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Sample records for includes spectral parameters

  1. A new peak shear strength criterion for rock joints which includes spectral parameters as roughness measures

    SciTech Connect

    Kulatilake, P.H.S.W.; Shou, G.; Huang, T.H.

    1996-04-01

    Most of the natural rock joint surface profiles do not belong to the self similar fractal category. In general, roughness profiles of rock joints consist of non-stationary and stationary components. At the simplest level, only one parameter is sufficient to quantify non-stationary joint roughness. The average inclination angle I, along with the direction considered for the joint surface, is suggested to capture the non-stationary roughness. It is shown that even though the fractal dimension D is a useful parameter, it alone is insufficient to quantify the stationary roughness of non-self similar profiles.

  2. Spectral line parameters including line shapes in the 2ν3 Q branch of 12CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Yu, Shanshan; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Boudon, Vincent; Ismail, Syed

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report the first experimental measurements of spectral line shape parameters (self- and air-broadened Lorentz half-widths, pressure-shifts, and line mixing (via off-diagonal relaxation matrix elements) coefficients and their temperature dependences, where appropriate) for transitions in the 2ν3 Q branch manifolds, Q(11)-Q(1) of methane (12CH4), in the 5996.5-6007-cm-1 region. The analysis included 23 high-resolution, high signal-to-noise laboratory absorption spectra recorded with the Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at JPL. The experimental data were obtained using 12C-enriched 12CH4 and dilute mixtures of 12CH4 in dry air in the 130-296 K range using a room-temperature long path absorption cell and, two custom-built coolable cells. In the analysis, an interactive multispectrum fitting software was employed where all the 23 spectra (11 self-broadened and 12 air-broadened) were fit simultaneously. By carefully applying reasonable constraints to the parameters for severely blended lines, we were able to determine a self-consistent set of broadening, shift and line mixing (relaxation matrix coefficients) parameters for CH4-CH4 and CH4-air collisions. In the majority of cases, a quadratic speed dependence parameter common for all transitions in each Q(J) manifold was determined. However, temperature dependences of the Q branch line mixing parameter could not be determined from the present data. Since no other experimental line shape measurements have been reported for this Q-branch, the present results are compared to available values in the HITRAN2012 database.

  3. Spectral Line Parameters Including Temperature Dependences of Self- and Air-Broadening in the 2 (left arrow) 0 Band of CO at 2.3 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.; Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Predoi-Cross, A.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature dependences of pressure-broadened half-width and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with accurate positions and intensities have been determined for transitions in the 2<--0 band of C-12 O-16 from analyzing high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers. A total of 28 spectra, 16 self-broadened and 12 air-broadened, recorded using high- purity (greater than or equal to 99.5% C-12-enriched) CO samples and CO diluted with dry air(research grade) at different temperatures and pressures, were analyzed simultaneously to maximize the accuracy of the retrieved parameters. The sample temperatures ranged from 150 to 298K and the total pressures varied between 5 and 700 Torr. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares spectrum fitting technique was used to adjust the rovibrational constants (G, B, D, etc.) and intensity parameters (including Herman-Wallis coefficients), rather than determining individual line positions and intensities. Self-and air-broadened Lorentz half-width coefficients, their temperature dependence exponents, self- and air-pressure-induced shift coefficients, their temperature dependences, self- and air-line mixing coefficients, their temperature dependences and speed dependence have been retrieved from the analysis. Speed-dependent line shapes with line mixing employing off-diagonal relaxation matrix element formalism were needed to minimize the fit residuals. This study presents a precise and complete set of spectral line parameters that consistently reproduce the spectrum of carbon monoxide over terrestrial atmospheric conditions.

  4. Spectral Line Parameters Including Temperature Dependences of Self- and Air-Broadening in the 2 (left arrow) 0 Band of CO at 2.3 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.; Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Predoi-Cross, A.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature dependences of pressure-broadened half-width and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with accurate positions and intensities have been determined for transitions in the 2<--0 band of C-12 O-16 from analyzing high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers. A total of 28 spectra, 16 self-broadened and 12 air-broadened, recorded using high- purity (greater than or equal to 99.5% C-12-enriched) CO samples and CO diluted with dry air(research grade) at different temperatures and pressures, were analyzed simultaneously to maximize the accuracy of the retrieved parameters. The sample temperatures ranged from 150 to 298K and the total pressures varied between 5 and 700 Torr. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares spectrum fitting technique was used to adjust the rovibrational constants (G, B, D, etc.) and intensity parameters (including Herman-Wallis coefficients), rather than determining individual line positions and intensities. Self-and air-broadened Lorentz half-width coefficients, their temperature dependence exponents, self- and air-pressure-induced shift coefficients, their temperature dependences, self- and air-line mixing coefficients, their temperature dependences and speed dependence have been retrieved from the analysis. Speed-dependent line shapes with line mixing employing off-diagonal relaxation matrix element formalism were needed to minimize the fit residuals. This study presents a precise and complete set of spectral line parameters that consistently reproduce the spectrum of carbon monoxide over terrestrial atmospheric conditions.

  5. Water quality parameter measurement using spectral signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to the problem of measuring water quality parameters from remote sensing spectral signature data. The equations necessary to perform regression analysis are presented and methods of testing the strength and reliability of a regression are described. An efficient algorithm for selecting an optimal subset of the independent variables available for a regression is also presented.

  6. Multispectrum measurements of spectral line parameters including temperature dependences of N2- and self-broadened half-width coefficients in the region of the v9 band of 12C2H6

    SciTech Connect

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C.P.; Smith, M.A.H.; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, L.R.; Mantz, A. W.

    2010-11-01

    Ethane is a prominent contributor to the spectrum of Titan, particularly in the region of the v9 band at 12μm. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting program was applied to laboratory spectra of ethane to measure accurate positions, absolute intensities, N2- and selfbroadened half- width coefficients and their temperature dependences for a large number transitions. These measurements include several pQ and rQ sub-bands (and other sub-bands such as pP, rR) in the v9 fundamental band of 12C2H6 centered near 822 cm-1. Positions were measured for 2958 transitions and intensities for 3771 transitions. N2- and self-broadened half-width coefficients were determined for over 1700 transitions while temperature dependence exponents were retrieved for over 1350 of those transitions. Of these, many measurements (mostly line positions and intensities) belong to the v9+v4-v4 hot band, v9+2v4-2v4 hot band, 13C12CH6 v9 band and unidentified transitions. Forty-three high resolution (0.0016-0.005 cm-1) infrared laboratory absorption spectra recorded at temperatures between 148 and 298 K were fitted simultaneously to retrieve these parameters. Forty-one of these spectra were obtained in the temperature range of 211-298 K using the Bruker IFS 120HR interferometer located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. Two additional spectra at 148 K were recorded using a new temperature stabilized cryogenic cell designed to work inside the sample compartment of the high resolution Bruker IFS 125HR interferometer of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena California. The specialized cooling cell developed at Connecticut College and capable of achieving gas sample temperatures down to 70 K with a temperature stability and uniformity of better than ±0.05 K was employed to record the 148 K spectra. Constraints to intensity ratios, doublet separations, half-width coefficients and their temperature dependence exponents were required to

  7. Evaluation of the Chromium Resonance Parameters Including Resonance Parameter Covariance

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this work is to report the results and describe the procedures utilized to evaluate the chromium isotopes' cross sections, i.e., (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, and (54)Cr, for criticality safety applications. The evaluations were done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The novel aspect of this evaluation is the inclusion of new transmission and capture cross-section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for energies below 100 keV and the extension of the (53)Cr energy region. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code, SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on the Bayes' theory. Complete sets of resonance parameters and resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCMs) were obtained for each of the chromium isotopes from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database.

  8. Relationship between Cole-Cole model parameters and spectral decomposition parameters derived from SIP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) data are commonly analysed using phenomenological models. Among these models the Cole-Cole (CC) model is the most popular choice to describe the strength and frequency dependence of distinct polarization peaks in the data. More flexibility regarding the shape of the spectrum is provided by decomposition schemes. Here the spectral response is decomposed into individual responses of a chosen elementary relaxation model, mathematically acting as kernel in the involved integral, based on a broad range of relaxation times. A frequently used kernel function is the Debye model, but also the CC model with some other a priorly specified frequency dispersion (e.g. Warburg model) has been proposed as kernel in the decomposition. The different decomposition approaches in use, also including conductivity and resistivity formulations, pose the question to which degree the integral spectral parameters typically derived from the obtained relaxation time distribution are biased by the approach itself. Based on synthetic SIP data sampled from an ideal CC response, we here investigate how the two most important integral output parameters deviate from the corresponding CC input parameters. We find that the total chargeability may be underestimated by up to 80 per cent and the mean relaxation time may be off by up to three orders of magnitude relative to the original values, depending on the frequency dispersion of the analysed spectrum and the proximity of its peak to the frequency range limits considered in the decomposition. We conclude that a quantitative comparison of SIP parameters across different studies, or the adoption of parameter relationships from other studies, for example when transferring laboratory results to the field, is only possible on the basis of a consistent spectral analysis procedure. This is particularly important when comparing effective CC parameters with spectral parameters derived from decomposition results.

  9. The spectral parameter maps of Vesta from VIR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Tosi, F.; Longobardo, A.; Zambon, F.; McCord, T.; Combe, J. P.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    Here we present the spectral parameter maps used in this Surface Composition of Vesta Special Issue. The use of spectral parameters have been important since the first ground-based observations of Vesta as they can describe single mineralogic aspects as abundances or change in surface composition. Mapping these parameters over the surface shows the mineralogic diversity across the asteroid Vesta. In this work we discuss the development of the maps, which are produced from the data of the Visible and Infrared mapping spectrometer onboard NASA's Dawn mission. We describe how we processed the VIR spectra and how we produced the geometries of data acquisition. Spectra and geometries are used to design a Geographic Information System procedure to mosaic these data. We conclude the article with a description of the trends of the pyroxene-related spectral parameters across the asteroid, and some statistics on the spectral parameters of each map within the quadrangle-based scheme used in this special issue.

  10. Viscoelastic parameter estimation based on spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, H; Salcudean, S E; Rohling, R

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduces a new technique for the robust estimation of relaxation-time distribution in tissue. The main novelty is in the use of the phase of transfer functions calculated from a time series of strain measurements at multiple locations. Computer simulations with simulated measurement noise demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. An experimental apparatus and software were developed to confirm the simulations. The setup can be used both as a rheometer to characterize the overall mechanical properties of a material or as a vibro-elastography imaging device using an ultrasound system. The algorithms were tested on tissue mimicking phantoms specifically developed to exhibit contrast in elasticity and relaxation time. The phantoms were constructed using a combination of gelatin and a polyvinyl alcohol sponge to produce the desired viscoelastic properties. The tissue parameters were estimated and the elasticity and relaxation time of the materials have been used as complementary features to distinguish different materials. The estimation results are consistent with the rheometry, verifying that the relaxation time can be used as a complementary feature to elasticity to delineate the mechanical properties of the phantom.

  11. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Asticio; Mar Sánchez-López, María del; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  12. Spectral vegetation indexes and the remote sensing of biophysical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huemmrich, Karl F.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1992-01-01

    Combinations of remotely sensed data from different spectral bands have been combined into spectral vegetation indexes (SVIs) and used to determine biophysical parameters. The characteristics of two-band SVIs made up of visible and near-infrared reflectances are examined. Two canopy reflectance models, a turbid media model and a geometrical model, are used to study the effects of different canopy structures on the measurement of leaf area index and the fraction of photosynthetically intercepted active radiation.

  13. Atmospheric parameters, spectral indexes and their relation to CPV spectral performance

    SciTech Connect

    Núñez, Rubén Antón, Ignacio Askins, Steve Sala, Gabriel

    2014-09-26

    Air Mass and atmosphere components (basically aerosol (AOD) and precipitable water (PW)) define the absorption of the sunlight that arrive to Earth. Radiative models such as SMARTS or MODTRAN use these parameters to generate an equivalent spectrum. However, complex and expensive instruments (as AERONET network devices) are needed to obtain AOD and PW. On the other hand, the use of isotype cells is a convenient way to characterize spectrally a place for CPV considering that they provide the photocurrent of the different internal subcells individually. Crossing data from AERONET station and a Tri-band Spectroheliometer, a model that correlates Spectral Mismatch Ratios and atmospheric parameters is proposed. Considering the amount of stations of AERONET network, this model may be used to estimate the spectral influence on energy performance of CPV systems close to all the stations worldwide.

  14. Estimation of Wheat Agronomic Parameters using New Spectral Indices

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiu-liang; Diao, Wan-ying; Xiao, Chun-hua; Wang, Fang-yong; Chen, Bing; Wang, Ke-ru; Li, Shao-kun

    2013-01-01

    Crop agronomic parameters (leaf area index (LAI), nitrogen (N) uptake, total chlorophyll (Chl) content ) are very important for the prediction of crop growth. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether the wheat LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content could be accurately predicted using spectral indices collected at different stages of wheat growth. Firstly, the product of the optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index and wheat biomass dry weight (OSAVI×BDW) were used to estimate LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content; secondly, BDW was replaced by spectral indices to establish new spectral indices (OSAVI×OSAVI, OSAVI×SIPI, OSAVI×CIred edge, OSAVI×CIgreen mode and OSAVI×EVI2); finally, we used the new spectral indices for estimating LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content. The results showed that the new spectral indices could be used to accurately estimate LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content. The highest R2 and the lowest RMSEs were 0.711 and 0.78 (OSAVI×EVI2), 0.785 and 3.98 g/m2 (OSAVI×CIred edge) and 0.846 and 0.65 g/m2 (OSAVI×CIred edge) for LAI, nitrogen uptake and total Chl content, respectively. The new spectral indices performed better than the OSAVI alone, and the problems of a lack of sensitivity at earlier growth stages and saturation at later growth stages, which are typically associated with the OSAVI, were improved. The overall results indicated that this new spectral indices provided the best approximation for the estimation of agronomic indices for all growth stages of wheat. PMID:24023639

  15. Optimizing spectral CT parameters for material classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigie, D. S.; La Rivière, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we propose a framework for optimizing spectral CT imaging parameters and hardware design with regard to material classification tasks. Compared with conventional CT, many more parameters must be considered when designing spectral CT systems and protocols. These choices will impact material classification performance in a non-obvious, task-dependent way with direct implications for radiation dose reduction. In light of this, we adapt Hotelling Observer formalisms typically applied to signal detection tasks to the spectral CT, material-classification problem. The result is a rapidly computable metric that makes it possible to sweep out many system configurations, generating parameter optimization curves (POC’s) that can be used to select optimal settings. The proposed model avoids restrictive assumptions about the basis-material decomposition (e.g. linearity) and incorporates signal uncertainty with a stochastic object model. This technique is demonstrated on dual-kVp and photon-counting systems for two different, clinically motivated material classification tasks (kidney stone classification and plaque removal). We show that the POC’s predicted with the proposed analytic model agree well with those derived from computationally intensive numerical simulation studies.

  16. Systematic study of parameters influencing spectral behavior of laboratory mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancarella, Francesca; Fonti, Sergio; Alemanno, Giulia; Orofino, Vincenzo; D'Elia, Marcella

    2017-04-01

    The spectral behavior of mixtures of particulate materials has important implications for the study of planetary surfaces, in particular after that, in the last decades, the spatial resolution of orbiting instruments has improved considerably. In fact, a planetary surface should be considered as composed by mixtures of different minerals and rocks and, in such scenario, a good understanding of the spectral behavior of a mixture, as a function of the characteristics of the components, is necessary for the interpretation of the observational data. In this work, we report the main results of a laboratory test program aimed to check the spectral behavior of several mixtures of particulate samples. The laboratory reflectance spectra are taken in a wide wavelength range from visible (VIS) to mid-infrared (MIR) (i.e. from 0.35 to 25 µm). Then they are carefully analyzed to check how their spectral characteristics are changing as a function of several parameters, such as the mean reflectance level, the percentage and the grain size of the particles of each material.

  17. Stark Broadening Parameters for Neutral Oxygen Spectral Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonizan, N.; Qindeel, R.; Nessib, N. Ben; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Dimitrijević, Milan S.

    2015-12-01

    Stark broadening parameters for nine neutral oxygen (O I) lines have been determined within the impact approximation and the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic data have been taken from the TOPbase and NIST atomic databases. The electron and proton Stark widths and shifts and ion broadening parameter values for these O I lines have been calculated for electron density of 10 16 cm -3 and for 4 different electron temperatures in the range of 5000 K to 40000 K. These Stark broadening parameters are compared with our previous results (Ben Nessib, N. et al. 1996, Physica Scripta, 54, 603-613), where we calculated Stark broadening parameters for only four O I spectral lines and where Stark widths and shifts were compared with experimental and theoretical data available in the literature. In the present paper, we have also compared our results with the Griem's book (Griem, H. R. 1974, Spectral line broadening by plasmas) and VALD (Ryabchikova, T. et al. 2015, Physica Scripta, 90, 054005) values.

  18. Stellar and wind parameters of massive stars from spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.

    2017-07-01

    The only way to deduce information from stars is to decode the radiation it emits in an appropriate way. Spectroscopy can solve this and derive many properties of stars. In this work we seek to derive simultaneously the stellar and wind characteristics of A and B supergiant stars. Our stellar properties encompass the effective temperature, the surface gravity, the stellar radius, the micro-turbulence velocity, the rotational velocity and, finally, the chemical composition. For wind properties we consider the mass-loss rate, the terminal velocity and the line-force parameters (α, k and δ) obtained from the standard line-driven wind theory. To model the data we use the radiative transport code Fastwind considering the newest hydrodynamical solutions derived with Hydwind code, which needs stellar and line-force parameters to obtain a wind solution. A grid of spectral models of massive stars is created and together with the observed spectra their physical properties are determined through spectral line fittings. These fittings provide an estimation about the line-force parameters, whose theoretical calculations are extremely complex. Furthermore, we expect to confirm that the hydrodynamical solutions obtained with a value of δ slightly larger than ˜ 0.25, called δ-slow solutions, describe quite reliable the radiation line-driven winds of A and late B supergiant stars and at the same time explain disagreements between observational data and theoretical models for the Wind-Momentum Luminosity Relationship (WLR).

  19. Bayesian parameter estimation in spectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Cox, Ben T.; Arridge, Simon R.; Kaipio, Jari P.; Tarvainen, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an imaging technique combining strong contrast of optical imaging to high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. These strengths are achieved via photoacoustic effect, where a spatial absorption of light pulse is converted into a measurable propagating ultrasound wave. The method is seen as a potential tool for small animal imaging, pre-clinical investigations, study of blood vessels and vasculature, as well as for cancer imaging. The goal in PAT is to form an image of the absorbed optical energy density field via acoustic inverse problem approaches from the measured ultrasound data. Quantitative PAT (QPAT) proceeds from these images and forms quantitative estimates of the optical properties of the target. This optical inverse problem of QPAT is illposed. To alleviate the issue, spectral QPAT (SQPAT) utilizes PAT data formed at multiple optical wavelengths simultaneously with optical parameter models of tissue to form quantitative estimates of the parameters of interest. In this work, the inverse problem of SQPAT is investigated. Light propagation is modelled using the diffusion equation. Optical absorption is described with chromophore concentration weighted sum of known chromophore absorption spectra. Scattering is described by Mie scattering theory with an exponential power law. In the inverse problem, the spatially varying unknown parameters of interest are the chromophore concentrations, the Mie scattering parameters (power law factor and the exponent), and Gruneisen parameter. The inverse problem is approached with a Bayesian method. It is numerically demonstrated, that estimation of all parameters of interest is possible with the approach.

  20. Ultrasonic tissue characterization for prostate diagnostics: spectral parameters vs. texture parameters.

    PubMed

    Scheipers, U; Ermert, H; Sommerfeld, H J; Garcia-Schürmann, M; Kühne, K; Senge, T; Philippou, S

    2003-05-01

    An ultrasonic multi-feature tissue characterizing system for the detection of prostate cancer is presented. The system is based on the processing of radio frequency (RF) ultrasonic echo data. Data from 100 patients was acquired in a clinical study. Parameters are extracted from the RF echo data and classified using two adaptive network-based fuzzy inference systems (FIS) working in parallel as a nonlinear classifier. Next to spectral parameters, conventional texture parameters are calculated using demodulated and log-compressed echo data. In the first approach, the classifier is trained on both, spectral and texture parameters. In the second approach, the classifier is only trained on texture parameters. Classification results of both approaches are compared and it is demonstrated, that only the use of spectral parameters yields satisfying classification results. Results of a minimum distance classifier (MDC) are presented for comparison with the fuzzy inference system. For the final fuzzy inference systems used in this approach, the area under the ROC curve is between 84% and 86% for the combined approach and between 70% and 74% for the approach based on texture parameters only.

  1. Mercer's spectral decomposition for the characterization of thermal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahusborde, E.; Azaïez, M.; Belgacem, F. Ben; Palomo Del Barrio, E.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate a tractable Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method used in thermography for the characterization of thermal parameters. The inverse problem to solve is based on the model of transient heat transfer. The most significant advantage is the transformation of the dynamic identification problem into a steady identification equation. The time dependence is accounted for by the SVD in a performing way. We lay down a mathematical foundation well fitted to this approach, which relies on the spectral expansion of Mercer kernels. This enables us to shed more light on most of its important features. Given its potentialities, the analysis we propose here might help users understanding the way the SVD algorithm, or the TSVD, its truncated version, operate in the thermal parameters estimation and why it is relevant and attractive. When useful, the study is complemented by some analytical and numerical illustrations realized within MATLAB's code.

  2. Spectral Determination of Source Parameters in The Marmara Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseoglu, A.; Meral Ozel, N.; Barıs, S.

    2014-12-01

    Ever since the 1999 Kocaeli Earthquake, in which the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) was not able to correctly reflect the magnitude size in its preliminary report because of the saturation effect, a rapid and accurate determination of the earthquake becomes a very important issue. Therefore, in the framework of this study an automatic determination of the moment magnitude was performed by using the displacement spectra of selected earthquakes in Marmara Region. For this purpose 39 three component broadband stations from KOERI seismic network which recorded 174 earthquakes with magnitudes 2.5≤M≤5.0 in between 2006-2009 were used. Due to the importance of quality factor in determination of the moment magnitude with spectral analysis method, the quality factor was calculated for the whole region in the beginning. Source spectrum which was obtained by converting the velocity records to displacement spectra and moment magnitudes of earthquakes were determined by fitting this spectrum to classical Brune model. For this aim, an automatic procedure was utilized which based on minimizing the differences between observed and synthetic source spectra identified by the S-waves. Besides of moment magnitude and location parameters, some source parameters such as seismic moment, spectral level, corner frequency and stress drop were also calculated. Application of the method proves that determine the seismic moment from the source spectra is applicable not only for earthquakes with small magnitude but also moderate earthquakes as well.

  3. C -parameter distribution at N3LL' including power corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01

    We compute the e+e- C -parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O (αs3), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O (ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS ¯ to a short distance "Rgap" scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C -parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≃ 2.5 % at Q =mZ.

  4. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; ...

    2015-05-15

    We compute the e⁺e⁻ C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(α3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O(ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switchmore » from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≅ 2.5% at Q=mZ.« less

  5. Solar oscillation parameters: simultaneous velocity-intensity spectral & cross-spectral fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barban, Caroline; Hill, Frank

    2003-02-01

    We use the Severino et al. (2001) model for simultaneously fitting four spectra: V (velocity) and I (intensity) power, I-V phase difference and I-V coherence to observational data. We show that this model allows us to reproduce well the observed spectra for l = 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 at low and intermediate frequencies. At high frequencies, the contamination of the spectrum by leaks may prevent fitting the data with the model. A study of the fit parameters as a function of frequency shows the well-known behavior of the mode amplitude and width, but additional modes are needed for a physical interpretation of all fit parameters. Comparing the oscillation parameters from the multi-spectral fitting and from using only the V spectra shows that the oscillation frequency differs by at most 0.1 μHz.

  6. Stark parameter measurement of Ar II UV spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurović, S.; Belmonte, M. T.; Peláez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar, S.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present results of experimental determination of Stark parameters of Ar II spectral lines. We report 126 half-width and 111 shift results, 53 half-widths and 44 shifts of which are presented here for the first time. The obtained data may be of astrophysical interest. The results were compared with available experimental results of other authors and with calculated ones in the cases where it was possible. A low-pressure pulsed arc, filled with pure argon, was used as a plasma source. All measurements were done under electron density which ranges from 0.20 × 1023 to 1.15 × 1023 m-3 and electron temperature from 16 000 to 26 000 K.

  7. Informed spectral analysis: audio signal parameter estimation using side information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourer, Dominique; Marchand, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    Parametric models are of great interest for representing and manipulating sounds. However, the quality of the resulting signals depends on the precision of the parameters. When the signals are available, these parameters can be estimated, but the presence of noise decreases the resulting precision of the estimation. Furthermore, the Cramér-Rao bound shows the minimal error reachable with the best estimator, which can be insufficient for demanding applications. These limitations can be overcome by using the coding approach which consists in directly transmitting the parameters with the best precision using the minimal bitrate. However, this approach does not take advantage of the information provided by the estimation from the signal and may require a larger bitrate and a loss of compatibility with existing file formats. The purpose of this article is to propose a compromised approach, called the 'informed approach,' which combines analysis with (coded) side information in order to increase the precision of parameter estimation using a lower bitrate than pure coding approaches, the audio signal being known. Thus, the analysis problem is presented in a coder/decoder configuration where the side information is computed and inaudibly embedded into the mixture signal at the coder. At the decoder, the extra information is extracted and is used to assist the analysis process. This study proposes applying this approach to audio spectral analysis using sinusoidal modeling which is a well-known model with practical applications and where theoretical bounds have been calculated. This work aims at uncovering new approaches for audio quality-based applications. It provides a solution for challenging problems like active listening of music, source separation, and realistic sound transformations.

  8. Spectral-domain computation of characteristic impedances and multiport parameters of multiple coupled microstrip lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Vijai K.; Lee, Hyuckjae

    1989-01-01

    A numerical procedure based on the spectral-domain techniques is formulated to compute all the frequency-dependent normal-mode parameters of general multiple coupled line structures in an inhomogeneous medium. In addition to the phase and attenuation constants for all the normal modes, these parameters include the line-mode and decoupled line modal impedances and the current and equivalent voltage eigenvector matrices of the coupled system. The multiport admittance (and impedance) matrices and coupled line equivalent-circuit model parameters are evaluated in terms of these normal-mode parameters. Numerical results for these normal-mode parameters for typical asymmetric two-, three-, and four-line microstrip structures are included to demonstrate the procedure and the frequency dependence of these parameters.

