (26.4% vs 17.5%, P=0.004), respectively. XPS-180W was associated with the lowest storage symptoms among the three GreenLight generations at all follow-up visits. In multivariate analysis, baseline IPSS-storage subscore ≥ 9, prolonged operative time >100 minutes, and lower percent of postoperative PSA level reduction significantly predicted less improvement of postoperative storage symptoms regardless of the laser procedure. Storage urinary symptoms significantly improved more after HoLEP compared with PVP, irrespective of the generation of GreenLight laser used. Recovery from bothersome storage urinary symptoms after prostate vaporization is time dependent, and

  18. Inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside on benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Nan; Xu, Yuan; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Wang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside (GTW) against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into five groups: Group I, vehicle control group (sham-operated and treated with vehicle); Group II, BPH group; Group III, BPH rats treated with finasteride at a dose of 5 mg·kg(-1); and Groups IV and V, BPH rats treated with GTW at dose levels of 10 and 20 mg·kg(-1), respectively. The drugs were administered orally once a day for 14 days. Prostate weight, prostatic index, and the testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum and prostate, and the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were measured; prostate tissues were taken for histopathological examination; and serum biochemical analysis was also performed. The BPH rats displayed an increase in prostate weight, prostatic index with increased testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and increased serum PSA levels. GTW treatment at both doses resulted in significant reductions in prostate weight, prostatic index, testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and serum PSA levels, compared with BPH group. Histopathological examination also indicated that GTW treatment at both doses inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia. Serum biochemical analysis showed that the liver and renal functions were normal. In conclusion, GTW inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats, without host toxicity, providing a basis for the development of GTW as a novel therapy for BPH. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 in benign and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Reinicke, Karin; Sotomayor, Paula; Cisterna, Pedro; Delgado, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Godoy, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Over-expression of hexose transporters (Gluts), specifically Glut-1, is a common event in human malignancies. In prostate cancer (CaP), however, expression of Gluts has been characterized poorly. In this study, expression and distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 proteins were characterized using immunohistochemistry in 76 specimens of benign prostate, 10 specimens of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and 28 specimens of CaP. In addition, mRNA expression of Glut-2, Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 was analyzed in a set of five specimens of benign prostate and CaP. In benign prostate, Glut-1 localized to the basal cells and to the basolateral membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. In HGPIN, Glut-1 was immunohistochemically undetectable. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of the neoplastic epithelial cells. In CaP, Glut-1 and Glut-5, were immunohistochemically undetectable. However, over-expression of GLUT1 was observed in some specimens of highly proliferative intraductal CaP. Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 mRNAs were detected in benign prostate and CaP, however, only Glut-11 mRNA was consistently up-regulated in CaP compared to benign prostate. Low levels of expression of Glut-1 protein in the majority of CaP could explain, at least in part, the limited clinical applicability of positron emission tomography using 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for imaging CaP. Moreover, expression of Glut-5 in HGPIN suggested that fructose could be utilized as potential metabolic substrate in HGPIN. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation/dysregulation of Gluts in CaP could provide insight in the understanding of hexose metabolism in CaP.

  20. Stiffness of benign and malignant prostate tissue measured by shear-wave elastography: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Melodelima, Christelle; Hoang Dinh, Au; Bratan, Flavie; Pagnoux, Gaele; Sanzalone, Thomas; Crouzet, Sébastien; Colombel, Marc; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Souchon, Rémi

    2017-05-01

    To measure benign and malignant prostate tissue stiffness using shear-wave elastography (SWE). Thirty consecutive patients underwent transrectal SWE in the axial and sagittal planes before prostatectomy. After reviewing prostatectomy specimens, two radiologists measured stiffness in regions corresponding to cancers, lateral and median benign peripheral zone (PZ) and benign transition zone (TZ). Cancers were stiffer than benign PZ and TZ. All tissue classes were stiffer on sagittal than on axial imaging, in TZ than in PZ, and in median PZ than in lateral PZ. At multivariate analysis, the nature of tissue (benign or malignant; P < 0.00001), the imaging plane (axial or sagittal; P < 0.00001) and the location within the prostate (TZ, median PZ or lateral PZ; P = 0.0065) significantly and independently influenced tissue stiffness. On axial images, the thresholds maximising the Youden index in TZ, lateral PZ and median PZ were respectively 62 kPa, 33 kPa and 49 kPa. On sagittal images, the thresholds were 76 kPa, 50 kPa and 72 kPa, respectively. SWE can distinguish prostate malignant and benign tissues. Tissue stiffness is influenced by the imaging plane and the location within the gland. • Prostate cancers were stiffer than the benign peripheral zone • All tissue classes were stiffer on sagittal than on axial imaging • All tissue classes were stiffer in the transition zone than in the peripheral zone • All tissue classes were stiffer in the median than in the lateral peripheral zone • Taking into account imaging plane and zonal anatomy can improve cancer detection.

  1. Combination of Autoantibody Signature with PSA Level Enables a Highly Accurate Blood-Based Differentiation of Prostate Cancer Patients from Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Petra; Keller, Andreas; Milchram, Lisa; Harz, Christian; Hart, Martin; Werth, Angelika; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd; Ludwig, Nicole; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Although an increased level of the prostate-specific antigen can be an indication for prostate cancer, other reasons often lead to a high rate of false positive results. Therefore, an additional serological screening of autoantibodies in patients' sera could improve the detection of prostate cancer. We performed protein macroarray screening with sera from 49 prostate cancer patients, 70 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 28 healthy controls and compared the autoimmune response in those groups. We were able to distinguish prostate cancer patients from normal controls with an accuracy of 83.2%, patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia from normal controls with an accuracy of 86.0% and prostate cancer patients from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia with an accuracy of 70.3%. Combining seroreactivity pattern with a PSA level of higher than 4.0 ng/ml this classification could be improved to an accuracy of 84.1%. For selected proteins we were able to confirm the differential expression by using luminex on 84 samples. We provide a minimally invasive serological method to reduce false positive results in detection of prostate cancer and according to PSA screening to distinguish men with prostate cancer from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  2. Combination of Autoantibody Signature with PSA Level Enables a Highly Accurate Blood-Based Differentiation of Prostate Cancer Patients from Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Leidinger, Petra; Keller, Andreas; Milchram, Lisa; Harz, Christian; Hart, Martin; Werth, Angelika; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Although an increased level of the prostate-specific antigen can be an indication for prostate cancer, other reasons often lead to a high rate of false positive results. Therefore, an additional serological screening of autoantibodies in patients’ sera could improve the detection of prostate cancer. We performed protein macroarray screening with sera from 49 prostate cancer patients, 70 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 28 healthy controls and compared the autoimmune response in those groups. We were able to distinguish prostate cancer patients from normal controls with an accuracy of 83.2%, patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia from normal controls with an accuracy of 86.0% and prostate cancer patients from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia with an accuracy of 70.3%. Combining seroreactivity pattern with a PSA level of higher than 4.0 ng/ml this classification could be improved to an accuracy of 84.1%. For selected proteins we were able to confirm the differential expression by using luminex on 84 samples. We provide a minimally invasive serological method to reduce false positive results in detection of prostate cancer and according to PSA screening to distinguish men with prostate cancer from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:26039628

  3. Differential expression of neuropilin-1 in malignant and benign prostatic stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Vanveldhuizen, Peter J; Zulfiqar, Muhammad; Banerjee, Snigdha; Cherian, Rachel; Saxena, Neela K; Rabe, Amy; Thrasher, J Brantley; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2003-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), a co-receptor for VEGF165, is overexpressed in various prostate cancer cell lines and in advanced prostate tumors. However, distribution of the NRP-1 in prostate tumors has not yet been evaluated. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we evaluated 21 archival prostate tumors and 5 benign glands for the expression of NRP-1. In addition, we utilized a quantitative RT-PCR method to examine mRNA expression in 9 additional prostate tumors obtained from radical prostatectomy specimens and compared this expression to the adjacent normal tissue. The RT-PCR analyses demonstrated overexpression of NRP-1 mRNA in malignant tissue samples by 10.0-fold as compared to adjacent normal tissue. By immunohistochemistry, NRP-1 protein was undetected or minimally detected in the epithelial tumor cells. However, NRP-1 immuno-reaction was detected in the surrounding tumor stroma. Variable immuno-reaction for NRP-1 was also seen in the adjacent normal tumor stroma and the stroma of the benign prostate samples. These observations suggest that neuropilin-1 is expressed in the prostatic stromal cells, not epithelial tumor cells, and this expression is significantly increased in the malignant phenotype.

  4. Relationship of age, prostate-specific antigen, and prostate volume in Indonesian men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Putra, Ida Bagus O W; Hamid, Agus R A H; Mochtar, Chaidir A; Umbas, Rainy

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between age, prostate specific antigen (PSA), and prostate volume (PV) in Indonesian men with histologically proven benign prostatic hyperplasia. Data were generated from our BPH database from June 1994 until December 2013. Subjects were men with a minimum age of 40 years with chief complaint of LUTS or urinary retention, diagnosed with BPH. All patients underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Patients with PSA level >10 ng/mL were excluded from the study to exclude the possibility of occult prostate cancer. PV was measured with TRUS. Appropriate statistical tests were employed for data analysis. In all, 1638 patients were enrolled in our study. There was a statistically significant difference in PSA (P = 0.03) and PV (P < 0.0001) between age groups. Overall correlation between age, PSA, and PV were: i). Age and PV (r = 0.12, P < 0.0001); ii). Age and PSA (r = 0.07, P = 0.008); iii). PSA and PV (r = 0.26, P < 0.0001). Subgroup analysis in terms of indwelling catheter use versus without: i). Age 66.09 ± 8 years versus 65.38 ± 7.66 years (P = 0.158); ii). PSA 4.93 ± 2.62 ng/mL versus 4.68 ± 2.82 ng/mL (P = 0.038); iii). PV 47.58 ± 21.33 mL versus 41.43 ± 20.55 mL (P < 0.0001). Correlation between age, PSA, and PV in patients were similar in patients with and without indwelling catheter. In Indonesian men with biopsy-proven BPH, both PV and PSA increased with ageing. Prostate volume was significantly correlated with PSA. Even though the results were weaker, these results are consistent with results in other sets of population. The results vary between different countries and thus, ethnicities. Indonesia is a populous a sociocultural and ethnically diverse country. Therefore, aside from PSA, age, and PV, when investigating men with BPH, ethnicity may also need to be taken into account.

  5. [The use of laser vaporization for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Ustinov, D V; Kholtobin, D P; Kul'chavenia, E V; Aĭzikovich, B I

    2013-01-01

    Results of use of UroBeam laser diode in 72 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were analyzed. Average prostate volume was 67.29 +/- 26.72 cm3, the duration of vaporization--69.2 +/- 23.7 min. Blood loss was minimal. In the period from 2 weeks to 4 months after surgery, 9 patients have developed acute urinary retention. In the early postoperative period, acute prostatitis was diagnosed in 7 patients and was jugulated using drug treatment. The laser vaporization of BPH led to a three-fold reduction in the severity of urinary disorders and increase the urinary flow rate. The combination of laser vaporization of the prostate with transurethral resection of the prostate allow to improve the recovery of urination after surgery.

  6. Detection of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules in T2W MR images using fuzzy decision forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Nathan; Freeman, Sabrina; Turkbey, Baris; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men MRI has proven useful for detecting prostate cancer, and CAD may further improve detection. One source of false positives in prostate computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) is the presence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) nodules. These nodules have a distinct appearance with a pseudo-capsule on T2 weighted MR images but can also resemble cancerous lesions in other sequences such as the ADC or high B-value images. Describing their appearance with hand-crafted heuristics (features) that also exclude the appearance of cancerous lesions is challenging. This work develops a method based on fuzzy decision forests to automatically learn discriminative features for the purpose of BPH nodule detection in T2 weighted images for the purpose of improving prostate CAD systems.

  7. Potential protective mechanisms of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vatsal; Vezina, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an evolutionarily conserved ligand activated transcription factor best known for its role in mediating toxic responses to dioxin-like environmental contaminants. However, AHR signaling has also emerged as an active participant in processes of normal development and disease progression. Here, we review the role of AHR signaling in prostate development and disease processes, with a particular emphasis on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inappropriate AHR activation has recently been associated with a decreased risk of symptomatic BPH in humans and has been shown to impair prostate development and disrupt endocrine signaling in rodents. We highlight known physiological responses to AHR activation in prostate and other tissues and discuss potential mechanisms by which it may act in adult human prostate to protect against symptomatic BPH. PMID:21684673

  8. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Vaarala, Markku H.; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996–1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62–1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29–0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation. PMID:27446410

  9. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vaarala, Markku H; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A

    2016-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996-1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62-1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29-0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation.

  10. UroLift: a new minimally-invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan P.; Aboumarzouk, Omar; Somani, Bhaskar K.

    2016-01-01

    ‘UroLift’ has emerged as a new minimally-invasive nonablative surgical technique for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We discuss the procedure, cost, evidence, advantages and disadvantages of this procedure. It is a novel technology suitable for a selected group of patients that allows for a bespoke treatment for men with BPH. PMID:27904652

  11. Inflammatory Responses in a Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Line (BPH-1) Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Su; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissues from prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. Chronic prostatic inflammation is known as a risk factor for prostate enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and acute urinary retention. Our aim was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce inflammatory responses in cells of a benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cell line (BPH-1). When BPH-1 cells were infected with T. vaginalis, the protein and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines, such as CXCL8, CCL2, IL-1β, and IL-6, were increased. The activities of TLR4, ROS, MAPK, JAK2/STAT3, and NF-κB were also increased, whereas inhibitors of ROS, MAPK, PI3K, NF-κB, and anti-TLR4 antibody decreased the production of the 4 cytokines although the extent of inhibition differed. However, a JAK2 inhibitor inhibited only IL-6 production. Culture supernatants of the BPH-1 cells that had been incubated with live T. vaginalis (trichomonad-conditioned medium, TCM) contained the 4 cytokines and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cells) and mast cells (HMC-1 cells). TCM conditioned by BPH-1 cells pretreated with NF-κB inhibitor showed decreased levels of cytokines and induced less migration. Therefore, it is suggested that these cytokines are involved in migration of inflammatory cells. These results suggest that T. vaginalis infection of BPH patients may cause inflammation, which may induce lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). PMID:27180569

  12. Inflammatory Responses in a Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Line (BPH-1) Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Su; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissues from prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. Chronic prostatic inflammation is known as a risk factor for prostate enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and acute urinary retention. Our aim was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce inflammatory responses in cells of a benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cell line (BPH-1). When BPH-1 cells were infected with T. vaginalis, the protein and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines, such as CXCL8, CCL2, IL-1β, and IL-6, were increased. The activities of TLR4, ROS, MAPK, JAK2/STAT3, and NF-κB were also increased, whereas inhibitors of ROS, MAPK, PI3K, NF-κB, and anti-TLR4 antibody decreased the production of the 4 cytokines although the extent of inhibition differed. However, a JAK2 inhibitor inhibited only IL-6 production. Culture supernatants of the BPH-1 cells that had been incubated with live T. vaginalis (trichomonad-conditioned medium, TCM) contained the 4 cytokines and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cells) and mast cells (HMC-1 cells). TCM conditioned by BPH-1 cells pretreated with NF-κB inhibitor showed decreased levels of cytokines and induced less migration. Therefore, it is suggested that these cytokines are involved in migration of inflammatory cells. These results suggest that T. vaginalis infection of BPH patients may cause inflammation, which may induce lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

  13. Differential Utilization of Dietary Fatty Acids in Benign and Malignant Cells of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Theresa; Höfer, Julia; Gnaiger, Erich; Aufinger, Astrid; Kenner, Lukas; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells adapt via metabolic reprogramming to meet elevated energy demands due to continuous proliferation, for example by switching to alternative energy sources. Nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, ketone bodies and amino acids may be utilized as preferred substrates to fulfill increased energy requirements. In this study we investigated the metabolic characteristics of benign and cancer cells of the prostate with respect to their utilization of medium chain (MCTs) and long chain triglycerides (LCTs) under standard and glucose-starved culture conditions by assessing cell viability, glycolytic activity, mitochondrial respiration, the expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes as well as mitochondrial mass and mtDNA content. We report that BE prostate cells (RWPE-1) have a higher competence to utilize fatty acids as energy source than PCa cells (LNCaP, ABL, PC3) as shown not only by increased cell viability upon fatty acid supplementation but also by an increased ß-oxidation of fatty acids, although the base-line respiration was 2-fold higher in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, BE RWPE-1 cells were found to compensate for glucose starvation in the presence of fatty acids. Of notice, these findings were confirmed in vivo by showing that PCa tissue has a lower capacity in oxidizing fatty acids than benign prostate. Collectively, these metabolic differences between benign and prostate cancer cells and especially their differential utilization of fatty acids could be exploited to establish novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26285134

  14. Differential Utilization of Dietary Fatty Acids in Benign and Malignant Cells of the Prostate.

    PubMed

    Dueregger, Andrea; Schöpf, Bernd; Eder, Theresa; Höfer, Julia; Gnaiger, Erich; Aufinger, Astrid; Kenner, Lukas; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells adapt via metabolic reprogramming to meet elevated energy demands due to continuous proliferation, for example by switching to alternative energy sources. Nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, ketone bodies and amino acids may be utilized as preferred substrates to fulfill increased energy requirements. In this study we investigated the metabolic characteristics of benign and cancer cells of the prostate with respect to their utilization of medium chain (MCTs) and long chain triglycerides (LCTs) under standard and glucose-starved culture conditions by assessing cell viability, glycolytic activity, mitochondrial respiration, the expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes as well as mitochondrial mass and mtDNA content. We report that BE prostate cells (RWPE-1) have a higher competence to utilize fatty acids as energy source than PCa cells (LNCaP, ABL, PC3) as shown not only by increased cell viability upon fatty acid supplementation but also by an increased ß-oxidation of fatty acids, although the base-line respiration was 2-fold higher in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, BE RWPE-1 cells were found to compensate for glucose starvation in the presence of fatty acids. Of notice, these findings were confirmed in vivo by showing that PCa tissue has a lower capacity in oxidizing fatty acids than benign prostate. Collectively, these metabolic differences between benign and prostate cancer cells and especially their differential utilization of fatty acids could be exploited to establish novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  15. Robotic-Assisted Versus Manual Prostatic Arterial Embolization for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bagla, Sandeep; Smirniotopoulos, John; Orlando, Julie C; Piechowiak, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) is a safe and efficacious procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), though is technically challenging. We present our experience of technical and clinical outcomes of robotic and manual PAE in patients with BPH. IRB-approved retrospective study of 40 consecutive patients 49-81 years old with moderate or severe grade BPH from May 2014 to July 2015: 20 robotic-assisted PAE (group 1), 20 manual PAE (group 2). Robotic-assisted PAE was performed using the Magellan Robotic System. American Urological Association (AUA-SI) score, cost, technical and clinical success, radiation dose, fluoroscopy, and procedure time were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed within and between each group using paired t test and one-way analysis of variance respectively, at 1 and 3 months. No significant baseline differences in age and AUA-SI between groups. Technical success was 100% (group 1) and 95% (group 2). One unsuccessful subject from group 2 returned for a successful embolization using robotic assistance. Fluoroscopy and procedural times were similar between groups, with a non-significant lower patient radiation dose in group 1 (30,632.8 mGy/cm(2) vs 35,890.9, p = 0.269). Disposable cost was significantly different between groups with the robotic-assisted PAE incurring a higher cost (group 1 $4530.2; group 2 $1588.5, p < 0.0001). Clinical improvement was significant in both arms at 3 months: group 1 mean change in AUA-SI of 8.3 (p = 0.006), group 2: 9.6 (p < 0.0001). No minor or major complications occurred. Robotic-assisted PAE offers technical success comparable to manual PAE, with similar clinical improvement with an increased cost.

  16. Risk of erectile dysfunction associated with use of 5-α reductase inhibitors for benign prostatic hyperplasia or alopecia: population based studies using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Katrina Wilcox; Divan, Hozefa A; Persson, Rebecca; Nickel, J Curtis; Jick, Susan S

    2016-09-22

     To estimate the risk of erectile dysfunction in men who used 5-α reductase inhibitors to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia or alopecia.  Cohort studies with nested case-control analyses.  UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink.  Two populations of men free of risk factors for erectile dysfunction and other sexual dysfunction or its treatment: men aged 40 or more with benign prostatic hyperplasia who received a prescription for a 5-α reductase inhibitor (finasteride or dutasteride) or α blocker, or both, and men aged 18-59 with alopecia.  In the benign prostatic hyperplasia study, exposures were classified as 5-α reductase inhibitors only, 5-α reductase inhibitors+α blockers, or α blockers only. In the alopecia study, exposures were finasteride 1 mg or no treatment.  Cases were men with a diagnosis of erectile dysfunction or treatment (procedure or prescription for a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor) during follow-up. We calculated incidence rates and adjusted incidence rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals. We also conducted nested case-control analyses to control for major confounders, and calculated adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals.  In the population with benign prostatic hyperplasia (n=71 849), the risk of erectile dysfunction was not increased with use of 5-α reductase inhibitors only (incidence rate ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 0.99; odds ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 1.03) or 5-α reductase inhibitors+α blocker (1.09, 0.99 to 1.21, 0.92; 0.80 to 1.06) compared with α blockers only, and remained null regardless of number of prescriptions or timing of use. The risk of erectile dysfunction increased with longer duration of benign prostatic hyperplasia, regardless of exposure. For the alopecia population (n=12 346), the risk of erectile dysfunction was not increased for users of finasteride 1 mg compared with unexposed men with alopecia (1.03, 0.73 to 1.44; 0.95, 0.64 to 1.41).  5-

  17. Efficacy and Safety of 120-W Thulium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet Vapoenucleation of Prostates Compared with Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostates for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kai; Liu, Yu-Qing; Lu, Jian; Xiao, Chun-Lei; Huang, Yi; Ma, Lu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study compared the efficacy and safety between 120-W thulium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Tm:YAG) vapoenucleation of prostates (ThuVEP) and holmium laser enucleation of prostates (HoLEP) for patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: A retrospective analysis of 88 consecutive patients with symptomatic BPH was carried out, who underwent either 120-W ThuVEP or HoLEP nonrandomly. Patient demographics and peri-operative and 12-month follow-up data were analyzed with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL) score, maximum flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), and rates of peri-operative and late complications. Results: The patients in each group showed no significant difference in preoperative parameters. Compared with the HoLEP group, patients in the 120-W ThuVEP group required significantly shorter time for laser enucleation (58.3 ± 12.8 min vs. 70.5 ± 22.3 min, P = 0.003), and resulted in a significant superiority in laser efficiency (resected prostate weight/laser enucleation time) for 120-W Tm:YAG laser compared to holmium:YAG laser (0.69 ± 0.18 vs. 0.61 ± 0.19, P = 0.048). During 1, 6, and 12 months of follow-ups, the procedures did not demonstrate a significant difference in IPSS, QoL score, Qmax, or PVR (P > 0.05). Mean peri-operative decrease of hemoglobin in the HoLEP group was similar to the ThuVEP group (17.1 ± 12.0 g/L vs. 15.2 ± 10.1 g/L, P = 0.415). Early and late incidences of complications were low and did not differ significantly between the two groups of 120-W ThuVEP and HoLEP patients (P > 0.05). Conclusions: 120-W ThuVEP and HoLEP are potent, safe and efficient modalities of minimally invasive surgeries for patients with LUTS due to BPH. Compared with HoLEP, 120-W ThuVEP offers advantages of reduction of laser enucleation time and improvement of laser efficiency. PMID:25836607

  18. Efficacy and safety of 120-W thulium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet vapoenucleation of prostates compared with holmium laser enucleation of prostates for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kai; Liu, Yu-Qing; Lu, Jian; Xiao, Chun-Lei; Huang, Yi; Ma, Lu-Lin

    2015-04-05

    This study compared the efficacy and safety between 120-W thulium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Tm:YAG) vapoenucleation of prostates (ThuVEP) and holmium laser enucleation of prostates (HoLEP) for patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A retrospective analysis of 88 consecutive patients with symptomatic BPH was carried out, who underwent either 120-W ThuVEP or HoLEP nonrandomly. Patient demographics and peri-operative and 12-month follow-up data were analyzed with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL) score, maximum flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), and rates of peri-operative and late complications. The patients in each group showed no significant difference in preoperative parameters. Compared with the HoLEP group, patients in the 120-W ThuVEP group required significantly shorter time for laser enucleation (58.3 ± 12.8 min vs. 70.5 ± 22.3 min, P = 0.003), and resulted in a significant superiority in laser efficiency (resected prostate weight/laser enucleation time) for 120-W Tm:YAG laser compared to holmium:YAG laser (0.69 ± 0.18 vs. 0.61 ± 0.19, P = 0.048). During 1, 6, and 12 months of follow-ups, the procedures did not demonstrate a significant difference in IPSS, QoL score, Qmax, or PVR (P > 0.05). Mean peri-operative decrease of hemoglobin in the HoLEP group was similar to the ThuVEP group (17.1 ± 12.0 g/L vs. 15.2 ± 10.1 g/L, P = 0.415). Early and late incidences of complications were low and did not differ significantly between the two groups of 120-W ThuVEP and HoLEP patients (P > 0.05). 120-W ThuVEP and HoLEP are potent, safe and efficient modalities of minimally invasive surgeries for patients with LUTS due to BPH. Compared with HoLEP, 120-W ThuVEP offers advantages of reduction of laser enucleation time and improvement of laser efficiency.

  19. Bacteriology of Urine Specimens Obtained from Men with Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Agbugui, Jude Orumuah; Obarisiagbon, EO; Osaigbovo, II

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bacteriuria and urinary tract infections are common sequelae of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Thus, the knowledge of urine bacteriology in men with symptomatic BPH in our environment may play a complementary role in management. Objectives: To determine the incidence of bacteriuria and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacterial isolates in cultured urine samples of men with symptomatic BPH. Patients and Methods: This was a 1 year prospective study. All patients who presented with lower urinary tract symptoms due to BPH and who met the inclusion criteria were studied. Urine samples were obtained from the patients for microscopy, culture, and sensitivity following standard protocol. Results: Ninety-four patients were studied. The age range was 53–80 years with a mean of 65.5 ± 7.8 years. Bacterial isolates were noted in 42 (44.7%) patients. Six of these had two different species of bacterial organisms isolated. Escherichia coli noted in 20 (47.6%) specimens was the most common organism isolated while the least common, Providencia species, was noted in 1 (2.4%). The bacterial isolates were mostly sensitive to imipenem, meropenem, and nitrofurantoin, but showed greater resistance to cefuroxime, gentamicin, and ofloxacin. There was no significant difference between the means for age (P = 0.80), duration of symptoms (P = 0.09), and prostate size (P = 0.52) in the patients with and those without bacteriuria. Conclusion: Bacteriuria is a common finding in patients with symptomatic BPH in our setting. The bacterial isolates showed high level of resistance to oral cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. There is a need to update guidelines in empiric use of antibiotics in this group of patients. PMID:27843267

  20. Cratylia mollis lectin nanoelectrode for differential diagnostic of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia based on label-free detection.

    PubMed

    Silva, Priscila M S; Lima, Amanda L R; Silva, Bárbara V M; Coelho, Luana C B B; Dutra, Rosa F; Correia, Maria T S

    2016-11-15

    The research for new biomarkers of cancer has studied the role of fetuin glycoprotein on the metastatic disease diagnosis. Cratylia mollis is a lectin with high finity to fetuin, and used here to differentiate prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. A label-free electrochemical nanosensor based on assembled carboxylated carbon nanotubes (COOH-CNTs) and poly-L-lysine (PLL) film was developed and applied to serum samples of prostate cancer positive for Gleason score. The electrode analytical response to fetuin in PBS samples, obtained by square wave voltammetry, exhibited a linear range from 0.5 to 25µgmL(-1), with a high correlation coefficient (r=0.994, p<0.001) and low limit of detection (0.017µgmL(-1)). The lectin nanoelectrode showed a good repeatability (1.24% RSD) and reproducibility (4.24% RSD). A pool of serum samples from prostate cancer patients with known the Gleason score were tested showing a significant statistically correlation. Thus, the lectin nanoelectrode was able to distinguish the degree of staging prostate cancer, providing the diagnostic differentiation of benign and malign hyperplasia. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first biosensor for this application using a lectin.

