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Sample records for incident mobility disability

  1. Perceived neighborhood safety and incident mobility disability among elders: the hazards of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Cheryl R; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ryan, Louise; Ertel, Karen; Fay, Martha E; Berkman, Lisa F

    2009-01-01

    Background We investigated whether lack of perceived neighborhood safety due to crime, or living in high crime neighborhoods was associated with incident mobility disability in elderly populations. We hypothesized that low-income elders and elders at retirement age (65 – 74) would be at greatest risk of mobility disability onset in the face of perceived or measured crime-related safety hazards. Methods We conducted the study in the New Haven Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE), a longitudinal cohort study of community-dwelling elders aged 65 and older who were residents of New Haven, Connecticut in 1982. Elders were interviewed beginning in 1982 to assess mobility (ability to climb stairs and walk a half mile), perceptions of their neighborhood safety due to crime, annual household income, lifestyle characteristics (smoking, alcohol use, physical activity), and the presence of chronic co-morbid conditions. Additionally, we collected baseline data on neighborhood crime events from the New Haven Register newspaper in 1982 to measure local area crime rates at the census tract level. Results At baseline in 1982, 1,884 elders were without mobility disability. After 8 years of follow-up, perceiving safety hazards was associated with increased risk of mobility disability among elders at retirement age whose incomes were below the federal poverty line (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.02 – 2.37). No effect of perceived safety hazards was found among elders at retirement age whose incomes were above the poverty line. No effect of living in neighborhoods with high crime rates (measured by newspaper reports) was found in any sub-group. Conclusion Perceiving a safety hazard due to neighborhood crime was associated with increased risk of incident mobility disability among impoverished elders near retirement age. Consistent with prior literature, retirement age appears to be a vulnerable period with respect to the effect of neighborhood conditions on

  2. Comparison of Assessment Results of Children with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dennis J.; Reilly, AmySue; Henley, Joan

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a research study that assessed young children with a low incidence disability, specifically Cri-du-Chat Syndrome (CDSC). A description of the concerns of assessing individuals with low incidence disabilities is described. Parent reports (using the Development Observation Checklist System) on the functioning of their children…

  3. Calf circumference predicts mobility disability: A secondary analysis of the Mexican health and ageing study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Zepeda, M.U.; Gutiérrez-Robledo, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calf circumference is a surrogate measurement of muscle mass. However, there is scarce evidence on its validity in predicting adverse outcomes such as mobility disability. The aim of this report is to determine if calf circumference could predict incident mobility disability in Mexican 60-year or older adults. Methods This is a secondary analysis of the Mexican Health and Aging Study and in particular of its two first waves. Sixty-year or older adults without mobility disability in the first assessment were included and followed-up for two years. Calf circumference quartile groups were compared to test the difference of incident mobility disability. Logistic regression models were fitted to test the independent association when including confounding variables. Results A total of 745 older adults were assessed, from which 24.4% of the older adults developed mobility disability at follow-up. A calf circumference > 38 cm was associated with a higher risk of developing mobility disability, even after adjustment in the multivariate model, with an odds ratio 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.31–0.99, P = 0.049). Conclusions High calf circumference in Mexican older adults is independently associated with incident mobility disability. This could reflect the impact of adverse health conditions such as obesity (with high fat tissue) or edema. Further research should aim at testing these results in different populations.

  4. Calf circumference predicts mobility disability: A secondary analysis of the Mexican health and ageing study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Zepeda, M.U.; Gutiérrez-Robledo, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calf circumference is a surrogate measurement of muscle mass. However, there is scarce evidence on its validity in predicting adverse outcomes such as mobility disability. The aim of this report is to determine if calf circumference could predict incident mobility disability in Mexican 60-year or older adults. Methods This is a secondary analysis of the Mexican Health and Aging Study and in particular of its two first waves. Sixty-year or older adults without mobility disability in the first assessment were included and followed-up for two years. Calf circumference quartile groups were compared to test the difference of incident mobility disability. Logistic regression models were fitted to test the independent association when including confounding variables. Results A total of 745 older adults were assessed, from which 24.4% of the older adults developed mobility disability at follow-up. A calf circumference > 38 cm was associated with a higher risk of developing mobility disability, even after adjustment in the multivariate model, with an odds ratio 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.31–0.99, P = 0.049). Conclusions High calf circumference in Mexican older adults is independently associated with incident mobility disability. This could reflect the impact of adverse health conditions such as obesity (with high fat tissue) or edema. Further research should aim at testing these results in different populations. PMID:27656259

  5. Gender differences in incidence and determinants of disability in activities of daily living among elderly individuals: SABE study.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Determining the groups that are most susceptible to developing disability is essential to establishing effective prevention and rehabilitation strategies. The aim of the present study was to determine gender differences in the incidence of disability regarding activities of daily living (ADL) and determinants among elderly residents of Sao Paulo, Brazil. In 2000, 1634 elderly with no difficulties regarding ADL (modified Katz Index) were selected. These activities were reassessed in 2006 and disability was the outcome for the analysis of determinants. The following characteristics were analyzed at baseline: socio-demographic, behavioral, health status, medications, falls, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, handgrip, mobility and balance. The incidence density was 42.4/1000 women/year and 17.5/1000 men/year. After adjusting for socioeconomic status and health conditions, women with chronic diseases and social vulnerability continued to have a greater incidence of disability. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age and depressive symptoms in both genders; stroke and slowness on the sit-and-stand test among men; and osteoarthritis and sedentary lifestyle among women. Better cognitive performance and handgrip strength were protective factors among men and women, respectively. Adverse clinical and social conditions determine differences between genders regarding the incidence of disability. Decreased mobility and balance and health conditions that affect the central nervous system or lead to impaired cognition disable men more, whereas a sedentary lifestyle, reduction in muscle strength and conditions that affect the osteoarticular system disable women more. PMID:22546518

  6. Incidence of Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of…

  7. MOBILITY, DISABILITY, AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Andrea L.; Taylor, Jennifer A.; Tabb, Loni Philip; Michael, Yvonne L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine cross-sectional associations between mobility with or without disability and social engagement in a community-based sample of older adults Methods Social engagement of participants (n=676) was outside the home (participation in organizations and use of senior centers) and in home (talking by phone and use of internet). Logistic or proportional odds models evaluated the association between social engagement and position in the disablement process (no mobility limitations, mobility limitations/no disability, and mobility limitations/disability). Results Low mobility was associated with lower level of social engagement of all forms (OR=0.59, CI: 0.41–0.85 for organizations; OR=0.67, CI: 0.42–1.06 for senior center; OR=0.47, CI: 0.32–0.70 for phone; OR=0.38, CI: 0.23–0.65 for internet). For social engagement outside the home, odds of engagement were further reduced for individuals with disability. Discussion Low mobility is associated with low social engagement even in the absence of disability; associations with disability differed by type of social engagement. PMID:23548944

  8. Pain Characteristics Associated With the Onset of Disability in Older Adults: The MOBILIZE Boston Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Laura H.P.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Shi, Ling; Kiely, Dan K.; Shmerling, Robert H.; Jones, Rich N.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives To determine the effects of chronic pain on the development of disability and decline in physical performance over time among older adults. Design Longitudinal cohort study with 18 months follow-up. Setting Urban/suburban communities Participants 634 community-dwelling older adults aged >64 years. Measurements Chronic pain assessment consisted of musculoskeletal pain locations, and pain severity and pain interference by subscales of the Brief Pain Inventory. Disability was self-reported as any difficulty in mobility and basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL, IADL). Mobility performance was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Relationships between baseline pain and incident disability in 18 months were determined using risk ratios (RRs) from multivariable Poisson regression models. Results Almost 65% of participants reported chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. New onset of mobility difficulty at 18-months was strongly associated with baseline pain distribution: 7% (no sites), 18% (1 site), 24% (multisite) and 39% (widespread pain, p-value for trend <0.001). Similar graded effects were found for other disability measures. Elders with multisite or widespread pain had at least a three-fold increased risk for onset of mobility difficulty compared to their peers without pain after adjusting for disability risk factors (multisite pain: RR=2.95, 95%CI, 1.58–5.50; widespread pain: RR=3.57, 95%CI, 1.71–7.48). Widespread pain contributed to decline in mobility performance (1 point decline in SPPB, RR=1.47, 95%CI, 1.08–2.01). Similar associations were found for baseline pain interference predicting subsequent mobility decline and (I)ADL disability. Weaker and less consistent associations were observed with pain severity. Conclusion Older community-dwelling adults living with chronic pain in multiple musculoskeletal locations have a substantial increased risk for developing disability over time and for

  9. Brief Report: A Growth Mixture Model of Occupational Aspirations of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, In Heok; Rojewski, Jay W.

    2013-01-01

    A previous longitudinal study of the occupational aspirations of individuals with high-incidence disabilities revealed multiple longitudinal patterns for individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavioral disorders. Growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether individuals in these two high-incidence disabilities groups (N =…

  10. Characteristics of Transition Planning and Services for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Audrey A.; Morningstar, Mary E.; Murray, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Transition planning is conceptually and empirically linked to successful postschool outcomes for adolescents with disabilities and has been legally mandated for more than two decades. Unfortunately, young adults with high-incidence disabilities, including learning disabilities (LD), emotional disabilities (ED), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity…

  11. Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple case study is to describe the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities. There is much information about what should be happening when making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities, but…

  12. Understanding the Relationship between Transition Services and Postschool Outcomes for Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Gauri Salil

    2012-01-01

    Given the consistently poor postschool outcomes of individuals with high incidence disabilities, there is a need to examine the transition services provided to them while in school. This secondary data analysis explored the transition services received by individuals with high incidence disabilities through the National Longitudinal Transition…

  13. Perspectives of Effective Teachers of Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jennifer Johnson; Gengel, Stacey

    2005-01-01

    Studies have examined the characteristics of excellent general and special education teachers. However, comparatively few studies have examined the characteristics of excellent teachers of students with low-incidence disabilities. Outstanding teachers of students with low-incidence disabilities were contacted to determine their willingness to…

  14. Intermediate Work Outcomes for Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gregg, Noel

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal sample from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 was used to determine differences in work outcomes between (a) individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavior disorders and (b) individuals with or without disabilities. Twelve factors were arranged into individual, family, school-peer, and community categories.…

  15. Community-Based Summer Work Experiences of Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey A.; Ditchman, Nicole; Swedeen, Beth; Owens, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Although summer offers a natural context for adolescents to gain community-based work experience, little is known about the extent to which youth with disabilities are accessing these transition-related opportunities. We examined the summer employment experiences of 220 youth with high-incidence disabilities at two time points. Although more than…

  16. Prospective Analyses of Childhood Factors and Antisocial Behavior for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chin-Chih; Symons, Frank J.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the association between childhood factors (individual, family, and school characteristics) and later antisocial behavior (official juvenile delinquency and adult crime) for students identified with high-incidence disabilities (i.e., learning disabilities, emotional disturbance). The sample consisted…

  17. Hearing impairment and incident disability and all-cause mortality in older British community-dwelling men

    PubMed Central

    Liljas, Ann E. M.; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Whincup, Peter H.; Papacosta, Olia; Walters, Kate; Iliffe, Steve; Lennon, Lucy T.; Carvalho, Livia A.; Ramsay, Sheena E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: hearing impairment is common in older adults and has been implicated in the risk of disability and mortality. We examined the association between hearing impairment and risk of incident disability and all-cause mortality. Design and setting: prospective cohort of community-dwelling older men aged 63–85 followed up for disability over 2 years and for all-cause mortality for 10 years in the British Regional Heart Study. Methods: data were collected on self-reported hearing impairment including hearing aid use, and disability assessed as mobility limitations (problems walking/taking stairs), difficulties with activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL). Mortality data were obtained from the National Health Service register. Results: among 3,981 men, 1,074 (27%) reported hearing impairment. Compared with men with no hearing impairment, men who could hear and used a hearing aid, and men who could not hear despite a hearing aid had increased risks of IADL difficulties (age-adjusted OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.29–2.70; OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.53–4.93, respectively). The associations remained after further adjustment for covariates including social class, lifestyle factors, co-morbidities and social engagement. Associations of hearing impairment with incident mobility limitations, incident ADL difficulties and all-cause mortality were attenuated on adjustment for covariates. Conclusion: this study suggests that hearing problems in later life could increase the risk of having difficulties performing IADLs, which include more complex everyday tasks such as shopping and light housework. However, further studies are needed to determine the associations observed including the underlying pathways. PMID:27146303

  18. Disability incidence and official health status transitions in Russia.

    PubMed

    Becker, Charles M; Merkuryeva, Irina S

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines determinants of being disabled in Russia, along with the probability of moving from one disability status to another, using data from 1994 through 2005 from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey. Results from multinomial probit regressions indicate that disability risk rises sharply with age, declines with income and self-reported good health, and is lower for women. Neither smoking nor drinking alcohol increases either the risk of being or becoming disabled. Recovery--health status improvement--improves with household size. Misclassification or measurement error is important: a surprisingly large proportion of "incurably" disabled Russians do in fact recover. This study has been funded in part by National Institute of Aging grant #2P30 AG17248-02 through the Population Aging Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder. We are grateful to Aleksandr Andreev for outstanding research assistance. Jeanine Braithwaite, John Komlos, Cem Mete, Mieke Meurs, Daniel Mont, Frank Sloan, and five anonymous referees contributed valuable comments. We acknowledge our appreciation without implicating them in remaining errors and misinterpretations.

  19. The Assessment of Physical and Program Accessibility for Students with Physical (Mobility) Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Deana R.

    A checklist and instructions are presented for evaluating the level of accessibility to school buildings, grounds, curricula, technology, and extracurricular activities for students with physical (mobility) disabilities. Legislative mandates (including The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act)…

  20. The Experiences of Students with Mobility Disabilities in Cypriot Higher Education Institutions: Listening to Their Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjikakou, Kika; Polycarpou, Vaso; Hadjilia, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of students with mobility disabilities in Cypriot higher education institutions. In order to obtain relevant information, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 Cypriot students with different forms of mobility disabilities, who attended different Cypriot higher education institutions and a…

  1. Factors Related to Hysterectomy in Women with Physical and Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Chen, Si-Fan; Wu, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to identify self-report data for hysterectomy prevalence and to explore its correlated factors among women with physical and mobility disabilities in Taiwan. This paper was part of a larger study, "Survey on Preventive Health Utilizations of People with Physical and Mobility Disability in Taiwan," which is a cross-sectional survey…

  2. 78 FR 41824 - Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals With Disabilities: Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR... Federal Transit Administration Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals With Disabilities: Proposed... implementing the Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Program. The Moving Ahead...

  3. Body mass index and the risk of incident functional disability in elderly Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Tomata, Yasutake; Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Kaiho, Yu; Honkura, Kenji; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanji, Fumiya; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cause-specific disability remains unclear. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,376 Japanese individuals aged ≥65 years who were followed up for 5.7 years. Information on BMI and other lifestyle factors was collected via a questionnaire in 2006. Functional disability data were retrieved from the public Long-term Care Insurance database. BMI was divided into 6 groups (<21, 21–<23, 23–<25, 25–<27[reference], 27–<29 and ≥29). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cause-specific disability were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. A U-shaped relationship between BMI and functional disability was observed, with a nadir at 26. The nadir BMI values with the lowest disability risk were 28 for dementia, 25 for stroke, and 23 for joint disease. A low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, the HR values (95% CI) being 2.48 (1.70–3.63) for BMI <21 and 2.25 (1.54–3.27) for BMI 21 to <23; a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease, the HR value (95% CI) being 2.17 (1.40–3.35). There was no significant relationship between BMI and disability due to stroke. The BMI nadirs for cause-specific disability differed: a low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, and a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease. Because BMI values of 23 to <29 did not pose a significantly higher risk for each cause of disability, this range should be regarded as the optimal one for the elderly population. PMID:27495075

  4. Preparing Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities for High-Stakes Testing with Strategy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Wehby, Joseph; Hughes, Carolyn; Johnson, Stephen M.; Plank, Don R.; Barton-Arwood, Sally M.; Lunsford, Lauren B.

    2005-01-01

    Recent policy initiatives promoting high-stakes testing for graduation present a significant challenge to practitioners charged with educating students with high-incidence disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of test-taking strategy instruction on the test performance of secondary students with high-incidence…

  5. An Evaluation of the Regional Programs for Educating Low-Incidence Disabled Children in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Stephen P.; And Others

    Key findings from an evaluative study of 16 Illinois regional programs for educating low-incidence disabled children are summarized; 12 recommendations are presented for organizing, delivering, and financing improved statewide services; and suggestions are offered for implemeting basic recommendations in comprehensive programs for aurally,…

  6. Making Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy; Hughes, Trudie

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study described the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions for high school students with high incidence disabilities. Participants included three parents, three students, three case managers, three mathematics teachers, and three administrators from different high schools across rural, suburban and…

  7. Prevalence of Weight Problems among Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Lambert, Matthew C.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Thompson, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of weight problems among youth in general and youth in out-of-home care has been well documented; however, the prevalence of obesity/overweight among youth with high-incidence disabilities in more restrictive settings, such as residential care, has not been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of…

  8. Prevalence and Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Cerebrovascular Accident in Ageing Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, J.; Rozeboom, W.; Penning, C.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological information on age-related cardiovascular disease in people with intellectual disability (ID) is scarce and inconclusive. We compared prevalence and incidence of cerebrovascular accident and myocardial infarction over age 50 in a residential population with ID to that in a general practice population. Method: Lifetime…

  9. Assessment of Cognitive Ability of Students with Severe and Low-Incidence Disabilities--Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crepeau-Hobson, Franci; Vujeva, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Students with severe and low-incidence disabilities comprise a heterogeneous population that often presents a challenge to the professionals charged with evaluating their skills and abilities. This is especially true in conducting a valid assessment of the cognitive ability of these children. Often, school psychologists are limited to the use of…

  10. Sexuality and Developmental Disabilities: An Investigation of Sexual Incidents at Bernard Fineson Developmental Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled, Albany.

    This report is the result of an investigation by the New York State Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled of the Bernard Fineson Developmental Center's policies and practices concerning sexual incidents among residents. It also raises broader issues about the meaning of consent when sexual activity involves persons with severe or…

  11. Incidence and Trends in Psychopathology Symptoms over Time in Adults with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.; Sipes, Megan; Shoemaker, Mary; Belva, Brian; Bamburg, Jay W.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have a high risk for developing comorbid psychopathology. While researchers have shown that symptoms of psychopathology remain relatively stable in children with ID over time, little research has been conducted to demonstrate symptom stability for adults with ID. Incidence of psychopathology symptoms…

  12. On CALL: One Approach to Improving Services for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Johnson, C. Merle; Drevon, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Students with low-incidence disabilities frequently receive less than optimal psychoeducational services because the specialized tests and instructional materials required to meet their idiosyncratic needs often are unavailable due to budget constraints, inadequate training of school personnel, and the difficulty school personnel have keeping…

  13. Physical Mobility Limitations in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, S.; Hunter, D.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mobility limitations increase with age in the general population. Despite a growing population of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), mobility is rarely studied in the ID literature. The specific aim of this study was to identify and summarise primary literature investigating mobility limitations in adults with ID.…

  14. Incidence of Disability Among Children 12 Months After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Koepsell, Thomas D.; Wang, Jin; Temkin, Nancy; Dorsch, Andrea; Vavilala, Monica S.; Durbin, Dennis; Jaffe, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the burden of disability resulting from traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among children younger than 18 years. Methods. We derived our data from a cohort study of children residing in King County, Washington, who were treated in an emergency department for a TBI or for an arm injury during 2007–2008. Disabilities 12 months after injury were assessed according to need for specialized educational and community-based services and scores on standardized measures of adaptive functioning and social–community participation. Results. The incidence of children receiving new services at 12 months was about 10-fold higher among those with a mild TBI than among those with a moderate or severe TBI. The population incidence of disability (defined according to scores below the norm means on the outcome measures included) was also consistently much larger (2.8-fold to 28-fold) for mild TBIs than for severe TBIs. Conclusions. The burden of disability caused by TBIs among children is primarily accounted for by mild injuries. Efforts to prevent these injuries as well as to decrease levels of disability following TBIs are warranted. PMID:22994196

  15. Country-specific estimates of the incidence of intellectual disability associated with prenatal exposure to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, David C; O'Leary, Keri; Rainis, Holly; Gibb, Herman J

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes country-specific estimates of the incidence of intellectual disability in children associated with prenatal exposure to methylmercury. A systematic review was undertaken to identify country-specific data on hair mercury concentrations in women of reproductive age. A variety of approaches were used to estimate biomarker concentrations for countries lacking such data. A dose-effect relationship derived on the basis of the data from three large prospective studies relating prenatal methylmercury exposure to IQ in children was used to estimate the country-specific incidences of mild, moderate, severe, and profound intellectual disability in children as a result of prenatal methylmercury exposure. The incidence of methylmercury-associated mild intellectual disability (IQ scores 50-70) varied nearly 40-fold across countries, with the greatest incidences generally in countries that are islands or that are coastal. Countries with high birth rates and greater consumption of foods that contribute most to methylmercury intake in humans (seafood, rice) can be expected to make the largest contributions to the worldwide burden of disease associated with methylmercury. The assumptions and limitations of the estimates are discussed. PMID:26874048

  16. SIMON: Integration of mobility and parking solutions for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, Alberto; Barberà, Ricard; Durá-Gil, Juan Vicente; Solaz, José; Muñoz, Eva María; Serrano, Manuel; Marqués, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Mobility and parking in urban areas are often difficult for people with disabilities. Obstacles include lack of accessible information on routes, transport alternatives and parking availability, as well as fraud in the use of the specific services intended for these citizens. The SIMON project aims to improve this situation through the integration of different ICT solutions. SIMON is enhancing the European Parking Card for disable people with contactless technologies and integrates mobile solutions to support user unique identification in existing parking areas whilst preserving privacy. SIMON will also promote better mobility solutions for mobility including information, navigation and access to restricted areas. PMID:26294493

  17. SIMON: Integration of mobility and parking solutions for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, Alberto; Barberà, Ricard; Durá-Gil, Juan Vicente; Solaz, José; Muñoz, Eva María; Serrano, Manuel; Marqués, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Mobility and parking in urban areas are often difficult for people with disabilities. Obstacles include lack of accessible information on routes, transport alternatives and parking availability, as well as fraud in the use of the specific services intended for these citizens. The SIMON project aims to improve this situation through the integration of different ICT solutions. SIMON is enhancing the European Parking Card for disable people with contactless technologies and integrates mobile solutions to support user unique identification in existing parking areas whilst preserving privacy. SIMON will also promote better mobility solutions for mobility including information, navigation and access to restricted areas.

  18. Effects of Increased Mobility Skills on Meaningful Life Participation for an Adult with Severe Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an adult with severe, multiple disabilities and discusses issues affecting meaningful life participation. Emphasis is placed on the role of functional mobility skills to increase active engagement in age-appropriate activities and opportunities to make informed choices. MOVE for Adults (Mobility Opportunities…

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Netherlands: Incidence, Costs and Disability-Adjusted Life Years

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Panneman, Martien J. M.; van Beeck, Ed F.; Polinder, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Objective Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, leading to great personal suffering and huge costs to society. Integrated knowledge on epidemiology, economic consequences and disease burden of TBI is scarce but essential for optimizing healthcare policy and preventing TBI. This study aimed to estimate incidence, cost-of-illness and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of TBI in the Netherlands. Methods This study included data on all TBI patients who were treated at an Emergency Department (ED - National Injury Surveillance System), hospitalized (National Medical Registration), or died due to their injuries in the Netherlands between 2010–2012. Direct healthcare costs and indirect costs were determined using the incidence-based Dutch Burden of Injury Model. Disease burden was assessed by calculating years of life lost (YLL) owing to premature death, years lived with disability (YLD) and DALYs. Incidence, costs and disease burden were stratified by age and gender. Results TBI incidence was 213.6 per 100,000 person years. Total costs were €314.6 (USD $433.8) million per year and disease burden resulted in 171,200 DALYs (on average 7.1 DALYs per case). Men had highest mean costs per case (€19,540 versus €14,940), driven by indirect costs. 0–24-year-olds had high incidence and disease burden but low economic costs, whereas 25–64-year-olds had relatively low incidence but high economic costs. Patients aged 65+ had highest incidence, leading to considerable direct healthcare costs. 0–24-year-olds, men aged 25–64 years, traffic injury victims (especially bicyclists) and home and leisure injury victims (especially 0–5-year-old and elderly fallers) are identified as risk groups in TBI. Conclusions The economic and health consequences of TBI are substantial. The integrated approach of assessing incidence, costs and disease burden enables detection of important risk groups in TBI, development of prevention programs that

  20. Autonomous mobile platform for enhanced situational awareness in Mass Casualty Incidents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongyi; Schafer, James; Wang, Sili; Ganz, Aura

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of the search and rescue process of a Mass Casualty Incident, we introduce a low cost autonomous mobile platform. The mobile platform motion is controlled by an Android Smartphone mounted on a robot. The pictures and video captured by the Smartphone camera can significantly enhance the situational awareness of the incident commander leading to a more efficient search and rescue process. Moreover, the active RFID readers mounted on the mobile platform can improve the localization accuracy of victims in the disaster site in areas where the paramedics are not present, reducing the triage and evacuation time. PMID:25570104

  1. Smoking and alcohol consumption patterns among elderly Canadians with mobility disabilities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobility disability is a major adverse health outcome associated with aging and an impediment to older adults’ well-being and behaviors in social and leisure activities. It has been shown that lifestyle factors, including smoking and alcohol consumption, have been used as coping strategies to deal with the negative impact of disability. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of smoking and alcohol consumption among older Canadians with different levels of mobility disabilities and to examine factors associated with these two lifestyle patterns among those with disabilities. Methods Secondary data analysis was performed using individuals (n = 6,038) aged 65 years and older from both the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey and the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey. Multivariate logistic regressions examined the relationship between disability severity and smoking as well as alcohol consumption while controlling for potential confounding socioeconomic factors. Results The proportion of current smokers among seniors with less-severe and more-severe mobility disabilities and those in the general population was comparable with 12.55%, 11.57% and 11.93%, respectively. Forty-eight percent of seniors in the general population consumed alcohol regularly, compared to only 12.85% with more-severe mobility disabilities. No significant association was shown between the severity level of mobility disabilities and smoking (odds ratio = 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.08). However, seniors having more-severe disability were less likely to consume alcohol regularly (odds ratio = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.89). Other variables including age, gender, income, living status, and social participation also impacted these lifestyle patterns among the study population. Conclusions Smoking and alcohol patterns present different associations with the severity level of mobility disabilities. Compared with the general

  2. The Prevalence, Incidence, and Factors Predictive of Mental Ill-Health in Adults with Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sally-Ann; Smiley, Elita; Finlayson, Janet; Jackson, Alison; Allan, Linda; Williamson, Andrew; Mantry, Dipali; Morrison, Jillian

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no previous studies of the prevalence and incidence of mental ill-health in adults with profound intellectual disabilities. Method: In this population-based prospective cohort study, adults with profound intellectual disabilities underwent psychiatric assessment (n = 184), with further assessment after 2 years (n = 131).…

  3. [Cumulative annual incidence of disabling work-related musculoskeletal disorders in an urban area of Brazil].

    PubMed

    Souza, Norma Suely Souto; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2011-11-01

    This study focused on the annual cumulative incidence (ACI) of disabling work-related musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs (ULMSD) among workers covered by the National Social Insurance System in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Cases were workers who received disability compensation benefits when unable to work due to ULMSD, during the year 2008. The data were obtained from the administrative systems of the National Social Insurance Institute and Ministry of Labor and Employment. ACI was 15 per 10,000 workers. Increased ACI of ULMSD was associated with female gender, lower income, and work in financial activities or manufacturing. Women earning the minimum wage (US$ 64.00 per month) or less had the highest ACI of ULMSD (123 per 10,000), suggesting inequalities in the occurrence of these disorders. The study indicates the need to prioritize preventive actions focusing on ergonomics and work organization, early diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation. PMID:22124490

  4. Incidence, prevalence, and hybrid approaches to calculating disability-adjusted life years

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    When disability-adjusted life years are used to measure the burden of disease on a population in a time interval, they can be calculated in several different ways: from an incidence, pure prevalence, or hybrid perspective. I show that these calculation methods are not equivalent and discuss some of the formal difficulties each method faces. I show that if we don’t discount the value of future health, there is a sense in which the choice of calculation method is a mere question of accounting. Such questions can be important, but they don’t raise deep theoretical concerns. If we do discount, however, choice of calculation method can change the relative burden attributed to different conditions over time. I conclude by recommending that studies involving disability-adjusted life years be explicit in noting what calculation method is being employed and in explaining why that calculation method has been chosen. PMID:22967055

  5. [Cumulative annual incidence of disabling work-related musculoskeletal disorders in an urban area of Brazil].

    PubMed

    Souza, Norma Suely Souto; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2011-11-01

    This study focused on the annual cumulative incidence (ACI) of disabling work-related musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs (ULMSD) among workers covered by the National Social Insurance System in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Cases were workers who received disability compensation benefits when unable to work due to ULMSD, during the year 2008. The data were obtained from the administrative systems of the National Social Insurance Institute and Ministry of Labor and Employment. ACI was 15 per 10,000 workers. Increased ACI of ULMSD was associated with female gender, lower income, and work in financial activities or manufacturing. Women earning the minimum wage (US$ 64.00 per month) or less had the highest ACI of ULMSD (123 per 10,000), suggesting inequalities in the occurrence of these disorders. The study indicates the need to prioritize preventive actions focusing on ergonomics and work organization, early diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.

  6. Mobile DIORAMA-II: infrastructure less information collection system for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Aura; Schafer, James M; Yang, Zhuorui; Yi, Jun; Lord, Graydon; Ciottone, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce DIORAMA-II system that provides real time information collection in mass casualty incidents. Using a mobile platform that includes active RFID tags and readers as well as Smartphones, the system can determine the location of victims and responders. The system provides user friendly multi dimensional user interfaces as well as collaboration tools between the responders and the incident commander. We conducted two simulated mass casualty incidents with 50 victims each and professional responders. DIORAMA-II significantly reduces the evacuation time by up to 43% when compared to paper based triage systems. All responders that participated in all trials were very satisfied. They felt in control of the incident and mentioned that the system significantly reduced their stress level during the incident. They all mentioned that they would use the system in an actual incident.

  7. Multidisciplinary Procedures for Designing Housing Adaptations for People with Mobility Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Sukkay, Sasicha

    2016-01-01

    Based on a 2013 statistic published by Thai with Disability foundation, five percent of Thailand's population are disabled people. Six hundred thousand of them have mobility disability, and the number is increasing every year. To support them, the Thai government has implemented a number of disability laws and policies. One of the policies is to better disabled people's quality of life by adapting their houses to facilitate their activities. However, the policy has not been fully realized yet-there is still no specific guideline for housing adaptation for people with disabilities. This study is an attempt to address the lack of standardized criteria for such adaptation by developing a number of effective ones. Our development had 3 objectives: first, to identify the body functioning of a group of people with mobility disability according to the international classification functioning concept (ICF); second, to perform post-occupancy evaluation of this group and their houses; and third, with the collected data, to have a group of multidisciplinary experts cooperatively develop criteria for housing adaptation. The major findings were that room dimensions and furniture materials really had an impact on accessibility and toilet as well as bed room were the most difficult areas to access. PMID:27534326

  8. School Mobility, Dropout, and Graduation Rates across Student Disability Categories in Utah. REL 2015-055

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrat, Vanessa X.; Berliner, BethAnn; Voight, Adam; Tran, Loan; Huang, Chun-Wei; Yu, Airong; Chen-Gaddini, Min

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6-12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results…

  9. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,…

  10. Obstacle Course Training Can Improve Mobility and Prevent Falls in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hanegem, E.; Enkelaar, L.; Smulders, E.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) constitute a special-needs population at high risk of falling. This is the first study to evaluate whether obstacle course training can improve mobility and prevent falls in this population. Methods: The intervention was implemented as part of an institution-wide health care improvement plan…

  11. Effects of Disability on Pregnancy Experiences Among Women with Impaired Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Little is known about how functional impairments might affect the pregnancies of women with mobility disability. We aimed to explore complications that arise during pregnancy specifically related to physical functional impairments of women with significant mobility disabilities. Design Qualitative descriptive analysis Setting Telephone interviews with women from 17 USA states Sample 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years; most participants were recruited through social networks. Methods We conducted 2-hour, in-depth telephone interviews using a semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol. We used NVivo software to sort interview transcript texts for conventional content analyses. Main outcome measures Functional impairment-related complications during pregnancy. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years. Most were white, well-educated, and higher income; 8 women had spinal cord injuries, 4 cerebral palsy, and 10 had other conditions; 18 used wheeled mobility aids; and 14 had cesarean deliveries (8 elective). Impairment-related complications during pregnancy included: falls; urinary tract and bladder problems; wheelchair fit and stability problems that reduced mobility and compromised safety; significant shortness of breath, sometimes requiring respiratory support; increased spasticity; bowel management difficulties; and skin integrity problems (this was rare, but multiple women greatly increased skin monitoring during pregnancy to prevent pressure ulcers). Conclusions In addition to other pregnancy-associated health risks, women with mobility disabilities appear to experience problems relating to their functional impairments. Pre-conception planning and in-depth discussions during early pregnancy could potentially assist women with mobility disabilities to anticipate and address these difficulties. PMID:25417861

  12. Body mass index and the risk of incident functional disability in elderly Japanese: The OHSAKI Cohort 2006 Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Tomata, Yasutake; Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Kaiho, Yu; Honkura, Kenji; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanji, Fumiya; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cause-specific disability remains unclear.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,376 Japanese individuals aged ≥65 years who were followed up for 5.7 years. Information on BMI and other lifestyle factors was collected via a questionnaire in 2006. Functional disability data were retrieved from the public Long-term Care Insurance database. BMI was divided into 6 groups (<21, 21-<23, 23-<25, 25-<27[reference], 27-<29 and ≥29). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cause-specific disability were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models.A U-shaped relationship between BMI and functional disability was observed, with a nadir at 26. The nadir BMI values with the lowest disability risk were 28 for dementia, 25 for stroke, and 23 for joint disease. A low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, the HR values (95% CI) being 2.48 (1.70-3.63) for BMI <21 and 2.25 (1.54-3.27) for BMI 21 to <23; a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease, the HR value (95% CI) being 2.17 (1.40-3.35). There was no significant relationship between BMI and disability due to stroke.The BMI nadirs for cause-specific disability differed: a low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, and a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease. Because BMI values of 23 to <29 did not pose a significantly higher risk for each cause of disability, this range should be regarded as the optimal one for the elderly population. PMID:27495075

  13. Food Access Patterns and Barriers among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Deborah L; Rosenberg, Dori E; Simonovich, Shannon D; Belza, Basia

    2012-01-01

    We examined where midlife and older adults with a mobility disability accessed food outside the home in King County, Washington, USA, how they travelled to these food destinations, and facilitators and barriers to food access using qualitative interviews. Thirty-five adults aged ≥50 years with a mobility disability (defined as use of an assistive device for mobility) were interviewed. Supplemental objective information was obtained from a Global Positioning System device worn by participants for 3 days. Participants primarily accessed food at grocery stores, restaurants, and coffee shops/cafés. The most common transportation modes were walking, obtaining a ride from friends, motorized chair/scooter, and public transit. Location and proximity of food destinations were factors affecting participants' ability to access these destinations. Adequate space, ease of entry, available amenities such as restrooms, and helpful people were facilitators for participants to access food outside the home. PMID:23056944

  14. Food Access Patterns and Barriers among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Deborah L.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2012-01-01

    We examined where midlife and older adults with a mobility disability accessed food outside the home in King County, Washington, USA, how they travelled to these food destinations, and facilitators and barriers to food access using qualitative interviews. Thirty-five adults aged ≥50 years with a mobility disability (defined as use of an assistive device for mobility) were interviewed. Supplemental objective information was obtained from a Global Positioning System device worn by participants for 3 days. Participants primarily accessed food at grocery stores, restaurants, and coffee shops/cafés. The most common transportation modes were walking, obtaining a ride from friends, motorized chair/scooter, and public transit. Location and proximity of food destinations were factors affecting participants' ability to access these destinations. Adequate space, ease of entry, available amenities such as restrooms, and helpful people were facilitators for participants to access food outside the home. PMID:23056944

  15. Related Services Research for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giangreco, Michael F.

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes a team process for making related services decisions called VISTA (Vermont Interdependent Services Team Approach) and nine research studies on the use and impact of VISTA with students with low incidence disabilities. It also addresses team size, consumer perspectives, and paraprofessional supports. Five major conclusions…

  16. Critical Incidents Involving Students with Psychiatric Disabilities: The Gap between State of the Art and Campus Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belch, Holley A.; Marshak, Laura E.