  9. Early postoperative spectral Doppler parameters of renal transplants: the effect of donor and recipient factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-K; Chiou, S-Y; Lai, Y-C; Cheng, H-Y; Lin, N-C; Loong, C-C; Chiou, H-J; Chou, Y-H; Chang, C-Y

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the donor and recipient factors related to the spectral Doppler parameters of the transplant kidney in the early posttransplantation period. This retrospective study included 76 patients who underwent renal transplantation assessed using Doppler ultrasonography (US) on the first postoperative day. We compared spectral Doppler parameters (peak systolic velocity [PSV] and resistive index [RI]) of the segmental artery of the transplant kidney according to the type of renal transplant, level of serum creatinine (SCr) of donor prior to organ donation, and donor/recipient age. RI was significantly higher in deceased-donor kidney transplantation (DDKT) as compared with living-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT; 0.73 ± 0.10 vs 0.66 ± 0.11; P = .007). In the DDKT recipients, multivariate analysis showed donor SCr was the only factor affecting PSV (P = .023), whereas recipient age was the only factor affecting RI (P = .035). In the LDKT recipients, multivariate analysis showed recipient age was the only factor affecting both PSV (P = .009) and RI (P = .018). Spectral Doppler parameters in the early posttransplantation period are related to the type of renal transplant, donor renal function, and recipient age. These factors should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results of spectral Doppler US. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation into Spectral Parameters as they Impact CPV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Rodriguez, J.

    2011-03-01

    The CPV industry is well aware that performance of triple junction cells depends on spectral conditions but there is a lack of data quantifying this spectral dependence at the module level. This paper explores the impact of precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and optical air mass on multiple CPV module technologies on-sun in Golden, CO.

  11. Power extraction calculation improvement when local parameters are included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Mateos, L. M.; Hartnett, M.

    2016-02-01

    The improvement of the tidal resource assessment will be studied by comparing two approaches in a two-dimensional, finite difference, hydrodynamic model DIVAST-ADI; in a channel of non-varying cross-sectional area that connects two large basins. The first strategy, considers a constant trust coefficient; the second one, use the local field parameters around the turbine. These parameters are obtained after applying the open channel theory in the tidal stream and after considering the turbine as a linear momentum actuator disk. The parameters correspond to the upstream and downstream, with respect to the turbine, speeds and depths; also the blockage ratio, the wake velocity and the bypass coefficients and they have already been incorporated in the model. The figure (a) shows the numerical configuration at high tide developed with DIVAST-ADI. The experiment undertakes two open boundary conditions. The first one is a sinusoidal forcing introduced as a water level located at (I, J=1) and the second one, indicate that a zero velocity and a constant water depth were kept (I, J=362); when the turbine is introduced it is placed in the middle of the channel (I=161, J=181). The influence of the turbine in the velocity and elevation around the turbine region is evident; figure (b) and (c) shows that the turbine produces a discontinuity in the depth and velocity profile, when we plot a transect along the channel. Finally, the configuration implemented reproduced with satisfactory accuracy the quasi-steady flow condition, even without presenting shock-capturing capability. Also, the range of the parameters 0.01<α 4<0.55, $0

  12. Observational constraints on unified dark matter including Hubble parameter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kai; Cao, Shuo; Wang, Jun; Gong, Xiaolong; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2012-03-01

    We constrain a unified dark matter (UDM) model from the latest observational data. This model assumes that the dark sector is degenerate. Dark energy and dark matter are the same component. It can be described by an affine equation of state PX=p0+αρX. Our data set contains the newly revised H(z) data, type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from Union2 set, baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) observation from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 7 (DR7) galaxy sample, as well as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) observation from the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) results. By using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we obtain the results in a flat universe: ΩΛ=0.719-0.0305+0.0264(1σ)-0.0458+0.0380(2σ), α=1.72-4.79+3.92(1σ)-7.30+5.47(2σ)(×10-3), Ωbh2=0.0226-0.0011+0.0011(1σ)-0.0015+0.0016(2σ). Moreover, when considering a non-flat universe, ΩΛ=0.722-0.0447+0.0362(1σ)-0.0634+0.0479(2σ), α=0.242-0.775+0.787(1σ)-1.03+1.10(2σ)(×10-2), Ωbh2=0.0227-0.0014+0.0015(1σ)-0.0018+0.0021(2σ), Ωk=-0.194-1.85+2.02(1σ)-2.57+2.75(2σ)(×10-2). These give a more stringent results than before. We also give the results from other combinations of these data for comparison. The observational Hubble parameter data can give a more stringent constraint than SNe Ia. From the constraint results, we can see the parameters α and Ωk are very close to zero, which means a flat universe is strongly supported and the speed of sound of the dark sector seems to be zero.

  13. Numerical solution of vector Sturm-Liouville problems with a nonlinear dependence on the spectral parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrikov, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    A new iterative based on spectral corrections method for solving regular self-adjoint vector Sturm-Liouville problems is presented. It is assumed that symmetric matrix coefficients of the differential equation depend nonlinearly on the spectral parameter. The method has quadratic convergence with respect to a small parameter. The numerical results for test examples are given.

  14. Thermodynamic and cloud parameter retrieval using infrared spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Huang, Hung-Lung A.; Li, Jun; McGill, Matthew J.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution infrared radiance spectra obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. A fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. The retrieval algorithm is presented along with its application to recent field experiment data from the NPOESS Airborne Sounding Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I). The retrieval accuracy dependence on cloud properties is discussed. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals can be achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to cloud top level are obtained. For both optically thin and thick cloud situations, the cloud top height can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 1.0 km. Preliminary NAST-I retrieval results from the recent Atlantic-THORPEX Regional Campaign (ATReC) are presented and compared with coincident observations obtained from dropsondes and the nadir-pointing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL).

  15. Cool stars: spectral library of high-resolution echelle spectra and database of stellar parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, D.

    2013-05-01

    During the last years our group have undertake several high resolution spectroscopic surveys of nearby FGKM stars with different spectrographs (FOCES, SARG, SOFIN, FIES, HERMES). A large number of stars have been already observed and we have already determined spectral types, rotational velocities as well as radial velocities, Lithium abundance and several chromospheric activity indicators. We are working now in a homogeneous determination of the fundamental stellar parameters (T_{eff}, log{g}, ξ and [Fe/H]) and chemical abundances of many elements of all these stars. Some fully reduced spectra in FITS format have been available via ftp and in the {http://www.ucm.es/info/Astrof/invest/actividad/spectra.html}{Worl Wide Web} (Montes et al. 1997, A&AS, 123, 473; Montes et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 485; and Montes et al. 1999, ApJS, 123, 283) and some particular spectral regions of the echelle spectra are available at VizieR by López-Santiago et al. 2010, A&A, 514, A97. We are now working in made accessible all the spectra of our different surveys in a Virtual Observatory ({http://svo.cab.inta-csic.es/}{VO}) compliant library and database accessible using a common web interface following the standards of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance ({http://www.ivoa.net/}{IVOA}). The spectral library includes F, G, K and M field stars, from dwarfs to giants. The spectral coverage is from 3800 to 10000 Å, with spectral resolution ranging from 40000 to 80000. The database will provide in addition the stellar parameters determined for these spectra using {http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/abs/2012arXiv1205.4879T}{StePar} (Tabernero et al. 2012, A&A, 547, A13).

  16. Uncertainty of rotating shadowband irradiometers and Si-pyranometers including the spectral irradiance error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbert, Stefan; Kleindiek, Stefan; Nouri, Bijan; Geuder, Norbert; Habte, Aron; Schwandt, Marko; Vignola, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar power projects require accurate direct normal irradiance (DNI) data including uncertainty specifications for plant layout and cost calculations. Ground measured data are necessary to obtain the required level of accuracy and are often obtained with Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSI) that use photodiode pyranometers and correction functions to account for systematic effects. The uncertainty of Si-pyranometers has been investigated, but so far basically empirical studies were published or decisive uncertainty influences had to be estimated based on experience in analytical studies. One of the most crucial estimated influences is the spectral irradiance error because Si-photodiode-pyranometers only detect visible and color infrared radiation and have a spectral response that varies strongly within this wavelength interval. Furthermore, analytic studies did not discuss the role of correction functions and the uncertainty introduced by imperfect shading. In order to further improve the bankability of RSI and Si-pyranometer data, a detailed uncertainty analysis following the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) has been carried out. The study defines a method for the derivation of the spectral error and spectral uncertainties and presents quantitative values of the spectral and overall uncertainties. Data from the PSA station in southern Spain was selected for the analysis. Average standard uncertainties for corrected 10 min data of 2 % for global horizontal irradiance (GHI), and 2.9 % for DNI (for GHI and DNI over 300 W/m²) were found for the 2012 yearly dataset when separate GHI and DHI calibration constants were used. Also the uncertainty in 1 min resolution was analyzed. The effect of correction functions is significant. The uncertainties found in this study are consistent with results of previous empirical studies.

  17. Uncertainty of Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers and Si-Pyranometers Including the Spectral Irradiance Error

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbert, Stefan; Kleindiek, Stefan; Nouri, Bijan; Geuder, Norbert; Habte, Aron; Schwandt, Marko; Vignola, Frank

    2016-05-31

    Concentrating solar power projects require accurate direct normal irradiance (DNI) data including uncertainty specifications for plant layout and cost calculations. Ground measured data are necessary to obtain the required level of accuracy and are often obtained with Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSI) that use photodiode pyranometers and correction functions to account for systematic effects. The uncertainty of Si-pyranometers has been investigated, but so far basically empirical studies were published or decisive uncertainty influences had to be estimated based on experience in analytical studies. One of the most crucial estimated influences is the spectral irradiance error because Si-photodiode-pyranometers only detect visible and color infrared radiation and have a spectral response that varies strongly within this wavelength interval. Furthermore, analytic studies did not discuss the role of correction functions and the uncertainty introduced by imperfect shading. In order to further improve the bankability of RSI and Si-pyranometer data, a detailed uncertainty analysis following the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) has been carried out. The study defines a method for the derivation of the spectral error and spectral uncertainties and presents quantitative values of the spectral and overall uncertainties. Data from the PSA station in southern Spain was selected for the analysis. Average standard uncertainties for corrected 10 min data of 2% for global horizontal irradiance (GHI), and 2.9% for DNI (for GHI and DNI over 300 W/m2) were found for the 2012 yearly dataset when separate GHI and DHI calibration constants were used. Also the uncertainty in 1 min resolution was analyzed. The effect of correction functions is significant. The uncertainties found in this study are consistent with results of previous empirical studies.

  18. Atmospheric, Cloud, and Surface Parameters Retrieved from Satellite Ultra-spectral Infrared Sounder Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Yang, Ping; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, Larrabee

    2007-01-01

    An advanced retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. This physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multivariable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. This retrieval algorithm is applied to the MetOp satellite Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched on October 19, 2006. IASI possesses an ultra-spectral resolution of 0.25 cm(exp -1) and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760 cm(exp -1). Preliminary retrievals of atmospheric soundings, surface properties, and cloud optical/microphysical properties with the IASI measurements are obtained and presented.

  19. Extraction and fusion of spectral parameters for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisier, B.; Billiot, B.; Abdessalem, Z.; Gouton, P.; Hardeberg, J. Y.

    2011-03-01

    Many methods have been developed in image processing for face recognition, especially in recent years with the increase of biometric technologies. However, most of these techniques are used on grayscale images acquired in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. The aims of our study are to improve existing tools and to develop new methods for face recognition. The techniques used take advantage of the different spectral ranges, the visible, optical infrared and thermal infrared, by either combining them or analyzing them separately in order to extract the most appropriate information for face recognition. We also verify the consistency of several keypoints extraction techniques in the Near Infrared (NIR) and in the Visible Spectrum.

  20. [Method of Remote Sensing Identification for Mineral Types Based on Multiple Spectral Characteristic Parameters Matching].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Ming, Yan-fang; Han, Liu-sheng; Ren, Zhong-liang; Guo, Ya-min

    2015-10-01

    The traditional mineral mapping methods with remote sensing data, based on spectral reflectance matching techniques, shows low accuracy, for obviously being affected by the image quality, atmospheric and other factors. A new mineral mapping method based on multiple types of spectral characteristic parameters is presented in this paper. Various spectral characteristic parameters are used together to enhanced the stability in the situation of atmosphere and environment background affecting. AVIRIS (Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data of Nevada Cuprite are selected to determine the mineral types with this method. Typical mineral spectral data are also obtained from USGS (United States Geological Survey) spectral library to calculate the spectral characteristic parameters. A mineral identification model based on multiple spectral characteristic parameters is built by analyzing the various characteristic parameters, and is applied in the mineral mapping experiment in Cuprite area. The mineral mapping result produced by Clark et al. in 1995 is used to evaluate the effect of this method, results show, that mineral mapping results with this method can obtain a high precision, the overall mineral identification accuracy is 78.96%.

  1. Line by Line Spectral Parameters in the 4ν_3 Spectral Region of Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; O'Brien, J. J.; Shaji, S.; Spickler, P. T.; Houck, C. P.; Coakley, J. A.; Dolph, J.; Rankin, K.

    2012-06-01

    The near infrared bands of methane were first observed in the outer planets and Titan where atmospheric ray paths are long. The spectrum is complex, and long absorption paths in the laboratory are difficult to cool to outer solar system temperatures. At room temperature, many significant spectral lines appear per Doppler width. The band models generally used in the 890 nm spectral region of methane do not provide transmissions that are multiplicative, so scattering and inhomogeneous atmospheres cannot be properly treated using this approach. The intracavity laser spectrometer at the University of Missouri-St. Louis was used to obtain low temperature (99-161K), low pressure (0.12-7.13 Torr), long path (3.14-5.65 km) and high resolution ( 0.01 cm-1 HWHM) spectra of methane covering the entire 890nm feature (10925-11500 cm-1), the deepest band in the CCD spectral region. At these temperatures the Doppler width is 0.01 cm-1 and the spectral lines originating from levels higher than J"=11 and excited vibrational states are not visible. The result is a dense, but manageable spectrum from which over 11,200 line positions, intensities and lower state energies are derived on a line by line basis by the College of William and Mary multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting program Simulations of the methane spectrum for outer planet atmospheres using our positions, intensities and lower state energies reveal a surprising amount of spectral structure at high resolution. This structure carries a great deal of atmospheric information Support for the work at William and Mary was provided by NASA through grant NNX08AF06G. Support for the work at UM-St. Louis provided by NASA through grant NAG5-12013, from NSF through grant CHE-0213356 and by the University of Missouri Research Board. Partial support at Bridgewater College was provided by its Martin Science Research Institute and from an AAS Small Research Grant. D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. M. Devi, M. A. H. Smith, and

  2. Coudé-feed stellar spectral library - atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Singh, H. P.; Prugniel, P.; Gupta, R.; Koleva, M.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Empirical libraries of stellar spectra play an important role in different fields. For example, they are used as reference for the automatic determination of atmospheric parameters, or for building synthetic stellar populations to study galaxies. The CFLIB (Coudé-feed library, Indo-US) database is at present one of the most complete libraries, in terms of its coverage of the atmospheric parameters space (T{eff}, log g and [Fe/H]) and wavelength coverage 3460-9464 Å at a resolution of 1 Å FWHM. Although the atmospheric parameters of most of the stars were determined from detailed analyses of high-resolution spectra, for nearly 300 of the 1273 stars of the library at least one of the three parameters is missing. For the others, the measurements, compiled from the literature, are inhomogeneous. Aims: In this paper, we re-determine the atmospheric parameters, directly using the CFLIB spectra, and compare them to the previous studies. Methods: We use the ULySS program to derive the atmospheric parameters, using the ELODIE library as a reference. Results: Based on comparisons with several previous studies we conclude that our determinations are unbiased. For the 958 F, G, and K type stars the precision on T{eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] is respectively 43 K, 0.13 dex and 0.05 dex. For the 53 M stars they are 82 K, 0.22 dex and 0.28 dex. And for the 260 OBA type stars the relative precision on T{eff} is 5.1%, and on log g, and [Fe/H] the precision is respectively 0.19 dex and 0.16 dex. These parameters will be used to re-calibrate the CFLIB fluxes and to produce synthetic spectra of stellar populations. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/525/A71

  3. Statistical Analysis of Spectral Properties and Prosodic Parameters of Emotional Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Přibil, J.; Přibilová, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper addresses reflection of microintonation and spectral properties in male and female acted emotional speech. Microintonation component of speech melody is analyzed regarding its spectral and statistical parameters. According to psychological research of emotional speech, different emotions are accompanied by different spectral noise. We control its amount by spectral flatness according to which the high frequency noise is mixed in voiced frames during cepstral speech synthesis. Our experiments are aimed at statistical analysis of cepstral coefficient values and ranges of spectral flatness in three emotions (joy, sadness, anger), and a neutral state for comparison. Calculated histograms of spectral flatness distribution are visually compared and modelled by Gamma probability distribution. Histograms of cepstral coefficient distribution are evaluated and compared using skewness and kurtosis. Achieved statistical results show good correlation comparing male and female voices for all emotional states portrayed by several Czech and Slovak professional actors.

  4. Influence of autoregressive model parameter uncertainty on spectral estimates of heart rate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Christini, D J; Kulkarni, A; Rao, S; Stutman, E R; Bennett, F M; Hausdorff, J M; Oriol, N; Lutchen, K R

    1995-01-01

    Linear autoregressive (AR) model-based heart rate (HR) spectral analysis has been widely used to study HR dynamics. Owing to system and measurement noise, the parameters of an AR model have intrinsic statistical uncertainty. In this study, we evaluate how this AR parameter uncertainty can translate to uncertainty in HR power spectra. HR time series, obtained from seven subjects in supine and standing positions, were fitted to AR models by least squares minimization via singular value decomposition. Spectral uncertainty due to inexact parameter estimation was assessed through a Monte Carlo study in which the AR model parameters were varied randomly according to their Gaussian distributions. Histogram techniques were used to evaluate the distribution of 50,000 AR spectral estimates of each HR time series. These Monte Carlo uncertainties were found to exceed those predicted by previous theoretical approximations. It was determined that the uncertainty of AR HR spectral estimates, particularly the locations and magnitudes of spectral peaks, can often be large. The same Monte Carlo analysis was applied to synthetic AR time series and found levels of spectral uncertainty similar to that of the HR data, thus suggesting that the results of this study are not specific to experimental HR data. Therefore, AR spectra may be unreliable, and one must be careful in assigning pathophysiological origins to specific spectral features of any one spectrum.

  5. Behaviour of spectral entropy, spectral edge frequency 90%, and alpha and beta power parameters during low-dose propofol infusion.

    PubMed

    Mahon, P; Greene, B R; Greene, C; Boylan, G B; Shorten, G D

    2008-08-01

    In this study we analyse the behaviour, potential clinical application and optimal cortical sampling location of the spectral parameters: (i) relative alpha and beta power; (ii) spectral edge frequency 90%; and (iii) spectral entropy as monitors of moderate propofol-induced sedation. Multi-channel EEG recorded from 12 ASA 1 (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1) patients during low-dose, target effect-site controlled propofol infusion was used for this analysis. The initial target effect-site concentration was 0.5 microg ml(-1) and increased at 4 min intervals in increments of 0.5 to 2 microg ml(-1). EEG parameters were calculated for 2 s epochs in the frequency ranges 0.5-32 and 0.5-47 Hz. All parameters were calculated in the channels: P4-O2, P3-O1, F4-C4, F3-C3, F3-F4, and Fp1-Fp2. Sedation was assessed clinically using the OAA/S (observer's assessment of alertness/sedation) scale. Relative beta power and spectral entropy increased with increasing propofol effect-site concentration in both the 0.5-47 Hz [F(18, 90) = 3.455, P<0.05 and F(18, 90) = 3.33, P<0.05, respectively] and 0.5-32 Hz frequency range. This effect was significant in each individual channel (P<0.05). No effect was seen of increasing effect-site concentration on relative power in the alpha band. Averaged across all channels, spectral entropy did not outperform relative beta power in either the 0.5-32 Hz [Pk=0.79 vs 0.814 (P>0.05)] or 0.5-47 Hz range [Pk=0.81 vs 0.82 (P>0.05)]. The best performing indicator in any single channel was spectral entropy in the frequency range 0.5-47 Hz in the frontal channel F3-F4 (Pk=0.85). Relative beta power and spectral entropy when considered over the propofol effect-site range studied here increase in value, and correlate well with clinical assessment of sedation.

  6. Atlas of ozone spectral parameters from microwave to medium infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Flaud, J.M.; Camy-Peyret, C. ); Rinsland, C.P.; Smith, M.A.H. . Langley Research Center); Devi, V.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    At this point in time, an intense desire to understand fully the complex process of the depletion of stratospheric ozone is pervading the scientific community throughout the world. Laboratory experiments are being performed continually using the full power of modern technology to generate unambiguous values for the molecular parameters of ozone and related atmospheric constituents. These basic data are essential for a reliable analysis of stratospheric spectra recorded with remote sensing instruments. This book provides a critical assessment of our current knowledge of ozone spectroscopy in the infrared and microwave regions. such a comprehensive review, as embodied in this atlas, will certainly help in the planning of new research required to achieve the desired precision in our experimental knowledge of atmospheric constituents. In addition, it provides a solid base necessary for the development of new sensors that will be useful in a global remote sounding network.

  7. Stellar parameters of early-M dwarfs from ratios of spectral features at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Affer, L.; Micela, G.; Scandariato, G.; Damasso, M.; Stelzer, B.; Barbieri, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Biazzo, K.; Bignamini, A.; Borsa, F.; Claudi, R. U.; Covino, E.; Desidera, S.; Esposito, M.; Gratton, R.; González Hernández, J. I.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Perger, M.; Pillitteri, I.; Piotto, G.; Poretti, E.; Prisinzano, L.; Rebolo, R.; Ribas, I.; Shkolnik, E.; Southworth, J.; Sozzetti, A.; Suárez Mascareño, A.

    2015-05-01

    uncertainties of about 70 K. Eighty-two ratios of pseudo-equivalent widths of features were calibrated to derive spectral types within 0.5 subtypes for stars with spectral types between K7V and M4.5V. We calibrated 696 combinations of the pseudo-equivalent widths of individual features and temperature-sensitive ratios for the stellar metallicity over a metallicity range from -0.54 to +0.24 dex, with estimated uncertainties in the range of 0.07-0.10 dex. We provide our own empirical calibrations for stellar mass, radius, and surface gravity. These parameters depend on the stellar metallicity. For a given effective temperature, lower metallicities predict lower masses and radii as well as higher gravities. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 072.C-0488(E), 082.C-0718(B), 085.C-0019(A), 180.C-0886(A), 183.C-0437(A), and 191.C-0505(A), as well as data from the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) Archive (programmes ID CAT-147, and A27CAT_83).Our computational codes including the full version of Tables 2, 4, and 6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A132Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Control of the spectral parameters of vanadate lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotkin, A A; Vlasov, V I; Zagumennyi, A I; Zavartsev, Yu D; Kutovoi, S A; Shcherbakov, I A

    2014-01-31

    It is experimentally established that the luminescence spectra of Nd{sup 3+} ions at the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} – {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition in Nd{sup 3+}:YVO{sub 4}, Nd{sup 3+}:GdVO{sub 4}, Nd{sup 3+}:Gd{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}VO{sub 4}, and Nd{sup 3+}:Sc{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}VO{sub 4} vanadate crystals strongly depend on the recording and polarisation angles with respect to the crystallographic axes. Using these angular dependences of luminescence spectra, it is possible to control the gain coefficient for lasers based on vanadate crystals, create broad gain bands for pico- and femtoseconds lasers, and change radiation wavelengths. Efficient operation of a passively Q-switched laser based on a Nd{sup 3+}:GdVO{sub 4} crystal cut at an angle to the a axis (θ = 25°, ψ = 0) is demonstrated for the first time. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  9. Spectral parameters and signal-to-noise ratio requirement for TANSAT hyper spectral remote sensor of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Yang, Zhong-Dong; Bi, Yan-Meng

    2014-11-01

    , the results indicate that sampling ratio should exceed 2 pixels/FWHM to ensure the accuracy of CO2 spectrum. Signal-to-noise ratio is one of the most important parameters of hyper spectral CO2 detectors to ensure the reliability of CO2 signal. SNR requirements of CO2 detector to different detection precisions are explored based on the radiance sensitivity factors. The results show that it is difficult to achieve the SNR to detect 1×10-6-4×10-6 CO2 concentration change in the boundary layer by solar shortwave infrared passive remote sensing, limited by the instrument development at present. However, the instrument SNR to detect 1% change in the CO2 column concentration is attainable. The results of this study are not only conductive to universal applications and guides on developing grating spectrometer, but also helpful to have a better understanding of the complexity of CO2 retrieval.

  10. Non-small cell lung cancer: Spectral computed tomography quantitative parameters for preoperative diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengfeng; Dong, Jie; Wang, Xiuting; Fu, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Tong

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the application value of spectral computed tomography (CT)quantitative parameters for preoperative diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSLC). 84 patients with suspected lung cancer who underwent chest dual-phase enhanced scan with gemstone spectral CT imaging (GSI) mode were selected. GSI quantitative parameters including normalized iodine concentrations (NIC), water concentration, slope of the spectral Hounsfield unit curve (λHU) were measured. The two-sample t test was used to statistically compare these quantitative parameters. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn to establish the optimal threshold values. A total of 144 lymph nodes were included, with 48 metastatic lymph nodes and 96 non-metastatic lymph nodes. The slope of the spectral Hounsfeld unit curve (λHU) measured during both arterial and venous phases were signifcantly higher in metastatic than in benign lymph nodes (P<0.05). The area under the ROC curve (AUC=0.951) of λHU of the arterial phase (AP) was the largest. When the optimal threshold values of λHU was 2.75, the sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes were 88.2%, 88.4%, 87.0%, respectively. Conventional CT diagnostic criteria established in accordance with size (lymph node maximal short axis diameter ≥10mm) as the basis for judging metastatic lymph node. In quantitative assessment using spectral CT imaging, quantitative parameters showed higher accuracy than qualitative assessment of conventional CT based on the size for preoperative diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterizing microstructural changes of skeletal muscle tissues using spectral transformed Mueller matrix polarization parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Polarization imaging techniques are recognized as potentially powerful tools to detect the structural changes of biological tissues. Meanwhile, spectral features of the scattered light can also provide abundant microstructural information, therefore can be applied in biomedical studies. In this paper, we adopt the polarization reflectance spectral imaging to analyze the microstructural changes of hydrolyzing skeletal muscle tissues. We measure the Mueller matrix, which is a comprehensive description of the polarization properties, of the bovine skeletal muscle samples in different periods of time, and analyze its behavior using the multispectral Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) technique. The experimental results show that for bovine skeletal muscle tissues, the backscattered spectral MMT parameters have different values and variation features at different stages. We can also find the experimental results indicate that the stages of hydrolysis for bovine skeletal muscle samples can be judged by the spectral MMT parameters. The results presented in this work show that combining with the spectral technique, the MMT parameters have the potential to be used as tools for meat quality detection and monitoring.

  12. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating the three spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses and their statistical properties investigated. The estimation procedure is then generalized for application to real cosmic-ray data. To illustrate the procedure and its utility, analytical methods were developed in conjunction with a Monte Carlo simulation to explore the combination of the expected cosmic-ray environment with a generic space-based detector and its planned life cycle, allowing us to explore various detector features and their subsequent influence on estimating the spectral parameters. This study permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  13. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  14. Parameter-dependent spectral statistics of chaotic quantum graphs: Neumann versus circular orthogonal ensemble boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Hul, Oleh; Sirko, Leszek

    2011-06-01

    The parameter-dependent spectral statistics of totally connected quantum graphs with n = 4-30 vertices, such as the parametric velocities correlation functions and the distribution of curvatures, are studied. The inverse participation ratio (IPR), an important measure of localization effects, was also numerically investigated. In the calculations, we successfully used two different theoretical approaches. The first approach was based on the graphs' eigenenergies and wave functions calculations, while the second one used the eigenphases and the eigenvectors of the bond scattering matrix S(k). We considered graphs with Neumann and circular orthogonal ensemble (COE) boundary conditions. We show that in contrast to large Neumann graphs, for which the departure of many parameter-dependent spectral statistics from the random matrix theory (RMT) predictions is observed, for large COE graphs, the spectral statistics and IPR are in good agreement with the RMT predictions.