  1. Comparison of Nonspherical Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles and Microspheres for Prostatic Arterial Embolization in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin Ho; Chang, Il Soo; Jung, Sung Il; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lho, Yong Soo; Kim, Hyeong Gon; Paick, Sung Hyun; Park, Hyoung Keun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report early results following prostatic artery embolization (PAE) and compare outcomes between nonspherical polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and microspheres to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods PAE was performed in nine patients (mean age: 78.1 years) with symptomatic BPH. Embolization was performed using nonspherical PVA particles (250–355 μm) in four patients and microspheres (300–500 μm) in five patients. Results PAE was technically successful in all nine patients (100%). During a mean follow-up of 10.1 months, improvements in mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Quality of Life (QoL), prostatic volume (total volume and transition zone), and peak urinary flow (Qmax) were 9.8 points, 2.3 points, 28.1 mL, 17.8 mL, and 4.5 mL/s, respectively. Clinical success was obtained in seven of nine patients (78%). Patients in the microsphere group showed greater improvement in IPSS, QoL, prostatic volume, and Qmax compared to patients in the nonspherical PVA particle group. However, significant difference was noted only in the prostatic volume. Conclusion PAE is a feasible, effective, and safe treatment option for BPH with LUTS. Use of microspheres showed greater prostatic volume reduction compared to nonspherical PVA particles. PMID:28717651

  2. Interleukin-18 may lead to benign prostatic hyperplasia via thrombospondin-1 production in prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hamakawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Imura, Makoto; Kubota, Yasue; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-05-01

    Although inflammation plays an important role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), little is known about the exact mechanism underlying this pathogenesis. Here, we investigated the relationship between the inflammatory reaction and BPH. cDNA microarray analysis was used to identify changes in inflammation-related gene expression in a recently established rat model that mimics human BPH. To investigate the genes identified in the analysis, quantitative (q)RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunostaining, and a cell proliferation assay were conducted using BPH model tissues, human prostate tissues, and normal human prostate cultured cells. Of the 31,100 genes identified in the cDNA analysis, seven inflammatory-response-related genes were expressed at a >2-fold higher level in rat BPH tissues than in normal rat prostate tissues. The levels of the most commonly expressed pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-18, significantly increased in rat BPH tissues. In humans, IL-18 was localized in the epithelial and stromal components, while its receptor was strongly localized in smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, in human prostate smooth muscle cell line (PrSMC), IL-18 effected dose-dependent increases in the phosphorylated Akt and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) levels. TSP-1 promoted proliferation of the human prostate stromal cells (PrSC). IL-18 may act directly in BPH pathogenesis by inducing TSP-1 production in prostatic smooth muscle cells via Akt phosphorylation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Subtypes of white blood cells in patients with prostate cancer or benign prostatic hyperplasia and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Arslan, Alaettin; Ergul, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the baseline white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil, eosinophil count, total prostate-specific antigen (TPSA), free PSA (FPSA) level, neutrophil- to-lymphocyte and neutrophil-to-monocyte ratios among patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), as well as healthy individuals. 2005-2012 laboratory files of 160 patients with prostate cancer at Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Oncology Outpatient Clinic, 285 patients who were pathologically diagnosed with BPH in Urology Outpatient Clinic and 200 healthy individuals who were admitted to Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline WBC, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil, eosinophil count, TPSA, FPSA level, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and neutrophil-to-monocyte ratio were recorded and compared across groups. Patients with prostate cancer had a lower lymphocyte level compared to the patients with BPH and healthy controls (p<0.001). The mean monocyte count, leukocyte-to-monocyte ratio, and leukocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio were higher in patients with prostate cancer, but without significance. The mean WBC and leukocyte count were lower in patients with prostate cancer, but again without statistical significance (p=0.130). The mean TPSA and FPSA were 39.4 and 5.67, respectively in patients with prostate cancer, while they were 5.78 and 1.28 in patients with BPH. There was a significant difference in the mean TPSA and FPSA levels between the patient groups (p<0.001). Our study results showed that patients with prostate cancer had a lower level of lymphocytes, neutrophils and WBCs and a higher level of monocytes with a significant difference in lymphocyte count, compared to healthy controls. We suggest that lymphocyte count may be used in combination with other parameters in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, thanks to its ease of assessment.

  4. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) Is Associated With Prostatic Growth Dysregulation and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kazutoshi; Ewing, Charles M.; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Isaacs, William B.; Pavlovich, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic inflammation is commonly observed in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate tissue often contains increased inflammatory infiltrates, including T cells and macrophages. Cytokines are not only key mediators of inflammation but may also play important roles in the initiation and progression of BPH. METHODS In order to determine what cytokines might be involved in prostatic enlargement, expressed prostatic secretions (EPS) from ex vivo prostates were analyzed by human cytokine antibody microarray and ELISA. Prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and prostate stromal cells (PrSC) were used for ELISA, proliferation, and Western blot assays. RESULTS Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) was one of the most elevated proteins in secretions from large prostate glands. PrSC were found to secrete MCP-1; Western blotting showed that both PrSC and PrEC express the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 which by RT-PCR was the CCR2b isoform. Proliferation assays showed that MCP-1 stimulates the proliferation of PrEC, but not PrSC, and that a specific MCP-1 antagonist (RS102895) suppressed this effect. Conditioned medium from PrSC stimulated the proliferation of PrEC as well, an effect completely inhibited by both RS102895 and a neutralizing anti-MCP-1 monoclonal antibody. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon-γ, and IL-2 enhanced the secretion of MCP-1 from PrEC and PrSC. In addition, MCP-1 levels in EPS correlated with mRNA levels of the macrophage marker CD68 in the same secretions. CONCLUSIONS The cytokine MCP-1, of apparent prostatic stromal cell origin, may play an important role in prostatic enlargement and BPH, and is a candidate biomarker for these pathologic processes. PMID:19902472

  5. Prostate size correlates with fasting blood glucose in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with normal testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok Joong; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the correlations between BMI, fasting glucose, insulin, testosterone level, insulin resistance, and prostate size in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with normal testosterone levels. Data from 212 non-diabetic BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) due to medical treatment failure, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≥ 3 ng/mL underwent multicore transrectal prostate biopsy before TURP to rule out prostate cancer. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or serum testosterone levels of < 3.50 ng/mL were excluded from analysis. Correlations between clinical and laboratory parameters were determined. Prostate size correlated positively with age (r = 0.227, P < 0.001), PSA (r = 0.510, P < 0.001), and fasting glucose level (r = 0.186, P = 0.007), but not with BMI, testosterone, insulin level, or insulin resistance (each P > 0.05). Testosterone level inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.327, P < 0.001), insulin level (r = -0.207, P = 0.003), and insulin resistance (r = -0.221, P = 0.001), but not with age, prostate size, PSA, or fasting glucose level (each P > 0.05). Upon multiple adjusted linear regression analysis, prostate size correlated with elevated PSA (P < 0.001) and increased fasting glucose levels (P = 0.023). In non-DM BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, fasting glucose level is an independent risk factor for prostate hyperplasia.

  6. Surgical intervention for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia is correlated with expression of the AP-1 transcription factor network.

    PubMed

    Lin-Tsai, Opal; Clark, Peter E; Miller, Nicole L; Fowke, Jay H; Hameed, Omar; Hayward, Simon W; Strand, Douglas W

    2014-05-01

    Approximately one-third of patients fail medical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS) requiring surgical intervention. Our purpose was to establish a molecular characterization for patients undergoing surgical intervention for LUTS to address therapeutic deficiencies. Clinical, molecular, and histopathological profiles were analyzed in 26 patients undergoing surgery for severe LUTS. Incidental transitional zone nodules were isolated from 37 patients with mild symptoms undergoing radical prostatectomy. Clinical parameters including age, prostate volume, medication, prostate specific antigen, symptom score, body mass index, and incidence of diabetes were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analysis with adjustments for potential confounding variables was used to examine associations between patient clinical characteristics and molecular targets identified through molecular profiling. Compared to incidental BPH, progressive symptomatic BPH was associated with increased expression of the activating protein-1 transcription factor/chemokine network. As expected, inverse correlations were drawn between androgen receptor levels and age, as well as between 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) treatment and tissue prostate specific antigen levels; however, a novel association was also drawn between 5ARI treatment and increased c-FOS expression. This study provides molecular evidence that a network of pro-inflammatory activating protein-1 transcription factors and associated chemokines are highly enriched in symptomatic prostate disease, a profile that molecularly categorizes with many other chronic autoimmune diseases. Because 5ARI treatment was associated with increased c-FOS expression, future studies should explore whether increased activating protein-1 proteins are causal factors in the development of symptomatic prostate disease, inflammation or resistance to traditional hormonal therapy. © 2014 Wiley

  7. Resistive index of prostate capsular arteries: a newly identified parameter to diagnose and assess bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Li, Gang; Wei, Xuedong; Mo, Xiaodong; Hu, Linkun; Zha, Yueqin; Hou, Jianquan

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the association of the resistive index of the prostate capsular arteries and bladder outlet obstruction severity in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. A total of 74 patients histologically diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia were ultimately enrolled in this prospective study. Urodynamics were performed by a urologist to determine bladder outlet obstruction. Baseline parameters measured in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were the prostate capsular artery resistive index, International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life score, total prostate and transition zone volume, and the transition zone index. ROC curves were produced to calculate the ROC AUC and evaluate the diagnostic performance of the prostate capsular artery resistive index, International Prostate Symptom Score, obstructive symptoms, total prostate and transition zone volume, and the transition zone index for bladder outlet obstruction. Significant difference between patients with and without bladder outlet obstruction was observed in the resistive index, which showed the highest coefficient with the degree of obstruction (r = 0.712, p <0.0001). At a cutoff of 0.69 the resistive index distinguished patients with and without bladder outlet obstruction with 78% sensitivity and 86.4% specificity. The prostate capsular artery resistive index had the maximum AUC of 0.823. The prostate capsular artery resistive index is significantly higher in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia related bladder outlet obstruction than in those without such obstruction. The resistive index might serve as a novel indicator to diagnose and assess bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Evidence of a Potential Relationship, Hypothesized Etiology, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno; Castiglione, Fabio; Gallina, Andrea; Capitanio, Umberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is highly prevalent in older men and causes substantial adverse effects on health. The pathogenesis of this disease is not totally clear. Recent reports have suggested a possible relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and BPH. Single components of MetS (obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance) as well as the syndrome itself may predispose patients to a higher risk of BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This may stem from changes in insulin resistance, increased autonomic activity, impaired nitrergic innervation, increased Rho kinase activity, pro-inflammatory status, and changes in sex hormones that occur in association with MetS. However, the exact underlying mechanisms that regulate the potential relationship between MetS and BPH/LUTS still need to be clarified. Increased physical activity and dietary strategies may help in decreasing the incidence of MetS and its impact on BPH/LUTS. However, differences in the definitions used to address the examined predictors and endpoints preclude the possibility of arriving at definitive conclusions. PMID:21927696

  9. Targeting Stromal Androgen Receptor Suppresses Prolactin-Driven Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9®, led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy. PMID:23893956

  10. Oxytocin: its role in benign prostatic hyperplasia via the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Fu, Shi; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Gu, Meng; Liu, Chong; Qiao, Zhiguang; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Zhong

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxytocin and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and study the cell signalling mechanism. Investigation was performed in patients about the correlation between oxytocin level and BPH. Mice were injected with oxytocin or oxytocin antagonist for 2 weeks and the prostate morphology was studied after their sacrifice. Furthermore, in vitro experiments were performed to evaluate the oxytocin effect through the MEK/ERK/RSK pathway. Oxytocin was significantly elevated in the serum and prostate tissue of patients with BPH, and a positive correlation with prostate volume indicated. In the animal experiments, prostate enlargement was observed in the oxytocin-treated group, whereas oxytocin antagonist reduced prostate hyperplasia. The in vitro study confirmed this result and also revealed activation of the MEK/ERK/RSK pathway. Oxytocin is highly expressed in the serum and prostate tissue of patients with BPH. In addition, oxytocin aggravates BPH and the oxytocin-induced proliferative effect on prostatic cells is mediated through the MEK/ERK/RSK pathway, at least partly. Thus, the hypothalamic regulation may be involved in development of BPH, which may open a new door to more medications for BPH in the future. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Anti-proliferation effects of Cistanches salsa on the progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyo-Jin An; Chung, Kyung-Sook; An, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cistanche salsa has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of kidney deficiency, neurasthenia, sexual dysfunction diseases, and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which C. salsa extract (CSE) elicits an anti-proliferative effect on the prostate tissue of BPH-induced rats. The effects of CSE on BPH were evaluated in terms of prostate weight, production of serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and the mRNA expression of 5α-reductase type 1 and type 2 in the prostate tissue of BPH-induced rats. In addition, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed for histological examination of prostate gland morphology, and protein expression levels in prostate tissue were investigated by western blot analysis. CSE treatment decreased prostate weight, serum DHT concentration, and the mRNA expression of 5α-reductase type 1 and type 2 in prostate tissue of BPH-induced rats. In addition, CSE treatment suppressed cell proliferation by regulating the expression levels of inflammatory-related proteins (inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2) and apoptosis-associated proteins (caspase-3 and Bcl-2 family proteins). CSE may be a potential therapeutic candidate for BPH owing to its ability to regulate the expression of inflammatory and apoptosis-related proteins.

  12. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Tristan M.; Sehgal, Priyanka D.; Drew, Sally A.; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goal of this study was to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR & ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR & ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH. PMID:23792768

  13. Bipolar transurethral resection versus monopolar transurethral resection for benign prostatic hypertrophy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yin; Li, Jinhong; Pu, Chuanxiao; Bai, YunJin; Yuan, HaiChao; Wei, Qiang; Han, Ping

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of monopolar (M-TURP) and bipolar (B-TURP) transurethral resection of the prostate in benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) patients. Eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from electronic databases without language restrictions. Database search, quality assessment, and data extraction were independently performed. The primary postoperative outcomes of topical M-TURP and B-TURP were maximum flow rate (Qmax) and/or International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Safety was estimated by TUR syndrome; need for transfusion; clot retention; bladder neck contracture (BNC); urethral stricture (US); and catheter removal time. Efficacy and safety were investigated using the Review Manager. Thirty-one trials met the inclusion criteria. Pooled analysis revealed significant difference in efficacy between the M-TURP and B-TURP groups. Safety analysis revealed significant improvement in the TUR syndrome with B-TURP than with M-TURP. Pooled analysis revealed that clot retention was significantly higher in M-TURP than in B-TURP. Moreover, pooled analysis revealed no significant difference between both groups in the blood transfusion frequency or late complications (urethral strictures) and bladder neck constriction. This systematic review indicates that B-TURP was significantly better in the result of Qmax and for decreasing the incidence of TUR syndrome and clot retention. No significant differences were observed in the nature of adverse events such as transfusions, retention after catheter removal, and urethral complications between both groups. Thus, B-TURP is the next generation "gold standard" for benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) because it is associated with a lower rate of clinically relevant complications such as TUR syndrome and clot retention.

  14. Singapore Urological Association Clinical Guidelines for Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The first clinical guidelines for male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were published in 2005. An update is urgently needed in view of BPH being recognised as one of ten chronic illnesses by the Ministry of Health, Singapore. This review summarises the definition of BPH and the epidemiology of male LUTS/BPH in Singapore. BPH can be phenotyped with noninvasive transabdominal ultrasonography, according to intravesical prostatic protrusion and prostate volume, and classified according to severity (staging) for individualised treatment. At the initial evaluation, the majority of patients (59%) can be managed with fluid adjustment, exercise and diet; 32% with medications, using alpha blockers and/or 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for prostates weighing more than 30 g; and 9% with surgical intervention for more advanced disease. The 2015 guidelines comprise updated evidence that will help family medicine practitioners and specialists manage this common ailment more cost-effectively. PMID:28848988

  15. Ablation of benign prostatic hyperplasia using microbubble-mediated ultrasound cavitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Zheng

    2010-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a world-wide common disease in elderly male patients. A number of invasive physiotherapies have been used to replace prostatectomy. In this article we report our hypothesis of using microbubbles-mediated ultrasound cavitation effects to ablate prostatic tissues. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agent is widely used contrast media in ultrasonography, yet it is also found to act as cavitation nuclei or enhancer. Once excited by a high peak pressure ultrasound pulse, the mechanical effects, like shock wave and microstream, released from cavitation could produce a series of bioeffects, contributing to sonoporation, microvascular rupture and hematoma. BPH is known to have hyperplastic neovasculature and this make it possible to be disrupted by the physical effects of cavitation under existing microbubbles in circulation. Mechanical ablation of prostatic capillary or small vessels could result in pathological alterations such as thrombosis, micro-circulation blockage, prostatic necrosis and atrophia. Thereupon it could effectively treat BPH by nontraumatic ways.

  16. A randomized study comparing visual laser ablation and transurethral evaporation of prostate in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Narayan, P; Tewari, A; Aboseif, S; Evans, C

    1995-12-01

    We evaluated the safety, efficacy, failure and complications of 2 techniques of laser prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): transurethral evaporation of the prostate (evaporation) versus visual laser ablation of the prostate (coagulation) in a randomized trial. A total of 64 consecutive patients with symptomatic BPH was randomized to undergo evaporation (32) or coagulation (32). American Urological Association symptom score, peak urinary flow rate and post-void residual urine volume were measured at baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Other parameters evaluated included prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, total laser energy per patient and per cc volume of the prostate, number of laser fibers per prostate, duration of catheterization and hospitalization, need for re-catheterization, and failure and complication rates. Our main findings were that patients undergoing laser prostatectomy using the coagulation technique (visual laser ablation of the prostate) had higher reoperation rates (16% versus 0%, p = 0.0199) and were 4 times more likely to have prolonged postoperative urinary retention (25% versus 6.3%, p = 0.0389), evaporation and coagulation were effective at relieving symptoms of prostatism with significant improvement in American Urological Association symptom scores and post-void residual urine volumes compared to baseline, improvement in peak flow rates was significantly greater in patients undergoing evaporation at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months (p < 0.001) compared to coagulation, and a significantly greater amount of laser energy was required to evaporate a unit volume of prostate tissue compared to coagulation (2,251 J./cc versus 1,036 J./cc, p < 0.03). Between the 2 major techniques of laser prostatectomy, transurethral evaporation is associated with better results at up to 12 months of followup.

  17. Differential expression of MST4, STK25 and PDCD10 between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heyu; Ma, Xi; Peng, Saihui; Nan, Xu; Zhao, Hongshan

    2014-01-01

    Both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) are common diseases for men around the world. Both serine/threonine protein kinase MST4 (MST4) and serine/threonine kinase 25 (STK25) belong to the Ste20-like kinases and interact with programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) which is closely linked to cancer diseases. To clarify the roles of MST4, STK25 and PDCD10 in prostate carcinogenesis, we examined MST4, STK25 and PDCD10 expression in tissue microarray blocks containing 110 cores of BPH and 160 cores of PC immunohistochemically and evaluated their correlation with clinicopathological findings. MST4 was not expressed in all the BPH cases and expressed in 38.7% of PC cases (P < 0.0001). STK25 expression was found in 77.3% of BPH cases and 93.1% of PC cases (P < 0.0001). PDCD10 staining was considered weak in 82 (74.5%) and strong in 28 (25.5%) of BPH cases. However, in prostate cancer cases, PDCD10 staining was weak in 95 (59.4%) and strong in 65 (40.6%) (P < 0.05). PDCD10 and STK25 immunostaining were associated with age in prostatic hyperplasia cases (P < 0.05). The staining intensity for STK25 was significantly greater in Gleason grades 3-5 (47.1% of such cases staining strongly) compared with other grades of prostate cancer (only 26.5% of these cases staining strongly; P < 0.05). Our results suggest that MST4, STK25 and PDCD10 are unregulated in prostate cancer and may play roles in prostate tumorigenesis. MST4 may be a helpful marker for identifying prostate cancer.

  18. GATA3 Positivity in Benign Radiated Prostate Glands: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Wobker, Sara E; Khararjian, Armen; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2017-04-01

    Histologic changes following radiation therapy to the prostate include multilayering of glands, atrophy, squamous metaplasia, and often marked random nuclear atypia. We have seen multiple consultation cases where the differential diagnosis of these radiated prostate glands included urothelial carcinoma, with multilayered to solid-appearing proliferations that were positive by immunohistochemistry for GATA3. To formally investigate this issue, 30 cases of benign prostate tissue with radiation atypia, from 1990 to 2015, were obtained from our institution. Cases were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for the prostate-specific markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA), P501S (Prostein), and NKX3.1 and urothelial markers GATA3 and uroplakin 2. GATA3 was positive in 100% of cases, with 70% showing moderately strong to strong staining in a mostly patchy manner within a gland. PSA was positive in 93.3% of cases, with 89.2% showing moderately strong to strong staining in a mostly diffuse manner. P501S was positive in 96.7% of cases, with 93.1% showing moderately strong to strong staining in a mostly patchy manner. NKX3.1 was positive in 82.8% of cases, with 33.3% showing moderately strong to strong staining in a mostly patchy manner. Uroplakin 2 was negative in 100% of cases. Our findings highlight that GATA3 is often positive in benign prostate glands with radiation atypia, which along with the morphologic features present a pitfall for the misdiagnosis of urothelial carcinoma. A combination of PSA and P501S is the best prostate-specific panel for use in radiated prostate, with the caveat that they are often patchy and do not stain all radiated glands.

  19. Distinguishing prostate cancer from benign confounders via a cascaded classifier on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litjens, G. J. S.; Elliott, R.; Shih, N.; Feldman, M.; Barentsz, J. O.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C. A.; Kovacs, I.; Huisman, H. J.; Madabhushi, A.

    2014-03-01

    Learning how to separate benign confounders from prostate cancer is important because the imaging characteristics of these confounders are poorly understood. Furthermore, the typical representations of the MRI parameters might not be enough to allow discrimination. The diagnostic uncertainty this causes leads to a lower diagnostic accuracy. In this paper a new cascaded classifier is introduced to separate prostate cancer and benign confounders on MRI in conjunction with specific computer-extracted features to distinguish each of the benign classes (benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), inflammation, atrophy or prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PIN). In this study we tried to (1) calculate different mathematical representations of the MRI parameters which more clearly express subtle differences between different classes, (2) learn which of the MRI image features will allow to distinguish specific benign confounders from prostate cancer, and (2) find the combination of computer-extracted MRI features to best discriminate cancer from the confounding classes using a cascaded classifier. One of the most important requirements for identifying MRI signatures for adenocarcinoma, BPH, atrophy, inflammation, and PIN is accurate mapping of the location and spatial extent of the confounder and cancer categories from ex vivo histopathology to MRI. Towards this end we employed an annotated prostatectomy data set of 31 patients, all of whom underwent a multi-parametric 3 Tesla MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. The prostatectomy slides were carefully co-registered to the corresponding MRI slices using an elastic registration technique. We extracted texture features from the T2-weighted imaging, pharmacokinetic features from the dynamic contrast enhanced imaging and diffusion features from the diffusion-weighted imaging for each of the confounder classes and prostate cancer. These features were selected because they form the mainstay of clinical diagnosis. Relevant features for

  20. Correlation between international prostate symptom score and uroflowmetry in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Oranusi, C K; Nwofor, A E; Mbonu, O

    2017-04-01

    To determine the correlation between severity of symptoms using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and uroflowmetry in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms-benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS-BPH). We prospectively collected data from 51 consecutive men, who presented with LUTS-BPH at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, from January 2012 through December, 2014. Symptom severity was assessed using the self-administered IPSS questionnaire. We also performed uroflowmetry using the Urodyn 1000 (Dantec, serial no. 5534). The mean age of the patients was 67.2 ± 9.7 years (range 40-89 years). The most common presenting IPSS-LUTS was nocturia (100%) followed by urinary frequency (98%), straining (92.0%), weak stream (84.3%), urgency (41.2%), incomplete voiding (39.2%), and intermittency (35.3%) Most of the patients had moderate symptoms (58.8%) on IPSS with a mean value of 13.5 ± 3.0. The mean Qmax was 15.6 ± 18.7 mL/s and the mean voided volume was 193.0 ± 79.2 mL. About one-third of the patients (39.2%) had an unobstructed flow pattern based on Qmax. Correlation analysis showed a weak correlation between IPSS and voiding time (r = 0.220, P > 0.05), flow time (r = 0.128, P > 0.05), and time to maximum flow (r = 0.246, P > 0.05). These correlations were not significant (P > 0.05). IPSS showed a negative correlation with maximum flow rate (r = 0.368; P < 0.0075), average flow rate (-0.203, P > 0.05), and voided volume (r = -0.164, P > 0.05). This negative correlation was significant for maximum flow rate. Correlation between IPSS and Qmax was negative but statistically significant. This implies that an inverse relationship exists between IPSS and Qmax, and remains the only important parameter in uroflowmetry. There was no statistically significant correlation between IPSS and the other variables of uroflowmetry.

  1. Interstitial laser coagulation therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Alsudani, Mohammed

    1996-05-01

    Alternatives to the side-firing laser method include controlled destruction of prostatic adenoma by an atraumatic saline cooled laser fiber introduced endoscopically into the prostate under visual and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) control. Laser light produces intense heating and interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) occurs with characteristic TRUS changes which are used to control the volume of tissue destruction. The prostatic urethral lining is preserved which may reduce laser side effects). Thirty-six men with symptomatic BPH were treated by ILC between April 1994 and September 1995. All were discharged home on the first post-operative day and reviewed periodically to 12 months post-treatment with measurement of IPSS, flow rate (FR), residual volume, complications, potency and TRUS. Seventeen men (47%) voided immediately, 15 (42%) performed intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) for 3.5 days (2 - 5). Four men (11%) required catheterization for 1/52. Thirty-five men tolerated the treatment well, requiring only mild oral analgesia. One man developed dysuria and required early transurethral resection revealing a large volume of coagulative necrosis. Improvement in symptoms and flow rate developed from 1 - 30 days later. There were no significant complications. Hyperechoic and cystic zones developed at the ILC site which persisted to 12 months. This clinical study indicates the feasibility and safety of intense heating by ILC with visible and ultrasound control to coagulate the adenoma while preserving the urethra. Changes are easily seen on TRUS, symptomatic improvement is good and there have been minimal urethral symptoms or complications.

  2. The therapeutic potential of royal jelly in benign prostatic hyperplasia. Comparison with contemporary literature.

    PubMed

    Pajovic, Bogdan; Radojevic, Nemanja; Dimitrovski, Antonio; Tomovic, Savo; Vukovic, Marko

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the scientific benefit of royal jelly (RJ) on prostatic-specific antigen (PSA), post-void residual (PVR) volume and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) in benign prostatic hyperplasia. For the study, a group of 40 men were administered 38 mg of RJ over a period of three months, their PSA values, prostate volumes and the volumes of their transitory prostate zones, PVR and IPPS values were measured at the end of the first month, and at the end of the third month. The results of this study confirm the potential of RJ in reducing PSA scores and improving IPSS values. Since the use of RJ did not lead to any significant reduction in PVR, prostate volume, or to any involution of the transitory zone, it appears that it may only affect the blood marker of prostatic hyperplasia and to improve quality-of-life (QoL) in those patients. Overall, in comparison to phytotherapy and conventional therapy, RJ had similar positive effects on QoL in patients with BPH, however it exhibited markedly better effects on reducing PSA levels in blood. The therapeutical use of RJ exhibited no side effects.

  3. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27294569

  4. Association between benign prostatic hyperplasia, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome in Chinese men

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhuo; Yang, Jin-Rui; Rao, Jian-Ming; Song, Wei; Zhou, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have showed that men suffering from diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and obesity have a higher risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The present study aimed to examine the association between BPH, obesity, and features of MetS among men of the Hunan area of China. For this cross-sectional study, 904 males (aged 50–59 years) were included. MetS parameters, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, total prostate volume (TPV), postvoid residual volume (PVR) and maximum urine flow rate (Qmax) were measured. Results showed that MetS was associated with TPV (P = 0.048), PVR (P = 0.004) and IPSS (P = 0.011), but not with other indicators of BPH progression such as PSA levels or Qmax. MetS was associated with the voiding symptoms score (P < 0.05), but not with the storage symptom score. In addition, body mass index and fasting blood glucose positively correlated with TPV (r = 0.416, P < 0.001; and r = 0.310, P= 0.011, respectively). In conclusion, results suggest that MetS is associated with higher prostatic volume, prostate symptom score and voiding symptoms, but not with other features of prostatic hyperplasia such as PSA levels or Qmax. Changes in lifestyle factors, including physical activity and prevention of MetS, might be useful to prevent BPH and its progression, but further studies are needed. PMID:25677137

  5. Intraprostatic Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia—A Spotlight in Reality

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Chao; Wang, Hung-Jen; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It inhibits the release of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters from the nerve terminal. Botulinum toxin, specifically toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been used since the 1970s to reduce the muscular hypercontraction disorders. The application of BoNT-A in urology field started from intra-bladder injection for overactive bladder, which has been recognized as third line therapy in many countries. Since prostate gland as well as bladder is under the influence of autonomic innervation, theorectically, injection of BoNT-A into the prostate induces chemo-denervation and modulation of prostate function, and reduces lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This article reviews the application of BoNT-A in patients with LUTS/ benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from mechanisms of action to clinical results. BoNT-A has been shown to induce prostate apoptosis, downregulation of alpha 1A receptors, and reduce contractile function of prostate in animal studies. Open studies of intraprostate BoNT-A injection have demonstrated promising results of reducing LUTS and improvement of voiding function in human LUTS/BPH, however, intraprostatic BoNT-A injection did not perform better than the placebo group in recent publications of placebo controlled studies. We suggested that BoNT-A prostate injection might benefit selected population of BPH/LUTS, but it is unlikely to be an effective therapy for general population of male LUTS/BPH. PMID:27128942

  6. ABCG2-mediated dyecycle violet efflux defined side population in benign and malignant prostate

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Grinu; Timm, Earl A.; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Smith, Gary J.; Huss, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    The efflux of Hoechst 33342 by ATP-binding cassette protein G2 (ABCG2) membrane pump allows reproducible identification of a subpopulation of cells by flow cytometric analysis termed the “side population” (SP). The SP identified by constitutive Hoechst efflux contains the stem/progenitor cell population from bone marrow and many solid organs, including prostate. DyeCycle Violet (DCV) is a cell membrane permeable, fluorescent vital dye that intercalates into DNA and is a substrate for ABCG2-mediated efflux. Therefore, DCV was evaluated in this study as a tool for identification of the SP from prostate cancer cell lines and from freshly harvested human prostate tissue. SPs that demonstrated ABCG2-mediated efflux of DCV were identified in the human prostate cancer cell lines CWR-R1, DU-145 and RWPE-1, but not in the BPH-1, LAPC-4 or PC-3 cell lines. Additionally, a SP was identified in enzymatically disaggregated prostate tumors from Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP), human benign prostate tissue and human prostate cancer tissue. The causal role of ABCG2-mediated efflux of DCV in the identification of the SP was confirmed by loss of the SP by incubation with the specific inhibitor of ABCG2, Fumitremorgin C. Expression of ABCG2 in the SP cells was confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Consequently, DCV represents an important new tool for isolation of viable candidate stem cells/cancer stem cells as a SP from cultured prostate cell lines, and prostate tissue specimens, without the requirement for instrumentation with ultra-violet excitation capability and minimizing the risk of damage to DNA in the sorted population. PMID:19270533

  7. Effects of Melandrium firmum methanolic extract on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Nam-Hun; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Son, Jong-Keun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown aetiology characterized by prostatic enlargement coincident with distinct alterations in tissue histomorphology. Instead of therapeutic agents that can cause severe side effects, plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH. In this study, we investigated whether the Melandrium firmum methanolic extract (MFME) improves BPH, using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Castration was performed via the scrotal route under sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia. BPH in castrated rats was generated via daily subcutaneous injections of TP (3 mg kg−1) dissolved in corn oil, for 4 weeks. MFME was administered daily by oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg kg−1 for 4 weeks, along with the TP injections. The control group received injections of corn oil subcutaneously. At the scheduled termination of the experiment, all rats were killed and their prostates weighed; the relative prostate weight (prostate/body weight ratio) was calculated, and histomorphological changes in the prostate were examined. Additionally, we measured the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the serum and the prostate. Experimentally induced BPH led to marked decreases in the relative prostate weight and the DHT levels in the serum and the prostate. Histologically, BPH was evident in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and MFME treatment suppressed the severity of the lesions. These results indicate that MFME effectively inhibits the development of BPH induced by testosterone in a rat model. Further studies will be needed to identify the compound(s) responsibility for inducing the protective effect against BPH and determine its mechanism of action. PMID:22231294

  8. Effects of Melandrium firmum methanolic extract on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Nam-Hun; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Son, Jong-Keun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown aetiology characterized by prostatic enlargement coincident with distinct alterations in tissue histomorphology. Instead of therapeutic agents that can cause severe side effects, plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH. In this study, we investigated whether the Melandrium firmum methanolic extract (MFME) improves BPH, using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Castration was performed via the scrotal route under sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia. BPH in castrated rats was generated via daily subcutaneous injections of TP (3 mg kg(-1)) dissolved in corn oil, for 4 weeks. MFME was administered daily by oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg kg(-1) for 4 weeks, along with the TP injections. The control group received injections of corn oil subcutaneously. At the scheduled termination of the experiment, all rats were killed and their prostates weighed; the relative prostate weight (prostate/body weight ratio) was calculated, and histomorphological changes in the prostate were examined. Additionally, we measured the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the serum and the prostate. Experimentally induced BPH led to marked decreases in the relative prostate weight and the DHT levels in the serum and the prostate. Histologically, BPH was evident in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and MFME treatment suppressed the severity of the lesions. These results indicate that MFME effectively inhibits the development of BPH induced by testosterone in a rat model. Further studies will be needed to identify the compound(s) responsibility for inducing the protective effect against BPH and determine its mechanism of action.