    2006-01-01

    The proliferation of students with psychiatric disabilities and the severity of the issues they present pose significant challenges to campus personnel and specifically to student affairs staff. This study identified the specific types of critical incidents related to students with psychiatric disorders that senior student affairs officers found…

  17. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four…

  18. Effects of an Adapted Physical Education Teaching Model on Special Educator Teaching Approaches for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a training package, which consisted of the Flex Grid Teaching Model along with adapted physical education consultation, on special education teacher instruction of functional motor skill acquisition instruction to secondary students with low incidence disabilities. Special education teachers…

  19. Causal Effects of Career-Technical Education on Postsecondary Work Outcomes of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Heok In; Rojewski, Jay W.; Gregg, Noel

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2, a propensity score analysis revealed significant causal effects for a secondary career and technical education (CTE) concentration on the postsecondary work outcomes of adolescents with high-incidence disabilities. High school students identified as CTE concentrators (three or more high…

  20. Team-Based Learning for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in High School Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Shawn; Wanzek, Jeanne; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of implementing team-based learning (TBL) practices on content acquisition for 11th grade students with high-incidence disabilities enrolled in general education social studies courses. TBL components focus on collaborative discourse within heterogeneous teams. TBL, which requires critical thinking and the application…

  1. Poor mobilizer: a retrospective study on proven and predicted incidence according to GITMO criteria.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Nicola; Vacca, Michele; Lanti, Alessandro; Ipsevich, Francesco; Maresca, Maddalena; Fiorelli, Elena; Bianchi, Maria; Adorno, Gaspare; Pierelli, Luca; Majolino, Ignazio; Leone, Giuseppe; Zini, Gina

    2012-10-01

    The Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation (Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo, GITMO) recently formalized criteria for a shared definition of poor mobilizer in order to facilitate randomized clinical trials and study comparison focusing on the efficacy of current mobilizing regimens. The availability of a standardized tool for poor mobilizer definition suggested us to retrospectively test GITMO criteria feasibility and applicability. Therefore we analyzed medical and laboratory records of adult patients affected by myeloma (MM) or lymphoma undergoing mobilization for autologous peripheral blood HSC collection from January 2010 to June 2011, at Servizio di Emotrasfusione, Istituto di Ematologia, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Roma, UOC SIMT AO S. Camillo Forlanini Roma and SIMT Fondazione Policlinico Tor Vergata Roma. We collected data about 227 patients (134 male, 93 female) affected by MM (31.3%) NHL (58.6%) e HD (10.1%). Thirty-nine patients, 21 male and 18 female met proven poor mobilizer criteria definition resulting in a incidence of 17.2% (12.7% in MM, 21.8% in NHL and 4.3% in HD). Eleven patients, seven affected by lymphoma and four affected by myeloma, were defined predicted PM according to major criteria. Eight patients, seven affected by lymphoma and one affected by myeloma, were define predicted PM according to minor criteria. Sixteen out of 39 patients defined as poor mobilizer either according to major or minor criteria underwent collection procedures and eight (20.5%) achieved a cell dose ⩾2×10(6)/kg CD34(+) cells. GITMO criteria application was easy and resulted in poor mobilizer incidence comparable to current literature. Definitions of proven poor mobilizer and predicted poor mobilizer according to major criteria were very effective while minor criteria were less predictive. These results came from a retrospective analysis and therefore should be validated in future prospective trial. On the other hand these data could be

  2. Balance training to maintain mobility and prevent disability.

    PubMed

    Judge, James Oat

    2003-10-01

    Balance is important for the safe performance of many activities that allow older people to remain independent in their community. Housework, cooking, shopping, and travel generally require the ability to stand, reach, turn, and bend down and pick up objects from the floor. Multiple interacting factors are implicated in the deterioration of balance. Several strategies have been tested to improve balance and reduce falls. Home-based individualized training that attempted to improve identified deficits reduced falls and improved physical performance and stabilized or reduced disability. Home-based exercise programs that included low-intensity strength and balance training have improved balance and reduced fall rates by about 40% compared to controls. Class-based exercise programs in senior centers or exercise centers have improved balance and physical performance, and some have reduced falls. Programs such as tai chi and social dance look promising and should be further investigated.

  3. Mobility Modification Alleviates Environmental Influence on Incident Mobility Difficulty among Community-Dwelling Older People: A Two-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Portegijs, Erja; Viljanen, Anne; Iwarsson, Susanne; Rantanen, Taina

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental barriers increase risk for mobility difficulties in old age. Mobility difficulty is preceded by a phase where people try to postpone a difficulty through mobility modification. We studied whether perceived environmental mobility barriers outdoors correlate with mobility modification and mobility difficulty, predict development of mobility difficulty over a two-year follow-up, and whether mobility modification alleviates the risk for difficulty. Methods At baseline, 848 people aged 75–90 were interviewed face-to-face. Telephone follow-up interviews were conducted one (n = 816) and two years (n = 761) later. Environmental barriers to mobility were self-reported using a15-item structured questionnaire at baseline, summed and divided into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Mobility difficulty was assessed as self-reported ability to walk 2 km at all assessment points and categorized into ‘no difficulty’, ‘no difficulty but mobility modifications’ (reducing frequency, stopping walking, using an aid, slowing down or resting during the performance) and ‘difficulty’. Results At baseline, 212 participants reported mobility modifications and 356 mobility difficulties. Those reporting one or multiple environmental barriers had twice the odds for mobility modifications and up to five times the odds for mobility difficulty compared to those reporting no environmental barriers. After multiple adjustments for health and functioning, reporting multiple environmental barriers outdoors continued to predict the development of incident mobility difficulty over the two-year follow-up. Mobility modifications attenuated the association. Conclusion For older people who successfully modify their performance, environmental influence on incident mobility difficulty can be diminished. Older people use mobility modification to alleviate environmental press on mobility. PMID:27104750

  4. Health Major Incident : The Experiences of Mobile Medical Team During Major Flood

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Rashidi; Mohamad, Zainalabidin; Noh, Abu Yazid Mohd; Mohamad, Nasir; Hamzah, Mohd Saharudin Shah Che; Mohammed, Nik Ariff Nik; Baharudin, Kamarul Aryffin; Kamauzaman, Tuan Hairulnizam Tuan

    2008-01-01

    Disaster is a sudden event that associated with ecological changes, disruption of normal daily activities, destruction of infrastructures, loss of properties, and medical disabilities. In disaster, there is a mismatch between available resources and patients need for healthcare service. During flood disaster, the victims were predisposed to different type of illnesses for various reasons such as inadequate supply of clean water, poor sanitation or drainage system, unhealthy foods, and over-crowded relief centers. Mobile clinic is an option for delivering medical care for the disaster victims who often have a difficulty to access to the medical facilities. In this article we would like to share our experiences during the provision of humanitarian services for flood victims at District of Muar Johor. Common illnesses among the flood victims at visited relief centers and advantages of Mobile Medical Relief Team were also highlighted and discussed. PMID:22589626

  5. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and…

  6. Socioeconomic differences in the benefits of structured physical activity compared with health education on the prevention of major mobility disability in older adults: the LIFE study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiying; Bonell, Chris; Glynn, Nancy W; Fielding, Roger A; Manini, Todd; King, Abby C; Pahor, Marco; Mihalko, Shannon L; Gill, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence is lacking on whether health-benefiting community-based interventions differ in their effectiveness according to socioeconomic characteristics. We evaluated whether the benefit of a structured physical activity intervention on reducing mobility disability in older adults differs by education or income. Methods The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicentre, randomised trial that compared a structured physical activity programme with a health education programme on the incidence of mobility disability among at-risk community-living older adults (aged 70–89 years; average follow-up of 2.6 years). Education (≤ high school (0–12 years), college (13–17 years) or postgraduate) and annual household income were self-reported (<$24 999, $25 000 to $49 999 and ≥$50 000). The risk of disability (objectively defined as loss of ability to walk 400 m) was compared between the 2 treatment groups using Cox regression, separately by socioeconomic group. Socioeconomic group×intervention interaction terms were tested. Results The effect of reducing the incidence of mobility disability was larger for those with postgraduate education (0.72, 0.51 to 1.03; N=411) compared with lower education (high school or less (0.93, 0.70 to 1.24; N=536). However, the education group×intervention interaction term was not statistically significant (p=0.54). Findings were in the same direction yet less pronounced when household income was used as the socioeconomic indicator. Conclusions In the largest and longest running trial of physical activity amongst at-risk older adults, intervention effect sizes were largest among those with higher education or income, yet tests of statistical interactions were non-significant, likely due to inadequate power. Trial registration number NCT01072500. PMID:27060177

  7. Making mobility-related disability better: a complex response to a complex problem.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Mobility disability in older adults can arise from single system problems, such as discrete musculoskeletal injury. In frail older adults, however, mobility disability is part of a complex web of problems. The approach to their rehabilitation must take that complexity into account, as is reported by Fairhall et al. First, their overall health state must be assessed, which is achieved by a comprehensive geriatric assessment. The assessment can show how a particular patient came to be disabled, so that an individualized care plan can be worked out. Whether this approach works in general can be evaluated by looking at group differences in mean mobility test scores. Knowing whether it has worked in the individual patient requires an individualized measure. This is because not every patient starts from the same point, and not every patient achieves success by aiming for the same goal. For one patient, walking unassisted for three metres would be a triumph; for another it would be a tragedy. Unless we understand the complexity of the needs of frail older adults, we will neither be able to treat them effectively nor evaluate our efforts sensibly.Please see related article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/120.

  8. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-09-01

    THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO COMPARE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO COMPILED PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAMS: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (+/-SD) age for all participants was 59 +/- 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score >/=20 points or >/=50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0-100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7-16) over 5-12 weeks and 20 (18-24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (>/=20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented.

  9. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed Central

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two compiled physiotherapy programs: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (±SD) age for all participants was 59 ± 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score ≥20 points or ≥50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0–100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7–16) over 5–12 weeks and 20 (18–24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (≥20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented. PMID:18833335

  10. A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will describe a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in October 1990, is focused on prototyping a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed and easily operated by HAZMAT Team personnel allowing remote entry and exploration of a hazardous material incident site. The close involvement of JPL Fire Department personnel has been critical in establishing system requirements as well as evaluating the system. The current robot, called HAZBOT III, has been especially designed for operation in environments that may contain combustible gases. Testing of the system with the Fire Department has shown that teleoperated robots can successfully gain access to incident sites allowing hazardous material spills to be remotely located and identified. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through enhancement of the operator interface and by allowing tetherless operation.

  11. Exploring Mobility Options for Children with Physical Disabilities: A Focus on Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The study by Tefft et al. (2011, in this issue) is one of the few studies that have explored the impact of pediatric powered mobility on families. The parents who participated in their study reported increased satisfaction with their children's social and play skills, ability to move independently, sleeping patterns, and public perception of their…

  12. Reading Achievement in the Middle School Years: A Study Investigating Growth Patterns by High Incidence Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakimowski, Mary E.; Faggella-Luby, Michael; Kim, Yujin; Wei, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous research studies (e.g., Anderson, Kutash, & Duchnowski, 2001; Lane, Carter, Pierson, & Glaeser, 2006; Volpe, Dupaul, Jitendra, & Tresco, 2009; Wei, Blackorby, & Schiller, 2011) have shown that students with disabilities generally exhibit lower reading scores than their peers without disabilities. However, questions remain…

  13. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Prevalence, Incidence and Remission of Aggressive Behaviour and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, S.-A.; Smiley, E.; Jackson, A.; Finlayson, J.; Allan, L.; Mantry, D.; Morrison, J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive behaviours can be disabling for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), with negative consequences for the adult, their family and paid carers. It is surprising how little research has been conducted into the epidemiology of these needs, given the impact they can have. This study investigates point prevalence, 2-year…

  14. Assisting Students with High-Incidence Disabilities to Pursue Careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Cari; Rabren, Karen S.; Taylor, Stephanie L.; Dotson, Courtney K.

    2012-01-01

    Persons with disabilities have been underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields for many years. Reasons for this include low expectations for students with disabilities, limited exposure to prerequisite courses, lack of role models, and lack of access to individualized supports. This article identifies…

  15. The effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis

    2013-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is the result of cervical nerve root pathology that may lead to chronic pain and disability. Although manual therapy interventions including cervical traction and neural mobilization have been advocated to decrease pain and disability caused by cervical radiculopathy, their analgesic effect has been questioned due to the low quality of research evidence. The purpose of this paper is to present the effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in a patient experiencing cervical radiculopathy. A 52-year-old woman presented with a 2 month history of neurological cervico-brachial pain and whose presentation was consistent with cervical radiculopathy. Cervical traction and a slider neural mobilization of the medial nerve were applied simultaneously to reduce the patient's pain and disability measured at baseline and at 2 and 4 weeks using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Improvements in all outcome measures were noted over a period of four weeks. Scores in all outcome measures revealed that the patient's pain had almost disappeared and that she was able to perform her household chores and job tasks without difficulties and limitations. In conclusion, the findings of this study support that the application of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization can produce significant improvements in terms of pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy.

  16. Middle-Aged and Mobility-Limited: Prevalence of Disability and Symptom Attributions in a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gardener, Elizabeth A; Huppert, Felicia A; Guralnik, Jack M; Melzer, David

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lower limb mobility disabilities are well understood in older people, but the causes in middle age have attracted little attention. OBJECTIVES To estimate the prevalence of mobility disabilities among noninstitutionalized adults in England and to compare the disabling symptoms reported by middle-aged and older people. DESIGN Cross-sectional data from the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Mobility disability was identified by level of reported difficulty walking a quarter mile. PARTICIPANTS Eleven thousand two hundred sixteen respondents aged 50 years and older living in private households in 2002. RESULTS The prevalence of difficulty walking a quarter mile increases sharply with age, but even in the middle-aged (50 to 64 years age-group) 18% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 16% to 19%) of men and 19% (95% CI: 17% to 20%) of women reported some degree of difficulty. Of the 16 main symptoms reported as causing mobility disability in middle age, 2 dominated: pain in the leg or the foot (43%; 95% CI: 40% to 46%) and shortness of breath/dyspnea (21%; 95% CI: 18% to 23%). Fatigue or tiredness, and stability problems were cited by only 5% and 6%, respectively. These proportions were slightly different from those in the 65 to 79-year age group: 40%, 23%, 6%, and 8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Mobility (walking) disabilities in the middle-aged are relatively common. The symptoms reported as causes in this age group differ little from those reported by older groups, and are dominated by lower limb pain and shortness of breath. More clinical attention paid to disabling symptoms may lead to disability reductions in later life. PMID:16970558

  17. The Effects of Obesity and Mobility Disability in Access to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in France: Results from the National Health and Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bussière, Clémence; Sicsic, Jonathan; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to disentangle the effects of obesity and mobility limitation on cervical and breast cancer screening among community dwelling women. Methods The data source was the French national Health and Disability Survey - Household Section, 2008. The Body Mass Index (BMI) was used to categorize obesity status. We constructed a continuous score of mobility limitations to assess the severity of disability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84). Logistic regressions were performed to examine the association between obesity, mobility limitations and the use of Pap test (n = 8 133) and the use of mammography (n = 7 561). Adjusted odds ratios were calculated (AOR). Interaction terms between obesity and the disability score were included in models testing for effect modifications. Results Compared with non-obese women, the odds of having a Pap test in the past 3 years was 24% lower in obese women (AOR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.65 to 0.89), the odds of having a mammogram in the past 2 years was 23% lower (AOR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.66 to 0.91). Each time the disability score was 5 points higher, the odds of having a Pap test decreases by 20% (AOR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.98), the odds of having a mammogram decreases by 25% (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.97). There was no significant interaction between obesity and disability score. Conclusion Obesity and mobility limitation are independently associated with a lower likelihood of cervical and breast cancer screening. Protective outreach and follow-up are necessary to reduce inequalities and thus to reduce health disparities in these vulnerable and high-risk populations of obese women with disabilities. PMID:25133662

  18. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition, participants wore Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices for 3 days prior to the interview. The GPS maps were used as prompts during the interviews. Open coding of the 35 interviews using latent content analysis resulted in key themes and subthemes that achieved consensus between coders. Two investigators independently coded the text of each interview. Results: Participants were on average of 67 years of age (range: 50–86) and predominantly used canes (57%), walkers (57%), or wheelchairs (46%). Key themes pertained to curb ramp availability and condition, sidewalk availability and condition, hills, aesthetics, lighting, ramp availability, weather, presence and features of crosswalks, availability of resting places and shelter on streets, paved or smooth walking paths, safety, and traffic on roads. Implications: A variety of built environment barriers and facilitators to neighborhood-based activity exist for midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Preparing our neighborhood environments for an aging population that uses assistive devices will be important to foster independence and health. PMID:23010096

  19. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  20. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  1. Using Mobile Technology in an Urban High School to Decrease Adult Prompting during in School Transitions for Students Identified with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the application of video modeling on mobile technology to increase efficiency in the classroom for students identified with intellectual disabilities. Specially, this study sought to identify if video modeling on mobile technology could decrease adult prompting for students with intellectual disabilities during…

  2. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Falls among Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, C. R.; Clemson, L.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Durvasula, S.; Sherrington, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Falls among people with intellectual disability (ID) occur at a younger age than the general population and are a significant cause of injury and hospitalisation. There is very limited research investigating risk factors for falls among people with ID and none with people living outside of formal care arrangements, either independently…

  3. Assessing the Transition-Related Strengths and Needs of Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey A.; Sun, Ye; Owens, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Although meaningful assessment is considered the cornerstone of transition planning, little empirical guidance is available to inform this assessment process. This study examined the transition-related strengths and needs of 160 students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) or learning disabilities (LD) from the perspectives of special…

  4. Factors Influencing the Self-Determination of Transition-Age Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Melinda R.; Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Glaeser, Barbara C.

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the contributions of self-determination to improved outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities, researchers are increasingly directing their efforts toward identifying factors associated with (a) these students' acquisition of skills that enhance self-determination and (b) educators' efforts to promote opportunities to be…

  5. Critical Social Skills for Adolescents with High Incidence Disabilities: Parental Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Sharon M.; Hanley-Maxwell, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    In this study, 11 parents shared their beliefs that emotional intelligence and character play critical roles in the social and emotional development of their children with disabilities. Although the parents agree academic performance is important, they also want their children to develop moral and interpersonal and intrapersonal skills. (Contains…

  6. The Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Ernest L., II

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown evidence that mindfulness-based meditation practices may be effective treatment interventions for mental, emotional, and medical disabilities in the adult population. There has been a limited number of research studies showing the effectiveness of meditation practices with secondary students who receive special education…

  7. Public Policy and the Shaping of Disability: Incidence Growth in Educational Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dana Lee

    2004-01-01

    Autism has gained the attention of policy makers and public administrators in recent years. The surge in prevalence, in tandem with a growing social preference for community inclusion of individuals with disabilities, strains a variety of policy infrastructures. Autism and related disorders, which were first described in 1943, were originally…

  8. Injury Incidence and Patterns in Workers with Intellectual Disability: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysaght, Rosemary; Sparring, Cynthia; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Marshall, Carrie Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background: Workplace safety is a concern in the employment of persons with intellectual disability, due to both real concerns for employee well-being, and the effect that negative perceptions of safety risk can have on hiring. Method: This study involved a retrospective analysis of workplace insurance claim records for workers with and without…

  9. Cost effectiveness of the LIFE physical activity intervention for older adults at increased risk for mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Losing the ability to walk safely and independently is a major concern for many older adults. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study recently demonstrated that a physical activity (PA) intervention can delay the onset of major mobility disability. Our objective is ...

  10. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Prevalence, Incidence and Remission of Self-Injurious Behaviour, and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, S.-A.; Smiley, E.; Allan, L. M.; Jackson, A.; Finlayson, J.; Mantry, D.; Morrison, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Self-injurious behaviour (SIB) is a serious condition, with implications for the person, their family and financial costs to the state providing care. The previously reported prevalence of SIB has ranged from 1.7% to 41%, or 1.7%-23.7% in community studies. There has been little study of remission rate, and incidence has not previously…

  11. [Work-related disability among postal employees: incidence, duration, and social security costs in 2008].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Flávia Alves Neves; Barbosa-Branco, Anadergh

    2014-06-01

    This study analyzed the characteristics of Brazilian postal workers that received sick leave benefits in 2008. The databases were from the Unified Benefits System (SUB) and the National Registry of Social Information (CNIS). The incidence rate was 556.5 benefits per 10,000 employees, and the leading causes of work-related sick leave were injuries, musculoskeletal disorders, and mental disorders. Areas most frequently reported in injuries were knees and legs, wrists and hands, ankles and feet, and shoulders and arms, with higher incidence rates in men. Women were more affected by musculoskeletal disorders and mental disorders. Average sick leave lasted longer in men, and the incidence of benefits increased with age. The States with the highest incidence rates were Mato Grosso do Sul, Goiás, and Santa Catarina, and security benefits averaged BRL 1,847.00. Postal work may involve additional risk of injuries to the limbs, due to the long distances carrying heavy weight, assault, and dog bites.

  12. Childhood brain tumours and use of mobile phones: comparison of a case–control study with incidence data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The first case–control study on mobile phone use and brain tumour risk among children and adolescents (CEFALO study) has recently been published. In a commentary published in Environmental Health, Söderqvist and colleagues argued that CEFALO suggests an increased brain tumour risk in relation to wireless phone use. In this article, we respond and show why consistency checks of case–control study results with observed time trends of incidence rates are essential, given the well described limitations of case–control studies and the steep increase of mobile phone use among children and adolescents during the last decade. There is no plausible explanation of how a notably increased risk from use of wireless phones would correspond to the relatively stable incidence time trends for brain tumours among children and adolescents observed in the Nordic countries. Nevertheless, an increased risk restricted to heavy mobile phone use, to very early life exposure, or to rare subtypes of brain tumours may be compatible with stable incidence trends at this time and thus further monitoring of childhood brain tumour incidence rate time trends is warranted. PMID:22607537

  13. Empowered to Play: A Case Study Describing the Impact of Powered Mobility on the Exploratory Play of Disabled Children.

    PubMed

    Sonday, Amshuda; Gretschel, Pam

    2016-03-01

    Exploratory play is one of the most vital ways in which children learn about their environment and develop. It is well documented that limited mobility restricts a child's ability to engage in their environment through exploratory play. In this study, a qualitative, collective case study design explored the impact of powered mobility on the exploratory play of two children with physical disabilities. Data were collected from the children, their parents and their siblings through participant observation and in-depth, informal interviews. This paper focuses on two themes: Opportunity to Play revealed how powered mobility increased opportunities for the children to become more actively engaged in exploratory play with others across a wider array of contexts, and My Child was Transformed highlighted significant changes in the affect and motivation of each child, which seemed to be linked to their increased internal control over their play choices. The findings suggest that the provision of powered mobility is a key contributor promoting the participation of physically disabled children in exploratory play. Because of undergraduate curricular constraints, a limitation of this study was that data were only confined to 2 months; affecting the depth of data gained that prolonged engagement would have offered. The study recommends for occupational therapy practice that occupational therapists advocate for easier access to powered mobility through governmental and policy means. The study also recommends further research be conducted on the experiences of the caregivers on how these powered mobility devices have influenced their day-to-day occupations.

  14. Motor vehicle driving in high incidence psychiatric disability: comparison of drivers with ADHD, depression, and no known psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Aduen, Paula A; Kofler, Michael J; Cox, Daniel J; Sarver, Dustin E; Lunsford, Erin

    2015-05-01

    Although not often discussed in clinical settings, motor vehicle driving is a complex multitasking endeavor during which a momentary attention lapse can have devastating consequences. Previous research suggests that drivers with high incidence psychiatric disabilities such as ADHD contribute disproportionately to collision rates, which in turn portend myriad adverse social, financial, health, mortality, and legal outcomes. However, self-referral bias and the lack of psychiatric comparison groups constrain the generalizability of these findings. The current study addressed these limitations and examined the unique associations among ADHD, Depression, and adverse driving outcomes, independent of self-selection, driving exposure, and referral bias. The Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP-2) Naturalistic Driving Study comprises U.S. drivers from six sites selected via probability-based sampling. Groups were defined by Barkley ADHD and psychiatric diagnosis questionnaires, and included ADHD (n = 275), Depression (n = 251), and Healthy Control (n = 1828). Primary outcomes included self-reported traffic collisions, moving violations, collision-related injuries, and collision fault (last 3 years). Accounting for demographic differences, ADHD but not Depression portended increased risk for multiple violations (OR = 2.3) and multiple collisions (OR = 2.2). ADHD but not Depression portended increased risk for collision fault (OR = 2.1). Depression but not ADHD predicted increased risk for self-reported injury following collisions (OR = 2.4). ADHD appears uniquely associated with multiple collisions, multiple violations, and collision fault, whereas Depression is uniquely associated with self-reported injury following a collision. Identification of the specific mechanisms underlying this risk will be critical to designing effective interventions to improve long-term functioning for drivers with high incidence psychiatric disability.

  15. “How did that happen?” Public responses to women with mobility disability during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about current societal attitudes toward women with significant mobility disability who are visibly pregnant. Objective To use qualitative descriptive analysis methods to examine perceptions of women with significant mobility disability about how strangers reacted to their visible pregnancies. Methods In late 2013, we conducted 2-h telephone interviews with 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years. The semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol addressed wide-ranging pregnancy-related topics, including statements from strangers. Most participants were recruited through social networks, coming from 17 states nationwide. We used NVivo to sort the texts for content analysis. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years; most were white, well-educated, and higher income, although half had Medicaid during their pregnancies; and 18 used wheeled mobility aids. Eighteen women described memorable interactions with strangers relating to their pregnancies or newborn babies. Strangers’ statements fell into six categories: (1) curious; (2) intrusively and persistently curious; (3) hostile, including concerns that taxpayers would end up supporting the mother and child; (4) questioning woman’s competence as a potential parent; (5) oblivious, not recognizing visible pregnancy or motherhood; and (6) positive. Many women reported strangers asking how their pregnancy had happened. The women doubted that visibly pregnant women without disabilities evoke the same reactions from strangers. Conclusions Women with mobility disability who are visibly pregnant may perceive reactions from strangers that appear intrusive. Planning ahead for handling such encounters could reduce the stresses of these interactions. PMID:25944504

  16. A Qualitative Study of Individual and Peer Factors Related to Effective Nonviolent versus Aggressive Responses to Problem Situations among Adolescents with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Helms, Sarah W.; Bettencourt, Amie F.; Sutherland, Kevin; Lotze, Geri M.; Mays, Sally; Wright, Stephen; Farrell, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    To enhance the positive adjustment of youths with high incidence disabilities, a better understanding of the factors that influence their use of effective responses in challenging situations is needed. In this qualitative study, adolescents described individual and peer factors that would influence their use of effective nonviolent or aggressive…

  17. Interdisciplinary Graduate Program: Rural Early Intervention Specialists for Low Incidence Disabilities (REIS/LID). Final Grant Performance Report [and] REIS/LID Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Center for Community Inclusion.

    This final report describes accomplishments and activities of a 3-year federally funded project of the University of Maine to develop and deliver a graduate Master's degree program in early intervention for infants and young children with low incidence disabilities. A curriculum was designed to prepare professionals to provide culturally relevant,…

  18. The effects of inquiry-based science on the social and communicative skills of students with low-incidence disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Heather Hopkins

    This research utilized inquiry based science as a vehicle to implement and maintain social skills training for secondary students, ages 14 to 20, with low-incidence disabilities in a self-contained classroom. This three year action research study examined the effects of an inquiry based science curriculum on the level and quantity of social skills used by students with one or more of the following challenges: significant learning disability (functioning more than two grade levels below grade level), emotional/social disability, mental retardation, Autism, and/or varying degrees of brain damage. Through the use of video recording, the students in the study were analyzed based on the level of social interaction and the amount of socialization that took place during inquiry based science. The skills sought were based on the social and communication skills earmarked in the students' weekly social skills training class and their Individualized Education Plans (IEP). Based on previous research in social skills training it has been determined that where social skills training is lacking are in the areas of transfer and maintenance of skills. Due to the natural social behavior that must take place in inquiry based science this group of students were found to exhibit gains in (1) quantity of social interactions on topic; (2) developing higher levels of social interactions (sharing, taking other's suggestions, listening and responding appropriately, etc.); and (3) maintenance of social skills taught outside of formal social skills training. These gains were seen overall in the amount of student involvement during inquiry based science verses teacher involvement. Such increases are depicted through students' verbal exchanges, excerpts from field notes, and student reflections. The findings of this research is expected to guide special educators, administrators and directors of curriculum as to how to better create curriculum for this specific population where social skills

  19. Associations Between Fatigue and Disability, Functional Mobility, Depression, and Quality of Life in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Steffani; Gappmaier, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fatigue is a common symptom in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), but its associations with disability, functional mobility, depression, and quality of life (QOL) remain unclear. We aimed to determine the associations between different levels of fatigue and disability, functional mobility, depression, and physical and mental QOL in people with MS. Methods: Eighty-nine individuals with MS (mean [SD] disease duration = 13.6 [9.8] years, mean [SD] Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score = 5.3 [1.5]) and no concurrent relapses were retrospectively analyzed. Participants were divided into two groups based on five-item Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS-5) scores: group LF (n = 32, MFIS-5 score ≤10 [low levels of fatigue]) and group HF (n = 57, MFIS-5 score >10 [high levels of fatigue]). Results: Sixty-four percent of the sample reported high levels of fatigue. Compared with group LF, group HF demonstrated significantly (P < .05) greater impairments in the Timed Up and Go test, Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale, and 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale scores; depression; and QOL but not in the EDSS scores, which were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: Fatigue was found to be a predominant symptom in the study participants. Individuals reporting higher levels of fatigue concomitantly exhibited greater impairments in functional mobility, depression, and physical and mental QOL. Disability was not found to be related to level of fatigue. These findings can be important for appropriate assessment and management of individuals with MS with fatigue. PMID:27134580

  20. Muscle strength and BMI as predictors of major mobility disability in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders pilot (LIFE-P)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle weakness and obesity are two significant threats to mobility facing the increasing number of older adults. To date, there are no studies that have examined the association of strength and body mass index (BMI) on event rates on a widely used performance measure of major mobility disability. T...

  1. Assessment of toxic metal exposure following the Camelford water pollution incident: evidence of acute mobilization of lead into drinking water.

    PubMed

    Powell, J J; Greenfield, S M; Thompson, R P; Cargnello, J A; Kendall, M D; Landsberg, J P; Watt, F; Delves, H T; House, I

    1995-03-01

    Following the incident of acidic pollution of water by aluminium sulfate centred around Camelford in July 1988, we have carried out a retrospective analysis of the mobilization of toxic metals to residents of the area. An advanced nuclear technique was used to measure trace levels of elements within hair, thus, avoiding surface contamination. In contrast to controls, lead, but no other toxic metals, was consistently found within sections of hair that dated to mid-1988 from four residents; they must, therefore, have consumed this metal around the time of the incident. The source of this lead was probably local water pipe residue, and this was found on analysis to have a matrix specific to such soft-water areas that, prior to the incident, had slowly accumulated certain toxic metals such as cadmium and uranium and particularly lead. Lead is mobilized from such residues by acidic water and could, therefore, have heavily contaminated mains water after the incident. However, analyses of residents' plasma and whole blood, and of urine following a lead-chelation test, showed no evidence of either long-term increased body burdens of toxic metals or depletion of essential elements. In addition, we found no evidence of continued poor water quality in the area. In conclusion, during a short period following the pollution, some residents who consumed mains water would have been acutely exposed to lead and other toxic metals. Prediction of the scale of metal exposure to individuals was not possible owing to heterogeneity of the water distribution network, but long-term effects to residents from lead are not anticipated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Mobilizing Disability Experience to Inform Architectural Practice: Lessons Learned from a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeersch, Peter-Willem; Heylighen, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through their bodily interaction with the designed environment, disabled people can detect obstacles and appreciate spatial qualities architects may not be attuned to. While designers in several disciplines acknowledge disabled people as lead or critical users, in architectural practice their embodied experience is hardly recognized as a valuable…

  3. [Effect of working conditions and various social and living factors of the incidence of nervous system diseases with temporary disability among farmers].