  15. Physical parameters of helium-rich subdwarf B stars from spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Jeffery, C. S.

    2004-01-01

    We present effective temperatures and angular radii for eleven helium-rich subdwarf B stars. These are measured using spectral energy distributions from archival IUE spectra and existing optical and infrared photometry. The data have been analysed using a grid of high-gravity helium-rich LTE model atmospheres and a χ2-minimization procedure. The parameters derived here allow for independent verification of the parameters derived from the analysis of optical spectra. Based on INES data from the IUE satellite.

  16. Dispersion equation and eigenvalues for quantum wells using spectral parameter power series

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Perez, Raul; Oviedo-Galdeano, Hector; Rabinovich, Vladimir S.

    2011-04-15

    We derive a dispersion equation for determining eigenvalues of inhomogeneous quantum wells in terms of spectral parameter power series and apply it for the numerical treatment of eigenvalue problems. The method is algorithmically simple and can be easily implemented using available routines of such environments for scientific computing as MATLAB.

  17. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Spectral Analysis using Linearly Chirped Gaussian Pulse Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huan; Wang, An-Ting; Xu, Li-Xin; Ming, Hai

    2009-07-01

    We analyze the spectrum of a stacked pulse with the technique of linearly chirped Gaussian pulse stacking. Our results show that there are modulation structures in the spectrum of the stacked pulse. The modulation frequencies are discussed in detail. By applying spectral analysis, we find that the intensity fluctuation cannot be smoothed by introducing an optical amplitude filter.

  18. Cirrus Parameter Retrieval by Combined Analysis of Spectral Thermal Infrared and Lidar Sensing from Aircraft and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Duda, David; Eloranta, Edward

    2000-01-01

    The distribution, radiative and microphysical parameters of cirrus clouds are an important factor for cloud effects on the global radiation balance and climate. Multispectral thermal infrared observation are the most significant method used to remote sense cirrus parameter from current and planned passive satellite observations. Passive sensing alone has the limitation that both the cloud radiative temperature, or height, and the spectral emissivity must be derived in the analysis. Factors such as multiple cloud laying, which is very common, are known to introduce ambiguities in results. The addition of lidar cloud height structure measurements significantly improves retrievals. Such active/passive observations have been applied from the NASA ER-2 high altitude remote sensing aircraft since 1983. Applications include the study of the effective effective particle size of cirrus and application toward remote sensing of the ice/water content of cirrus clouds in addition to radiative parameters. Limitations, accuracy and examples of retrievals are presented. In 1997 a space shuttle hitch hiker experiment was flown which included a new technology Infrared Spectral Imaging Radiometer and a laser altimeter for direct cloud height measurements. A 30 orbit data set to test global application of combined spectral infrared and laser height measurements were obtained. Initial results for cirrus analysis from the shuttle experiment will also be presented.

  19. Electro-optical parameters in excited states of some spectrally active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchea, Andreea Celia; Closca, Valentina; Rusu, Cristina Marcela; Morosanu, Cezarina; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2014-08-01

    The spectral shifts measured in different solvents are expressed as functions of the solvent macroscopic parameters. The value of the correlation coefficient multiplying the functions of electric permittivity was determined by statistical means. The correlation coefficient depends on the electric dipole moment of the spectrally active molecules. The electro-optical parameters in the ground state of the solute molecules can be approximated by molecular modeling. The excited state parameters are usually estimated using the results obtained both by HyperChem Programme and solvatochromic study. The importance of this approximate method is that it offers information about of the excited state of solute molecule for which our measuring possibilities are very restrictive. The information about the excited electronic state is affected by the limits in which the theories of liquid solutions are developed. Our results refer to two molecules of vitamins from B class, namely B3 and B6.

  20. Group interpretation of the spectral parameter. The case of isothermic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśliński, Jan L.; Kobus, Artur

    2017-03-01

    It is well known that in some cases the spectral parameter has a group interpretation. We discuss in detail the case of Gauss-Codazzi equations for isothermic surfaces immersed in E3. The algebra of Lie point symmetries is 4-dimensional and all these symmetries are also symmetries of the Gauss-Weingarten equations (which can be considered as so(3) -valued non-parametric linear problem). In order to obtain a non-removable spectral parameter one has to consider so(4 , 1) -valued linear problem which has a 3-dimensional algebra of Lie point symmetries. The missing symmetry introduces a non-removable parameter. In the second part of the paper we extend these results on the case of isothermic immersions in arbitrary multidimensional Euclidean spaces. In order to simplify calculations the problem was formulated in terms of a Clifford algebra.

  1. A method extracting solar cell parameters from spectral response by inverse laplace transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuominen, E.; Acerbis, M.; Hovinen, A.; Siirtola, T.; Sinkkonen, J.

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical method to interpret spectral responses measured from solar cells has been developed. Taking an inverse Laplace transform from the spectral response of a solar cell the spatial dependent collection efficiency of the cell can be obtained. Several important material parameters of the solar cell can be extracted from this function. Applying this method the properties of the solar cell can be investigated without applying characterization methods to the cell itself. We have applied the method both to simulated solar cells andto real solar cells.

  2. Accurate atmospheric parameters at moderate resolution using spectral indices: Preliminary application to the marvels survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; Ge, Jian; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Ji; and others

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T {sub eff}, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ∼ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T {sub eff}, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An

  3. Accurate Atmospheric Parameters at Moderate Resolution Using Spectral Indices: Preliminary Application to the MARVELS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Cargile, Phillip; Ge, Jian; Pepper, Joshua; Wang, Ji; Paegert, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T eff, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ~ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T eff, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An additional test was

  4. Comparison between the spectral diffuse attenuation coefficients and the IOP parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhihua; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Haiqing; Bai, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The spectral diffuse attenuation coefficients of downward irradiance (Kd) and upward radiance (Ku) are calculated from a profiler spectrometer measured data. Both Kd and Ku are the parameters of apparent optical properties (AOP) and need to be normalized according to the position of the Sun and sky conditions. Three kinds of sky indices are used to indicate the atmospheric conditions of clear, overcast and partly cloudy at the time of measurements. The values of normalized Kd can be compared with the sums of total absorption and backscattering coefficients. The total values from both measured data and the models fit the normalized Kd with the correlation coefficients of 0.85 and 0.81, respectively. The accuracy of Kd is also evaluated by the spectral root mean square error (RMSE) less than 0.15 m-1 in the spectral range from 450 to 700 nm.

  5. Analysis of the influence of system parameters on the measurement accuracy of a high spectral resolution lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Changbo; Boselli, Antonella; Sannino, Alessia; Zhao, Yiming; Spinelli, Nicola; Wang, Xuan

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play very important roles in climate change and air particulate pollution. Lidars based on elastic scattering have been widely used to measure aerosol spatial distribution and to retrieve the profiles of aerosol optical properties by an assumption of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio. High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) is one of methods that can be used to measure aerosol optical properties without a-priori hypotheses. Compared to Raman lidar, HSRL has the advantage of day and night measurements and can be adapted to many kinds of carrying platforms. Unlike ordinary elastic backscatter lidar, HSRL needs to separate the Mie signal scattered by atmospheric aerosol and the Rayleigh signal scattered by atmospheric molecules. Due to small spectral difference between Mie and Rayleigh signals, there are three difficulties: firstly, the laser source must have a narrow bandwidth, high energy and stable center wavelength; secondly, the receiver should have a very narrow spectral filter to separate aerosol scattering and molecular scattering; thirdly, the center wavelength of the receiver must be real-time locked to laser source. In order to study the influence of system parameters on the measurement accuracy of a high spectral resolution lidar and to optimize their values, a simulation and analysis has been done and will be presented in this paper. In this paper, the system parameters including the linewidth of emission laser, the bandwidth of the Fabry-Pérot interferometric filter in the receiver and the spectral tracking accuracy between the receiver and laser are mainly analyzed. At the same time, several environmental factors have been considered, including atmospheric temperature and wind, pointing accuracy of platform, aerosol concentration range etc. A typical vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosol optical properties is considered and the received signals of high spectral channels are simulated. From the simulated signals, the

  6. The Atlas of Vesta Spectral Parameters derived from Dawn/VIR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Fonte, S.; Giardino, M.; Magni, G.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-09-01

    The Dawn mission mapped Vesta from three different orbital heights during Survey orbit (2700 km altitude), HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 700 km altitude), and LAMO (Low Altitude Mapping Orbit, 210 km altitude) [1]. From these orbits the Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) acquired infrared and visible spectra from 0.2 to 5 microns, sampled in 864 channels with a spatial resolution reaching about 150 m/pixel. Studies of the comparison of spectra from remote sensed data and spectra from laboratory allows to synthesize spectral parameters, which can be combined to identify specific physical and compositional states. VIR spectra of Vesta, stored in about 4300 Planetary Data System (PDS) cubes, have been analyzed to derive spectral parameters, each of which is diagnostic of the associated mineralogy on the surface of the asteroid being observed [2]. Maps of spectral parameters show terrain units compositions in their stratigraphic context. Band centers and band depths are among the most important diagnostic parameters of the mineralogy in a spectrum. In most pyroxenes and in the basaltic achondrites there is a strong correlation between the position of BI center and BII center and the associated mineralogy. For example, orthopyroxene bands shift towards longer wavelengths with increasing amounts of iron, whereas clinopyroxene bands shift towards longer wavelengths with increasing calcium content. Band depth is related to scattering effects, thus can be related to the physical state of the material.

  7. Representations of the quantum doubles of finite group algebras and spectral parameter dependent solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dancer, K. A.; Isac, P. S.; Links, J.

    2006-10-15

    Quantum doubles of finite group algebras form a class of quasitriangular Hopf algebras that algebraically solve the Yang-Baxter equation. Each representation of the quantum double then gives a matrix solution of the Yang-Baxter equation. Such solutions do not depend on a spectral parameter, and to date there has been little investigation into extending these solutions such that they do depend on a spectral parameter. Here we first explicitly construct the matrix elements of the generators for all irreducible representations of quantum doubles of the dihedral groups D{sub n}. These results may be used to determine constant solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation. We then discuss Baxterization ansaetze to obtain solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation with a spectral parameter and give several examples, including a new 21-vertex model. We also describe this approach in terms of minimal-dimensional representations of the quantum doubles of the alternating group A{sub 4} and the symmetric group S{sub 4}.

  8. Dependence of spectral characteristics on parameters describing CO2 exchange between crop species and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uździcka, Bogna; Stróżecki, Marcin; Urbaniak, Marek; Juszczak, Radosław

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that spectral vegetation indices are good indicators of parameters describing the intensity of CO2 exchange between crops and the atmosphere. Measurements were conducted over 2011-2013 on plots of an experimental arable station on winter wheat, winter rye, spring barley, and potatoes. CO2 fluxes were measured using the dynamic closed chamber system, while spectral vegetation indices were determined using SKYE multispectral sensors. Based on spectral data collected in 2011 and 2013, various models to estimate net ecosystem productivity and gross ecosystem productivity were developed. These models were then verified based on data collected in 2012. The R2 for the best model based on spectral data ranged from 0.71 to 0.83 and from 0.78 to 0.92, for net ecosystem productivity and gross ecosystem productivity, respectively. Such high R2 values indicate the utility of spectral vegetation indices in estimating CO2 fluxes of crops. The effects of the soil background turned out to be an important factor decreasing the accuracy of the tested models.

  9. Line shape of amplitude or frequency-modulated spectral profiles including resonator distortions.

    PubMed

    Suter, Martin; Quack, Martin

    2015-05-10

    We report experiments and an improved method of analysis for any harmonics of frequency-modulated spectral line shapes allowing for very precise determinations of the resonance frequency of single absorption lines for gigahertz spectroscopy in the gas phase. Resonator perturbations are implemented into the formalism of modulation spectroscopy by means of a full complex transmission function being able to model the asymmetrically distorted absorption line shapes for arbitrary modulation depths, modulation frequencies, and resonator reflectivities. Exact equations of the in-phase and the quadrature modulation signal, taking into account a full resonator transmission function, are simultaneously adjusted to two-channel lock-in measurements performed in the gigahertz regime to obtain the spectral line position. The determination of the absorption line position of the rotational transition J' = 7 ← J" = 6 of (16)O(12)C(32)S in the vibrational ground state is investigated while changing the resonator distortions. The results are subjected to the approach proposed here and compared to standard methods known from the literature.

  10. Atmospheric and Fundamental Parameters of Stars in Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R approximately 1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. We are presently working to determine the atmospheric and fundamental parameters of the stars from the NGSL spectra themselves via full-spectrum fitting of model spectra to the observed (extinction-corrected) spectrum over the full wavelength range, 0.2-1.0 micron. We use two grids of model spectra for this purpose: the very low-resolution spectral grid from Castelli-Kurucz (2004), and the grid from MARCS (2008). Both the observed spectrum and the MARCS spectra are first degraded in resolution to match the very low resolution of the Castelli-Kurucz models, so that our fitting technique is the same for both model grids. We will present our preliminary results with a comparison with those from the Sloan/Segue Stellar Parameter Pipeline, ELODIE, and MILES, etc.

  11. Generalized intermediate long-wave hierarchy in zero-curvature representation with noncommutative spectral parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degasperis, A.; Lebedev, D.; Olshanetsky, M.; Pakuliak, S.; Perelomov, A.; Santini, P. M.

    1992-11-01

    The simplest generalization of the intermediate long-wave hierarchy (ILW) is considered to show how to extend the Zakharov-Shabat dressing method to nonlocal, i.e., integro-partial differential, equations. The purpose is to give a procedure of constructing the zero-curvature representation of this class of equations. This result obtains by combining the Drinfeld-Sokolov formalism together with the introduction of an operator-valued spectral parameter, namely, a spectral parameter that does not commute with the space variable x. This extension provides a connection between the ILWk hierarchy and the Saveliev-Vershik continuum graded Lie algebras. In the case of ILW2 the Fairlie-Zachos sinh-algebra was found.

  12. Spectral method for fast measurement of twisted nematic liquid crystal cell parameters.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Plinio Jesús; Pérez, Isabel; Sánchez-Pena, José Manuel; Vázquez, Carmen

    2014-08-10

    We present an experimental approach for the fast measurement of twisted nematic (TN) liquid crystal (LC) cells' parameters. It is based on the spectral measurements of the light transmitted by the system polarizer-reference wave plate-LC cell-analyzer. The cell parameters are obtained by fitting the theoretical model to the experimental data. This method allows determining the rubbing angle, the twist angle and its sense, and the spectral dispersion of the LC cell retardation, simultaneously, with few measurements and without the need of applying voltage or any specific analytical conditions. The method is validated by characterizing two different TN cells with retardations of about 0.91 and 1.85 μm. The birefringence relative error is less than 1.3%.

  13. Atmospheric and Fundamental Parameters of Stars in Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R approximately 1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. We are presently working to determine the atmospheric and fundamental parameters of the stars from the NGSL spectra themselves via full-spectrum fitting of model spectra to the observed (extinction-corrected) spectrum over the full wavelength range, 0.2-1.0 micron. We use two grids of model spectra for this purpose: the very low-resolution spectral grid from Castelli-Kurucz (2004), and the grid from MARCS (2008). Both the observed spectrum and the MARCS spectra are first degraded in resolution to match the very low resolution of the Castelli-Kurucz models, so that our fitting technique is the same for both model grids. We will present our preliminary results with a comparison with those from the Sloan/Segue Stellar Parameter Pipeline, ELODIE, and MILES, etc.

  14. Estimating Cosmic Ray Spectral Parameters From Simulated Detector Responses With Detector Design Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index alpha (sub 1), is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at knee energy E(sub k) to a steeper spectral index alpha(sub 2) greater than alpha(sub 1) above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  15. Estimating Cosmic-Ray Spectral Parameters from Simulated Detector Responses with Detector Design Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2001-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index (alpha-1) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at knee energy (E(sub k)) to a steeper spectral index alpha-2 > alpha-1 above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF YOUNG AND FIELD AGE OBJECTS WITH MASSES SPANNING THE STELLAR TO PLANETARY REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline; Cruz, Kelle L.; Van Gordon, Mollie M.; Looper, Dagny L.

    2015-09-10

    We combine optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared spectra and photometry to construct expanded spectral energy distributions for 145 field age (>500 Myr) and 53 young (lower age estimate <500 Myr) ultracool dwarfs (M6-T9). This range of spectral types includes very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary mass objects, providing fundamental parameters across both the hydrogen and deuterium burning minimum masses for the largest sample assembled to date. A subsample of 29 objects have well constrained ages as probable members of a nearby young moving group. We use 182 parallaxes and 16 kinematic distances to determine precise bolometric luminosities (L{sub bol}) and radius estimates from evolutionary models give semi-empirical effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) for the full range of young and field age late-M, L, and T dwarfs. We construct age-sensitive relationships of luminosity, temperature, and absolute magnitude as functions of spectral type and absolute magnitude to disentangle the effects of degenerate physical parameters such as T{sub eff}, surface gravity, and clouds on spectral morphology. We report bolometric corrections in J for both field age and young objects and find differences of up to a magnitude for late-L dwarfs. Our correction in Ks shows a larger dispersion but not necessarily a different relationship for young and field age sequences. We also characterize the NIR–MIR reddening of low gravity L dwarfs and identify a systematically cooler T{sub eff} of up to 300 K from field age objects of the same spectral type and 400 K cooler from field age objects of the same M{sub H} magnitude.

  17. Nonlocal symmetries, spectral parameter and minimal surfaces in AdS/CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Thomas; Loebbert, Florian; Münkler, Hagen

    2017-03-01

    We give a general account of nonlocal symmetries in symmetric space models and their relation to the AdS/CFT correspondence. In particular, we study a master symmetry which generates the spectral parameter and acts as a level-raising operator on the classical Yangian generators. The master symmetry extends to an infinite tower of symmetries with nonlocal Casimir elements as associated conserved charges. We discuss the algebraic properties of these symmetries and establish their role in explaining the recently observed one-parameter deformation of holographic Wilson loops. Finally, we provide a numerical framework, in which discretized minimal surfaces and their master symmetry deformation can be calculated.

  18. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.

    2002-01-01

    The method of Maximum Likelihood (ML) is used to estimate the spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. This methodology, which requires the complete specificity of all cosmic-ray detector design parameters, is shown to provide approximately unbiased, minimum variance, and normally distributed spectra information for events detected by an instrument having a wide range of commonly used detector response functions. The ML procedure, coupled with the simulated performance of a proposed space-based detector and its planned life cycle, has proved to be of significant value in the design phase of a new science instrument. The procedure helped make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope. This ML methodology is then generalized to estimate broken power law spectral parameters from real cosmic-ray data sets.

  19. Improving weather predictability by including land-surface model parameter uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The land surface forms an important component of Earth system models and interacts nonlinearly with other parts such as ocean and atmosphere. To capture the complex and heterogenous hydrology of the land surface, land surface models include a large number of parameters impacting the coupling to other components of the Earth system model. Focusing on ECMWF's land-surface model HTESSEL we present in this study a comprehensive parameter sensitivity evaluation using multiple observational datasets in Europe. We select 6 poorly constrained effective parameters (surface runoff effective depth, skin conductivity, minimum stomatal resistance, maximum interception, soil moisture stress function shape, total soil depth) and explore their sensitivity to model outputs such as soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff using uncoupled simulations and coupled seasonal forecasts. Additionally we investigate the possibility to construct ensembles from the multiple land surface parameters. In the uncoupled runs we find that minimum stomatal resistance and total soil depth have the most influence on model performance. Forecast skill scores are moreover sensitive to the same parameters as HTESSEL performance in the uncoupled analysis. We demonstrate the robustness of our findings by comparing multiple best performing parameter sets and multiple randomly chosen parameter sets. We find better temperature and precipitation forecast skill with the best-performing parameter perturbations demonstrating representativeness of model performance across uncoupled (and hence less computationally demanding) and coupled settings. Finally, we construct ensemble forecasts from ensemble members derived with different best-performing parameterizations of HTESSEL. This incorporation of parameter uncertainty in the ensemble generation yields an increase in forecast skill, even beyond the skill of the default system. Orth, R., E. Dutra, and F. Pappenberger, 2016: Improving weather predictability by

  20. Analysis of Reliability of Spectral Water Vapor Line Parameters at High Temperatures in Spectroscopic Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Egorov, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2017-06-01

    Parameters of high-temperature water vapor spectral lines presented in the well-known spectroscopic databases are discussed. As a reliability criterion for parameter values, recent experimental data on the transmittance measured with spectral resolution of 1 cm-1 at T 1000 K are employed. As a result of our analysis, 156 spectral lines were revealed (12 of them were found previously) in the HITEMP2010 database the use of which in calculations of the transmittance leads to considerable deviations (≥20%) from the available experimental data. The line intensities determined by this method exceed by 3 times and more the data presented in other spectroscopic bases. Additionally, the line intensities from the HITEMP2010 database in the spectral range 10-6000 cm-1 are completely compared with the result of semiempirical calculation at the high temperature available from the literature. The hot bands for which the relative deviation of the integral intensities exceeds 10% at T = 1302 K are identified. It is established that as a whole, the most reliable integral hot band intensities are contained in the HITEMP2010 database. This is confirmed by their least deviations from the measured transmittance at high temperatures. As a result, it is demonstrated that to obtain the best coincidence (Δav = 2.64%) with the measured data in the range 1000-2000 cm-1 in calculation based on the HITEMP2010 database, the parameter values recommended in the present work for lines with overestimated intensities and different distribution of the temperature coefficients must be used.

  1. Evaluation of hydrologic parameters in a semiarid rangeland using remotely sensed spectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, M. S.; Clarke, T. R.; Kustas, W. P.; Weltz, M.; Amer, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relation between remotely sensed spectral data and measurements of vegetation-related hydrologic parameters in a semiarid rangeland in southeast Arizona. Throughout the measurement periods, ranging from June to September 1990, eight sites in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service Walnut Gulch experimental watershed were monitored for water and energy fluxes and other meteorological and biological parameters. Corresponding spectral data were acquired with ground-based radiometers, low-altitude aircraft-mounted instruments, and Landsat thematic mapper sensors. Spectral indices were derived from measurements of surface reflectance, based on their response to variations in hydrologic parameters and sensitivity to unrelated variables, such as solar zenith angle and soil differences. A soil-adjusted vegetation index, SAVI (derived from red and NIR reflectance factors), was found to be highly correlated with the temporal changes in vegetation cover and biomass, but less successful in discriminating spatial differences in cover and biomass across the watershed. Significant relations were found between the surface-air temperature (Ts-Ta) difference and measurements of soil moisture content, though the shape differed from that previously published for bare soil. The relation between daily evaporation rate and measurements of (Ts-Ta) and daily net radiation was similar to that derived previously for irrigated pasture and dryland shortgrass in France but differed from that derived for irrigated wheat. These results emphasized the strengths and limitations of the use of spectral data for estimation of hydrologic characteristics of sparsely vegetated sites and suggested a need for reevaluation of common empirical relations between remotely sensed measurements and surface characteristics for application to rangeland areas.

  2. Including parameter dependence in the data and covariance for cosmological inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Martin; Padmanabhan, Nikhil

    2015-12-01

    The final step of most large-scale structure analyses involves the comparison of power spectra or correlation functions to theoretical models. It is clear that the theoretical models have parameter dependence, but frequently the measurements and the covariance matrix depend upon some of the parameters as well. We show that a very simple interpolation scheme from an unstructured mesh allows for an efficient way to include this parameter dependence self-consistently in the analysis at modest computational expense. We describe two schemes for covariance matrices. The scheme which uses the geometric structure of such matrices performs roughly twice as well as the simplest scheme, though both perform very well.

  3. Using UV-vis absorbance spectral parameters to characterize the fouling propensity of humic substances during ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghao; Meng, Fangang

    2015-12-15

    Ultrafiltration (UF) can achieve excellent removal of natural organic matter (NOM), but the main challenge for this process is the limited understanding of membrane fouling. The objective of this study is to explore the potential of UV-vis spectroscopic analysis for the detection of membrane fouling caused by humic acids (HA) at different solution chemistries (i.e., calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and pH). In the presence of Ca(2+), several spectral parameters, including the DSlope(325-375) (the slope of the log-transformed absorbance spectra over 325-375 nm), S(275-295) (the slope of the absorption coefficient over 257-295 nm) and S(R) (the ratio of S(275-295) to S(350-400)) of various HA solutions, were correlated with the molecule aggregation and the membrane fouling potential. Interestingly, increased DSlope(325-375) and decreased S(275-295) and S(R) were observed for the HA-Ca(2+) interaction under alkaline conditions (i.e., pH = 9) relative to those in lower pH environments (i.e., pH = 7 or 6), suggesting that spectral parameters were able to predict HA-Ca(2+) interactions under varying pH conditions. The strong correlations between the spectral parameters and the unified membrane fouling index (UMFI) obtained from UF experiments further corroborated that the spectral parameters were able to predict the membrane fouling potential. Moreover, the spectral parameters were also found to well reveal the fouling extent of the mixture of HA and Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) or the pure SRNOM added with varying calcium concentrations, implying that the spectroscopic analysis was also available for the indication of practical NOM fouling. In addition, the measurement of S(275-295) and S(R) of the permeate solution suggests an increasing proportion of small-molecule HA in the permeate during the UF process. This study not only expands our knowledge of NOM-Ca(2+) aggregates as well as their role in membrane fouling behavior but also provides an approach for the in situ

  4. Optimizing Savitzky-Golay parameters for improving spectral resolution and quantification in infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Boris; Kohler, Achim

    2013-08-01

    Calculating derivatives of spectral data by the Savitzky-Golay (SG) numerical algorithm is often used as a preliminary preprocessing step to resolve overlapping signals, enhance signal properties, and suppress unwanted spectral features that arise due to nonideal instrument and sample properties. Addressing these issues, a study of the simulated and measured infrared data by partial least-squares regression has been conducted. The simulated data sets were modeled by considering a range of undesired chemical and physical spectral anomalies and variations that can occur in a measured spectrum, such as baseline variations, noise, and scattering effects. The study has demonstrated the importance of the optimization of the SG parameters during the conversion of spectra into derivative form, specifically window size and polynomial order of the fitting curve. A specific optimal window size is associated with an exact component of the system being estimated, and this window size does not necessarily apply for some other component present in the system. Since the optimization procedure can be time-consuming, as a rough guideline spectral noise level can be used for assessment of window size. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, when the extended multiplicative signal correction (EMSC) is used alongside the SG procedure, the derivative treatment of data by the SG algorithm must precede the EMSC normalization.