  9. Interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a minimally invasive treatment alternative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordonez, Robert F.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.; Aronoff, David R.; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    The use of minimally invasive treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have been introduced into the medical community. Over the last decade several minimally invasive treatment techniques have been approved for use. In particular, interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) has shown pomise as an alternative to the current gold standard, transurethral resection of prostate (TURP). Studies show ILC to have equal efficacy as TURP while causing less side effects. Future technical advances as well as increased physician experience with ILC could lead to the replacement of TURP as the gold standard in trestment of BPH.

  10. Symptomatic and asymptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: Molecular differentiation by using microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Kulkarni; Pirozzi, Gregorio; Elashoff, Michael; Munger, William; Waga, Iwao; Dhir, Rajiv; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2002-05-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a disease of unknown etiology that significantly affects the quality of life in aging men. Histologic BPH may present itself either as symptomatic or asymptomatic in nature. To elucidate the molecular differences underlying BPH, gene expression profiles from the prostate transition zone tissue have been analyzed by using microarrays. A set of 511 differentially expressed genes distinguished symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH. This genetic signature separates BPH from normal tissue but does not seem to change with age. These data could provide novel approaches for alleviating symptoms and hyperplasia in BPH.

  11. [The use of drug vitaprost forte in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, B A; Neĭmark, A I; Nozdrachev, N A

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of vitaprost forte rectal suppositories 100 mg in 30 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were evaluated. It is proven, that the use of this drug positively affects both the subjective and the objective symptoms of BPH. Vitaprost forte significantly reduces the clinical signs of the disease and improves quality of life, that is, reduces the severity of bladder outlet obstruction (according to the data of uroflowmetry, it increases maximum urinary flow rate), decreases the amount of residual urine. In addition, moderate reduction in mean prostate volume was revealed in BPH patients receiving vitaprost forte.

  12. Extravasation of Urine Associated with Bilateral Complete Ureteral Duplication, Vesicoureteral Reflux and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Issei; Kaga, Kanya; Takei, Kohei; Tokura, Yuumi; Sakamoto, Kazumasa; Nishihara, Daisaku; Mizuno, Tomoya; Yuki, Hideo; Betsunoh, Hironori; Abe, Hideyuki; Yashi, Masahiro; Fukabori, Yoshitatsu; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kamai, Takao

    2017-02-01

    We report a rare case of extravasation of urine, which may be associated with bilateral complete ureteral duplication, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A 71-year-old male presented with a complaint of right abdominal pain. An extravasation of urine was noted, and was improved by indwelling urethral catheterization. Transurethral resection of the prostate and the endoscopic subureteral injection of dextanomer/hyaluronic acid were performed for the treatment of BPH and VUR, respectively. The post-surgery recovery was successful.

  13. Diode laser vaporization of prostate as treatment for benign prostatic enlargement: initial results of 73 patients with 1 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Aćimović, Miodrag; Rafailović, Dragutin; Bumbaširević, Uroš; Babić, Uroš; Šantrić, Veljko; Stanić, Miodrag; Džamić, Zoran; Hadži-Djokić, Jovan

    2014-01-01

    Our objective is to evaluate the efficacy, safety and 12 month outcome of a 980 nm diode laser with Twister fiber in the treatment of benign prostatic enlargement. Between February 2011 and January 2013, 73 patients with benign pros- tatic enlargement had undergone diode laser vaporization of prostate at our institution. The fol- lowing parameters were assessed at baseline, and after a follow-up period of 3 and 12 months: International Prostate Symptom Score, peak urinary flow rate, post-void residual urine volume, and quality of life score. The procedure was completed successfully in all patients with no intraoperative complications. At 12 months postoperatively the percentage improvements in IPSS was -69.09%, Qmax +197%, PVR -88.54%, and QoL -68.29%. Diode laser vaporization of prostate is safe and effective method for treatment of benign prostatic enlargement.

  14. Prostate cancer incidence in males with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Wei, Lai; Wu, Christina; Frankel, Wendy; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; de la Chapelle, Albert; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An increased risk of prostate cancer is currently not considered a part of the Lynch syndrome spectrum. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively examine prostate cancer incidence in the Lynch syndrome cohort at the Ohio State University in comparison with that in the general population. Methods We included all males diagnosed with Lynch syndrome from June 1998 to June 2012 at the Ohio State University and obtained baseline information including cancer history. If patients had not been seen in the 12 months before June 2012, they were contacted to document changes in their cancer history. We compared prostate cancer incidence among the Lynch syndrome families with that of the general population by using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry 1999–2009. Results Of the 188 males identified with Lynch syndrome, 11 males were diagnosed with prostate cancer during the study period. The ratio of observed to expected numbers of prostate cancer cases resulted in a standardized rate ratio of 4.87 (95% confidence interval: 2.43–8.71). Impaired mismatch repair expression and microsatellite instability were seen in one out of two prostate cancer specimens available for testing. Conclusion Males with Lynch syndrome had a nearly fivefold increased risk of developing prostate cancer but did not appear to have earlier onset or a more aggressive phenotype. PMID:24434690

  15. Transurethral enucleation of the prostate versus transvesical open prostatectomy for large benign prostatic hyperplasia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Youcheng; Wu, Xun; Xu, Abai; Ren, Rui; Zhou, Xueqiong; Wen, Yong; Zou, Yong; Gong, Mancheng; Liu, Chunxiao; Su, Zexuan; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transurethral enucleation of the prostate (TUEP) versus transvesical open prostatectomy (OP) for the management of large benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TUEP and OP were identified from PubMed, Embase and Web of Science up to February 28, 2015. A meta-analysis was conducted with the STATA 12.0 software. Nine RCTs including 758 patients were enrolled in our meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the maximum urinary flow rate at 1, 3, 6 months, 1 and 2 years: postvoiding residual urinary volume, prostate-specific antigen, international prostate symptom score and quality of life score at 1, 3, 6 months and 1 year; or international index of erectile function at 3, 6 months and 1 year. Perioperative outcomes including hemoglobin level drop, catheter period, irrigation length and hospital stay favored TUEP, while operative time and resected prostate weight favored OP. There was significantly less blood transfusion with TUEP, but no significant differences were found in other complications such as recatheterization, urinary tract infection, reintervention for clots and bleeding control, incidence of pneumonia and infarction, transient incontinence, bladder neck contracture, urethral stricture and recurrent adenoma. TUEP can be performed effectively and safely with functional outcomes and complications similar to OP for large BPH, whereas it has the advantages of a shorter catheter period, shorter hospital stays and less blood transfusion. These findings seem to support TUEP as the next-generation "gold standard" of surgery for large BPH.

  16. PPARγ: A Molecular Link between systemic metabolic disease and benign prostate hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; Strand, Douglas W.; Franco, Omar E.; Clark, Peter E.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2011-01-01

    The emergent epidemic of metabolic syndrome and its complex list of sequelae mandate a more thorough understanding of benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS) in the context of systemic metabolic disease. Here we discuss the nature and origins of BPH, examine its role as a component of LUTS and review retrospective clinical studies that have drawn associations between BPH/LUTS and type II diabetes, inflammation and dyslipidemia. PPARγ signaling, which sits at the nexus of systemic metabolic disease and BPH/LUTS through its regulation of inflammation and insulin resistance is proposed as a candidate for molecular manipulation in regard to BPH/LUTS. Finally, we introduce new cell and animal models that are being used to study the consequences of obesity, diabetes and inflammation on benign prostatic growth. PMID:21645960

  17. Men's lived experiences following transurethral prostatectomy for benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pateman, B; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the lived experience of prostatectomy recovery by means of semi-structured interviews. Despite the commonality of prostatic enlargement and the corrective transurethral procedure, surprisingly little is known of the impact upon the men's social and psychological well-being. The interviews have produced very rich data, which illustrate the extent to which the men are initially very reluctant to identify 'problems' either with their hospital experience or their subsequent recovery period. However, once respondents appeared to feel more comfortable, we began to learn of their very substantial difficulties both before and after the operation.

  18. A study of molecular signals deregulating mismatch repair genes in prostate cancer compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanmitra; Majumder, Subhadipa; Bhowal, Ankur; Ghosh, Alip; Naskar, Sukla; Nandy, Sumit; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Basu, Keya; Karmakar, Dilip; Banerjee, Soma; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, P<0.05) was observed in prostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro) conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75). Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, P<0.05) with methylation quotient of its promoter which showed a significantly higher methylation density (P = 0.008, Z = -2.649) in cancer patients. hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-21 gene expressions were significantly elevated (66-85%, P<0.05) in tumor specimens and negatively correlated (r = -0.602 to -0.527, P<0.05) with that of MMR genes. hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-21 were demonstrated to bind to their putative seed sequences in hMLH1 and hMSH6 3'UTRs respectively. Relatively higher expression of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and HIF-1α genes (34-50%, P<0.05) were also detected in tumor tissues. This

  19. A Study of Molecular Signals Deregulating Mismatch Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Compared to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanmitra; Majumder, Subhadipa; Bhowal, Ankur; Ghosh, Alip; Naskar, Sukla; Nandy, Sumit; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Basu, Keya; Karmakar, Dilip; Banerjee, Soma; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, P<0.05) was observed in prostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro) conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75). Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, P<0.05) with methylation quotient of its promoter which showed a significantly higher methylation density (P = 0.008, Z = -2.649) in cancer patients. hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-21 gene expressions were significantly elevated (66-85%, P<0.05) in tumor specimens and negatively correlated (r = -0.602 to -0.527, P<0.05) with that of MMR genes. hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-21 were demonstrated to bind to their putative seed sequences in hMLH1 and hMSH6 3’UTRs respectively. Relatively higher expression of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and HIF-1α genes (34-50%, P<0.05) were also detected in tumor tissues

  20. [Safety ov benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment with alpha-adrenoblocker dalphas].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Pushkar', D Iu; Rasner, P I

    2000-01-01

    The study was made of dalphas-retard safety and effectiveness in 940 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and relevant urination problems. The drug was given in a dose 5-10 mg/day for 12 weeks. The results were assessed in 881 patients who had completed the treatment course. 18 patients (1.9%) discontinued the treatment because of side effects. 38 patients (4%) had side effects once or more times.

  1. [Zinc, calcium and sodium values in secretions of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D

    1990-12-01

    In two randomized patients groups suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) two exprimate samples were drawn at a seven-day interval. In the untreated control group no changes in the values of Ca, Na and Zn were found. In the other group the patients have been treated with ERU capsules (Radicis urticae) for 7 days and thereafter a significant decrease of Zn values were found.

  2. Antidepression medication improves quality of life in elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and depression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Huizhen; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Wei; Qian, Yuying; Wang, Jieyu; Feng, Ming; Li, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We aim to explore the influence of an antidepression medication on symptom scores and quality of life in elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanied by depression. We conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial which included 94 elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanied by depression in Xuan Wu Hospital and Beijing Boai Hospital during August 2008 to May 2012. The study was designed to compare outcomes related to patient quality of life (QoL). The patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups, consisting of a control group (n = 47) and a therapy group (n = 47), and were followed up for 3 months. The pre-treatment and post-treatment changes among patients in the two groups were compared using their respective IPSS symptom scores, HAM-D scores, and scores on the Short Form 36 Health Survey. Following treatment, the patient IPSS symptom scores in the therapy group were significantly lower than those in the control group (10.74 ± 4.72 vs. 16.42 ± 8.09, respectively; t = 4.157, P < 0.05). Additionally, each measured dimension of QoL was significantly higher in the therapy group [total score (69.12 ± 3.92) vs. (61.30 ± 3.51), P < 0.05]. The results show antidepression medication can improve the symptoms and quality of life among elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanied by depression. Our findings suggest that an antidepression medication should be included when treating elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  3. Photo-Acoustic Ultrasound Imaging to Distinguish Benign from Malignant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    An ultrasound transducer delivers a pulse of acoustic energy into the area of interest and listens for the echoes which return as the sound waves... ultrasound probe developed in this project (Figure 13C). The images from the IVUS probe are relatively low quality and highly scattering targets...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0137 TITLE: Photo-Acoustic Ultrasound Imaging to Distinguish Benign from Malignant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL

  4. Antidepression medication improves quality of life in elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and depression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lina; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Huizhen; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Wei; Qian, Yuying; Wang, Jieyu; Feng, Ming; Li, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We aim to explore the influence of an antidepression medication on symptom scores and quality of life in elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanied by depression. We conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial which included 94 elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanied by depression in Xuan Wu Hospital and Beijing Boai Hospital during August 2008 to May 2012. The study was designed to compare outcomes related to patient quality of life (QoL). The patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups, consisting of a control group (n = 47) and a therapy group (n = 47), and were followed up for 3 months. The pre-treatment and post-treatment changes among patients in the two groups were compared using their respective IPSS symptom scores, HAM-D scores, and scores on the Short Form 36 Health Survey. Following treatment, the patient IPSS symptom scores in the therapy group were significantly lower than those in the control group (10.74 ± 4.72 vs. 16.42 ± 8.09, respectively; t = 4.157, P < 0.05). Additionally, each measured dimension of QoL was significantly higher in the therapy group [total score (69.12 ± 3.92) vs. (61.30 ± 3.51), P < 0.05]. The results show antidepression medication can improve the symptoms and quality of life among elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanied by depression. Our findings suggest that an antidepression medication should be included when treating elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:26064306

  5. Association of prostate volume with incidence and aggressiveness of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalil, Shadi; Ibilibor, Christine; Cammack, James Thomas; de Riese, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the possible correlation between prostate volume and aggressiveness and incidence of prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and methods A chart review of a cohort of 448 consecutive prostate biopsy-naive men was performed. These men underwent at least a 12-core biopsy at our institution due to increased prostate-specific antigen serum levels (>4 ng/mL) and/or suspicious findings on digital rectal examination during the period between 2008 and 2013. Transrectal ultrasound was used to determine the prostate volume. Results The positive biopsy rate was 66% for patients with a prostate volume of ≤35 cc and 40% for patients with a prostate volume of ≥65 cc (P<0.001). Of the 110 patients testing positive on biopsy with a volume of ≤35 cc, 10 patients (9.1%) had a Gleason score of ≥8. Of the 27 patients testing positive on biopsy with a volume of ≥65 cc, only 1 patient (3.7%) had a Gleason score of ≥8. Conclusion These results suggest that there may be an association between prostate volume and the incidence and aggressiveness of PCa. The larger the prostate, the lower the positive biopsy rate for PCa and the lower the Gleason score. PMID:27822463

  6. Chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue is associated with high-grade prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Gurel, Bora; Lucia, M. Scott; Thompson, Ian M.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Kristal, Alan R.; Parnes, Howard L.; Hoque, Ashraful; Lippman, Scott M.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Drake, Charles G.; Nelson, William G.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is hypothesized to influence prostate cancer development, although a definitive link has not been established. Methods Prostate cancer cases (N=191) detected on a for-cause (clinically indicated) or end-of-study (protocol directed) biopsy, and frequency-matched controls (N=209), defined as negative for cancer on an end-of-study biopsy, were sampled from the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Inflammation prevalence and extent in benign areas of biopsy cores were visually assessed using digital images of H&E stained sections. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations. Results 86.2% of cases and 78.2% of controls had at least one biopsy core (of 3 assessed) with inflammation in benign areas, most of which was chronic. Men who had at least one biopsy core with inflammation had 1.78 (95% CI 1.04–3.06) times the odds of prostate cancer compared with men who had zero cores with inflammation. The association was stronger for high-grade disease (Gleason sum 7–10, N=94; odds ratio [OR]=2.24, 95% CI 1.06–4.71). These patterns were present when restricting to cases and controls in whom intraprostatic inflammation was the least likely to have influenced biopsy recommendation because their PSA was low (<2 ng/mL at biopsy). Conclusion Inflammation, most of which was chronic, was common in benign prostate tissue, and was positively associated with prostate cancer, especially high-grade. The association did not appear to be due to detection bias. Impact This study supports an etiologic link between inflammation and prostate carcinogenesis, and suggests an avenue for prevention by mitigating intraprostatic inflammation. PMID:24748218

  7. Administration of extract of mushroom Phellinus linteus induces prostate enlargement with increase in stromal component in experimentally developed rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Arai, Seiji; Fukabori, Yoshitatsu; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2005-08-01

    To clarify the effect of the mushroom extract Phellinus linteus on noncancerous prostate cells using an experimentally developed rat benign prostatic hyperplasia model. A growing number of people take some natural herbal extracts for maintenance of their health. Among them, the extracts of certain mushrooms are believed to have a marked tumoricidal effect but low toxicity for normal tissues, and they are being drunk widely in Japan and Korea. However, until now, their effect on noncancerous benign prostate growth has not been examined. The mushroom extract was administered daily for 5 weeks to experimentally developed benign prostatic hyperplasia rats. Prostate organ weight, histologic composition, and gene expression levels of sex hormone receptors, transforming growth factor-beta, vascular endothelial growth factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase were examined. Prostate weight increased significantly by 37% owing to treatment with the mushroom extract (P < 0.05). In particular, the stromal component of the prostate increased significantly by 80% (P < 0.05). A suppression of transforming growth factor-beta1 expression by 56% was observed with the mushroom extract treatment (P < 0.05). We found that the mushroom extract enlarged the prostate. The effect was suggested to be on the prostate stroma, which may be involved in transforming growth factor-beta1 regulation. Administration of mushroom extract should be considered carefully by those with an enlarged prostate.

  8. Profiling of differential expression of messenger RNA in normal, benign, and metastatic prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Ratna; Robles, Liza D; Gibson, Jane; Muroski, Megan

    2002-12-01

    To understand the phenotypic changes associated with prostate cancer development and metastasis, we investigated differential gene expression in primary and established prostate cell lines used as models. We have used a differential display of messenger RNA (DDRT-PCR) technique using 168 primer combinations and total RNA from BPH-1, LNCaP, and PC3 cells to identify filter-based cDNA microarrays containing 18,376 nonredundant clones of genes and expressed sequence tags (EST) using mRNA from PrEC and MDAPCa2a cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed in normal, benign, and cancerous prostate cell lines. Twenty-five cDNA with a significant difference in expression of 76 candidate cDNA, as identified by DDRT-PCR and confirmed by slot-blot analysis, were selected for sequence analysis. Of these, 14 cDNA were further confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data showed that a variety of genes/EST were up- or down-regulated in the metastatic prostate tumor cells and a majority of these genes encode cytoskeletal proteins and proteins with regulatory function. Expression profile of two EST was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We also have identified a number of genes exhibiting differential expression in prostate cancer cells, which were not known earlier to be involved in prostate cancer. This report provides a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and a foundation to facilitate in-depth studies on the mechanism of prostate cancer development and metastasis.

  9. [Serum metabolomics analysis on benign prostate hyperplasia in mice based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Geng, Yue; Sun, Fengxia; Ma, Yu; Deng, Ligang; Lü, Jianyun; Li, Teng; Wang, Congcong

    2014-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) increasingly becomes a common factor affecting the quality of life of aging men. Its pathogenesis has not yet been fully elucidated. Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS) was employed to detect the changes of serum metabolites in normal mice, benign prostatic hyperplasia model mice and BPH model mice with finasteride intervention. The serum metabolite profiles of the three groups of mice were analyzed. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used for group differentiation and biomarker selection. The results showed good distinction among the three groups of mice serum metabolite spectra. Three potential biomarkers, 1-hexadecanoyl-SN-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine and (Z)-13-docosenamide, were discovered and identified. They all indicated the occurrence of benign prostatic hypertrophy is closely related to the disorders of lipid metabolism. Coinpared with the control group, the contents of the first two substances were significantly increased in the serum of BPH model mice, and significantly decreased after intervened by finasteride. The contents of (Z)-13-docosenamide decreased significantly in the serum of model group, and increased after intervened by finasteride. Compared with the control group, the contents of three biomarkers in finasteride group did not recover completely and had significant differences. This study is conductive to open new avenues of diagnosis and medical treatment for BPH.

  10. The therapeutic effects of docosahexaenoic acid on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Luo, Fei; Zhou, Ying; Du, Xiaoling; Shi, Jiandang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Yan; Hong, Wei; Zhang, Ju

    2016-07-15

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major disorders of the urinary system in elderly men. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the main component of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and has nerve protective, anti-inflammatory and tumour-growth inhibitory effects. Here, the therapeutic potential of DHA in treating BPH was investigated. Seal oil effectively prevented the development of prostatic hyperplasia induced by oestradiol/testosterone in a rat model by suppressing the increase of the prostatic index (PI), reducing the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, inhibiting the proliferation of both prostate epithelial and stromal cells, and downregulating the expression of androgen receptor (AR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα). An in vitro study showed that DHA inhibited the growth of the human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and the epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In both cell lines, the DHA arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. In addition, DHA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in the WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results indicate that DHA inhibits the multiplication of prostate stromal and epithelial cells through a mechanism that may involve cell cycle arrest and the downregulation of ERα and AR expression.

  11. Intraprostatic ozone therapy: A minimally invasive approach in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Shabbir; Sharma, Deepti B.; Solanki, Fanindra S.; Pathak, Ajay; Sharma, Dhananjay

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) remains the golden standard therapy since decades. There are various minimally invasive therapies (MITs) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Still, there is a need for therapy with lesser side effects and better outcome. We had studied the effect of intraprostatic ozone injection (IPOI) as an MIT for patients with BPH who have failed trial without catheter (TWOC). Materials and Methods: Thirty elderly patients with BPH with a prostate size of 30 g or more were enrolled for the study. Forty milliliters of ozone at a concentration of 30 μg/dl was injected in prostate (20 ml in each lateral lobe) per rectally. Prostate volume (PV) by ultrasonography was assessed after catheter removal on the 7th day and after 1 month. Observations and Results: Totally thirty patients (mean age - 67.8 years) with mean prostatic volume (MPV) of 46.10cc received IPOI. MPV came as 44.96cc on the 7th day of postozone therapy (P = 0.008). Successful voiders showed a significant reduction in PV (mean = 13.12cc) as compared to unsuccessful voiders (mean = 2.61cc) after 1 month. Conclusion: Intraprostatic ozone injection helps to reduce the PV to some extent and can be helpful in patients who have failed TWOC even on alpha blockers and are unfit for TURP. Larger studies are required to assess the efficacy and long-term results of this technique. PMID:28216927

  12. Androgens and estrogens in benign prostatic hyperplasia: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Tristan M.; Ricke, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology. While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, sex steroids have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Sufficient data exists linking androgens and androgen receptor pathways to BPH and use of androgen reducing compounds, such as 5α-reductase inhibitors which block the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, are a component of the standard of care for men with LUTS attributed to an enlarged prostate. However, BPH is a multifactorial disease and not all men respond well to currently available treatments, suggesting factors other than androgens are involved. Testosterone, the primary circulating androgen in men, can also be metabolized via CYP19/aromatase into the potent estrogen, estradiol-17β. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of endogenous and exogenous estrogens in directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation signifying potential roles in BPH. Recent research has demonstrated that estrogen receptor signaling pathways may be important in the development and maintenance of BPH and LUTS; however, new models are needed to genetically dissect estrogen regulated molecular mechanisms involved in BPH. More work is needed to identify estrogens and associated signaling pathways in BPH in order to target BPH with dietary and therapeutic SERMs. PMID:21620560

  13. Extensive repeat transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in patients with previous benign sextant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Borboroglu, P G; Comer, S W; Riffenburgh, R H; Amling, C L

    2000-01-01

    Standard sextant prostate biopsy may underestimate cancer in men in whom clinical findings are suspicious for localized prostate cancer. We describe our experience with extensive transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in men in whom previous sextant biopsy was negative. Between November 1997 and March 1999, 57 men 47 to 72 years old (mean age 61.4) underwent extensive transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate using intravenous sedation at our institution. An average of 22.5 cores (range 15 to 31) were obtained depending on prostate size. Biopsies were obtained from each of 6 sagittal regions, including samples from the far lateral and mid transitional zones. Each patient had undergone at least 1 previous benign transrectal ultrasound guided sextant biopsy (mean 2.1, range 1 to 4). Indications for repeat biopsy were persistently elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) in 89% of the cases, increased PSA velocity in 63%, suspicious free-to-total PSA in 39% and a previous suspicious biopsy finding in 32%. Clinical factors (PSA, PSA velocity, free-to-total PSA and previous suspicious biopsy) were analyzed for the ability to predict positive biopsy, and tumor parameters were assessed pathologically in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Adenocarcinoma was identified in 17 of the 57 men (30%). Biopsy revealed a Gleason score of 6 to 8 (mean 6.4). In 7 of the 17 patients (41%) in whom cancer was identified only 1 biopsy core was positive. Of the 15 patients in whom previous sextant biopsy had demonstrated high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia or atypical small acinar proliferation extensive biopsy revealed cancer in 7 (47%). Although serum PSA was higher and free-to-total PSA was lower in those with cancer, the only statistically significant predictor of positive biopsy was PSA velocity (p <0.001). Prostate cancer was noted in 64% of the men with PSA velocity 1 ng./ml. or greater. Of the 13 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

  14. Serum Adiponectin, C-peptide and Leptin and Risk of Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Results From the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Jeannette M.; Kristal, Alan R.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Tangen, Catherine M.; White, Emily; Lin, Daniel W.; Thompson, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiologic studies have identified obesity as a risk factor for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We examined whether adiponectin, leptin and C-peptide were associated with incident, symptomatic BPH and whether these factors mediate the relationship between obesity and BPH risk. Methods Data are from Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial placebo arm participants who were free of BPH at baseline. Incident BPH (n=698) was defined as treatment, two International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) values >14, or an increase of ≥5 in IPSS from baseline documented on at least two occasions plus at least one score ≥12. Controls (n=709) were selected from men reporting no BPH treatment or IPSS >7 during the seven-year trial. Baseline serum was analyzed for adiponectin, C-peptide, and leptin concentrations. Results Neither C-peptide nor leptin was associated with BPH risk. The odds ratio [95% CI] contrasting highest to lowest quartiles of adiponectin was 0.65[0.47, 0.87] ptrend=0.004. Findings differed between levels of physical activity: there was a strong inverse association between adiponectin and BPH among moderately/very active men OR=0.43[0.29, 0.63], and no association among sedentary/minimally active men OR=0.92[0.65, 1.30] pinteraction=0.005. Adiponectin concentrations explained only a moderate amount of the relationship between obesity and BPH risk. Conclusions High adiponectin concentrations were associated with reduced risk of incident, symptomatic BPH. This association was limited to moderately/very active men; suggesting the relationship between obesity and BPH involves a complex interaction between factors affecting glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity. However, adiponectin is likely not the only mechanism through which obesity affects BPH risk. PMID:19475640

  15. A Prospective Study of Chronic Inflammation in Benign Prostate Tissue and Risk of Prostate Cancer: Linked PCPT and SELECT Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Platz, Elizabeth A; Kulac, Ibrahim; Barber, John R; Drake, Charles G; Joshu, Corinne E; Nelson, William G; Lucia, M Scott; Klein, Eric A; Lippman, Scott M; Parnes, Howard L; Thompson, Ian M; Goodman, Phyllis J; Tangen, Catherine M; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2017-10-01

    Background: We leveraged two trials to test the hypothesis of an inflammation-prostate cancer link prospectively in men without indication for biopsy.Methods: Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) participants who had an end-of-study biopsy performed per protocol that was negative for cancer and who subsequently enrolled in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) were eligible. We selected all 100 cases and sampled 200 frequency-matched controls and used PCPT end-of-study biopsies as "baseline." Five men with PSA > 4 ng/mL at end-of-study biopsy were excluded. Tissue was located for 92 cases and 193 controls. We visually assessed inflammation in benign tissue. We estimated ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regression adjusting for age and race.Results: Mean time between biopsy and diagnosis was 5.9 years. In men previously in the PCPT placebo arm, 78.1% of cases (N = 41) and 68.2% of controls (N = 85) had at least one baseline biopsy core (∼5 evaluated per man) with inflammation. The odds of prostate cancer (N = 41 cases) appeared to increase with increasing mean percentage of tissue area with inflammation, a trend that was statistically significant for Gleason sum <4+3 disease (N = 31 cases; vs. 0%, >0-<1.8% OR = 1.70, 1.8-<5.0% OR = 2.39, ≥5% OR = 3.31, Ptrend = 0.047). In men previously in the finasteride arm, prevalence of inflammation did not differ between cases (76.5%; N = 51) and controls (75.0%; N = 108).Conclusions: Benign tissue inflammation was positively associated with prostate cancer.Impact: This first prospective study of men without biopsy indication supports the hypothesis that inflammation influences prostate cancer development. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(10); 1549-57. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. [Anatomoradiologic correlations in prostate benign hypertrophy. Report of a series of 220 cases].