    PubMed

    Kuptsov, V V

    1989-01-01

    It is pointed out that working and living conditions have essential impact on the incidence of nervous diseases causing temporary disability among farmers. The above conclusion has great practical significance since the necessity of carrying out a set of measures aimed at the sanitation of working and living conditions of farmers has been scientifically approved in order to reduce work losses due to nervous diseases. PMID:2744550

  4. Trial Development of a Mobile Feeding Assistive Robotic Arm for People with Physical Disabilities of the Extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Hideyuki; Higa, Hiroki; Soken, Takashi; Namihira, Yoshinori

    A mobile feeding assistive robotic arm for people with physical disabilities of the extremities has been developed in this paper. This system is composed of a robotic arm, microcontroller, and its interface. The main unit of the robotic arm can be contained in a laptop computer's briefcase. Its weight is 5kg, including two 12-V lead acid rechargeable batteries. This robotic arm can be also mounted on a wheelchair. To verify performance of the mobile robotic arm system, drinking tea task was experimentally performed by two able-bodied subjects as well as three persons suffering from muscular dystrophy. From the experimental results, it was clear that they could smoothly carry out the drinking task, and that the robotic arm could firmly grasp a commercially available 500-ml plastic bottle. The eating task was also performed by the two able-bodied subjects. The experimental results showed that they could eat porridge by using a spoon without any difficulty.

  5. Built environment attributes related to GPS measured active trips in mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Nancy M.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Carlson, Jordan; Kerr, Jacqueline; Belza, Basia

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding factors which may promote walking in mid-life and older adults with mobility impairments is key given the association between physical activity and positive health outcomes. Objective To examine the relationship between active trips and objective measures of the home neighborhood built environment. Methods Global positioning systems (GPS) data collected on 28 adults age 50+ with mobility disabilities were analyzed for active trips from home. Objective and geographic information systems (GIS) derived measures included Walk Score, population density, street connectivity, crime rates, and slope within the home neighborhood. For this cross-sectional observational study, we conducted mean comparisons between participants who took active trips from home and those who did not for the objective measures. Effect sizes were calculated to assess the magnitude of group differences. Results Nine participants (32%) took active trips from home. Walking in the home neighborhood was significantly associated with GIS derived measures (Walk Score, population density, and street density; effect sizes .9-1.2). Participants who used the home neighborhood for active trips had less slope within 1 km of home but the difference was not significant (73.5 meters±22 vs. 100.8 meters ±38.1, p=.06, d=0.8). There were no statistically significant differences in mean scores for crime rates between those with active trips from home and those without. Conclusions The findings provide preliminary evidence that more walkable environments promote active mobility among mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities. The data suggest that this population can and does use active transportation modes when the built environment is supportive. PMID:25637503

  6. Free Computer-Based Assistive Technology to Support Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in the Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Meyer, Nancy K.; Satsangi, Rajiv; Savage, Melissa N.; Hunley, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Written expression is a neglected but critical component of education; yet, the writing process--from prewriting, to writing, and postwriting--is often an area of struggle for students with disabilities. One strategy to assist students with disabilities struggling with the writing process is the use of computer-based technology. This article…

  7. Increasing Dengue Incidence in Singapore over the Past 40 Years: Population Growth, Climate and Mobility.

    PubMed

    Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In Singapore, the frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemics have increased significantly over the past 40 years. It is important to understand the main drivers for the rapid increase in dengue incidence. We studied the relative contributions of putative drivers for the rise of dengue in Singapore: population growth, climate parameters and international air passenger arrivals from dengue endemic countries, for the time period of 1974 until 2011. We used multivariable Poisson regression models with the following predictors: Annual Population Size; Aedes Premises Index; Mean Annual Temperature; Minimum and Maximum Temperature Recorded in each year; Annual Precipitation and Annual Number of Air Passengers arriving from dengue-endemic South-East Asia to Singapore. The relative risk (RR) of the increase in dengue incidence due to population growth over the study period was 42.7, while the climate variables (mean and minimum temperature) together explained an RR of 7.1 (RR defined as risk at the end of the time period relative to the beginning and goodness of fit associated with the model leading to these estimates assessed by pseudo-R2 equal to 0.83). Estimating the extent of the contribution of these individual factors on the increasing dengue incidence, we found that population growth contributed to 86% while the residual 14% was explained by increase in temperature. We found no correlation with incoming air passenger arrivals into Singapore from dengue endemic countries. Our findings have significant implications for predicting future trends of the dengue epidemics given the rapid urbanization with population growth in many dengue endemic countries. It is time for policy-makers and the scientific community alike to pay more attention to the negative impact of urbanization and urban climate on diseases such as dengue.

  8. Increasing Dengue Incidence in Singapore over the Past 40 Years: Population Growth, Climate and Mobility.

    PubMed

    Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In Singapore, the frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemics have increased significantly over the past 40 years. It is important to understand the main drivers for the rapid increase in dengue incidence. We studied the relative contributions of putative drivers for the rise of dengue in Singapore: population growth, climate parameters and international air passenger arrivals from dengue endemic countries, for the time period of 1974 until 2011. We used multivariable Poisson regression models with the following predictors: Annual Population Size; Aedes Premises Index; Mean Annual Temperature; Minimum and Maximum Temperature Recorded in each year; Annual Precipitation and Annual Number of Air Passengers arriving from dengue-endemic South-East Asia to Singapore. The relative risk (RR) of the increase in dengue incidence due to population growth over the study period was 42.7, while the climate variables (mean and minimum temperature) together explained an RR of 7.1 (RR defined as risk at the end of the time period relative to the beginning and goodness of fit associated with the model leading to these estimates assessed by pseudo-R2 equal to 0.83). Estimating the extent of the contribution of these individual factors on the increasing dengue incidence, we found that population growth contributed to 86% while the residual 14% was explained by increase in temperature. We found no correlation with incoming air passenger arrivals into Singapore from dengue endemic countries. Our findings have significant implications for predicting future trends of the dengue epidemics given the rapid urbanization with population growth in many dengue endemic countries. It is time for policy-makers and the scientific community alike to pay more attention to the negative impact of urbanization and urban climate on diseases such as dengue. PMID:26322517

  9. Increasing Dengue Incidence in Singapore over the Past 40 Years: Population Growth, Climate and Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In Singapore, the frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemics have increased significantly over the past 40 years. It is important to understand the main drivers for the rapid increase in dengue incidence. We studied the relative contributions of putative drivers for the rise of dengue in Singapore: population growth, climate parameters and international air passenger arrivals from dengue endemic countries, for the time period of 1974 until 2011. We used multivariable Poisson regression models with the following predictors: Annual Population Size; Aedes Premises Index; Mean Annual Temperature; Minimum and Maximum Temperature Recorded in each year; Annual Precipitation and Annual Number of Air Passengers arriving from dengue-endemic South-East Asia to Singapore. The relative risk (RR) of the increase in dengue incidence due to population growth over the study period was 42.7, while the climate variables (mean and minimum temperature) together explained an RR of 7.1 (RR defined as risk at the end of the time period relative to the beginning and goodness of fit associated with the model leading to these estimates assessed by pseudo-R2 equal to 0.83). Estimating the extent of the contribution of these individual factors on the increasing dengue incidence, we found that population growth contributed to 86% while the residual 14% was explained by increase in temperature. We found no correlation with incoming air passenger arrivals into Singapore from dengue endemic countries. Our findings have significant implications for predicting future trends of the dengue epidemics given the rapid urbanization with population growth in many dengue endemic countries. It is time for policy-makers and the scientific community alike to pay more attention to the negative impact of urbanization and urban climate on diseases such as dengue. PMID:26322517

  10. Adults with self-reported learning disabilities in Slovenia: findings from the international adult literacy survey on the incidence and correlates of learning disabilities in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Magajna, Lidija; Kavkler, Marija; Ortar-Krizaj, Martina

    2003-11-01

    This study of adults with self-reported learning disabilities (SRLD) in Slovenia is part of a larger secondary analysis of the data from the International Literacy Survey project (IALS). The purpose of the study was to examine the characteristics of 79 (2.68%) individuals who reported experiencing learning disabilities and compare them to the general population on a variety of indicators of educational background, employment status, and reading and writing activities at work and at home. The proficiency scores of the SRLD individuals were lower in all three literacy domains (prose, document and quantitative literacy). In prose literacy 77.9% of SRLD adults performed at Level 1 and only 7.8% reached the level necessary for a modern technological society. Experiencing learning disabilities was not related to gender or age, however, results showed significant differences between the levels achieved by older and younger people with SRLD. In SRLD groups aged 40 years and above, no one achieved more than the second level of literacy in any domain. Learning disabilities were reported more frequently in rural areas. SRLD groups achieve significantly lower educational attainment, and lower employment status, with a preference for manual labour or craft. These findings are of critical importance. SRLD people report that poorer literacy skills are an obstacle to their progression in employment. In the Slovene sample, the SRLD group stands out for low scores in quantitative literacy. Results show that they are less active, pick up information only auditorily or in short written form. They need more frequent help from relatives in literacy activities. Interpretation of the IALS data on SRLD presents many problems. These include amongst others, problems in terminology, different background factors, and the validity of self-report measures. However, the study also raises many interesting challenges for future research and policy. Increasing the availability of support, assistance

  11. Students with Disabilities Experience in Higher Education Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Self-Efficacy, Use of Assistive Technologies and Mobile Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Chandinie Devi Parasram

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this mixed methods study was to explore the online experiences of students with disabilities, with particular focus on students' use of assistive technologies, mobile media and self-efficacy. Using a multifaceted an integrative approach, this study considered a framework of universal design, Scherer's Matching…

  12. A Transdisciplinary Training Program for Providing Seating Positioning and Mobility Intervention to Children with Developmental Disabilities Who Are 0-3 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvester, Lorrie; Shelden, M'Lisa

    The Oklahoma Assistive Technology Center was developed as an interagency collaborative effort, with one of its services being the delivery of positioning and mobility services to young children with developmental disabilities. The Center operates as an outpatient clinic and coordinates outreach services through two satellite centers in rural…

  13. Antihypertensive use and the effect of a physical activity intervention in the prevention of major mobility disability among older adults: The LIFE study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: This subgroup analysis of the Lifestyle Intervention and Independence for Elders trial evaluates the impact of a long-term physical activity (PA) intervention on rates of major mobility disability (MMD) among older adults according to their antihypertensive medication use. METHODS: Lifes...

  14. An Investigation into the Incidence of Obesity and Underweight among Adults with an Intellectual Disability in an Australian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kathleen; McGillivray, Jane; Illingworth, Kaye; Brookhouse, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Reports suggest that 7% to 18% of Australian adults are obese and a further 16% to 55% are overweight. Studies from other countries have indicated that obesity among people with an intellectual disability may be at least, or even more, prevalent. Prevalence rates range from 28% to 59%. The aim of the current study was to investigate the weight…

  15. Correlates of the incidence of disability and mortality among older adult Brazilians with and without diabetes mellitus and stroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The combined effect of diabetes and stroke on disability and mortality remains largely unexplored in Brazil and Latin America. Previous studies have been based primarily on data from developed countries. This study addresses the empirical gap by evaluating the combined impact of diabetes and stroke on disability and mortality in Brazil. Methods The sample was drawn from two waves of the Survey on Health and Well-being of the Elderly, which followed 2,143 older adults in São Paulo, Brazil, from 2000 to 2006. Disability was assessed via measures of activities of daily living (ADL) limitations, severe ADL limitations, and receiving assistance to perform these activities. Logistic and multinomial regression models controlling for sociodemographic and health conditions were used to address the influence of diabetes and stroke on disability and mortality. Results By itself, the presence of diabetes did not increase the risk of disability or the need for assistance; however, diabetes was related to increased risks when assessed in combination with stroke. After controlling for demographic, social and health conditions, individuals who had experienced stroke but not diabetes were 3.4 times more likely to have ADL limitations than those with neither condition (95% CI 2.26-5.04). This elevated risk more than doubled for those suffering from a combination of diabetes and stroke (OR 7.34, 95% CI 3.73-14.46). Similar effects from the combination of diabetes and stroke were observed for severe ADL limitations (OR 19.75, 95% CI 9.81- 39.76) and receiving ADL assistance (OR 16.57, 95% CI 8.39-32.73). Over time, older adults who had experienced a stroke were at higher risk of remaining disabled (RRR 4.28, 95% CI 1.53,11.95) and of mortality (RRR 3.42, 95% CI 1.65,7.09). However, risks were even higher for those who had experienced both diabetes and stroke. Diabetes was associated with higher mortality. Conclusions Findings indicate that a combined history of stroke and

  16. Mobility Device Use Among Older Adults and Incidence of Falls and Worry About Falling: Findings From the 2011–2012 National Health and Aging Trends Study

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Nancy M.; Wallace, Robert B.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Mroz, Tracy M.; Patel, Kushang V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine mobility device use prevalence among community-dwelling older adults in the U.S. and to investigate the incidence of falls and worry about falling by the type and number of mobility devices used. DESIGN Analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the 2011–2012 National Health and Aging Trends Study SETTING In-person interviews in the homes of study participants PARTICIPANTS Nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries(N=7609). MEASUREMENTS Participants were asked about mobility device use (e.g., canes, walkers, wheelchairs and scooters) in the last month, one-year fall history and worry about falling. RESULTS Twenty-four percent of adults age ≥65 reported mobility device use in 2011 and 9.3% reported using multiple devices within the last month. Mobility device use increased with advancing age and was associated with non-White race/ethnicity, female sex, lower education level, greater multi-morbidity, and obesity (all P-values < 0.001). Adjusting for demographic, health characteristics, and physical function, the incidence of falls and recurrent falls were not associated with the use of multiple devices or any one particular type of mobility device. Activity-limiting worry about falling was significantly higher in cane-only users, compared with non-users. CONCLUSION The percentage of older adults reporting mobility device use is higher compared to results from previous national surveys and multiple device use is common among those who use any device. Mobility device use is not associated with increased incidence of falls compared to non-device users. Cane-only users may compensate for worry about falling by limiting activity. PMID:25953070

  17. Overlapping Chat's Accessibility Requirements between Students with and without Disabilities Due to the Mobile Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Rocío; Iglesias, Ana; Moreno, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The use of Chats has been extended to mobile-learning (m-learning) environments in the last decade. Students and teachers can communicate in real time and they do not need waiting till their next tutoring date to solve their problems and doubts. However, Chats have many accessibility barriers and many students cannot use this collaborative tool.…

  18. Graph Theory Analysis of Functional Brain Networks and Mobility Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Jonathan H.; Morgan, Ashley R.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Laurienti, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The brain’s structural integrity is associated with mobility function in older adults. Changes in function may be evident earlier than changes in structure and may be more directly related to mobility. Therefore, we assessed whether functional brain networks varied with mobility function in older adults. Methods. Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging were collected on 24 young (mean age = 26.4±5.1) and 48 older (mean age = 72.04±5.1) participants. Older participants were divided into three groups by SPPB score: Low SPPB (score = 7–9), Mid SPPB (score = 10), High SPPB (score = 11–12).Graph theory–based methods were used to characterize and compare brain network organization. Results. Connectivity in the somatomotor cortex distinguished between groups based on SPPB score. The community structure of the somatomotor cortex was significantly less consistent in the Low SPPB group (mean = 0.097±0.05) compared with Young (mean = 0.163±0.09, p = .03) SPPB group. Striking differences were evident in second-order connections between somatomotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus and insula that reached statistical significance. The Low SPPB group (mean = 140.87±109.30) had a significantly higher number of connections than Young (mean = 45.05±33.79, p = .0003) or High (mean = 49.61±35.31, p = .002) SPPB group. Conclusions. Older adults with poorer mobility function exhibited reduced consistency of somatomotor community structure and a greater number of secondary connections with vestibular and multisensory regions of the brain. Further study is needed to fully interpret these effects, but analysis of functional brain networks adds new insights to the contribution of the brain to mobility. PMID:24717331

  19. Time trend in incidence of malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system in relation to mobile phone use among young people in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuto; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Kojimahara, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether incidence of malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system from 1993 to 2010 has increased among young people in Japan, and whether the increase could be explained by increase in mobile phone use. Joinpoint regression analysis of incidence data was performed. Subsequently, the expected incidence rate was calculated assuming that the relative risk was 1.4 for those who used mobile phones more than 1640 h cumulatively. Annual percent change was 3.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-6.3) for men in their 20s from 1993 to 2010, 12.3% (95% CI, 3.3-22.1) for women in their 20s from 2002 to 2010, 2.7% (95% CI, 1.3-4.1) for men in their 30s from 1993 to 2010, and 3.0% (95% CI, 1.4-4.7) for women in their 30s from 1993 to 2010. Change in incidence rates from 1993 to 2010 was 0.92 per 100,000 people for men in their 20s, 0.83 for women in their 20s, 0.89 for men in their 30s, and 0.74 for women in their 30s. Change in expected incidence rates from 1993 to 2010 was 0.08 per 100,000 people for men in their 20s, 0.03 for women in their 20s, 0.15 for men in their 30s, and 0.05 for women in their 30s. Patterns in sex-, age-, and period-specific incidence increases are inconsistent with sex-, age-, and period-specific prevalence trends, suggesting the overall incidence increase cannot be explained by heavy mobile phone use. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:282-289, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27197787

  20. Functional disability and compromised mobility among older women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Hanissian, Paul D.; Strohbehn, Kris; Bynum, Julie P.W.; Fried, Terri R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine the prevalence of functional disability among older women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2005-06 National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP). Daily UI was defined as answering “daily” to the question, “How frequently...have you had difficulty controlling your bladder, including leaking small amounts of urine, leaking when you cough or sneeze, or not being able to make it to the bathroom on time?” We then explored functional status. Women were asked about seven basic activities of daily living (ADLs). Statistical analyses with percentage estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. Logistic regression was performed to assess the association between functional status and daily UI. Results In total, 1,412 women were included in our analysis. Daily UI was reported by 177 (12.5%) women. Functional dependence or disability with any ADLs was reported in 62.1% (95% CI 54.2%, 70.1%) of women with daily UI. Among women with daily UI, 23.6% (95% CI 16.8%, 30.5%) reported specific difficulty or dependence with using the toilet signifying functional limitations which may contribute to urine leakage. After adjusting for age category, race/ethnicity, education level, and parity, women with daily UI had 3.31 increased odds of functional difficulty or dependence compared with continent older women. Conclusion Over 60% of older women with daily UI reported functional difficulty or dependence and 1/4 of women with daily UI specifically reported difficulty or dependence with using the toilet. PMID:25185600

  1. Incidence of ADL Disability in Older Persons, Physical Activities as a Protective Factor and the Need for Informal and Formal Care – Results from the SNAC-N Project

    PubMed Central

    Sjölund, Britt-Marie; Wimo, Anders; Engström, Maria; von Strauss, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine 1) the incidence of disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL), in persons 78 years and older 2) explore whether being physical active earlier is a significant predictor of being disability free at follow-up and 3) describe the amount of informal and formal care in relation to ADL-disability. Methods Data were used from a longitudinal community-based study in Nordanstig (SNAC-N), a part of the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC). To study objectives 1) and 2) all ADL-independent participants at baseline (N = 307) were included; for objective 3) all participants 78 years and older were included (N = 316). Data were collected at baseline and at 3- and 6-year follow-ups. ADL-disability was defined as a need for assistance in one or more activities. Informal and formal care were measured using the Resource utilization in Dementia (RUD)-instrument. Results The incidence rates for men were similar in the age groups 78-81and 84 years and older, 42.3 vs. 42.5/1000 person-years. For women the incidence rate for ADL-disability increased significantly from the age group 78–81 to the age group 84 years and older, 20.8 vs.118.3/1000 person-years. In the age group 78–81 years, being physically active earlier (aOR 6.2) and during the past 12 month (aOR 2.9) were both significant preventive factors for ADL-disability. Both informal and formal care increased with ADL-disability and the amount of informal care was greater than formal care. The incidence rate for ADL-disability increases with age for women and being physically active is a protective factor for ADL-disability. Conclusion The incidence rate for ADL-disability increases with age for women, and being physical active is a protective factor for ADL-disability. PMID:26407207

  2. Incidence of oral health in paediatric patients with disabilities: Sensory disorders and autism spectrum disorder. Systematic review II

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomé-Villar, Begona; Diéguez-Pérez, Montserrat; de Nova-García, Manuel-Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We are currently witnessing an increase in the number of disabled patients, creating the need for knowledge of each of the pathologies and of the different oral and dental conditions they present, in order to achieve efficient management and treatment. Objectives To analyse the existing scientific literature on the oral conditions of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children with sensory deficits (SD), in comparison with the healthy child population. Material and Methods The bibliographic search was carried out in Pubmed/Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library and included articles taking a sample of children between 0 and 18 years of age diagnosed with the abovementioned disorders and including at least one of the following oral hygiene conditions - oral hygiene, dental caries, malocclusion, oral habits, dental trauma, and gingival-periodontal status - comparing them with a healthy population. Results A total of 10 articles were obtained for autism spectrum disorder and six for sensory deficits. Conclusions Of all the variables studied, only the state of oral, gingival and/or periodontal hygiene can be considered worse in patients with ASD and SD, although we believe a larger number of research studies is needed to corroborate these results. Key words:Oral health, dental caries, malocclusion, oral habits, dental trauma, oral hygiene, disabled child, autism, autism spectrum disorder, deaf, blind. PMID:27398188

  3. Impacts of mobility disability and high and increasing body mass index on health-related quality of life and participation in society: a population-based cohort study from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing obesity in adults with mobility disability has become a considerable health problem, similar to the increasing trend of obesity in the general population. The aims of this study were to investigate the association of mobility disability with overweight status and obesity in a large population-based Swedish cohort of adults, and to investigate whether mobility disability, high body mass index (BMI), and increasing BMI over time are predictors of health-related quality of life and participation in society after 8 years of follow-up. Methods The study cohort included 13,549 individuals aged 18–64 years who answered questions about mobility disability, weight, height, health-related quality of life and participation in society in the Stockholm Public Health Survey 2002 and 2010. The cohort was randomly selected from the population of Stockholm County, and divided into six subgroups based on data for mobility disability and overweight status. Multiple binary logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the likelihood for low health-related quality of life and lack of participation. Results Respondents with mobility disability had a higher mean BMI than those without mobility disability. Respondents both with and without mobility disability increased in BMI, but with no significant difference in the longitudinal changes (mean difference: 0.078; 95% CI: -0.16 - 0.32). Presence of mobility disability increased the risk of low health-related quality of life and lack of participation in 2010, irrespective of low health-related quality of life and lack of participation in 2002. The risk of pain and low general health (parts of health-related quality of life) increased for every 5 units of higher BMI reported in 2010. In respondents without low general health at baseline, the risk of obtaining low general health increased for every 5 units of higher BMI in 2010 (OR:1.60; CI: 1.47 - 1.74). Conclusions The greatest risk of low general health

  4. Positive and Negative Effects of Finance-based Social Capital on Incident Functional Disability and Mortality: An 8-year Prospective Study of Elderly Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Naoki; Suzuki, Kohta; Minai, Junko; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2012-01-01

    Background Rotating savings and credit associations (ROSCAs) involve group financial self-help activities. These voluntary financial cooperative associations—mujin in Japanese—are found in some rural areas of Japan. Cross-sectional evidence suggests that active participation in mujin correlates with rich social capital and better functional capacities among older adults. However, the effect of mujin on subsequent health outcomes is unknown. Methods In 2003, we conducted a baseline interview survey of 583 functionally independent adults randomly selected from Yamanashi Prefecture residents aged 65 years or older. They were followed up until 2011. We used proportional hazards models, and factor analysis of 8 mujin-related questions identified 2 components: the “intensity and attitude” and “financing” aspects of mujin. Results The hazard ratios (HRs) for incident functional disability—identified by using the public long-term care insurance database—per 1-SD increase in factor scores were 0.82 (95% CI: 0.68–0.99) for the intensity and attitude score and 1.21 (1.07–1.38) for financing score. Adjustments for age, sex, marital status, household composition, physical health, education, income, and other factor scores only slightly attenuated these HRs. The results for mortality models were very similar to those for incident functional disability. Conclusions ROSCA-type activities in Japan could have beneficial effects on the health of older adults if used primarily for the purpose of friendship. Mujin for aggressively financial purposes might be somewhat harmful, as such activities might reflect the “dark side” of social capital, ie, overly demanding expectations of group conformity. PMID:23117222

  5. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  6. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  7. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  8. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  9. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE – Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ≥ 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke

  10. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE - Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ≥ 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke

  11. Mobile Applications for Participation at the Shopping Mall: Content Analysis and Usability for Persons with Physical Disabilities and Communication or Cognitive Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labbé, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppée; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team’s and users’ comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  12. The global burden of injury: incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years and time trends from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013

    PubMed Central

    Haagsma, Juanita A; Graetz, Nicholas; Bolliger, Ian; Naghavi, Mohsen; Higashi, Hideki; Mullany, Erin C; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abraham, Jerry Puthenpurakal; Adofo, Koranteng; Alsharif, Ubai; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Ammar, Walid; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T; Barrero, Lope H; Bekele, Tolesa; Bose, Dipan; Brazinova, Alexandra; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Dandona, Lalit; Dandona, Rakhi; Dargan, Paul I; De Leo, Diego; Degenhardt, Louisa; Derrett, Sarah; Dharmaratne, Samath D; Driscoll, Tim R; Duan, Leilei; Petrovich Ermakov, Sergey; Farzadfar, Farshad; Feigin, Valery L; Gabbe, Belinda; Gosselin, Richard A; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi; Hijar, Martha; Hu, Guoqing; Jayaraman, Sudha P; Jiang, Guohong; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khan, Ejaz Ahmad; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Chanda; Lecky, Fiona E; Leung, Ricky; Lunevicius, Raimundas; Lyons, Ronan Anthony; Majdan, Marek; Mason-Jones, Amanda J; Matzopoulos, Richard; Meaney, Peter A; Mekonnen, Wubegzier; Miller, Ted R; Mock, Charles N; Norman, Rosana E; Polinder, Suzanne; Pourmalek, Farshad; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Refaat, Amany; Rojas-Rueda, David; Roy, Nobhojit; Schwebel, David C; Shaheen, Amira; Shahraz, Saeid; Skirbekk, Vegard; Søreide, Kjetil; Soshnikov, Sergey; Stein, Dan J; Sykes, Bryan L; Tabb, Karen M; Temesgen, Awoke Misganaw; Tenkorang, Eric Yeboah; Theadom, Alice M; Tran, Bach Xuan; Vasankari, Tommi J; Vavilala, Monica S; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Yip, Paul; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Younis, Mustafa Z; Yu, Chuanhua; Murray, Christopher J L; Vos, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Background The Global Burden of Diseases (GBD), Injuries, and Risk Factors study used the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) to quantify the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors. This paper provides an overview of injury estimates from the 2013 update of GBD, with detailed information on incidence, mortality, DALYs and rates of change from 1990 to 2013 for 26 causes of injury, globally, by region and by country. Methods Injury mortality was estimated using the extensive GBD mortality database, corrections for ill-defined cause of death and the cause of death ensemble modelling tool. Morbidity estimation was based on inpatient and outpatient data sets, 26 cause-of-injury and 47 nature-of-injury categories, and seven follow-up studies with patient-reported long-term outcome measures. Results In 2013, 973 million (uncertainty interval (UI) 942 to 993) people sustained injuries that warranted some type of healthcare and 4.8 million (UI 4.5 to 5.1) people died from injuries. Between 1990 and 2013 the global age-standardised injury DALY rate decreased by 31% (UI 26% to 35%). The rate of decline in DALY rates was significant for 22 cause-of-injury categories, including all the major injuries. Conclusions Injuries continue to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed and developing world. The decline in rates for almost all injuries is so prominent that it warrants a general statement that the world is becoming a safer place to live in. However, the patterns vary widely by cause, age, sex, region and time and there are still large improvements that need to be made. PMID:26635210

  13. Defining a Technology Research Agenda for Elementary and Secondary Students with Learning and Other High-Incidence Disabilities in Inclusive Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Matthew T.

    2010-01-01

    Increased numbers of elementary and secondary students with learning and other disabilities are participating in inclusive science classrooms. Unfortunately, many of these students struggle to achieve at a level commensurate with their peers. As a result, few students with disabilities pursue advanced scientific coursework or enter science,…

  14. The Efficacy of an Interactive Hypermedia Program for Teaching a Test-Taking Strategy to Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Paula E.; Lancaster, Sean J. C.; Schumaker, Jean B.; Deshler, Donald D.

    2006-01-01

    Increased demand for accountability in the public schools has led to an increase in the number of testing situations for all students, including students with disabilities. The purpose of this project was to develop and validate an interactive hypermedia (IH) program to teach a test-taking strategy to secondary-level students with disabilities.…

  15. Burden of Six Healthcare-Associated Infections on European Population Health: Estimating Incidence-Based Disability-Adjusted Life Years through a Population Prevalence-Based Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Eckmanns, Tim; Abu Sin, Muna; Ducomble, Tanja; Harder, Thomas; Sixtensson, Madlen; Velasco, Edward; Weiß, Bettina; Kramarz, Piotr; Monnet, Dominique L.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E.; Suetens, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating the burden of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) compared to other communicable diseases is an ongoing challenge given the need for good quality data on the incidence of these infections and the involved comorbidities. Based on the methodology of the Burden of Communicable Diseases in Europe (BCoDE) project and 2011–2012 data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) point prevalence survey (PPS) of HAIs and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals, we estimated the burden of six common HAIs. Methods and Findings The included HAIs were healthcare-associated pneumonia (HAP), healthcare-associated urinary tract infection (HA UTI), surgical site infection (SSI), healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection (HA CDI), healthcare-associated neonatal sepsis, and healthcare-associated primary bloodstream infection (HA primary BSI). The burden of these HAIs was measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Evidence relating to the disease progression pathway of each type of HAI was collected through systematic literature reviews, in order to estimate the risks attributable to HAIs. For each of the six HAIs, gender and age group prevalence from the ECDC PPS was converted into incidence rates by applying the Rhame and Sudderth formula. We adjusted for reduced life expectancy within the hospital population using three severity groups based on McCabe score data from the ECDC PPS. We estimated that 2,609,911 new cases of HAI occur every year in the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA). The cumulative burden of the six HAIs was estimated at 501 DALYs per 100,000 general population each year in EU/EEA. HAP and HA primary BSI were associated with the highest burden and represented more than 60% of the total burden, with 169 and 145 DALYs per 100,000 total population, respectively. HA UTI, SSI, HA CDI, and HA primary BSI ranked as the third to sixth syndromes in terms of burden of disease

  16. Laying the foundation for Connect to Protect: a multi-site community mobilization intervention to reduce HIV/AIDS incidence and prevalence among urban youth.

    PubMed

    Ziff, Mauri A; Harper, Gary W; Chutuape, Kate S; Deeds, Bethany Griffin; Futterman, Donna; Francisco, Vincent T; Muenz, Larry R; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2006-05-01

    Despite the considerable resources that have been dedicated to HIV prevention interventions and services over the past decade, HIV incidence among young people in the United States remains alarmingly high. One reason is that the majority of prevention efforts continue to focus solely on modifying individual behavior, even though public health research strongly suggests that changes to a community's structural elements, such as their programs, practices, and laws or policies, may result in more effective and sustainable outcomes. Connect to Protect is a multi-city community mobilization intervention that focuses on altering or creating community structural elements in ways that will ultimately reduce youth HIV incidence and prevalence. The project, which spans 6 years, is sponsored by the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions at multiple urban clinical research sites. This paper provides an overview of the study's three phases and describes key factors in setting a firm foundation for the initiation and execution of this type of undertaking. Connect to Protect's community mobilization approach to achieving structural change represents a relatively new and broad direction in HIV prevention research. To optimize opportunities for its success, time and resources must be initially placed into laying the groundwork. This includes activities such as building a strong overarching study infrastructure to ensure protocol tasks can be met across sites; tapping into local site and community expertise and knowledge; forming collaborative relationships between sites and community organizations and members; and fostering community input on and support for changes at a structural level. Failing to take steps such as these may lead to insurmountable implementation problems for an intervention of this kind. PMID:16739051

  17. Laying the Foundation for Connect to Protect®: A Multi-Site Community Mobilization Intervention to Reduce HIV/AIDS Incidence and Prevalence among Urban Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ziff, Mauri A.; Harper, Gary W.; Chutuape, Kate S.; Deeds, Bethany Griffin; Futterman, Donna; Francisco, Vincent T.; Muenz, Larry R.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the considerable resources that have been dedicated to HIV prevention interventions and services over the past decade, HIV incidence among young people in the United States remains alarmingly high. One reason is that the majority of prevention efforts continue to focus solely on modifying individual behavior, even though public health research strongly suggests that changes to a community's structural elements, such as their programs, practices, and laws or policies, may result in more effective and sustainable outcomes. Connect to Protect is a multi-city community mobilization intervention that focuses on altering or creating community structural elements in ways that will ultimately reduce youth HIV incidence and prevalence. The project, which spans 6 years, is sponsored by the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions at multiple urban clinical research sites. This paper provides an overview of the study's three phases and describes key factors in setting a firm foundation for the initiation and execution of this type of undertaking. Connect to Protect's community mobilization approach to achieving structural change represents a relatively new and broad direction in HIV prevention research. To optimize opportunities for its success, time and resources must be initially placed into laying the groundwork. This includes activities such as building a strong overarching study infrastructure to ensure protocol tasks can be met across sites; tapping into local site and community expertise and knowledge; forming collaborative relationships between sites and community organizations and members; and fostering community input on and support for changes at a structural level. Failing to take steps such as these may lead to insurmountable implementation problems for an intervention of this kind. PMID:16739051

  18. Democratizing Neurorehabilitation: How Accessible are Low-Cost Mobile-Gaming Technologies for Self-Rehabilitation of Arm Disability in Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Rinne, Paul; Mace, Michael; Nakornchai, Tagore; Zimmerman, Karl; Fayer, Susannah; Sharma, Pankaj; Liardon, Jean-Luc; Burdet, Etienne; Bentley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Motor-training software on tablets or smartphones (Apps) offer a low-cost, widely-available solution to supplement arm physiotherapy after stroke. We assessed the proportions of hemiplegic stroke patients who, with their plegic hand, could meaningfully engage with mobile-gaming devices using a range of standard control-methods, as well as by using a novel wireless grip-controller, adapted for neurodisability. We screened all newly-diagnosed hemiplegic stroke patients presenting to a stroke centre over 6 months. Subjects were compared on their ability to control a tablet or smartphone cursor using: finger-swipe, tap, joystick, screen-tilt, and an adapted handgrip. Cursor control was graded as: no movement (0); less than full-range movement (1); full-range movement (2); directed movement (3). In total, we screened 345 patients, of which 87 satisfied recruitment criteria and completed testing. The commonest reason for exclusion was cognitive impairment. Using conventional controls, the proportion of patients able to direct cursor movement was 38–48%; and to move it full-range was 55–67% (controller comparison: p>0.1). By comparison, handgrip enabled directed control in 75%, and full-range movement in 93% (controller comparison: p<0.001). This difference between controllers was most apparent amongst severely-disabled subjects, with 0% achieving directed or full-range control with conventional controls, compared to 58% and 83% achieving these two levels of movement, respectively, with handgrip. In conclusion, hand, or arm, training Apps played on conventional mobile devices are likely to be accessible only to mildly-disabled stroke patients. Technological adaptations such as grip-control can enable more severely affected subjects to engage with self-training software. PMID:27706248

  19. Orientation and Mobility with Persons Who Are Deaf-Blind: An Initial Examination of Single-Subject Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.