  5. Real-time system for robust spectral parameter estimation in Doppler signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Giuliomaria, C; Capponi, M; D'Alessio, T; Sacco, R; Zanette, E

    1990-01-01

    In assessing the level of stenosis in extracranial Doppler analysis, spectral analysis has until now been used qualitatively, for the most part. Owing to the many variables affecting the measurements (mainly noise level and instrument setting made subjectively by the operator), the reliability of the inferences on the degree of stenosis is not clearly definable. Under such conditions the need arises for algorithms and systems that can estimate spectral parameters with a higher degree of accuracy, to verify whether reliable inferences can indeed by made or if this technique is only a qualitative one. In the paper a real-time spectral analysis system is described. The system relies on a new spectral estimation algorithm which gives estimates with good robustness with respect to noise. Moreover, a clear measurement procedure which eliminates the many subjective factors affecting the estimates has also been proposed and used. The system has been evaluated with simulated signals and in clinical trials and has shown better performance than the commonly used commercial analysers.

  6. Smoothing parameter estimation framework for Markov random field by using contextual and spectral information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghighi, Hossein; Trinder, John

    2013-10-01

    Markov random field (MRF) is currently the most common method to find the optimal solution for the classification of image data incorporating contextual visual information. The labeling for a site in MRF is dependent on smoothing parameters. Therefore, this paper deals with the development of a new robust two-step method to determine the smoothing parameter which balances spatial and spectral energies for the purpose of maximizing the classification accuracy. Multispectral images obtained by WorldView-2 satellite were employed in this research. In the first step, a support vector machine (SVM) was used to provide a vector of multi-class probability and a class label for each pixel. Then, the summation of the maximum probability of each pixel and its 8 neighbors is calculated for a dynamic block and this value is assigned to the central pixels of each block. The blocks of each class are sorted and an equal proportion of blocks of each class with the highest probability are selected. Then, the class codes and spectral information of the selected blocks are extracted from the classified map and multispectral image, respectively. This information is used to calculate class label co-occurrence matrices of the blocks (CLCMB), class label co-occurrence matrix (CLCM) and class separability indices. Finally, different smoothing parameters are calculated and the results show that estimated smoothing parameter can produce a more accurate map.

  7. The 4850 cm^{-1} Spectral Region of CO_2: Constrained Multispectrum Nonlinear Least Squares Fitting Including Line Mixing, Speed Dependent Line Profiles and Fermi Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Nugent, Emily; Brown, Linda R.; Miller, Charles E.; Toth, Robert A.; Sung, Keeyoon

    2009-06-01

    Room temperature spectra of carbon dioxide were obtained with the Fourier transform spectrometers at the National Solar Observatory's McMath-Pierce telescope and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique is being used to derive accurate spectral line parameters for the strongest CO_2 bands in the 4700-4930 cm^{-1} spectral region. Positions of the spectral lines were constrained to their quantum mechanical relationships, and the rovibrational constants were derived directly from the fit. Similarly, the intensities of the lines within each of the rovibrational bands were constrained to their quantum mechanical relationships, and the band strength and Herman-Wallis coefficients were derived directly from the fit. These constraints even include a pair of interacting bands with the interaction coefficient derived directly using both the positions and intensities of the spectral lines. Room temperature self and air Lorentz halfwidth and pressure induced line shift coefficients are measured for most lines. Constraints upon the positions improve measurement of pressure-induced shifts, and constraints on the intensities improve the measurement of the Lorentz halfwidths. Line mixing and speed dependent line shapes are also required and characterized. D. Chris Benner, C.P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M.A.H. Smith, and D. Atkins, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 53, 705-721 (1995)

  8. Parameters of Selected Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae from Consistent Optical and UV Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschinski, Cornelius Bernhard

    optical emission lines, from which the mass loss rate is determined in case of a purely optical based analysis, depends on the square of the density. A possible clumpiness in the winds would thus lead to an uncertainty in the determination of atmospheric mass loss rates from the strength of such optical recombination lines. Since the mass loss rate is not a free parameter, but is rather a function of the other stellar parameters, this may lead to an uncertainty in the determination of the stellar parameters. We used the improved code to re-evaluate, with respect to the influence of clumping on the appearance of the UV spectra, the optical parameter set determined in an earlier study that employed clumping in its models to achieve fits to the observed optical lines. We found that, with and without clumping, wind strengths and terminal velocities in accordance to their stellar parameters from the optical analysis yield spectra which are incompatible with the optical and UV observations, whereas our self-consistent models achieve good fits to both observations. Moreover, moderate clumping factors are found to have the same order of influence on the optical recombination lines as the density (velocity field) has. During the same study we also derived shock temperatures and ratios of X-ray to bolometric luminosities so as to reproduce the highly ionized O VI line in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectral range. These values agree with those derived for O stars, again confirming the similarity of massive O type CSPN and massive O star atmospheres. Based on the derived shock structures of our sample of CSPNs we investigated the possible influence of shocks on emission line studies from HII regions. Here, tools for the inversion of line ratios into desired physical properties are required and come in the form of diagnostic ratios or diagrams which are based on grids of photoionization models. We calculated such a grid of shock influenced ionizing fluxes from a

  9. Spectral gap optimization of order parameters for sampling complex molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Berne, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    In modern-day simulations of many-body systems, much of the computational complexity is shifted to the identification of slowly changing molecular order parameters called collective variables (CVs) or reaction coordinates. A vast array of enhanced-sampling methods are based on the identification and biasing of these low-dimensional order parameters, whose fluctuations are important in driving rare events of interest. Here, we describe a new algorithm for finding optimal low-dimensional CVs for use in enhanced-sampling biasing methods like umbrella sampling, metadynamics, and related methods, when limited prior static and dynamic information is known about the system, and a much larger set of candidate CVs is specified. The algorithm involves estimating the best combination of these candidate CVs, as quantified by a maximum path entropy estimate of the spectral gap for dynamics viewed as a function of that CV. The algorithm is called spectral gap optimization of order parameters (SGOOP). Through multiple practical examples, we show how this postprocessing procedure can lead to optimization of CV and several orders of magnitude improvement in the convergence of the free energy calculated through metadynamics, essentially giving the ability to extract useful information even from unsuccessful metadynamics runs. PMID:26929365

  10. Spectral and kinetic parameters of phosphorescence of triplet chlorophyll a in the photosynthetic apparatus of plants.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A; Kovalev, Yu V

    2014-04-01

    Spectral and kinetic parameters and quantum yield of IR phosphorescence accompanying radiative deactivation of the chlorophyll a (Chl a) triplet state were compared in pigment solutions, greening and mature plant leaves, isolated chloroplasts, and thalluses of macrophytic marine algae. On the early stages of greening just after the Shibata shift, phosphorescence is determined by the bulk Chl a molecules. According to phosphorescence measurement, the quantum yield of triplet state formation is not less than 25%. Further greening leads to a strong decrease in the phosphorescence yield. In mature leaves developing under normal irradiation conditions, the phosphorescence yield declined 1000-fold. This parameter is stable in leaves of different plant species. Three spectral forms of phosphorescence-emitting chlorophyll were revealed in the mature photosynthetic apparatus with the main emission maxima at 955, 975, and 995 nm and lifetimes ~1.9, ~1.5, and 1.1-1.3 ms. In the excitation spectra of chlorophyll phosphorescence measured in thalluses of macrophytic green and red algae, the absorption bands of Chl a and accessory pigments - carotenoids, Chl b, and phycobilins - were observed. These data suggest that phosphorescence is emitted by triplet chlorophyll molecules that are not quenched by carotenoids and correspond to short wavelength forms of Chl a coupled to the normal light harvesting pigment complex. The concentration of the phosphorescence-emitting chlorophyll molecules in chloroplasts and the contribution of these molecules to chlorophyll fluorescence were estimated. Spectral and kinetic parameters of the phosphorescence corresponding to the long wavelength fluorescence band at 737 nm were evaluated. The data indicate that phosphorescence provides unique information on the photophysics of pigment molecules, molecular organization of the photosynthetic apparatus, and mechanisms and efficiency of photodynamic stress in plants.

  11. Influence of grain size on ultrasonic spectral parameters in AISI type 316 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Jayakumar, T.; Palanichamy, P.; Raj, B.

    1999-01-08

    The grain size of a material is an important engineering parameter which influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue, creep, yield strength, impact transition temperature, etc. The reliability of the ultrasonic methods for grain size measurement, particularly amplitude based measurements are highly dependent upon the couplant condition. Therefore, application of these methods may be difficult for some practical applications, where uniform couplant condition can not be maintained. Therefore, it would be useful if a simplified method is developed, which could be used on-line and is free from the above mentioned limitations of the other methods. The shift in the spectral peak frequency has been used for microstructural characterization in carbon steel and for evaluation of structural variations induced by tensile deformation in SUS304 stainless steel. The spectral peak frequency in SUS304 steel was found to increase with increase in the tensile elongation. This was attributed to formation and growth of martensite structures due to tensile deformation resulting in smaller crystalline grains, thus reducing the attenuation due to ultrasonic scattering. The peak frequency has also been found to shift with the change in the grain size in Inconel 600 and copper. In the present study, the shift in the spectral peak frequency and the change in full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the autopower spectrum are correlated with the grain size in AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel, a widely used structural material in nuclear, chemical, fertilizer and many other industries.

  12. Senegalese land surface change analysis and biophysical parameter estimation using NOAA AVHRR spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Toll, David L.; Kennard, Ruth L.

    1989-01-01

    Surface biophysical estimates were derived from analysis of NOAA Advanced Very High Spectral Resolution (AVHRR) spectral data of the Senegalese area of west Africa. The parameters derived were of solar albedo, spectral visible and near-infrared band reflectance, spectral vegetative index, and ground temperature. Wet and dry linked AVHRR scenes from 1981 through 1985 in Senegal were analyzed for a semi-wet southerly site near Tambacounda and a predominantly dry northerly site near Podor. Related problems were studied to convert satellite derived radiance to biophysical estimates of the land surface. Problems studied were associated with sensor miscalibration, atmospheric and aerosol spatial variability, surface anisotropy of reflected radiation, narrow satellite band reflectance to broad solar band conversion, and ground emissivity correction. The middle-infrared reflectance was approximated with a visible AVHRR reflectance for improving solar albedo estimates. In addition, the spectral composition of solar irradiance (direct and diffuse radiation) between major spectral regions (i.e., ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and middle-infrared) was found to be insensitive to changes in the clear sky atmospheric optical depth in the narrow band to solar band conversion procedure. Solar albedo derived estimates for both sites were not found to change markedly with significant antecedent precipitation events or correspondingly from increases in green leaf vegetation density. The bright soil/substrate contributed to a high albedo for the dry related scenes, whereas the high internal leaf reflectance in green vegetation canopies in the near-infrared contributed to high solar albedo for the wet related scenes. The relationship between solar albedo and ground temperature was poor, indicating the solar albedo has little control of the ground temperature. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the derived visible reflectance were more sensitive to antecedent

  13. Mapping Site Response Parameters on Cal Poly Pomona Campus Using the Spectral Ratio Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, K. Y. K.; Polet, J.

    2014-12-01

    Site characteristics are an important factor in earthquake hazard assessment. To better understand site response differences on a small scale, as well as the seismic hazard of the area, we develop site response parameter maps of Cal Poly Pomona campus. Cal Poly Pomona is located in southern California about 40 km east of Los Angeles, within 50 km of San Andreas Fault. The campus is situated on top of the San Jose Fault. With about twenty two thousand students on campus, it is important to know the site response in this area. To this end, we apply the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio technique, which is an empirical method that can be used in an urban environment with no environmental impact. This well-established method is based on the computation of the ratio of vertical ambient noise ground motion over horizontal ambient noise ground motion as a function of frequency. By applying the spectral ratio method and the criteria from Site Effects Assessment Using Ambient Excitations (SESAME) guidelines, we can determine fundamental frequency and a minimum site amplification factor. We installed broadband seismometers throughout the Cal Poly Pomona campus, with an initial number of about 15 sites. The sites are approximately 50 to 150 meters apart and about two hours of waveforms were recorded at each site. We used the Geopsy software to make measurements of the peak frequency and the amplitude of the main peak from the spectral ratio. These two parameters have been determined to be estimates of fundamental frequency and a minimum site amplification factor, respectively. Based on the geological map from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and our data collected from Cal Poly Pomona campus, our preliminary results suggest that the area of campus that is covered by alluvial fan material tends to have a single significant spectral peak with a fundamental frequency of ~1Hz and a minimum amplification factor of ~3.7. The minimum depth of the surface layer is about 56

  14. A two-parameter model for the infrared/submillimeter/radio spectral energy distributions of galaxies and active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Daniel A.; Helou, George; Magdis, Georgios E.; Armus, Lee; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Shi, Yong

    2014-03-20

    A two-parameter semi-empirical model is presented for the spectral energy distributions of galaxies with contributions to their infrared-submillimeter-radio emission from both star formation and accretion disk-powered activity. This model builds upon a previous one-parameter family of models for star-forming galaxies, and includes an update to the mid-infrared emission using an average template obtained from Spitzer Space Telescope observations of normal galaxies. Star-forming/active galactic nucleus (AGN) diagnostics based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent widths and broadband infrared colors are presented, and example mid-infrared AGN fractional contributions are estimated from model fits to the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey sample of nearby U/LIRGS and the Five mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey sample of 24 μm selected sources at redshifts 0 ≲ z ≲ 4.

  15. Genetic and least squares algorithms for estimating spectral EIS parameters of prostatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Halter, Ryan J; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D; Schned, Alan; Heaney, John

    2008-06-01

    We employed electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to evaluate the electrical properties of prostatic tissues. We collected freshly excised prostates from 23 men immediately following radical prostatectomy. The prostates were sectioned into 3 mm slices and electrical property measurements of complex resistivity were recorded from each of the slices using an impedance probe over the frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz. The area probed was marked so that following tissue fixation and slide preparation, histological assessment could be correlated directly with the recorded EIS spectra. Prostate cancer (CaP), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), non-hyperplastic glandular tissue and stroma were the primary prostatic tissue types probed. Genetic and least squares parameter estimation algorithms were implemented for fitting a Cole-type resistivity model to the measured data. The four multi-frequency-based spectral parameters defining the recorded spectrum (rho(infinity), Deltarho, f(c) and alpha) were determined using these algorithms and statistically analyzed with respect to the tissue type. Both algorithms fit the measured data well, with the least squares algorithm having a better average goodness of fit (95.2 mOmega m versus 109.8 mOmega m) and a faster execution time (80.9 ms versus 13 637 ms) than the genetic algorithm. The mean parameters, from all tissue samples, estimated using the genetic algorithm ranged from 4.44 to 5.55 Omega m, 2.42 to 7.14 Omega m, 3.26 to 6.07 kHz and 0.565 to 0.654 for rho(infinity), Deltarho, f(c) and alpha, respectively. These same parameters estimated using the least squares algorithm ranged from 4.58 to 5.79 Omega m, 2.18 to 6.98 Omega m, 2.97 to 5.06 kHz and 0.621 to 0.742 for rho(infinity), Deltarho, f(c) and alpha, respectively. The ranges of these parameters were similar to those reported in the literature. Further, significant differences (p < 0.01) were observed between CaP and BPH for the spectral parameters Deltarho and f

  16. On parameterization of spectral line profiles including the speed-dependence in the case of gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    The physically grounded parameterization of a line profile including the speed-dependence was performed. It was shown that two actual parameters of the quadratic speed-dependence appear in gas mixtures instead of a single parameter in a pure gas. One of the parameters is associated with hard elastic velocity-changing collisions; the second is connected with the other sorts of collisions. For comparable concentrations of gas species, they may differ by 50% and depend nonlinearly on partial gas pressures. The dimensionless line narrowing parameter also reveals nonlinear pressure-dependence. The computational expressions for the line profile including all main physical mechanisms of its forming in conditions of gas mixtures are derived.

  17. Spectral and spatiotemporal variability ECG parameters linked to catheter ablation outcome in persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Muñoz, Antonio R; Latcu, Decebal G; Meo, Marianna; Meste, Olivier; Popescu, Irina; Saoudi, Nadir; Zarzoso, Vicente

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF), there is a strong clinical interest in determining whether a patient suffering from persistent AF will benefit from catheter ablation (CA) therapy at long term. This work presents several regression models based on noninvasive measures automatically computed from the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) such as AF dominant frequency (DF), spectral concentration and spatiotemporal variability (STV). Sixty-two AF patients referred to CA were enrolled in this study. Forty-seven of them had no recurrence after CA during an average follow-up of 14 ± 8 months. The ECG features were extracted from an ECG recorded before the CA intervention and they were combined by means of logistic regression. The combination of DF and STV values from different precordial leads reached AUC = 0.939, outperforming the best results by using only one kind of features, such as DF (AUC = 0.801), and yielding a global accuracy of 93.5% for discriminating the best long-term responders to CA. These results point out the need to take into consideration the spatial variation of spectral ECG parameters to build predictive models dealing with AF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Calculation of Spectral Parameters for Doped/Codoped MWO4 (M = Ba2+/Ca2+) Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambast, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.

    2017-08-01

    We report the spectral parameters of Dy3+-doped and Sr2+/K+-codoped MWO4 (M = Ba2+/Ca2+) tungstate phosphors synthesized by solid-state reaction route. The structural and optical properties were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, photoluminescence (PL) measurements, and ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectroscopy. The XRD results indicate tetragonal structure of the phosphors in space group I4 1 / a. The PL spectra show blue and yellow emission at 489 nm and 577 nm, respectively, on excitation at wavelength of 350 nm. The diffuse reflectance spectra reveal bandgap values for the phosphors in the range from 4.24 eV to 5.7 eV. Judd-Ofelt theory was used to calculate the oscillator strength from the excitation spectra of the phosphors. The intensity parameters ( Ω 2, Ω 4, and Ω 6) were used to calculate many radiative parameters such as the radiative transition probabilities ( A R), radiative lifetime ( τ R), branching ratio ( β R), stimulated emission cross-section [ σ( λ p)], and quantum efficiency ( η) for certain excited states of Dy3+ ion.

  19. Bayesian inference of spectral induced polarization parameters for laboratory complex resistivity measurements of rocks and soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérubé, Charles L.; Chouteau, Michel; Shamsipour, Pejman; Enkin, Randolph J.; Olivo, Gema R.

    2017-08-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements are now widely used to infer mineralogical or hydrogeological properties from the low-frequency electrical properties of the subsurface in both mineral exploration and environmental sciences. We present an open-source program that performs fast multi-model inversion of laboratory complex resistivity measurements using Markov-chain Monte Carlo simulation. Using this stochastic method, SIP parameters and their uncertainties may be obtained from the Cole-Cole and Dias models, or from the Debye and Warburg decomposition approaches. The program is tested on synthetic and laboratory data to show that the posterior distribution of a multiple Cole-Cole model is multimodal in particular cases. The Warburg and Debye decomposition approaches yield unique solutions in all cases. It is shown that an adaptive Metropolis algorithm performs faster and is less dependent on the initial parameter values than the Metropolis-Hastings step method when inverting SIP data through the decomposition schemes. There are no advantages in using an adaptive step method for well-defined Cole-Cole inversion. Finally, the influence of measurement noise on the recovered relaxation time distribution is explored. We provide the geophysics community with a open-source platform that can serve as a base for further developments in stochastic SIP data inversion and that may be used to perform parameter analysis with various SIP models.

  20. Spectral parameter estimation of CAT radar echoes in the presence of fading clutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, T.; Woodman, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis technique and a part of the results obtained from CAT radar echoes from higher troposphere and lower stratosphere are presented. First, the effect of processing distortion caused by the periodogram method using FFT algorithm on the slowly fading ground clutter echo is discussed. It is shown that an extremely narrow clutter spectrum can spill over the entire frequency range if the data are truncated at a tie sorter than their correlation time affecting largely the estimation of the CAT spectrum contribution, especially when the latter is a few tens of dB weaker than the former. A nonlinear least squares fitting procedure is used to parameterize the observed power spectrum in terms of CAT echo power, Doppler shift, spectral width, and the parameters which specify the shape of the clutter component.

  1. Effect of laser parameters and assist gas on spectral response of silicon fibrous nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Alubiady, M.; Tan, Bo

    2010-11-15

    This article report, for the first time, the influence of laser parameters on the spectral response of weblike silicon fibrous nanostructures. These nanostructures are formed by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz pulse frequency under atmosphere and nitrogen ambient. The observed decreasing in reflectance is correlated with the density of fibrous nanostructures and the size of the agglomerated nanoparticles. Compared to bulk silicon, Raman spectra of fibrous nanostructures shows a downward shift and asymmetric broadening at the first order phonon peak. The shift and broadening are attributed to phonon confinement of fibrous nanostructure. Polarization and nitrogen gas modify the morphology of generated nanomaterials but does not have effect on light absorptance. Pulsewidth and pulse frequency do not have significant effect on light absorptance.

  2. Effects of snow physical parameters on spectral albedo and bidirectional reflectance of snow surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Teruo; Aoki, Tadao; Fukabori, Masashi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Fumihiko

    2000-04-01

    Observations of spectral albedo and bidirectional reflectance in the wavelength region of λ = 0.35-2.5 μm were made together with snow pit work on a flat snowfield in eastern Hokkaido, Japan. The effects of snow impurities, density, layer structure, and grain size attained by in situ and laboratory measurements were taken into account in snow models for which spectral albedos were calculated using a multiple-scattering model for the atmosphere-snow system. Comparisons of these theoretical albedos with measured ones suggest that the snow impurities were concentrated at the snow surface by dry fallout of atmospheric aerosols. The optically equivalent snow grain size was found to be of the order of a branch width of dendrites or of a dimension of narrower portion of broken crystals. This size was smaller than both the mean grain size and the effective grain size obtained from micrographs by image processing. The observational results for the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) normalized by the radiance at the nadir showed that the anisotropic reflection was very significant in the near-infrared region, especially for λ > 1.4 μm, while the visible normalized BRDF (NBRDF) patterns were relatively flat. Comparison of this result with two kinds of theoretical NBRDFs, where one having been calculated using single-scattering parameters by Mie theory and the other using the same parameters except for Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function obtained from the same asymmetry factor as in the Mie theory, showed that the observed NBRDF agreed with the theoretical one using the HG phase function rather than with that using the Mie phase function, while the albedos calculated with both phase functions agreed well with each other.

  3. Global Source Parameters from Regional Spectral Ratios for Yield Transportability Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, W. S.; Fisk, M. D.; Stead, R. J.; Begnaud, M. L.; Rowe, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    We use source parameters such as moment, corner frequency and high frequency rolloff as constraints in amplitude tomography, ensuring that spectra of well-studied earthquakes are recovered using the ensuing attenuation and site term model. We correct explosion data for path and site effects using such models, which allows us to test transportability of yield estimation techniques based on our best source spectral estimates. To develop a background set of source parameters, we applied spectral ratio techniques to envelopes of a global set of regional distance recordings from over 180,000 crustal events. Corner frequencies and moment ratios were determined via inversion using all event pairs within predetermined clusters, shifting to absolute levels using independently determined regional and teleseismic moments. The moment and corner frequency results can be expressed as stress drop, which has considerable scatter, yet shows dramatic regional patterns. We observe high stress in subduction zones along S. America, S. Mexico, the Banda Sea, and associated with the Yakutat Block in Alaska. We also observe high stress at the Himalayan syntaxes, the Pamirs, eastern Iran, the Caspian, the Altai-Sayan, and the central African rift. Low stress is observed along mid ocean spreading centers, the Afar rift, patches of convergence zones such as Nicaragua, the Zagros, Tibet, and the Tien Shan, among others. Mine blasts appear as low stress events due to their low corners and steep rolloffs. Many of these anomalies have been noted by previous studies, and we plan to compare results directly. As mentioned, these results will be used to constrain tomographic imaging, but can also be used in model validation procedures similar to the use of ground truth in location problems, and, perhaps most importantly, figure heavily in quality control of local and regional distance amplitude measurements.

  4. Estimation of the spectral parameter kappa in the region of the Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Raúl R.; Ávila-Barrientos, Lenin

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed records from the Broadband Seismological Network of the Gulf of California (RESBAN) and from stations of the NARS-Baja array, operated by CICESE, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, to make estimates of the spectral decay parameter kappa ( κ). This attenuation parameter is important for evaluating the seismic risk and hazard of this region. Thirteen shallow earthquakes with focal depths less than 20 km and magnitudes between 5.1 and 6.6 were selected to calculate κ and the near-site attenuation κ 0. We used three different approaches to estimate κ 0: (a) with individual measurements of κ from vector modulus of three-component spectral amplitudes at different epicentral distances and extrapolating to zero distance to estimate κ 0, (b) with individual measurements using vertical component spectra, and (c) measuring from the high-frequency part of the site transfer function determined calculating the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. For most stations, the three methods give similar results. At short distances (50-60 km), κ takes values close to 0.04 s at NE76, the station located in the middle of the array. κ increases with distance taking an average value of up to 0.18 s for distances close to 500 km. κ 0 at most sites is close to 0.03 s, except for GUYB (Guaymas) that has a κ 0 = 0.05 s and NE83 (Navolato) with κ 0 = 0.065 s, both stations located in the continent, on the eastern side of the gulf, where the soils are less consolidated. Finally, we analyze if κ 0 correlates with magnitude and back azimuth, and we found that for most stations, κ 0 does not correlate with either one. However, station TOPB, located on basalt, shows a moderate correlation with magnitude, with κ 0 increasing with increasing M W in a short back-azimuth range. We also found that for station NE74, located on soft soil, κ 0 correlates with back azimuth, having lower values for azimuths near 120°.

  5. A HIGH-RESOLUTION, MULTI-EPOCH SPECTRAL ATLAS OF PECULIAR STARS INCLUDING RAVE, GAIA , AND HERMES WAVELENGTH RANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasella, Lina; Munari, Ulisse; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2010-12-15

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution (R = 20,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 A and includes the RAVE, Gaia, and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of the observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars, which were collected during 56 observing nights between 1998 November and 2002 August, are presented. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectrophotometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve in the planning and development of automated classification algorithms designed for RAVE, Gaia, HERMES, and other large-scale spectral surveys. The spectrum of XX Oph is discussed in some detail as an example of the content of the present atlas.