    PubMed

    Debbagh, A; Dahami, Z; Fekak, H; Joual, A; Bennani, S; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2002-05-01

    In our daily practice, the reliability of ultrasonography (US) and digital rectal examination (DRE) is limited by many factors. The aim of our study is to correlate between the prostatic volume assessed by the DRE, the pre operative US results and the actual weight of the enucleated or endoscopic resection benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We report a serie of 220 patients with BPH treated by endoscopic resection or by open surgery. The mean age is 65 years (40-90 years old). Ultrasonography was performed in 92% of the cases, and transrectal ultrasound only in 8%. All our patients either underwent endoscopic resection (49.6%) or adenomectomy (50.4%). We found a high correlation between the prostatic volume assessed by DRE and by ultrasonography (r = 0.79; P < 0.0001) and the weight of the piece of surgical adenomectomy (r = 0.701, P < 0.0001). However, the volume of benign prostatic hyperplasia assessed by US did not correlate with the piece of endoscopic resection (r = 0.214, P < 0.05). This study and a review of recent literature enabled us to notice the various anatomical and radiological factors implicated in this correlation.

  17. [Efficacy and safety of Saw Palmetto Extract Capsules in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiao-bing; Gu, Xiao-jian; Zhang, Zheng-yu; Wei, Zhong-qing; Xu, Zhuo-qun; Miao, Hui-dong; Zhou, Wei-min; Xu, Ren-fang; Cheng, Bin; Ma, Jian-guo; Niu, Tian-li; Qu, Ping; Xue, Bo-xin; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of Saw Palmetto Extract Capsules in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We conducted a multi-centered open clinical study on 165 BPH patients treated with Saw Palmetto Extract Capsules at a dose of 160 mg qd for 12 weeks. At the baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks of medication, we compared the International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS), prostate volume, postvoid residual urine volume, urinary flow rate, quality of life scores (QOL), and adverse events between the two groups of patients. Compared with the baseline, both IPSS and QOL were improved after 6 weeks of medication, and at 12 weeks, significant improvement was found in IPSS, QOL, urinary flow rate, and postvoid residual urine. Mild stomachache occurred in 1 case, which necessitated no treatment. Saw Palmetto Extract Capsules were safe and effective for the treatment of BPH.

  18. Varicocele: the origin of benign prostatic hypertrophy? Testosterone dosages in the periprostatic plexus.

    PubMed

    De Caestecker, Karel; Lumen, Nicolaas; Spinoit, Anne-Françoise; Everaert, Karel; Fiers, Tom; Oosterlinck, Willem

    2016-06-09

    In 2008, Gat et al. wrote the hypothesis that benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) was caused by reflux from high free testosterone containing blood from varicocele. The purpose of this study is to measure testosterone at the prostatic veins in patients operated for large BPH, confirming Gat's theory. In 13 patients, operated by Millin technique, the periprostatic plexus was punctured in 45° tilted position in order to the measure total and free testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Brachial blood was taken simultaneously for similar measurements. Seven patients had a clinical varicocele. High testosterone levels, in comparison with the brachial blood, were detected in only two patients. Dihydrotestosterone was at least doubled in all cases, demonstrating that the puncture was done in prostatic drainage area. Gat's theory, concerning the role of varicocele in the origin of BPH, could not be confirmed in this study. Technical limitations can be responsible for this.

  19. [Relationship between PTH and PSA values in patients with pathological finding of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Romeo, Salvatore; Napoli, Giancarlo; Melloni, Guglielmo; Dispensa, Nino; Melloni, Darwin

    2012-01-01

    The functional relationship between parathyroid glands and prostatic gland is commonly very well known. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between serum levels of PTH and serum levels of PSA in patients with pathological finding of BPH. According to 261 transrectal ultrasound-guided prostatic biopsies performed from March 2009 to March 2010, 75 patients, responding to our inclusion criteria, were selected. 26 patients (34.6%) ended the study. All patients with high serum levels of PSA (>4 ng/mL), with histological diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia, underwent the assay of serum levels of PTH. We observed high levels of PTH (> 66 pg/mL) in 9 patients (35.2%).

  20. Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Roehrborn, Claus G

    2011-01-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia, enlargement of the prostate, and bladder outlet obstruction are common among aging men and will increase in socioeconomic and medical importance at a time of increased life expectancy and aging of the baby boomer generation. This article reviews the epidemiology, management, and therapeutic options for these conditions. In patients bothered by moderate to severe symptoms, providers can make educated and differential choices between several classes of drugs, alone or in combination, to treat effectively and improve the symptoms in most men. Despite the efficacy of medical therapy, there will be patients who require referral to a urologist either early, to rule out prostate cancer and other conditions, or later, after initial medical therapy and lifestyle management has failed. Perhaps as many as 30% of patients fail to achieve sufficient symptom improvement with medication, lifestyle adjustment, and fluid management, and may require more invasive or surgical treatment options.

  1. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume. PMID:27227564

  2. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters-such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications-were compared between the groups. PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume.

  3. Epigenomic profiling of DNA methylation in paired prostate cancer versus adjacent benign tissue.

    PubMed

    Geybels, Milan S; Zhao, Shanshan; Wong, Chao-Jen; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Wu, Michael; Ostrander, Elaine A; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation may promote prostate carcinogenesis. We investigated epigenome-wide DNA methylation profiles in prostate cancer (PCa) compared to adjacent benign tissue to identify differentially methylated CpG sites. The study included paired PCa and adjacent benign tissue samples from 20 radical prostatectomy patients. Epigenetic profiling was done using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Linear models that accounted for the paired study design and False Discovery Rate Q-values were used to evaluate differential CpG methylation. mRNA expression levels of the genes with the most differentially methylated CpG sites were analyzed. In total, 2,040 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified in PCa versus adjacent benign tissue (Q-value < 0.001), the majority of which were hypermethylated (n = 1,946; 95%). DNA methylation profiles accurately distinguished between PCa and benign tissue samples. Twenty-seven top-ranked hypermethylated CpGs had a mean methylation difference of at least 40% between tissue types, which included 25 CpGs in 17 genes. Furthermore, for 10 genes over 50% of promoter region CpGs were hypermethylated in PCa versus benign tissue. The top-ranked differentially methylated genes included three genes that were associated with both promoter hypermethylation and reduced gene expression: SCGB3A1, HIF3A, and AOX1. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data provided confirmatory evidence for our findings. This study of PCa versus adjacent benign tissue showed many differentially methylated CpGs and regions in and outside gene promoter regions, which may potentially be used for the development of future epigenetic-based diagnostic tests or as therapeutic targets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. AB133. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anxi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To improve the level of diagnosis and treatment of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis. Methods The clinical data of a case of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis were analyzed retrospectively and discussed with relative literature review. Results A 56-year-old man presented with a 1 month history of difficult urination, which was exacerbated for 10 days. The patient was confirmed with xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with chronic suppurative inflammation and abscess by pathologic diagnosis after plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP). The patient achieved smooth voiding and was discharged after operation for one week. Urination was normal during two months follow up. Conclusions Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is rare clinical disease, which should be excluded from prostate cancer and can be confirmed by pathobiology. According to the degree of lower urinary tract obstruction, it is treated by medicine or surgical operation. Examination of PSA regularly and long-term follow-up must be performed.

  5. Embryologic development of the prostate. Insights into the etiology and treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, E

    1990-08-01

    Pharmacologic strategies for the treatment of BPH are at present directed toward relaxing prostate smooth muscle and reducing prostate volume. Historically, the primary limitation of pharmacotherapy for BPH has been that the symptomatic improvement achieved was overshadowed by the morbidity of treatment. However, the morbidity has been markedly diminished based on a more precise understanding of the embryology, physiology, and pharmacology of the prostate. The origins and pharmacologic properties of the smooth musculature of the prostate and bladder are unique. Therefore, drugs such as alpha blockers may relax the prostate selectively without altering bladder function. Although phenoxybenzamine, a nonselective alpha blocker, relieves infravesical obstruction secondary to BPH, the severity of the adverse reactions limits the use of this drug. The contractile properties of the prostate smooth muscle are mediated by alpha-1 adrenoceptors. The effectiveness of phenoxybenzamine and selective alpha-1 blockers such as prazosin and terazosin are similar. The side effects of the selective alpha-1 blockers are negligible. Androgen suppression, which lowers testosterone, produces intolerable side effects such as gynecomastia, erectile dysfunction, and impaired libido. The androgen dependency of the prostate provides the rationale for using 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors for the treatment of BPH. Reduction of prostate volume can be achieved by blocking the action or synthesis of dihydrotestosterone without impotence, gynecomastia, and hot flashes. These recent advances in pharmacotherapy for BPH are based on understanding of the fundamental developmental properties of the prostate.

  6. Role of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Elastography in Determination of Severity of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Bircan; Utangaç, Mazhar; Göya, Cemil; Dağgülli, Mansur

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the potential contribution of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography to the determination of the severity of benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) by performing shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements of the prostate using ARFI technology. Material/Methods Sixty BPH patients and 40 healthy volunteers were included in this study. SWV measurements of the prostate were performed by transabdominal ultrasonography (US), both in the BPH patients and control subjects. The BPH patients also underwent uroflowmetry measurements. Using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the BPH patients were divided into two subgroups, a mild-to-moderate BPH group and a severe BPH group, to compare SWV values. Results The BPH patients had higher SWV values for the central area of the prostate compared to the control subjects (2.52±0.59 m/s and 1.47±0.42 m/s, p<0.01). The SWV values of the central area of prostate were higher in the severe BPH group compared to the mild-to-moderate BPH group (2.62±0.58 and 2.25±0.55, p=0.02). Conclusions Our ARFI elastography results indicated that the central prostate SWV values of BPH patients were significantly higher relative to those of a healthy control group. The central prostate SWV values increased in proportion to the increased severity of BPH. Measurement of SWV by ARFI technology constitutes a non-invasive alternative to other methods for the determination of BPH severity. PMID:27876713

  7. Prostate cancer antigen 3 gene expression in peripheral blood and urine sediments from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia patients versus healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Moradi Sardareh, Hemen; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Yadegar-Azari, Reza; Poorolajal, Jalal; Mousavi-Bahar, Seyed Habibollah; Saidijam, Massoud

    2014-11-30

    To determine the expression of prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) gene in peripheral blood and urine sediments from patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal subjects. A total number of 48 patients [24 with biopsy proven prostate cancer (PCa) and 24 with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)] were studied. Twenty-four healthy individuals were also recruited as control group. After blood and urine sampling, total RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized. Expression of PCA3 gene was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of PCA3 gene expression between control and BPH groups indicated no statistically significant differences in both urine and blood samples. Patients with PCa demonstrated an increased PCA3 gene expression rate compared to control and BPH groups (10.64 and 7.17 folds, respectively). The rate of fold increased PCA3 gene expression in urine was 20.90, 20.90, and 20.35 in patients with PCa, BPH and normal subjects, respectively. Evaluation of PCA3 gene expression can be considered as a reliable marker for detection of PCa. Increased level of this marker in urine sediments is more sensitive than blood for distinguishing between cancerous and non-cancerous groups. 

  8. [Position statement for the diagnosis and treatment of men with benign prostate enlargement and lower urinary tract symptoms].

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Alexander; Ferman, Zvi; Stav, Kobi; Gruenwald, Ilan; Matzkin, Haim; Ramon, Jacob

    2014-09-01

    Benign prostate enlargement causing lower urinary symptoms is a common progressive phenomenon in adult men. Lower urinary tract symptoms may emerge during the storage, voiding, and post micturition phases, harm quality of life and may be caused by a variety of factors. The purpose of evaluation is to identify benign prostate enlargement and factors other than enlarged prostate as the cause of symptoms, and recognize the risk factors for progression of the condition. The goal of treatment is to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life, and to prevent deterioration of symptoms and development of complications. Medical therapy is the basic approach, whereas surgery and minimally invasive procedures are reserved for patients not interested in medical therapy or for those in whom symptoms were not alleviated by means of medical therapy. In the present position statement, we present the approach to the evaluation and treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men with benign prostate enlargement.

  9. Bipolar Plasma Enucleation of the Prostate (B-TUEP) in Benign Prostate Hypertrophy Treatment: 3-Year Results.

    PubMed

    Giulianelli, Roberto; Gentile, Barbara Cristina; Mirabile, Gabriella; Albanesi, Luca; Tariciotti, Paola; Rizzo, Giorgio; Buscarini, Maurizio; Falavolti, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    To investigate numerous endoscopic techniques that have been described for the treatment of benign prostate enlargement. Plasma-button enucleation of the prostate (B-TUEP) is a successful treatment option because the large surface creates a fast enucleation process, vaporization, and concomitant hemostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bipolar button electrode transurethral adenoma enucleation (B-TUEP) in saline solution. The second end point was to determine the change of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), post-void residual urine, International Index of Erectile Function, transrectal ultrasound gland volume evaluation, and prostate-specific antigen. Between July 2011 and March 2012, 50 consecutive patients underwent B-TUEP in our facility, all performed by a single surgeon (R.G.). All patients were preoperatively assessed with maximum urinary flow rate, single-question quality of life assessment, IPSS and the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaires, transrectal ultrasound gland volume evaluation, prostate-specific antigen, and post-void residual urine. We observed a significant improvement at 12, 24, and 36 months in terms of maximum urinary flow rate (22.3 ± 4.74 mL/s, 23.2 ± 0.30 mL/s, and 23.6 ± 1.26 mL/s, respectively, P <.01) and quality of life (5.28 ± 0.97, 5.69 ± 0.90, and 5.73 ± 0.87). IPSS and IEEF scores improved significantly (P <.05). Gland volume evaluation and post-void residue decreased (P <.001). The prostate-specific postoperative antigen levels were 0.76 ± 0.61 ng/mL, 0.7 ± 0.51 ng/mL, and 0.62 ± 0.18 ng/mL, at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively. Two patients (4%) had persistent bladder outlet obstruction requiring reoperation. After 3-year follow-up, B-TUEP represents an effective, durable, and safe form of surgical intervention. B-TUEP is an alternative treatment for symptomatic benign prostate enlargement. Copyright © 2017

  10. Monopolar versus bipolar transurethral resection of prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia: Operative outcomes and surgeon preferences, a real-world scenario

    PubMed Central

    Madduri, Vijay Kumar Sarma; Bera, Malay Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Monopolar transurethral resection of prostate (M-TURP) is considered the gold standard for the management of bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Its newly introduced modification, bipolar TURP (B-TURP), promises to overcome its most prominent shortcomings, namely bleeding and dilutional hyponatremia. Literature is conflicting regarding merits of B-TURP over M-TURP. Aims: To find a difference, if any, in perioperative outcomes between M-TURP and B-TURP in a real-wold setting. Settings and Design: Prospective nonrandomized study. Subjects and Methods: Operative outcomes of patients undergoing M-TURP and B-TURP from February 2014 to October 2015 were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Categorical data were compared by Fischer exact test and numerical data were compared by independent samples Mann–Whitney U-test. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean size of prostate operated by bipolar technology was significantly greater than those operated by monopolar technology (38.12 ± 9.59 cc vs. 66.49 ± 22.95 cc; P < 0.001). The mean fall in postoperative serum sodium concentration was 0.99 ± 0.76 mEq/L for the B-TURP group as compared to 3.60 ± 2.89 mEq/L for the M-TURP group (P < 0.001). The mean drop in postoperative hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.28) was statistically insignificant, even though larger glands were operated by B-TURP. There were three instances of the transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome in the M-TURP group whereas no TUR syndrome occurred in the B-TURP group. Conclusions: In spite of various contrary viewpoints in literature, surgeons prefer to operate on larger prostates using bipolar technology. B-TURP definitely reduces the incidence of bleeding and dilutional hyponatremia, making it a contender to replace M-TURP as the new gold standard. PMID:27453650

  11. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 1, Pathological Background and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Fei Crisóstomo, Verónica Báez-Díaz, Claudia Sánchez, Francisco M.

    2016-01-15

    Pathological features of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) dictate various responses to prostatic artery embolization (PAE). Typically, BPH originates in the transition zone and periurethral region, where should be considered the primary target area in PAE procedures. Given that histological heterogeneity of components in hyperplasia nodules, epithelial or stromal, identifying the more responsive nodules to PAE will have clinical implications. Since some lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with BPH are usually related to bladder outlet obstruction-induced changes in bladder function rather than to outflow obstruction directly, proper selection of candidate patients prior to PAE is of great clinical importance. BPH is a typical chronic progressive condition, suggesting PAE could aim not only to relieve LUTS but also to delay or prevent the clinical progression. Awareness of the pathological background of BPH is essential for interventional radiologists to improve clinical outcomes and develop new treatment strategies in clinical practice of PAE.

  12. Correlation of benign prostatic obstruction-related complications with clinical outcomes in patients after transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Run-Qi; Yu, Wei; Meng, Yi-Sen; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Ben; Xiao, Yun-Xiang; Wu, Shi-Liang; Pan, Bai-Nian

    2017-03-01

    We aim to investigate the correlation of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO)-related complications with clinical outcomes in patients after transurethral resection of the prostate in China. We reviewed the medical history of all patients who underwent surgery from 1992 to 2013. We assessed the preoperative clinical profile, clinical management, and operative complications. Overall, 2271 patients were enrolled in the study. Of these patients, 1193 (52.5%) had no BPO-related complications and 1078 (46.3%) had BPO-related complications. Compared with patients without BPO-related complications, those with BPO-related complications were older (p = 0.001) and usually had other urologic comorbidities (p = 0.003). Additionally, they tended to have more tissue resected (p < 0.001), a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists grade (p = 0.002), and larger prostates (p < 0.001). Nonetheless, there was no obvious difference in surgical complications between both groups (p > 0.05). Among patients with BPO-related complications, compared with the bladder stone group, only the bladder stone+ group tended to have a greater urinary infection risk after transurethral resection of the prostate. Compared with patients with one or two BPO-related complications, those with three BPO-related complications tended to have a higher risk of pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome (p < 0.05). Despite the widespread use of medication, patients with BPO-related complications were older and had larger prostates; however, transurethral resection of the prostate is still considered a safe and recommended surgical treatment. Nevertheless, those with three or more complications were at a higher risk of severe complication after surgery, and active surgical intervention is needed once BPO-related complications develop. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.. All rights reserved.

  13. Bilateral ureteral obstruction revealing a benign prostatic hypertrophy: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prostatic hyperplasia is the most frequent tumor in men older than 50 years of age. Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to benign prostatic hypertrophy is a rare condition most often due to vesicoureteral reflux. Herein we report a case of a patient with bilateral hydronephrosis with distal ureter obstruction caused by detrusor hypertrophy due to prostatic hyperplasia, our analysis of the clinical data and a review of the relevant published literature. Case presentation We report a case of a 65-year-old Berber man with clinically significant storage, bladder-emptying symptoms and bilateral low back pain with renal biologic failure and bilateral ureterohydronephrosis, distal ureteral stenosis, detrusor hypertrophy and prostate hyperplasia without significant post-void residual urine volume visualized by abdominal sonography. The patient underwent bilateral JJ stent insertion with transurethral resection of the prostate. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery without any obvious complications. At his 3-month follow-up examination, the JJ stent was removed and the patient had comfortable urination without renal failure. Conclusion This is an extremely rare condition that has important diagnostic considerations because of the possibility of comorbid severe obstructive uropathy and chronic renal failure. PMID:24513237

  14. Bilateral ureteral obstruction revealing a benign prostatic hypertrophy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Riyach, Omar; Ahsaini, Mustapha; Kharbach, Youssef; Bounoual, Mohammed; Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; El Ammari, Jalal Eddine; Mellas, Soufiane; Fassi, Mohammed El Jamal; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2014-02-11

    Prostatic hyperplasia is the most frequent tumor in men older than 50 years of age. Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to benign prostatic hypertrophy is a rare condition most often due to vesicoureteral reflux. Herein we report a case of a patient with bilateral hydronephrosis with distal ureter obstruction caused by detrusor hypertrophy due to prostatic hyperplasia, our analysis of the clinical data and a review of the relevant published literature. We report a case of a 65-year-old Berber man with clinically significant storage, bladder-emptying symptoms and bilateral low back pain with renal biologic failure and bilateral ureterohydronephrosis, distal ureteral stenosis, detrusor hypertrophy and prostate hyperplasia without significant post-void residual urine volume visualized by abdominal sonography. The patient underwent bilateral JJ stent insertion with transurethral resection of the prostate. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery without any obvious complications. At his 3-month follow-up examination, the JJ stent was removed and the patient had comfortable urination without renal failure. This is an extremely rare condition that has important diagnostic considerations because of the possibility of comorbid severe obstructive uropathy and chronic renal failure.

  15. Constitutional, organopathic and combined homeopathic treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hati, A K; Paital, B; Naik, K N; Mishra, A K; Chainy, G B N; Nanda, L K

    2012-10-01

    Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) is common in older men. This study compared homeopathic treatment strategies using constitutional medicines (CM) or organopathic medicines (OM) alone or in combination (BCOM) in patients suffering from BPH. 220 men aged 30-90 years were recruited in Odisha, India. Patients presenting symptoms of prostatism, with or without evidence of bladder outflow obstruction were included in the study. Patients with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)> 4 nmol/mL, malignancy, complete urine retention, stone formation and gross bilateral hydronephrosis were excluded. Patients were sequentially allocated to OM, CM or BCOM. The main outcome measure was the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). 73, 70 and 77 patients respectively were sequentially allocated to OM, CM or BCOM. 180 patients (60 per group) completed treatment and were included in the final analysis. Overall 85% of patients showed improvement of subjective symptoms such as frequency, urgency, hesitancy, intermittent flow, unsatisfactory urination, feeble stream, diminution of residual urine volume but there was no reduction in prostate size. Treatment response was highest with BCOM (38.24%) compared to OM (31.62%) and CM (30.15%). Effect sizes were highest for the decrease in IPSS, residual urine volume and urinary flow rate. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transurethral photodynamic therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia : a canine pilot study using benzoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sugandh D.; Peabody, James O.; Beck, Elsa R.; Cerny, Joseph C.; Amin, Mahul B.; Richter, Anna M.

    1999-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) principles were evaluated in management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a canine model. Five dogs were injected with benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD) and samples of prostate, bladder, urethra and rectum were taken at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours and analyzed for BPD. Next, 16 dogs were treated with 100 Joules at 690 nm light form argon dye laser 1 hour after administration of BPD at 0.5 mg/kg using cylindrical diffuser tip fiber passed transurethrally. The prostates were harvested weekly up to 4 weeks and the size of the lesion was measured and the prostates were examined. Prostate had the highest BPD levels. Hemorrhagic lesion of 2.5 cm in diameter was noted at 1 week after PDT. At 3 and 4 weeks there were changes of glandular atrophy in the periurethral region. Minimally invasive technique of transurethral PDT causes glandular and stromal changes in the periurethral zone and has potential in the treatment of BPH.

  17. Diabetes, growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor pathways and association to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongwei; Olumi, Aria F

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes significantly increases the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The major endocrine aberration in connection with the metabolic syndrome is hyperinsulinemia. Insulin is an independent risk factor and a promoter of BPH. Insulin resistance may change the risk of BPH through several biological pathways. Hyperinsulinemia stimulates the liver to produce more insulin-like growth factor (IGF), another mitogen and an anti-apoptotic agent which binds insulin receptor/IGF receptor and stimulates prostate growth. The levels of IGFs and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in prostate tissue and in blood are associated with BPH risk, with the regulation of circulating androgen and growth hormone. Stromal-epithelial interactions play a critical role in the development and growth of the prostate gland and BPH. Previously, we have shown that the expression of c-Jun in the fibroblastic stroma can promote secretion of IGF-I, which stimulates prostate epithelial cell proliferation through activating specific target genes. Here, we will review the epidemiologic, clinical, and molecular findings which have evaluated the relation between diabetes and development of BPH.

  18. [Low-intensity laser radiation in preoperative preparation of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, A I; Muzalevskaia, N I

    2000-01-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy administered in the form of intravenous blood irradiation, transrectal and transurethral prostatic irradiation and their combination as preoperative preparation and correction of immunity disturbances in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were studied. The response to the treatment was evaluated by positive changes in the immune status and bacterial contamination of the urine and prostatic tissue. Conventional preoperative preparation (uroantiseptics, antibiotics and phytotherapy) fails to correct signs of T-cell immunodeficiency, depression of phagocytic activity of neutrophils, significantly reduce bacteriurea. Laser therapy as intravenous laser blood radiation acts immunomodulatorily on cellular immunity and normalized the proportion of T-helpers of the first and second order (T-suppressors) and neutrophil phagocytosis. The antibacterial effect of this technique on urinary microflora and prostatic tissue is not very high. Local laser therapy is a potent immunostimulator of T- and B-lymphocytes, increased the index of immunoregulatory cells' proportion, activated phagocytosis of neutrophils. It has pronounced antibacterial effect against gram-negative urinary microflora and tissue of the prostate. Combined laser therapy produced the highest immunomodulating action on T-lymphocytes and immunostimulating one on B-lymphocytes, potentiated phagocytic ability of neutrophils, elevated index of the immunoregulatory cells, but was unable to correct their imbalance completely. Antibacterial effects of combined laser therapy were the highest, including the bacterial group Proteus-Providencia. Preoperative low-intensity laser therapy of BPH reduced the number of postoperative pyoinflammatory complications, hospital stay, severity of postoperative period.

  19. Postoperative MRI in patients undergoing interstitial laser coagulation thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Heuck, A.F.; Scheidler, H.J.; Reiser, M.F.