    2009-01-01

    Persons who are deaf-blind represent a heterogeneous, low-incidence population of children and adults who, at some point in life, regardless of the presence of additional disabilities, may benefit from formal orientation and mobility (O&M) instruction. Current national policies, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, which emphasize that…

  20. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Findings Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable

  1. Association among measures of mobility-related disability and self-perceived fatigue among older people: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Wuber J. S.; Lima, Camila A.; Bilton, Tereza L.; Ferrioli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosângela C.; Perracini, Monica R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between self-perceived fatigue with different physical functioning tests and functional performance scales used for evaluating mobility-related disability among community-dwelling older persons. Method: This is a cross-sectional, population-based study. The sample was composed of older persons with 65 years of age or more living in Cuiabá, MT, and Barueri, SP, Brazil. The data for this study is from the FIBRA Network Study. The presence of self-perceived fatigue was assessed using self-reports based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. The Lawton instrumental activities of daily living scale (IADL) and the advanced activities of daily living scale (AADL) were used to assess performance and participation restriction. The following physical functioning tests were used: five-step test (FST), the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and usual gait speed (UGS). Three models of logistic regression analysis were conducted, and a significance level of α<0.05 was adopted. Results: The sample was composed of 776 older adults with a mean age (SD) of 71.9 (5.9) years, of whom the majority were women (74%). The prevalence of self-perceived fatigue within the participants was 20%. After adjusting for covariates, SPPB, UGS, IADL, and AADL remained associated with self-perceived fatigue in the final multivariate regression model. Conclusion: Our results suggest that there is an association between self-perceived fatigue and lower extremity function, usual gait speed and activity limitation and participation restriction in older adults. Further cohort studies are needed to investigate which physical performance measure may be able to predict the negative impact of fatigue in older adults. PMID:26039035

  2. Understanding and Reducing Disability in Older Adults Following Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Brummel, N.E.; Balas, M.C.; Morandi, A.; Ferrante, L.E.; Gill, T.M.; Ely, E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review how disability can develop in older adults with critical illness and to explore ways to reduce long-term disability following critical illness. Data Sources Review of the literature describing post-critical illness disability in older adults and expert opinion. Results We identified 19 studies evaluating disability outcomes in critically ill patients age 65 years and older. Newly acquired disability in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living and mobility activities was commonplace among older adults who survived a critical illness. Incident dementia and less-severe cognitive impairment was also highly prevalent. Factors related to the acute critical illness, intensive care unit practices such as heavy sedation, physical restraints and immobility as well as aging physiology and coexisting geriatric conditions can combine to result in these poor outcomes. Conclusion Older adults who survive critical illness suffer physical and cognitive declines resulting in disability at greater rates than hospitalized, non-critically ill and community dwelling older adults. Interventions derived from widely available geriatric care models in use outside of the ICU, which address modifiable risk factors including immobility and delirium, are associated with improved functional and cognitive outcomes and can be used to complement ICU-focused models such as the ABCDEs. PMID:25756418

  3. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered mobility... individuals with mobility disabilities in any areas open to pedestrian use. (b)(1) As A PVO subject to Title... permit the use of other power-driven mobility devices by individuals with mobility disabilities,...

  4. Disability in activities of daily living: patterns of change and a hierarchy of disability.

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, D D; Hughes, S L; Manheim, L M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper examines longitudinal data over 6 years to evaluate incidence rates of disability and the pattern of dependency in activities of daily living. METHODS: The Longitudinal Study of Aging (n = 5151) was used to evaluate incidence of disability in activities of daily living; biennial interview data from 1984 through 1990 were used. The median age to disability onset for individual activities was estimated from survival analysis. A prevalent ordering of incident disability was identified from patterns of disability onset within individuals. RESULTS: The progression of incident disability among the elderly supported by longitudinal data, based on both the ordering of median ages to disability onset and patterns of incident disability, was as follows: walking, bathing, transferring, dressing, toileting, feeding. Gender differences were found in disability incidence rates. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a mathematical picture of physical functioning as people age. These findings, based on longitudinal data, indicate a different hierarchical structure of disability than found in previous reports using cross-sectional data. Furthermore, the study documents gender differences in incident impairment, which indicate that although women outlive men, they spend more time in a disabled state. PMID:9096537

  5. Disability Identity--Disability Pride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a way of thinking about disability which has emerged out of the UK Disabled People's Movement over the last three decades in opposition to the preceding medical model of disability which viewed disability as synonymous with problem. Disabled people are increasingly challenging the notion that their embodiment is inherently…

  6. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Learning Disabilities Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Learning Disabilities? Learning disabilities are disorders that affect the ability ...

  7. Learning Disability Subtypes in Children with Neurofibromatosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Vickie R.; Moore, Bartlett D., III; Hiscock, Merrill

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the incidence of learning disabilities in 105 children (ages 6-18) with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1). Results found that nearly 70% of the subjects were academically deficient and 42% met the criteria for learning disabilities. A low incidence of visuospatial-constructional deficits was also found. (Author/CR)

  8. Improving mobility and reducing disability in older people through early high-dose vitamin d replacement following hip fracture: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial and economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mak, Jenson C S; Mason, Rebecca; Klein, Linda; Cameron, Ian D

    2011-05-01

    Hypovitaminosis D is particularly common among older people with a proximal femoral (hip) fracture and has been linked with poorer lower extremity functioning, falls, and fractures. There is evidence that disability severity and fall rates may be reduced by adequate vitamin D replacement. However, the ideal regimen for vitamin D administration to have these benefits in older people who have been in the hospital has not been established. This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effects of an oral vitamin D loading dose with maintenance oral vitamin D and calcium on lower extremity function (gait velocity), correction of hypovitaminosis D, falls, and fractures among older people after hip fracture surgery. The cost-effectiveness of the REVITAHIP program from the health and community service provider's perspective will also be established, as will predictors of adherence with the treatment. A total of 450 older people who have recently had a hip fracture requiring surgical intervention will be screened to achieve 250 participants for the study. Participants will have no medical contraindications to vitamin D replacement. The primary outcome measure will be mobility-related disability as measured with the 2.4-m gait velocity test. Secondary measures will be 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels at 2, 4, and 26 weeks, number of falls and fractures, and additional measures of mobility, disability, quality of life, health system and community-service contact, adherence to the intervention, and adverse events. After surgical fixation and being deemed medically stable, participants will be randomly allocated to an intervention or placebo-control group. Participants of the intervention group will receive initial oral 250 000 IU (5 × 50 000 IU) vitamin D3 tablets. Both groups will receive oral maintenance vitamin D3 and calcium and will follow the usual hip fracture rehabilitation pathway. The study will determine the impact of a vitamin D loading dose on mobility

  9. A Report on the Maltreatment of Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosse, Scott B.; And Others

    This report summarizes available information on the incidence of child abuse among children with disabilities, relationships between child abuse and disability, and the incidence of disabilities resulting from child abuse or neglect. Much of the information in the report comes from data collected on 1,249 substantiated cases of maltreatment…

  10. Declines in Mobility and Changes in Performance in the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Among Mildly Disabled Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bear-Lehman, Jane; Anderson, Stewart J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Gait speed is as an important predictor of mortality, volume of medical care, hospitalization, onset of activities of daily living (ADL) disability, and nursing home placement. We examined associations between change in gait speed and change in observed performance in the instrumental ADL (IADL) in a sample of mild-to-moderately disabled older adults. Methods. Participants in the Sources of Independence in the Elderly project (n = 375) were approached to complete a 4-m gait assessment and a performance test of IADL competency at three points over 2 years. IADL competency was assessed by occupational therapists, who rated participants using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) and who also made a global rating of need for help or supervision. Linear mixed models were developed to assess change in motor AMPS score relative to baseline status and change in gait speed and AMPS process scores. Results. Baseline gait and change in gait were significant correlates of change in the AMPS motor ability measures in models that adjusted for cognitive status and AMPS process ability. Even respondents with gait speeds of 1 m/s at baseline were at risk of declining AMPS motor ability and an occupational therapist rating of IADL disability if gait speed declined. Conclusions. Slowing in gait speed is an important risk factor for IADL disability in mild to moderately disabled older adults. PMID:24952575

  11. Studies on deaf mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    The deaf normally considered to be disabled that do not need any mobile technology due to the inabilities of hearing and talking. However, many deaf are using mobile phone in their daily life for various purposes such as communication and learning. Many studies have attempted to identify the need of deaf people in mobile application and level of usage of the applications. This study aims in studying the recent research conducted on deaf mobile application to understand the level of importance of mobile technology for this disabled community. This paper enable identification of studies conducted are limited and the need of more research done of this disabled people to ensure their privilege of using mobile technology and its application, which leads to the identification of deaf user requirement for mobile application as future study.

  12. Incidence of mental retardation as compared with other psychiatric disorders and necessary support to persons placed at the Public Institution for Placement of Persons with Mental Disabilities "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Bjelošević, Edin; Karahmet, Amar; Hadžikapetanović, Halima; Bjelošević, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    Aim To compare the frequency of mental retardation with other psychiatric disorders at the Institute for Mentally Disabled Persons "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, to asses psychosocial condition and necessary support to persons with mental retardation. Methods In this retrospective, descriptive and epidemiologic study neuropsychiatric findings and reports of the Institute's social services of 527 residents (beneficiaries) were analyzed in the period 2013-2014 (age, gender, mobility, years of life spent in the Institute, visits of family members and close relatives, visits to families, mental retardation - degree, required support). Results The research included 213 (40.42%) women and 314 (59.58%) men. The average age was 39.64 years. The average number of years spent in the Institute was 10.42.Fifty-four 25.47%) examinees with mental retardation had occasional visits to their families, while 69 (32.54%) had regular visits. Thirty-four (16.04%) examinees had mild mental retardation, 70 (33.02%) had moderate retardation, 52 (24.52%) were with severe, and 56(26.42%) with profound retardation. It was found that 66 (31.13%)beneficiaries with the diagnosis of mental retardation completely depended on other persons. Conclusion The degree of mental retardation has a direct impact on the process of resocialization. A very small number of people diagnosed with mental retardation had been successfully involved in the process of resocialization. It is necessary work intensively on thecreation of conditions for the realization of the Independent Living Support program, thus making a step forward to deinstitutionalization. PMID:27313109

  13. Incidence of mental retardation as compared with other psychiatric disorders and necessary support to persons placed at the Public Institution for Placement of Persons with Mental Disabilities "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Bjelošević, Edin; Karahmet, Amar; Hadžikapetanović, Halima; Bjelošević, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    Aim To compare the frequency of mental retardation with other psychiatric disorders at the Institute for Mentally Disabled Persons "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, to asses psychosocial condition and necessary support to persons with mental retardation. Methods In this retrospective, descriptive and epidemiologic study neuropsychiatric findings and reports of the Institute's social services of 527 residents (beneficiaries) were analyzed in the period 2013-2014 (age, gender, mobility, years of life spent in the Institute, visits of family members and close relatives, visits to families, mental retardation - degree, required support). Results The research included 213 (40.42%) women and 314 (59.58%) men. The average age was 39.64 years. The average number of years spent in the Institute was 10.42.Fifty-four 25.47%) examinees with mental retardation had occasional visits to their families, while 69 (32.54%) had regular visits. Thirty-four (16.04%) examinees had mild mental retardation, 70 (33.02%) had moderate retardation, 52 (24.52%) were with severe, and 56(26.42%) with profound retardation. It was found that 66 (31.13%)beneficiaries with the diagnosis of mental retardation completely depended on other persons. Conclusion The degree of mental retardation has a direct impact on the process of resocialization. A very small number of people diagnosed with mental retardation had been successfully involved in the process of resocialization. It is necessary work intensively on thecreation of conditions for the realization of the Independent Living Support program, thus making a step forward to deinstitutionalization.

  14. Is There Really a Difference? Distinguishing Mild Intellectual Disability from "Similar" Disability Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Students with mild intellectual disability generally garner less individual attention in research, as they are often aggregated with students with moderate and severe intellectual disability or students with other high incidence disabilities. This study used the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) to look at the personal…

  15. PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW AS A PREDICTOR OF SUBSEQUENT DISABILITY AND DEATH IN COMMUNITY-LIVING OLDER PERSONS

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Gahbauer, Evelyne A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Concato, John; Gill, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether peak expiratory flow (PEF), when expressed by a validated method using standardized residual (SR) percentile, is associated with subsequent disability and death in older persons. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting New Haven, Connecticut. Participants 754 initially nondisabled, community-living persons aged 70 years or older. Measurements PEF was assessed at baseline along with chronic conditions and smoking history. The onset of persistent disability in activities of daily living (ADL), continuous mobility disability, and death were ascertained during monthly interviews over a five-year period. Results The mean age was 78.4 years; 63.7% had a smoking history and 17.4% reported chronic lung disease. The incidence rates per 100 person-months (95% confidence intervals) were 1.00 (0.90, 1.12) for ADL disability, 0.80 (0.70, 0.93) for mobility disability, and 0.44 (0.38, 0.51) for death. At a PEF < 10th SR-percentile, identifying nearly a quarter of the cohort, hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for multiple confounders, including age, smoking, and chronic lung disease, demonstrated an increased risk of ADL disability (HR [95% confidence interval]: 1.79 [1.23, 2.62]), mobility disability (1.89 [1.15, 3.10]), and death (2.31 [1.29, 4.12]). Conclusion In our elderly cohort, we found that a diminished PEF, when expressed as an SR-percentile, is independently associated with subsequent disability and death. These results support the use of PEF as a potentially valuable risk assessment tool among community-living older persons. PMID:18422951

  16. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  17. 28 CFR 36.311 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wheelchairs and manually-powered mobility aids. A public accommodation shall permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually-powered mobility aids, such as walkers, crutches, canes, braces... shall not ask an individual using a wheelchair or other power-driven mobility device questions about...

  18. 28 CFR 36.311 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... wheelchairs and manually-powered mobility aids. A public accommodation shall permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually-powered mobility aids, such as walkers, crutches, canes, braces... shall not ask an individual using a wheelchair or other power-driven mobility device questions about...

  19. Disability pornography: the fetishization of women's vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Elman, R A

    1997-06-01

    This paper offers a critical exploration of a form of pornography consisting in sexual abuse and exploitation of women and girls with disabilities. This practice allows men to create and maintain their sexual dominance over the female gender. Disability pornography, like all other forms of pornography, but in its own way, contributes to the second-class status of all women, particularly those who are suffering from limitations in mobility and other disabilities. By promoting the castrating, dominant, violent image of women, pornography allows men to justify their abusive behaviors toward women. This form of pornography preys on the vulnerability of disabled women and increases the possibility that they will be abused. The sexually explicit lack of physical mobility is as celebrated in disability pornography as the political mobility of women is condemned in all genres of pornography. Amputee pornography is just one example of this brutal practice.

  20. The Progression of Disability among Older Adults in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Venegas, Carlos; Reistetter, Timothy A.; Wang, Ching-Yi; Wong, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper seeks to document the progression of disability in a developing country and to examine gender differences in this process. Methods The data come from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS), a nationally representative sample of older adults. An ordinal logistic regression (n = 3,283) is used to measure the progression of disability that considers: 1) no disability, 2) mobility problems, 3) mobility problems with IADLs limitations, 4) mobility problems plus ADLs limitations, 5) combinations of the latter three, and 6) death. Results Approximately 43% of the sample remained in the same level of disability after 2 years. The patterns of progression with two disabilities differ for men and women. Conclusions Our model reflects the importance of separating ADLs and IADLs in the study of disability progression in Mexico. Varying risk profiles and cultural differences might influence the divergent disability paths followed by each gender. PMID:26729017

  1. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  2. Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, James J.; McCarthy, Joan F.

    An attempt to collate basic knowledge concerning learning disabilities, the text discusses the background and definition of learning disabilities, and its identification, etiology, and epidemiology. Guidelines for diagnostic evaluation are presented as are approaches from perceptual motor, developmental, visual, neurophysiological, linguistic, and…

  3. Medium-/Long-Term Effects of a Specific Exercise Protocol Combined with Patient Education on Spine Mobility, Chronic Fatigue, Pain, Aerobic Fitness and Level of Disability in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Erika; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Pigatto, Maurizia; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Doria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To propose a rehabilitation protocol able to produce immediate and long-term beneficial effects on level of disability and overall performance in ADLs. Materials and Methods. Forty-one FM patients were randomized to an exercise and educational-behavioral programme group (experimental group, EG = 21) or to a control group (CG = 20). Each subject was evaluated before, at the end (T1), and after 6 months (T6) from the conclusion of the rehabilitation treatment using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), tender points count (TPC), and spinal active range of motion. The exercise protocol included 20 sessions consisting in self-awareness, stretching, strengthening, spine flexibility, and aerobic exercises, which patients were subsequently educated to perform at home. Results. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At T1, the EG showed a positive trend in FIQ, VAS, HAQ, and FSS scales and significant improvement in 6MWT and in most spinal active range of motion measurements (P between 0.001 and 0.04). The positive results were maintained at the follow-up. Conclusion. The proposed programme was well tolerated and produced immediate and medium-term beneficial effects improving function and strain endurance. This trial is registered with DRKS00005071 on DRKS. PMID:24616894

  4. Patients living with disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lofters, Aisha; Guilcher, Sara; Maulkhan, Niraj; Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the potential risk factors for lower-quality primary care, the potential markers of unmet needs in primary care, and the willingness to participate in future research among primary care patients with versus without physical disabilities. Design A waiting room survey using a convenience sample. Setting A family health team (FHT) in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, with a designated Mobility Clinic. Participants A total of 40 patients seen at the FHT Mobility Clinic and 80 patients from the general patient population of the same FHT. Main outcome measures Socioeconomic status and social capital, number of self-reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations in the preceding year, and willingness of the patients in the 2 groups to participate in future research studies. Results Patients from the Mobility Clinic were more than twice as likely to be receiving benefits or social assistance (75.0% vs 32.1%, P < .001), were twice as likely to report an annual household income of less than $40000 (58.6% vs 29.2%, P = .006), and were more likely to report their health status to be fair or poor (42.5% vs 16.2%, P = .002). Half of Mobility Clinic patients had visited the emergency department at least once in the preceding year, compared with 29.7% in the general patient population (P = .027). When asked if they would be willing to provide their health card number in the future so that it could be linked to health care data for research, 82.5% of Mobility Clinic patients agreed versus 55.0% of those in the general patient population (P = .004). Conclusion In this study, patients with disabilities were at a social disadvantage compared with their peers without disabilities and were more likely to use the emergency department, suggesting that they had unmet health needs. Future research should continue to explore this patient population and to investigate if an interprofessional primary health care team approach focused on patients with disabilities can

  5. Learning Disabilities and Employment before and in the Americans with Disabilities Act Era: Progress or a Bridge Too Far?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Paul J.; Batalo, Cecilia G.; Achola, Edwin O.

    2011-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and its amendments have been in existence for a little more than twenty years. Title One, which pertains to employment, has had a bearing on employment for persons with disabilities, particularly the high incidence category of learning disabilities, who for the most part work in competitive…

  6. Shakespeare on old age and disability.

    PubMed

    Covey, H

    2000-01-01

    The plays of William Shakespeare were reviewed for references to disabilities, aging and disability, and older characters with disabilities. Shakespeare's references draw from traditional cultural notions about older people with disabilities. These traditional notions include people with physical disabilities being evil, the entertainment value of disabilty, and those who were mentally ill being wild and animal-like. He viewed the aging process as disabling and old age as a time when individuals lost some abilities to function, particularly when it came to mental capacity and physical mobility. His writings show that he used disability as a literary tool to add dimension to characters and set them apart. Contemporary literature continues to share some of Shakespeare's view on aging and disability but also departs from them in important ways. For example, contemporary treatment of disabilities and aging places more emphasis on the human side of the affects of aging and disabilities. Disabilities and aging are not cast in the same negative terms as Shakespeare used. PMID:10987340

  7. Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... many causes of developmental disabilities, including Genetic or chromosome abnormalities. These cause conditions such as Down syndrome and Rett syndrome. Prenatal exposure to substances. Drinking alcohol when ... also help. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  8. Intellectual disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infectious diseases. Certain infections can lead to intellectual disability. Preventing these diseases reduces the risk. For example, rubella syndrome can be prevented through vaccination. Avoiding exposure to cat feces that can cause ...

  9. Sexual Force at Sexual Debut. Swedish Adolescents with Disabilities at Higher Risk than Adolescents without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnberg, Elinor; Bostrom, Margareta Linden; Berglund, Mats

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study are first to compare the incidence of force on the first occasion of sexual intercourse reported by participants with disabilities to that of students without disabilities; second to determine whether there are significant differences in mental health, substance abuse, and school performance as reported by participants…

  10. Incident reporting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J

    Healthcare delivery is a risky business. People view the NHS in the same light as other commercial businesses such as the hotel, retail and airline industries. The White Paper 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Secretary of State for Health, 1997) places statutory responsibilities on managers and clinicians to provide a quality service and to have accountability for clinical governance and performance management. Quality and risk are two sides of the same coin, i.e. if you have good quality you have low risk, and this firmly supports the clinical effectiveness agenda. Healthcare organizations in all sectors of care delivery need to demonstrate their high levels of achievement and commitment to continuous quality improvements. Risk management is a process for identifying, assessing and evaluating risks which have adverse effects on the quality, safety and effectiveness of service delivery, and taking positive action to eliminate or reduce them. Having an open, honest and blame-free organization which is open to improving processes and systems of care is a big step towards having staff who are committed to quality and getting things right. Near-miss, incident and indicator recording and reporting are cornerstones of any quality and risk management system.

  11. Regional patterns of disability-free life expectancy and disability-adjusted life expectancy: global Burden of Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, C J; Lopez, A D

    1997-05-10

    Published and unpublished data were reviewed to estimate the incidence, prevalence, and duration of 483 disabling sequelae of 107 diseases and injuries in an attempt to quantify disability for inclusion in health policy debates. The DisMod computer program was applied many times until consistent parameters were identified. The severity of disability was measured by the person-trade-off method, disability weights were measured across groups, and the prevalence of seven classes of disability was back-calculated from the distribution of each disabling sequelae across disabilities. The prevalence for each class of disability for different age-sex groups was used to calculate seven forms of disability-free life expectancy (DFLE) and disability-adjusted life expectancy (DALE). The prevalence of most disability classes is highest in sub-Saharan Africa and lowest in established market economies, with low-severity disabilities being the most common. DFLE varies significantly among regions. In high-income regions, almost 90% of expected disability is due to non-communicable diseases and most of the rest to injuries. However, in poorer regions, almost half of expected disability is due to communicable diseases and injuries. The higher proportion of life span spent disabled in high-mortality populations is consistent with the compression of morbidity hypothesis. PMID:9149696

  12. with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Sparks, Shannon L.; Aldridge, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Parents from culturally diverse backgrounds need to feel that they play a vital role in the future success of their sons or daughters with disabilities. Differences in culture and ethnicity can affect families' involvement in transition planning and the goals that they emphasize for their children. Families of diverse backgrounds were…

  13. Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... follows: _________________ Definition of “Intellectual Disability” under IDEA Until Rosa’s Law was signed into law by President Obama ... the term “mental retardation” instead of “intellectual disability.” Rosa’s Law changed the term to be used in ...

  14. Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... known causes of intellectual disability – like Down syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, fragile X syndrome, genetic conditions, birth defects, and infections – happen before birth. Others happen while a baby is being born or soon after ... fetal, el síndrome X frágil, afecciones genéticas, defectos congénitos ...

  15. The implications of disability protests for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Barnartt, Sharon N

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the demands which have been made in the over 800 US protests this author has analyzed. Some demands are cross-disability, meaning they could apply to people with all types of impairments; these include demands for rights and accessibility in all domains. Other demands are disability-specific: they apply to people with specific types of impairments, ranging from mobility impairments to developmental disabilities. Many demands have been related to services, which can be either cross-disability or disability-specific. The paper examines the implications of these demands for social work practice. These include that disability be de-stigmatized by practitioners, that people with disabilities have choices, that they have control over their services, and that all aspects of social work practice be accessible to people with any type of disability.

  16. Deaf mobile application accessibility requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    Requirement for deaf mobile applications need to be analysed to ensure the disabilities need are instilled into the mobile applications developed for them. Universal design is understandable to comply every user needs, however specific disability is argued by the authors to have different need and requirements. These differences are among the reasons for these applications being developed to target for a specific group of people, however they are less usable and later abandoned. This study focuses on deriving requirements that are needed by the deaf in their mobile applications that are meant specifically for them. Studies on previous literature was conducted it can be concluded that graphic, text, multimedia and sign language interpreter are among mostly required features to be included in their mobile application to ensure the applications are usable for this community.

  17. The Electronic Patient Reported Outcome Tool: Testing Usability and Feasibility of a Mobile App and Portal to Support Care for Patients With Complex Chronic Disease and Disability in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Ashlinder; Khan, Anum Irfan; Hans, Parminder Kaur; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background People experiencing complex chronic disease and disability (CCDD) face some of the greatest challenges of any patient population. Primary care providers find it difficult to manage multiple discordant conditions and symptoms and often complex social challenges experienced by these patients. The electronic Patient Reported Outcome (ePRO) tool is designed to overcome some of these challenges by supporting goal-oriented primary care delivery. Using the tool, patients and providers collaboratively develop health care goals on a portal linked to a mobile device to help patients and providers track progress between visits. Objectives This study tested the usability and feasibility of adopting the ePRO tool into a single interdisciplinary primary health care practice in Toronto, Canada. The Fit between Individuals, Fask, and Technology (FITT) framework was used to guide our assessment and explore whether the ePRO tool is: (1) feasible for adoption in interdisciplinary primary health care practices and (2) usable from both the patient and provider perspectives. This usability pilot is part of a broader user-centered design development strategy. Methods A 4-week pilot study was conducted in which patients and providers used the ePRO tool to develop health-related goals, which patients then monitored using a mobile device. Patients and providers collaboratively set goals using the system during an initial visit and had at least 1 follow-up visit at the end of the pilot to discuss progress. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with patients and providers to capture usability and feasibility measures. Data from the ePRO system were extracted to provide information regarding tool usage. Results Six providers and 11 patients participated in the study; 3 patients dropped out mainly owing to health issues. The remaining 8 patients completed 210 monitoring protocols, equal to over 1300 questions, with patients often answering questions daily. Providers and patients

  18. Disability Experience and Measurement.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Lois M

    2016-10-01

    Top themes of international research on disability in the past three decades are discussed: disability dynamics, buffers and barriers for disability, disability trends, and disability among very old persons. Each theme is highlighted by research examples. Turning to measurement, I discuss traditional measures of disability, new longer and shorter ones, and composites like disability-free life expectancy, noting their merits. Contemporary models of disability are presented, ranging from visual images to formal theories. The article ends on how scientists can facilitate movement of disability science into health care practice and policy. PMID:27590795

  19. Reliability of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Marie; Jahnsen, Reidun; Froslie, Kathrine Frey; Hussain, Aktahr

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) is an instrument for evaluating function in children with disabilities aged 6 months to 7.5 years. The PEDI measures both functional performance and capability in three domains: (1) self-care, (2) mobility, and (3) social function. The PEDI has recently been translated into Norwegian. The purpose…

  20. Common Pediatric Disabilities: Medical Aspects and Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Janet Siantz; Colson, Steven

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of common pediatric disabilities and information about incidence, causes, diagnosis, common characteristics, complications with educational implications, and multidisciplinary intervention approaches. It covers the following conditions: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, fragile…

  1. [People with learning disabilities: an overview of the facts].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article gives a short overview of some basic facts about people with learning disabilities. The prevalence (1-3% worldwide) and stability of the incidence are described, as well as the causes and possible medical comorbidities.- People with learning disabilities are at significantly greater risk of developing cognitive and medical problems compared with the average population. Lastly, an overview of actual chronic care costs is given, as well as actual participation possibilities for people with learning disabilities.

  2. Academic Performance in Math and English and Award Rates of Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavilan Coll., Gilroy, CA.

    This document addresses characteristics students with a disability at Gavilan College (California). Over the past several years, a shift has occurred in the types of disability represented at Gavilan College. Learning disabled is the largest group, but has been proportionally declining as has mobility impaired students while developmentally…

  3. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  4. Predictive Indices of Reading Failure in Learning Disabled Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomer, Phyllis L.; Magee, Patricia

    1977-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which learning disabled students scored poorly on a reading readiness test administered when they entered school, the incidence of undiagnosed oral language deficits among these learning disabled children, and the predictive relationships between reading readiness skills and components of oral language. (Author/MV)

  5. Learning Disabilities: Introduction and Strategies for College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, Sandy; Scheerer, Jan

    Designed for community college educators, this paper provides an overview of the characteristics and problems of the learning disabled adult and offers strategies for both teaching and learning. Following introductory remarks, the paper provides definitions of learning disability and discusses the symptoms, psychological effects, and incidence of…

  6. Opportunities Made Equal: Accommodating Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Cynthia D.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the accommodation of college students with learning disabilities, focusing on the increasing incidence (or overdiagnosis) of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, applicable federal legislation, and leveling the academic playing field for students with learning disabilities. Argues that professors should provide recommended…

  7. Sleep and Developmental Disabilities: Assessment, Treatment, and Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Scott M.; Harvey, Mark T.; Horner, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    People with developmental disabilities sleep less and experience higher incidence of clinical sleep disorders than the general population. Exploring the neurophysiology linking sleep with daytime performance in patients with developmental disabilities is now possible using minimally sufficient sleep and sleep-sensitive behavioral assays. Although…

  8. Learning Disability Prevalence and Adult Education Program Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Margaret Becker

    2008-01-01

    This study identifies adult education program characteristics associated with learning disability (LD) prevalence through statistical analyses of data from a single U.S. state (Kansas). Data indicate that several variables at the adult education (AE) program level are linked to LD prevalence, including disability incidence, educational background…

  9. Rural People with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Disabilities in Rural Areas . What are the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act for small ... U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. What are the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act for local ...

  10. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children with kernicterus are more likely to have cerebral palsy, hearing and vision problems, and problems with their ... developmental disabilities, such as: ADHD , autism spectrum disorder , cerebral palsy , hearing loss , intellectual disability , learning disability, vision impairment , ...

  11. What Are Learning Disabilities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Learning Disabilities: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What are learning disabilities? Learning disabilities are conditions that affect how a ...

  12. Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Curiae Briefs Legislative Goals Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities National Goals 2015 SIS Product Information Benefits of ... SIS Use Order SIS-A Contact Us Intellectual Disability Historical Context Definition FAQs on Intellectual Disability Diagnostic ...

  13. The Multidomain Intervention to preveNt disability in ElDers (MINDED) project: rationale and study design of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Matteo; Demougeot, Laurent; Boccalon, Henri; Guyonnet, Sophie; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine

    2014-05-01

    Disability is hardly reversible at old age, negatively impacts on the elders' quality of life, and significantly threatens the sustainability of public health services. Therefore, preventive interventions become necessary for successfully avoiding its onset. The translation of the successful clinical approach represented by the geriatric comprehensive assessment at the community-level and the specific targeting of frailty (a well-established geriatric syndrome) might represent a promising possibility. This approach may allow the implementation of preventive interventions before the irreversible features of disability onset. Unfortunately, there is a lack of evidence on the effectiveness of primary prevention programs against disability in community-dwelling elders. Moreover, the novelty of the topic makes it difficult for the immediate design and conduction of a full-scale trial. For these reasons, a pilot project aimed at obtaining the preliminary information for the design of a subsequent definitive trial is required. In the present article, we describe the objectives, design, and methods of the Multidomain Intervention to preveNt Disability in ElDers (MINDED) project. MINDED is articulated into three sequential phases. First, a screening tool for indentifying non-disabled frail older persons in the community (ideal target population for preventive interventions against disability) will be validated. Then, the organization of a multidisciplinary team in the development and design of a multidomain preventive plan against disability will be verified/optimized. Finally, a randomized controlled trial measuring the effect size of a multicomponent intervention (based on physical exercise, nutrition, and cognitive training) against incident mobility disability versus usual care in community-dwelling frail elders will be conducted.