  6. Estimation of Cloud Physical Parameters from Airborne Solar Spectral Reflectance Measurements for Stratocumulus Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Shoji; Shioibara, Masataka; Uchiyama, Akihiro

    1995-10-01

    A new method is proposed to retrieve various cloud physical parameters of water clouds from the solar-flux reflectances at four wavelengths measured by using the airborne Multi-channel Cloud Pyranometer (MCP) system. The MCP system was designed to measure the spectral reflectances at nine wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared region. The estimation procedure assumes a locally plane-parallel and vertically homogeneous water-cloud layer with monomodal particle size distributions of a fixed width. The cloud optical thickness 500 and the effective particle radius re, of the water-cloud layer can be simultaneously retrieved from the MCP reflectances measured at the visible channel of =500 nm and at the near-infrared channel of =1650 nm. Under the assumption that cloud pressure height is known, the cloud liquid water content (LWC) can then be retrieved from the MCP reflectance at the oxygen absorption-band channel cantered at =760 nm. Finally, the in-cloud water vapor amount uH2O can be estimated from the MCP reflectance at the water vapor absorption-band channel centered at =938 nm. Using these directly retrieved parameters, we can estimate byproduct parameters such as integrated liquid water path, cloud particle concentration, and geometrical thickness of the homogeneous cloud layer. A reliably applicable range of the present method was estimated to be 1500<100, 4 µm re<25 µm, LWC1 g m3, and uH2O10 g m3.The present retrieval method was applied to the MCP spectral reflectance data obtained through aircraft observations for wintertime stratocumulus clouds over the ocean south of Tokyo, made as part of the Western North Pacific Cloud-Radiation Experiment/Meteorological Research Institute program in Decembers of 1989 and 1990. Reasonable values of the cloud physical parameters were successfully retrieved for the stratocumulus clouds. However, a comparison with the simultaneous in situ cloud measurement showed that the estimated effective particle radii and liquid

  7. Changes in bone mineral metabolism parameters, including FGF23, after discontinuing cinacalcet at kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barros, Xoana; Fuster, David; Paschoalin, Raphael; Oppenheimer, Federico; Rubello, Domenico; Perlaza, Pilar; Pons, Francesca; Torregrosa, Jose V

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of the administration of cinacalcet in dialytic patients who are scheduled for kidney transplantation, and in particular about the changes in FGF23 and other mineral metabolism parameters after surgery compared with recipients not on cinacalcet at kidney transplantation. We performed a prospective observational cohort study with recruitment of consecutive kidney transplant recipients at our institution. Patients were classified according to whether they were under treatment with cinacalcet before transplantation. Bone mineral metabolism parameters, including C-terminal FGF23, were measured at baseline, on day 15, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. In previously cinacalcet-treated patients, cinacalcet therapy was discontinued on the day of surgery and was not restarted after transplantation. A total of 48 kidney transplant recipients, 20 on cinacalcet at surgery and 28 cinacalcet non-treated patients, completed the follow-up. Serum phosphate declined significantly in the first 15 days after transplantation with no differences between the two groups, whereas cinacalcet-treated patients showed higher FGF23 levels, although not significant. After transplantation, PTH and serum calcium were significantly higher in cinacalcet-treated patients. We conclude that patients receiving cinacalcet on dialysis presented similar serum phosphate levels but higher PTH and serum calcium levels during the initial six months after kidney transplantation than cinacalcet non-treated patients. The group previously treated with cinacalcet before transplantation showed higher FGF23 levels without significant differences, so further studies should investigate its relevance in the management of these patients.

  8. Improvement of the measurement accuracy of the spectral method for evaluation parameters of the optically transparent thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhov, A. A.; Kostrin, D. K.; Gerasimov, V. A.; Selivanov, L. M.; Simon, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the ways of increasing the measurement accuracy of the parameters of the optically transparent thin films using the spectral method are described. The proposed plotting of the envelope curves for the minima and maxima of the interference oscillations in a film and additional filtering of the spectral data, allows improving the accuracy of determining the extrema position and, consequently, increasing the accuracy of the thickness measurements of the deposited coatings.

  9. A Recommended Procedure for Estimating the Cosmic Ray Spectral Parameter of a Simple Power Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index a(f(sub i)) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic ray (GQ proton flux at energies below 1013 eV. Two procedures for estimating a(f(sub i)), referred as (1) the method of moments, and (2) maximum likelihood, are developed and their statistical performance compared. I concluded that the maximum likelihood procedure attains the most desirable statistical properties and is hence the recommended statistic estimation procedure for estimating a1. The maximum likelihood procedure is then generalized for application to a set of real cosmic ray data and thereby makes this approach applicable to existing cosmic ray data sets. Several other important results, such as the relationship between collecting power and detector energy resolution, as well as inclusion of a non-Gaussian detector response function, are presented. These results have many practical benefits in the design phase of a cosmic ray detector because they permit instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of one of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose practical limits to the design envelope.

  10. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  11. Parameter Estimation of Binary Neutron Stars using an Effective One Body Model including Tidal Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Monica; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Lackey, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Ground gravitational wave detectors, built to detect perturbations in spacetime, can pick up signals produced by inspiraling binary neutron stars, the remnants of the core collapse of massive stars. A new EOB model (Bernuzzi et al. 2015) simulates the inspiral and merger of binary neutron star systems, including how they are deformed due to tides. We used a Bayesian parameter estimation algorithm to infer how well a plausible gravitational wave detection would allow us to constrain this tidal deformability. We then compared our results to prior investigations (Wade et al. 2014) which employed a post-Newtonian-based approximation for the inspiral. I would like to thank the RIT Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the RIT Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation.

  12. ECG spectral and morphological parameters reviewed and updated to detect adult and paediatric life-threatening arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Aramendi, E; Irusta, U; Pastor, E; Bodegas, A; Benito, F

    2010-06-01

    Since the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation approved the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in children, efforts have been made to adapt AED algorithms designed for adult patients to detect paediatric ventricular arrhythmias accurately. In this study, we assess the performance of two spectral (A(2) and VFleak) and two morphological parameters (TCI and CM) for the detection of lethal ventricular arrhythmias using an American Heart Association (AHA) compliant database that includes adult and paediatric arrhythmias. Our objective was to evaluate how those parameters can be optimally adjusted to discriminate shockable from nonshockable rhythms in adult and paediatric patients. A total of 1473 records were analysed: 751 from 387 paediatric patients (spectral parameters showed no significant differences (p > 0.01) between the adult and paediatric patients for the shockable records; the differences for nonshockable records however were significant. Still, these parameters maintained the discrimination power when paediatric rhythms were included. A single threshold could be adjusted to obtain sensitivities and specificities above the AHA goals for the complete database. The sensitivities for ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were 91.1% and 96.6% for VFleak, and 90.3% and 99.3% for A(2). The specificities for normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and other nonshockable rhythms were 99.5% and 96.3% for VFleak, and 99.0% and 97.7% for A(2). On the other hand, the morphological parameters showed significant differences between the adult and paediatric patients, particularly for the nonshockable records, because of the faster heart rates of the paediatric rhythms. Their performance clearly degraded with paediatric rhythms. Using a single threshold, the sensitivities and specificities were below the AHA goals, particularly VT sensitivity (60.4% for TCI and 65.8% for CM

  13. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Direct Numerical Simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Tan, Duo-Wang

    2009-08-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady three-dimensional high-order spectral element method code. The numerical model used consists of Navier-Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation. The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory. Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code, including instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers. These results indicate that turbulent structures of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions. The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of simulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows.

  14. Spectral red edge parameters for winter wheat under different nitrogen support levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yisong; Hu, Chunsheng; Dai, Hui; Lei, Yuping

    2005-09-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is not only an important technical method in observing global ecosystems and vegetation cover change, but also a main aspect of studies on precision agriculture. In order to monitor crop nutrient supply condition and to realize precision fertilization, spectral red edge parameter for winter wheat was studied. Experiments were carried out through 8 years since 1997 under four nitrogen support levels in Luancheng Station, Hebei province (e.g., 0, 100, 200 and 300 kg N ha-1). Canopy reflectance spectrum was measured by ASD HandHeld Spectroradiometer (325-1075 nm) during 2002 and 2004. The dynamics of red edge parameters for physiological stages of winter wheat canopy were calculated using first derivative curve. Analyses revealed that the red edge of the wheat canopy reflectance spectrum locates between 720-740 nm. All the different trial had distinct "red shift" trait, but higher N stress had shorter "red edge" wavelength. Position of red edge turned "blue shift" after pregnant period. Red edge swing is a first-order derivative spectrum when wavelength reached red edge position, red edge swing double peak shape showed that the pregnant period was the best stage to detect nitrogen deficiency. Red edge swing correlated with relative chlorophyll content and leaf N content. Area of red edge peak is the value of first-order derivative spectra accumulative total between 680 and 750 nm. These parameters can be used to estimate LAI and N accumulating quantities, and these results provide information needed for the development of variable-rate N application technology.

  15. Relation between the properties of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations and spectral parameters in 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Evandro M.; Méndez, Mariano; Zhang, Guobao; Sanna, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the relation between the parameters of the energy spectrum and the frequency and amplitude of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53. We fit the 3-180-keV spectrum of this source with a model that includes a thermal Comptonization component. We show that the frequencies of both kHz QPOs follow the same relation as a function of the parameters of this spectral component, except for a systematic frequency shift, whereas the rms fractional amplitude of each QPO follows a different relation with respect to those same parameters. This implies that, while the dynamical mechanism that sets the frequencies of the QPO can be the same for both kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation (kHz QPOs), the radiative mechanisms that set the amplitudes of the lower and the upper kHz QPO are likely different. We discuss the implications of these results to the modelling of the kHz QPOs and the possibility that the lower kHz QPO reflects a resonance between the Comptonizing medium and the photons from the accretion disc and/or the neutron star surface.

  16. Effect of method and parameters of spectral analysis on selected indices of simulated Doppler spectra.

    PubMed

    Kaluzynski, K; Palko, T

    1993-05-01

    The sensitivity of Doppler spectral indices (mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral broadening index and turbulence intensity) to the conditions of spectral analysis (estimation method, data window, smoothing window or model order) increases with decreasing signal bandwidth and growing index complexity. The bias of spectral estimate has a more important effect on these indices than its variance. A too low order, in the case of autoregressive modeling and minimum variance methods, and excessive smoothing, in the case of the FFT method, result in increased errors of Doppler spectral indices. There is a trade-off between the errors resulting from a short data window and those due to insufficient temporal resolution.

  17. Physical parameters of sdB stars from spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Jeffery, C. S.

    2001-03-01

    The atmospheric parameters of 34 hot subdwarf B stars have been obtained using a combination of 61 short and long-wave IUE spectra, together with new and existing optical and infrared photometric data. Using a grid of high-gravity helium-deficient model atmospheres and a chi 2-minimization procedure, 15 single sdB stars and 19 composite systems, containing a hot subdwarf B star and a cool main-sequence companion, were analyzed. From the (log L-log T_eff) diagram of our results, we conclude that the majority of the cool companions to our sample of binary sdB stars are main sequence stars, in the range of 4000 < Teff / K < 6000 and mass 0.8 < M/Msun < 1.3. The lower limit on detectability of cool stars in composite sdB of our sample is ~ 3600 K, corresponding to a spectral type of M1 or later (Lang \\cite{Lang-92}). Based on observations made with the Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, and on INES data obtained with the IUE satellite.

  18. Measurement of the spectral characteristics and color parameters of flat objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Lastovskaia, Elena A.; Korotaev, Valery V.; Norko, Vadim E.

    2015-02-01

    Quality control of different coatings (colorful, paint, marker, safety, etc.) that are applied to the surface of various objects (both metallic and non-metallic) is an important problem. Also, there is a problem of dealing with counterfeit products. So it's necessary to distinguish the fake replicas of marking from the authentic marking of producer. To solve these problems, we propose an automated device (hardware and software complex) for analysis and control of spectral reflection characteristics, albedo and color parameters of extended (up to 150 mm × 150 mm) flat objects. It allows constructing the color image of the object surface as well as its multispectral images in selected regions of the spectrum. Herewith the color of the object surface can be calculated for various standard light sources (A, B, C, D65, E, F2, F7, F11, GE), or to any light source with a predetermined emission spectrum. The paper presents the description of construction and working principles of the proposed hardware and software complex. All color settings calculations correspond to the requirements and recommendations of CIE.

  19. Improved line parameters for ozone bands in the 10-microm spectral region.

    PubMed

    Flaud, J M; Camy-Peyret, C; Rinsland, C P; Devi, V M; Smith, M A; Goldman, A

    1990-09-01

    A complete update of spectroscopic line parameters for the 10-microm bands of ozone is reported. The listing contains calculated positions, intensities, lower state energies, and air- and self-broadened halfwidths of more than 53,000 lines. The results have been generated using improved spectroscopic parameters obtained in a number of recent high resolution laboratory studies. A total of eighteen bands of (16)O(3) (sixteen hot bands plus the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals) are included along with the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals of both (16)O(16)O(18)O and (16)O(18)O(16)O. As shown by comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.003-cm(-1) resolution balloon-borne stratospheric solar spectra, the new parameters greatly improve the accuracy of atmospheric calculations in the 10-microm region, especially for the isotopic (16)O(16)O(18)O and (16)O(18)O(16)O lines.

  20. Improved line parameters for ozone bands in the 10-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaud, Jean-Marie; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, Malathy V.

    1990-01-01

    A complete update of spectroscopic line parameters for the 10-micron bands of ozone is reported. The listing contains calculated positions, intensities, lower state energies, and air- and self-broadened halfwidths of more than 53,000 lines. The results have been generated using improved spectroscopic parameters obtained in a number of recent high resolution laboratory studies. A total of eighteen bands of (O-16)3 (sixteen hot bands plus the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals) are included along with the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals of both (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16). As shown by comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.003/cm resolution balloon-borne stratospheric solar spectra, the new parameters greatly improve the accuracy of atmospheric calculations in the 10-micron region, especially for the isotopic (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16) lines.

  1. [Quantitative topographic characterization of the myoelectric activity distribution of the masseter muscle: mapping of spectral EMG parameters].

    PubMed

    Scholle, H C; Schumann, N P; Anders, C; Mey, E

    1992-09-01

    A new method for quantitative characterization of myoelectrical masseter activity distribution by mapping of spectral EMG-parameters is described. The surface electromyograms of M. masseter were monopolarly recorded (16 channels). On the basis of registered EMG intervals (512 ms) the spectral EMG power of several frequency bands was calculated (Fast Fourier Transformation). The spectral EMG parameters between the 16 electrode positions were estimated by linear interpolation (4-nearest neighbours algorithm). Afterwards the spectral EMG parameters were fitted in a grey-tone or colour scale with 10 intervals. The so obtained EMG activity maps ("EMG-Maps") permit a quantitative-topographic characterization of myoelectrical masseter activity during different functional load procedures. The frequency range which is to consider in masseter surface-EMG investigations encloses frequencies between 15 and 500 Hz. The topography of EMG activation pattern of M. masseter is only described in a comprehensive manner when the electrode array consists of 16 electrodes and more. During defined motor tasks like clenching with controlled forces the reproducibility of EMG-Maps which respect to the topography of EMG activity pattern is very high. The absolute values of spectral EMG power as well as power changes of selected band ranges during clenching correlate to the extent of chewing forces.

  2. The Atlas of Vesta Spectral Parameters derived from the mapping spectrometer VIR onboard NASA/Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, A.; De Sanctis, M.; Ammannito, E.; Tosi, F.; Capria, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Zambon, F.; Palomba, E.; Magni, G.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    From 2011 to 2012 the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) onboard NASA/Dawn spacecraft has mapped the surface of Vesta from three different orbital heights, acquiring infrared and visible spectra from 0.2 to 5 microns, sampled in 864 channels with a spatial resolution up to about 150 m/pixel. From the large amount of spectra retrieved we have derived spectral parameters which can be combined to identify specific physical and compositional states. To start with, we have computed the band center and depth for band I and band II of pyroxenes. Pyroxene's band center I and II are commonly associated with a compositional variation. For example, orthopyroxene bands shift towards longer wavelengths with increasing amounts of iron, while clinopyroxene bands shift towards longer wavelengths with increasing calcium content. Band depths are related to scattering effects, associated to the abundance and the grain size of the absorber. Mapping these parameters on the surface allow to detect terrain units compositions and physical-state in their stratigraphic context. We have produced an atlas of digital maps, projected following the 15-quadrangle scheme commonly adopted for small sized planetary bodies. The digital maps have geospatial metadata and are available in GIS and other scientific programming language formats. A special imagery product has been produced, where the geomorphologic context from the Framing Camera, and the IAU nomenclature have been added to the mineralogic maps. This way we have both quantitative digital maps and print-ready maps. Digital maps are useful in statistical and geo-processing studies, while print-ready maps represent an easy to be consulted high-level data products. As with the atlas we are combining data acquired at very different observing geometries and in different phases of the mission, filtering has been necessary and an iterative process to project data produces results that are incrementally more consistent as we detect and

  3. Determination of spectral parameters for lines targeted by the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) on the Mars Curiosity rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manne, Jagadeeshwari; Webster, Christopher R.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular line parameters of line strengths, self- and foreign-broadening by nitrogen, carbon dioxide and helium gas have been experimentally determined for infrared ro-vibrational spectral lines of water and carbon dioxide at 2.78 μm targeted by the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Good agreement is found by comparison with the line parameters reported in the HITRAN-2012 database.

  4. Genetic parameter estimates for carcass traits and visual scores including or not genomic information.

    PubMed

    Gordo, D G M; Espigolan, R; Tonussi, R L; Júnior, G A F; Bresolin, T; Magalhães, A F Braga; Feitosa, F L; Baldi, F; Carvalheiro, R; Tonhati, H; de Oliveira, H N; Chardulo, L A L; de Albuquerque, L G

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether visual scores used as selection criteria in Nellore breeding programs are effective indicators of carcass traits measured after slaughter. Additionally, this study evaluated the effect of different structures of the relationship matrix ( and ) on the estimation of genetic parameters and on the prediction accuracy of breeding values. There were 13,524 animals for visual scores of conformation (CS), finishing precocity (FP), and muscling (MS) and 1,753, 1,747, and 1,564 for LM area (LMA), backfat thickness (BF), and HCW, respectively. Of these, 1,566 animals were genotyped using a high-density panel containing 777,962 SNP. Six analyses were performed using multitrait animal models, each including the 3 visual scores and 1 carcass trait. For the visual scores, the model included direct additive genetic and residual random effects and the fixed effects of contemporary group (defined by year of birth, management group at yearling, and farm) and the linear effect of age of animal at yearling. The same model was used for the carcass traits, replacing the effect of age of animal at yearling with the linear effect of age of animal at slaughter. The variance and covariance components were estimated by the REML method in analyses using the numerator relationship matrix () or combining the genomic and the numerator relationship matrices (). The heritability estimates for the visual scores obtained with the 2 methods were similar and of moderate magnitude (0.23-0.34), indicating that these traits should response to direct selection. The heritabilities for LMA, BF, and HCW were 0.13, 0.07, and 0.17, respectively, using matrix and 0.29, 0.16, and 0.23, respectively, using matrix . The genetic correlations between the visual scores and carcass traits were positive, and higher correlations were generally obtained when matrix was used. Considering the difficulties and cost of measuring carcass traits postmortem, visual scores of

  5. Evaluation of the Lower Punctum Parameters and Morphology Using Spectral Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Allam, Riham S H M; Ahmed, Rania A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study features of the lower punctum in normal subjects using spectral domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SD AS-OCT). Methods. Observational cross-sectional study that included 147 punctae (76 subjects). Punctae were evaluated clinically for appearance, position, and size. AS-OCT was used to evaluate the punctal shape, contents, and junction with the vertical canaliculus. Inner and outer diameters as well as depth were measured. Results. 24 males and 52 females (mean age 44 ± 14.35 y) were included. Lower punctum was perceived by OCT to be an area with an outer diameter (mean 412.16 ± 163 μm), inner diameter (mean 233.67 ± 138.73 μm), and depth (mean 251.7 ± 126.58 μm). The OCT measured outer punctum diameter was significantly less than that measured clinically (P: 0.000). Seven major shapes were identified. The junction with the vertical canaliculus was detectable in 44%. Fluid was detected in 34%, one of which had an air bubble; however, 63% of punctae showed no contents and 4% had debris. Conclusions. AS-OCT can be a useful tool in understanding the anatomy of the punctum and distal lacrimal system as well as tear drainage physiology. Measuring the punctum size may play a role in plugs fitting.

  6. Zooming of states and parameters using a lumping approach including back-translation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Systems biology models tend to become large since biological systems often consist of complex networks of interacting components, and since the models usually are developed to reflect various mechanistic assumptions of those networks. Nevertheless, not all aspects of the model are equally interesting in a given setting, and normally there are parts that can be reduced without affecting the relevant model performance. There are many methods for model reduction, but few or none of them allow for a restoration of the details of the original model after the simplified model has been simulated. Results We present a reduction method that allows for such a back-translation from the reduced to the original model. The method is based on lumping of states, and includes a general and formal algorithm for both determining appropriate lumps, and for calculating the analytical back-translation formulas. The lumping makes use of efficient methods from graph-theory and ϵ-decomposition and is derived and exemplified on two published models for fluorescence emission in photosynthesis. The bigger of these models is reduced from 26 to 6 states, with a negligible deviation from the reduced model simulations, both when comparing simulations in the states of the reduced model and when comparing back-translated simulations in the states of the original model. The method is developed in a linear setting, but we exemplify how the same concepts and approaches can be applied to non-linear problems. Importantly, the method automatically provides a reduced model with back-translations. Also, the method is implemented as a part of the systems biology toolbox for matlab, and the matlab scripts for the examples in this paper are available in the supplementary material. Conclusions Our novel lumping methodology allows for both automatic reduction of states using lumping, and for analytical retrieval of the original states and parameters without performing a new simulation. The two

  7. Estimation of site-dependent spectral decay parameter from seismic array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seon Jeong; Lee, Jung Mo; Baag, Chang-Eob; Choi, Hoseon; Noh, Myunghyun

    2016-04-01

    The kappa (κ), attenuation of acceleration amplitude at high frequencies, is one of the most important parameters in ground motion evaluation and seismic hazard analysis at sites. κ simply indicates the high frequency decay of the acceleration spectrum in log-linear space. The decay trend can be considered as linear for frequencies higher than a specific frequency, fe which is starting point of the linear regression at the acceleration spectrum. The κ has been investigated using the data from seismic arrays in the south-eastern part of Korea in which nuclear facilities such as power plant and radiological waste depository are located. The seismic array consists of 20 seismic stations and it was operated from October in 2010 through March in 2013. A classical method by Anderson and Hough (1984) and a standard procedure recently suggested by Ktenidou et al. (2013) were applied for computation of κ. There have been just a few studies on spectral attenuation characteristics for Korean Peninsula so far and even those studies utilized small amount of earthquake events whose frequency range was lower than 25 Hz. In this study, the available frequency range is up to 60 Hz based on the sampling rate of 200 and instrument response. This allows us to use a large range of frequencies for κ computations. It is outstanding advantage that we couldn't obtain from earlier κ studies in Korea. In addition, we investigate the regional κ characteristics through calculating the κ using data of 20 seismic stations which are highly extensive seismic array. It allows us to find the more specific attenuation characteristics of high frequencies in study area. Distance and magnitude dependence of κ has also been investigated. Before calculating the κ, the corner frequency (f_c) has been checked so that the fe can lie to the right of fc to exclude source effects in the computation. Manually picked fe is generally in the range of 10 to 25 Hz. The resulting κR is 9.2e-06 and κ0 is 0

  8. Optical spectral signatures of liquids by means of fiber optic technology for product and quality parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Diaz-Herrera, N.; Garcia-Allende, P. B.; Ottevaere, H.; Thienpont, H.; Attilio, C.; Cimato, A.; Francalanci, S.; Paccagnini, A.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy in the wide 200-1700 nm spectral range is carried out by means of optical fiber instrumentation to achieve a digital mapping of liquids for the prediction of important quality parameters. Extra virgin olive oils from Italy and lubricant oils from turbines with different degrees of degradation were considered as "case studies". The spectral data were processed by means of multivariate analysis so as to obtain a correlation to quality parameters. In practice, the wide range absorption spectra were considered as an optical signature of the liquids from which to extract product quality information. The optical signatures of extra virgin olive oils were used to predict the content of the most important fatty acids. The optical signatures of lubricant oils were used to predict the concentration of the most important parameters for indicating the oil's degree of degradation, such as TAN, JOAP anti-wear index, and water content.

  9. The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) including a critical cavity size ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquier, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) has been developed to predict the packing density of mixtures constituted by bidisperse spherical particles. The four parameters are: the wall effect and the loosening effect coefficients, the compaction index and a critical cavity size ratio. The two geometrical interactions have been studied theoretically on the basis of a spherical cell centered on a secondary class bead. For the loosening effect, a critical cavity size ratio, below which a fine particle can be inserted into a small cavity created by touching coarser particles, is introduced. This is the only parameter which requires adaptation to extend the model to other types of particles. The 4-parameter CPM demonstrates its efficiency on frictionless glass beads (300 values), spherical particles numerically simulated (20 values), round natural particles (125 values) and crushed particles (335 values) with correlation coefficients equal to respectively 99.0%, 98.7%, 97.8%, 96.4% and mean deviations equal to respectively 0.007, 0.006, 0.007, 0.010.

  10. Studies on electronic spectral parameters of doped Nd(III) ion with therapeutically important ligands in dioxane solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Annu; Jain, Sushma

    2016-05-06

    The present investigation is concerened with the studies on electronic spectral parameters viz. Oscillator strength (P), Judd-Ofelt T{sub λ} (λ=2,4,6), Slater-Condon(F{sub K}),Lande(ζ{sub 4F}),Nephelauxetic ratio(β), Bonding parameter (b{sup 1/2}) and Percent covalency parameter (δ%) for Nd(III) ion complexes with the ligands having Nitrogen,Oxygen Sulphur donor sites.The variation in the values of oscillator strength explicitly shows the relative sensitivities of the 4f-4f transition as well as the specific correlation between ligand structures and nature of Nd(III) ligand interaction.

  11. Improving simulated Amazon forest biomass and productivity by including spatial variation in biophysical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanho, A. D. A.; Coe, M. T.; Costa, M. H.; Malhi, Y.; Galbraith, D.; Quesada, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic vegetation models forced with spatially homogeneous biophysical parameters are capable of producing average productivity and biomass values for the Amazon basin forest biome that are close to the observed estimates, but these models are unable to reproduce observed spatial variability. Recent observational studies have shown substantial regional spatial variability of above-ground productivity and biomass across the Amazon basin, which is believed to be primarily driven by a combination of soil physical and chemical properties. In this study, spatial heterogeneity of vegetation properties is added to the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) land surface model, and the simulated productivity and biomass of the Amazon basin are compared to observations from undisturbed forest. The maximum RuBiCo carboxylation capacity (Vcmax) and the woody biomass residence time (τw) were found to be the most important properties determining the modeled spatial variation of above-ground woody net primary productivity and biomass, respectively. Spatial heterogeneity of these properties may lead to simulated spatial variability of 1.8 times in the woody net primary productivity (NPPw) and 2.8 times in the woody above-ground biomass (AGBw). The coefficient of correlation between the modeled and observed woody productivity improved from 0.10 with homogeneous parameters to 0.73 with spatially heterogeneous parameters, while the coefficient of correlation between the simulated and observed woody above-ground biomass improved from 0.33 to 0.88. The results from our analyses with the IBIS dynamic vegetation model demonstrated that using single values for key ecological parameters in the tropical forest biome severely limits simulation accuracy. Clearer understanding of the biophysical mechanisms that drive the spatial variability of carbon allocation, τw and Vcmax is necessary to achieve further improvements to simulation accuracy.

  12. Compressed spectral arrays for the analysis of 24-hr heart rate variability signal: enhancement of parameters and data reduction.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, S; Bianchi, A; Baselli, G; Civardi, S; Guzzetti, S; Malliani, A; Pagani, A; Pagani, M

    1989-10-01

    Heart rate variability signal in the form of an R-R interval tachogram is detected in Holter type 24-hr ECG recordings. Spectral analysis is carried out over consecutive nonoverlapping records, and the information is displayed in the form of a compressed spectral array through parametric techniques. The trends of spectral parameters such as low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) powers and central frequencies are also plotted, together with the classical mean R-R value and variance relative to each single spectrum. These parameters quantify the effect of sympatho-vagal balance on heart rate control during the 24-hr period and provide important elements for the diagnostic evaluation of various pathologies, like hypertension. A spectral compression algorithm which checks the position of the poles relative to LF and HF bands inside the unitary circle in the complex zeta-plane is also developed. Applications of this procedure are foreseen in the clinical evaluation of ambulant patients as well as in the study of physical and psychological stress.