    1996-03-01

    We conducted MRI of the effects of laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eighteen patients (average age 64 years) were examined with MRI 24-48 h before and after LITT of BPH. Sagittal and axial T2-weighted FSE MR images were evaluated for signs of coagulation necrosis in the prostate gland and the presence of intra- and extraprostatic edema. Coagulation areas showed as a hypointense central core with a hyperintense rim. Intraprostatic edema led to a volume increase of 18-108% both in the central and in the total gland. Periprostatic edema was severe in preprostatic and prevesical tissue as well as lateral to the prostate, moderate in the presacral space, and mild perirectally and dorsal to the prostate. Follow-up examinations 2 weeks to 6 months after LITT in five patients showed decrease of coagulation necrosis volume, prostate size, and edema. MRI appears to be a reliable method to monitor LITT effects in patients with BPH. 22 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Dutasteride/tamsulosin fixed-dose combination for the treatment of benign prostatic enlargement.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M; Hashim, H

    2012-01-01

    Fixed-dose dutasteride/tamsulosin is a combination therapy for lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic enlargement (LUTS/BPE), which is composed of two active ingredients, tamsulosin and dutasteride. Tamsulosin is an α-adrenoceptor blocker that is relatively selective for the α(1A)-adrenoceptor subtype within the prostatic smooth muscles. The inhibition of α(1A)-adrenoceptors results in smooth muscle relaxation. Dutasteride is an inhibitor of 5α-reductase, an enzyme that is responsible for the conversion of testosterone to its active form dihydrotestosterone. This occurs in the prostate, liver and skin. 5α-Reductase results in the shrinkage of the prostatic epithelium and reduction in the size of the prostate. No clinical studies have been performed on the fixed-dose dutasteride/tamsulosin combination, although several clinical trials have been conducted on the combination therapy of 5α-reductase and α-adrenoceptor blockers for LUTS/BPE. The CombAT study is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial in men with a clinical diagnosis of LUTS/BPE that is comparing tamsulosin or dutasteride as a monotherapy to tamsulosin and dutasteride as combination therapy (as separate tablets). The combination therapy was associated with significant improvements in the symptom score compared to tamsulosin or dutasteride as monotherapy. It is therefore logical to combine the two medications into one tablet. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  1. Qianliening capsule treats benign prostatic hyperplasia via suppression of the EGF/STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIN, JIUMAO; ZHOU, JIANHENG; XU, WEI; ZHONG, XIAOYONG; HONG, ZHENFENG; PENG, JUN

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a pathological overgrowth of the human prostate. It may cause increased resistance to urine flow through the urethra and occasionally kidney damage, bladder stones and urinary tract infections, and therefore affect the quality of life. Qianliening capsule (QC) is a traditional Chinese formula that has been used clinically in China to treat BPH for a number of years. However, the mechanism of its anti-BPH effect remains largely unknown. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of QC in a rat model of BPH, established by the injection of testosterone following castration, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of action. We observed that QC treatment significantly and dose-dependently decreased the prostatic volume (PV) and prostatic index (PI; P<0.05 or P<0.01), and ameliorated the histological damage of the prostate tissue in the BPH rats. In addition, treatment with QC inhibited the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), as well as the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclin D1 and Bcl-2. Our results suggest that suppression of the EGF/STAT3 pathway may be one of the mechanisms by which QC treats BPH. PMID:23737867

  2. Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Using the 180 Watt System: Multicenter Study of the Impact of Prostate Size on Safety and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Bienz, Marc Nicolas; Valdivieso, Roger; Lavigueur-Blouin, Hugo; Misrai, Vincent; Rutman, Matthew; Te, Alexis E; Chughtai, Bilal; Barber, Neil J; Emara, Amr M; Munver, Ravi; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Zorn, Kevin C

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated photoselective vaporization of the prostate using the GreenLight™ XPS™ 180 W system for benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment in a large multi-institutional cohort at 2 years. We particularly examined safety, outcomes and the re-treatment rate in larger prostates, defined as a prostate volume of 80 cc or greater, to assess the potential of photoselective vaporization of the prostate as a size independent procedure. A total of 1,196 patients were treated at 6 international centers in Canada, the United States, France and England. All parameters were collected retrospectively, including complications, I-PSS, maximum urinary flow rate, post-void residual urine, prostate volume, prostate specific antigen and the endoscopic re-intervention rate. Subgroup stratified comparative analysis was performed according to preoperative prostate volume less than 80 vs 80 cc or greater on transrectal ultrasound. Median prostate size was 50 cc in 387 patients and 108 cc in 741 in the prostate volume groups less than 80 and 80 cc or greater, respectively. The rate of conversion to transurethral prostate resection was significantly higher in the 80 cc or greater group than in the less than 80 cc group (8.4% vs 0.6%, p <0.01). I-PSS, quality of life score, maximum urinary flow rate and post-void residual urine were significantly improved compared to baseline at 6, 12 and 24 months of followup without significant differences between the prostate size groups. The re-treatment rate at 2 years reported in 5 of 411 patients was associated with the delivery of decreased energy density (2.1 vs 4.4 kJ/cc) in the group without re-treatment. Photoselective vaporization of the prostate using the XPS 180 W system is safe and efficacious, providing durable improvement in functional outcomes at 2 years independent of prostate size when treated with sufficient energy. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Sperm quality and selected biochemical parameters of seminal fluid in dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, L; Wąchocka, A; Brodzki, P; Wrona, Z; Piech, T; Wawron, W; Chałabis-Mazurek, A

    2015-09-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in dogs is most commonly associated with age and increasing concentrations of dihydrotesterone, a hormone that stimulates growth and secretion of the prostatic epithelial cells. During this process, the biochemical composition of prostatic secretion changes, which can affect the quality of semen and limit the ability of the sperm to contribute to fertilization. Therefore, the present study was conducted to examine possible correlation between BPH and biological quality of semen. The study was performed in 11 sexually mature dogs of various breeds. Animals were divided into two groups: healthy dogs (Group I; n = 5; mean age 4.32; SEM = 1.28) and dogs with BPH (Group II n = 6; mean age 6.16; SEM = 0.65). Semen and prostate secretions were collected and evaluated in this study. Standard semen examinations were conducted in the ejaculates collected; moreover, the extent of apoptosis and DNA defragmentation was determined. The selected biochemical parameters were determined in the prostate secretion. According to the examination results, there were no significant differences in standard semen parameters between the two groups of dogs. Nevertheless, morphological tests of semen in dogs with BPH demonstrated elevated percentages of primary defects in spermatozoa. A significant increase (P = 0.01) in DNA defragmentation of sperm was found in dogs with BPH. Moreover, changes in the biochemical composition of prostate secretion were demonstrated. In dogs with BPH, pH of prostate secretions was greater (P = 0.03), concentrations of cholesterol increased while concentrations of Zn and Cu decreased. The study findings reveal that BPH does not change semen quality in dogs.

  4. Reduction in expression of the benign AR transcriptome is a hallmark of localised prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Stuchbery, Ryan; Macintyre, Geoff; Cmero, Marek; Harewood, Laurence M.; Peters, Justin S.; Costello, Anthony J.; Hovens, Christopher M.; Corcoran, Niall M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of androgen receptor (AR) signalling to prostate cancer development, little is known about how this signalling pathway changes with increasing grade and stage of the disease. Objective To explore changes in the normal AR transcriptome in localised prostate cancer, and its relation to adverse pathological features and disease recurrence. Design Publically accessible human prostate cancer expression arrays as well as RNA sequencing data from the prostate TCGA. Tumour associated PSA and PSAD were calculated for a large cohort of men (n=1108) undergoing prostatectomy. Outcome Measurements and Statistical Analysis We performed a meta-analysis of the expression of an androgen-regulated gene set across datasets using Oncomine. Differential expression of selected genes in the prostate TCGA database was probed using the edgeR Bioconductor package. Changes in tumour PSA density with stage and grade were assessed by Student's t-test, and its association with biochemical recurrence explored by Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression. Results Meta-analysis revealed a systematic decline in the expression of a previously identified benign prostate androgen-regulated gene set with increasing tumour grade, reaching significance in nine of 25 genes tested despite increasing AR expression. These results were confirmed in a large independent dataset from the TCGA. At the protein level, when serum PSA was corrected for tumour volume, significantly lower levels were observed with increasing tumour grade and stage, and predicted disease recurrence. Conclusions Lower PSA secretion-per-tumour-volume is associated with increasing grade and stage of prostate cancer, has prognostic relevance, and reflects a systematic perturbation of androgen signalling. PMID:27120785

  5. Inhibitory effects of Ponciri Fructus on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Kim, Ohn Soon; Seo, Chang-Seob; Jin, Seong Eun; Kim, Jung-Ae; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo; Kim, Yong-Ung; Lee, Mee-Young

    2017-08-03

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is non-cancerous condition of enlargement of the prostate, a common occurrence in older men. The immature fruits of Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Rafinesque (Rutaceae), Ponciri Fructus are widely used in traditional oriental medicine for the therapy of various diseases. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of BPH. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of a Ponciri Fructus extract (PFE) on the development of BPH in a in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate (TP). Male Sprague Dawley rats were used as a model of BPH after its induction by daily subcutaneous injections of TP/corn oil, for a period of four weeks. PFE was administrated daily 1 h before TP/corn oil injection by oral gavage at a dose level of 200 mg/kg during the 4 weeks of TP/corn oil injections. All rats were sacrificed at the end of the experiment, we measured the relative prostate weight, the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), histological changes, activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase), and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In addition, we also measured the inhibition (%) of 5α-reductase in the prostatic tissue. Our findings indicate that PFE significantly inhibited the development of BPH; decreased the relative prostate weight, the level of testosterone and DHT in serum and prostatic tissue, prostatic hyperplasia, expression of PCNA, and increased the antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, PFE showed a weak inhibitory activity on 5α-reductase. These results suggest that PFE may be used as a therapeutic agent for BPH via antiproliferative and antioxidant effects.

  6. VAT-1 is a novel pathogenic factor of progressive benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mori, Fumitaka; Tanigawa, Kiyoshi; Endo, Kanji; Minamiguchi, Kazuhisa; Abe, Masaaki; Yamada, Shizuo; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2011-10-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), arising from prostatic stromal hyperplasia (STH), is a progressive disease associated with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The mechanism of this STH remains unclear because there is no suitable model to study BPH pathology. Previously, we reported a new experimental BPH model that is clinically relevant to STH (the STH model). To elucidate prostatic STH mechanism, we used a compound found to be effective in the STH model. A binding protein specific for the effective compound in the STH model was pulled down using a compound-conjugated affinity matrix and identified by mass spectrometry. The RNA interference (RNAi) method was used to confirm the participation of the binding protein in cell proliferation. The binding protein expression in the prostate was assessed by immunohistochemistry. A benzimidazole derivative (Benz) significantly suppressed growth of implanted urogenital sinuses (UGS; 37.1%) in the STH model and inhibited the proliferation of human prostate stromal cells (PrSC) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50  = 0.43 µM). Vesicle amine transport protein-1 (VAT-1) was identified as a specific binding protein of Benz. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the VAT-1 expression level was higher in both epithelial and stromal cells of rat UGS and human BPH tissue than in normal prostate. VAT-1 siRNA markedly inhibited proliferation of PrSC, two androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and DU145), and suppressed UGS growth (28.2%) in the STH model. Here, we demonstrate that VAT-1 is a novel pathogenic factor in BPH associated with cell proliferation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Inhibitory effect of diosgenin on experimentally induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Huai-Fen; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Ruan, Jin-Lan

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of diosgenin, a natural sapogenin possessing various pharmacological activities, on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats and the possible mechanisms. BPH was established in the castrated rats by subcutaneous injection of testosterone propionate. Animals were randomly divided into four groups (n=10 each): model group (0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose); positive control group (3 mg/kg finasteride); two diosgenin groups (50 and 100 mg/kg). The drugs were intragastricaly given in each group for consecutive 3 weeks. Another 10 rats with no testicles cut off served as negative controls and they were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 mL olive oil per day and then treated with 0.5% sodium carboxymethylcellulose. After 3-week administration, the prostate index and serum PSA level were determined, and histopathological examination was carried out. The levels of MDA, SOD and GPx in prostates were also measured. Additionally, the expression of Bcl-2, Bax and p53 was examined using Western blotting. The results showed that the prostate index and serum PSA level were significantly decreased, and the pathological changes of the prostate gland were greatly improved in diosgenin groups as compared with the model group. Elevated activities of SOD and GPx, and reduced MDA level were also observed in diosgenin-treated rats. In addition, the expression of Bcl-2 in prostates was down-regulated, whereas that of Bax and p53 was up-regulated in diosgenin-treated rats. These results indicated that diosgenin was effective in inhibiting testosterone propionate-induced prostate enlargement and may be a candidate agent for the treatment of BPH.

  8. Analysis of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients' Perspective Through a Third Party-administered Survey.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M; Tyson, Mark D; Andrews, Paul E; Castle, Erik P; Ferrigni, Robert G; Wolter, Christopher E; Swanson, Scott K; McLemore, Ryan Y; Humphreys, Mitchell R

    2016-02-01

    To assess patient-reported functional and quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes associated with various surgical treatments for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). An independent third-party survey was sent to all patients who underwent any surgical treatment for BPH at our institution from January 2007 through January 2013. Overall satisfaction and urinary and sexual outcomes were evaluated using Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM), International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) for urinary function, and International Continence Society-Short Form (ICSmaleSF) questionnaires. Four hundred and seventy-nine respondents (response rate, 55.6%) had undergone holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP; n = 214), transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 210), holmium laser ablation of the prostate (n = 21), photoselective vaporization (n = 18), transurethral incision of the prostate (n = 9), and open simple prostatectomy (n = 7). Postoperatively, Sexual Health Inventory for Men scores were not different. However, total IPSS varied significantly among surgical techniques (P < .001). Mean (standard deviation) IPSS was lowest for open simple prostatectomy (4.0 [2.6]), followed by HoLEP (5.8 [5.4]). For individual domains, significant differences were in intermittency (P < .001), weak stream (P = .003), straining (P < .001), and QoL (P = .001). In all these domains, HoLEP had the lowest scores. Regarding International Continence Society-Short Form, we observed a significant difference favoring transurethral resection of the prostate in incontinence (P < .001) and favoring HoLEP in voiding (P = .02) and QoL domains (P = .03). Most patients were satisfied with their surgical intervention, independent of the procedure type. Regret was least in patients who underwent HoLEP (P = .02). Patients generally expressed satisfaction with various interventions for BPH. However, those who underwent HoLEP had the best outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Is there a relationship between androgenic alopecia and benign prostatic hyperplasia?

    PubMed

    Dastgheib, Ladan; Shirazi, Mehdi; Moezzi, Iman; Dehghan, Saber; Sadati, Maryam-Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia as a physiologic process and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) as a pathologic process in the older population are androgen-dependent processes influenced by 5-alpha reductase enzyme which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This cross sectional study was done to evaluate the relationship between androgenic alopecia and BPH. 150 men older than 50 years old, who presented to the free prostate screening clinic, were included. They were asked about urinary symptoms. PSA level, prostate volume with sonography and alopecia grading using Hamilton-Norwood classification (grade I to VII) were evaluated. Analysis was done by SPSS statistical method. 59.6% of men had mild alopecia (grade I, II, III), 34.1% had moderate alopecia (grade IV, V) and 6.3% had severe alopecia (grade VI, VII).The mean PSA level was 1.37 ± 1.48 ng/ml. The minimum PSA level was 0.1 ng/ml, and the maximum level was 6.8 ng/ml. The mean prostate volume was 37.85 ± 21.85cc. The minimum prostate size was 10 ml, and the maximum volume was 173 ml. The mean international prostate symptom score (IPSS) was 7.6 ± 6.11 with the minimum score 0 and the maximum score 27. However, no relationship between these parameters and androgenic alopecia was detected. This study showed that there is no relationship between androgenic alopecia, PSA level, IPSS, and prostate volume. Occurrence of alopecia in younger age and a positive family history correlated with a higher grade of alopecia.

  10. Usage of GreenLight HPS 180-W laser vaporisation for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Džamić, Z; Aćimović, M; Kajmaković, B; Pejčić, T

    2014-01-01

    Laser therapy has gained increasing acceptance as a relatively less invasive treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). From the early procedure of interstitial laser coagulation through to the use of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate, there has been an expanding body of evidence on the efficacy of such procedures. One of the newer lasers is the Green Light HPS 180 W laser. Studies with this GreenLight laser (GLL) (American Medical Systems, Inc, Minnetonka, MN, USA) showing results as good as those of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). In this paper, the efficacy of the new GLL 180-W versus the gold standard TURP in patients with LUTS due to BPH was tested in a prospective clinical trial. To compare results of Green light laser (GLL) evaporisation of the prostatae and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for treatment of BPH. MATERIJALS AND METHODS: A total of 62 patients with BPH were randomly assigned to two equal groups: TURP or GLL. Both groups were compared regarding all relevant preoperative, operative, and postoperative parameters. Functional results in terms of improvement of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximum flow rate (Qmax), and postvoid residual (PVR) urine were assessed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 mo. A total of 62 patients completed 12 mo of follow-up in the TURP and GLL groups, respectively. Baseline characteristics were comparable. Mean operative time was significantly shorter for TURP. Compared to preoperative values, there was significant reduction in hemoglobin levels at the end of TURP only. A significant difference in favor of GLL was achieved regarding the duration of catheterization and hospital stay. In the GLL, no major intraoperative complications were recorded and none of the patients required blood transfusion. Among TURP patients, 6 required transfusion, 1 developed TUR syndrome, and capsule perforation was observed in 5 patients. There was dramatic

  11. Evidence of the efficacy and safety of the thulium laser in the treatment of men with benign prostatic obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Barbalat, Yana; Velez, Marissa C.; Sayegh, Christopher I.; Chung, Doreen E.

    2016-01-01

    In 2005, the high power thulium laser was introduced for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic obstruction. It has several properties that confer theoretical advantages over other lasers used for the same indication, such as technical versatility and a relatively small zone of thermal damage. Studies using the 70–150 W thulium laser systems demonstrate good efficacy of these procedures with low morbidity and few complications even in higher risk patients. Different techniques have been employed to treat the prostate with this technology, including enucleation, vapoenucleation, vaporization and resection. Comparative studies have been published comparing thulium laser prostatectomy to monopolar transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), bipolar TURP and holmium laser enucleation of prostate (HoLEP). In this review we discuss the current literature on the safety and efficacy of various thulium techniques for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and examine comparative studies. PMID:27247628

  12. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate is effective in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia of any size including a small prostate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ho; Yang, Hee Jo; Kim, Doo Sang; Lee, Chang Ho; Jeon, Youn Soo

    2014-11-01

    Although transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is considered the standard surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is replacing TURP. We compared TURP with HoLEP with matching for prostate size. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of patients who underwent TURP and HoLEP performed by one surgeon at our institute. All patients were categorized into 3 groups on the basis of prostate size (group 1, <40 g; group 2, 40-79 g; and group 3, >80 g), and 45 patients were selected for each method. No major intraoperative complications were encountered. The mean resected tissue weight was 6.3, 18.3, and 28.0 g for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, for TURP and 8.7, 25.0, and 39.8 g, respectively, for HoLEP. The mean operation time was 51.8, 89.3, and 101.9 minutes for TURP and 83.6, 122.8, and 131.2 minutes for HoLEP in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. HoLEP had better resection efficacy than TURP for any size prostate, but there was no statistical difference between the methods. Both methods resulted in an immediate and significant improvement of International Prostate Symptom Score, peak urinary flow rates, and postvoid residual urine volume. HoLEP is effective for BPH treatment, regardless of prostate size, even in a small prostate. The perioperative morbidity of HoLEP is also comparable to that of TURP.

  13. Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Barbados, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Hambleton, Ian R.; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Skeete, Desiree H.-A.; Nemesure, Barbara; Leske, M. Cristina

    2011-01-01

    We describe prostate cancer incidence and mortality in Barbados, West Indies. We ascertained all histologically confirmed cases of prostate cancer during the period July 2002 to December 2008 and reviewed each death registration citing prostate cancer over a 14-year period commencing January 1995. There were 1101 new cases for an incidence rate of 160.4 (95% Confidence Interval: 151.0–170.2) per 100,000 standardized to the US population. Comparable rates in African-American and White American men were 248.2 (95% CI: 246.0–250.5) and 158.0 (95% CI: 157.5–158.6) per 100,000, respectively. Prostate cancer mortality rates in Barbados ranged from 63.2 to 101.6 per 100,000, compared to 51.1 to 78.8 per 100,000 among African Americans. Prostate cancer risks are lower in Caribbean-origin populations than previously believed, while mortality rates appeared to be higher than reported in African-American men. Studies in Caribbean populations may assist understanding of disparities among African-origin populations with shared heredity. PMID:22110989

  14. [X-ray-guided endovascular surgery in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Neimark, A I; Tachalov, M A; Neimark, B A; Torbik, D V; Arzamastsev, D D

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of superselective embolization and chemoembolization of the prostatic artery as an independent method of treating prostate cancer and BPH. From 2004 to 2015, 116 patients with BPH (mean age 73.2+/-5.2 years) underwent prostatic artery embolization. Mean prostate volume ranged from 55 to 296 cc3. From 2011 to 2015, 37 patients with prostate cancer (mean age 72.3+/-2.06 years) were treated with X-ray-guided endovascular chemoembolization. All patients had confirmed PCa, of whom 7 had stage T2a and 30 stage T2c disease. PSA ranged from 0.8 to17 ng/ml (mean 13.1+/-3.9). Prostate volume ranged from 61 to 93 cc3 (mean 69.4+/-9.3). The follow-up ranged from 8 to 42 months. Prostatic artery embolization in BPH patients resulted in a significant reduction in IPSS symptom score and increase in Qmax. The volume of prostate and nodular mass decreased on average by 53% and 47%, respectively, maximum by 82%. Chemoembolization was effective in 31 (83.7%) patients. An objective response was achieved in reducing the PSA level and prostate volume measured by TRUS, and improved urination. The median PSA at 6 months was - 3.4 +/- 0.02 ng/ml. In all patients, chemoembolization resulted in a marked reduction in the prostate volume. The greatest decrease in the prostate volume was observed at 6 months after treatment. Chemoembolization led to a marked improvement in the quality of urination confirmed by uroflowmetry and IPSS symptom scores. At 12 months, 16 patients with prostate cancer underwent the follow-up biopsy. In 12 cases pathology showed fibrosis and epithelial degeneration without signs of atypia and in 2 cases curative pathomorphosis was observed. Chemoembolization was well tolerated and did not cause any significant complications. Embolization techniques for BPH and chemoembolization for localized PCa showed good effectiveness and safety in patients who had medical contraindications to traditional treatments.

  15. Incidence and potential causative factors associated with chronic benign neutropenia in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Benign neutropenia often presents in certain populations without any genotype nor phenotype. Middle East countries are among the regions where endemic cases of chronic benign neutropenia are reported in the general population with an incidence of approximately between 10-15%. Not many studies have been performed to ascertain the cause or burden associated with this condition. The objective of the current study was to identify the frequency and characterize the consequences of chronic benign neutropenia in the country of Saudi Arabia. Results Benign neutropenia was found to be high in the Saudi Arabia general population (up to 20%), with an average neutrophil count of 1.48 (range 0.99 – 1.95 × 109cells/L), with Saudis having a higher incidence of chronic benign neutropenia compared to non-Saudis (p = <0.05). Complete blood count analyses showed significant difference in the total white cell count of neutrophils (p < 0.0001), WBC (p < 0.0001), lymphocytes (p < 0.001), monocytes (p < 0.001), eosinophils (p = 0.013) as well as the CD19 B cells (p = 0.008). Conclusions Our study is the first to carefully quantitate benign neutropenia in Saudi Arabia. We identified that this condition is prevalent in the middle aged population (18 years to 55 years). These individuals not only had lower neutrophil counts, but also reduced peripheral blood cells types, especially the B-lymphocyte population (CD19 subset). As B-lymphocytes are involved in antibody production and antigen recognition, a decrease might easily predispose the individuals to infectious agents. As such more mechanistic studies need to be undertaken to understand the cause and potential long-term consequences of benign neutropenia. PMID:25810761

  16. Urethral bleeding as a presenting sign of benign prostatic hyperplasia in the dog: a retrospective study (1979-1993).

    PubMed

    Read, R A; Bryden, S

    1995-01-01

    Nineteen dogs were presented to the Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital (MUVH) because of blood loss from the urethra, unassociated with other clinical signs of prostatic disease. Blood loss was intermittent in all cases, but was severe enough to require blood transfusion in one case. Prostatic enlargement was detected on rectal palpation in all cases, and benign prostatic hyperplasia was diagnosed after elimination of other prostatic diseases (i.e., infection, cysts, neoplasia) using diagnostic imaging and clinical laboratory tests. Castration resulted in cessation of blood loss; whereas antiandrogen therapy, an alternative treatment to castration, was less effective.

  17. Transurethral vapor enucleation and resection of the prostate with plasma vaporization button electrode for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liping; Mao, Qiqi; Chen, Hong; Qin, Jie; Zheng, Xiangyi; Lin, Yiwei; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Various improvements and modifications to the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia have emerged over the last decade. Most techniques often initially claimed superiority only to turn out to be mediocre with time. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate has been associated with superior outcomes compared with transurethral resection of the prostate and demonstrated improvement in long-term outcomes, while its clinical use has limitations. We describe the first use of plasma vaporization button electrode combined with loop electrode for transurethral vapor enucleation and resection of the prostate.

  18. Bacteriological Profile of Isolates From Urine Samples in Patients of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and or Prostatitis Showing Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ved; Singh, Kashmir; Mog, H; Agarwal, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) or Prostatitis is increasing considerably worldwide. The Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) due to bacterial aetiology are one of the common factors for the complications among the patients. Aim To determine the bacterial agents and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern from the urine samples of patients of BPH or Prostatitis showing symptoms of LUTS. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology of Rohilkhand Medical College and Hospital of Northern India from June 2014 to May 2015. A total of 105 urine specimens from patients of BPH and/ or Prostatitis were cultured by a semi-quantitative method. The isolated bacteria were identified by colony morphology, Gram’s staining, motility and biochemical tests. Antibiotic sensitivity was done according to the CLSI 2007 guidelines by disc diffusion method. Data was analysed by SPSS and Microsoft office 2007. Proportions and percentages were used as statistical measures. Results The urine cultures from patients with BPH and or chronic Prostatitis, showed n=66/105 (62.85%) culture positivity. Out of 66 isolates the frequency was in following order Escherichia coli 21/66 (31.81%), Klebsiella spp 19/66 (28.78%), Staphylococcus aureus 11/66 (16.66%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.60%), Proteus spp, Enterococcus spp, Acinetobacter spp and Citrobacter spp. The most susceptible 1st, 2nd and 3rd line antibiotics for Gram negative isolates were ampicillin, amikacin and tigecycline respectively. Amongst the Gram positive isolates, the susceptible 1st, 2nd and 3rd line antibiotics were cefoxitin, vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Multidrug resistance was seen in Escherichia coli (n=6), Klebsiella spp (n=7), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=4) and Staphylococcus aureus (n=3). Conclusion Based on the above findings we can say that accurate aetiology of the LUTS among the patients of BPH and/or Prostatitis is warranted to

  19. Prostatic Urethral Lift Vs Prostate Arterial Embolization: Novel Nonablative Strategies in the Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Secondary to Benign Prostate Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Aboumarzouk, Omar M; Somani, Bhaskar K

    2016-01-01

    Prostate urethral lift and prostate arterial embolization represent two evolving techniques with contrasting mechanisms of action (mechanical decompression vs angiographic embolization). Both yield relief of lower urinary tract symptoms over a period of several weeks. They display similar safety profiles with self-limiting pelvic discomfort characterizing the commonest minor adverse event. Both procedures have the potential to be carried out under local anesthesia and in the outpatient setting with suitability for patients with cardiovascular comorbidities. Neither has been found to cause degradation of sexual function. Further randomized studies are needed to delineate the formal position of these techniques in the surgical management of benign prostate hyperplasia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Urodynamic Features and Significant Predictors of Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Patients With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Small Prostate Volume.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Kim, Myong; Choo, Min Soo; Paick, Jae-Seung; Oh, Seung-June

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the clinical and urodynamic features of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) according to their prostate size. We analyzed 2039 LUTS/BPH patients who underwent urodynamic study between October 2004 and August 2013. We divided the patients into three groups according to their prostate size: small (≤30 mL), moderately enlarged (31-80 mL), and large prostate (≥81 mL) groups. We compared the groups regarding age, International Prostatic Symptom Score, maximal flow rate (Qmax), postvoided residual (PVR), serum prostate-specific antigen, prostate volume measured by ultrasonography, and urodynamic findings. Patients with a small prostate had better urodynamic outcomes than those with larger prostates in overall population. Although the total prostate volume significantly correlated with the bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) index (r  =  0.51), BOO patients with a small prostate had similar Qmax, higher PVR, and lower voiding efficiency, compared to those with larger prostates. Moreover, urodynamic parameters indicating bladder abnormalities, including low compliance and involuntary detrusor contraction positivity, were similar among the groups in BOO patients. A higher proportion of detrusor underactivity was also observed in the small prostate group in BOO patients. Finally, when adjusting for potential confounding variables, we identified serum prostate-specific antigen levels (odds ratio, 1.34) and Qmax (odds ratio, 0.77) as significant predictors for BOO in LUTS/BPH patients with a small prostate. BOO patients with a small prostate showed higher PVR and poor voiding efficiency, as well as similar urodynamic bladder abnormalities, compared to those with moderately enlarged and large prostates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Medium- and Long-Term Outcome of Prostate Artery Embolization for Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Results in 630 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pisco, João M; Bilhim, Tiago; Pinheiro, Luis C; Fernandes, Lucia; Pereira, Jose; Costa, Nuno V; Duarte, Marisa; Oliveira, António G

    2016-08-01

    To confirm that prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has a positive medium- and long-term effect in symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Between March 2009 and October 2014, 630 consecutive patients with BPH and moderate-to-severe lower urinary tract symptoms refractory to medical therapy for at least 6 months or who refused any medical therapy underwent PAE. Outcome parameters were evaluated at baseline; 1, 3, and 6 months; every 6 months between 1 and 3 years; and yearly thereafter up to 6.5 years. Mean patient age was 65.1 years ± 8.0 (range, 40-89 y). There were 12 (1.9%) technical failures. Bilateral PAE was performed in 572 (92.6%) patients and unilateral PAE was performed in 46 (7.4%) patients. The cumulative clinical success rates at medium- and long-term follow-up were 81.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.3%-84.9%) and 76.3% (95% CI, 68.6%-82.4%). There was a statistically significant (P < .0001) change from baseline to last observed value in all clinical parameters: International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality-of-life (QOL), prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen, urinary maximal flow rate, postvoid residual, and International Index of Erectile Function. There were 2 major complications without sequelae. PAE had a positive effect on IPSS, QOL, and all objective outcomes in symptomatic BPH. The medium- (1-3 y) and long-term (> 3-6.5 y) clinical success rates were 81.9% and 76.3%, with no urinary incontinence or sexual dysfunction reported. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. BiVap saline vaporization of the prostate in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia: our clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Ayhan; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Atesci, Yusuf Ziya

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy, safety, and postoperative outcomes of the recently developing endoscopic technique of BiVap saline vaporization of the prostate in patients with benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). Ninety-six patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate with BiVap system for BPO and with available data during the 1-year postoperative follow-up period were included in the study. All patients were evaluated at the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th month, and preoperative and postoperative values of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL) score, total prostate-specific antigen, International Index of Erectile Function 15, postvoiding residual urinary volume (PVR), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), and average urinary flow rate (Qave) were compared. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS version 18. A P value <.05 was considered significant. Mean age of the patients was 65.6 ± 7.5 years. Significant improvement was noted for IPSS, Qmax, Qave, PVR, and QoL score by the postoperative first month when compared with the preoperative values. Maximum improvement in the IPSS, Qmax, Qave, PVR, and QoL score was achieved at postoperative 6th, 3rd, 6th, 12th, and 3rd months, respectively. Although total International Index of Erectile Function and subgroup scores decreased at the postoperative first month, all improved to their preoperative levels by the postoperative third month. BiVap system is a safe, effective, and useful technique, which can be easily performed in patients with BPO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effectiveness of reducing the daily dose of finasteride in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michael J; Geller, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Background Finasteride, a 5 alpha reductase inhibitor, is an established treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The recommended dosage is 5 mg a day, however case reports have show effectiveness with lower doses. The objective of the current study was to determine in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia, previously treated for at least one year with finasteride 5 mg daily, if they will maintain subjective and objective improvements in urinary obstruction when treated with 2.5 mg of finasteride daily for one year. Methods In an open label, prospective study, 40 men with benign prostatic hyperplasia, previously treated for at least one year with 5 mg of finasteride, took 2.5 mg of finasteride daily for one year. Measurements included AUA symptom score, maximum flow rate, voided volume and PSA. Results There were no significant changes in maximum flow rate, voided volume, or AUA symptom score after one year of finasteride 2.5 mg daily therapy. PSA increased significantly, p < .01, after one year of finasteride 2.5 mg daily, 2.0 +1.4 ng/ml, when compared to finasteride 5 mg daily, 1.4+ 1.0 ng/ml. Conclusions The daily dose of finasteride can be reduced to 2.5 mg daily without significant effect on subjective and objective measures of urinary obstruction. Although statistically significant increases in PSA are noted when reducing the daily finasteride dose from 5 mg to 2.5 mg, the clinical significance of a mean .6 ng/ml increase in PSA is questionable. PMID:11818031

  4. An observational analysis of provider adherence to AUA guidelines on the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Auffenberg, Gregory B; Gonzalez, Chris M; Wolf, J Stuart; Clemens, J Quentin; Meeks, William; McVary, Kevin T

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively evaluated urologist adherence to the AUA guidelines on the management of new patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia related lower urinary tract symptoms in a large university urology group. All first time benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptom visits to the urology clinic at the Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 were evaluated using an institutionally managed electronic medical record data repository. Clinical documentation and orders from each encounter were assessed to determine the rate of performance of guideline measures. Approximately 1% of all results were manually reviewed in a validation process designed to determine the reliability of the electronic medical record based system. A total of 3,494 eligible encounters were evaluated in the final analysis. Provider adherence rates with the 9 measures recommended in the guidelines varied by measure from 53.0% to 92.8%. The rate of performance of 5 not routinely recommended measures was 10.2% or less. Post-void residual and urinary flow measurement were optional measures, and were performed on 68.1% and 4.6% of new encounters respectively. Manual validation revealed the electronic medical record data extraction was concordant with manual review in 96.7% of cases (95% CI 94.8-98.5). Using electronic medical record based data extraction techniques, we reliably document a baseline adherence rate with AUA guidelines on the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Establishing this benchmark will be important for future investigation into patient outcomes related to guideline adherence and into methods for improving provider adherence. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Evolution of Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Muta M

    2005-01-01

    The 2 basic principles of laser therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), based on the final tissue effect, are laser vaporization and laser coagulation. In laser vaporization techniques, higher-density laser thermal energy is used; effects range from complete tissue vaporization to incision, resection, or enucleation of the obstructing prostatic tissue. Interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) requires lower therapeutic temperatures. The urethral preservation and lack of tissue evaporation/resection with ILC make this treatment different from conventional transurethral free-beam laser prostatectomy. The Indigo® Optima Laser treatment system is the most widely used ILC system. Unlike other BPH laser therapies, Indigo ILC can be satisfactorily performed using pure local anesthesia in an office or outpatient setting. Favorable treatment outcomes are seen in a large percentage of patients, with minimal adverse events. Such favorable results depend on proper surgical technique and operator experience. PMID:16985899

  6. Sidefiring laser-fiber technology for minimally invasive transurethral treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Matthews, James Lester; Gardetto, W. W.; Everett, R. V.; Lahon, H. A.