  14. Increasing the adjustment success of the disabled African American.

    PubMed

    Miller, S D

    1993-01-01

    Adjustment to a physically disabling condition is a challenge for any patient who confronts a future of severe impairment and limited mobility. The emotional trauma is usually devastating at least until the initial shock of the disability dissipates. For the disabled African-American patient, the physical and psychic pain are compounded by personal and social factors not experienced in similar intensity by other disabled patients. A conceptual framework for better understanding the nature of the forces that impinge on the ability of the disabled African-American patient to adjust and an understanding of the impact of multi-level systems on the life of the disabled African-American is provided. The influence of racism, be it intentional or unintentional, is explained as it relates to the services and the attitudes of health care systems. The family as a significant and vital system is discussed as the major contributor to the successful adjustment of African-American disabled persons.

  15. Understanding a Need...Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention for People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VSA Educational Services, Washington, DC. Resource Center on Substance Abuse Prevention and Disability.

    This booklet provides an overview of alcohol and other drug abuse prevention, disability, and the relationship between the two issues. It cites the incidence of alcohol and other drug abuse among people with disabilities. It looks at alcohol and other drug abuse risk factors that are disability related, such as medication use, chronic pain,…

  16. Similarities and Differences between Children with and without Disabilities on Identified Clinical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Diane C.

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the types and proportions of identified clinical findings among children with and without disabilities. Using data from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS), this study compared 7672 children aged 0 to 15 years (n=1067 with disabilities and n=6605 without disabilities) who were…

  17. State Plan for Texans with Developmental Disabilities FY 1987-89 [with Amendments].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Rehabilitation Commission, Austin.

    This plan was to establish goals and objectives for the development of a comprehensive service delivery system for Texans with developmental disabilities. Section 1 outlines: the mission and functions of the Council; the definition, incidence, and impact of developmental disability; the Developmental Disabilities Basic State Grant Program; and…

  18. Social and Communicative Interventions and Transition Outcomes for Youth with Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwell, Morgen; Cobb, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between social and communicative interventions and transition-related outcomes for secondary-aged youth with disabilities is explored in this systematic review. In all, 30 studies intervening with 316 youth with a broad range of disability labels (both high- and low-incidence disabilities) were reviewed. Subgroup analyses were…

  19. Career Interests and Self-Estimated Abilities of Young Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sherri; Unkefer, Lesley Craig; Cichy, Bryan Ervin; Peper, Christine; Juang, Ju-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain vocational interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities of young adults with disabilities. Results showed that young adults with both low incidence and high incidence disabilities have a wide range of interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities that are comparable to those in the general…

  20. Visual factors and mobility in persons with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kuyk, T; Elliott, J L

    1999-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of reducing light level on mobility performance in persons with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and how performance relates to measures of visual sensory and perceptual function. ARMD results in the loss of central, high-acuity vision and is the leading cause of vision loss in veterans participating in the blind rehabilitation programs of the Department of Veterans Affairs. In 41 subjects with ARMD acuity, peak letter contrast sensitivity, visual field extent, glare disability, color confusion, spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity, motion sensitivity, scanning ability, and figure-ground discrimination were measured to determine their ability to predict mobility performance. Mobility performance was assessed under photopic (high illumination) and mesopic (low illumination) lighting conditions on a laboratory obstacle course and two real-world courses, an indoor hallway and an outdoor residential route. Reducing illumination resulted in significant increases in the time to complete each course and the number of mobility incidents (errors) that occurred. Two measures of overall performance, total time and total mobility incidents, were calculated for each course by summing time and incidents over the two illumination levels. Combinations of vision variables were able to account for 30 to 60% of the variance in the measures of overall performance. Log contrast sensitivity measured with the Pelli-Robson chart test and visual field extent were the most important predictors of performance. Other variables making significant contributions to prediction in multi-predictor models included: scanning ability, glare sensitivity, color confusion, and peak contrast sensitivity to drifting gratings. PMID:10678453

  1. Mobility and Mobility Aids for Visually Handicapped Individuals. Bibliography, No. 84-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    The bibliography lists approximately 150 references (1973-1983) on orientation and mobility for visually impaired individuals. Citations are organized alphabetically by author's name within five major topic areas: general works, manuals and curriculum guides, research literature, mobility for special populations (multiple disabilities, children…

  2. Effect of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on pain, mobility, strength, and disability of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan-Woo; Kim, Won-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on the muscle strength and endurance, range of motion, and the disability index of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-six patients with chronic neck pain participated. They received an intervention for 35 minutes a day, three times a week for 10 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to one control and two experimental groups: group A (thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training, n=16), group B (deep craniocervical flexor training, n=15), and group C (active self-exercise as a control group, n=15). Muscle strength and endurance, pain, neck disability index, and range of motion of the cervical and thoracic spine were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Group A showed significant increases in muscle strength, endurance, and cervical and thoracic range of motion, and significant decreases in the pain and neck disability index, compared with groups B and C. [Conclusion] Although deep craniocervical flexor training is effective at improving neck function, thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training was a more effective intervention for pain relief and improving the range of motion, muscle function, and neck disability of patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain. PMID:26957752

  3. Body image among eating disorder patients with disabilities: a review of published case studies.

    PubMed

    Cicmil, Nela; Eli, Karin

    2014-06-01

    While individual cases of eating disorder (ED) patients with disabilities have been reported, there has been little synthesis of their experiences of body image and thin idealization. This study reviews 19 published clinical reports of ED patients with sensory, mobility-related, or intellectual disabilities and evaluates the extent to which their experiences align with or challenge current conceptions of body image in ED. ED patients with visual impairment reported a profound disturbance of body image, perceived intersubjectively and through tactile sensations. Reducing dependence in mobility was an important motivation to control body size for ED patients with mobility-related disabilities. ED as a way of coping with and compensating for the psychosocial consequences of disability was a recurrent theme for patients across a range of disabilities. These experiential accounts of ED patients with disabilities broaden current understandings of body image to include touch and kinaesthetic awareness, intersubjective dynamics, and perceptions of normalcy.

  4. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  5. What is an Intellectual Disability?

    MedlinePlus

    ... White House Lunch Recipes What Is an Intellectual Disability? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is an Intellectual Disability? ... becoming an independent person. continue What Causes Intellectual Disabilities? Intellectual disabilities happen because the brain gets injured ...

  6. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDDs): Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) are a primary focus of the NICHD’s ...

  7. General Information about Learning Disabilities (Fact Sheet Number 7) = Informacion General sobre Impedimentos en el Aprendizaje (Fact Sheet Number 19).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interstate Research Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet providing general information about learning disabilities is presented in both English and Spanish versions. It begins with the federal definition of learning disabilities and a discussion of its implications followed by estimates of incidence. Typical characteristics of students with learning disabilities are then summarized as…

  8. Rural Economies and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Dennis

    Both the rural economy and the disability community in rural areas can benefit from a recognition that they are mutually dependent. With the decline of rural America, the economic base underpinning all aspects of disability support systems is weakening. In addition, rural disability services often are compartmentalized along functional lines with…

  9. Substance Abuse and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos

    A review of the literature provides the conclusion that individuals with a disability versus those without a disability are more likely to have a substance abuse problem and less likely to get effective treatment. Data suggest 10-40% of all individuals in treatment for substance abuse have a coexisting physical or mental disability. Alcohol rates…

  10. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  11. Work Disability in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Judith

    This paper begins by examining the history of disability payments to disabled workers, specifically disability payments to coal workers. Efforts by the United Mine Workers of America made mine health and safety an issue in the 1960s, and continuing liberalization of the law continued through the 1970s. The identification of coal miners with…

  12. Disability Accommodation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick-Hruska, Connie, Comp.; Blythe, Gretchen, Comp.

    Designed as a resource for two-year college faculty and staff working with students with disabilities, this handbook contains facts about various disabilities, practical suggestions for improving services, and resource points for further information. Following a brief introduction, legal implications regarding disabled students are discussed for…

  13. Disability and marginal utility of income: evidence from hypothetical choices.

    PubMed

    Tengstam, Sven

    2014-03-01

    It is often assumed that disability reduces the marginal utility of income. In this article, individuals' marginal utility of income in two states-(i) paralyzed in both legs from birth and (ii) not mobility impaired at all-is measured through hypothetical choices between imagined lotteries behind a so-called veil of ignorance. The outcomes of the lotteries include both income and disability status. It is found that most people have higher marginal utility when paralyzed than when not mobility impaired at all. The two marginal utilities are evaluated at the same levels of income. Having personal experience of mobility impairment and supporting the Left Party, the Social Democratic Party, the Green Party, or the Liberal Party are associated with having a higher marginal utility when paralyzed. The results suggest that more than full insurance of income losses connected to being disabled is optimal. The results further suggest that, given a utilitarian social welfare function, resources should be transferred to rather than from disabled people. Finally, if the transfers are not large enough to smooth out the marginal utilities of the disabled and the nondisabled, distributional weights based on disability status should be used in cost-benefit analysis.

  14. Incident analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, D.W.; Buerer, A.; Leeds, S.

    1996-02-20

    This document presents information about a fire that occurred in January 1996 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This fire was caused by the spontaneous combustion of 100% fuming nitric acid. Topics discussed include: Summary of the incident; technical background; procedural background; supervision; previous incidents with 100% fuming nitric acid; and judgment of potential hazards.

  15. Filicide-suicide involving children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Coorg, Rohini; Tournay, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Filicide-suicide, or murder of a child by a parent followed by suicide, has an unknown incidence in both the general and disabled population. As there is no national database, the authors examined known associated factors and newspaper reports to characterize filicide-suicide victims and perpetrators involving children with disabilities. A newspaper search was conducted using LexisNexis and NewsBank: Access World News databases through the University of California, Irvine Library's Web site. Age, gender of child and parent, method used, and diagnoses of parent and child were recorded. Twenty-two news articles were found describing a total of 26 disabled children as victims of filicide-suicide between 1982 and 2010. Eighty-one percent of children killed were male, and 54% were autistic. Thirty percent of perpetrators had a reported mental illness. Male children or children with autism may be at risk for filicide-suicide, but accurate record keeping is needed to determine the incidence and risk factors and aid in its prevention in the disabled population. PMID:22826515

  16. Adaptive computing for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Merrow, S L; Corbett, C D

    1994-01-01

    Adaptive computing is a relatively new area, and little has been written in the nursing literature on the topic. "Adaptive computing" refers to the professional services and the technology (both hardware and software) that make computing technology accessible for persons with disabilities. Nurses in many settings such as schools, industry, rehabilitation facilities, and the community, can use knowledge of adaptive computing as they counsel, advise, and advocate for people with disabilities. Nurses with an awareness and knowledge of adaptive computing will be better able to promote high-level wellness for individuals with disabilities, thus maximizing their potential for an active fulfilling life. People with different types of disabilities, including visual, mobility, hearing, learning, communication disorders and acquired brain injuries may benefit from computer adaptations. Disabled people encounter barriers to computing in six major areas: 1) the environment, 2) data entry, 3) information output, 4) technical documentation, 5) support, and 6) training. After a discussion of these barriers, the criteria for selecting appropriate adaptations and selected examples of adaptations are presented. Several cases studies illustrate the evaluation process and the development of adaptive computer solutions. PMID:8082064

  17. Initiation and Generalization of Self-Instructional Skills in Adolescents with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Katherine A.; Ayres, Kevin A.; Alexander, Jennifer; Ledford, Jennifer R.; Shepley, Collin; Shepley, Sally B.

    2016-01-01

    Self-instruction using videos or other supports on a mobile device is a pivotal skill and can increase independence for individuals with disabilities by decreasing a need for adult supports. This study evaluated the effects of progressive time delay (PTD) to teach four adolescents with autism and intellectual disability how to initiate…

  18. A Wheelchair User with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities Managing Simple Orientation Technology for Indoor Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Persons with profound visual impairments and other disabilities, such as neuromotor and intellectual disabilities, may encounter serious orientation and mobility problems even in familiar indoor environments, such as their homes. Teaching these persons to develop maps of their daily environment, using miniature replicas of the areas or some…

  19. "So Much Potential in Reading!" Developing Meaningful Literacy Routines for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenlon, Amanda G.; McNabb, Jessica; Pidlypchak, Harmony

    2010-01-01

    Children with multiple disabilities, often experience challenges in communication, mobility, and learning. Despite these challenges, substantial research exists that documents successful educational methods and strategies for these students. Specifically, students with multiple disabilities have successfully been taught to use a voice output…

  20. Disability and Democracy in Cambodia: An Integrative Approach to Community Building and Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, Darren C.

    2010-01-01

    The political framework through which the various communities of disabled persons in Cambodia advocate for and claim their rights is complex and confusing. Both governmental and non-governmental actors engage this political framework through the mobilization of persons from the various disabled communities, competing in the civic sphere through…

  1. Evaluation of an Application for Making Palmtop Computers Accessible to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Steven E.; Davies, Daniel K.; Davies, Katelyn R.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Palmtop computers provide a promising mobile platform to address barriers to computer-based supports for people with intellectual disabilities. This study evaluated a specially designed interface to make navigation and features of palmtop computers more accessible to users with intellectual disabilities. Method: The specialised…

  2. Reasonable Accommodations: A Faculty Guide to Teaching College Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Staff Congress of the City Univ. of New York, NY.

    This handbook is designed to provide City University of New York faculty with practical information and suggestions to help them meet the needs of disabled students in their classrooms. An overview on teaching students with disabilities is provided, followed by discussions of specific topics including coping with mobility and hand-function…

  3. Disability and global development.

    PubMed

    Durocher, Joan; Lord, Janet; Defranco, Allison

    2012-07-01

    The United States invests billions of taxpayer dollars each year into foreign assistance programs that foster international diplomacy and development directed toward improving the quality of life for people around the world. These programs develop economies and combat poverty, promote democracy and governance, build new infrastructure, advance and protect human rights, among other development goals. The United States cannot effectively accomplish the goals of foreign assistance programs unless it undertakes measures to ensure that the programs are accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. The United States has been a leader in advancing the rights of people with disabilities and must continue to promote disability rights through its international development work. Overseas economic development will not be successful unless people with disabilities are included. Because of the significant number of people with disabilities in developing countries, if they are not included, the very economic growth the United States is trying to foster will be hindered. The goals of democracy and governance programs cannot be achieved without the inclusion of people with disabilities. In many countries, domestic law contains blatant discriminatory provisions for people with disabilities that undermine access to justice and full participation in society. The provisions that discriminate against people with disabilities include arbitrary exclusions in electoral codes, sweeping plenary guardianship laws with no due-process protections, discriminatory banking practices, and inaccessible court proceedings. National disability legal frameworks remain underdeveloped throughout the world. PMID:22726852

  4. Disability and global development.

    PubMed

    Durocher, Joan; Lord, Janet; Defranco, Allison

    2012-07-01

    The United States invests billions of taxpayer dollars each year into foreign assistance programs that foster international diplomacy and development directed toward improving the quality of life for people around the world. These programs develop economies and combat poverty, promote democracy and governance, build new infrastructure, advance and protect human rights, among other development goals. The United States cannot effectively accomplish the goals of foreign assistance programs unless it undertakes measures to ensure that the programs are accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. The United States has been a leader in advancing the rights of people with disabilities and must continue to promote disability rights through its international development work. Overseas economic development will not be successful unless people with disabilities are included. Because of the significant number of people with disabilities in developing countries, if they are not included, the very economic growth the United States is trying to foster will be hindered. The goals of democracy and governance programs cannot be achieved without the inclusion of people with disabilities. In many countries, domestic law contains blatant discriminatory provisions for people with disabilities that undermine access to justice and full participation in society. The provisions that discriminate against people with disabilities include arbitrary exclusions in electoral codes, sweeping plenary guardianship laws with no due-process protections, discriminatory banking practices, and inaccessible court proceedings. National disability legal frameworks remain underdeveloped throughout the world.

  5. Disability and dignity-enabling home environments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Barbara E; Secker, Barbara; Rolfe, Debbie; Wagner, Frank; Parke, Bob; Mistry, Bhavnita

    2012-01-01

    In Canada where long-term care is primarily oriented to elderly persons and affordable accessible housing is limited, younger disabled adults may be living in circumstances that do not meet their health needs and contribute to their social exclusion. The purpose of this study was to undertake an ethical analysis of what constitute an 'adequate' home environment for adults with significant mobility disabilities. An integrated design was used that combined qualitative interviews with normative ethical analysis in an iterative process. Twenty interviews with 19 participants were conducted in Ontario, Canada with two groups: younger adults (ages 18-55) with mobility disabilities and 'decision-makers' who consisted of policy makers, program administrators and discharge planners. Data were analyzed using a critical disability ethics approach and processes of reflective equilibrium. Drawing on Nora Jacobson's (Jacobson, 2009) taxonomy of dignity and pluralistic approaches to social justice, the concept of 'social dignity' provides a lens for exploring the adequacy of home environments for disabled people. Analyses suggested seven threshold conditions necessary for a dignity-enabling home: the ability to form and sustain meaningful relationships; access to community and civic life; access to control and flexibility of daily activities; access to opportunities for self-expression and identity affirmation; access to respectful relationships with attendants; access to opportunities to participate in school, work or leisure; access to physical, psychological and ontological security. The results have implications for housing, health and social care policies, and political reform. Social dignity provides a normative ethical grounding for assessing the adequacy of home environments. The threshold elements outline specific dignity-enabling conditions that are open to further specification or elaboration in different contexts.

  6. 49 CFR 39.29 - May PVOs limit the number of passengers with a disability on a passenger vessel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mobility disability on your vessel. However, if in the Captain's judgment, weight or stability issues are presented by the presence of mobility devices and would conflict with legitimate safety requirements pertaining to the vessel and its passengers, then the number of passengers with mobility aids may be...

  7. Modeling Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berl, Andras

    In wireless networks, communication can take place based on an infrastructure (e.g. WLAN access point or GPRS base station) or it can take place in adhoc mode, where mobile devices are connected directly to each other and care for the routing by themselves (mobile ad-hoc networks). When such wireless networks are investigated and simulations are performed, it is often necessary to consider the movement of entities within the simulated environment.

  8. Note-Taking Techniques for Students with Disabilities: A Systematic Review of the Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Joseph R.; Rivera, Tina Z.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a synthesis of note-taking research among students with learning disabilities or other high-incidence disabilities. A search of the professional literature between 1980 and 2010 yielded nine intervention studies, which were evaluated either in terms of effect size or percentage of nonoverlapping data. The studies examined…

  9. How Special Ed Vouchers Keep Kids from Being Mislabeled as Disabled. Civic Report No. 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Marcus A.; Greene, Jay P.

    2009-01-01

    In the last three decades, special-education programs in the United States have grown at a tremendous pace. Much of this growth reflects a growing incidence of students diagnosed with the mildest form of learning disability, called a Specific Learning Disability (SLD), and thus the hardest to distinguish from an ordinary cognitive deficit. Between…

  10. RADIUS: Research Archive on Disability in the United States. [CD-ROMs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This Research Archive on Disability in the United States (RADIUS), a database on CD-ROM, contains 19 data sets on the prevalence, incidence, correlates, and consequences of disability in the United States. The 19 data sets are: (1) 1991 National Maternal and Infant Health Follow-Up Survey; (2) National Pediatric Trauma Registry, 1988-1994; (3)…

  11. Educating the Disabled: Enabling Learners in Inclusive Settings. A Scarecrow Education Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George R.; Harrington, Frances T.

    Intended for administrators responsible for educating students with disabilities in inclusive schools, the book has 14 chapters with the following titles: (1) "Administrative Theory, Roles, and Leadership Characteristics"; (2) "Administering School Reforms"; (3) "Incidences of Disability"; (4) "Organizing School Programs for Individuals with…

  12. Sexual Abuse of Individuals with Disabilities: Prevention Strategies for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEachern, Adriana G.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual abuse of individuals with disabilities occurs in alarming proportions, although the prevalence and incidence of such abuse is difficult to determine. Although all states maintain statistics on child sexual abuse, the rate of victimization for individuals with disabilities is not specific. This paper reviews several studies conducted on…

  13. Etiological Survey on Intellectual Disability in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikura, Ulla; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Olsen, Paivi; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Taanila, Anja; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2005-01-01

    The etiology of intellectual disability was studied both in incident (n = 9,432) and prevalent (n = 9,351) populations in a one-year birth cohort born in Northern Finland in 1985-1986. Data from multiple sources were used to follow the children until the age of 11.5 years. Of the incident cases (n = 119) with intellectual disabilities, 66.4% had…

  14. Minority Perceptions of the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grand, Sheldon A.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the attitudes of Black versus White male students (N=60) toward three different disability types. Results showed significant differences between race, disability type, and social distance with Blacks evaluating disabled persons more highly. (LLL)

  15. A Secure Operational Model for Mobile Payments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service. PMID:25386607

  16. Ubiquitous Yet Unique: Perspectives of People With Disabilities on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Mactavish, Jennifer B.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study was grounded in a qualitative framework and used a focus group method to examine the meanings that individuals with disabilities (e.g., permanent mobility impairments, sensory impairments) attach to their experiences of stress, as well as major sources or causes of stress in these individuals' lives. Overall, the data showed…

  17. Play Spaces to Accommodate Disabled Children. Research Project 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, James H.

    This report deals primarily with the design of an integrated free play environment for both able-bodied and disabled children. First, the different types of handicaps (and their debilitating effects) which affect children, and the different mobility aids which are used by these children are discussed. Then, a number of guidelines concerning…

  18. Exploring the Experiences of Abuse of College Students With Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Findley, Patricia A; Plummer, Sara-Beth; McMahon, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    Intimate partner violence and sexual assault of college students has garnered increased attention and publicity. Current studies have focused primarily on general campus populations with little to no attention to students with disabilities. While studies suggest the rate of abuse of individuals with disabilities is similar or higher compared to the general population, there remains a lack of focus on this issue. Individuals with disabilities are at particularly high risk for abuse, both through typical forms of violence (physical, sexual, emotional, and economic) and those that target one's disability. In an effort highlight and explore this issue further, an exploratory study was conducted to learn the rates of abuse among university students who have identified as having a disability. This is a cross-sectional survey of 101 students of students with disabilities from a large northeastern public university. Experiences of abuse were measured through the use of the Abuse Assessment Screen- Disability (AAS-D) scale. Students were asked about experiences of physical, sexual, psychological, and disability related abuse within the last year and help seeking behaviors when an incident of abuse occurred. We found that 22 % of participants reported some form of abuse over the last and nearly 62% (n= 63) had experienced some form of physical or sexual abuse before the age of 17. Those who were abused in the past year, 40% reported little or no knowledge of abuse-related resources and only 27% reported the incident. Authors discuss implications results have for programs and policies on campus for individuals with disabilities.

  19. The Disabled: Media's Monster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    From the early nineteenth century to the present, horror, gangster, and adventure films, television, the comics, and newspapers have shown physical and mental disabilities to connote murder, violence, and danger. Such false portrayals have promoted negative public attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Author/MJL)

  20. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes: "Preventing Early Reading…

  1. Biologic Patterns of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Carl V.; Linn, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of Rasch analysis to elucidate biological patterns of disability present in the functional ability of persons undergoing medical rehabilitation. Uses two measures, one for inpatients and one for outpatients, to illustrate the approach and provides examples of some biological patterns of disability associated with specific types…

  2. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants a job can find a job,…

  3. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants to work can find a…

  4. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. Employers can make sound business decisions and gain a competitive advantage by using this guide to increase the…

  5. Learning about Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Rita Ann

    1983-01-01

    The author describes lessons provided for regular class elementary students to help them understand disabilities and disabled persons. Objectives, materials needed, and activities are outlined for six lessons focusing on the following topics: individual differences, wheelchairs; devices that help people walk; amputation, artificial limbs, and…

  6. Some Ideologies of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Colin

    2006-01-01

    The paper analyses the "separate systems of honour" which constitute the ideologies surrounding disability. After critiquing traditional (false conscious and liberal) and radical (separate development and pseudo-radical) responses to the disadvantaged and humiliating situation of disability, it concludes by advancing a genuinely radical response…

  7. Disabling the SAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Miriam Kurtzig

    2003-01-01

    Argues the College Boards' decision to stop flagging the SAT scores of students with disabilities given extended time to take the test will compromise the test's validity. A civil rights organization urged the College Board to stop flagging SAT scores because the practice violated the rights of students with disabilities. Proposes three…

  8. Beauty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    People often hold stereotypical notions about disability, assuming people with significant disabilities offer little in terms of friendship or contribution. Some are even repulsed by that person's physical appearance. Such responses, evident within the Christian community as well, fail to acknowledge the inherent worth of the person as created in…

  9. Educating Disabled Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mary

    1986-01-01

    Despite many accomplishments since the passing of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, not all disabled children are benefiting from the law. Examples are cited from Douglas Biklen's study of schools that have achieved the integration of disabled and nondisabled students. (MLF)

  10. Assessment of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    The assessment and diagnosis of learning disabilities (LD) in the school is problematic. How do educators determine who is learning disabled? What practices are recommended? The main focus of the paper is on specific, relatively technical points that influence the validity of assessment. Since technical concerns are only one of the factors…

  11. Dads and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Cindy, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the relationship of fathers and their children with disabilities. It reports a study of 86 Kansas fathers of children (ages 5 to 8) with and without disabilities. The study was conducted in order to identify more options for fathers wishing to increase their involvement with their children. The study sent surveys of…

  12. Disability: Our Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourihan, John P., Ed.

    Ten papers from a 1978 lecture series on employment, civil rights, education, social aspects, and recreation and leisure for disabled persons are presented. It is explained that as disabled persons, the lecturers presented role models to the students at the Regional Education Program for Handicapped College Students at Teachers College, Columbia.…

  13. Ghana: Disability and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botts, Betsy H.; Evans, William H.

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study explores the educational system and attitudes toward disability in the Volta Region of Ghana. Traditional, Christian, and Islamic beliefs toward disability are explored. Educators from Accra and three families from the Volta Region with children with special needs are interviewed in an effort to explore the connection…

  14. Anatomy of an incident

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Trujillo, Stanley; Lawton, Cindy M.; Land, Whitney M.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2016-03-23

    A traditional view of incidents is that they are caused by shortcomings in human competence, attention, or attitude. It may be under the label of “loss of situational awareness,” procedure “violation,” or “poor” management. A different view is that human error is not the cause of failure, but a symptom of failure – trouble deeper inside the system. In this perspective, human error is not the conclusion, but rather the starting point of investigations. During an investigation, three types of information are gathered: physical, documentary, and human (recall/experience). Through the causal analysis process, apparent cause or apparent causes are identifiedmore » as the most probable cause or causes of an incident or condition that management has the control to fix and for which effective recommendations for corrective actions can be generated. A causal analysis identifies relevant human performance factors. In the following presentation, the anatomy of a radiological incident is discussed, and one case study is presented. We analyzed the contributing factors that caused a radiological incident. When underlying conditions, decisions, actions, and inactions that contribute to the incident are identified. This includes weaknesses that may warrant improvements that tolerate error. Measures that reduce consequences or likelihood of recurrence are discussed.« less

  15. Disentangling the disablement process.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, R H; Jette, A M

    1996-07-01

    A model was proposed to assess the premise that functional limitations are an intermediary stage between risk factors (e.g., sex and frequency of walking a mile), pathology/impairments (e.g., musculoskeletal problems), and the onset and course of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) disability. Analyses were based on two random subsamples (each with n = 524) of Longitudinal Study of Aging respondents who were nondisabled at baseline (1984) and reinterviewed in 1988 and 1990. The model's central premise was supported in two ways. The main influence of age, frequency of walking, and musculoskeletal problems was on the onset of functional limitations, rather than the onset of IADL disability. And, onset of lower body functional limitations influenced future disability (1990) through its relationship with disability in 1988 and functional limitations in 1990. The results underscore the value of clinical trials which focus on minimizing functional limitations as a strategy for preventing disability.

  16. Workers with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Blanck, P D; Pransky, G

    1999-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities constitute a sizable portion of the workforce and represent the majority of working-age persons who are unable to work. Historically, barriers to employment have included attitudinal discrimination by employers, lack of workplace accommodations, and inadequate job training. The disability rights movement has achieved considerable success in promoting legislation to remove these barriers and uphold equal employment. Research suggests that many employers actively attempt to incorporate persons with disabilities into the workforce and gain substantial economic benefit from their participation, without incurring burdensome expenses. Occupational health providers are asked by employers and others to provide input on feasibility and safety, a difficult task given the lack of scientific study on the occupational abilities and risks associated with specific disabilities. Providers have an important role in promoting the equal employment of disabled persons, by providing objective opinions on their ability and risks on the job and suggesting workplace accommodations and treatments that enhance the ability to work.

  17. Physical fitness is predictive for a decline in daily functioning in older adults with intellectual disabilities: results of the HA-ID study.

    PubMed

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; van Wijck, Ruud; Schoufour, Josje D; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2014-10-01

    A high incidence of limitations in daily functioning is seen in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), along with poor physical fitness levels. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of physical fitness for daily functioning after 3 years, in 602 older adults with borderline to profound ID (≥ 50 years). At baseline, physical fitness levels and daily functioning (operationalized as basic activities of daily living [ADL] and mobility) were assessed. After 3 years, the measurements of daily functioning were repeated. At follow-up, 12.6% of the participants were completely independent in ADL and 48.5% had no mobility limitations. More than half of the participants (54.8%) declined in their ability to perform ADL and 37.5% declined in their mobility. Manual dexterity, visual reaction time, balance, comfortable and fast gait speed, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were significant predictors for a decline in ADL. For a decline in mobility, manual dexterity, balance, comfortable and fast walking speed, grip strength, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were all significant predictors. This proves the predictive validity of these physical fitness tests for daily functioning and stresses the importance of using physical fitness tests and implementing physical fitness enhancing programs in the care for older adults with ID.

  18. Spatial hearing in children with visual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ashmead, D H; Wall, R S; Ebinger, K A; Eaton, S B; Snook-Hill, M M; Yang, X

    1998-01-01

    A study is reported of the effect of early visual experience on the development of auditory space perception. The spatial hearing of thirty-five children with visual disabilities (twenty-two with congenital total blindness) was compared with that of eighteen sighted children and seventeen sighted adults. The tests provided a comprehensive assessment of spatial-hearing ability, including psychophysical estimates of spatial resolution in the horizontal, vertical, and distance dimensions, as well as measures of reaching and walking to the locations of sound sources. The spatial hearing of the children with visual disabilities was comparable to or somewhat better than that of the sighted children and adults. This pattern held even when the group with visual disabilities was restricted to those children with congenital total blindness; in fact, some of those children had exceptionally good spatial hearing. These findings imply that the developmental calibration of human spatial hearing is not dependent on a history of visual experience. It seems likely that this calibration arises from the experience of changes in sound-localization cues arising from self-motion, such as turning the head or walking. As a practical matter, orientation and mobility instructors may reasonably assume that individuals with visual disabilities can use their hearing effectively in day-to-day travel situations.

  19. Disability and Health: Exploring the Disablement Experience of Young Adult African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to examine disablement as experienced by young adult African American men and women with permanent mobility impairment. Methods This study included a sample of 5 male and 5 female participants ranging in age from 22 to 39. An exploratory descriptive design and qualitative methods, including interviews and fieldnotes, were used. Interview data was analyzed using the process of inductive qualitative content analysis. Results Basic desires for independence, shared intimacy, and psychological and physical health were not diminished by physical limitations. The disablement experience of this group is reflected in the themes of “Cumulative Losses” and “Sustained Desires.” The findings of this study describe the high level of motivation that young adult African American men and women with disabilities have to improve levels of health and well-being within the context of their impairments. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the contextual factors and experiences that may contribute to the development of further disability and subsequent health-related problems over time. Increased knowledge of the disablement experience of these young men and women may assist health care entities and social service providers in improving health care and rehabilitation efforts targeting this group. PMID:23745770

  20. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics…

  1. Using iPads with Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from Students, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper Rodríguez, Cathi; Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has increased greatly in recent years. Although the research in this area is still in its infancy, preliminary studies are showing a positive impact on the skills and academic engagement of students with disabilities. This column provides an overview of a selection of research studies involving mobile devices such as…

  2. Exploring Postsecondary Education Disability Service's Standards: Alignment with Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A study analyzing the perspectives held by higher education's disability service providers in regards to disability and/or students with disabilities in the implementation of program standards was carried out using a sequential mixed-methods design. Using the knowledge gather by Disability Studies scholars, the study used the constructs of…

  3. An Exploration of Community Learning Disability Nurses' Therapeutic Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsham, Marian

    2012-01-01

    This literature review and primary qualitative research explores therapeutic role from the perspective of Community Learning Disability Nurses. Semi-structured interviews, based on Critical Incident Technique ("Psychol Bull", 51, 1954, 327), and descriptive phenomenological methodology were adopted to elicit data amenable to systematic content…

  4. Grading Students with Significant Disabilities in Inclusive Settings: Teacher Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Jennifer; Gross, Megan; Lovinger, Stephanie; Catalano, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes teacher (K-12) opinions and practices related to grading and providing modified instruction, assignments, and assessments for students with low-incidence disabilities in inclusive settings. One hundred and thirty nine teachers working in K-12 inclusive schools in Arizona and California completed an on-line survey…

  5. Vitamin D and Fractures in People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanlint, S.; Nugent, M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) are thought to be at an increased risk of fractures. The extent of this increase in risk has been incompletely documented in the literature, and the underlying reasons remain to be elucidated. Methods: The aims of our study were to document the vitamin D status and fracture incidence in an…

  6. [Incidence of inguinal hernias].

    PubMed

    Michalský, R

    2001-04-01

    Groin hernia operation is the third most frequent operation in the Czech republic. Early recurrence of the hernia after prime operation is a medical failure. The recurrences can arise after all types of operation. Incidence of recurrences, time factors of its genesis and treatment are discussed there.

  7. Critical Incidents in Negotiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This report presents imaginary dialogues between a management team and an employee team and critiques the dialogues to emphasize the significance of situations and episodes that can hasten or hamper a settlement at the negotiation table. Three critical incidents are studied within each developmental phase of the negotiation process: (1) procedural…

  8. RAPID INCIDENT RESPONSE FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will discuss WERF Contract (RFP# 03-HHE-5PP), Protocols for the Timely Investigation of Potential Health Incidents Associated with Biosolids Land Application, as a member of the project advisory committee. The contractor, University of North Carolina, started work in early June, ...