  13. Developing parameters for multi-mode ambient air models including the nanometer mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronville, Paolo; Rivers, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The particle count, surface and mass in an occupied space can be modeled when the HVAC system airflows are known, along with the particle-size distribution for outdoor air, internal generation rates as a function of particle size, and the efficiency as a function of particle size for filters present. Outdoor air particle-size distribution is rarely available, but measures of particle mass concentration, PM2.5 and PM10, are often available for building locations. Outdoor air aerosol size distributions are well modeled by sums of two or three log-normal distributions, with essentially all mass in two larger modes. Studies have also shown that some mode parameters are, in general, related by simple functions. This paper shows how these relationships can be combined with known characteristics of PM2.5 and PM10 samplers to create reasonable inclusive models of outdoor air aerosol-size distributions. This information plus knowledge of indoor particle generation allows calculation of aerosol mass in occupied spaces. Estimation of parameters of aerosol modes with sizes below100 nm and measurement of filter efficiencies in that range are described.

  14. The Effect of Differential Growth Rates across Plants on Spectral Predictions of Physiological Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Tal; Hochberg, Uri; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Leaves of various ages and positions in a plant's canopy can present distinct physiological, morphological and anatomical characteristics, leading to complexities in selecting a single leaf for spectral representation of an entire plant. A fortiori, as growth rates between canopies differ, spectral-based comparisons across multiple plants – often based on leaves' position but not age – becomes an even more challenging mission. This study explores the effect of differential growth rates on the reflectance variability between leaves of different canopies, and its implication on physiological predictions made by widely-used spectral indices. Two distinct irrigation treatments were applied for one month, in order to trigger the formation of different growth rates between two groups of grapevines. Throughout the experiment, the plants were physiologically and morphologically monitored, while leaves from every part of their canopies were spectrally and histologically sampled. As the control vines were constantly developing new leaves, the water deficit plants were experiencing growth inhibition, resulting in leaves of different age at similar nodal position across the treatments. This modification of the age-position correlation was characterized by a near infrared reflectance difference between younger and older leaves, which was found to be exponentially correlated (R2 = 0.98) to the age-dependent area of intercellular air spaces within the spongy parenchyma. Overall, the foliage of the control plant became more spectrally variable, creating complications for intra- and inter-treatment leaf-based comparisons. Of the derived indices, the Structure-Insensitive Pigment Index (SIPI) was found indifferent to the age-position effect, allowing the treatments to be compared at any nodal position, while a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)-based stomatal conductance prediction was substantially affected by differential growth rates. As various biotic and

  15. The effect of differential growth rates across plants on spectral predictions of physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Tal; Hochberg, Uri; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Leaves of various ages and positions in a plant's canopy can present distinct physiological, morphological and anatomical characteristics, leading to complexities in selecting a single leaf for spectral representation of an entire plant. A fortiori, as growth rates between canopies differ, spectral-based comparisons across multiple plants--often based on leaves' position but not age--becomes an even more challenging mission. This study explores the effect of differential growth rates on the reflectance variability between leaves of different canopies, and its implication on physiological predictions made by widely-used spectral indices. Two distinct irrigation treatments were applied for one month, in order to trigger the formation of different growth rates between two groups of grapevines. Throughout the experiment, the plants were physiologically and morphologically monitored, while leaves from every part of their canopies were spectrally and histologically sampled. As the control vines were constantly developing new leaves, the water deficit plants were experiencing growth inhibition, resulting in leaves of different age at similar nodal position across the treatments. This modification of the age-position correlation was characterized by a near infrared reflectance difference between younger and older leaves, which was found to be exponentially correlated (R(2) = 0.98) to the age-dependent area of intercellular air spaces within the spongy parenchyma. Overall, the foliage of the control plant became more spectrally variable, creating complications for intra- and inter-treatment leaf-based comparisons. Of the derived indices, the Structure-Insensitive Pigment Index (SIPI) was found indifferent to the age-position effect, allowing the treatments to be compared at any nodal position, while a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)-based stomatal conductance prediction was substantially affected by differential growth rates. As various biotic and abiotic

  16. Spectral estimation of the energy-band-structure parameters of nanoparticles of potassium polytitanate modified in transition metal salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Gorokhovsky, A. V.; Tret'yachenko, E. V.; Kochubei, V. I.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Sina, J. S.

    2014-05-01

    An approach to spectral analysis of the energy-band-structure parameters (bandgap width and Urbach energy) of potassium polytitanate (PPT) nanoparticles modified by transition metals is proposed, which can provide a basis for the synthesis of new photocatalytic materials. It is established that the modified PPT samples are characterized by reduced values of the bandgap width and higher values of the Urbach energy as compared to the initial material. Possible mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed.

  17. Spectral Classification and Physical Parameters of Be Stars in the Perseus Arm with the BCD System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkouvelis, L.; Fabregat, J.; Zorec, J.; Raddi, R.; Drew, J. E.; Steeghs, D.; Wright, N. J.; Farnhill, H. J.; Greimel, R.; Sabin, L.; Corradi, R. M. L.; Drake, J.~J.

    2013-06-01

    IPHAS (the INT/WTC Photometric Ha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane, www.iphas.org) is a survey carried out, in H-α, r and i filters, with the Wide Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope in La Palma. Besides the photometric survey, the IPHAS collaboration is conducting follow up spectroscopic observations of selected emission line objects detected from the photometry. Most of the observed targets turned out to be classical Be stars. In this work we present the analysis of about 60 classical Be stars spectra, obtained with the INT and NOT telescopes in La Palma, by means of the BCD (Barbier-Chalonge-Divan) classification system. We have developed a semi-authomatic procedure, based on the BCD techniques, to obtain the physical parameters of classical Be stars, including effective temperature, luminosity class, interstellar reddening and absolute magnitude. We compare our results with those obtained for the same stellar sample with standard spectroscopic techniques by Raddi et al. (MNRAS, in press), in order to validate our procedure. Our final goal is to apply our technique to a much larger sample of Be star spectra through the northern galactic plane, in order to obtain their physical parameters and use them to trace the galactic structure.

  18. Spectral Responses in Zebrafish Horizontal Cells Include a Tetraphasic Response and a Novel UV-Dominated Triphasic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Zebrafish are tetrachromats with red (R, 570 nm), green (G, 480 nm), blue (B, 415 nm), and UV (U, 362 nm) cones. Although neurons in other cyprinid retinas are rich in color processing neural circuitry, spectral responses of individual neurons in zebrafish retina, a genetic model for vertebrate color vision, are yet to be studied. Using dye-filled sharp microelectrodes, horizontal cell voltage responses to light stimuli of different wavelengths and irradiances were recorded in a superfused eyecup. Spectral properties were assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Six spectral classes of horizontal cell were distinguished. Two monophasic response types (L1 and L2) hyperpolarized at all wavelengths. L1 sensitivities peaked at 493 nm, near the G cone absorbance maximum. Modeled spectra suggest equally weighted inputs from both R and G cones and, in addition, a “hidden opponency” from blue cones. These were classified as R−/G−/(b+). L2 sensitivities were maximal at 563 nm near the R cone absorbance peak; modeled spectra were dominated by R cones, with lesser G cone contributions. B and UV cone signals were small or absent. These are R−/g−. Four chromatic (C-type) horizontal cells were either depolarized (+) or hyperpolarized (−) depending on stimulus wavelength. These types are biphasic (R+/G−/B−) with peak excitation at 467 nm, between G and B cone absorbance peaks, UV triphasic (r−/G+/U−) with peak excitation at 362 nm similar to UV cones, and blue triphasic (r−/G+/B−/u−) and blue tetraphasic (r−/G+/B−/u+), with peak excitation at 409 and 411 nm, respectively, similar to B cones. UV triphasic and blue tetraphasic horizontal cell spectral responses are unique and were not anticipated in previous models of distal color circuitry in cyprinids. PMID:20610786

  19. Potential of the Sentinel-2 Red Edge Spectral Bands for Estimation of Eco-Physiological Plant Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenovsky, Zbynek; Homolova, Lucie; Janoutova, Ruzena; Landier, Lucas; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Berthelot, Beatrice; Huck, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    In this study we investigated importance of the space- borne instrument Sentinel-2 red edge spectral bands and reconstructed red edge position (REP) for retrieval of the three eco-physiological plant parameters, leaf and canopy chlorophyll content and leaf area index (LAI), in case of maize agricultural fields and beech and spruce forest stands. Sentinel-2 spectral bands and REP of the investigated vegetation canopies were simulated in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Their potential for estimation of the plant parameters was assessed through training support vector regressions (SVR) and examining their P-vector matrices indicating significance of each input. The trained SVR were then applied on Sentinel-2 simulated images and the acquired estimates were cross-compared with results from high spatial resolution airborne retrievals. Results showed that contribution of REP was significant for canopy chlorophyll content, but less significant for leaf chlorophyll content and insignificant for leaf area index estimations. However, the red edge spectral bands contributed strongly to the retrievals of all parameters, especially canopy and leaf chlorophyll content. Application of SVR on Sentinel-2 simulated images demonstrated, in general, an overestimation of leaf chlorophyll content and an underestimation of LAI when compared to the reciprocal airborne estimates. In the follow-up investigation, we will apply the trained SVR algorithms on real Sentinel-2 multispectral images acquired during vegetation seasons 2015 and 2016.

  20. Spectrum of one BVP with discontinuities and spectral parameter in the boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, K.; Mukhtarov, O. Sh.; Olǧar, H.

    2016-04-01

    The aim this of paper is to investigate the spectral problem for the equation -(pu')'(x) + q(x)u(x) = λu(x), under eigen-dependent boundary conditions and supplementary transmission conditions at finite number interior points. By modifying some techniques of classical Sturm-Liouville theory and suggesting own approaches we esthabilish some properties of the eigenvalues and eigenfunction.

  1. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joe; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Godfrey, Paige A.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    The physical and atmospheric properties of ultracool dwarfs are deeply entangled due to the degenerate effects of mass, age, metallicity, clouds and dust, activity, rotation, and possibly even formation mechanism on observed spectra. Accurate determination of fundamental parameters for a wide diversity of objects at the low end of the IMF is thus crucial to testing stellar and planetary formation theories. To determine these quantities, we constructed and flux calibrated nearly-complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 221 M, L, T, and Y dwarfs using published parallaxes and 0.3-40 μm spectra and photometry. From these homogeneous SEDs, we calculated bolometric luminosity (Lbol), effective temperature (Teff), mass, surface gravity, radius, spectral indexes, synthetic photometry, and bolometric corrections (BCs) for each object. We used these results to derive Lbol, Teff, and BC polynomial relations across the entire very-low-mass star/brown dwarf/planetary mass regime. We use a subsample of objects with age constraints based on nearby young moving group membership, companionship with a young star, or spectral signatures of low surface gravity to define new age-sensitive diagnostics and characterize the reddening of young substellar atmospheres as a redistribution of flux from the near-infrared into the mid-infrared. Consequently we find the SED flux pivots at Ks band, making BCKs as a function of spectral type a tight and age independent relationship. We find that young L dwarfs are systematically 300 K cooler than field age objects of the same spectral type and up to 600 K cooler than field age objects of the same absolute H magnitude. Finally, we present preliminary comparisons of these empirical results to best fit parameters from four different model atmosphere grids via Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis in order to create prescriptions for the reliable and efficient characterization of new ultracool dwarfs.

  2. Spectral Parameters of HRV In Yoga Practitioners, Athletes And Sedentary Males.

    PubMed

    Peter, Rosemary; Sood, Sushma; Dhawan, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Exercise is considered an acceptable method for improving and maintaining physical and emotional health. Although yoga is historically a spiritual discipline, a growing body of evidence supports the belief that yoga benefits physical and mental health. The objective of this study was to evaluate heart rate variability which reflects autonomic control of heart among yoga practitioners, athletes and individuals with sedentary lifestyle. The study was carried out in the departments of physiology at MAMC Agroha, Hisar and Pt. BD Sharma PGIMS Rohtak, Haryana. The study group comprised of 1200 healthy male volunteers of 16 to 55 years of age. The study group was divided into four age groups: Group A of age 16 to 25 years; Group B of age 26 to 35 years; Group C of age 36 to 45 years and Group D of age 46 to 55 years. All age groups were further divided into three categories i.e athlete (runner), yoga (yoga practitioners) and sedentary in which individuals with sedentary life style were included. The basal recording of ECG in lead II was done for 5 minutes. The Polyrite-D ECG data was used for analysis of heart rate variability by frequency domain method. Two spectral components were recorded namely high frequency (HF) component (0.15-0.4 Hz), an indicator of vagal efferent activity and low frequency (LF) component (0.04-.15 Hz), replicator of composite sympatho-vagal interplay. HF component in normalized unit was found significantly high in age group B and C in yoga practitioners and athletes as compared to sedentary individuals and in age group D significantly high in yoga practitioners as compared to athletes and sedentary individuals. Significantly decreased LF/HF ratio was found in age group B and C in yoga and athlete subjects as compared to sedentary individuals and in age group D in yoga practitioners as compared to athletes and sedentary individuals. This indicates that

  3. Aluminum-induced changes in properties and fouling propensity of DOM solutions revealed by UV-vis absorbance spectral parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghao; Meng, Fangang

    2016-04-15

    The integration of pre-coagulation with ultrafiltration (UF) is expected to not only reduce membrane fouling but also improve natural organic matter (NOM) removal. However, it is difficult to determine the proper coagulant dosage for different water qualities. The objective of this study was to probe the potential of UV-vis spectroscopic analysis to reveal the coagulant-induced changes in the fouling potentials of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and to determine the optimal coagulant dosage. The Zeta potentials (ZPs) and average particle size of the four DOM solutions (Aldrich humic acid (AHA), AHA-sodium alginate (SA), AHA-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and AHA-dextran (DEX)) coagulated with aluminum chloride (AlCl3) were measured. Results showed that increasing the aluminum coagulant dosage induced the aggregation of DOM. Meanwhile, the addition of aluminum coagulant resulted in an increase in DSlope(325-375) (the slope of the log-transformed absorbance spectra from 325 to 375 nm) and a decrease in S(275-295) (the slope of the log-transformed absorption coefficient from 275 to 295 nm) and SR (the ratio of Slope(275-295) and Slope(350-400)). The variations of these spectral parameters (i.e., DSlope(325-375), S(275-295) and SR) correlated well with the aluminum-caused changes in ZPs and average particle size. This implies that spectral parameters have the potential to indicate DOM aggregation. In addition, good correlations of spectral parameters and membrane fouling behaviors (i.e., unified membrane fouling index (UMFI)) suggest that the changes in DSlope(325-375), S(275-295) and SR were indicative of the aluminum-caused alterations of fouling potentials of all DOM solutions. Interestingly, the optimal dosage of aluminum (40 μM for AHA, AHA-BSA, and AHA-DEX) was obtained based on the relation between spectral parameters and fouling behaviors. Overall, the spectroscopic analysis, particularly for the utilization of spectral parameters, provided a convenient approach

  4. Effects of Adiponectin Including Reduction of Androstenedione Secretion and Ovarian Oxidative Stress Parameters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Comim, Fabio V.; Gutierrez, Karina; Bridi, Alessandra; Bochi, Guilherme; Chemeris, Raisa; Rigo, Melânia L.; Dau, Andressa Minussi P.; Cezar, Alfredo S.; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is the most abundantly produced human adipokine with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and insulin-sensitizing properties. Evidence from in vitro studies has indicated that adiponectin has a potential role in reproduction because it reduces the production of androstenedione in bovine theca cells in vitro. However, this effect on androgen production has not yet been observed in vivo. The current study evaluated the effect of adiponectin on androstenedione secretion and oxidative stress parameters in a rodent model. Seven-week-old female Balb/c mice (n = 33), previously treated with equine gonadotropin chorionic, were assigned to one of four different treatments: Group 1, control (phosphate-buffered saline); Group 2, adiponectin 0.1 μg/mL; Group 3, adiponectin 1.0 μg/mL; Group 4, adiponectin 5.0 μg/mL. After 24 h, all animals were euthanized and androstenedione levels were measured in the serum while oxidative stress markers were quantified in whole ovary tissue. Female mice treated with adiponectin exhibited a significant reduction (about 60%) in serum androstenedione levels in comparison to controls. Androstenedione levels decreased from 0.78 ± 0.4 ng/mL (mean ± SD) in controls to 0.28 ± 0.06 ng/mL after adiponectin (5 μg/mL) treatment (P = 0.01). This change in androgen secretion after 24 hours of treatment was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of CYP11A1 and STAR (but not CYP17A1). In addition, ovarian AOPP product levels, a direct product of protein oxidation, decreased significantly in adiponectin-treated mice (5 μg/mL); AOPP (mean ± SD) decreased to 4.3 ± 2.1 μmol/L in comparison with that of the controls (11.5 ± 1.7 μmol/L; P = 0.0003). Our results demonstrated for the first time that acute treatment with adiponectin reduced the levels of a direct oxidative stress marker in the ovary as well as decreased androstenedione serum levels in vivo after 24 h. PMID:27158926

  5. Information content in spectral dependencies of optical unit volume parameters under action of He-Ne laser on blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairullina, Alphiya Y.; Oleinik, Tatiana V.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous works concerned with the development of methods for studying blood and action of low-intensity laser radiation on blood and erythrocyte suspensions had shown the light- scattering methods gave a large body of information on a medium studied due to the methodological relationship between irradiation processes and techniques for investigations. Detail analysis of spectral diffuse reflectivities and transmissivities of optically thick blood layers, spectral absorptivities calculated on this basis over 600 - 900 nm, by using different approximations, for a pathological state owing to hypoxia testifies to the optical significance of not only hemoglobin derivatives but also products of hemoglobin decomposition. Laser action on blood is specific and related to an initial state of blood absorption due to different composition of chromoproteids. This work gives the interpretation of spectral observations. Analysis of spectral dependencies of the exinction coefficient e, mean cosine m of phase function, and parameter Q equals (epsilon) (1-(mu) )H/(lambda) (H - hematocrit) testifies to decreasing the relative index of refraction of erythrocytes and to morphological changes during laser action under pathology owing to hypoxia. The possibility to obtain physical and chemical information on the state of blood under laser action in vivo is shown to be based on the method proposed by us for calculating multilayered structures modeling human organs and on the technical implementation of this method.

  6. Correlation between spectral state and quasi-periodic oscillation parameters in GX 5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Klis, M.; Jansen, F.; Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sztajno, M.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of seven Exosat observations, the bimodal spectral behavior and the quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO)/red noise properties of GX 5-1 show a strict correlation. In one of the two spectral states (characterized by a 'horizontal branch' in the hardness-intensity diagram), strong 20-40 Hz QPO and red noise below about 60 Hz were always present. In the other ('normal branch'), no QPO between 6 and 60 Hz or red noise above 1 Hz were detected, but there was an indication for weak QPO near 5 Hz. In both states 'very low frequency noise' (VLFN) is detected below 0.1 Hz which has a power-law shape and and which extends down to the lowest observed frequencies (0.0001 Hz). The VLFN is probably not directly related to the QPO. The results are compared to those on Sco X-1 and Cyg X-2 and it is concluded that, although all three sources show bimodal spectral and QPO/red noise behavior, there is a qualitative difference between GX 5-1 and Cyg X-2 on one hand and Sco X-1 on the other.

  7. Correlation between spectral state and quasi-periodic oscillation parameters in GX 5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Klis, M.; Jansen, F.; Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sztajno, M.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of seven Exosat observations, the bimodal spectral behavior and the quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO)/red noise properties of GX 5-1 show a strict correlation. In one of the two spectral states (characterized by a 'horizontal branch' in the hardness-intensity diagram), strong 20-40 Hz QPO and red noise below about 60 Hz were always present. In the other ('normal branch'), no QPO between 6 and 60 Hz or red noise above 1 Hz were detected, but there was an indication for weak QPO near 5 Hz. In both states 'very low frequency noise' (VLFN) is detected below 0.1 Hz which has a power-law shape and and which extends down to the lowest observed frequencies (0.0001 Hz). The VLFN is probably not directly related to the QPO. The results are compared to those on Sco X-1 and Cyg X-2 and it is concluded that, although all three sources show bimodal spectral and QPO/red noise behavior, there is a qualitative difference between GX 5-1 and Cyg X-2 on one hand and Sco X-1 on the other.

  8. Line parameters including temperature dependences of air- and self-broadened line shapes of 12C16O2: 2.06-μm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Miller, Charles E.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Gamache, Robert R.

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the results from analyzing a number of high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra in the 2.06-μm spectral region for pure CO2 and mixtures of CO2 in dry air. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique has been used to retrieve the various spectral line parameters. The dataset includes 27 spectra: ten pure CO2, two 99% 13C-enriched CO2 and fifteen spectra of mixtures of 12C-enriched CO2 in dry air. The spectra were recorded at various gas sample temperatures between 170 and 297 K. The absorption path lengths range from 0.347 to 49 m. The sample pressures for the pure CO2 spectra varied from 1.1 to 594 Torr; for the two 13CO2 spectra the pressures were ∼10 and 146 Torr. For the air-broadened spectra, the pressures of the gas mixtures varied between 200 and 711 Torr with CO2 volume mixing ratios ranging from 0.014% to 0.203%. The multispectrum fitting technique was applied to fit simultaneously all these spectra to retrieve consistent set of line positions, intensities, and line shape parameters including their temperature dependences; for this, the Voigt line shape was modified to include line mixing (via the relaxation matrix formalism) and quadratic speed dependence. The new results are compared to select published values, including recent ab initio calculations. These results are required to retrieve the column averaged dry air mole fraction (XCO2) from space-based observations, such as the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite mission that NASA launched in July 2014.

  9. Non-invasive diagnostics of several structural and biophysical parameters of skin cover by spectral light reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Arkady P.; Barun, Vladimir V.

    2007-05-01

    A calculation scheme and an algorithm to simultaneously diagnose several structural and biophysical parameters of skin by reflected light are constructed in the paper. The procedure is based the fact that, after absorption and scattering, light reflected by tissue contains information on its optically active chromophores and structure. The problem on isolating the desired parameters is a spectroscopic one under multiple scattering conditions. The latter considerably complicates the solution of the problem and requires the elaboration of an approach that is specific to the object studied. The procedure presented in the paper is based on spectral tissue model properties proposed earlier and engineering methods for solving the radiative transfer equation. The desired parameters are melanin and blood volume fractions, f and c, epidermis thickness d, mean diameter D of capillaries, and blood oxygenation degree S. Spectral diffuse reflectance R(λ) of skin over the range of 400 to 850 nm was calculated as a first stage. Then the sensitivity of R(λ) to the above parameters was studied to optimize the algorithm by wavelengths and to propose an experimental scheme for diagnostics. It is shown that blood volume fraction and f*d product can be rather surely determined by the reflected green -- red light. One can find f and d separately as well as D by the blue reflectance. The last stage is the derivation of S at about 600 nm.

  10. Tissue-type imaging (TTI) based on ultrasonic spectral and clinical parameters for detecting, evaluating, and managing prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feleppa, Ernest J.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Dasgupta, Shreedevi; Kalisz, Andrew; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Porter, Christopher R.

    2005-04-01

    This study seeks to develop more-sensitive and -specific ultrasonic methods of imaging cancerous prostate tissue and thereby to improve means of guiding biopsies and planning, targeting, and monitoring treatment. Ultrasonic radio-frequency, echo-signal data, and clinical variables, e.g., PSA, voiding function, etc., during biopsy examinations were acquired. Spectra of the radio-frequency signals were computed in each biopsied region, and used to train neural networks; biopsy results served as the gold standard. A lookup table gave scores for cancer likelihood on a pixel-by-pixel basis from locally computed spectral-parameter and global clinical-parameter values. ROC curves used leave-one-patient- and leave-one-biopsy-out approaches to minimize classification bias. Resulting ROC-curve areas were 0.80+/-0.03 for neural-networks versus 0.66+/-0.03 for conventional classification. TTIs generated from data acquired pre-surgically showed tumors that were unrecognized in conventional images and during surgery. 3-D renderings of prostatectomy histology and TTIs showed encouraging correlations, which shows promise for improving the detection and management of prostate cancer, e.g., for biopsy guidance, planning dose-escalation and tissue-sparing options for radiation or cryotherapy, and assessing the effects of treatment. Combining MRS parameters with US spectral parameters appears capable of further improving prostate-cancer imaging. [Work supported by NIH.

  11. Research on the relationship between the fractional coverage of the submerged plant Vallisneria spiralis and observed spectral parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Kunqi; Bai, Yan; Hu, Yueming

    2013-07-01

    The present paper discusses the relationship between the coverage fraction of submerged plants and the observed spectral characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to validate a remote sensing technology to monitor the change in the plant composition of a water body. In the current study, the reflectance spectra of the submerged plant Vallisneria spiralis at different fraction coverages of the wetland in Hangzhou Bay were measured. The relationships between the fraction coverage of V. spiralis and simulated Quickbird normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), red edge, and other spectral characteristic parameters were established. The results showed that the spectral reflectance characteristics of submerged plant V. spiralis were mainly in the visible light (490-650 nm) and near infrared (700-900 nm). The rate of change of the blue band curve and simulated Quickbird NDVI showed a higher correlation with the V. spiralis coverage, so estimation models of the fraction coverage were constructed using these parameters. The estimated fraction coverage of V. spiralis with different models were validated with ground data, and the accuracy of estimation models was assessed. The most suitable estimated fraction coverage of V. spiralis was obtained using the rate of change of the blue band curve and simulated Quickbird NDVI. The present work demonstrated a method to monitor the distribution and dynamical variation of submerged plants at the large scale.

  12. Effects of spectral parameters on the light properties of red-green-blue white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingsheng; Zhang, Haoxiang; Zhou, Quanbin; Wang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Red-green-blue white light-emitting diodes (RGB-WLEDs) have great potential as commercial solid-state lighting devices, as well as visible light communication because of their high color-rendering index (CRI) and high response frequency. The quality of light of an RGB-WLED strongly depends on its spectral parameters. In this study, we fabricated RGB-WLEDs with red, blue, and green LEDs and measured the spectral power distribution (SPD). The experimental SPD is consistent with the calculated spectrum. We also measured the SPDs of LEDs with different peak wavelengths and extracted the spectral parameters, which were then used for modeling. We studied the effect of the wavelength and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on both the color rendering index and the luminous efficiency (LE) of the RGB-WLED using simulations. We find that the LE improves as the wavelength of the blue LED increases and the wavelength of the red LED decreases. When the wavelength of the green LED increases, the LE increases first, but later decreases. The CRI of the RGB-WLED increases with the wavelengths of the red, blue, and green LEDs first, but then decreases. The optimal wavelengths and FWHMs for maximum color-rendering and LE of the blue, green, and red LEDs are 466, 536, 606 nm; and 26.0, 34.0, and 19.5 nm, respectively.

  13. Systems and methods for measuring a parameter of a landfill including a barrier cap and wireless sensor systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Svoboda, John M.; Johnson, James T.