    1993-07-01

    We have designed and are fabricating the SideFireR laser optical fiber device incorporating a 99.95+% purity gold tip with a mirror which laterally reflects the beam at a 105 degree(s) angle to the optical fiber axis while closely maintaining the beam profile. The monolithic gold construction of the mirrored tip underlies the optical and thermal stability and the bicompatibility of the device during lasing in aqueous environments using up to 80 W of Nd:YAG 1.064 micrometers radiation. Current studies are being conducted to evaluate the use of this device in laser coagulation of the prostate as an alternative treatment to transurethral resection in treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

  7. Review of Current Laser Therapies for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Benjamin B.

    2013-01-01

    The gold standard for symptomatic relief of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia has traditionally been a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Over the past decade, however, novel laser technologies that rival the conventional TURP have multiplied. As part of the ongoing quest to minimize complications, shorten hospitalization, improve resection time, and most importantly reduce mortality, laser prostatectomy has continually evolved. Today, there are more variations of laser prostatectomy, each with several differing surgical techniques. Although abundant data are available confirming the safety and feasibility of the various laser systems, future randomized-controlled trials will be necessary to verify which technique is superior. In this review, we describe the most common modalities used to perform a laser prostatectomy, mainly, the holmium laser and the potassium-titanyl-phosphate lasers. We also highlight the physical and clinical characteristics of each technology with a review of the most current and highest-quality literature. PMID:23789041

  8. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, Metabolic Syndrome and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is Metaflammation the Link?

    PubMed

    Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Cimino, Sebastiano; Castelli, Tommaso; Favilla, Vincenzo; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Condorelli, Rosita A; La Vignera, Sandro; Calogero, Aldo E; Motta, Fabio; Puzzo, Lidia; Caltabiano, Rosario; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of prostatic inflammation (PI) is very frequent in patients affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). To investigate the relationship between prostatic inflammation (PI) and the presence of MetS and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a cohort of patients affected by BPH/LUTS. We conducted a prospective study from January 2012 to June 2014 on 264 consecutive patients, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate for bladder outlet obstruction. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Prior to surgery, each patient has been evaluated for the presence of MetS and NAFLD. All surgical specimens were investigated for the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate, according to the Irani score. The prevalence of patients affected by MetS alone was 13.8% (32/232), 13.8% (32/232) by NAFLD alone, and 42.7% (99/232) by both diseases. The rate of subjects affected by MetS + NAFLD and severe PI was significantly greater than those with only one metabolic alteration (75.8% vs. 24.2%, P < 0.01). The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that FLI was independently associated with high PI (Irani score ≥ 4) (odds ratio [OR]: 1.04; P < 0.01). Further, the combination between MetS and NAFLD was associated severe PI (OR: 4.5; P < 0.01) while not MetS as a single alteration. Patients with BPH/LUTS and metabolic aberration exhibited grater PI. The coexistence of MetS and NAFLD exerted a greater detrimental effect on prostate gland by increasing severity of inflammation. Prostate 76:1528-1535, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hemato-biochemical alterations and urinalysis in dogs suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Das, M. R.; Patra, R. C.; Das, R. K.; Rath, P. K.; Mishra, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The study was designed to evaluate the hemato-biochemical alterations, urinalysis along with histomorphological and histological changes of prostate glands in dogs affected with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. Materials and Methods: In toto, 445 dogs presented to the Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex of the College of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry, one Government Veterinary Hospital and two pet clinics in and around Bhubaneswar screened for the presence of BPH. Most of the 57 dogs were 6 years and above as reported by the owners. Only 57 dogs found positive for BPH basing on the presence of typical clinical signs subjected for a detailed hemato-biochemical study. Most of the 57 dogs were 6 years and above as reported by the owners. Routine and microscopic urinalyses were done as per the routine procedure. Histomorphological evaluations of prostate glands were done through manual rectal palpation. Histological examinations of prostate tissue sections of two dead dogs were conducted with routine hematoxylin and eosin stain. Results: The study revealed about 12.8% (57/445) of dogs was suffering from BPH. Typical clinical signs - such as passing small thin tape-shaped feces, holding tail away from backward, tenesmus, and straining during urination and defecation - were seen in most of the cases. Urine samples of affected dogs were positive for glucose, occult blood, and protein. A significant decrease in lymphocytes and increase in eosinophil counts in dogs with BPH was recorded. Serum biochemical analysis showed a nonsignificant increase in creatinine and blood urea nitrogen with a significant decrease in total protein, albumin, globulin, A:G ratio. Histology of prostate glands collected during postmortem was characterized by fibrosis of prostate gland, and hyperplasia of the acinar epithelium. Conclusions: High rate of the prevalence of BPH in dogs poses an alarming condition which if diagnosed at an

  10. Two-micrometer thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Jian; Wei, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Fei; Liu, Hai-Tao; Zhao, Fu-Jun; Han, Bang-Min; Sun, Xiao-Wen; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2017-01-01

    The 2-μm thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique (TmLRP-TT) has been introduced as a minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study was undertaken to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of TmLRP-TT for the treatment of BPH patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy. A prospective analysis of 51 patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy who underwent surgical treatment using TmLRP-TT was performed from December 2011 to December 2013. Preoperative status, surgical details, and perioperative complications were recorded. The follow-up outcome was evaluated with subjective and objective tests at 1 and 6 months. TmLRP-TT was successfully completed in all patients. Mean prostate volume, operative duration, and catheterization time were 93.3 ± 37.9 ml, 69.5 ± 39.5 min, and 6.5 ± 1.3 days, respectively. The mean International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life score, maximum urinary flow rate, and post-void residual urine volume changed notably at 6-month follow-up (22.5 ± 6.9 vs 6.1 ± 3.2, 4.8 ± 1.3 vs 1.1 ± 0.9, 7.3 ± 4.5 vs 18.9 ± 7.1 ml s-1 , and 148.7 ± 168.7 vs 28.4 ± 17.9 ml). Two (3.9%) patients required blood transfusion perioperatively, while 3 (5.9%) patients experienced transient hematuria postoperatively, and 2 (3.9%) patients received 3 days recatheterization due to clot retention. TmLRP-TT is a safe and effective minimally invasive technique for patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy during the 6-month follow-up. This promising technology may be a feasible surgical method for previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy in the future.

  11. Two-micrometer thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jian; Wei, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Fei; Liu, Hai-Tao; Zhao, Fu-Jun; Han, Bang-Min; Sun, Xiao-Wen; Jun-Lu; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2017-01-01

    The 2-μm thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique (TmLRP-TT) has been introduced as a minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study was undertaken to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of TmLRP-TT for the treatment of BPH patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy. A prospective analysis of 51 patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy who underwent surgical treatment using TmLRP-TT was performed from December 2011 to December 2013. Preoperative status, surgical details, and perioperative complications were recorded. The follow-up outcome was evaluated with subjective and objective tests at 1 and 6 months. TmLRP-TT was successfully completed in all patients. Mean prostate volume, operative duration, and catheterization time were 93.3 ± 37.9 ml, 69.5 ± 39.5 min, and 6.5 ± 1.3 days, respectively. The mean International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life score, maximum urinary flow rate, and post-void residual urine volume changed notably at 6-month follow-up (22.5 ± 6.9 vs 6.1 ± 3.2, 4.8 ± 1.3 vs 1.1 ± 0.9, 7.3 ± 4.5 vs 18.9 ± 7.1 ml s−1, and 148.7 ± 168.7 vs 28.4 ± 17.9 ml). Two (3.9%) patients required blood transfusion perioperatively, while 3 (5.9%) patients experienced transient hematuria postoperatively, and 2 (3.9%) patients received 3 days recatheterization due to clot retention. TmLRP-TT is a safe and effective minimally invasive technique for patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy during the 6-month follow-up. This promising technology may be a feasible surgical method for previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy in the future. PMID:26732107

  12. What do I tell patients about saw palmetto for benign prostatic hyperplasia?

    PubMed

    Kane, Christopher J; Raheem, Omer A; Bent, Stephen; Avins, Andrew L

    2011-08-01

    Saw palmetto is widely used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Although there is passionate support for herbal and complementary therapies for LUTS, clinical evidence is mixed. Because there is a well-recognized, profound placebo effect in tests of efficacy for agents treating LUTS, it is imperative that all therapies be tested in placebo-controlled trials. This article reviews evidence of the efficacy and safety of saw palmetto for men with LUTS caused by BPH, with particular emphasis on published randomized clinical trials and the upcoming Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Urologic Symptoms (CAMUS) trial.

  13. Preventing Progression in Men with Mild Symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Potential Role for Phytotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Yan Kit; Marihart, Sibylle; Harik, Mike; Djavan, Bob

    2004-01-01

    Prevalence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is increasing with the aging population worldwide. Throughout the 20th century, men with minimally symptomatic BPH were generally advised to defer treatment. Treatment deferral or watchful waiting has always appeared reasonable because mild lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of bladder outlet obstruction are not bothersome and are often regarded as part of the aging process, progression is usually slow, and symptoms often regress spontaneously. This review examines the evidence of the natural history of BPH, highlighting the group of patients with mild symptoms, the risk factors for progression, and the potential role of phytotherapy in this group of men. PMID:16985600

  14. [Benign hyperplasia of the prostate--a known and unknown disease].

    PubMed

    Safarík, L; Dvorácek, J

    2001-11-22

    Authors give an overview of the current approaches to diagnostics and therapy of the benign hyperplasia of the prostate (BPH). The up-to-date diagnostic possibilities are cited in the relation to our health care system and the procedures of conservative and surgical treatment of BPH are outlined. In epidemiology and diagnostics of BPH, one has always to consider the possibility of prostate cancer (PC), which may have similar symptoms, particularly in initial stages. If prostate cancer were found, it could be successfully cured at this stage only. Drug therapy or BPH enables in most cases at least temporarily to resign on surgical treatment. Patients treated with alphablockers regularly speak about an improved quality of life regarding previous micturition troubles. To diagnose BPH, the complex urological examination is needed, including some laboratory tests (prostate specific antigen PSA, uroflowmetry UFM). The article is supplemented with a graph of latest available figures referring to the number of TURPs performed annually and a table showing the list of methods for the minimal invasive surgical treatment of BPH.

  15. Minimally invasive devices for treating lower urinary tract symptoms in benign prostate hyperplasia: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Marcelis, Quentin; Roumeguère, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) represents a spectrum of related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The cost of currently recommended medications and the discontinuation rate due to side effects are significant drawbacks limiting their long-term use in clinical practice. Interventional procedures, considered as the definitive treatment for BPH, carry a significant risk of treatment-related complications in frail patients. These issues have contributed to the emergence of new approaches as alternative options to standard therapies. This paper reviews the recent literature regarding the experimental treatments under investigation and presents the currently available experimental devices and techniques used under local anesthesia for the treatment of LUTS/BPH in the vast majority of cases. Devices for delivery of thermal treatment (microwaves, radiofrequency, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the Rezum system), mechanical devices (prostatic stent and urethral lift), fractionation of prostatic tissue (histotripsy and aquablation), prostate artery embolization, and intraprostatic drugs are discussed. Evidence for the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of these “minimally invasive procedures” is analyzed. PMID:26317083

  16. Protective potential of epigallocatechin-3-gallate against benign prostatic hyperplasia in metabolic syndrome rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinglou; Song, Hongping

    2016-07-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a major catechin in green tea with functions of antioxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and attenuating metabolic syndrome. In this study, rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) accompanied with metabolic syndrome was induced by fed on high-fat diet for 12 weeks combined with testosterone injection (10mg/kg/d) from 9th to 12th weeks. EGCG was orally given from 9th to 12th weeks. Finally, the levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, prostate weight, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), inflammatory cytokines, antioxidant enzymes, and prostatic expression of IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) were evaluated. It was found that EGCG significantly decreased the levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, IGFs, and inflammatory cytokines, normalized the activities of antioxidant enzymes, as well as increased the prostatic expression of IGFBP-3 and PPARs. These results indicated that EGCG was able to exert anti-BPH activities in metabolic syndrome rats.

  17. Anti-Proliferation Effects of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) on the Progression of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Shin, Su-Jin; Lee, Na Young; Cheon, Se-Yun; Park, Wansu; Sun, Seung-Ho; An, Hyo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a urologic disease that affects most of men over the age 50. But until now there is no such perfect cure without side effects. Because of diverse adverse effects, it is desirable to develop effective and long term-safety-herbal medicines to inhibit the progress of BPH. In spite of garlic's large use and a wide spectrum of studies, including anti-hyperlipidemic, cardio-protective, and anti-inflammatory activities, there was none to prove efficacy for BPH. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of garlic to prove its suppressing effects on BPH. Garlic administration decreased relative prostate weight ratio, suppressed mRNA expression level of AR, DHT serum levels, and the growth of prostatic tissue in BPH-induced rats. Moreover, garlic administration decreased the levels of inflammatory proteins, iNOS, and COX-2 in prostatic tissue. Further investigation showed that garlic induced accumulation of death-inducing signal complex and activation of AMPK and decreased the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and survivin. These results suggest that garlic may have suppressing effects on BPH and it has great potential to be developed as treatment for BPH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Correlation of transrectal and transabodominal ultrasound measurement of transition zone volume with post-operative enucleated adenoma volume in benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Idowu; Aremu, Ademola; Olajide, Abimbola; Bello, Tope; Olajide, Folake; Adetiloye, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common disease of ageing men worldwide. Though transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) is the standard in most parts of the world in evaluation of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), it is rarely done in some less developed countries because of non availability of appropriate probes and or specialists. Transabdominal ultrasonography (TAUS) remains the mainstay in these areas. Some controversies still exist in literature about the accuracy of TAUS evaluation of prostatic volume in patients with BPH. This study aimed at comparing the transition zone volume estimation of the prostate on transrectal and transabdominal ultrasound with post-operative enucleated adenoma volume in Nigeria patients with BPH and to suggest better predictor of prostate volume in evaluation of BPH. Forty-six (46) patients with lower urinary tract symptoms due to BPH attending the urologic clinic were evaluated ultrasonographically and eventually managed with open surgery (prostatectomy) after due counselling. The post operative samples were weighted using a sensitive top loading weighing balance and converted to volume. Since the specific gravity of the prostate is equivalent to that of water,the weight is the same as volume. Patients' ages ranged between 59 and 90 years with a peak age incidence at seventh decade. Transition Zone (TZ) volume estimation on both transrectal and transabdominal ultrasound showed positive correlation with the post operative enucleated adenoma(r = 0.594, p < 0.001) but the transrectal method was more accurate. There was no significant relationship between the TZ volume and patients' symptoms(r = 0.491, p = 0.007). Both TRUS and TAUS are comparable at TZ volume estimation and therefore TAUS can be utilized in regions where intracavitary probes and or the expertise is/are not available.

  19. Bipolar versus monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia: safe in patients with high surgical risk

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Er J.; Li, Hao; Sun, Xin B.; Huang, Li; Wang, Li; Gong, Xiao X.; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we compared the effects of bipolar and monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (B-TURP, M-TURP) for treating elderly patients (≥75 years) with benign prostatic hyperplasia(BPH) who had internal comorbidities. Eligible BPH patients were aged ≥75 years and had at least one internal comorbidity. In this open-label, prospective trial, patients were assigned to B-TURP (n = 75) and M-TURP (n = 88) groups. Data on prostate volume (PV), urination, and time during perioperative period were compared; data associated with urination and complications at one year postoperatively were also compared. Finally, follow-up data were available for 68 and 81 patients in the B-TURP and M-TURP group, respectively. No deaths were recorded. Intraoperative bleeding was lower and irrigation time, indwelling catheter time, and hospital stay were shorter in the B-TURP group than in the M-TURP group (p < 0.001). No difference was observed with respect to operation time (p = 0.058). At one year after the operation, differences with respect to urination and complications were not significant. In conclusion, Short-term efficacy of B-TURP or M-TURP was satisfactory for elderly patients with BPH who had internal comorbidities. Besides, B-TURP is a more sensible choice because it has a lower prevalence of adverse effects. PMID:26892901

  20. A comparative study of thulium laser resection of the prostate and bipolar transurethral plasmakinetic prostatectomy for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Guang-chun; Zheng, Jun-hua; Xia, Sheng-qiang; Geng, Jiang; Che, Jian-ping; Yan, Yang; Huang, Jian-hua; Xu, Yun-fei; Yang, Bin

    2013-04-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Thulium laser is a new generation of surgical laser. It is a minimally invasive technology with several advantages, including rapid vaporization and minimal tissue damage and bleeding. However, details regarding the safety and efficacy of thulium laser in treating BPH remains unknown. We performed a comparative study in 100 patients with BPH of the safety and efficacy of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP, n = 50) and bipolar transurethral plasmakinetic prostatectomy (TUPKP, n = 50). We found that the efficacy and indications were the same in TMLRP and TUPKP. In TUPKP, the morbidity of urethrostenosis was low, and was nearly bloodless in surgery and had higher safety. Nevertheless, TUPKP is more suitable for patients with larger prostate volume. To compare the safety and short-term efficacy of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) and bipolar transurethral plasmakinetic prostatectomy (TUPKP) for the treatment of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A total of 100 patients diagnosed with BPH were randomly divided into two groups, treated with either TMLRP (50, group 1) or TUPKP (50, group 2). There was no significant difference in preoperative variables such as age, prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax ) and postvoid residual urine volume (PVR) between the two groups. The perioperative parameters and therapeutic effects were recorded and compared between the two groups. There were significant differences in the following parameters between the two groups (TMLRP vs TUPKP [mean ± SD]): operation duration, 61.2 ± 24.2 vs 30.14 ± 15.9 min; catheterization time, 1.8 ± 0.4 vs 3.2 ± 0.6 d; postoperative hospital stay, 3.3 ± 0.8 vs 4.1 ± 1.3 d. The volume of blood loss and postoperative bladder irrigation were significantly lower in TMLRP group than in the TUPKP group. At 1 month

  1. Incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm in patients after major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong Min; Cho, Chol Kyoon; Koh, Yang Seok; Kim, Hee Joon; Park, Eun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Despite hepatolithiasis being a risk factor for biliary neoplasm including cholangiocarcinoma, the incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm is unknown in patients with preoperative benign hepatolithiasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm in patients who underwent major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis. Methods Between March 2005 and December 2015, 73 patients who underwent major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis were enrolled in this study. The incidence and pathological differentiation of concomitant biliary neoplasm were retrospectively determined by review of medical records. Postoperative complications after major hepatectomy were evaluated. Results Concomitant biliary neoplasm was pathologically confirmed in 20 patients (27.4%). Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BIN) was detected in 12 patients (16.4%), and 1 patient (1.4%) had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), as the premalignant lesion. Cholangiocarcinoma was pathologically confirmed in 7 patients (9.6%). Preoperative imaging of the 73 patients revealed biliary stricture at the first branch of bile duct in 31 patients (42.5%), and at the second branch of bile duct in 39 patients (53.4%). Postoperative complications developed in 14 patients (19.1%). Almost all patients recovered from complications, including intra-abdominal abscess (9.6%), bile leakage (4.1%), pleural effusion (2.7%), and wound infection (1.4%). Only 1 patient (1.4%) died from aspiration pneumonia. Conclusions The incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm was not negligible in the patients with hepatolithiasis, despite meticulous preoperative evaluations. PMID:28261696

  2. [The immunohistochemical determination of p53 and of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the epithelial nuclei of benign prostatic hyperplasia following the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, A M; Vozianov, S O; Zabarko, L B

    1999-01-01

    With the purpose of studying into the morphogenesis and proliferous activity of the prostatic epithelium under a long-term exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation there have been conducted comparative histological and immunohistochemical (expression of p53 and proliferous cellular nuclear antigen-PCNA) investigations designed to study benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients living in those Ukraine territories affected by radionuclide contamination (group III), residents of Kiev (group II), and patients having been operated on before the Chernobyl accident, having constituted the control group I. It has been found out that the incidence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), the level of nuclear expression of proteins p53 (in the PIN epithelium) and PCNA (in the epithelium of both benign prostatic hyperplasia and PIN) of patients in groups II and III are by far higher as compared with those in group I. The stroma of benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients of groups II and III was clearly different from that in the control group in that the former was characterized by apparent phenomena of hyalinosis, sclerosis, fibrosis, and extensive inflammatory infiltration, which changes can be explained by a long-term systematic exposure of prostatic tissue to low doses of ionizing radiation.

  3. Effects of pumpkin seed oil and saw palmetto oil in Korean men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heeok; Kim, Chun-Soo; Maeng, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    This study was to investigate the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the prevention and treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. For this purpose, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed over 12 months on 47 benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with average age of 53.3 years and international prostate symptom score over 8. Subjects received either sweet potato starch (group A, placebo, 320 mg/day), pumpkin seed oil (group B, 320 mg/day), saw palmetto oil (group C, 320 mg/day) or pumpkin seed oil plus saw palmetto oil (group D, each 320 mg/day). International prostate symptom score, quality of life, serum prostate specific antigen, prostate volume and maximal urinary flow rate were measured. In groups B, C and D, the international prostate symptom score were reduced by 3 months. Quality of life score was improved after 6 months in group D, while those of groups B and C were improved after 3 months, compared to the baseline value. Serum prostate specific antigen was reduced only in group D after 3 months, but no difference was observed in prostate volume in all treatment groups. Maximal urinary flow rate were gradually improved in groups B and C, with statistical significance after 6 months in group B and after 12 months in group C. None of the parameters were significantly improved by combined treatment with pumpkin seed oil and saw palmetto oil. From these results, it is suggested that administrations of pumpkin seed oil and saw palmetto oil are clinically safe and may be effective as complementary and alternative medicine treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  4. Effects of pumpkin seed oil and saw palmetto oil in Korean men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Heeok; Kim, Chun-Soo

    2009-01-01

    This study was to investigate the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the prevention and treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. For this purpose, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed over 12 months on 47 benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with average age of 53.3 years and international prostate symptom score over 8. Subjects received either sweet potato starch (group A, placebo, 320 mg/day), pumpkin seed oil (group B, 320 mg/day), saw palmetto oil (group C, 320 mg/day) or pumpkin seed oil plus saw palmetto oil (group D, each 320 mg/day). International prostate symptom score, quality of life, serum prostate specific antigen, prostate volume and maximal urinary flow rate were measured. In groups B, C and D, the international prostate symptom score were reduced by 3 months. Quality of life score was improved after 6 months in group D, while those of groups B and C were improved after 3 months, compared to the baseline value. Serum prostate specific antigen was reduced only in group D after 3 months, but no difference was observed in prostate volume in all treatment groups. Maximal urinary flow rate were gradually improved in groups B and C, with statistical significance after 6 months in group B and after 12 months in group C. None of the parameters were significantly improved by combined treatment with pumpkin seed oil and saw palmetto oil. From these results, it is suggested that administrations of pumpkin seed oil and saw palmetto oil are clinically safe and may be effective as complementary and alternative medicine treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:20098586

  5. Efficacy and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for extremely large prostatic adenoma in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong; Piao, Songzhe; Lee, Hahn-Ey; Kim, Sung Han; Oh, Seung-June

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for extremely large prostates. Patients undergoing HoLEP between July 2008 and December 2013 from the Seoul National University Hospital Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Database Registry were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into three groups according to their total prostate volume (TPV): group A (TPV<100 mL), group B (100 mL≤TPV<200 mL), and group C (TPV≥200 mL); the clinical data of the three groups were compared. All patients were followed up 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. A total of 502 patients (group A, 426; group B, 70; group C, 6) with a mean age of 69.0 (standard deviation, ±7.3) years were included in our analysis. The mean prostate volume and prostate-specific antigen level were 68.7±36.9 mL and 4.15±4.24 ng/mL, respectively. The enucleation and morcellation times were longer in group C (p<0.001), and the enucleation efficacy was higher in this group (p<0.001, R(2)=0.399). Moreover, the mean postoperative catheterization and hospitalization periods were significantly longer in group C (p=0.004 and p=0.011, respectively). However, there were no significant differences between the groups in any other postoperative events, including recatheterization, reoperation, urinary tract infection, clot retention, and bladder neck contracture (p range, 0.516-0.913). One patient in group C experienced recurrence of the urethral stricture. HoLEP in patients with an extremely large prostate can be performed efficiently and safely.

  6. Efficacy and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for extremely large prostatic adenoma in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myong; Piao, Songzhe; Lee, Hahn-Ey; Kim, Sung Han

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for extremely large prostates. Materials and Methods Patients undergoing HoLEP between July 2008 and December 2013 from the Seoul National University Hospital Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Database Registry were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into three groups according to their total prostate volume (TPV): group A (TPV<100 mL), group B (100 mL≤TPV<200 mL), and group C (TPV≥200 mL); the clinical data of the three groups were compared. All patients were followed up 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Results A total of 502 patients (group A, 426; group B, 70; group C, 6) with a mean age of 69.0 (standard deviation, ±7.3) years were included in our analysis. The mean prostate volume and prostate-specific antigen level were 68.7±36.9 mL and 4.15±4.24 ng/mL, respectively. The enucleation and morcellation times were longer in group C (p<0.001), and the enucleation efficacy was higher in this group (p<0.001, R2=0.399). Moreover, the mean postoperative catheterization and hospitalization periods were significantly longer in group C (p=0.004 and p=0.011, respectively). However, there were no significant differences between the groups in any other postoperative events, including recatheterization, reoperation, urinary tract infection, clot retention, and bladder neck contracture (p range, 0.516-0.913). One patient in group C experienced recurrence of the urethral stricture. Conclusions HoLEP in patients with an extremely large prostate can be performed efficiently and safely. PMID:25763126

  7. Expression of IL-17A, E, and F and their receptors in human prostatic cancer: Comparison with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbo; Zhao, Xiaohui; Sun, Xuemei; Li, Yongmei; Wang, Zhenjiang; Jiang, Jing; Han, Huiming; Shen, Weigao; Corrigan, Chris J; Sun, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) are the most common urological diseases in elderly men. Although studies suggest the cytokine family might be associated with BPH and PCa, there has been no systematic comparisons of expression of IL-17A, E, F and their receptors, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and changes in structural cells in PCa and BPH. Immunohistochemistry was employed to evaluate immunoreactivity for IL-17A, E, F and their receptors IL-17RA, IL-17BR, and IL-17CR, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and changes in structural cells including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells in prostate tissues from subjects with PCa or BPH as well as controls. Immunostaining showed that expression of immunoreactivity for IL-17A, IL-17RA, IL-17E, and IL-17F was significantly elevated in prostatic tissue from BPH and PCa compared with that in controls, which was accompanied by increased numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells and CD31(+) blood vessels. Compared with BPH, PCa was characterized by reduced immunoreactivity for IL-17BR and reduced numbers of CD68(+) macrophages, fibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells, although there was a trend for these changes to correlate with disease severity in both PCa and BPH. Our data are compatible with hypothesis that IL-17A acting through IL-17RA, but not IL-17CR contribute to the pathogenesis of BPH and PCa. In contrast, IL-17E interacting with the IL-17BR might have an anti-tumor effect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Evaluation of biomarker canine-prostate specific arginine esterase (CPSE) for the diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Dora; Machado, João; Viegas, Carlos; Baptista, Cláudia; Bastos, Estela; Magalhães, Joana; Pires, Maria A; Cardoso, Luís; Martins-Bessa, Ana

    2017-03-23

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common canine prostatic disorder. Although most or even all intact male dogs may develop BPH by 5-8 years of age, many show no clinical signs. Taking into account the non-specific character of clinical and ultrasonographic findings, a new diagnostic approach has recently been proposed based on the augmentation of blood canine prostate-specific arginine esterase (CPSE) in hyperplasic dogs. The aim of the present study was to verify CPSE levels in negative controls and hyperplasic dogs, considering cytological findings as the reference method and taking into account the fact that controls were middle-aged intact dogs (median of 5.0 years), contrarily to previous studies carried out with very young control dogs. Significant differences of median CPSE levels were found between controls and hyperplasic dogs (29.1 versus 160.7 ng/mL, respectively); and significant positive correlations were found between median CPSE levels and age or prostatic volume (r = 0.549 and 0.448, respectively; p < 0.001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios put into evidence the good performance of the test. The agreement between methods was found to be very high, notably between CPSE levels and cytological results (Cohen's kappa coefficients above 0.8). Considering the results all together, measurement of CPSE is confirmed as a useful and accurate method and should be considered as an alternative or complementary tool to conventional methods for the diagnosis of BPH in middle-aged dogs.