  9. Incident meteoroid flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badadjanov, P. B.; Bibarsov, R. SH.; Getman, V. S.; Kolmakov, V. M.

    1987-01-01

    Complex photographic and radar meteor observations were carried out. Using the available observational data, the density of incident flux of meteoroids was estimated over a wide mass range of 0.001 to 100 g. To avoid the influence of apparatus selectivity a special technique was applied. The main characteristics of this technique are given and discussed.

  10. Dickens and disability.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1996-12-01

    The novels of Charles Dickens include many vivid portraits of individuals with physical disabilities or deformities, and these conditions are often used symbolically to highlight some of the author's recurring themes. Disabled children are depicted as innocent victims, while their older counterparts are most often viewed as corrupt victimizers whose physical deformities are outward manifestations of their inner depravity. Punishment for moral failings in non-disabled characters frequently takes the form of paralysis and/or aphasia resulting from a cerebrovascular accident. In this context the wheelchair becomes a potent metaphor of imprisonment as a form of retributive justice. PMID:9007422

  11. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  12. The Excessive Appearance of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalko, Rod

    2009-01-01

    This paper engages the appearance of disability in contemporary Western culture. Rather than taking disability for granted as a biomedical condition, I interrogate how disability is made to appear in our culture, including its appearance as a biomedical condition. Fundamentally, disability appears to us as a trouble and, as such, cultural…

  13. Student Disability and Experiential Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Gerald D.

    2009-01-01

    As a significant percentage of students in higher education today have one or more disabilities, it is important for instructors to be aware of what disabilities, and how disabilities, impact student performance. Students with a wide range of disabilities can encounter significant obstacles when experiential instructional methods are implemented…

  14. Reflections on Growing Up Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Reginald L., Ed.

    The book offers firsthand accounts of the experiences and perceptions of disabled persons, as well as the views of parents of disabled children. Entries include the following titles: "Reflections of Disabled Children" (J. Umbreit and D. Baker); "The Handicap That Had No Name" (D. Brown); "Orthopedically Disabled: Determination on Wheels" (D.…

  15. Information Package on Disability Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Perri; Lewin, Lori

    This document is a resource guide to disabilities studies, an approach to disability which seeks to examine the social, economic, and political forces that for years have served to marginalize and oppress people with disabilities. Following an introduction that explains the field of disability studies, Section 1 is an annotated bibliography of 13…

  16. Identification and placement for deaf students with multiple disabilities: choosing the path less followed.

    PubMed

    Guardino, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Students with a hearing loss often have an additional disability. Although the number of deaf students with multiple disabilities is growing, research on this population has significantly decreased over the past quarter-century. The article reviews the literature on identification and placement of deaf students with multiple disabilities, specifically deaf students with one of the following disabilities: autism, emotional/behavior disorders, attention deficit disorders, or mental retardation. Degree of incidence is also reported, and is compared with statistics from the annual report of the Gallaudet Research Institute (2005). Included in the review are suggestions for future research and implications for professionals in the field of deafness. PMID:18619069

  17. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  18. Cognitive Impairment and Disability in Older Japanese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Lee, Sangyoon; Suzuki, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of disability is increasing due to an expanding aging population and an increasing incidence of chronic health problems. Cognitive impairment may predict the development of disability in older adults. Therefore, we examined the association of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and/or general cognitive impairment (GCI, defined as a Mini Mental State Examination [MMSE] score of 20–23) with the development of disability in a cohort of Japanese community-dwelling older adults. A total of 4290 participants (aged ≥65 years) enrolled in the Obu Study of Health Promotion for the Elderly were classified according to the presence and degree of cognitive impairment as follows: cognitively healthy, GCI, MCI single domain (MCIs), MCIs with GCI, MCI multiple domain (MCIm), and MCIm with GCI. MMSE scores, risk factors for dementia, and incidences of new disability were recorded. After an average of 29.5 months, 205 participants (4.8%) experienced a new onset of disability. All subtypes of cognitive impairment showed significant relationships with disability except for GCI alone. The following hazard ratios (HRs) were determined: MCIs (HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.39–3.00), MCIs with GCI (HR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.21–3.62), MCIm (HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.39–3.85), and MCIm with GCI (HR, 4.23; 95% CI, 2.73–6.57). These results indicate that cognitive impairment may be related to an increased risk for the development of disability. Healthcare providers should implement global cognitive assessments to identify MCI and GCI and consider preventive interventions for disability, especially in older persons. PMID:27415430

  19. Patterns of Functional Disability in the Oldest Adults in China.

    PubMed

    Fong, Joelle H; Feng, Jun

    2016-09-01

    This study examined patterns of onset of activity of daily living (ADL) disability in a nationally representative sample of older adults in mainland China. Using longitudinal data from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey from 1998 to 2008 (N = 5,570), nonparametric methods were used to evaluate median age at onset of various ADL disabilities and differences in the incidence of disabilities according to sex. The sampled older Chinese adults developed ADL disabilities, on average, between the ages of 89 and 94. Women were likely to experience later onset than men. The results also show that the oldest adults generally lose bathing ability, followed by toileting, transferring, dressing, eating, and finally, continence. This order-derived from estimated median age at onset-was also found to be highly prevalent in subsequently disabled respondents in the sample. The disability experience of older adults in China is somewhat similar to that of older adults in Western developed countries; elderly adults tend to lose ability in activities that require lower extremity strength earlier than those that require upper extremity strength. The relative importance of the various ADL items in the hierarchical ordering has implications for early intervention to reduce the risk of functional disability in older adults and those at risk of transitions of care. PMID:27534382

  20. Want to Stay Mobile as You Age? a Healthy Diet May Do the Trick

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159583.html Want to Stay Mobile as You Age? A Healthy Diet May Do the Trick Study found ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy eating may help reduce a woman's risk of physical disability as she grows ...

  1. Approach to learning disability.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Kalantre, S; Upadhye, S; Karande, S; Ahuja, S

    2001-06-01

    Learning disabilities (LD) is one of the important causes of poor academic performance in school going children. Learning disabilities are developmental disorders that usually manifest during the period of normal education. These disabilities create a significant gap between the true potential and day to day performance of an individual. Dyslexia, dysgraphia and dyscalculia denote the problem related to reading, writing and mathematics. Perinatal problems are certain neurological conditions, known to be associated with LD; however, genetic predisposition seems to be the most probable etiological factors. Evaluation of a child suspected to be having LD consists of medical examination, vision and hearing test analysis of school performance. The psycho-behaviour assessment and education testing are essential in the process of diagnosis. The experienced persons in the field of LD should interpret the results of such tests. With Individualized Remedial Education Plan (IEP) most children learn to cope up with disability and may get integrated in a regular steam. PMID:11450386

  2. Cognition and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    1984-01-01

    The cognitive approach to education is briefly summarized, and its implications for learning disabilities considered. The approach, which includes the genetic epistemology espoused by J. Piaget and information processing theory, proposes the importance of active involvement and control processes. (CL)

  3. Disability and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Findings Disability-Related Documents Resources & Materials Multimedia & Tools Free Materials Grantee Information Information for ... and obesity are both labels for ranges of weight that are greater than what is ...

  4. Ethics in neurodevelopmental disability.

    PubMed

    Racine, Eric; Bell, Emily; Shevell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, like autism spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy are a common health problem in children. Given the impact of these conditions on children, families, and healthcare and social systems, the care of developmentally challenged children raises questions related to values and ethical principles. We review the common features of neurodevelopmental disorders that help understand the associated ethical questions. We focus on three major areas where ethical questions arise for clinicians and those involved in making decisions for or caring for these children: (1) the principles of decision-making and autonomy as they relate to developmental disability; (2) the issues related to quality of life that have long intersected with developmental disability; and (3) the use of unproven therapies and diagnostics that are particularly controversial given the extent that neurodevelopmental disabilities impact children and their families, yet active treatments options are limited. PMID:24182383

  5. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, FOA DP 13-001, initial review. In accordance with Section 10(a)(2... to ``Prevalence and Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, FOA DP 13-001, initial review.'' Contact... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention...

  6. Appendicular Fractures: A Significant Problem among Institutionalized Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, K. M.; Williams, J.; Womack, C.; Nayak, N. G.; Nasef, S.; Bush, A.; Tylavsky, F. A.; Carbone, L.

    2003-01-01

    This study found a high incidence of nontraumatic fractures in adults with developmental disabilities living in a state-run facility, a 7.3% incidence among 391 adults. Factors associated with fractures included use of antiepileptic medication. Although bone mineral density (BMD) by heel ultrasound did not predict fracture, values were much lower…

  7. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of the circulatory system. Cardiomyopathy accounted for 1% of general cardiologists' and for 7% of academic cardiologists' patient encounters. In Scandinavia, population surveys suggested an annual incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy ranging from 0.73 to 7.5 cases per 100,000 population; for Tokyo this figure is 2.6. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy in underdeveloped and in tropical countries is considerably higher than in developed countries.

  8. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions. PMID:20169800

  9. Autism and learning disability.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Gregory; Pearson, Joanne

    2004-06-01

    In this article a short overview is given of the relationship between autism and learning disability. Autism exists with any level of intelligence, but many individuals with autism suffer also from learning disability. Although both disorders show overlap in some behaviours they are different in many aspects. Are they distinct syndromes which influence each other, or do they belong to a broad spectrum of a condition?

  10. Sports and disability.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Pamela E; Clayton, Gerald H

    2010-03-01

    Participation in recreational and competitive sports at an early age has long been touted as a positive influence on growth and development, and for fostering lifelong healthy lifestyles. The benefits of an active lifestyle include not only fitness, but the promotion of a sense of inclusion and improved self-esteem. These benefits are well documented in all populations, and their importance has been summarized in the recent Healthy People 2010 guidelines. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recently produced a summary statement on the benefits of activity for disabled children. They note that children with disabilities tend to have an overall lower level of fitness and an increased level of obesity. For this population, developing a lifelong desire to be active can be a simple means for limiting illness and much of the morbidity associated with sedentary lifestyles often associated with disability. For disabled youth, participation in disabled sports programs available nationally and internationally can be an effective means to promote such precepts. The goal of this focused review is to improve the learner's knowledge of the positive impact that active lifestyles can have on overall health in the disabled youth population and, as a result, modify their practice by incorporating recreational and competitive sport activities as part of improving overall patient care.

  11. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  12. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  13. Part of Your General Public Is Disabled. A Handbook for Guides in Museums, Zoos, and Historic Houses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majewski, Janice

    Addressed to docents, the manual presents general guidelines for making public tours of museums, historic buildings, and zoos more accessible to handicapped persons. Information on eight major disability groups is provided (mental retardation, learning disabilities, hearing impairments, visual handicaps, mobility impairments, cerebral palsy,…

  14. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the…

  15. How to Find Good Apps: An Evaluation Rubric for Instructional Apps for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ok, Min Wook; Kim, Min Kyung; Kang, Eun Young; Bryant, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Computers can be an effective teaching method for students with learning disabilities (LD). The use of mobile devices as education tools for students with disabilities has received considerable attention in special education recently. Parents, teachers, and professionals look for effective applications (i.e., apps) that meet the needs of their…

  16. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  17. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  18. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  19. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  20. Administrative Challenge or Ethical Dilemma? Responding Justly when a Student with a Disability Engages in a Violent or Disruptive Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faircloth, Susan C.; Ritter, Suzanne T.; Wilson, Felicia R.

    2007-01-01

    This case study involves an 8-year-old American Indian student with a disability, who was videotaped assaulting another student as they exited the school bus. Although acts of school violence are common on campuses across the nation, this incident is particularly complex, given the disability status of the student committing this act. This case…

  1. Your Child Has a Learning Disability...What Is It? A Guide for Parents and Teachers. Revised 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabow, Beverly W.

    Intended for parents and teachers, the booklet describes the symptoms and need for early identification of learning disabilities. Sections address the definition of learning disabilities, characteristics, incidence, etiology, diagnosis, medication, education, counseling--therapy, and sources of information. Offered are tips for both parents (such…

  2. Assessing mental disability in minors.

    PubMed

    Mozes, T; Tyano, S

    2006-06-01

    Forensic psychiatry devotes a great deal of attention to the "imprecise" and "insufficiently scientific" nature of psychiatric disability assessment, and, for this reason, it is vitally important to establish a reliable method of assessing different levels of disability. The assessment of mental disability in minors is unique in that it involves developmental aspects, which affect the formation and outcome of the disability. The relationship between disability and development is reciprocal: disability can affect development, thereby intensifying the degree of disability, while development affects integration of the disability into the personality and self-image, thereby preventing or reducing the transformation of disability into handicap. Only an understanding of both the psychopathological structure and its interaction with developmental elements can lead to an accurate assessment of the degree of disability. Such an understanding is vital to the proper practice of forensic psychiatry. We hereby propose a new formula for disability quantification which provides an arithmetical means for the calculation of disability percentages in minors, and we recommend its use in the assessment of demands for National Insurance benefits and compensation claims. The relationship between this new formula and the existing Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) functional scale, when tested retrospectively on 50 clinical reports composed by the writers of this article, showed a good correlation in the results obtained independently by each writer. Two case studies are presented here. A further evaluation by objective evaluators is necessary in order to construct a model for a final objective evaluation of disability in children and adolescents. PMID:16929808

  3. Client Preference for a Disabled Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Harry A., Jr.; Cohen, Marc S.

    1980-01-01

    Preference for an able-bodied v disabled counselor was rated across three problem areas by disabled and nondisabled volunteers. Data demonstrated that nondisabled persons preferred nondisabled counselors, and disabled persons preferred disabled counselors. (Author)

  4. Bridging the Gap between Disability Studies and Disability Services in Higher Education: A Model Center on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Alan L.; Sales, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The professional field of Disability Services in Higher Education and the academic discipline of Disability Studies share a perspective on disability that considers disability as a socially constructed phenomenon. Despite this common underpinning, there has been little effort or inquiry into the ways that disability services and Disability Studies…

  5. Madness as disability.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Sander L

    2014-12-01

    How does society imagine mental illness? Does this shift radically over time and with different social attitudes as well as scientific discoveries about the origins and meanings of mental illness? What happens when we begin to think about mental illness as madness, as a malleable concept constantly shifting its meaning? We thus look at the meanings associated with 'general paralysis of the insane' in the nineteenth century and autism today in regard to disability. In this case study we examine the claims by scholars such as the anthropologist Emily Martin and the psychiatrist Kay Jamison as to the relationship between mental illness, disability and creativity. Today, the health sciences have become concerned with mental illness as a form of disability. How does this change the meaning of madness for practitioners and patients?

  6. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organizations International Classification of Diseases is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the ICD has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field, requiring that all “conditions” in the ICD be named as a “disorder.” This article discusses the effect of naming on how people with intellectual disability are perceived by others and how they perceive themselves. The importance of continuing to move the field toward the adoption of functional/person-environment fit models of disability is discussed. “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1–2) PMID:23537360

  7. 75 FR 9821 - Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ..., Disability benefits, Old-age, Survivors and Disability Insurance, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements... set forth below: PART 404--FEDERAL OLD AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Subpart P-- 1....gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . What Do Our Current Rules Provide? Under our current rules, a State...

  8. Math Disabilities and Reading Disabilities: Can They Be Separated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga; Zheng, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    This article synthesizes some of the published literature that selectively compares the cognitive functioning of children with math disabilities (MDs) with average-achieving children and poor readers (children with reading disabilities [RDs] or comorbid disabilities [RDs + MDs]). All studies in the synthesis report reading, IQ, and math scores for…

  9. Growing Up Physically Disabled: Factors in the Evaluation of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Nancy

    1982-01-01

    Investigated how people with congenital orthopedic disabilities intially learn that they are different and how they learn the evaluative meaning associated with being disabled. Analyzed the content of 29 autobiographies. Results indicated that people born with orthopedic disabilities discover between ages 3 and 5 that they are different. (Author)

  10. Thrice Disabling Disability: Enabling Inclusive, Socially Just Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, S. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice-oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism-as-culture movement.…

  11. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language…

  12. Federal Family and Disability Policy: Special Relevance for Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III; Stowe, Matthew J.; Agosta, John; Turnbull, Ann P.; Schrandt, M. Suzanne; Muller, John F.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews federal policy affecting families who have children or adult members with disabilities, particularly but not exclusively developmental disabilities. It reviews the federal statutes and family-and-disability related decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and the other courts. It then reviews the research on current family support…

  13. Distinguishing "Yearning Disabilities" from Learning Disabilities in Postsecondary Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Donald W.

    1994-01-01

    Many postsecondary students who request academic accommodations for learning disabilities actually show no documentable learning disability but a discrepancy between their intellectual ability and their achievement aspirations (i.e., a "yearning disability") rather than a discrepancy between their ability and achievement (i.e., a learning…

  14. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of…

  15. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  16. Racist Incident-Based Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ocampo, Carlota

    2005-01-01

    Racist incidents are potentially traumatizing forms of victimization that may lead to increased psychiatric and psychophysiological symptoms in targets. The magnitude of the problem of racist incidents in the United States is difficult to estimate; however, data from several sources permit the inference that the prevalence of racist incidents,…

  17. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  18. Sports-related injuries in athletes with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Fagher, K; Lexell, J

    2014-10-01

    The number of athletes with disabilities participating in organized sports and the popularity of the Paralympic Games is steadily increasing around the world. Despite this growing interest and the fact that participation in sports places the athlete at risk for injury, there are few studies concerning injury patterns, risk factors, and prevention strategies of injuries in disabled athletes. In this systematic literature search and critical review, we summarize current knowledge of the epidemiology of sports-related injuries in disabled athletes and describe their characteristics, incidence, prevalence, and prevention strategies. The outcomes of interest were any injury, either an acute trauma or an overuse event. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were systematically searched and 25 of 605 identified studies met the inclusion criteria. Lower extremity injuries were more common in walking athletes, whereas upper extremity injuries were more prevalent in wheelchair athletes. The methodologies and populations varied widely between the studies. Few studies were sports or disability specific, which makes it difficult to determine specific risk factors, and few studies reported injury severity and prevention of injuries. Further longitudinal, systematic sports and disability specific studies are needed in order to identify and prevent injuries in athletes with disabilities.

  19. Mobile robot sense net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konolige, Kurt G.; Gutmann, Steffen; Guzzoni, Didier; Ficklin, Robert W.; Nicewarner, Keith E.

    1999-08-01

    Mobile robot hardware and software is developing to the point where interesting applications for groups of such robots can be contemplated. We envision a set of mobots acting to map and perform surveillance or other task within an indoor environment (the Sense Net). A typical application of the Sense Net would be to detect survivors in buildings damaged by earthquake or other disaster, where human searchers would be put a risk. As a team, the Sense Net could reconnoiter a set of buildings faster, more reliably, and more comprehensibly than an individual mobot. The team, for example, could dynamically form subteams to perform task that cannot be done by individual robots, such as measuring the range to a distant object by forming a long baseline stereo sensor form a pari of mobots. In addition, the team could automatically reconfigure itself to handle contingencies such as disabled mobots. This paper is a report of our current progress in developing the Sense Net, after the first year of a two-year project. In our approach, each mobot has sufficient autonomy to perform several tasks, such as mapping unknown areas, navigating to specific positions, and detecting, tracking, characterizing, and classifying human and vehicular activity. We detail how some of these tasks are accomplished, and how the mobot group is tasked.

  20. Benefits for Children with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Social Security . . . 3 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Supplemental Security Income ( SSI) payments for children with disabilities. . . . . 4 Social Security ... for adults disabled since childhood. . . . . 10 Applying for SSI payments or SSDI benefits and how you can ...

  1. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  2. Mortality and disability among granite workers.

    PubMed

    Koskela, R S; Klockars, M; Järvinen, E; Kolari, P J; Rossi, A

    1987-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the mortality, disability, and long-term morbidity of granite workers. The study included 1,026 workers hired between 1940 and 1971 and followed until the end of 1981. The total number of deaths was 235, and the expected number was 229.7. Excess mortality rates were observed for respiratory diseases (observed/expected = 28/13.9). The number of tumor deaths was 46 (expected 44.9). Excess lung cancer mortality was evident at 15 to 35 years of latency; the observed number of lung cancer deaths for the follow-up period of 25 to 29 years was 8, while 2.1 were expected. Mortality from cardiovascular diseases and violent deaths was slightly less than expected. The results for disability and long-term morbidity showed elevated incidence and prevalence rates for respiratory diseases and rheumatoid arthritis. The observed number of disability pensions due to rheumatoid arthritis in 1981 was 10 observed versus 1.8 expected, and the observed number of patients granted free medication was 19 versus 8.1 expected. The results indicate that granite dust exposure per se may be an etiologic and pathogenetic factor for lung cancer, cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, and some extrapulmonary nonmalignant chronic diseases.

  3. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  4. School problems and solutions for students with disabilities: a qualitative examination.

    PubMed

    Sorani-Villanueva, Sandra; McMahon, Susan D; Crouch, Ronald; Keys, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities is a process that requires collaboration among multiple individuals, with teachers, aides, parents, students, and school systems playing important roles in resolving student problems. In the current study, we examined data from 75 teachers concerning 126 students about problems that students with disabilities had following a transition from a school primarily serving students with disabilities to more inclusive schools. Reported problems were reviewed and five major themes emerged: academic, behavioral, mobility/accessibility, social, and transportation issues. Teachers typically resolved academic problems by working directly with the student or collaborating with school staff. Social problems were resolved through student and teacher initiatives. Behavioral, transportation, and mobility/accessibility problems were resolved through collaboration among many key school figures and family members. Implications for theory, research, and inclusive school practices related to academic curricula, resources, services, and architectural accommodations for students with disabilities are discussed. PMID:24447159

  5. School problems and solutions for students with disabilities: a qualitative examination.

    PubMed

    Sorani-Villanueva, Sandra; McMahon, Susan D; Crouch, Ronald; Keys, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities is a process that requires collaboration among multiple individuals, with teachers, aides, parents, students, and school systems playing important roles in resolving student problems. In the current study, we examined data from 75 teachers concerning 126 students about problems that students with disabilities had following a transition from a school primarily serving students with disabilities to more inclusive schools. Reported problems were reviewed and five major themes emerged: academic, behavioral, mobility/accessibility, social, and transportation issues. Teachers typically resolved academic problems by working directly with the student or collaborating with school staff. Social problems were resolved through student and teacher initiatives. Behavioral, transportation, and mobility/accessibility problems were resolved through collaboration among many key school figures and family members. Implications for theory, research, and inclusive school practices related to academic curricula, resources, services, and architectural accommodations for students with disabilities are discussed.

  6. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward…

  7. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  8. Literary Characters Who Are Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Keith; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Determines which specific disability categories appear most often in literature, when they appear, and which authors have contributed most to their appearance. Physical disabilities have been portrayed most often, followed by alcoholism and sensory disorders. Most portrayals of disabilities appeared between 1900 and 1949 and Charles Dickens wrote…

  9. Emerging Technologies and Cognitive Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddock, David; Rizzolo, Mary C.; Thompson, Micah; Bell, Rodney

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive disability entails a substantial limitation in one's capacity to think, including conceptualizing, planning, and sequencing thoughts and actions, remembering, interpreting subtle social cues, and understanding numbers and symbols. Cognitive disabilities include intellectual disabilities and can also stem from brain injury, Alzheimer's…

  10. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    Reviewed 1998 and early 1999 court decisions related to disability discrimination in higher education. This period witnessed major developments in the law of disability discrimination as it relates to higher education. A major focus was on whether persons whose impairments are ameliorated by treatment are individuals with disabilities covered by…

  11. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but Learning…

  12. Employment and People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue offers six articles on employment of people with disabilities. "Employment and People with Disabilities: Challenges for the Nineties" (Frank Bowe) discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act, issues in unemployment and under-education, earnings, and implications for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative…

  13. Entrepreneurship among People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holub, Tamara

    This brief paper reviews the literature on entrepreneurship among people with disabilities. It notes that entrepreneurship by individuals with disabilities is often a consequence of disability discrimination in the workforce and provides both benefits and disadvantages such as independence and freedom from access-related obstacles (benefits) and…

  14. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court cases in 1999 related to disability discrimination in higher education focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The "Garrett" case regarding Eleventh Amendment immunity is the case most likely to be significant in the development of the law of disability discrimination. (SLD)

  15. Attitudes toward people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Brillhart, B A; Jay, H; Wyers, M E

    1990-01-01

    Attitudes toward people with disabilities are learned, emotionally toned predispositions. This study compares such attitudes held by nursing faculty, beginning nursing students, graduating nursing students, registered nurses, and people with disabilities. Results of the study indicate that persons with disabilities were significantly more positive in their attitudes. Faculty held the least positive attitude, closely followed by graduating nursing students.

  16. Disability Management in Small Firms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, David

    1991-01-01

    Notes that American research has paid relatively little attention to prospects for adapting disability management practices to financial and management environment of smaller employers. Compares large and small firms in terms of employer disability practices and characteristics of disabled workers; discusses barriers to rehabilitation and…

  17. Resources to Support Disabled Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2008-01-01

    With 4 to 6 percent of all students in the nation's public schools classified as having specific learning disabilities, according to the Learning Disabilities Association of America (LDA), most teachers can expect to have students who are learning disabled in their classrooms. This presents a challenge to teachers and administrators alike, who are…

  18. Accommodating Law Faculty with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Bonnie Poitras; Smith, Joseph F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The obligations of law schools, under federal law, to accommodate faculty with disabilities are examined. Employment provisions of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the definition of a disabled individual are reviewed, and real and hypothetical scenarios in hiring and employing law teachers are…

  19. The Politics of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Forness, Steven R.

    1998-01-01

    This analysis of the politics of learning disabilities finds that the balance between political and scientific aspects of learning disabilities has been disturbed, with political aspects being overly influential. Discussed in detail are the scientific side of learning disabilities, politics as advocacy, politics as ideology (especially Marxism),…

  20. Self Image and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jill; Diller, Howard

    This book discusses the poor self-image of children with learning disabilities, reviews the history of identifying and serving children with learning disabilities, and addresses the need to serve children who are failing in school but do not qualify as having a learning disability. The book emphasizes the role and responsibility of the school for…

  1. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people…

  2. Pelvic Incidence in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Ibrahim J.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Restrepo, Santiago; Albert, Todd J.; Radcliff, Kris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability that results in considerable social and medical costs. Mechanics such as posture, alignment and orientation of the hips and the spinal column and the relationship between these factors have been implicated in the development of both hip and spine pathologies. This study aims to test the hypothesis if pelvic incidence varies in patients with and without osteoarthritis. We assessed the relationship between spinopelvic alignment as measured by pelvic incidence (PI) and the presence of hip OA. Methods: We collected supine pelvis CT scans of 1,012 consecutive patients not known to have hip OA. Our first group consisted of 95 patients with moderate to severe hip OA as per radiology reports. The second group included 87 patients with no evidence of hip OA. Power analysis revealed the need for 77 patients per group to find a mean difference in PI of 5° or less between both groups. Two trained physicians independently measured the PI to account for inter-observer reliability. Results: Patients with moderate to severe hip OA had a mean PI of 56.5°±12.8°. The mean PI for patients without hip OA was 57.2°±7.5°. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference between the PI values of the two groups. Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.754 demonstrated a high inter-observer reliability. Conclusion: There was no difference in PI angle of hip OA patients and “healthy” patients. Our measurements of patients without OA were almost identical to the reported normal PI values in the literature. It appears that hip OA is not associated with PI angle, refuting the hypothesis made in previous studies, stating that elevated PI contributes to the future development of hip arthritis. CT scan seems to be a reliable and accurate way of assessing pelvic incidence. PMID:27200390

  3. Mobile shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  4. The Positive Effects of Early Powered Mobility on Children's Psychosocial and Play Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan; Tefft, Donita

    2013-01-01

    Powered mobility can have an important cognitive and psychosocial impact on young children who are unable to move independently. Twenty-three children with physical disabilities between the ages of 18 months and 6 years participated in this study. Data evaluating social skills, frequency of mobility play activities, frequency of interaction with…

  5. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics…

  6. Advances in learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Nass, R

    1994-04-01

    This review reports recent findings about diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, genetics, neuropsychological underpinnings, neuroanatomy, etiology, outcome, and treatment for the following: pervasive developmental disorder, the developmental language disorders, dyslexia, and dyscalculia. In addition, recent findings about neurological correlates, medical causes, and gender effects of learning disabilities are discussed. PMID:8019665

  7. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to acquaint business and industry with the programs and resources available to help diversify the workforce by hiring people with disabilities. It also provides information to businesses on how to access resources to better meet the growing need of business for a skilled workforce. This guide is the product of a joint…

  8. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  9. Disability: The College's Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourihan, John P., Ed.

    Fifteen author-contributed papers are presented to help campus personnel understand the difficulties encountered by disabled college students. Initial sections address issues and strategies involved, while a third section presents six case studies describing successful programs. A final chapter lists annotated resource guides on aspects of higher…

  10. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of…

  11. Obesity and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; Yamaki, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    While much of the industrialized world struggles for clues to the growing rise in obesity in their respective countries, researchers and service providers involved in understanding the health characteristics and health behaviors of persons with intellectual disability (ID) struggle with their own issues regarding the increased prevalence of…

  12. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  13. Autonomy, justice, and disability.

    PubMed

    Ball, C A

    2000-02-01

    In this Article, Professor Carlos A. Ball explores the philosophical foundations for the types of rights and benefits that our society currently provides to individuals with disabilities. The concept of autonomy places on society a moral obligation to assist individuals with disabilities when their basic human functional capabilities are impaired. The exercise of this obligation entails assisting individuals with crossing a minimum threshold of functional capabilities below which it is not possible to lead autonomous lives. In making this argument, Professor Ball responds to libertarian critics who contend that notions of freedom or liberty proscribe an activist role for government in this arena. He explains how even a libertarian state redistributes wealth in order to provide for some incapacities. Professor Ball also disputes the idea that the meeting of the needs of the disabled is enough to provide moral justification for the rights and benefits provided to individuals with disabilities. The problem with the concept of needs, Professor Ball argues, is that it fails to account sufficiently for the human good of personal autonomy.

  14. Americans with Disabilities Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updating School Board Policies, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Addressed to school board members, this article attempts to summarize requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its implications for school districts. It warns against hasty purchase of private compliance assistance; then provides an overview of each of the Act's five Titles which address employment practices, activities…

  15. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:…

  16. Societal Factors in Disablement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonak, Richard F.

    1985-01-01

    Examined data from a questionnaire concerning people with chronic health, emotional, mental, physical, and sensory impairments, and four respondent demographic and experiential characteristics to determine if 150 human service providers endorsed the premise that components of society disable people who are impaired. Results confirmed that…

  17. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…

  18. The Australian Incident Monitoring Study. Difficult intubation: an analysis of 2000 incident reports.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J A; Webb, R K; Szekely, S; Gillies, E R; Dreosti, A V

    1993-10-01

    The first 2000 incidents reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study were analysed with respect to the incidence and circumstances of problems with endotracheal intubation; 85 (4%) indicated difficulties with intubation. One third of these were emergency cases, one third involved an initially unassisted trainee and one fifth were outside normal working hours. Failure to predict a difficult intubation was reported in one third of the cases, with another quarter presenting serious difficulty despite preoperative prediction. Difficulties with ventilation were experienced in 1 in 7 of the 85 reports; there was one cardiac arrest, but no death. Endotracheal intubation was not achieved in one fifth of the cases. The commonest complications reported amongst the 85 incidents were oesophageal intubation (18 cases), arterial desaturation (15 cases), and reflux of gastric contents (7 cases). Emergency trans-tracheal airways were required in 5 cases. Obesity, limited neck mobility and mouth opening, and inadequate assistance together accounted for two thirds of all the contributing factors. The most successful intubation aid in this series was a gum elastic bougie. A capnograph contributed to management in 28% and a pulse oximeter in 12% of the cases in which they were used. The most serious desaturations were associated with accidental oesophageal intubation. These data suggest a lack of reliable preoperative assessment techniques and skills for the prediction of difficult intubations. They also suggest the need for a greater emphasis on ensuring that the necessary equipment is available, and on teaching and learning drills for difficult intubation and any associated difficulty with ventilation.

  19. Working Together: Computers and People with Mobility Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes several computing tools that have been effectively used by individuals with mobility impairments. Emphasis is on tasks to be completed and how the individuals abilities (not disabilities), with possible assistance from technology, can be used to accomplish them. Preliminary information addresses the importance of…

  20. Overcoming Challenges: "Going Mobile with Your Own Video Models"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Christina R.; Basham, James D.; Christman, Jennifer; Hollingshead, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be an effective intervention for students with a variety of disabilities. Traditional video models present problems in terms of application across meaningful settings, such as in the community or even across the school environment. However, with advances in mobile technology, portable devices with video capability…

  1. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  2. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Rachel E; Fregly, Benjamin J; Boninger, Michael L; Chan, Leighton; Rodgers, Mary M; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2012-04-20

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments.

  3. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  4. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  5. Assistance System for Disabled People: A Robot Controlled by Blinking and Wireless Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Val, Lara; Jiménez, María I.; Alonso, Alonso; de La Rosa, Ramón; Izquierdo, Alberto; Carrera, Albano

    Disabled people already profit from a lot of technical assistance that improves their quality of life. This article presents a system which will allow interaction between a physically disabled person and his environment. This system is controlled by voluntary muscular movements, particularly those of face muscles. These movements will be translated into machine-understandable instructions, and they will be sent by means of a wireless link to a mobile robot that will execute them. Robot includes a video camera, in order to show the user the environment of the route that the robot follows. This system gives a greater personal autonomy to people with reduced mobility.