    2007-03-06

    A method of measuring a parameter of a landfill including a cap, without passing wires through the cap, includes burying a sensor apparatus in the landfill prior to closing the landfill with the cap; providing a reader capable of communicating with the sensor apparatus via radio frequency (RF); placing an antenna above the barrier, spaced apart from the sensor apparatus; coupling the antenna to the reader either before or after placing the antenna above the barrier; providing power to the sensor apparatus, via the antenna, by generating a field using the reader; accumulating and storing power in the sensor apparatus; sensing a parameter of the landfill using the sensor apparatus while using power; and transmitting the sensed parameter to the reader via a wireless response signal. A system for measuring a parameter of a landfill is also provided.

  14. Effects of Spectral and Temporal Variations in Gamma Ray Burst Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejzak, L. M.; Melott, A. L.; Thomas, B. C.; Medvedev, M. V.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been shown that a typical gamma ray burst could have significant effects on the Earth, including such considerations as ozone depletion and production of odd nitrogen compounds. These effects in turn contribute to processes such as DNA damage in organisms, increasing opacity of the atmosphere, and nitric acid rain. Our interest lies in the role that these processes may play in mass extinction events, in particular the Ordovician mass extinction 443 Mya. Here we investigate variations in certain burst parameters and the resulting variation in the severity of effect that the burst radiation has on the Earth's atmosphere. We extend the range of photon energies used in the model beyond the range used in previous studies, and model bursts with a number of different peak energies. We also alter the temporal profile of the radiation during the burst itself. This research is conducted with support from NASA's Astrobiology: Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology Program and in collaboration with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and with supercomputer support from NCSA.

  15. Effects of Salinity on Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Biochemical Parameters of Nitrogen Fixing Soybean Plants (Glycine max L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora D.; Kirova, Elisaveta B.; Yanev, Tony K.; Iliev, Ilko Ts.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of physiology and hyperspectral leaf reflectance were used to detect salinity stress in nitrogen fixing soybean plants. Seedlings were inoculated with suspension of Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 273. Salinity was performed at the stage of 2nd-4th trifoliate expanded leaves by adding of NaCl in the nutrient solution of Helrigel in concentrations 40 mM and 80 mM. A comparative analysis was performed between the changes in the biochemical parameters - stress markers (phenols, proline, malondialdehyde, thiol groups), chlorophyll a and b, hydrogen peroxide, and leaf spectral reflectance in the spectral range 450-850 nm. The spectral measurements were carried out by an USB2000 spectrometer. The reflectance data of the control and treated plants in the red, green, red-edge and the near infrared ranges of the spectrum were subjected to statistical analysis. Statistically significant differences were found through the Student's t-criterion at the two NaCl concentrations in all of the ranges examined with the exception of the near infrared range at 40 mM NaCl concentration. Similar results were obtained through linear discriminant analysis. The tents of the phenols, malondialdehyde and chlorophyll a and b were found to decrease at both salinity treatments. In the spectral data this effect is manifested by decrease of the reflectance values in the green and red ranges. The contents of proline, hydrogen peroxide and thiol groups rose with the NaCl concentration increase. At 80 mM NaCl concentration the values of these markers showed a considerable increase giving evidence that the soybean plants were stressed in comparison with the control. This finding is in agreement with the results from the spectral reflectance analysis.

  16. [Motivation effect on EEG spectral power and heart rate parameters in students during examination stress].

    PubMed

    Dzhebrailova, T D; Korobeĭnikova, I I; Rudneva, L P

    2014-09-01

    EEG spectral power was calculated in 24 students (18-21 years) with different levels of motivation and anxiety (tested by Spielberger) in two experimental conditions: during the common educational process and the examination stress. Before examination tests, in subjects with high motivation and anxiety level the relative delta activity power increased in right frontal (F4) brain areas. In students with medium motivation immediately before an examination the relative beta2-activity power increased in right frontal (F4) brain areas. It is suggested that delta oscillati- ons reflect activity of the defensive motivational system, whereas beta2 oscillations may be associated with the achievement motivation.

  17. Estimation of tissue optical parameters with hyperspectral imaging and spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo G.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancer and its curable precursors can improve patient survival and quality of life. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds the potential for noninvasive early detection of oral cancer. The quantification of tissue chromophores by spectral unmixing of hyperspectral images could provide insights for evaluating cancer progression. In this study, non-negative matrix factorization has been applied for decomposing hyperspectral images into physiologically meaningful chromophore concentration maps. The approach has been validated by computer-simulated hyperspectral images and in vivo tumor hyperspectral images from a head and neck cancer animal model.

  18. Estimation of Tissue Optical Parameters with Hyperspectral Imaging and Spectral Unmixing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of oral cancer and its curable precursors can improve patient survival and quality of life. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds the potential for noninvasive early detection of oral cancer. The quantification of tissue chromophores by spectral unmixing of hyperspectral images could provide insights for evaluating cancer progression. In this study, non-negative matrix factorization has been applied for decomposing hyperspectral images into physiologically meaningful chromophore concentration maps. The approach has been validated by computer-simulated hyperspectral images and in vivo tumor hyperspectral images from a head and neck cancer animal model. PMID:26855467

  19. Photoprotective Response in Plants Impacts Estimation of Biophysical Parameters Using Spectral Reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Walter-Shea, E.

    2014-12-01

    Previously, we reported that reflectance increased across the whole PAR spectrum when plants were subjected to water stress. This effect was shown to exist in maize grown under greenhouse conditions and under field conditions. Greenhouse experiments showed that, in addition to leaf water content, the effect was strongly correlated with incident light intensity. Further, through the use of an integrating sphere, we demonstrated that the change in reflectance was due to a change in absorption rather than in a change scattering or other optical path effect. Time lapse microscopy showed lightening between leaf veins analogous to effects measured by researchers observing cross sections of stressed C4 plants. To further refine our study, additional leaf level and canopy level studies were undertaken. Excised leaf sections were separately exposed to red and white light in the laboratory as the leaf dried. Increasing reflectance and transmittance were observed for the section exposed to white light, while little change was observed under red light. Each of these observations can be explained by chloroplast avoidance movement, a photoprotective response causing chloroplasts to aggregate along cell walls effectively hiding chlorophyll from observation. Chloroplast movement, for example, is driven by blue light; explaining the lack of observed change under red light. Estimation of biophysical parameters, such as chlorophyll content and greenness, are affected by the difference between the "apparent" chlorophyll content and the actual chlorophyll content of leaves and canopies. Up to 30% changes in the VARI remote sensing index have been observed morning to afternoon in field-grown maize. Ten percent changes in chlorophyll estimates have been observed in greenhouse maize. We will report on further research and on the extension of our work to include the impact of chloroplast avoidance on remote sensing of C3 plants, specifically soybean, at leaf and canopy levels.

  20. Aerosol, surface, and cloud optical parameters derived from airborne spectral actinic flux: measurement comparison with other methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Bierwirth, E.; Schmidt, S.; Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Lack, D. A.; Madronich, S.; Parrish, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Optical parameters of aerosols, surfaces, and clouds are essential for an accurate description of Earth’s radiative balance. We will present values for such parameters derived from spectral actinic flux measured on board the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) study in April 2008. We will compare these measurements to results obtained from other instruments on board the same aircraft, such as the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) for irradiance measurements and aerosol extinction and absorption measurements by cavity ring-down and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). Actinic flux is sensitive to these parameters and can be used to measure them directly in the atmosphere without in-situ sampling methods required. We will describe the specifics of the actinic flux measurements, show advantages and disadvantages of this measurement technique, and compare results with other techniques. Furthermore, we will compare our measurements with model calculations from radiative transfer models such as the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiation model, the widely used library of radiative transfer (libradtran) model, and a Monte-Carlo radiation model (GRIMALDI). Also, we will investigate satellite measurements to constrain the radiation measurements to general radiation conditions in the arctic and to compare the results to aerosol optical depth retrievals. In particular, we will show results for surface albedo of the Arctic Ocean ice surface, extinction and absorption of Arctic haze layers, and optical thickness and albedo measurements of clouds.

  1. Error estimation of spectral parameters for high-resolution wind and turbulence measurements by wind profiler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Tong; Yamamoto, Masayuki K.; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hajime; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    2014-12-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigated a method for calculating the spectral parameters from Doppler spectra collected by high-resolution wind profiler radars (WPRs). Because high-resolution WPRs collect a huge amount of Doppler spectra, calculations must be simple and fast. The proposed method has two steps. In the first step, the echo range (Recho), in which the Doppler spectrum point with peak intensity is contained and all the smoothed Doppler spectrum points have intensities that are greater than the noise intensity, was determined. For producing the smoothed Doppler spectrum, a running average with equal weight (RA) or multitaper method (MTM) was used. In the second step, the spectral parameters were calculated using the Doppler spectrum points within Recho. By comparing the performance of the computation methods using RA and MTM, we concluded that the computation method using RA is more suitable because it has better estimation performance for small spectrum widths and the calculations are faster. Estimation error of the spectral parameters depends on the determination accuracy of the Doppler spectrum peak and Recho. Furthermore, for the case of a 512-point Doppler spectrum and 13-point RA, the estimation errors tend to be independent of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the peak level of the Doppler spectrum (pest) is ˜8 dB or more greater than the noise intensity. For pest of <˜8 dB, the estimation errors are well correlated to pest and the SNR. Therefore, the number of incoherent integration times should be determined by considering the SNR and pest.

  2. Spectral, energy, and time parameters of two-photon fluorescence of 2,5-diphenyloxazole polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Agal`tsov, A.M.; Gorelik, V.S.; Rakhmatullaev, I.A.

    1995-12-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPF) spectra of 2,5-diphenyloxazole polycrystals (known in the literature as PPO) were obtained and studied as a function of the pump power and time delay. The fluorescence spectrum shape observed upon two-photon excitation is shown to be distinctly different from that observed upon electron-beam excitation. It is shown that high pump powers result in stimulated fluorescence. PPO exhibits a high TPF quantum yield, the integrated conversion efficiency of exciting radiation to TPF being 40%. The TPF decay time is measured to be 20 ns. The spectral data obtained for PPO polycrystals can be used in the development of new TPF light sources tunable in the UV region. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Fluorescent spectral studies of the toxic effect of chlororganic pesticides on the biochemical parameters of synaptosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Bekshokov, K. S.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Abdullaeva, N. M.; Israpov, E. Kh.; Gashimov, I. Sh.

    2017-04-01

    The results of the study of the fluorescence spectra of suspensions of synaptosomes, which have been exposed to a chlororganic pesticide, thiamethoxam, at a concentration of 50 MPC during different time periods, at the excitation/emission wavelengths of 290 ± 5/310-600, 340 ± 5/360-700, and 420 ± 5/450-800 nm are given for the first time. It has been demonstrated that the development of intoxication results in weakening of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan, NAD(P)·H, derivatives of vitamin B6, and vitamin A and in an increase in the fluorescence of pyridoxic acid, lipofuscin, and flavin and porphyrin complexes. The results of the spectral studies indicate that the toxic effect of the chlororganic pesticide for the functioning of living systems is based on free radical toxicity.

  4. On spectral line Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar and laboratory plasma investigations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a review of semiclassical calculations of Stark broadening parameters and a comparison of different semiclassical procedures is discussed, as well as the agreement with critically selected experimental data and more sophisticated, close coupling calculations. Approximate methods for the calculation of Stark broadening parameters, useful especially in such astrophysical problems where large scale calculations and analyses must be performed and where a good average accuracy is expected, have also been discussed. The beginning and development of line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia has been described as well.

  5. Variation in plasmonic (electronic) spectral parameters of Pr (III) and Nd (III) with varied concentration of moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Shubha; Limaye, S. N.

    2015-07-31

    It is said that the -4f shells behave as core and are least perturbed by changes around metal ion surrounding. However, there are evidences that-4f shells partially involved in direct moderator interaction. A systematic investigation on the plasmonic (electronic) spectral studies of some Rare Earths[RE(III).Mod] where, RE(III) = Pr(III),Nd(III) and Mod(moderator) = Y(III),La(III),Gd(III) and Lu(III), increased moderator concentration from 0.01 mol dm{sup −3} to 0.025 mol dm{sup −3} keeping the metal ion concentration at 0.01mol dm{sup −3} have been carried out. Variations in oscillator strengths (f), Judd-Ofelt parameters (T{sub λ}),inter-electronic repulsion Racah parameters (δE{sup k}),nephelauxetic ratio (β), radiative parameters (S{sub ED},A{sub T},β{sub R},T{sub R}). The values of oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters have been discussed in the light of coordination number of RE(III) metal ions, denticity and basicity of the moderators. The [RE(III).Mod] bonding pattern has been studies in the light of the change in Racah parameters and nephelauxetic ratio.

  6. Combined analysis of whole human blood parameters by Raman spectroscopy and spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyba, M.; Wróbel, M. S.; Karpienko, K.; Milewska, D.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this article the simultaneous investigation of blood parameters by complementary optical methods, Raman spectroscopy and spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry, is presented. Thus, the mutual relationship between chemical and physical properties may be investigated, because low-coherence interferometry measures optical properties of the investigated object, while Raman spectroscopy gives information about its molecular composition. A series of in-vitro measurements were carried out to assess sufficient accuracy for monitoring of blood parameters. A vast number of blood samples with various hematological parameters, collected from different donors, were measured in order to achieve a statistical significance of results and validation of the methods. Preliminary results indicate the benefits in combination of presented complementary methods and form the basis for development of a multimodal system for rapid and accurate optical determination of selected parameters in whole human blood. Future development of optical systems and multivariate calibration models are planned to extend the number of detected blood parameters and provide a robust quantitative multi-component analysis.

  7. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Senthilkumar; Jagan, R.; Paulraj, Rajesh; Ramasamy, P.

    2015-10-01

    Metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The crystal structure and the unit cell parameters were analyzed from the X-ray diffraction studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the grown crystal belongs to triclinic system with the space group P-1. Functional groups in bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The peak observed at 663 cm-1 is assigned to the (Co-O) stretching vibrations. The optical transmission of the crystal was studied by UV-vis-NIR spectral analysis. The photoluminescence emission studies were carried out for the title compound in a wide wavelength range between 350 nm and 550 nm at 303 K. Mechanical strength was tested by Vickers microhardness test. The laser damage threshold value has been determined using Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. At various frequencies and temperatures the dielectric behavior of the material was investigated. Solid state parameters such as plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability were evaluated. Photoconductivity measurements were carried out for the grown crystal in the presence of DC electric field at room temperature. Thermal stability and decomposition of the crystal were studied by TG-DTA. The weight loss of the title compound occurs in different steps.

  8. SDSS/SEGUE spectral feature analysis for stellar atmospheric parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiangru; Lu, Yu; Yang, Tan; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Yongheng; Zuo, Fang

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale and deep sky survey missions are rapidly collecting a large amount of stellar spectra, which necessitate the estimation of atmospheric parameters directly from spectra and make it feasible to statistically investigate latent principles in a large data set. We present a technique for estimating parameters T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. With this technique, we first extract features from stellar spectra using the LASSO algorithm; then, the parameters are estimated from the extracted features using the support vector regression. On a subsample of 20,000 stellar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with reference parameters provided by the SDSS/SEGUE Spectroscopic Parameter Pipeline, estimation consistency are 0.007458 dex for log T{sub eff} (101.609921 K for T{sub eff}), 0.189557 dex for log g, and 0.182060 for [Fe/H], where the consistency is evaluated by mean absolute error. Prominent characteristics of the proposed scheme are sparseness, locality, and physical interpretability. In this work, each spectrum consists of 3821 fluxes, and 10, 19, and 14 typical wavelength positions are detected, respectively, for estimating T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H]. It is shown that the positions are related to typical lines of stellar spectra. This characteristic is important in investigating physical indications from analysis results. Then, stellar spectra can be described by the individual fluxes on the detected positions (PD) or local integration of fluxes near them (LI). The aforementioned consistency is the result based on features described by LI. If features are described by PD, consistency is 0.009092 dex for log T{sub eff} (124.545075 K for T{sub eff}), 0.198928 dex for log g, and 0.206814 dex for [Fe/H].

  9. Evaluation of a nonlinear parameter extraction mathematical model including the term C(subm(sub delta e squared))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Shuttle flight test data were used to determine values for the short-period parameters. The best identified, as judged by its estimated standard deviation, was the elevon effectiveness parameter C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)). However, the scatter about the preflight prediction of C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)) was large. Other investigators have suggested that adding nonlinear terms to the mathematical model used to identify C (sub m (sub sigma e)) could reduce the scatter. The results of this investigation show that C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)) is the only identifiable nonlinear parameter applicable and that the changes in C (sub m (sub sigma e)) values when C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)) is included are in the order of ten percent for the data estimated.

  10. Age-Associated Changes in the Spectral and Statistical Parameters of Surface Electromyogram of Tibialis Anterior

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Age-related neuromuscular change of Tibialis Anterior (TA) is a leading cause of muscle strength decline among the elderly. This study has established the baseline for age-associated changes in sEMG of TA at different levels of voluntary contraction. We have investigated the use of Gaussianity and maximal power of the power spectral density (PSD) as suitable features to identify age-associated changes in the surface electromyogram (sEMG). Eighteen younger (20–30 years) and 18 older (60–85 years) cohorts completed two trials of isometric dorsiflexion at four different force levels between 10% and 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Gaussianity and maximal power of the PSD of sEMG were determined. Results show a significant increase in sEMG's maximal power of the PSD and Gaussianity with increase in force for both cohorts. It was also observed that older cohorts had higher maximal power of the PSD and lower Gaussianity. These age-related differences observed in the PSD and Gaussianity could be due to motor unit remodelling. This can be useful for noninvasive tracking of age-associated neuromuscular changes. PMID:27610379

  11. Orthogonal experiment and analysis of power spectral density on process parameters of pitch tool polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kai; Wan, Yongjian; Wu, Fan; Shen, Lijun; Wu, Hsing-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Mid to high spatial frequency error (MSFR and HSFR) should be strictly controlled in modern optical systems. Pitch tool polishing (PTP) is an effective ultra-smoothing surface manufacturing method to control MSFR and HSFR. But it is difficult to control because it is affected by a lot of factors. The present paper describes the pitch tool polishing study based on eighteen well-planned orthogonal experiments (OA18 matrix). Five main process factors (abrasive particle size, slurry concentration, pad rotation speed, acidity and polishing time) in pitch tool polishing process were investigated. In this study, power spectral density (PSD) based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data obtained by white light interferometer was used as the results of orthogonal experiments instead of material removal rate and surface roughness. A normalization method of PSD was proposed as the range analysis rule. Three parts of spatial frequency bandwidth were selected and discussed. Acidity is the most important factor in part 1 and slurry concentration is the most significant one in part 2; while acidity is the least influenced one in part 3. The result in each part was explained by two-step material removal mechanism. At last, suggestions in low and high spatial frequency are given for pitch tool polishing.

  12. Use of spectral imaging for documentation of skin parameters in face lift procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruvolo, Eduardo C., Jr.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Dietz, Tim; Scamuffa, Robin; Shoemaker, Kurt; DiBernardo, Barry; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    In rhytidectomy the postoperative edema (swelling) and ecchymosis (bruising) can influence the cosmetic results. Evaluation of edema has typically been performed by visual inspection by a trained physician using a fourlevel or, more commonly, a two-level grading(1). Few instruments exist capable of quantitatively assessing edema and ecchymosis in skin. Here we demonstrate that edema and ecchymosis can be objectively quantitated in vivo by a multispectral clinical imaging system (MSCIS). After a feasibility study of induced stasis to the forearms of volunteers and a benchtop study of an edema model, five subjects undergoing rhytidectomy were recruited for a clinical study and multispectral images were taken approximately at days 0, 1, 3, 6, 8, 10, 15, 22 and 29 (according with the day of their visit). Apparent concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin (ecchymosis), melanin, scattering and water (edema) were calculated for each pixel of a spectral image stack. From the blue channel on cross-polarized images bilirubin was extracted. These chromophore maps are two-dimensional quantitative representations of the involved skin areas that demonstrated characteristics of the recovery process of the patient after the procedure. We conclude that multispectral imaging can be a valuable noninvasive tool in the study of edema and ecchymosis and can be used to document these chromophores in vivo and determine the efficacy of treatments in a clinical setting.

  13. Estimates of helioseismic oscillation excitation parameters from multi-spectral fitting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barban, C.; Hill, F.

    2003-05-01

    The solar oscillation parameters, as the frequency, are usually determined by fitting a theoretical profile to the observed Doppler velocity (V) power spectrum. We present here the solar oscillation parameters determined using GONG V data as well as Intensity (I) data. To do that, we used Severino et al. (2001, ApJ 561,444) model to reproduce the following 4 helioseismic spectra: V and I power spectrum, I-V phase difference and coherence spectra. This model is based on a coherent resonant p-mode signal; two coherent background components, one correlated and one uncorrelated to the oscillation modes; and, finally, the uncoherent noise. Using this model, we have fitted simultaneously the 4 helioseismic spectra mentioned above for several hundreds modes between l=15 and 50 and for 9 GONG months rotation corrected m-average data around the solar minimum. The solar oscillation parameters (frequency, amplitude and width) obtained by this way will be presented as well as a comparison with the results obtained using only V data. The study of the background components used in the model with the aim of better understanding the solar oscillation excitation mechanism will be addressed. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG5-11703.

  14. Spin Doublet Point Defects in Graphenes: Predictions for ESR and NMR Spectral Parameters.

    PubMed

    Vähäkangas, Jarkko; Lantto, Perttu; Mareš, Jiří; Vaara, Juha

    2015-08-11

    An adatom on a graphene surface may carry a magnetic moment causing spin-half paramagnetism. This theoretically predicted phenomenon has recently also been experimentally verified. The measurements of defect-induced magnetism are mainly based on magnetometric techniques where artifacts such as environmental magnetic impurities are hard to rule out. Spectroscopic methods such as electron spin resonance (ESR) and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) are conventionally used in the development of magnetic materials, e.g., to study paramagnetic centers. The present density functional theory study demonstrates with calculations of the ESR g-tensor and the hyperfine coupling tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding tensor, that these spectroscopies can be used to identify the paramagnetic centers in graphenes. The studied defects are hydrogen and fluorine adatoms on sp(2)-hybridized graphene, as well as hydrogen and fluorine vacancies in the sp(3)-hybridized graphane and fluorographene, respectively. The directly measurable ESR and pNMR parameters give insight into the electronic and atomic structures of these defects and may contribute to understanding carbon-based magnetism via the characterization of the defect centers. We show that missing hydrogen and fluorine atoms in the functionalized graphane and fluorographene, respectively, constitute sp(2)-defect centers, in which the magnetic resonance parameters are greatly enhanced. Slowly decaying adatom-induced magnetic resonance parameters with the distance from the sp(3)-defect, are found in pure graphene.

  15. Statistical Properties of the Stokes V-Parameter Spatial Distribution of Some Spectral Lines Across the Solar DisK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshcherov, V. S.; Demidov, M. L.; Zhigalov, V. V.; Grigoryev, V. M.

    The measurements of the Stokes parameters distribution in spectral lines (the more number of lines, the better) is the most powerful and promising tool of magnetic fields and termodynamical conditions diagnostics in solar plasma. Sometimes [1] it is very important to know such mean values of V-parameter distribution over the line profile as amplitude and area asymmetries, and what is espicially valuable, - on the different positions on the solar disc. At the present paper, using the CCD stokesmeter of the Sayan observatory [2], we study the properties of these parameters as a function of center-to-limb distance and the strength of magnetic fields. A great number of data (dozens of stokesgrames of the whole solar disc) with low-spatial resolution observation (two arc minutes) are used in the investigation. Some questions of theoretical interpretation of the founded properties are discussed. References 1. O.Steiner. Flux Tube Dynamic. - 3rd Advances in Solar Physics Euroconference: Magnetic Fields and Oscillations. (Eds. B.Schmieder, A.Hofmann, J,Staude). ASP Confernce Series. Vol.184, 1999, p.38-54. 2. V.S.Peshcherov, V.V.Zhigalov, M.L.Demidov, V.M. Grigoryev. Large -Scale Solar Magnetic Fields: the Stokes V-Parameter Distribution in the Line FeI 525.0 nm. - JOSO Annual Report, 1998, p.87-88.

  16. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  17. Determination of Spectral Line Parameters in Selected Portions of the Infrared Spectrum of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Karen Keppler

    1999-01-01

    Pressure broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients due to water and nitrogen have been determined for water vapor transitions in the CO2 region of interest to Project HALOE. The temperature dependences of the widths and shifts have also been determined for selected transitions in this region. Results have been compared with values available in the literature. The line parameters have been obtained from the analysis of room temperature recordings of the spectrum of pure water and recordings of the spectra of heated water/nitrogen mixtures. The recordings of the water vapor spectrum were obtained with Fourier Transform Spectrometers at Kitt Peak and at the Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen. Up to eighteen spectra have been fitted simultaneously with a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner and colleagues.

  18. Modulation of synthetic parameters of cobalt nanoparticles: TEM, EDS, spectral and thermal studies.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Avdhesh

    2012-12-01

    The study focuses on the modulation of synthetic parameters in order to influence the size, structure, composition and arrangement of nanoparticles of cobalt. Cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by ethanolic solution of benzildiethylenetriamine in cobalt nitrate solution at 60 °C with stirring and refluxing leads to nanoparticles of cobalt. The morphology and structure of the synthesized nanoparticles of cobalt were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), QELS Data and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). Crystalline size was 20 nm determined from the sharp peak at 2θ=25 °C from the powder XRD. TEM images of cobalt nanoparticles without reducing agent having the diameter 20 nm with spherical shape and black color.

  19. Bayesian statistics as a new tool for spectral analysis - I. Application for the determination of basic parameters of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnes, J.-M.; Robert, C.

    2015-11-01

    Spectral analysis is a powerful tool to investigate stellar properties and it has been widely used for decades now. However, the methods considered to perform this kind of analysis are mostly based on iteration among a few diagnostic lines to determine the stellar parameters. While these methods are often simple and fast, they can lead to errors and large uncertainties due to the required assumptions. Here, we present a method based on Bayesian statistics to find simultaneously the best combination of effective temperature, surface gravity, projected rotational velocity, and microturbulence velocity, using all the available spectral lines. Different tests are discussed to demonstrate the strength of our method, which we apply to 54 mid-resolution spectra of field and cluster B stars obtained at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic. We compare our results with those found in the literature. Differences are seen which are well explained by the different methods used. We conclude that the B-star microturbulence velocities are often underestimated. We also confirm the trend that B stars in clusters are on average faster rotators than field B stars.

  20. Selective ensemble modeling load parameters of ball mill based on multi-scale frequency spectral features and sphere criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Yu, Wen; Chai, Tianyou; Liu, Zhuo; Zhou, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to model multi-frequency signal, such as mechanical vibration and acoustic signals of wet ball mill in the mineral grinding process. In this paper, these signals are decomposed into multi-scale intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique. A new adaptive multi-scale spectral features selection approach based on sphere criterion (SC) is applied to these IMFs frequency spectra. The candidate sub-models are constructed by the partial least squares (PLS) with the selected features. Finally, the branch and bound based selective ensemble (BBSEN) algorithm is applied to select and combine these ensemble sub-models. This method can be easily extended to regression and classification problems with multi-time scale signal. We successfully apply this approach to a laboratory-scale ball mill. The shell vibration and acoustic signals are used to model mill load parameters. The experimental results demonstrate that this novel approach is more effective than the other modeling methods based on multi-scale frequency spectral features.