  9. Thulium Laser Resection Versus Plasmakinetic Resection of Prostates in the Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenming; Yang, Huan; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-10-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of thulium laser resection of prostate (ThuRP) and plasmakinetic resection of prostate (PKRP) for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), we made this meta-analysis in regard of the two techniques. A systematic search of PubMed, Web of Science, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed up to October 1, 2015. Outcomes of interest assessing the two techniques included demographic and clinical characteristics, perioperative variables, follow-up data, and complications. Nine eligible trials evaluating ThuRP versus PKRP for BPH were identified, including six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and three retrospective trials. ThuRP was associated with longer operation time (P < .001), shorter hospital stay (P < .001), irrigation (P = .02), and catheterization (P < .001) duration. Estimated blood loss (P = .005) and drop in hemoglobin level (P = .02) were significantly more in PKRP. Except quality of life score (P = .04), which was better in ThuRP, the postoperative data, including international prostate symptom score (P = .44), Qmax (P = .33), postvoid residual urine volume (P = .55), and the complications such as severe bleeding (P = .52), temporary urinary retention (P = .20), temporary urinary incontinence (P = .64), urinary tract infection (P = .83), and urethral stricture (P = .22), did not differ significantly. Our analysis showed that there was no significant difference in terms of efficacy between ThuRP and PKRP. Although ThuRP was associated with longer operation time, it possessed more safe capacity with less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, irrigation, and catheterization duration. More worldwide RCTs with long-term follow-up are still needed to support our conclusion.

  10. Predictors of urgency improvement after Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Won Sok; Kim, Joon Chul; Kim, Hyo Sin; Koh, Jun Sung; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the change in urinary urgency and predictors of urgency improvement after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients who were treated with HoLEP for BPH and had preoperative urgency measuring ≥3 on a 5-point urinary sensation scale. Those with prostate cancer diagnosed prior to or after HoLEP, a history of other prostatic and/or urethral surgery, moderate to severe postoperative complications, and neurogenic causes were excluded. Patients who had improved urgency with antimuscarinic medication after HoLEP were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups based on urgency symptoms 3 months after HoLEP: improved and unimproved urgency. Improved urgency was defined as a reduction of 2 or more points on the 5-point urinary sensation scale. Preoperative clinical and urodynamic factors as well as perioperative factors were compared between groups. Results In total, 139 patients were included in this study. Voiding parameters in all patients improved significantly after HoLEP. Seventy-one patients (51.1%) had improved urgency, while 68 (48.9%) did not show any improvement. A history of acute urinary retention (AUR) and postvoid residual were associated with postoperative urgency improvement in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, a history of AUR was an independent factor affecting urgency improvement. Conclusions A preoperative history of AUR could influence the change in urgency after HoLEP surgery in patients with BPH. PMID:27847917

  11. Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists in aircrew for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Andrew K; Tachikawa, Nina J

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) affects the majority of men later in life. Other than surgery, finasteride (Proscar) is currently the only pharmacologic option available for U.S. Air Force (USAF) aircrew. This article will evaluate the current literature regarding the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy with FDA approved tamsulosin (Flomax) and alfuzosin (Uroxatrol), third-generation alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists. Current literature supports the fact that some third-generation alpha blockers limit the side effects of hypotension when compared to other alpha blockers as a result of the specificity of subtype binding of the receptors and the sustained release formulation. Alpha blockers are currently used almost universally for the treatment of BPH; however, they are currently not approved for USAF aircrew. This article will review the aeromedical implications of the side effects of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists (alfuzosin, tamsulosin), which affect aircrew while performing aeronautical duties, and examine whether alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists should be acceptable medications in certain situations depending on airframe and aeronautical duties.

  12. Nanostructured systems containing babassu (Orbignya speciosa) oil as a potential alternative therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Valeria Pereira; Crean, Joanne; de Almeida Borges, Vinícius Raphael; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Tajber, Lidia; Boylan, Fabio; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2013-01-01

    The oil of babassu tree nuts (Orbignya speciosa) is a potential alternative for treatment and prophylaxis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Improved results can be obtained by drug vectorization to the hyperplastic tissue. The main objective of this work was the preparation and characterization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle and clay nanosystems containing babassu oil (BBS). BBS was extracted from the kernels of babassu tree nuts and characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. BBS-clay nanosystems were obtained by adding polyvinylpyrrolidone, Viscogel B8®, and BBS at a 2:1:1 mass ratio and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. The PLGA-BBS nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation-solvent evaporation method. Mean diameter, polydispersity, zeta potential, and scanning electron microscopic images of the nanosystems were analyzed. Thermogravimetric analysis showed successful formation of the nanocomposite. PLGA nanoparticles containing BBS were obtained, with a suitable size that was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Both nanostructured systems showed active incorporation yields exceeding 90%. The two systems obtained represent a new and potentially efficient therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23990721

  13. Outcomes and quality of life issues in the pharmacological management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Cambio, Angelo J; Evans, Christopher P

    2007-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease of the aging male population. BPH treatment includes a variety of pharmacological and surgical interventions. The goal of this paper is to review the natural history of BPH, outcomes of pharmacological management, effects on quality of life (QoL), future pharmacotherapies, and associated patient-focused perspectives. Medline searches for the keywords benign prostatic hyperplasia, BPH, alpha blockers, 5 alpha-reductase, and quality of life were performed. Relevant literature was reviewed and analyzed. Alpha blockers, 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, and phytotherapy are the three categories of pharmaceutical interventions currently available for BPH. Various clinical trials have shown that alpha blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors are safe, efficacious, and improve QoL in patients with BPH. The evidence for phytotherapeutics is not as convincing. The current armamentarium of pharmaceutical interventions are encompassed in these three classes of medications. New pharmacotherapies based on novel mechanisms are on the horizon. There are a variety of safe and efficacious medical therapies available for the management of BPH and it is important for the practicing physician to have an understanding of these pharmacotherapies and their potential impact on the patient. There is not enough evidence to make a recommendation regarding phytotherapy use. New classes of drugs for BPH will likely find their way into routine use.

  14. Outcomes and quality of life issues in the pharmacological management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)

    PubMed Central

    Cambio, Angelo J; Evans, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease of the aging male population. BPH treatment includes a variety of pharmacological and surgical interventions. The goal of this paper is to review the natural history of BPH, outcomes of pharmacological management, effects on quality of life (QoL), future pharmacotherapies, and associated patient-focused perspectives. Materials and methods Medline searches for the keywords benign prostatic hyperplasia, BPH, alpha blockers, 5 alpha-reductase, and quality of life were performed. Relevant literature was reviewed and analyzed. Results Alpha blockers, 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, and phytotherapy are the three categories of pharmaceutical interventions currently available for BPH. Various clinical trials have shown that alpha blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors are safe, efficacious, and improve QoL in patients with BPH. The evidence for phytotherapeutics is not as convincing. The current armamentarium of pharmaceutical interventions are encompassed in these three classes of medications. New pharmacotherapies based on novel mechanisms are on the horizon. Conclusion There are a variety of safe and efficacious medical therapies available for the management of BPH and it is important for the practicing physician to have an understanding of these pharmacotherapies and their potential impact on the patient. There is not enough evidence to make a recommendation regarding phytotherapy use. New classes of drugs for BPH will likely find their way into routine use. PMID:18360626

  15. Early Experience with Laparoscopic Retropubic Simple Prostatectomy in Patients with Voluminous Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Han Ki; Kwon, Joon Beom; Cho, Sung Ryong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopic simple prostatectomy was recently developed to treat voluminous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We describe the surgical technique and assess the feasibility of laparoscopic simple prostatectomy through our early experience. Materials and Methods The medical records of 11 patients who underwent laparoscopic simple prostatectomy between March 2008 and January 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The subjects were limited to the patients who satisfied the following conditions: prostate volume was at least 75 g, acute urinary retention repeatedly occurred or maximal flow rate (Qmax) was at most 10 ml/s, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) was at least 12. The surgery was performed by the laparoscopic extraperitoneal approach with a transcapsular route. Feasibility was assessed by objective operative parameters (reconversion, operating time, and blood loss) and perioperative complications. Data on short-term follow-up were also available. Results The mean age of the patients was 70.6 years. Mean preoperative prostate-specific antigen and prostate volume were 6.1 ng/ml and 109.3 cc, respectively. Mean operation time was 191.9 minutes and estimated blood loss was 390.9 cc. The resected adenoma weighed on average 72.4 g. No conversion to open surgery was required. Mean preoperative IPSS and quality of life (QoL) scores were 26.86 and 4.86. Mean Qmax, measured before the surgery, was 4.5 ml/s and residual urine was 106 ml. Mean postoperative IPSS and QoL scores were 4.2 and 1.5. After the surgery, mean Qmax was 15.5 ml/s and residual urine was 24.1 ml. Conclusions In the case of voluminous BPH, laparoscopic retropubic simple prostatectomy is expected to be a useful treatment on the condition that the learning curve can be overcome with clinical experience. PMID:20495695

  16. Prostatectomy using different lasers for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia in aging males

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chang; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Hou, Chen-Pang; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chen, Chien-Lun; Juang, Horng-Heng; Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Endoscopic lasers have become a treatment option for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). The study reported here sought to elucidate the benefits and drawbacks of different laser systems in the treatment of patients with BPH. Methods The study enrolled 741 patients diagnosed with lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to BPH during the period January 2005 to December 2011. The techniques used in the study were photoselective vaporization of the prostate, thulium laser prostatectomy, and diode laser prostatectomy. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to the type of laser treatment they received. Outcomes were evaluated using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life, maximal urinary flow rate, post-voiding residual urine volume, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Results The baseline characteristics of patients who received diode laser prostatectomy show a significant elevated risk and high American Society of Anesthesiology score (P=0.001). Operative time and catheter removal time differed significantly between the three groups (P=0.001). No cases were converted to transurethral resection of the prostate intraoperatively due to bleeding (P=0.142). Among the three groups, there were no significant differences in maximal flow rate, lower post-void residual urine, and postoperative PSA level during the entire follow-up period (P<0.05). Further, no significant differences in postoperative IPSS, quality of life, or bladder neck contracture (P=0.23) were observed. However, a significant difference was observed with regard to prolonged use of Foley catheters and prolonged hospital stay among patients in the diode laser group (P=0.001). Conclusion Laser prostatectomies are effective in dealing with lower urinary tract symptoms. Early subjective functional results (maximal flow rate, IPSS, and post-void residual urine) appeared the same as those obtained following laser prostatectomy. Thus, it appears that lasers are

  17. Expression of the SIBLINGs and their MMP partners in human benign and malignant prostate neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Anunobi, Charles C.; Koli, Komal; Saxena, Geetu; Banjo, Adekunbiola A.; Ogbureke, Kalu U.E.

    2016-01-01

    The small integrin binding ligands n-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs) have emerged as potential diagnostic and prognostic indices, and as key targets, in cancer therapy. Three members of the SIBLING family: bone sialoprotein (BSP); osteopontin (OPN); and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), bind and interact with specific matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs): BSP-MMP2; OPN-MMP3; DMP1-MMP9, in biochemical and biologic systems. The other two family members are dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE). The specific SIBLING-MMP pairing reported in some cancers have not been reported in prostate neoplasms. In this study, we investigated SIBLING-MMP expression and potential interaction in prostate neoplasms. Chi square analysis of immunohistochemistry results showed significant upregulation of OPN (X2=25.710/p<0.001), BSP (X2=19.546/p<0.001), and DSPP (X2=8.720/p=0.003) in prostate adenocarcinoma (pAdC). MEPE was significantly upregulated in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH; X2=44.153/p<0.001). There were no significant differences in MMP expression between BPH and pAdC. Western blot analysis showed significantly elevated BSP and DSPP in prostate cancer-derived cells. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed BSP-MMP2, OPN-MMP3, and DMP1-MMP9 coexpression in two cancer-derived cell lines, whereas in situ proximity ligation assays confirmed potential BSP-MMP2, OPN-MMP3, and DMP1-MMP9 interactions in BPH and pAdC. Our reports provide evidence that SIBLING-MMP interaction may play a role in the progression of BPH to pAdC. PMID:27331624

  18. In vivo evaluation of hot water extract of Acorus gramineus root against benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Joo-Myung; Sung, Hae-Mi; Jung, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Jae-Won; Wee, Ji-Hyang

    2017-08-22

    Acorus gramineus has been reported to exhibit various pharmacological effects including inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, enhancement of lipid metabolism, prevention of dementia and inhibition of mast cell growth. According to the Chinese compendium of materia media, it has been reported that Acorus spp. is effective for sedation, dementia prevention as well as diuretic effect. In addition, it showed more than equivalent activity compared to furosoemide, a drug known to be effective in diuretic action in animal model study. However, their effectiveness against benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) of Acorus gramineus has not been reported. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of Acorus gramineus root hot water extract (AG) against BPH in vivo. Male rats, 10 weeks of age and weighing 405 g ± 10 g, were used for this study. Biomarkers were evaluated including prostate weight, prostate weight ratio, hormonal changes, 5-α reductase type II androgen receptor (AR) of the prostate gland and anti-oxidant activation factors related to BPH. These biomarkers were measured in vivo test. AG showed significant effect at the 250 and 500 mg/kg/day in rats. Groups treated with AG displayed significantly lower levels of prostate gland weight (0.79 g) compared to the BPH induced group (1.19 g). Also, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) level was decreased from 61.8 to 100% and androgen receptor expression level was decreased from 111 to 658%. Any hematological toxicity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level wasn't observed. This study indicated that AG was effective for reducing BPH symptoms. Not applicable.

  19. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia: effects of serenoa repens, selenium and lycopene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The apoptosis machinery is a promising target against benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) modulate apoptosis by direct inhibition of caspases. Serenoa Repens (SeR) may be combined with other natural compounds such as Lycopene (Ly) and Selenium (Se) to maximize its therapeutic activity in BPH. We investigated the effects of SeR, Se and Ly, alone or in association, on the expression of four IAPs, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, NAIP and survivin in rats with experimental testosterone-dependent BPH. Moreover, caspase-3, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been evaluated. Rats were administered, daily, with testosterone propionate (3 mg/kg/sc) or its vehicle for 14 days. Testosterone injected animals (BPH) were randomized to receive vehicle, SeR (25 mg/kg/sc), Se (3 mg/kg/sc), Ly (1 mg/kg/sc) or the SeR-Se-Ly association for 14 days. Animals were sacrificed and prostate removed for analysis. Results BPH animals treated with vehicle showed unchanged expression of cIAP-1 and cIAP-2 and increased expression of NAIP, survivin, caspase-3, IL-6 and PSMA levels when compared with sham animals. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed the enhanced expression of NAIP and survivin with a characteristic pattern of cellular localization. SeR-Se-Ly association showed the highest efficacy in reawakening apoptosis; additionally, this therapeutic cocktail significantly reduced IL-6 and PSMA levels. The administration of SeR, Se and Ly significantly blunted prostate overweight and growth; moreover, the SeR-Se-Ly association was most effective in reducing prostate enlargement and growth by 43.3% in treated animals. Conclusions The results indicate that IAPs may represent interesting targets for drug therapy of BPH. PMID:24606563

  20. Qianliening capsule inhibits benign prostatic hyperplasia angiogenesis via the HIF-1α signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIN, JIUMAO; ZHOU, JIANHENG; XU, WEI; HONG, ZHENFENG; PENG, JUN

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in the progression and development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and has become a promising target for BPH treatment. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling pathway promotes the process of angiogenesis, contributing to the growth and progression of a number of hyperplasia diseases, including BPH. Qianliening capsule (QC) is a traditional Chinese formula that has been used clinically in China to treat BPH for a number of years. Recently, QC was demonstrated to inhibit prostatic cell growth and induce apoptosis in vivo and in vitro via regulating the epidermal growth factor/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway and mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis pathway. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-BPH effect remain largely unknown. To further elucidate the mechanism of QC activity in BPH treatment, a rat BPH model established by injecting testosterone following castration was established and the effect of QC on prostatic tissue angiogenesis was evaluated, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms. QC was shown to reduce the prostatic index in BPH rats, but without affecting the body weight, demonstrating that QC is effective in the treatment of BPH and without apparent toxicity. In addition, QC treatment significantly reduced the intraprostatic microvessel density, indicating antiangiogenesis activity in vivo. In addition, treatment with QC inhibited the expression of HIF-1α in BPH rats, as well as the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Therefore, for the first time, the present study hypothesized that QC inhibits angiogenesis in prostatic tissue of BPH rats via the inhibition of the HIF-1α signaling pathway, which may be one of the mechanisms in which QC treats BPH. PMID:24944609

  1. Dickkopf-related protein 3 promotes pathogenic stromal remodeling in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zenzmaier, Christoph; Sampson, Natalie; Plas, Eugen; Berger, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Compartment-specific epithelial and stromal expression of the secreted glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein (Dkk)-3 is altered in age-related proliferative disorders of the human prostate. This study aimed to determine the effect of Dkk-3 on prostate stromal remodeling that is stromal proliferation, fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation and expression of angiogenic factors in vitro. Lentiviral-delivered overexpression and shRNA-mediated knockdown of DKK3 were applied to primary human prostatic stromal cells (PrSCs). Cellular proliferation was analyzed by BrdU incorporation ELISA. Expression of Dkk-3, apoptosis-related genes, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and angiogenic factors were analyzed by qPCR, Western blot analysis or ELISA. Fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation was monitored by smooth muscle cell actin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 mRNA and protein levels. The relevance of Wnt/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways was assessed by cytoplasmic/nuclear β-catenin levels and phosphorylation of AKT. Knockdown of DKK3 significantly attenuated PrSC proliferation as well as fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation and increased the expression of the vessel stabilizing factor angiopoietin-1. DKK3 knockdown did not affect subcellular localization or levels of β-catenin but attenuated AKT phosphorylation in PrSCs. Consistently the PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 mimicked the effects of DKK3 knockdown. Dkk-3 promotes fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation and regulates expression of angiopoietin-1 in prostatic stroma potentially via enhancing PI3K/AKT signaling. Thus, elevated Dkk-3 in the stroma of the diseased prostate presumably regulates stromal remodeling by enhancing proliferation and differentiation of stromal cells and contributing to the angiogenic switch observed in BPH and PCa. Therefore, Dkk-3 represents a potential therapeutic target for stromal remodeling in BPH and PCa. © 2013 Wiley

  2. Plasmakinetic enucleation of prostate versus 160-W laser photoselective vaporization for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si-Jun; Mu, Xiao-Nan; Chen, Ji; Jin, Xun-Bo; Zhang, Shi-Bao; Zhang, Long-Yang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate (PKEP) for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) compared with 160-W lithium triboride laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP). From February 2011 to July 2012, a prospective nonrandomized study was performed. One-hundred one patients underwent PKEP, and 110 underwent PVP. No severe intraoperative complications were recorded, and none of the patients in either group required a blood transfusion. Shorter catheterization time (38.14 ± 23.64 h vs 72.54 ± 28.38 h, P < 0.001) and hospitalization (2.32 ± 1.25 days vs 4.07 ± 1.23 days, P < 0.001) were recorded in the PVP group. At 12-month postoperatively, the PKEP group had a maintained and statistically improvement in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) (4.07 ± 2.07 vs 5.00 ± 2.10; P < 0.001), quality of life (QoL) (1.08 ± 0.72 vs 1.35 ± 0.72; P = 0.007), maximal urinary flow rate (Qmax) (24.75 ± 5.87 ml s−1 vs 22.03 ± 5.04 ml s−1; P < 0.001), postvoid residual urine volume (PVR) (14.29 ± 6.97 ml vs 17.00 ± 6.11 ml; P = 0.001), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value (0.78 ± 0.57 ng ml−1 vs 1.27 ± 1.07 ng ml−1; P < 0.001). Both PKEP and PVP relieve low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to BPH with low complication rates. PKEP can completely remove prostatic adenoma while the total amount of tissue removed by PVP is less than that can be removed by PKEP. Based on our study of the follow-up, PKEP provides better postoperative outcomes than PVP. PMID:26732101

  3. Risk of gynecomastia and breast cancer associated with the use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Katrina Wilcox; Divan, Hozefa A; Fang, Shona C; Nickel, J Curtis; Jick, Susan S

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trial results suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may increase the risk of gynecomastia and male breast cancer, but epidemiological studies have been limited. We conducted a cohort study with nested case-control analyses using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We identified men diagnosed with BPH who were free from Klinefelter syndrome, prostate, genital or urinary cancer, prostatectomy or orchiectomy, or evidence of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Patients entered the cohort at age ≥40 years and at least 3 years after the start of their electronic medical record. We classified exposure as 5ARIs (alone or in combination with alpha blockers [ABs]), AB only, or unexposed to 5ARIs and ABs. Cases were men who had a first-time diagnosis of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the gynecomastia analysis and crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs in both analyses were calculated. Compared to no exposure, gynecomastia risk was elevated for users of 5ARIs (alone or in combination with ABs) in both the cohort (IRR=3.55, 95% CI 3.05-4.14) and case-control analyses (OR=3.31, 95% CI 2.66-4.10), whereas the risk was null for users of AB only. The increased risk of gynecomastia with the use of 5ARIs persisted regardless of the number of prescriptions, exposure timing, and presence or absence of concomitant prescriptions for drugs known to be associated with gynecomastia. The risk was higher for dutasteride than for finasteride. 5ARI users did not have an increased risk of breast cancer compared to unexposed men (OR=1.52, 95% CI 0.61-3.80). In men with BPH, 5ARIs significantly increased the risk of gynecomastia, but not breast cancer, compared to AB use and no exposure.

  4. Increased population use of medications for male lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia correlates with changes in indications for transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ingimarsson, Johann P; Isaksson, Helgi J; Sigbjarnarson, Hermann P; Gudmundsson, Jens; Geirsson, Gudmundur

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are correlations between medication use for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostate hypertrophy (LUTS/BPH) and alteration in incidence and indications for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). The number of TURP patients between 1984 and 2008 in Iceland was obtained from hospital registries. The number of defined daily doses (DDDs) of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors (5aRIs) and alpha-blockers (ABs) sold was obtained from the Icelandic Medicines Control Agency. Charts of all surgical BPH patients in Iceland from 1998 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcomes measures were: DDDs sold of 5aRIs and ABs, total numbers of TURP, indications for TURP and complications. After the introduction of ABs and 5aRIs, sales increased annually at a near linear rate. TURP rates peaked in 1992, then declined. In 2008, 81 and 3.4 of 1000 men over the age of 50 used LUTS/BPH medications or underwent TURP, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between LUTS/BPH medication use and (i) overall TURP (R(2) = 0.85), (ii) TURP done for absolute indications (R(2) = 0.91), and (iii) LUTS with (R(2) = 0.77) and (iv) without previous medical therapy (R(2) = 0.75). As medication use rose, fewer TURPs were performed for previous history of urinary retention, and more for recurrent urinary tract infections. Increased use of ABs and 5aRIs in the Icelandic population correlated with decreasing incidences of TURP procedures for both LUTS and absolute indications. The sequelae of BPH and indications for TURP are changing as medication use increases, although a clear causative link is hard to establish.

  5. Prevalence of inflammation and benign prostatic hyperplasia on autopsy in Asian and Caucasian men.

    PubMed

    Zlotta, Alexandre R; Egawa, Shin; Pushkar, Dmitry; Govorov, Alexander; Kimura, Takahiro; Kido, Masahito; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kuk, Cynthia; Kovylina, Marta; Aldaoud, Najla; Fleshner, Neil; Finelli, Antonio; Klotz, Laurence; Lockwood, Gina; Sykes, Jenna; Kwast, Theodorus van der

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We studied the prevalence of inflammation and BPH in Asian and Caucasian men on prostate glands (n=320) obtained during autopsy in Moscow, Russia (Caucasian men, n=220), and Tokyo, Japan (Asian men, n=100). We correlated the presence and grade of acute inflammation (AI) or chronic inflammation (CI) and BPH. AI, CI, and histologic BPH were analyzed in a blinded fashion using a grading system (0-3). We used the Cochran-Armitage test for associations between the degree of BPH and clinical variables and proportional odds logistic regression models in multivariable analysis. Histologic BPH was observed in a similar proportion of Asian and Caucasian men (p=0.94). CI was found in>70% of men in both the Asian and Caucasian groups (p>0.05). Higher BPH scores were associated with more CI (p<0.001). In multivariate analyses, individuals with CI were 6.8 times more likely to have a higher BPH score than individuals without (p<0.0001). Men included in this study presented at the hospital and their symptomatic status was not known. The prevalence of CI and BPH on autopsy is similar in Asian and Caucasian men despite very different diet and lifestyle. CI is strongly associated in both groups with BPH. In this study, we looked at the prevalence of inflammation and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) on autopsy in Asian and Caucasian men. We found chronic inflammation in>70% of men on autopsy. More chronic inflammation was associated with more BPH. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sonographic assessment of postvoid residual urine volumes in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Amole, Adewumi O; Kuranga, Sulyman A; Oyejola, Benjamin A

    2004-02-01

    To derive a formula that defines the postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume more accurately in patients with prostatic gland enlargement. Prospective. Department of Radiology, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. Fifty-two consecutive patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The mean age was 64.98+/-9.57 years. PVR urine was evaluated by ultrasonography. Each patient had two examinations, the first of which was with a full bladder and the second of which was immediately after voiding. Two orthogonal diameters were measured on each bladder section (longitudinal and transverse) in the supine position. Fifty-two paired sets of ultrasonic measurements were thus obtained. Catheterized postvoid urine residue was regarded as the gold standard. Using these measurements, an equation--[PVR(CUBIC)=374.057+(-196.94+V1)+(32.5539+V1(2))+(-1.1480+V1(3)) where V1=average of the length (L), width (T), and the anteroposterior distance on transverse section (Dt) of the postvoid urinary bladder]--more accurate than previously existing ones was obtained by cubic regression analysis. Mean ultrasound estimated volume was 220.51 ml as against 220.76 ml after catheterization. The mean difference was 0.25 ml (not significant, p<0.01) with 95% confidence interval of +/-10 ml. With this equation, the ultrasonographic residual urine volume showed a higher correlation coefficient with the catheterized volume at p<0.01 (Pearson r=0.982, r2=0.96) than previously defined formulas. The standard error of the mean was 5.11 ml (mean=220.5+/-190.4 ml). With the above equation, we consider conventional transabdominal ultrasonography a reliable method for assessing the residual urine volume in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. This equation, though complex when compared to some of the pre-existing formulas, can be integrated into the memory of modern ultrasound machines for easy and faster computation.

  7. High milk consumption does not affect prostate tumor progression in two mouse models of benign and neoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Bernichtein, Sophie; Pigat, Natascha; Capiod, Thierry; Boutillon, Florence; Verkarre, Virginie; Camparo, Philippe; Viltard, Mélanie; Méjean, Arnaud; Oudard, Stéphane; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Friedlander, Gérard; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies that have investigated whether dairy (mainly milk) diets are associated with prostate cancer risk have led to controversial conclusions. In addition, no existing study clearly evaluated the effects of dairy/milk diets on prostate tumor progression, which is clinically highly relevant in view of the millions of men presenting with prostate pathologies worldwide, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). We report here a unique interventional animal study to address this issue. We used two mouse models of fully penetrant genetically-induced prostate tumorigenesis that were investigated at the stages of benign hyperplasia (probasin-Prl mice, Pb-Prl) or pre-cancerous PIN lesions (KIMAP mice). Mice were fed high milk diets (skim or whole) for 15 to 27 weeks of time depending on the kinetics of prostate tumor development in each model. Prostate tumor progression was assessed by tissue histopathology examination, epithelial proliferation, stromal inflammation and fibrosis, tumor invasiveness potency and expression of various tumor markers relevant for each model (c-Fes, Gprc6a, activated Stat5 and p63). Our results show that high milk consumption (either skim or whole) did not promote progression of existing prostate tumors when assessed at early stages of tumorigenesis (hyperplasia and neoplasia). For some parameters, and depending on milk type, milk regimen could even exhibit slight protective effects towards prostate tumor progression by decreasing the expression of tumor-related markers like Ki-67 and Gprc6a. In conclusion, our study suggests that regular milk consumption should not be considered detrimental for patients presenting with early-stage prostate tumors.