  6. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  7. Sexual and Nonsexual Offenders With Intellectual and Learning Disabilities: A Comparison of Characteristics, Referral Patterns, and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Smith, Anne H. W.; Law, Jacqueline; Quinn, Kathleen; Anderson, Andrew; Smith, Astrid; Allan, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of a community intellectual disability offender service over the period from 1990 to 2001. Men who committed sex offenses or sexually abusive incidents (n = 106) and men who committed other types of offenses and serious incidents (n = 78) are compared on personal characteristics, referral sources, forensic…

  8. Including Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students with Co-Occurring Disabilities in the Accommodations Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppo, Rachel H. T.; Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Bond, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    (Purpose) Students who are deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH) are a low-incidence group of students; however, SDHH also have a high incidence of additional disabilities (SDHH+). Many SDHH and SDHH+ require accommodations for equal access to classroom instruction and assessment, particularly in mainstreamed educational settings where spoken English is…

  9. Processing of Speech Signals for Physical and Sensory Disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Harry

    1995-10-01

    Assistive technology involving voice communication is used primarily by people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have speech and/or language disabilities. It is also used to a lesser extent by people with visual or motor disabilities. A very wide range of devices has been developed for people with hearing loss. These devices can be categorized not only by the modality of stimulation [i.e., auditory, visual, tactile, or direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (auditory-neural)] but also in terms of the degree of speech processing that is used. At least four such categories can be distinguished: assistive devices (a) that are not designed specifically for speech, (b) that take the average characteristics of speech into account, (c) that process articulatory or phonetic characteristics of speech, and (d) that embody some degree of automatic speech recognition. Assistive devices for people with speech and/or language disabilities typically involve some form of speech synthesis or symbol generation for severe forms of language disability. Speech synthesis is also used in text-to-speech systems for sightless persons. Other applications of assistive technology involving voice communication include voice control of wheelchairs and other devices for people with mobility disabilities.

  10. Processing of speech signals for physical and sensory disabilities.

    PubMed

    Levitt, H

    1995-10-24

    Assistive technology involving voice communication is used primarily by people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have speech and/or language disabilities. It is also used to a lesser extent by people with visual or motor disabilities. A very wide range of devices has been developed for people with hearing loss. These devices can be categorized not only by the modality of stimulation [i.e., auditory, visual, tactile, or direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (auditory-neural)] but also in terms of the degree of speech processing that is used. At least four such categories can be distinguished: assistive devices (a) that are not designed specifically for speech, (b) that take the average characteristics of speech into account, (c) that process articulatory or phonetic characteristics of speech, and (d) that embody some degree of automatic speech recognition. Assistive devices for people with speech and/or language disabilities typically involve some form of speech synthesis or symbol generation for severe forms of language disability. Speech synthesis is also used in text-to-speech systems for sightless persons. Other applications of assistive technology involving voice communication include voice control of wheelchairs and other devices for people with mobility disabilities. PMID:7479816

  11. Barriers and facilitators to community mobility for assistive technology users.

    PubMed

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. PMID:23029617

  12. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. PMID:23029617

  13. Changes in Disability Levels Among Older Adults Experiencing Adverse Events in Postacute Rehabilitation Care

    PubMed Central

    Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Navarro-Pujalte, Esther; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the relationship between adverse events (AEs) and changes in the levels of disability from admission to discharge during inpatient rehabilitation programs. A prospective cohort study was conducted among a cohort of inpatients (216 older adults) admitted to a rehabilitation unit. The occurrences of any AE were reported. The level of disability regarding mobility activities was estimated using the disability qualifiers from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Changes in the levels of disability between admission and discharge were assessed. Baseline-measured covariates were also selected. Regarding all 4 disability levels (“no limitation,” “mild,” “moderate,” “severe,” and “complete disability”), a total of 159 participants experienced an improvement at discharge (126 participants progressed 1 level, whereas 33 improved 2 disability levels), 56 made no change, and no participants experienced a decline. The occurrence of fall-related events and the diagnostic group (musculoskeletal system) are specific predictive factors of change in the level of disability. The odds of undergoing a change in any disability level between admission and discharge decreases by 68% (1–0.32) when patients experience fall-related events (odds ratio [OR] = 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.97, P = 0.041) and increases for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.34–11.38, P = 0.012). Our findings suggest that increased efforts to prevent the occurrence of these AEs, together with early interventions suited to the diagnosis of the affected system, may have a positive influence on the improvement of disability. Further studies should evaluate disability over time after discharge to obtain a better sense of how transient or permanent the associated disability may be. PMID:25715255

  14. Prostitution, disability and prohibition.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frej Klem

    2015-06-01

    Criminalisation of prostitution, and minority rights for disabled persons, are important contemporary political issues. The article examines their intersection by analysing the conditions and arguments for making a legal exception for disabled persons to a general prohibition against purchasing sexual services. It explores the badness of prostitution, focusing on and discussing the argument that prostitution harms prostitutes, considers forms of regulation and the arguments for and against with emphasis on a liberty-based objection to prohibition, and finally presents and analyses three arguments for a legal exception, based on sexual rights, beneficence, and luck egalitarianism, respectively. It concludes that although the general case for and against criminalisation is complicated there is a good case for a legal exception.

  15. How to accommodate women with mobility limitations in biological studies.

    PubMed

    Walker, Janiece L; Tovar, Marlene; Harrison, Tracie C; Wommack, Joel

    2015-01-01

    People with disabilities should be routinely included in research studies if there is no specific reason for their exclusion. Regardless, they may be inadvertently excluded because of the procedures of the study. By conducting a community-based biological study with women aging with mobility limitations, these authors gained further understanding of their accommodation needs during research participation. The women aging with mobility limitations offered specific physical, cultural, or environmental needs that could have influenced the methods, procedures, and possible outcomes involved when conducting a biological study with this community living population. The authors and participants identified methodological challenges for women with mobility impairments within three key areas: recruitment procedures, laboratory procedures, and community-based data collection. The authors propose possible solutions to these identified challenges. It is our hope that this will begin a larger dialogue on how to routinely accommodate people with disabilities in biological research studies.

  16. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  17. Disability Does Not Discriminate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Amy Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the "it can't happen to me" mentality, which makes humans think they are physically invincible and have been guilty of thinking so. The author learned the danger of the "it can't happen to me" syndrome when she was disabled in a car accident in February 1994. The accident happened when she was 21 years old,…

  18. Altitude Modulates Concussion Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Currie, Dustin W.; Comstock, R. Dawn; Clark, Joseph F.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that the volume and/or pressure of intracranial fluid, a physiology affected by one’s altitude (ie, elevation above sea level), may be associated with the likelihood and/or severity of a concussion. The objective was to employ an epidemiological field investigation to evaluate the relationship between altitude and concussion rate in high school sports. Hypothesis: Because of the physiologies that occur during acclimatization, including a decline in intracranial compliance (a “tighter fit”), increased altitude may be related to a reduction in concussion rates in high school athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data on concussions and athlete exposures (AEs) between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012 were obtained from a large national sample of high schools (National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System [High School RIO]) and were used to calculate total, competition, and practice concussion rates for aggregated sports and for football only. Results: Altitude of participating schools ranged from 7 to 6903 ft (median, 600 ft), and a total of 5936 concussions occurred in 20,618,915 exposures (2.88 per 10,000 AEs). When concussion rates were dichotomized by altitude using the median, elevated altitude was associated with a reduction in concussion rates overall (rate ratio [RR], 1.31; P < .001), in competition (RR, 1.31; P < .001), and in practice (RR, 1.29; P < .001). Specifically, high school sports played at higher altitude demonstrated a 31% reduction (95% confidence interval [CI], 25%-38%) in the incidence of total reported concussions. Likewise, concussion rates at increased altitude were reduced 30% for overall exposures, 27% for competition exposures, and 28% for practice exposures in football players (P < .001). Conclusion: The results of this epidemiological investigation indicate increased physiological responses to altitude may be associated with a reduction in sports

  19. Impairment, disability, and handicap.

    PubMed

    Mooney, V

    1987-08-01

    It seems clear that the orthopedic surgeon cannot separate impairment from disability. The measurement of impairment is clouded by the inability to measure dynamic function. A range of motion demonstrated by a patient in the doctor's office does not fully describe the functional potential of either the extremity or the spine. Moreover, the rules by which disability is defined are interpreted with a natural sympathy of the physician's care for the patient. The physician may have less sympathy if the individual being reviewed is a client of an insurance company or of an attorney, compared to being a "private" patient. In the future, the orthopedic surgeon would focus on the musculoskeletal handicap rather than disability, or function rather than impairment. Function must be measured in a dynamic manner. The guidelines for definition of function or dysfunction should be similar to those used in sports medicine regarding the decision as to when the athlete can resume sports. What was the capacity before injury? How close to the normal capacity has medical care restored function? This includes measurements of passage of time and consideration of the desire to return to previous activity. The goal is the development of methods that will accurately measure dynamic musculoskeletal function. Visceral organ systems have biochemical standards of measurement; comparable standards must be devised for the musculoskeletal system.

  20. Unpacking intoxication, racialising disability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mel Y

    2015-06-01

    This article examines concepts whose strictly medical applications have only partly informed their widespread use and suggests that demonstrably shared logics motivate our thinking across domains in the interest of a politically just engagement. It considers exchanges between the culturally complex concepts of 'toxicity' and 'intoxication', assessing the racialised conditions of their animation in several geopolitically--and quite radically--distinct scenarios. First, the article sets the framework through considering the racial implications of impairment and disability language of 'non-toxic' finance capital in the contemporary US financial crisis. Shifting material foci from 'illiquid financial bodies' to opiates while insisting that neither is 'more' metaphorically toxic than the other, the article turns to address the role of opium and temporality in the interanimations of race and disability in two sites of 19th-century British empire: Langdon Down's clinic for idiocy, and China's retort on opium to Queen Victoria. The article concludes with a provocation that suggests yet another crossing of borders, that between researcher and researched: 'intoxicated method' is a hypothetical mode of approach that refuses idealised research positions by 'critically disabling' the idealised cognitive and conceptual lens of analysis.

  1. Impairment, disability, and handicap.

    PubMed

    Mooney, V

    1987-08-01

    It seems clear that the orthopedic surgeon cannot separate impairment from disability. The measurement of impairment is clouded by the inability to measure dynamic function. A range of motion demonstrated by a patient in the doctor's office does not fully describe the functional potential of either the extremity or the spine. Moreover, the rules by which disability is defined are interpreted with a natural sympathy of the physician's care for the patient. The physician may have less sympathy if the individual being reviewed is a client of an insurance company or of an attorney, compared to being a "private" patient. In the future, the orthopedic surgeon would focus on the musculoskeletal handicap rather than disability, or function rather than impairment. Function must be measured in a dynamic manner. The guidelines for definition of function or dysfunction should be similar to those used in sports medicine regarding the decision as to when the athlete can resume sports. What was the capacity before injury? How close to the normal capacity has medical care restored function? This includes measurements of passage of time and consideration of the desire to return to previous activity. The goal is the development of methods that will accurately measure dynamic musculoskeletal function. Visceral organ systems have biochemical standards of measurement; comparable standards must be devised for the musculoskeletal system. PMID:2955986

  2. Nonverbal learning disability.

    PubMed

    Volden, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) is described as a subtype of specific learning disability where the source of the disability is a difficulty in processing nonverbal information. The child with NLD presents with problems in visual, spatial, and tactile perception but with strengths in rote verbal skills. Traditionally, these children were recognized by their difficulties in arithmetic which presented a stark contrast with their strengths in spelling and decoding text. They also exhibited a split between their verbal IQ (VIQ) and performance IQ (PIQ) scores with the VIQ being significantly higher than PIQ. Over time, however, diagnostic criteria have evolved and the broadened definition of the NLD syndrome has led many to question the utility and uniqueness of the NLD diagnosis. In addition, shifting diagnostic standards have made research results difficult to replicate. In short, the research to date leaves many unanswered questions about (1) the definition of the NLD syndrome, (2) the pervasiveness of the academic, social and psychopathological difficulties, (3) the source of the NLD syndrome, and (4) the degree to which it overlaps with other conditions. This chapter outlines a brief history of the NLD syndrome, how it is currently conceptualized, and some of the current debate about the unanswered questions above. PMID:23622171

  3. Unpacking intoxication, racialising disability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mel Y

    2015-06-01

    This article examines concepts whose strictly medical applications have only partly informed their widespread use and suggests that demonstrably shared logics motivate our thinking across domains in the interest of a politically just engagement. It considers exchanges between the culturally complex concepts of 'toxicity' and 'intoxication', assessing the racialised conditions of their animation in several geopolitically--and quite radically--distinct scenarios. First, the article sets the framework through considering the racial implications of impairment and disability language of 'non-toxic' finance capital in the contemporary US financial crisis. Shifting material foci from 'illiquid financial bodies' to opiates while insisting that neither is 'more' metaphorically toxic than the other, the article turns to address the role of opium and temporality in the interanimations of race and disability in two sites of 19th-century British empire: Langdon Down's clinic for idiocy, and China's retort on opium to Queen Victoria. The article concludes with a provocation that suggests yet another crossing of borders, that between researcher and researched: 'intoxicated method' is a hypothetical mode of approach that refuses idealised research positions by 'critically disabling' the idealised cognitive and conceptual lens of analysis. PMID:26052116

  4. Harnessing Critical Incidents for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patahuddin, Sitti Maesuri; Lowrie, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A critical incident is a situation or event that holds significance for learning, both for the students and teachers. This paper presents four examples of critical incidents from a Year 7 teacher's lesson excerpts in Indonesia involving teaching of fractions, to show how they shaped classroom situation, brought forward elements of conflict, and…

  5. Understanding Learning Disabilities and Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Nonnie; Shadoff, Sander

    This guide is designed to assist people with learning disabilities to recognize their disabilities and the connection between learning disabilities and substance abuse. It begins by defining learning disabilities and providing a self-test checklist for common signs and symptoms of learning disabilities. Difficulties with organization, memory,…

  6. Mobility of University Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    This study deals with interuniversity mobility. Part I examines the harmonization of action taken to encourage mobility, the removal of legislative and statutory obstacles to mobility, the simplification of university staff regulations and careers, and incentives to mobility. Part II describes the ideas and activities of UNESCO, the Council of…

  7. Trajectories of Unhealthy Behaviors in Midlife and Risk of Disability at Older Ages in the Whitehall II Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sabia, Séverine; Dugravot, Aline; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Elbaz, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most of the evidence on the association between unhealthy behaviors and disability comes from studies in the elderly, where reverse causation and selection bias may distort associations; thus, studies based on midlife trajectories of health behaviors are needed. We examined the association of trajectories of four health behaviors (physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, smoking, alcohol), starting in midlife and over 20 years, with subsequent disability risk in early old age (range = 54–84 years) in the Whitehall II cohort study. Methods: Disability was assessed three times over 3 years. A hierarchical disability indicator was constructed; participants were considered disabled if they reported difficulties with mobility and instrumental activities of daily living or with mobility and instrumental and basic activities of daily living. Behavior trajectories were defined using group-based trajectory models. Multivariable generalized estimating equations logistic models were used to examine their independent associations with disability. Results: Of 6,825 participants, 19.2% reported being disabled at least once. In mutually adjusted models, participants with persistent inactivity or declining physical activity, recent ex- or current smokers, and persistent/recent abstainers or persistent heavy drinkers had a higher disability risk, whereas fruit and vegetable consumption was not associated with disability. Disability risk increased progressively with the number of unhealthy behavior trajectories: the odds ratio of disability for 2–3 unhealthy trajectories was 2.69 (95% confidence interval = 2.26–3.19); these associations remained after adjustment for a wide range of covariates. Conclusions: Unhealthy behavior trajectories in midlife are associated with greater disability risk later in life. PMID:27034508

  8. Main Idea Identification with Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities and Specific Learning Disabilities: A Comparison of Explicit and Basal Instructional Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, C. Alan; Darch, Craig B.; Flores, Margaret M.; Shippen, Margaret E.; Hinton, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Students with high-incidence disabilities struggle with reading comprehension due to difficulties in background knowledge and metacognitive skills, including use of self-monitoring and other strategies. In the United States, these students typically receive the majority of their instruction in general education settings. However, there is little…

  9. [The disability associated with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease and a potentially disabling illness, whose prevalence has increased in recent years alongside the aging population. The disability associated with this condition generates a brutal impact on individuals who are limited in their basic daily living activities. The increase in life expectancy is not correlated with an increase in quality of life, since the years of life increase, but characterized for living with disabilities.

  10. Disability and work: risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Meusz, C

    Recent parliamentary debate has brought the rights of disabled people back into the spotlight of media attention. In the workplace, the occupational health nurse (OHN) is uniquely placed to make a positive contribution to the achievement of equal opportunities for people with disabilities. The author describes a risk assessment approach to the occupational health and safety of disabled persons and their employers. Such approaches can help to ensure that the work skills of all employees are used to maximum potential.

  11. Chernobyl fallout and cancer incidence in Finland.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Anssi; Seppä, Karri; Pasanen, Kari; Kurttio, Päivi; Patama, Toni; Pukkala, Eero; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Arvela, Hannu; Verkasalo, Pia; Hakulinen, Timo

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since the Chernobyl accident, but its health consequences remain to be well established. Finland was one of the most heavily affected countries by the radioactive fallout outside the former Soviet Union. We analyzed the relation of the estimated external radiation exposure from the fallout to cancer incidence in Finland in 1988-2007. The study cohort comprised all ∼ 3.8 million Finns who had lived in the same dwelling for 12 months following the accident (May 1986-April 1987). Radiation exposure was estimated using data from an extensive mobile dose rate survey. Cancer incidence data were obtained for the cohort divided into four exposure categories (the lowest with the first-year committed dose <0.1 mSv and the highest ≥ 0.5 mSv) allowing for a latency of 5 years for leukemia and thyroid cancer, and 10 years for other cancers. Of the eight predefined cancer sites regarded as radiation-related from earlier studies, only colon cancer among women showed an association with exposure from fallout [excess rate ratio per increment in exposure category 0.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.11]. No such effect was observed for men, or other cancer sites. Our analysis of a large cohort over two decades did not reveal an increase in cancer incidence following the Chernobyl accident, with the possible exception of colon cancer among women. The largely null findings are consistent with extrapolation from previous studies suggesting that the effect is likely to remain too small to be empirically detectable and of little public health impact.

  12. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  14. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  15. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  16. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  17. Disability search tips and resources.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Demographic projections for people living in the United States indicate a growing need for information on disabilities. This article discusses a limited number of concepts in disability, along with relevant thesaurus terms and suggested search techniques in four databases: PubMed, CINAHL, REHABDATA, and the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange's (CIRRIE) Database of International Research. The article closes with annotations of potentially useful websites that focus on concerns of persons with disabilities, their caregivers, and researchers in disability. PMID:25611441

  18. Summit on the National Effort To Prevent Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities. Summit Proceedings (Washington, D.C., February 6-7, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation, Washington, DC.

    This document reports the proceedings of a summit to assess the adequacy of the U.S. effort to prevent mental retardation and related disabilities and to chart the course for future strategies to reduce the incidence and ameliorate the effects of these disabilities, particularly when caused by socioeconomic conditions. The document contains…

  19. Factors Mediating the Relationship between Social Skills and Academic Grades in a Sample of Students Diagnosed with Learning Disabilities or Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milsom, Amy; Glanville, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Research has found students with high incidence disabilities to be at risk for academic difficulties and school dropout. Using data from the NLTS-2 database, relationships between social skills and grades were examined for students who were diagnosed with learning disabilities or emotional disturbance. Results revealed significant direct and…

  20. Quality of Life among Persons with Physical Disability in Udupi Taluk: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuvalekar, Kunal; Kamath, Ramachandra; Ashok, Lena; Shetty, Bhartesh; Mayya, Shreemathi; Chandrasekaran, Varalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disability is not just a health problem or attribute of individuals, but it reflects the problems individuals experience in their interaction with society and physical movements. Disabled persons remain neglected part of society and they also experience various barriers due to restriction of participation. Objectives: The aim was to assess the quality of life (QOL) of physically disabled persons, the impact of physical disability on activities of daily living (ADL) and to study the awareness about laws and facilities available for disabled persons. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional community based study was conducted among 130 physical disabled persons who were selected using convenience sampling technique. The WHO BREF scale was used to assess QOL, while assessment of ADL was done using Barthel Index. Socio-demographic assessment was done using Udai Pareek scale. SPSS version 15.0 was used to analyze data. Categorical variables were expressed as frequencies and percentages. As per guidelines physical, psychological, social, and environmental domain scores for WHO BREF scale were calculated. Results: Among the study participants, 36.2% had a disability from birth that is, congenital. The second common cause of disability was found to be postpolio residual paralysis as it was found among 26.2% respondents. Other causes found were stroke/paralysis and accidents, in 19.2% and 18.5% respondents, respectively. Activities such as transfer, mobility, and stair climbing showed greater impact of physical disability. It was found that 11.5% respondents required help in one of the ADL. QOL score was found to be low under the psychological domain reflecting on negative feelings, bodily image, appearance, spirituality, and self-esteem of respondents. Conclusion: Physical disability had affected social participation as well as marriage of the respondents. However, it was found that very few of them are aware about facilities provided under persons with

  1. The Law's Understanding of Intellectual Disability as a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is differently yet validly described by different professions. Legal professionals find it most useful to consider ID as a disability rather than a disorder. Because the law regulates the actions of individuals in a society and the actions of society on an individual, the law's concern in dealing with a person with ID…

  2. Constructing Disability in Online Worlds: Conceptualising Disability in Online Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the online construction of disability is investigated and the implications for educators working in virtual worlds are considered. Based on the analysis of data collected through interviews with deaf residents of "Second Life", it is argued that research into online identity, disability and education needs to allow room for…

  3. Backlash: Don't Disable Teachers with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiser, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Great Britain's teachers with disabilities face discrimination in obtaining and retaining employment. To achieve disability equality and integration, a campaign is needed to change regulations for medical fitness to teach, develop an equality perspective across the whole curriculum, and force the government to allocate money to include disabled…

  4. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation…

  5. 75 FR 62676 - Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... benefits, Old-age, Survivors and Disability Insurance, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Social... set forth below: PART 404--FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950-) Subpart P-- 0 1... document is available on the date of publication in the Federal Register at...

  6. Disabilities Information Flow: A Disabilities Information Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Bin; Allison, Colin; Nicholl, J. Ross; Moodley, Luke; Roberts, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The Disabilities Information Flow (DIF) project at the University of St Andrews has sought to provide a means of efficiently managing all student disabilities information within the institution and provide appropriate role-based service interfaces for all staff who need to routinely interact with this information. This paper describes the software…

  7. HIV/AIDS, Disability, and Employment. Disability Statistics Report 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebesta, Douglas S.; LaPlante, Mitchell P.

    This report on HIV/AIDS, disability, and employment analyzes data from the AIDS Cost and Services Utilization Survey of 1991-1992, a longitudinal study of 1,949 HIV-infected men and women. The report examines the diagnostic history of people living with HIV and its relation to function, disability, and labor force participation over time. Study…

  8. Writing Disabilities and Reading Disabilities in Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Lara-Jeane C.; Edwards, Crystal N.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study was conducted to determine (a) the rate of co-occurrence of reading disabilities (RDs) in a writing disability (WD) population of students followed from first grade to fourth grade and (b) the cognitive burden that is assumed by having a WD and a RD (WD + RD). The sample included 137 first-grade students from a single…

  9. National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... sponsors grantees to generate new disability and rehabilitation knowledge and promote its use and adoption. Promoting the use and adoption of new disability and rehabilitation knowledge by various stakeholders helps people with disabilities in ...

  10. Determination of grave disability.

    PubMed

    Wilbert, D E; Jorstad, V; Loren, J D; Wirrer, B

    1976-01-01

    There is a historical dilemma concerning the civil rights of psychiatric patients who are believed to need a protected status because of incompetency. California's Lanterman-Petris-Short Act provides a mechanism for putting the patient under the care of a conservator if the patient is unable to provide for his own personal needs of food, clothing, and shelter. If successful, this legislation will likely be the model for the country. Fifty-one patients for whom the clinical staff desired to initiate conservatorship proceedings were given a test consisting of behavioral tasks specifically designed to be appropriate to the legal definition of grave disability. The natural groupings were: chronic organic brain syndrome, chronic schizophrenia, and other. We found that the grave disability of the organic brain syndrome patients was fairly predictable from their mental status examination, while the grave disability of the chronic schizophrenic patients was unpredictable from their mental status examination and required the application of the behavioral test for an appropriate determination of their ability to perform the functions specified in the law: The Lanterman-Petris-Short Act to provide for personal needs of food, clothing, and shelter. When the method or the proceedings were applied to patients of other diagnostic categories, they were found to be inappropriate. At this writing, our method of evaluation is being recognized and requested by public and legal agencies in our area. It has been used as evidence in court. The procedure is clear, relevant, and easily taught to new workers. The results, given in plain English and in essay form, are readily understood by physician, social worker, judge, and jury alike. We began our study with vexation, ambiguous criteria, and a chronic medical and legal problem; we conclude with a practical and relevant answer.

  11. Prevalence and features of ICF-disability in Spain as captured by the 2008 National Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since 1986, the study of disability in Spain has been mainly addressed by National Disability Surveys (NDSs). While international attempts to frame NDS designs within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) have progressed, in general, the ICF has hardly been used in either the NDS or epidemiological studies. This study sought to identify ICF Activity- and Participation-related content in the most recent Spanish NDS, the 2008 Survey on Disabilities, Independence and Dependency Situations (Encuesta sobre discapacidades, autonomía personal y situaciones de Dependencia - EDAD 2008), and estimate the prevalence of such ICF-framed disability. Methods EDAD 2008 methods and questions were perused. Of the 51 EDAD items analysed, 29 were backcoded to specific d2-d7 domains of the ICF Checklist and, by rating the recorded difficulty to perform specific tasks with or without help, these were then taken as performance and capacity respectively. A global ICF score was also derived, albeit lacking data for d1, "Learning and applying knowledge", d8, "Major Life Areas" and d9, "Community, Social and Civic Life". Data were grouped by sex, age, residence and initial positive screening, and prevalence figures were calculated by disability level both for the general population, using the originally designed weights, and for the population that had screened positive to disability. Data for institutionalised persons were processed separately. Results Crude prevalence of ICF severe/complete and moderate disability among the community-dwelling population aged ≥6 years was 0.9%-2.2% respectively, and that of severe/complete disability among persons living in sheltered accommodation was 0.3%. Prevalence of severe/complete disability was: higher in women than in men, 0.8% vs. 0.4%; increased with age; and was particularly high in domains such as "Domestic Life", 3.4%, "Mobility", 1.8%, and "Self-care", 1.9%, in which prevalence decreased

  12. Just What Is the Disability Perspective on Disability?

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Tom

    2016-05-01

    In the helpful article "Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology," Joseph Stramondo adds to the critique of actually existing bioethics and explains why disability activists and scholars so often find fault with the arguments of bioethicists. He is careful not to stereotype either community-rightly, given that bioethicists endorse positions as disparate as utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics, among others. Although Stramondo never explicitly mentions utilitarians or liberals, it seems probable that these are the main targets of his discontent. The disability community, as he concedes, is also a broad church. Yet for this reason, I do not believe that you can read off positions on bioethics questions from either disability embodiment or disability organization affiliation. PMID:27150416

  13. Mobility impairments and use of screening and preventive services.

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, L I; McCarthy, E P; Davis, R B; Siebens, H

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Primary care for people with disabilities often concentrates on underlying debilitating disorders to the exclusion of preventive health concerns. This study examined use of screening and preventive services among adults with mobility problems (difficulty walking, climbing stairs, or standing for extended periods). METHODS: The responses of non-institutionalized adults to the 1994 National Health Interview Survey, including the disability and Healthy People 2000 supplements, were analyzed. Multivariable logistic regressions predicted service use on the basis of mobility level, demographic characteristics, and indicators of health care access. RESULTS: Ten percent of the sample reported some mobility impairment; 3% experienced major problems. People with mobility problems were as likely as others to receive pneumonia and influenza immunizations but were less likely to receive other services. Adjusted odds ratios for women with major mobility difficulties were 0.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.4, 0.9) for the Papanicolaou test and 0.7 (95% CI = 0.5, 0.9) for mammography. CONCLUSIONS: More attention should be paid to screening and preventive services for people with mobility difficulties. Shortened appointment times, physically inaccessible care sites, and inadequate equipment could further compromise preventive care for this population. PMID:10846515

  14. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the “timed-up & go task (TUG)” to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  15. Idiot Savants: Rate of Incidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, A. Lewis

    1977-01-01

    A survey of 300 public residential facilities for the mentally retarded revealed a .06 percent incidence rate for idiot savants, persons of low intelligence who possess an unusually high skill in some special task. (CL)

  16. Foster Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Lederman, Cindy S.

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in foster care are a vulnerable population. They are at risk for abuse, neglect, and permanent separation from birth parents and have a greater incidence of emotional and behavioral difficulties. This is not surprising because these children are abused, neglected, or abandoned by the very people who are supposed to love and care…

  17. Disability Mediates the Impact of Common Conditions on Perceived Health

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; Vilagut, Gemma; Adroher, Núria D.; Chatterji, Somnath; He, Yanling; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Hinkov, Hristo; Hu, Chiyi; Iwata, Noboru; Lee, Sing; Levinson, Daphna; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; O'Neill, Siobhan; Hormel, J.; Posada-Villa, Jose A.; Ismet Taib, Nezar; Xavier, Miguel; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the extent to which disability mediates the observed associations of common mental and physical conditions with perceived health. Methods and Findings WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys carried out in 22 countries worldwide (n = 51,344 respondents, 72.0% response rate). We assessed nine common mental conditions with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and ten chronic physical with a checklist. A visual analog scale (VAS) score (0, worst to 100, best) measured perceived health in the previous 30 days. Disability was assessed using a modified WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), including: cognition, mobility, self-care, getting along, role functioning (life activities), family burden, stigma, and discrimination. Path analysis was used to estimate total effects of conditions on perceived health VAS and their separate direct and indirect (through the WHODAS dimensions) effects. Twelve-month prevalence was 14.4% for any mental and 51.4% for any physical condition. 31.7% of respondents reported difficulties in role functioning, 11.4% in mobility, 8.3% in stigma, 8.1% in family burden and 6.9% in cognition. Other difficulties were much less common. Mean VAS score was 81.0 (SD = 0.1). Decrements in VAS scores were highest for neurological conditions (9.8), depression (8.2) and bipolar disorder (8.1). Across conditions, 36.8% (IQR: 31.2–51.5%) of the total decrement in perceived health associated with the condition were mediated by WHODAS disabilities (significant for 17 of 19 conditions). Role functioning was the dominant mediator for both mental and physical conditions. Stigma and family burden were also important mediators for mental conditions, and mobility for physical conditions. Conclusions More than a third of the decrement in perceived health associated with common conditions is mediated by disability. Although the decrement is similar for physical and mental conditions, the pattern of mediation

  18. Incidence of Narcolepsy in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Oberle, Doris; Drechsel-Bäuerle, Ursula; Schmidtmann, Irene; Mayer, Geert; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Following the 2009 pandemic, reports of an association between an AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine and narcolepsy were published. Besides determining background incidence rates for narcolepsy in Germany this study aimed at investigating whether there was a change in incidence rates of narcolepsy between the pre-pandemic, pandemic, and the post-pandemic period on the population level. Design: Retrospective epidemiological study on the incidence of narcolepsy with additional capture-recapture analysis. Setting: German sleep centers. Patients or Participants: Eligible were patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy (ICD10 Code G47.4) within the period from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. Interventions: None; observational study. Measurements and Results: A total of 342 sleep centers were invited to participate in the study. Adequate and suitable data were provided by 233 sleep centers (68.1%). A total of 1,198 patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy within the observed period were included, of whom 106 (8.8%) were children and adolescents under the age of 18 years and 1,092 (91.2%) were adults. In children and adolescents, the age-standardized adjusted incidence rate significantly increased from 0.14/100,000 person-years in the pre-pandemic period to 0.50/100,000 person-years in the post-pandemic period (incidence density ratio, IDR 3.57; 95% CI 1.94–7.00). In adults, no significant change was detectable. This increase started in spring 2009. Conclusions: For the years 2007–2011, valid estimates for the incidence of narcolepsy in Germany were provided. In individuals under 18, the incidence rates continuously increased from spring 2009. Citation: Oberle D, Drechsel-Bäuerle U, Schmidtmann I, Mayer G, Keller-Stanislawski B. Incidence of narcolepsy in Germany. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1619–1628. PMID:25902804

  19. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  20. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  1. 77 FR 291 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Research on Use of Mobile Applications (``app'') to Increase HIV Testing Behavior and HIV Prevention with... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease...

  2. (Instrumental) Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Daily living skills are important to ageing adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of these skills in older adults with ID and to investigate the influence of gender, age, level of ID and mobility on these skills. Daily living skills were measured with the Barthel Index (for Activities of…

  3. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of…

  4. Assistive and Adaptive Technology--Supporting Competence and Independence in Young Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Arlene

    1997-01-01

    Argues that computers and related technology can be an important asset in the classrooms of young children with disabilities. Suggests that this technology can promote mobility, communication, and learning; increase independence; augment abilities; compensate for learning challenges; overcome learned helplessness; and foster competence and…

  5. Therapeutic Riding for a Student with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrman, Jennifer; Ross, David B.

    2001-01-01

    A 9-year-old with multiple disabilities and visual impairments was the focus of a 10-week developmental therapeutic riding program incorporating hippotherapy. The program has led to increased mobility, an increase in visual attention span and fixation time, signs of greater verbal communication, and the acquisition of new functional signs.…

  6. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  7. Visualising Disability in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlieger, Patrick; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank; Van Hove, Geert; Vanobbergen, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interdisciplinary work which has argued that disability is not an isolated, individual medical pathology but instead a key defining social category like "race", class and gender. Seen in this way disability provides researchers with another analytic tool for exploring the nature of power. Running almost…

  8. The Source for Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Paula S.; Wadlington, Elizabeth M.

    This book is designed to help clinicians and teachers work more effectively with people with learning disabilities and their families. Chapter 1 provides an overview of learning disabilities. It presents commonly accepted medical and educational definitions, prevalence figures, and possible etiological explanations for various disorders. Chapter 2…

  9. Disability disparities: a beginning model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model of disability disparities. Though the concept of health disparities is discussed in the health care literature, there is no such model that explicitly addresses disparities in the disability literature. Therefore, this model begins to fill a void in the disability literature. Part of the value of such a model is that it represents an attempt to address the question of why cultural competency is important in the disability arena at this point in the 21st century. The urgency in addressing cultural competency at this time in history is supported by understanding the multiple accountability demands on rehabilitation and disability providers these days, e.g., increasing diversification of the United States population, that render providing effective services to everyone a clear mandate. The author provides a working definition of disability disparity. The disability disparity model is described in terms of its five-domain continuum as well as its macro- and micro-level aspects that are designed to both promote clarity of the concept for researchers and offer practitioners ideas on how to explore the existence of disability disparities in working with specific service recipients. Limitations and strengths of the model are discussed along with suggested next steps in model validation. PMID:19802930

  10. Cognitive Development and Adolescent Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    1985-01-01

    The author offers clinical examples of ways in which the attainment of formal operations in adolescents both exacerbates chronic disabilities and contributes to the etiology of new disabilities (such as in teenage obesity, anorexia nervosa, and depression). He suggests treatment guidelines. (CL)

  11. Handbook on Specific Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-South Regional Resource Center, Lexington, KY.