  8. High Milk Consumption Does Not Affect Prostate Tumor Progression in Two Mouse Models of Benign and Neoplastic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Boutillon, Florence; Verkarre, Virginie; Camparo, Philippe; Viltard, Mélanie; Méjean, Arnaud; Oudard, Stéphane; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Friedlander, Gérard; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies that have investigated whether dairy (mainly milk) diets are associated with prostate cancer risk have led to controversial conclusions. In addition, no existing study clearly evaluated the effects of dairy/milk diets on prostate tumor progression, which is clinically highly relevant in view of the millions of men presenting with prostate pathologies worldwide, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). We report here a unique interventional animal study to address this issue. We used two mouse models of fully penetrant genetically-induced prostate tumorigenesis that were investigated at the stages of benign hyperplasia (probasin-Prl mice, Pb-Prl) or pre-cancerous PIN lesions (KIMAP mice). Mice were fed high milk diets (skim or whole) for 15 to 27 weeks of time depending on the kinetics of prostate tumor development in each model. Prostate tumor progression was assessed by tissue histopathology examination, epithelial proliferation, stromal inflammation and fibrosis, tumor invasiveness potency and expression of various tumor markers relevant for each model (c-Fes, Gprc6a, activated Stat5 and p63). Our results show that high milk consumption (either skim or whole) did not promote progression of existing prostate tumors when assessed at early stages of tumorigenesis (hyperplasia and neoplasia). For some parameters, and depending on milk type, milk regimen could even exhibit slight protective effects towards prostate tumor progression by decreasing the expression of tumor-related markers like Ki-67 and Gprc6a. In conclusion, our study suggests that regular milk consumption should not be considered detrimental for patients presenting with early-stage prostate tumors. PMID:25938513

  9. The short-term effects of terazosin in Japanese men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, K; Tsuboi, N; Suzuki, Y; Yoshida, K; Akimoto, M

    2001-04-01

    We evaluated the short-term efficacy of terazosin for treating symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Thirty men, aged 52 to 83 years (mean: 69.2 years) complaining of obstructive urinary symptoms due to BPH who had not received any prior treatment for their symptoms were orally administered 2 mg/day of terazosin. Symptoms (the total IPSS and the obstructive and irritative symptom scores) and objective parameters (peak flow rate [Qmax] and prostatic volume) were evaluated before treatment and after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of treatment. The mean total IPSS and the mean symptom scores for weak stream and nocturia were significantly decreased after only 1 week of treatment, while the mean scores for emptying, frequency, and urgency were significantly decreased after 2 weeks of treatment. However, the mean scores for intermittency and hesitancy did not decrease significantly at any time during treatment. Regarding objective parameters, the mean Qmax was significantly improved after 1 week of treatment, but the mean prostatic volume remained almost unchanged after 4 weeks. In conclusion, short-term terazosin therapy not only improved Qmax but also alleviated symptoms including irritative symptoms.

  10. Rice Hull Extract Suppresses Benign Prostate Hyperplasia by Decreasing Inflammation and Regulating Cell Proliferation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chae-Yun; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Cheon, Se-Yun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Park, Youn-Bum; An, Hyo-Jin

    2016-08-01

    Even though rice hull has various physiological functions with high antioxidant potential, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the effects of rice hull on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of rice hull water extract (RHE) against BPH, which is a common disorder in elderly men and involves inflammation that induces an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell death. In this study, RHE-treated mice exhibited lower prostate weights and ratios of prostate weight to body weight compared to those for the BPH-induced group. In addition, RHE-treated mice had lower serum levels of dihydrotestosterone, mRNA expression of 5α-reductase2, and protein expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Furthermore, RHE treatment significantly decreased cell proliferation by regulating the expression levels of inflammatory-related proteins (iNOS and COX-2) and apoptosis-associated proteins (Fas, FADD, procaspase-8, -3, and Bcl-2 family proteins). These results suggest that RHE could protect against the development of BPH through its anti-inflammatory and apoptotic properties and has good potential as a treatment for BPH.

  11. Different lasers in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingming; Shen, Pengfei; He, Qiying; Yin, Xiaoxue; Chen, Zhibin; Gui, Haojun; Shu, Kunpeng; Tang, Qidun; Yang, Yaojing; Pan, Xiuyi; Wang, Jia; Chen, Ni; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    All available surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have their individual advantages or disadvantages. However, the lack of head-to-head studies comparing different surgeries makes it unavailable to conduct direct analysis. To compare the efficacy and safety among different lasers and transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for BPH, randomized controlled trials were searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library, WHO International Clinical Trial Registration Platform, and Clinical Trial.gov by 2015.5; and the effectiveness-, perioperation- and complication-related outcomes were assessed by network meta-analysis. 36 studies involving 3831 patients were included. Holmium laser through resection and enucleation had the best efficacy in maximum flow rate. Thulium laser through vapo-resection was superior in improving international prostate symptom score and holmium laser through enucleation was the best for post-voiding residual volume improvement. Diode laser through vaporization was the rapidest in removing postoperative indwelling catheter, while TURP was the longest. TURP required the longest hospitalization and thulium laser through vapo-resection was relatively shorter. Holmium and thulium lasers seem to be relatively better in surgical efficacy and safety, so that these two lasers might be preferred in selection of optimal laser surgery. Actually, more large-scale and high quality head-to-head RCTs are suggested to validate the conclusions. PMID:27009501

  12. New surgical treatment options in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T. W.; Nelius, Thomas; Aronoff, David R.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2003-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in males older than 50 years of age. 75-80% of this population is considered to have some degree of BPH causing clinical symptoms and requiring urological treatment. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) is currently the standard surgical treatment modality for BPH. In an attempt to minimize the need for hospitalization and the associated perioperative and postoperative morbidity, alternatives have been sought. Various types of Laser techniques such as interstitial Laser cogaulation and side-firing technology have been proposed. Numerous studies have shown that Laser procedures safely and effectively reduce the volume of the prostate. Intra- and postoperative bleeding are nearly unknown complications for Laser procedures, whereas this is the most relevant complication for the TUR-P. Due to significant tissue edema after Laser treatment, patients commonly show delayed time to void adequately, and therefore, catheter drainage is often necessary for 3 to 21 days. Retrograde ejaculation is reported to occur less (0 - 10%) compared to TUR-P (> 60%). Urinary tract infections are very common after interstitial laser coagulation. Although not many long-term clinical data are available, various studies have shown that BPH patients improve in symptom score, flow rate and post-void residual up to 3 years after Laser treatment. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently used Laser techniques as well as the long-term clinical data compared to TUR-P.

  13. Different lasers in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingming; Shen, Pengfei; He, Qiying; Yin, Xiaoxue; Chen, Zhibin; Gui, Haojun; Shu, Kunpeng; Tang, Qidun; Yang, Yaojing; Pan, Xiuyi; Wang, Jia; Chen, Ni; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-24

    All available surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have their individual advantages or disadvantages. However, the lack of head-to-head studies comparing different surgeries makes it unavailable to conduct direct analysis. To compare the efficacy and safety among different lasers and transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for BPH, randomized controlled trials were searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library, WHO International Clinical Trial Registration Platform, and Clinical Trial.gov by 2015.5; and the effectiveness-, perioperation- and complication-related outcomes were assessed by network meta-analysis. 36 studies involving 3831 patients were included. Holmium laser through resection and enucleation had the best efficacy in maximum flow rate. Thulium laser through vapo-resection was superior in improving international prostate symptom score and holmium laser through enucleation was the best for post-voiding residual volume improvement. Diode laser through vaporization was the rapidest in removing postoperative indwelling catheter, while TURP was the longest. TURP required the longest hospitalization and thulium laser through vapo-resection was relatively shorter. Holmium and thulium lasers seem to be relatively better in surgical efficacy and safety, so that these two lasers might be preferred in selection of optimal laser surgery. Actually, more large-scale and high quality head-to-head RCTs are suggested to validate the conclusions.

  14. Update on the use of diode laser in the management of benign prostate obstruction in 2014.

    PubMed

    Lusuardi, Lukas; Mitterberger, Michael; Hruby, Stephan; Kunit, Thomas; Kloss, Birgit; Engelhardt, Paul F; Sieberer, Manuela; Janetschek, Günter

    2015-04-01

    To determine the status quo in respect of various diode lasers and present the techniques in use, their results and complications. We assess how these compare with transurethral resection of the prostate and other types of laser in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). When adequate RCTs were not available, case studies and reports were evaluated. Laser for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has aroused the interest and curiosity of urologists as well as patients. The patient associates the term laser with a successful and modern procedure. The journey that started with coagulative necrosis of prostatic adenoma based on neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser has culminated in endoscopic "enucleation" with holmium laser. Diode laser is being used in urology for about 10 years now. Various techniques have been employed to relieve bladder outlet obstruction due to BPH. The diode laser scenario is marked by a diversity of surgical techniques and wavelengths. We summarize the current published literature in respect of functional results and complications. More randomized controlled studies are needed to determine the position and the ideal technique of diode laser treatment for BPH.

  15. [Learning curve in laser treatment of benign prostatic syndrome: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Rasch, Andrej; Gruber, Sabine; Perleth, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate the evidence of a potential learning curve for laser treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. A systematic literature search was conducted in November 2011 using The Cochrane Library, EMBASE and MEDLINE. Overall, 18 sources (mostly case series) were included for further assessment. The majority of publications assume that a general learning curve exists. It is estimated that a range of 20 to 50 cases is needed to achieve a stable outcome level. For the most part, these findings are based on the HoLEP (Holmium laser enucleation of prostate) technique and intraoperative measures, such as enucleation efficiency. Valid conclusions regarding patient-related end-points are difficult to make, although some studies report a decreasing trend for complication rates with increasing experience of the surgeon. No statistically significant differences were found for postoperative outcomes such as IPSS (International Prostate Symptom Score), Qmax (peak flow rate) or Quality of Life. Overall, the present results are highly limited by the low evidence level and methodological problems of the publications available. Several publications suggest that adequate training during the implementation phase is relevant.

  16. Efficacy of terazosin and finasteride in symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Anwarul Islam, A K M; Kashem, M A; Shameem, I A; Kibria, S A M G

    2005-08-01

    Medical treatment for symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) has become popular for the last few years. This study was designed to find out and compare the efficacy of terazosin, a alpha1 adrenoceptor blocker and finasteride, a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor in symptomatic BPH. A total of 60 patients (30 in terazosin group and 30 finasteride group) of symptomatic BPH were selected. Terazosin group received 1 mg daily at bedtime for 3 days, 2 mg at bedtime for 7 days, thereafter 5 mg at bedtime daily for 6 months. Finasteride group received 5 mg once daily. In terazosin treated patients, improvement after 3 months were as follows, IPSS 3.93 +/- .74 points reduction, Qmax 2.13 +/- .68 ml/s increase, post-voided residual urine volume (PVR) 20.67 +/- 10.56 ml reduction (significant, p<0.001) and prostate volume 0.57 +/- 1.54 ml reduction (not significant). Similar statistical differences were observed at 6 months follow up. In finasteride treated patients, improvements after 3 months were as follows, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) 1.38 +/- .63 points reduction, Qmax 0.55 +/- 0.78 ml/s increase, PVR 5.93 +/- 7.64 ml reduction (significant, p<0.001) and prostate volume 0.17 +/- 5.6 ml reduction (non-significant). At 6 month follow up statistical differences were significant in all parameters including prostate volume 4.57 +/- 5.30 ml reduction (p<0.001). In comparison, statistically significant superiority of terazosin over finasteride was found in improving IPSS, Qmax and PVR in both follow up visits. But terazosin had nonsignificant effect in reducing prostate volume; in contrast, finasteride had significant effect in second visit. It can be concluded from this study that terazosin 5mg once daily is effective in mild to moderate cases of symptomatic BPH. On the other hand, finasteride 5mg once daily may be useful in large prostate and to be given for at least 6 months.

  17. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf

    1994-12-01

    Urinary outflow obstruction by prostatic enlargement is usually treated by resection or, recently, less invasively by thermal `ablation' of tissue through the urethra. With the latter technique, the amount of tissue that can be removed is limited by the limited penetration depth of suitable radiation sources, e.g. lasers, or conduction of heat. Interstitial thermotherapy was expected to overcome this problem. Our initial in vitro and animal studies with different light guides for interstitial application of Nd:YAG laser radiation showed small carbonized lesions with bare fibers, but large homogeneous coagulation zones with special `ITT' (interstitial thermotherapy) fibers. Further studies using these applicators resulted in a technique to be apt for clinical routine in the treatment of symptomatic prostatic enlargement. The tip of the light guide was repeatedly inserted into the prostate either transurethrally through a cystoscope under direct vision or percutaneously from the perineum under transrectal ultrasound guidance. The number of fiber placements depended on the size and configuration of the gland. Irradiation was performed either for 10 min with 5 or 7 W or in the advanced `turbo'- mode for 5 or 3 min per fiber placement using automatically stepwise reduced power (20 W for 30 s, 15 W for 30 s, 10 W for 30 s, and 7 W for 210 or 90 s). By optical feedback control the laser was switched off automatically in the case of carbonization to avoid fiber damage. From July 15, 1991 to October 1, 1993 239 patients with BPH and 14 patients with advanced prostate cancer, suffering from severe urinary outflow obstruction, were treated by laser induced interstitial thermotherapy. The results and complications of treatment are reported.

  18. [Transurethral resection of the prostate combined with 2-micron continuous-wave laser vaporesection for benign prostatic hyperplasia with the prostate volume > 80 ml].

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-lei; Gao, Zhi-ming; Xia, Hai-bo; Bao, Guo-chang; Li, Chun-sheng; Zhang, Hao

    2015-02-01

    To sum up the clinical experience in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the prostate weighing over 80 ml by transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) combined with 2 μm continuous-wave laser vaporesection (LVR). We retrospectively analyzed the clinical effects of TURP combined with 2 μm LVR in the treatment of 46 cases of BPH with the prostate volume > 80 ml. All the operations were successfully accomplished. The operation time and intraoperative blood loss were (112.0 ± 20.0) min (range 86-176 min) and (77.9 ± 25.9) ml (range 50-200 ml), respectively. The catheters were withdrawn at 7 days after surgery. Transient urinary incontinence occurred in 6 cases and secondary hemorrhage was found in 2 postoperatively. Six-month follow-up revealed no urethral stricture or other complications. Compared with the baseline, the international prostate symptom score (IPSS) was significantly decreased at 6 months after operation (26.3 ± 1.8 vs 11.6 ± 1.7, P <0.05), and so were the quality of life (QOL) score (5.3 ± 0.7 vs 1.3 ± 1.1, P <0.05) and post-void residual urine (PVR) ([115.5 ± 55.6] ml vs [19.9 ± 11.6] ml, P <0.05). However, the maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) was remarkably increased from (4.1 ± 2.6) ml/s to (16.2 ± 1.7) ml/s (P <0.05). TURP combined with 2 μm LVR is safe and effective for the treatment of BPH with the prostate volume >80 ml.

  19. Role of IAPs in prostate cancer progression: immunohistochemical study in normal and pathological (benign hyperplastic, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer) human prostate

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In this study was investigate IAPs in normal human prostate (NP), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostatic carcinoma (PC), and their involvement in apoptosis/proliferation via NF-kB (TNF-α, IL-1) stimulation. Methods Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed in 10 samples of normal prostates, 35 samples of BPH, 27 samples diagnosis of PIN (with low-grade PIN or high-grade PIN) and 95 samples of PC (with low, medium or high Gleason grades). Results In NP, cytoplasm of epithelial cells were positive to c-IAP1/2 (80% of samples), c-IAP-2 (60%), ILP (20%), XIAP (20%); negative to NAIP and survivin. In BPH, epithelial cells were immunostained to c-IAP1/2 (57.57%), c-IAP-2 (57.57%), ILP (66.6%), NAIP (60.6%), XIAP (27.27%), survivin (9.1%). Whereas low-grade PIN showed intermediate results between NP and BPH; results in high-grade PIN were similar to those found in PC. In PC, epithelial cells were immunostained to c-IAP1/2, c-IAP-2, ILP, NAIP, XIAP (no Gleason variation) and survivin (increasing with Gleason). Conclusions IAPs could be involved in prostate disorder (BPH, PIN and PC) development since might be provoke inhibition of apoptosis and subsequently cell proliferation. At the same time, different transduction pathway such as IL-1/NIK/NF-kB or TNF/NF-kB (NIK or p38) also promotes proliferation. Inhibitions of IAPs, IL-1α and TNFα might be a possible target for PC treatment since IAPs are the proteins that inhibited apoptosis (favour proliferation) and IL-1α and TNFα would affect all the transduction pathway involucrate in the activation of transcription factors related to survival or proliferation (NF-kB, Elk-1 or ATF-2). PMID:20078866

  20. Free Prostate-Specific Antigen Provides More Precise Data on Benign Prostate Volume Than Total Prostate-Specific Antigen in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon; Park, Jae Young; Shim, Ji Sung; Kim, Jae Heon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) and free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) for the estimation of prostate volume (PV) in pathologically-proven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients. Methods From January 2010 to March 2013, 165 Korean men with a PSA less than 10 ng/mL who were diagnosed without prostate cancer by prostate biopsy were enrolled. Patients were classified into three age groups: ≤60, 61-70, and >70 years old. The results were organized to estimate and compare the ability of serum tPSA and fPSA to assess the PV. Results Enrolled patients had a median age of 63.5 years (44 to 80), a median tPSA of 5.72 ng/mL, a median fPSA of 0.98 ng/mL and a median PV of 53.68 mL, respectively. Among the associations between tPSA, fPSA, age, and PV, the highest correlation was verified between fPSA and PV (r=0.377, P<0.0001); the correlation coefficient between tPSA and PV was much lower (r=0.262, P<0.001). All stratified age cohorts showed the same findings. The ROC curves (for PV greater than 30, 40, and 50 mL) showed that fPSA (area under the curve [AUC]=0.781, 0.718, and 0.700) outperformed tPSA (AUC=0.657, 0.583, and 0.67) in its ability to predict clinically significant PV enlargement. Conclusion Both tPSA and fPSA significantly correlated with PV in Korean men, while the correlation efficiency between fPSA and PV was more powerful. fPSA may be a useful tool in making therapeutic decisions and follow-up management in BPH patients. PMID:23869271

  1. Efficacy and safety of the urolift® system for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia symptoms: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, L M; Polo-deSantos, M; Gómez-Sancha, F; Luengo-Matos, S

    2015-06-01

    Interest in having alternatives in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. To assess the efficacy and safety of the Urolift® system for treating the symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia. Systematic review of the literature through searches on PubMed, Cochrane Library, CRD, Clinical Trials and EuroScan, collecting indicators of efficacy and safety. We included 5 case series and one clinical trial. The patients' mean age ranged from 65-74.3 years, and the mean prostate volume was 41-55cm3. The mean number of Urolif® implants was 3.7-5.5. The maximum follow-up in months was 24, 12 (3 studies) and one (2 studies). Improvements were found in lower urinary tract symptoms, as measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Impact Index (BPHII), maximum urinary flow (Qmax) and postvoid residual (PVR) volume. Improvements were in found sexual dysfunction symptoms, as measured with the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) and the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire or Ejaculatory Dysfunction (MHSQ-EjD), and in quality of life (QoL). In the clinical trial, the differences were significant for International Prostate Symptom Score, BPHII, Qmax and QoL (p<.05). The adverse effects were mild. Although the quality of evidence is low, Urolift® constitutes a good therapeutic alternative for patients with benign prostate hyperplasia. The short to medium-term results show that the technique contributes to improving lower urinary tract symptoms, with no relevant side effects, does not affect sexual function and improves quality of life. Further research is required, especially on long-term results. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Prostate Cancer Diagnosis on Repeat Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Biopsy of Benign Lesions: Recommendations for Repeat Sampling.

    PubMed

    Chelluri, Raju; Kilchevsky, Amichai; George, Arvin K; Sidana, Abhinav; Frye, Thomas P; Su, Daniel; Fascelli, Michele; Ho, Richard; Abboud, Steven F; Turkbey, Baris; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Urologists face a dilemma when a lesion identified on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is benign on image guided fusion biopsy. We investigated the detection rate of prostate cancer on repeat fusion biopsy in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging lesions initially found to be pathologically benign on fusion biopsy. We reviewed the records of all patients from 2007 to 2014 who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and image guided fusion biopsy. We identified men who underwent rebiopsy of the same discrete lesion after initial fusion biopsy results were benign. Data were documented on a per lesion basis. We manually reviewed UroNav system (Invivo, Gainesville, Florida) needle tracking to verify accurate image registration. Multivariate analysis was used to identify clinical and imaging factors predictive of prostate cancer detection at repeat fusion biopsy. A total of 131 unique lesions were rebiopsied in 90 patients. Of these 131 resampled lesions 21 (16%) showed prostate cancer, which in 13 (61.9%) was Gleason 3 + 3. On multivariate analysis only lesion growth on repeat multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was significantly associated with prostate cancer detection at repeat biopsy (HR 3.274, 95% CI 1.205-8.896, p = 0.02). Pathologically benign multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging lesions on initial image guided fusion biopsy are rarely found to harbor clinically significant prostate cancer on repeat biopsy. When prostate cancer was identified, most disease was low risk. An increase in lesion diameter was an independent predictor of prostate cancer detection. While these data are retrospective, they may provide some confidence in the reliability of negative initial image guided fusion biopsies despite a positive multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging finding. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of lycopene on cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human prostate cancer and benign hyperplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, Nathalia da Costa Pereira; Teodoro, Anderson Junger; Oliveira, Felipe Leite; Santos, Carlos Antonio do Nascimento; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Junior, Oswaldo Saback; Bianco, Mario; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Gimba, Etel Rodrigues Pereira; Borojevic, Radovan

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in men of the Western world. Lycopene has received attention because of its expcted potential to prevent cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of lycopene on cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells and benign prostate hyperplastic cells. Using MTT assay, we observed a decrease of cell viability in all cancer cell lines after treatment with lycopene, which decreased the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase and increased in S and G2/M phases after 96 h of treatment in metastatic prostate cancer cell lineages. Flow citometry analysis of cell cycle revealed lycopene promoted cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase after 48 and 96 h of treatment in a primary cancer cell line. Using real time PCR assay, lycopene also induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells with altered gene expression of Bax and Bcl-2. No effect was observed in benign prostate hyperplasia cells. These results suggest an effect of lycopene on activity of human prostate cancer cells.

  4. Effect of transurethral split of the prostate using a double-columnar balloon catheter for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiguo; Huang, Zheng; Xiao, Guofeng; Qin, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to evaluate the long-term therapeutic effect of transurethral split of the prostate (TUSP) with a newly improved double-columnar balloon catheter on patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Total 565 BPH patients (mean age 73.6 years, range 46–94 years) who underwent TUSP surgery between January 2006 and January 2015 were included. Patient's baseline characteristics, prostate size, PSA, preoperative and postoperative maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual (PVR), international prostate symptoms score (IPSS) and quality of life (QOL) score, perioperative data and postoperative complications were recorded. The mean preoperative prostates size was 48.6 ± 8.2 mL (range 33–230 mL), and the PSA level was 0.8 to 18.6 ng/mL. The mean duration of TUSP procedure from the catheter localization to the split of capsula prostatica was ∼10 minutes. After surgery, the mean Qmax increased from 5.2 ± 1.4 to 12.8 ± 2.2 mL/s (P < 0.001). Patients had improved mean PVR, QOL score, and IPSS after TUSP (76 ± 8 vs 20 ± 8.5 mL, 4.6 ± 0.2 vs 1.4 ± 0.3, and 20.2 ± 4.4 vs 6.6 ± 1.1, respectively, all P < 0.001). Until September 2014, 328 patients were successfully followed up for a long-term period of 38 to 99 months. There was no other case of recurrence with dysuria despite 2 recurrent cases. The TUSP with a double-columnar balloons catheter was a safe and long-term efficient treatment for BPH, with minimal invasion, short operative time, few postoperative complications, and low recurrence rate. PMID:27749528

  5. Prostatic arterial embolization for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms as a result of large benign prostatic hyperplasia: A prospective single-center investigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maoqiang; Guo, Liping; Duan, Feng; Yuan, Kai; Zhang, Guodong; Li, Kai; Yan, Jieyu; Wang, Yan; Kang, Haiyan; Wang, Zhijun

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of prostatic arterial embolization as a primary treatment for patients with lower urinary tract symptoms as a result of large benign prostatic hyperplasia. A total of 64 patients with prostates >80 mL were included in the study. Prostatic arterial embolization was carried out using a combination of 50-µm and 100-µm particles. Clinical follow up was carried out using the International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life, peak urinary flow, postvoid residual volume, International Index of Erectile Function Short Form, prostate-specific antigen, and prostatic volume at 1, 3, 6 and every 6 months thereafter. Prostatic arterial embolization was technically successful in 60 of 64 patients (93.8%). Follow-up data were available for 60 patients with a mean of 18 months. A clinical improvement, defined as reduction of International Prostate Symptom Score and increase of peak urinary flow, at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months, was achieved in 95.0%, 95.0%, 93.3%, 92.6% and 90.5%, respectively. A total of 42 patients had completed the follow up at 24 months after prostatic arterial embolization. There was an improvement in terms of mean International Prostate Symptom Score (pre-prostatic arterial embolization vs post-prostatic arterial embolization 27.0 vs 8.0; P < 0.01), mean quality of life (5.5 vs 2.0; P < 0.01), mean peak urinary flow (7.0 vs 13.0; P < 0.01), mean postvoid residual volume (130 vs 45.0; P < 0.05) and prostatic volume (121.0 vs 71.5, reduction of 40.9%; P < 0.01) were significantly different with respect to baseline. Prostatic arterial embolization seems to be a safe and effective treatment method for patients with lower urinary tract symptoms as a result of large benign prostatic hyperplasia, and it might play an important role for patients in whom medical therapy has failed, who are not candidates for surgical treatment. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Cyclooxygenase 2 (rs2745557) Polymorphism and the Susceptibility to Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer in Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Mohamed S; Elfayoumi, Abdel-Rahman; Mohamed, Randa H; Fatah, Ihab R Abdel; Saadawy, Sara F

    2016-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, has been reported to be correlated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between COX-2 (rs2745557) polymorphism and prostate cancer (PCa), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) risk. We also assessed the influence of other risk factors such as obesity, smoking, diabetes in modulating the risk of PCa in Egyptian men. COX-2 (rs2745557) was genotyped in 112 PC patients, 111 BPH and 120 subjects as a control group. COX-2 and PSA levels were measured by ELISA. We found that GG genotype was associated with a 17-fold increased risk for PCa and 20-fold increased the risk for BPH more than AA genotype. Also, G allele carriers of COX-2 were associated with metastatic cancer (OR = 1.3, P < 0.05) and disease aggressiveness (OR = 3.5, P < 0.001). The coexistence of obesity, smoking, or diabetes with GG genotype may lead to increasing the risk of developing BPH (OR = 3.3, 4, and 2.7, respectively) and of developing PCa (OR = 2.9, 4.9, and 3.2, respectively). Our results showed evidence suggesting the involvement of the COX-2 (rs2745557) polymorphism and its protein in PCa or BPH initiation and progression. Also, the coexistence of COX-2 (rs2745557) and obesity, smoking, or diabetes may lead to the development of PCa or BPH.

  7. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Using Sonablate® Devices for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Localized Prostate Cancer: 18-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki

    2011-09-01

    From 1993 to 2010, we have treated 156 patients benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 1,052 patients localized prostate cancer high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Four different HIFU devices, SonablateR-200, SonablateR-500, SonablateR-500 version 4 and Sonablate® TCM, have been used for this study. Clinical outcome of HIFU for BPH did not show any superior effects to transurethral resection of the prostate, laser surgery or transurethral vapolization of the prostate. However, HIFU appears to be a safe and minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially low- and intermediate-risk patients. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  8. Two-year results after convective radiofrequency water vapor thermal therapy of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Christopher M; Cedano, Edwin Rijo; Pacik, Dalibor; Vit, Vítězslav; Varga, Gabriel; Wagrell, Lennart; Larson, Thayne R; Mynderse, Lance A

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of convective radiofrequency (RF) water vapor thermal therapy in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); a pilot study design with 2-year follow-up evaluations. Patients and methods Men aged ≥45 years with an International Prostate Symptom Score ≥13, a maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) ≤15 mL/s, and prostate volume 20–120 cc were enrolled in a prospective, open-label pilot study using convective RF water vapor energy with the Rezūm System. Patients were followed up for 2 years after transurethral thermal treatment at 3 international centers in the Dominican Republic, Czech Republic, and Sweden. The transurethral thermal therapy utilizes radiofrequency to generate wet thermal energy in the form of water vapor injected through a rigid endoscope into the lateral lobes and median lobe as needed. Urinary symptom relief, urinary flow, quality of life (QOL) impact, sexual function, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed at 1 week, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results LUTS, flow rate, and QOL showed significant improvements from baseline; prostate volumes were appreciably reduced. Sexual function was maintained and no de novo erectile dysfunction occurred. The responses evident as early as 1 month after treatment remained consistent and durable over the 24 months of study. Early AEs were typically transient and mild to moderate; most were related to endoscopic instrumentation. No procedure related to late AEs were seen. Conclusion The Rezūm System convective RF thermal therapy is a minimally invasive treatment for BPH/LUTS which can be performed in the office or as an outpatient procedure with minimal associated perioperative AEs. It has no discernable effect on sexual function and provides significant improvement of LUTS that remain durable at 2 years. PMID:27921028

  9. A Comprehensive Approach Toward Novel Serum Biomarkers for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: The MPSA Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Chris; Lucia, M. Scott; Hayward, Simon W.; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Lin, Victor K.; Liu, Brian C.-S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Rubin, Mark A.; Slawin, Kevin; Star, Robert A.; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is primarily diagnosed based on a diverse array of progressive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and is likely distinct from histological BPH, which is detected by the presence of non-malignant proliferation of prostate cells but may or may not be associated with symptoms. Pharmacological management of LUTS has emerged as an effective initial treatment for clinical BPH due to the introduction of new drug therapies shown to be effective in recent large clinical trials. Despite advances in symptom management and research into BPH pathology, diagnostic strategies for prediction of BPH progression and response to drug modalities are lacking and questions remain as to the molecular differences underlying clinical (symptomatic) versus histological (non-symptomatic) BPH. Materials and Methods As part of the Medical Therapy of Prostatic Symptoms (MTOPS) clinical trial, which demonstr