    This handbook was developed as a resource on learning disabilities (LD) for North Carolina educators. The first section covers guidelines for identifying, diagnosing, and developing services for LD students. The handbook then provides an overview of effective practices for teaching students with learning disabilities and some ideas for structuring…

  12. Disability and the Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aron, Laudan; Loprest, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Education is important for all children, but even more so for children with disabilities, whose social and economic opportunities may be limited. In this article, Laudan Aron and Pamela Loprest assess how well the nation's education system is serving students with disabilities. Aron and Loprest trace the evolution of the special education system…

  13. Disability Law and Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, David

    2005-01-01

    Providing reasonable academic adjustments for students who qualify as disabled under the ADA should, of course, be a priority for all university professors. Eligible students with documented disabilities deserve conditions that make it possible for them to do their best work. A professor should not, however, have to accept a university official's…

  14. Collecting Disability Data from Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jill; Daniels, Harry; Feiler, Anthony; Georgeson, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and national trial of a methodology for collecting disability data directly from parents, enabling schools and local authorities to meet their obligations under the "Disability Discrimination Act" (DDA; 2005) to promote equality of opportunity for all children. It illustrates the complexities around…

  15. Hypermedia Interaction for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Special types of prosthetic devices have been designed to support the specific needs of disabled and handicapped computer users in retrieving information. Of particular importance are interfaces based on the use of sound, tactile operations, and gestures. Such interfaces may be used to provide disabled people with access to hypermedia information.…

  16. Dyslexia: Problems of Reading Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Herman K.; Schiffman, Gilbert B.

    The purpose of this book is to provide an understanding of both the educational and medical aspects of reading and to show how they are interrelated in reading disabilities. The various aspects of reading disabilities are presented in the following chapters: Introduction to the Reading Problem; Early Predictive Studies; Psychological Evaluation;…

  17. Learning Disabilities Association of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... provides the most current information on research, practice, theory, issues, and trends to broaden understanding and improve quality of life. Learn More If you are a parent or teacher of a child with a learning disability – or have learning disabilities yourself – you are ...

  18. Stability of Arithmetic Disability Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Cheryl H.; Pennett, H. Deborah-Lynne; Black, Jeffrey L.; Fair, George W.; Balise, Raymond R.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classification of 80 children (ages 9 to 13) representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD). Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling disabilities exhibited the…

  19. College Students and Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.

    2000-01-01

    This article briefly reviews Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and identifies criteria used to determine whether a student is both "disabled" and "qualified." Then, specific areas of admission, accommodation, and dismissal are examined. Finally, guidelines for professors and administrators…

  20. Neurological Aspects of Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Louis R.

    The author, a neurologist, looks at the nature of reading disabilities. He suggests that many reading disabilities are the result of normal constitutional differences and that the term "minimal brain dysfunction" is rarely appropriate and does not help the remediation process. Noted are various theories which relate neurology and reading ability.…

  1. Disabled Superheroes in Comic Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokaska, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The author reviews the role of "superhero" in comic books, finding five prominent characters with disabilities. He suggests that sales of these comic books are due, in part, to unique gimmicks in the character, but may also reflect increased acceptance within the society of successful disabled role models. (Author/CL)

  2. Dynamic Assessment of Language Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports a study of a narrative-based Dynamic Assessment (DA) procedure developed in the USA that is used in the UK with children with developmental language disabilities. Three monolingual English children with language disabilities are assessed by a speech/language pathologist/therapist who is learning to work with DA in collaboration…

  3. Apprenticeship for People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Donald M.; Hughes, James H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report results from a national survey on participation of disabled people in apprenticeship. Results indicate that disabled persons comprise 2 percent of the total apprentice population. Exemplary programs and practices are described. The authors present implications and recommendations drawn from the study results. (CH)

  4. The World Report on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickenbach, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The World Report on Disability, a joint endeavor of the World Health Organization and the World Bank, launched in June 2011, is an astonishing achievement that will set the standard for disability studies research for evidence-informed policy for years to come. The product of collaborative and participatory work between organizations of persons…

  5. Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFries, J. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Results obtained from the center's six research projects are reviewed, including research on psychometric assessment of twins with reading disabilities, reading and language processes, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and executive functions, linkage analysis and physical mapping, computer-based remediation of reading disabilities, and…

  6. Voices of Disability in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her story of being a nurse with a disability who serves people with disabilities and older adults. She recounts her experience of what it is like to be stigmatized, marginalized, and to have lowered expectations because of her difference. The author had no right arm save about six inches from the shoulder down.…

  7. Learning Disabilities: The Changing Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    This current response to a reprinted 1968 article by Ray Barsch (EC 602 662) focuses on legal aspects of learning disabilities, especially problems in implementing IDEA (the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and continuing controversies concerning definition, evaluation, instructional intervention, and placement or service delivery…

  8. Racial differences in melanoma incidence.

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, I. K.

    1979-01-01

    The incidences of malignant melanoma recorded by 59 population-based cancer registries were investigated to determine the effects of racial and skin-colour differences. White populations exhibited a wide range of melanoma incidences and females commonly, though not invariably, had a higher incidence than males. Non-white populations experienced in general a much lower incidence of melanoma although there was some overlap of white and non-white rates. No predominant sex difference emerged among non-whites. Populations of African descent were found to have a higher incidence than those of Asiatic origin, but it was concluded that this was due largely to the high frequency of tumours among Africans on the sole of the foot. A clear negative correlation between degree of skin pigmentation and melanoma incidence emerged for the exposed body sites. These data provide strong support for the hypotheses that UV radiation is a major cause of malignant melanoma and that melanin pigmentation protects against it. Further research is required to elucidate the aetiology of melanoma of the sole of the foot. PMID:475965

  9. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  10. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to

  11. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  12. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  13. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  14. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  15. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  16. Effective Interaction: Communicating with and about People with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Disabilities in the Workplace ODEP - Office of Disability Employment Policy Disability Employment Policy Resources by Topic Choose a Disability ... Effective Interaction: Communicating With and About People with Disabilities in the Workplace As children, we are curious — ...

  17. Defining disability: metaphysical not political.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Christopher A

    2013-08-01

    Recent discussions surrounding the conceptualising of disability has resulted in a stalemate between British sociologists and philosophers. The stagnation of theorizing that has occurred threatens not only academic pursuits and the advancement of theoretical interpretations within the Disability Studies community, but also how we educate and advocate politically, legally, and socially. More pointedly, many activists and theorists in the UK appear to believe the British social model is the only effective means of understanding and advocating on behalf of people with disabilities. This model, largely reliant upon materialist research traditions, contends that disability is a form of social oppression and hence, is a phenomenon that should be conceptualised in social terms. Individual properties such as impairments are disregarded as they are viewed to be unimportant in the analysis of the social causes of disability. Concurrently, many bioethicists and philosophers have embraced what Tom Shakespeare has classified as an 'Interactional Approach' to disability--that "the experience of a disabled person results from the relationship between factors intrinsic to the individual, and the extrinsic factors arising from the wider context in which she finds herself". I intend to demonstrate that the benefits of the British social model are now outweighed by its burdens. I suggest, as Jerome Bickenbach has, that while it may be somewhat churlish to critique the social model in light of its political success, taken literally, it implies that people with disabilities require no additional health resources by virtue of their impairments. Despite the eloquent arguments that have preceded me by interactional theorists, none have been accepted as evidence of fallacious reasoning by British social model theorists. This article is an attempt to clarify why it is that the types of arguments British social model theorists have been offering are misguided. I suggest that the British

  18. Defining disability: metaphysical not political.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Christopher A

    2013-08-01

    Recent discussions surrounding the conceptualising of disability has resulted in a stalemate between British sociologists and philosophers. The stagnation of theorizing that has occurred threatens not only academic pursuits and the advancement of theoretical interpretations within the Disability Studies community, but also how we educate and advocate politically, legally, and socially. More pointedly, many activists and theorists in the UK appear to believe the British social model is the only effective means of understanding and advocating on behalf of people with disabilities. This model, largely reliant upon materialist research traditions, contends that disability is a form of social oppression and hence, is a phenomenon that should be conceptualised in social terms. Individual properties such as impairments are disregarded as they are viewed to be unimportant in the analysis of the social causes of disability. Concurrently, many bioethicists and philosophers have embraced what Tom Shakespeare has classified as an 'Interactional Approach' to disability--that "the experience of a disabled person results from the relationship between factors intrinsic to the individual, and the extrinsic factors arising from the wider context in which she finds herself". I intend to demonstrate that the benefits of the British social model are now outweighed by its burdens. I suggest, as Jerome Bickenbach has, that while it may be somewhat churlish to critique the social model in light of its political success, taken literally, it implies that people with disabilities require no additional health resources by virtue of their impairments. Despite the eloquent arguments that have preceded me by interactional theorists, none have been accepted as evidence of fallacious reasoning by British social model theorists. This article is an attempt to clarify why it is that the types of arguments British social model theorists have been offering are misguided. I suggest that the British

  19. Mobility, Emotion, and Universality in Future Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignell, Mark; Hosono, Naotsune; Fels, Deborah; Lottridge, Danielle; Waterworth, John

    The Graphical user interface has traditionally supported personal productivity, efficiency, and usability. With computer supported cooperative work, the focus has been on typical people, doing typical work in a highly rational model of interaction. Recent trends towards mobility, and emotional and universal design are extending the user interface paradigm beyond the routine. As computing moves into the hand and away from the desktop, there is a greater need for dealing with emotions and distractions. Busy and distracted people represent a new kind of disability, but one that will be increasingly prevalent. In this panel we examine the current state of the art, and prospects for future collaboration in non-normative computing requirements. This panel draws together researchers who are studying the problems of mobility, emotion and universality. The goal of the panel is to discuss how progress in these areas will change the nature of future collaboration.

  20. The Americans with Disabilities Act, mental disability, and employment practices.

    PubMed

    Scheid, T L

    1998-08-01

    This research examines the response of employers to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), with a specific focus on the employment of those with mental disabilities. A telephone survey was completed in a metropolitan area in the southern United States with a random sample of 117 businesses. In terms of specific practices that indicated compliance with the ADA, 15% had specific policies for hiring those with mental disabilities, and 37.6% had indeed hired such individuals. Companies that had complied with the ADA were more likely to be large and to have specific policies for the hiring of minorities and those with physical disabilities. Employers also did not believe that employment of those with mental disabilities was their responsibility, and supported increased efforts by the rehabilitation community to improve employment opportunities for individuals with mental disabilities Mental health services providers need to work more closely with employers in their regions and educate them about the capabilities of individuals with mental disabilities, and inform employers that the types of accommodations necessary are neither costly nor difficult to implement.

  1. Age-Related Change in Mobility: Perspectives From Life Course Epidemiology and Geroscience.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Luigi; Cooper, Rachel; Shardell, Michelle; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Schrack, Jennifer A; Kuh, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Mobility is the most studied and most relevant physical ability affecting quality of life with strong prognostic value for disability and survival. Natural selection has built the "engine" of mobility with great robustness, redundancy, and functional reserve. Efficient patterns of mobility can be acquired during development even by children affected by severe impairments. Analogously, age-associated impairments in mobility-related physiological systems are compensated and overt limitations of mobility only occur when the severity can no longer be compensated. Mobility loss in older persons usually results from multiple impairments in the central nervous system, muscles, joints, and energetic and sensory physiological systems. Early preclinical changes in these physiological systems that precede mobility loss have been poorly studied. Peak performance, rate of decline, compensatory behaviors, or subclinical deterioration of physiological resources may cumulatively influence both timing of mobility loss and chances of recovery, but their role as risk factors has not been adequately characterized. Understanding the natural history of these early changes and intervening on them would likely be the most effective strategy to reduce the burden of disability in the population. For example, young women with low bone peak mass could be counseled to start strength resistance exercise to reduce their high risk of developing osteoporosis and fracture later in life. Expanding this approach to other physiological domains requires collecting and interpreting data from life course epidemiological studies, establishing normative measures of mobility, physical function, and physical activity, and connecting them with life course trajectories of the mobility-relevant physiological domains. PMID:26975983

  2. Age-Related Change in Mobility: Perspectives From Life Course Epidemiology and Geroscience.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Luigi; Cooper, Rachel; Shardell, Michelle; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Schrack, Jennifer A; Kuh, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Mobility is the most studied and most relevant physical ability affecting quality of life with strong prognostic value for disability and survival. Natural selection has built the "engine" of mobility with great robustness, redundancy, and functional reserve. Efficient patterns of mobility can be acquired during development even by children affected by severe impairments. Analogously, age-associated impairments in mobility-related physiological systems are compensated and overt limitations of mobility only occur when the severity can no longer be compensated. Mobility loss in older persons usually results from multiple impairments in the central nervous system, muscles, joints, and energetic and sensory physiological systems. Early preclinical changes in these physiological systems that precede mobility loss have been poorly studied. Peak performance, rate of decline, compensatory behaviors, or subclinical deterioration of physiological resources may cumulatively influence both timing of mobility loss and chances of recovery, but their role as risk factors has not been adequately characterized. Understanding the natural history of these early changes and intervening on them would likely be the most effective strategy to reduce the burden of disability in the population. For example, young women with low bone peak mass could be counseled to start strength resistance exercise to reduce their high risk of developing osteoporosis and fracture later in life. Expanding this approach to other physiological domains requires collecting and interpreting data from life course epidemiological studies, establishing normative measures of mobility, physical function, and physical activity, and connecting them with life course trajectories of the mobility-relevant physiological domains.

  3. Long-term Disability Associated With War-related Experience Among Vietnam Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Robert; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent combat operations have involved large numbers of personnel. Long-term health effects of military deployment remain largely unknown. Objectives: To examine patterns and trends in long-term disability among combat veterans and to relate disability to aspects of wartime experience. Participants: A total of 60,228 Australian military personnel deployed between 1962 and 1975 during the Vietnam War, and 82,877 military personnel who were not deployed overseas. Outcome Measures: Accepted physician-assessed disability claims were evaluated over follow-up periods up to 50 years after deployment, and compared with age-matched controls. Multivariable analysis was used to examine differences by service branch, rank, age, and deployment duration. Results: The steepest rise in disability incidence was observed among Vietnam veterans starting in the 1990s, around 20–30 years after deployment for most veterans. After 1994, when Statements of Principles were introduced to guide evaluation of disability claims, the hazard ratio for disability incidence was 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.32–1.77) compared with the prior period. By January 2011, after an average follow-up of 42.5 years, 69.7% (95% confidence interval, 69.4%–70.1%) of veterans had at least 1 war-related disability. Many veterans had multiple disabilities, with leading causes being eye and ear disorders (48.0%), mental health conditions (47.9%), and musculoskeletal disorders (18.4%). For specific categories of disability, relative risks for accepted claims among veterans compared with controls were highest for mental health disorders, at 22.9 (21.9–24.0) and lowest for injuries, at 1.5 (1.4–1.6) with a relative risk for any disability of 3.7 (3.7–3.8). Veterans with service of >1 year were 2.5 (2.2–2.7) times more likely to have a mental health disability than those who served <100 days, and 2.3 (2.1–2.5) times more likely to have other disabilities. Conclusions: Long-term effects of

  4. The association between functional disability and acute care utilization among the elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Yi; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Li, Chung-Pin; Fang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Nicole; Chou, Yiing-Jeng

    2013-01-01

    Disability is associated with increased long-term care use among the elderly, but its association with utilization of acute care is not well understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between functional disability and acute medical care utilization among the elderly. This nationwide, population-based cohort study was based on data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), linking to the 2004-2007 National Health Insurance (NHI) claims data. A total of 1521 elderly subjects aged 65 years or above were observed from the year 2004 to 2006; this sample was considered to be a national representative sample. The utilization of acute medical care (including outpatient services, emergency services, and inpatient services) and medical expenditure were measured. Functional disability was measured by determining limitations on activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and mobility. After adjusting for age, comorbidity, and sociodemographic characteristics, functional disability that affected IADLs or mobility was a significant factor contributing to the increased use of care. A clear proportional relationship existed between disability and utilization, and this pattern persisted across different types of acute care services. Disability affecting IADLs or mobility, rather than ADLs, was a more sensitive predictor of acute medical care utilization. Compared to elderly persons with no limitations, the medical expenditure of those with moderate-to-severe limitations was 2-3 times higher for outpatient, emergency, and inpatient services. In conclusion, functional disability among the elderly is a significant factor contributing to the increased use of acute care services.

  5. Ischemic stroke incidence in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (ISISCOG), Spain. A community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Sorribes, Marta; Heras, Antonio; Vila, Nicolás; Vicheto, Marisa; Forés, Rosa; Sánchez-Ojanguren, José; Sancho, Amparo; Pera, Guillem

    2008-01-01

    Background In Spain, stroke is one of the major causes of death and the main cause of severe disability in people over 65 years. We analyzed the incidence of ischemic stroke, stroke subtypes, case fatality and disability at 90 days after the event in a Spanish population. Methods A prospective community-based register of ischemic strokes was established in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (Barcelona) [116,220 inhabitants of all ages, according to the municipal census of December 31,2001], from January 1 to December 31, 2003. Standard definitions and case finding methods were used to identify all cases in all age groups. Every patient underwent a complete clinical evaluation and systematic tests including neuroimaging (CT/MRI) and vascular studies (carotid duplex ultrasound intra and extracranial and MR angiography). Results Over a one year period, 196 ischemic strokes were registered [107 men; median age = 76 years (range 39–98)], being the first event in 159 patients (81.1%) and a recurrent stroke in 37 (18.9%). After age-adjustment to the European population, the incidence of ischemic stroke per 100,000 inhabitants was 172 (95% CI, 148–196); 219 (176–261) in men and 133 (105–160) in women, with an annual incidence for first ischemic stroke of 139 (118–161); 165 (128–201) in men and 115 (89–140) in women. The incidence of stroke increased with age. Stroke subtypes (TOAST classification criteria) were lacunar in 28.8%, atherothrombotic in 18.6%, cardioembolic in 26.6% and undetermined in 26.0% of patients. At 90 days, the case-fatality was 12%, and among survivors, moderate-to-severe disability was present in 45 % at 3 months. Conclusion This prospective community-based study shows one of the lowest incidences of stroke in Europe, as well as one of the lowest case fatality and disability rates at 90 days after stroke. PMID:18371212

  6. Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

  7. [Evolution of disability and dependency. An international perspective].

    PubMed

    Zunzunegui, María Victoria

    2011-12-01

    In societies with a high level of population aging, the ability to live autonomously is a major goal of public health. The present article examines recent population-based studies analyzing a possible reduction in the prevalence of disability and provides evidence on the unmet needs of dependent individuals.In the last few decades, disability and reduced mobility have decreased in elderly persons living in high-income countries, including Spain. This decrease is clear in persons aged less than 85 years old but the trends in persons older than 85 years are difficult to study due to the lack of information. These trends depend on greater education among the population, a reduction in social and gender inequalities and the adoption of healthy lifestyle habits. A reduction in dependency also depends on changes in the physical and social environment to encourage active aging. The health gains in the generation aged between 40 and 65 years do not seem high. The reductions in disability in the next 25 years will not be as great as those observed between 1990 and the present time, except for a possible reduction in disability in women due to a decrease in gender roles. Dependence on help from third persons will tend to decrease, except in dementia. Use of technical aids is increasing and will continue to do so.

  8. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  9. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  10. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  11. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  12. Supporting Deaf Students with Intellectual Disabilities through a Specialized Literacy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berchin-Weiss, Janice; Falk, Jodi L.; Cunningham, Katherine Egan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of d/Deaf students with intellectual disabilities in schools for the d/Deaf has increased; however, the development of curricula for this population has not kept up with this trend. A literacy curriculum was developed at St. Joseph's School for the Deaf (SJSD) to address the special needs of these students using a reading and writing…

  13. Markers for Aggression in Inpatient Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; Didden, Robert; Stolker, Joost Jan; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 108 adults with mild and borderline ID and…

  14. Medical and Behavioral Symptoms as Potential Medication Side Effects in Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdovinos, Maria G.; Caruso, Mary; Roberts, Celeste; Kim, Geunyoung; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of medical and behavioral symptoms that could occur as side effects of psychotropic medication was assessed in a sample of 30 adults with developmental disabilities. Using a retrospective chart review method, we measured symptoms in six a priori classes of potential side effects over a 2-year period. The majority of side effects…

  15. Hepatitis C Seroprevalence in an Institution for Residents with a Developmental Disability. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Eric

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in Australia of 156 individuals with developmental disabilities who were long-term clients of a residential institution, to determine the incidence of hepatitis C antibodies. Results indicated that none of the residents was seropositive and that hepatitis C is less prevalent than hepatitis B in residential…

  16. Physical Intervention with People with Intellectual Disabilities: The Influence of Cognitive and Emotional Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, Dave; Weston, Clive

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study examines the relationship between the topography of challenging behaviour, subsequent attributions and emotional responses, with whether carers use physical intervention and their satisfaction with their intervention. Method: Thirty-seven carers described incidents where a person with an intellectual disability had exhibited…

  17. Prevalence of Psychopathology across a Service Population of Parents with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaw, Sue; Shaw, Tom; Beckley, Kerry

    2007-01-01

    This study identified and investigated the incidence of childhood trauma and psychopathology across a population of parents with intellectual disabilities (IDs) known to a parenting service in the United Kingdom over a 5-year period and examined the emotional and physical welfare of their children. Data were gathered from 49 parents with ID and 58…

  18. Papanicolaou Smear Screening of Women with Intellectual Disabilities: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Jin-Ding; Sung, Chang-Lin; Liu, Ta-Wen; Liu, Yi-Lian; Chen, Li-Mei; Chu, Cordia M.

    2010-01-01

    Although little is known about the incidence of cervical cancer in women with intellectual disabilities (ID), Pap smear screening is an effective public health program to prevent cervical cancer to this group of people. The purposes of this study were to identify and evaluate the factors regarding the utilization of the Pap smears in women with ID…

  19. Factors Related to Post-School Outcomes of Minority Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garate, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The levels of post-school life success were examined for a group of 273 minority youth, with high incidence disabilities (HID) one to four years out of high school. In this cross-sectional study, school leavers completed a phone survey regarding their actions beyond high school related to employment, continued post-secondary education, independent…

  20. Cancer and Intellectual Disability: A Review of Some Key Contextual Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, James; Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Research into the health of people with intellectual disabilities has increasingly focused on the occurrence of cancer in this population. Information on the incidence and prevalence of cancer is reviewed in both institutional and community settings. Examples of environmental causation are considered including "Helicobacter pylori."…

  1. Learning disabilities spectrum and sexual dimorphic abilities in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Inozemtseva, Olga; Matute, Esmeralda; Juárez, Jorge

    2008-08-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia could provide a promising model for the study of the effects of hormones on cognition. The aim of this study was to assess sexual dimorphic abilities related to oral language, spatial abilities, and verbal fluency and to determine the existence of learning disabilities in 11 congenital girls with adrenal hyperplasia compared with 11 healthy girls. Both groups underwent a neuropsychological evaluation using the Child Neuropsychological Assessment battery for Spanish-speaking children. Results showed that the congenital adrenal hyperplasia group had a significantly lower performance than the control group in the repetition and expression domains, right-left comprehension task, and verbal semantic fluency task. A higher incidence of learning disabilities (predominantly reading related) in the patient group compared with their controls was also evident. Thus, the presence of weak verbal areas along with a high incidence of learning disabilities related primarily, though not exclusively, to reading was documented in these girls.

  2. Transforming Disability Policy for Youth and Young Adults with Disabilities. Disability Policy Research Brief. Number 09-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Day, Bonnie; Stapleton, David

    2009-01-01

    The transition to adulthood can be difficult for youth, particularly those who have disabilities severe enough that they receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Insurance (DI), or other disability program benefits. Besides the issues facing all transition-age youth, young people with disabilities face a host of…

  3. Modeling wildfire incident complexity dynamics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire management in the United States and elsewhere is challenged by substantial uncertainty regarding the location and timing of fire events, the socioeconomic and ecological consequences of these events, and the costs of suppression. Escalating U.S. Forest Service suppression expenditures is of particular concern at a time of fiscal austerity as swelling fire management budgets lead to decreases for non-fire programs, and as the likelihood of disruptive within-season borrowing potentially increases. Thus there is a strong interest in better understanding factors influencing suppression decisions and in turn their influence on suppression costs. As a step in that direction, this paper presents a probabilistic analysis of geographic and temporal variation in incident management team response to wildfires. The specific focus is incident complexity dynamics through time for fires managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The modeling framework is based on the recognition that large wildfire management entails recurrent decisions across time in response to changing conditions, which can be represented as a stochastic dynamic system. Daily incident complexity dynamics are modeled according to a first-order Markov chain, with containment represented as an absorbing state. A statistically significant difference in complexity dynamics between Forest Service Regions is demonstrated. Incident complexity probability transition matrices and expected times until containment are presented at national and regional levels. Results of this analysis can help improve understanding of geographic variation in incident management and associated cost structures, and can be incorporated into future analyses examining the economic efficiency of wildfire management.

  4. Superintendent Vulnerability and Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Phyllis

    1996-01-01

    Examined Callahan's vulnerability thesis to determine its ability to explain the mobility of superintendents in Texas between 1985 and 1990. Questionnaire and interview data indicated that, at least in Texas where superintendent mobility reached 50% in that time period, vulnerability did not appear to account for much of superintendent mobility.…

  5. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  6. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  7. Fluid blade disablement tool

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos; Hughs, Chance G.; Todd, Steven N.

    2012-01-10

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  8. Epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Bowley, C; Kerr, M

    2000-10-01

    A Medline and Psychline literature review of epilepsy in people with intellectual disability was performed. The review has highlighted the importance of the impact of epilepsy on the lives of individuals and their families, affecting physical morbidity, leading to an increased mortality and increasing the care-giving burden. Interventions with a strong evidence base are mainly pharmacological with an increasing body of work on the novel antiepileptic drugs. Surprisingly little research exists into the quality of service provision for this population. The authors suggest three areas for future work: (1) an increasing application of research methodologies such as direct observation and qualitative studies into this field; (2) an exploration of the broad impact of treatment and (3) the possibility that epilepsy is a barrier to care provision. PMID:11079350

  9. Upper extremity neuro-rehabilitation through the use of power mobility.

    PubMed

    Damiao, John; Kean, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Power mobility is typically used as an accommodative form of assistive technology allowing individuals with impaired ambulation to remain mobile. While research has focused on the cognitive development and social benefits of power mobility for individuals with developmental disabilities, research is lacking on using this technology to rehabilitate physical dysfunction. Recent technology, such as robot-mediated neuro-rehabilitation, is proving effective in upper extremity rehabilitation, but lacks the movement feedback of power mobility. This article presents a case study of a client with cerebral palsy who experienced severe neural impairment following a motor vehicle accident. As a previous power mobility user, the client identified returning to using power mobility with the affected upper extremity as a key functional goal. This case study describes the series of steps that returned the client to independent mobility and increased upper extremity function. PMID:26565130

  10. Mobile Health Systems that Optimize Resources in Emergency Response Situations.

    PubMed

    Massey, Tammara; Gao, Tia

    2010-11-13

    During mass casualty incidents, a large number of patients need to be triaged accurately in order to save the maximum number of lives. Recently portable health systems have been developed that can gather patient's vital signs and wireless transmit this information to a central location for analysis. This research introduces a methodology to improve triage in mass casualty incidents by combining statistical optimization techniques with mobile health systems to manage resources using evidence based data. We combine data collected during a field test with data of patient's vital signs to simulate how mobile health systems can optimize resources in emergency response situations.

  11. 40 CFR 68.81 - Incident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... investigation began; (3) A description of the incident; (4) The factors that contributed to the incident; and... job tasks are relevant to the incident findings including contract employees where applicable....

  12. 40 CFR 68.81 - Incident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... investigation began; (3) A description of the incident; (4) The factors that contributed to the incident; and... job tasks are relevant to the incident findings including contract employees where applicable....

  13. ESCAP mobile training scheme.

    PubMed

    Yasas, F M

    1977-01-01

    In response to a United Nations resolution, the Mobile Training Scheme (MTS) was set up to provide training to the trainers of national cadres engaged in frontline and supervisory tasks in social welfare and rural development. The training is innovative in its being based on an analysis of field realities. The MTS team consisted of a leader, an expert on teaching methods and materials, and an expert on action research and evaluation. The country's trainers from different departments were sent to villages to work for a short period and to report their problems in fulfilling their roles. From these grass roots experiences, they made an analysis of the job, determining what knowledge, attitude and skills it required. Analysis of daily incidents and problems were used to produce indigenous teaching materials drawn from actual field practice. How to consider the problems encountered through government structures for policy making and decisions was also learned. Tasks of the students were to identify the skills needed for role performance by job analysis, daily diaries and project histories; to analyze the particular community by village profiles; to produce indigenous teaching materials; and to practice the role skills by actual role performance. The MTS scheme was tried in Nepal in 1974-75; 3 training programs trained 25 trainers and 51 frontline workers; indigenous teaching materials were created; technical papers written; and consultations were provided. In Afghanistan the scheme was used in 1975-76; 45 participants completed the training; seminars were held; and an ongoing Council was created. It is hoped that the training program will be expanded to other countries. PMID:12265562

  14. Disability terminology in the media: a comparison of newspaper reports in Canada and Israel.

    PubMed

    Auslander, G K; Gold, N

    1999-05-01

    The terminology used to refer to persons with disability may both reflect and influence attitudes towards them. Negative references may perpetuate negative attitudes and stereotypes. This is of particular importance in the mass media which reaches a broad spectrum of the population. This study looked at disability terminology used in major newspapers in Canada and Israel. It focused on the nature of that terminology and whether its use was related to other factors, such as the disability model reflected in the article, the content of the article (e.g. attributes of the disabled person) and its context (e.g. type of newspaper, feature versus news items). Overall, the use of inappropriate terminology of varying types was quite prevalent in both countries. In addition, in Canada there were a considerable number of articles which had no direct reference to the disability. In general, the terminology used was considerably more positive in articles dealing with individual persons with disabilities (as opposed to groups), with disabled children and with problems of mobility and rights. The results of the study indicate that the choice of terminology cannot be explained by journalistic expedience and conciseness alone.

  15. ACCESS Earth: Promoting Accessibility to Earth System Science for Students with Disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, S. M.; Cohen, L.; Lightbody, N.

    2001-05-01

    ACCESS Earth is an intensive summer institute for high school students with disabilities and their teachers that is designed to encourage students with disabilities to consider careers in earth system science. Participants study earth system science concepts at a Maine coastal estuary, using Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and field observations to evaluate the impacts of climate change, sea level rise, and development on coastal systems. Teachers, students, and scientists work together to adapt field and laboratory activities for persons with disabilities, including those with mobility and visual impairments. Other sessions include demonstrations of assistive technology, career discussions, and opportunities for students to meet with successful scientists with disabilities from throughout the U.S. The summer institute is one of several programs in development at the University of Southern Maine to address the problem of underrepresentation of people with disabilities in the earth sciences. Other projects include a mentoring program for high school students, a web-based clearinghouse of resources for teaching earth sciences to students with disabilities, and guidebooks for adaptation of popular published earth system science curricula for disabled learners.

  16. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children.

  17. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children. PMID:25895913

  18. Prevalence of disabled people involved in Spanish Civil Guard's police activity.

    PubMed

    González, José L; Cendra, Jacobo; Manzanero, Antonio L

    2013-11-01

    Improving interventions with victims and offenders with disabilities requires analysis of the degree of prevalence of crimes in which these people are involved. For this purpose, data regarding interventions made by the Spanish Civil Guard between 2008 and 2010, in which 2099 people had some kind of disability, have been collected and analyzed, with particular regard to criminal offenses (felonies and/or misdemeanors). In this study, the relationship between the types of disability a person has and other variables like their connection to the incident, their gender, age, the relationship between victim and perpetrator, and the time and place of the events were all taken into consideration. The results show that most of the victims with disabilities served by the Spanish Civil Guard were male. The interventions were mainly aid and rescues. Criminal offenses were only 20% of the events.

  19. [International classification of functioning, disability and disability certification in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Cortés-Reyes, Edgar; Riveros, Leidy T; Pineda-Ortiz, Gustavo A

    2013-01-01

    Certifying disability in Colombia has been demanded by disabled people; the country has assumed such challenge within the frame work of current legislation and international agreements signed by Colombia. A model of international classification of functioning (ICF), disability and healthwas thus adopted as it has been validated internationally in several studies; it incorporates international standards thereby allowing reliable evaluation of individuals' functional status. This essayinitially defines the concept of disabilityand locates it within a historical context leading to current ICF domain structure and categories. Such instrument provides a common, wide-ranging framework for providing suitable allocation of services and general and specific benefits, while assessing the differential between disabled people's current performance and their potential.

  20. Competitive sports for the disabled.

    PubMed

    Clark, M W

    1980-01-01

    A full life experience for people with and without physical disabilities usually includes some form of recreation or sport. Competition adds to enjoyment of sport for many people and can improve morale. This paper reviews some of the competitive opportunities available for people with a physical disability. These include competition within existing "able-bodied" organizations with or without adaptive devices and competition in separate organizations for those with disabilities. The latter include the National Wheelchair Basketball Association and the National Wheelchair Athletic Association.