  1. Spectral classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, C.

    Taxonomic classification of astronomically observed stellar objects is described in terms of spectral properties. Stars receive a classification containing a letter, number, and a Roman numeral, which relates the star to other stars of higher or lower Roman numerals. The citation indicates the stellar chromatic emission in relation to the wavelengths of other stars. Standards are chosen from the available objects detected. Various classification schemes such as the MK, HD, and the Barbier-Chalonge-Divan systems are defined, including examples of indexing differences. Details delineating the separations between classifications are discussed with reference to the information content in spectral and in photometric classification schemes. The parameters usually used for classification include the temperature, luminosity, reddening, binarity, rotation, magnetic field, and elemental abundance or composition. The inclusion of recently discovered extended wavelength characteristics in nominal classifications is outlined, together with techniques involved in automated classification.

  2. A hierarchical cluster analysis of normal-tension glaucoma using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography parameters.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyoung Won; Ji, Yongwoo; Lee, Hye Sun; Lee, Naeun; Hong, Samin; Seong, Gong Je; Sung, Kyung Rim; Kim, Chan Yun

    2015-01-01

    Normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) is a heterogenous disease, and there is still controversy about subclassifications of this disorder. On the basis of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), we subdivided NTG with hierarchical cluster analysis using optic nerve head (ONH) parameters and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknesses. A total of 200 eyes of 200 NTG patients between March 2011 and June 2012 underwent SD-OCT scans to measure ONH parameters and RNFL thicknesses. We classified NTG into homogenous subgroups based on these variables using a hierarchical cluster analysis, and compared clusters to evaluate diverse NTG characteristics. Three clusters were found after hierarchical cluster analysis. Cluster 1 (62 eyes) had the thickest RNFL and widest rim area, and showed early glaucoma features. Cluster 2 (60 eyes) was characterized by the largest cup/disc ratio and cup volume, and showed advanced glaucomatous damage. Cluster 3 (78 eyes) had small disc areas in SD-OCT and were comprised of patients with significantly younger age, longer axial length, and greater myopia than the other 2 groups. A hierarchical cluster analysis of SD-OCT scans divided NTG patients into 3 groups based upon ONH parameters and RNFL thicknesses. It is anticipated that the small disc area group comprised of younger and more myopic patients may show unique features unlike the other 2 groups.

  3. Measurements of spectral parameters for nitrous oxide near 4.56 μm using a quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Kuanliang; Zhang, Shaohua; Yu, Xilong

    2016-12-01

    Line strengths and nitrogen (N2)-broadening coefficients for six nitrous oxide transitions were measured using a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) operating near 4.56 μm. The temperature dependence of the exponent n for the N2-broadening coefficients was determined over the range 298-800 K using a sapphire-sealed optical cell. Spectral parameters were determined by fitting absorption spectra with multi-peak Voigt profiles. The line strengths for the six transitions are 0-3% larger than those in the HITRAN 2012 database, while the N2-broadening coefficients at the reference temperature are 2-5% smaller than the HITRAN 2012 values.

  4. Synthesis and Spectral Properties of meso-Arylbacteriochlorins, Including Insights into Essential Motifs of their Hydrodipyrrin Precursors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Muthyala Nagarjuna; Zhang, Shaofei; Kim, Han-Je; Mass, Olga; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2017-04-14

    Synthetic bacteriochlorins-analogues of bacteriochlorophylls, Nature's near-infrared absorbers-are attractive for diverse photochemical studies. meso-Arylbacteriochlorins have been prepared by the self-condensation of a dihydrodipyrrin-carbinol or dihydrodipyrrin-acetal following an Eastern-Western (E-W) or Northern-Southern (N-S) joining process. The bacteriochlorins bear a gem-dimethyl group in each pyrroline ring to ensure stability toward oxidation. The two routes differ in the location of the gem-dimethyl group at the respective 3- or 2-position in the dihydrodipyrrin, and the method of synthesis of the dihydrodipyrrin. Treatment of a known 3,3-dimethyldihydrodipyrrin-1-carboxaldehyde with an aryl Grignard reagent afforded the dihydrodipyrrin-1-(aryl)carbinol, and upon subsequent acetylation, the corresponding dihydrodipyrrin-1-methyl acetate (dihydrodipyrrin-acetate). Self-condensation of the dihydrodipyrrin-acetate gave a meso-diarylbacteriochlorin (E-W route). A 2,2-dimethyl-5-aryldihydrodipyrrin-1-(aryl)carbinol underwent self-condensation to give a trans-A₂B₂-type meso-tetraarylbacteriochlorin (N-S route). In each case, the aromatization process entails a 2e(-)/2H⁺ (aerobic) dehydrogenative oxidation following the dihydrodipyrrin self-condensation. Comparison of a tetrahydrodipyrrin-acetal (0%) versus a dihydrodipyrrin-acetal (41%) in bacteriochlorin formation and results with various 1-substituted dihydrodipyrrins revealed the importance of resonance stabilization of the reactive hydrodipyrrin intermediate. Altogether 10 new dihydrodipyrrins and five new bacteriochlorins have been prepared. The bacteriochlorins exhibit characteristic bacteriochlorophyll-like absorption spectra, including a Qy band in the region 726-743 nm.

  5. Back muscle fatigue in healthy men and women studied by electromyography spectral parameters and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    Elfving, B; Németh, G; Arvidsson, I

    2000-09-01

    To obtain reference data for future studies of patients with low back pain, back muscle fatigue was studied by surface electromyography at L1 and L5 lumbar levels in 55 healthy subjects exerting 80% of maximal voluntary contraction of the back extensors in a sitting position. Reference data were the initial value and rate of decrease (slope) of the median frequency during the contraction. The aim was also to study the effects of contraction time, gender differences, electrode locations and correlations with torque, age and subjective ratings. Initial median frequency was 52 Hz +/- 7.5, with no difference between electrode locations; steeper slopes were found at L5 level (-0.44%/s +/- 0.25) than at L1 (-0.36%/s +/- 0.26). No right-left differences and no gender differences were found for these parameters. A correlation was observed between slope and initial median frequency, higher for men (r approximately -0.7) than for women (r approximately -0.5). Intersubject coefficient of variation for the slope was smallest for the longest (45 seconds) recording time (60-70%), but still much higher than for the initial median frequency (14%). The torque and the subjective ratings of fatigue showed no correlation with the electromyography variables. We conclude that the same reference values can be used for men and women. Owing to the large intersubject range of the slope, the clinical use of this variable may, however, be impeded.

  6. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, Senthilkumar; Jagan, R.; Paulraj, Rajesh; Ramasamy, P.

    2015-10-15

    Metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The crystal structure and the unit cell parameters were analyzed from the X-ray diffraction studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the grown crystal belongs to triclinic system with the space group P-1. Functional groups in bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The peak observed at 663 cm{sup −1} is assigned to the (Co–O) stretching vibrations. The optical transmission of the crystal was studied by UV–vis–NIR spectral analysis. The photoluminescence emission studies were carried out for the title compound in a wide wavelength range between 350 nm and 550 nm at 303 K. Mechanical strength was tested by Vickers microhardness test. The laser damage threshold value has been determined using Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. At various frequencies and temperatures the dielectric behavior of the material was investigated. Solid state parameters such as plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability were evaluated. Photoconductivity measurements were carried out for the grown crystal in the presence of DC electric field at room temperature. Thermal stability and decomposition of the crystal were studied by TG–DTA. The weight loss of the title compound occurs in different steps. - Graphical abstract: Molecular structure of the bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate drawn at 40% ellipsoid probability level. - Highlights: • Bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystal is grown by slow evaporation method. • Structural and optical properties were discussed. • The title complex crystal is thermally stable up to 91 °C. • Plasma energy, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability are evaluated. • It exhibits positive photoconductivity.

  7. Spectral and parameter estimation problems arising in the metrology of high performance mirror surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1986-04-01

    The accurate characterization of mirror surfaces requires the estimation of two-dimensional distribution functions and power spectra from trend-contaminated profile measurements. The rationale behind this, and our measurement and processing procedures, are described. The distinction between profile and area spectra is indicated, and since measurements often suggest inverse-power-law forms, a discussion of classical and fractal models of processes leading to these forms is included. 9 refs.

  8. Extending a Tandem Mass Spectral Library to Include MS2 Spectra of Fragment Ions Produced In-Source and MSn Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Neta, Pedatsur; Stein, Stephen E.

    2017-07-01

    Tandem mass spectral library searching is finding increased use as an effective means of determining chemical identity in mass spectrometry-based omics studies. We previously reported on constructing a tandem mass spectral library that includes spectra for multiple precursor ions for each analyte. Here we report our method for expanding this library to include MS2 spectra of fragment ions generated during the ionization process (in-source fragment ions) as well as MS3 and MS4 spectra. These can assist the chemical identification process. A simple density-based clustering algorithm was used to cluster all significant precursor ions from MS1 scans for an analyte acquired during an infusion experiment. The MS2 spectra associated with these precursor ions were grouped into the same precursor clusters. Subsequently, a new top-down hierarchical divisive clustering algorithm was developed for clustering the spectra from fragmentation of ions in each precursor cluster, including the MS2 spectra of the original precursors and of the in-source fragments as well as the MSn spectra. This algorithm starts with all the spectra of one precursor in one cluster and then separates them into sub-clusters of similar spectra based on the fragment patterns. Herein, we describe the algorithms and spectral evaluation methods for extending the library. The new library features were demonstrated by searching the high resolution spectra of E. coli extracts against the extended library, allowing identification of compounds and their in-source fragment ions in a manner that was not possible before.

  9. Multistate Statistical Modeling: A Tool to Build a Lung Cancer Microsimulation Model That Includes Parameter Uncertainty and Patient Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Mathilda L; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Coupé, V M H

    2016-01-01

    With the shift toward individualized treatment, cost-effectiveness models need to incorporate patient and tumor characteristics that may be relevant to treatment planning. In this study, we used multistate statistical modeling to inform a microsimulation model for cost-effectiveness analysis of individualized radiotherapy in lung cancer. The model tracks clinical events over time and takes patient and tumor features into account. Four clinical states were included in the model: alive without progression, local recurrence, metastasis, and death. Individual patients were simulated by repeatedly sampling a patient profile, consisting of patient and tumor characteristics. The transitioning of patients between the health states is governed by personalized time-dependent hazard rates, which were obtained from multistate statistical modeling (MSSM). The model simulations for both the individualized and conventional radiotherapy strategies demonstrated internal and external validity. Therefore, MSSM is a useful technique for obtaining the correlated individualized transition rates that are required for the quantification of a microsimulation model. Moreover, we have used the hazard ratios, their 95% confidence intervals, and their covariance to quantify the parameter uncertainty of the model in a correlated way. The obtained model will be used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of individualized radiotherapy treatment planning, including the uncertainty of input parameters. We discuss the model-building process and the strengths and weaknesses of using MSSM in a microsimulation model for individualized radiotherapy in lung cancer.

  10. Pseudo-spectral control of a novel oscillating surge wave energy converter in regular waves for power optimization including load reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Tom, Nathan M.; Yu, Yi -Hsiang; Wright, Alan D.; ...

    2017-04-18

    The aim of this study is to describe a procedure to maximize the power-to-load ratio of a novel wave energy converter (WEC) that combines an oscillating surge wave energy converter with variable structural components. The control of the power-take-off torque will be on a wave-to-wave timescale, whereas the structure will be controlled statically such that the geometry remains the same throughout the wave period. Linear hydrodynamic theory is used to calculate the upper and lower bounds for the time-averaged absorbed power and surge foundation loads while assuming that the WEC motion remains sinusoidal. Previous work using pseudo-spectral techniques to solvemore » the optimal control problem focused solely on maximizing absorbed energy. This work extends the optimal control problem to include a measure of the surge foundation force in the optimization. The objective function includes two competing terms that force the optimizer to maximize power capture while minimizing structural loads. A penalty weight was included with the surge foundation force that allows control of the optimizer performance based on whether emphasis should be placed on power absorption or load shedding. Results from pseudo-spectral optimal control indicate that a unit reduction in time-averaged power can be accompanied by a greater reduction in surge-foundation force.« less

  11. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Spectral nonreciprocity induced by a magnetic field in nonstationary lasing regimes of a solid-state ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Nikolai V.; Lariontsev, E. G.; Pashinin, Pavel P.; Sidorov, S. S.; Chekina, S. N.

    2004-04-01

    It is found experimentally that the application of a magnetic field to the active element of a monolithic ring Nd:YAG chip laser in nonstationary lasing regimes can result in nonidentical spectral parameters of counterpropagating radiation waves (spectral nonreciprocity) in quasi-periodic and chaotic lasing regimes. The value of the spectral nonreciprocity depends on the coupling coefficient of counterpropagating waves, the excess over the pump threshold, and the optical nonreciprocity of the ring cavity. The obtained results are in good agreement with the results of numerical simulation.

  12. Determination of Stellar Parameters Through the Use of All Available Flux Data and Model Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanayake, Gemunu

    2017-05-01

    Basic stellar atmospheric parameters, such as effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity plays a vital role in the characterization of various stellar populations in the Milky Way. The Stellar parameters can be measured by adopting one or more observational techniques, such as spectroscopy, photometry, interferometry, etc. Finding new and innovative ways to combine these observational data to derive reliable stellar parameters and to use them to characterize some of the stellar populations in our galaxy is the main goal of this thesis. Our initial work, based on the spectroscopic and photometric data available in literature, had the objective of calibrating the stellar parameters from a range of available flux observations from far-UV to far-IR. Much effort has been made to estimate probability distributions of the stellar parameters using Bayesian inference, rather than point estimates. We applied these techniques to blue straggler stars (BSSs) in the galactic field, which are thought to be a product of mass transfer mechanism associated with binary stars. Using photometry available in SDSS and GALEX surveys we identified 85 stars with UV excess in their spectral energy distribution (SED) : indication of a hot white dwarf companion to BSS. To determine the parameter distributions (mass, temperature and age) of the WD companions, we developed algorithms that could fit binary model atmospheres to the observed SED. The WD mass distribution peaks at 0.4 solar mass, suggests the primary formation channel of field BSSs is Case-B mass transfer, i.e. when the donor star is in red giant phase of its evolution. Based on stellar evolutionary models, we estimate the lower limit of binary mass transfer efficiency beta 0.5. Next, we have focused on the Canis Major overdensity (CMO), a substructure located at low galactic latitude in the Milky Way, where the interstellar reddening (E(B-V)) due to dust is significantly high. In this study we estimated the reddening

  13. Modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the cataclysmic variable TT Ari and evaluation of the system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, K. V.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Nikolaeva, E. A.; Borisov, N. V.

    2010-11-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the TT Ari system, which is well known from published IUE and optical photometric observations, was modeled by a steady-state accretion α-disc around a white dwarf. Parameters of the system were derived from time-resolved optical spectral observations in the bright state that we obtained in Sep. 1998. The radial velocity semiamplitude of the white dwarf (33.8+/-2.5 km s-1) and corresponding mass function (f(M) = 5.5+/-1.2×10-4 Msolar) were derived from the motion of the emission components of Balmer lines. The mass ratio q(~0.315) was evaluated from the fractional period excess of the superhump period over the orbital period ɛ(~0.085), and a secondary mass range (0.18-0.38 Msolar) was estimated from the orbital period. Therefore, the white dwarf mass range is 0.57-1.2 Msolar and the inclination angle of the system to the line of sight is 17-22.5 degrees. The adopted distance to the system is 335+/-50 pc. To fit the observed SED it is necessary to add a thermal spectrum with T~11600 K and luminosity ~0.4 Ld to the accretion disc spectrum. This combined spectrum successfully describes the observed Balmer lines absorption components. Formally the best fit of the HeI 4471 line gives minimum masses of the components (MRD = 0.18 Msolar and (MWD = 0.57 Msolar), with the corresponding inclination angle i = 22.°1 and mass-accretion rate M = 2.6×1017 g s-1.

  14. Dispersive parameters for complex refractive index of p- and n-type silicon from spectrophotometric measurements in spectral range 200-2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zaiat, El-Sayed Y.; Youssef, Gamal M.

    2015-01-01

    The spectral reflectance R(λ) and spectral transmittance T(λ) of p- and n-type silicon samples, having plane-parallel faces, are measured with a UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer at room temperature. Measured data are introduced into analytical expressions to retrieve the complex refractive indices of silicon slabs across 200-2500 nm spectral range. The Wemple-DiDomenico dispersion model for real refractive index in the transparent region is used. Correlation between two atomic parameters and the dispersion constants of this dispersion model is established. Effects of doping on dispersion parameters, atomic parameters, the density of valence electrons, nv, coordination number, Nc, and the energy gap, Eg, are investigated. A dispersion model for the imaginary refractive index in the absorption region is investigated.

  15. Estimation of genetic parameters for heat stress, including dominance gene effects, on milk yield in Thai Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Boonkum, Wuttigrai; Duangjinda, Monchai

    2015-03-01

    Heat stress in tropical regions is a major cause that strongly negatively affects to milk production in dairy cattle. Genetic selection for dairy heat tolerance is powerful technique to improve genetic performance. Therefore, the current study aimed to estimate genetic parameters and investigate the threshold point of heat stress for milk yield. Data included 52 701 test-day milk yield records for the first parity from 6247 Thai Holstein dairy cattle, covering the period 1990 to 2007. The random regression test day model with EM-REML was used to estimate variance components, genetic parameters and milk production loss. A decline in milk production was found when temperature and humidity index (THI) exceeded a threshold of 74, also it was associated with the high percentage of Holstein genetics. All variance component estimates increased with THI. The estimate of heritability of test-day milk yield was 0.231. Dominance variance as a proportion to additive variance (0.035) indicated that non-additive effects might not be of concern for milk genetics studies in Thai Holstein cattle. Correlations between genetic and permanent environmental effects, for regular conditions and due to heat stress, were - 0.223 and - 0.521, respectively. The heritability and genetic correlations from this study show that simultaneous selection for milk production and heat tolerance is possible. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Line parameters including temperature dependences of self- and air-broadened line shapes of 12C16O2: 1.6-μm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.; Drouin, Brian J.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Yu, Shanshan; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Gamache, Robert R.

    2016-07-01

    Pressure-broadened line shapes in the 30013←00001 (ν1+4 ν20 +ν3) band of 12C16O2 at 6228 cm-1 are reanalyzed using new spectra recorded with sample temperatures down to 170 K. High resolution, high signal-to-noise (S/N) laboratory measurements of line shapes (Lorentz air- and self-broadened half-width coefficients, pressure-shift coefficients and off-diagonal relaxation matrix element coefficients) as a function of gas sample temperatures for various pressures and volume mixing ratios are presented. The spectra were recorded using two different Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS): (1) the McMath-Pierce FTS located at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona (and reported in Devi et al., J Mol Spectrosc 2007;245:52-80) and, (2) the Bruker IFS-125HR FTS at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The 19 spectra taken at Kitt Peak were all recorded near room temperature while the 27 Bruker spectra were acquired both at room temperature and colder temperatures (170-296 K). Various spectral resolutions (0.004-0.011 cm-1), absorption path lengths (2.46-121 m) and CO2 samples (natural and 12C-enriched) were included in the dataset. To maximize the accuracies of the various retrieved line parameters, a multispectrum nonlinear least squares spectrum fitting software program was used to adjust the ro-vibrational constants (G,B,D etc.) and intensity parameters (including Herman-Wallis terms) instead of directly measuring the individual line positions and intensities. To minimize systematic residuals, line mixing (via off-diagonal relaxation matrix elements) and quadratic speed dependence parameters were included in the analysis. Contributions from other weakly absorbing bands: the 30013←00001 and 30012←00001 bands of 13C16O2, the 30013←00001 band of 12C16O18O, hot bands 31113←01101 and 32212←02201 of 12C16O2, as well as the 40013←10001 and the 40014←10002 bands of 12C16O2, present within the fitted interval were also measured

  17. Spectral Induced Polarization monitoring of the groundwater physico-chemical parameters daily variations for stream-groundwater interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jougnot, Damien; Camerlynck, Christian; Robain, Henri; Tallec, Gaëlle; Ribolzi, Olivier; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades, geophysical methods have been attracting an increasing interest in hydrology and environmental sciences given their sensitivity to parameters of interests and their non-intrusive nature. The Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) is a low frequency electro-magnetic method that allows the characterization of the subsurface through its complex electrical conductivity. It reports the modulus of the conductivity and the phase between an injected current and a measured voltage over a rather large frequency range (from few millihertz to few tens of kilohertz). The real part of the conductivity is sensitive to lithological (porosity, specific surface area) and hydrological (water saturation, water salinity) parameters, while the imaginary part is linked to electrochemical polarizations, that have been shown to be largely influenced by the chemistry of the pore water. In the present contribution, we aim at better characterizing the exchanges between a stream and the surrounding groundwater using the SIP method and its sensitivity to pore water changes over time. Two sites from the OZCAR Research Infrastructure (French Critical Zone observatories) have been chosen for this study: the Houay Pano catchment (Laos) and the Orgeval catchment (France). These two sites have a good existing infrastructure and have been already studied extensively in terms of hydrology, geophysics, and hydrochemistry. They constitute perfect experimental sites to develop novel methodologies for the assessment of stream-groundwater exchanges. We propose to obtain a vertical description of the changes in complex electrical conductivity with depth based on SIP soundings undertaken with the multi-channel system SIP Fuchs III. We conducted a high-frequency monitoring close to a river stream (one vertical profiles every 30 min). In parallel, a high frequency monitoring of the physico-chemical parameters (temperature, conductivity, ionic concentrations) in the river stream has been

  18. Optimization of spectral sensitivities of mosaic five-band camera for estimating chromophore densities from skin images including shading and surface reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Misa; Akaho, Rina; Maita, Chikashi; Sugawara, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the spectral sensitivities of a mosaic five-band camera were optimized using a numerical skin phantom to perform the separation of chromophore densities, shading and surface reflection. To simulate the numerical skin phantom, the spectral reflectance of skin was first calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration for different concentrations of melanin, blood and oxygen saturation levels. The melanin and hemoglobin concentration distributions used in the numerical skin phantom were obtained from actual skin images by independent component analysis. The calculated components were assigned as concentration distributions. The spectral sensitivities of the camera were then optimized using a nonlinear technique to estimate the spectral reflectance for skin separation. In this optimization, the spectral sensitivities were assumed to be normally distributed, and the sensor arrangement was identical to that of a conventional mosaic five-band camera. Our findings demonstrated that spectral estimation could be significantly improved by optimizing the spectral sensitivities.

  19. The structure and vibrational spectral parameters of a complex of HF with the planar (H2CO)2 dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, V. P.; Koshevarnikov, A. M.; Tokhadze, K. G.

    2017-06-01

    Equilibrium nuclear configurations of the planar formaldehyde homodimer (H2CO)2 and the (H2CO)2···HF complex are determined in the MP2/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) approximation taking into account the superposition error of basis sets of monomers. Harmonic values of the frequencies and intensities of fundamental transitions between vibrational states of these hydrogen-bonded complexes were calculated using the Gaussian 09 package of programs. Anharmonic values of the frequencies and intensities of the ν(H-F) stretching vibration and several intermolecular vibrations in the (H2CO)2···HF trimer were obtained from variational solutions of one-, two-, and three-dimensional vibrational Schrödinger equations. The anharmonic influence of the C=O and hydrogen bond O···H-F stretching vibrations, as well as of librational vibrations of monomers, on the spectral parameters of the strongest ν(H-F) absorption band of trimer was studied.

  20. The area of applicability of apparatus for analyzing the spectral characteristics of reflection, albedo and color parameters of flat objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Peretyagin, Vladimir S.; Lastovskaia, Elena A.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    Quality control of different coatings (colorful, paint, marker, safety, etc.) that are applied to the surface of various objects (both metallic and non-metallic) is an important problem. Also, there is a problem of dealing with counterfeit products. So it's necessary to distinguish the fake replicas of marking from the authentic marking of producer. To solve these problems, we propose an automated apparatus for analysis and control of spectral reflection characteristics, albedo and color parameters of extended (up to 150 mm × 150 mm) flat objects. It allows constructing the color image of the object surface as well as its multispectral images in different regions of the spectrum. Herewith the color of the object surface can be calculated for various standard light sources (A, B, C, D65, E, F2, F7, F11, GE), or to any light source with a predetermined emission spectrum. The paper presents the description of working principles of the proposed apparatus as well as the results of reflection and multispectral analysis of different flat objects.

  1. Rainfall estimation over a Mediterranean region using a method based on various spectral parameters of SEVIRI-MSG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazri, Mourad; Ameur, Zohra; Ameur, Soltane; Mohia, Yacine; Brucker, Jean Michel; Testud, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    The ultimate objective of this paper is the estimation of rainfall over an area in Algeria using data from the SEVIRI radiometer (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager). To achieve this aim, we use a new Convective/Stratiform Rain Area Delineation Technique (CS-RADT). The satellite rainfall retrieval technique is based on various spectral parameters of SEVIRI that express microphysical and optical cloud properties. It uses a multispectral thresholding technique to distinguish between stratiform and convective clouds. This technique (CS-RADT) is applied to the complex situation of the Mediterranean climate of this region. The tests have been conducted during the rainy seasons of 2006/2007 and 2010/2011 where stratiform and convective precipitation is recorded. The developed scheme (CS-RADT) is calibrated by instantaneous meteorological radar data to determine thresholds, and then rain rates are assigned to each cloud type by using radar and rain gauge data. These calibration data are collocated with SEVIRI data in time and space.

  2. Real Gas Scale Effects on Hypersonic Laminar Boundary-Layer Parameters Including Effects of Entropy-Layer Swallowing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    Physical Surface Distance, s, for a Given Value of the Similarity Parameter, S. . 11. Logarithmic Plot of th.e Laminar Boundary-Layer Outer Edge Mach...Number Correlation Parameter 12. Logarithmic Plot of the Laminar Boundary-Layer Outer Edge Unit Reynolds Number Correlation Parameter . 0...0 0 • • • • • 13. Logarithmic Plot of the Laminar Boundary-Layer Thickness Correlation Parameter • • • • • • • 22 23 26 28 30 31 33 14. Logarithmic

  3. Spectral Discrimination of Salinity and Fertilizer Stress in Wheat (Triticum Sativa L.) using Photosynthesis Parameters and Hpyerspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S. H.; Houborg, R.; Tester, M.; McCabe, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Multidisciplinary research has long sought the ability to estimate the parameters of plant functions such as photosynthetic capacity under stress conditions from remotely sensed data. Yet, the main goal has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effects of saline water irrigation and the rate of fertilizer application on the photosynthetic response of wheat in a greenhouse based experiment. After two weeks of germination, the plants were subjected to irrigation with sea water blended with high quality reverse osmosis (RO) water. Three levels of water salinity having electrical conductivities (EC) of 0.3, 7.0, 14.0 dSm-1 were obtained by mixing sea water with RO water and plants were irrigated to approximately 70% of field capacity without excess drainage. Three levels of NPK fertilizer at the rate of null, half and full recommended doses were also employed in the experiment. The two key determinants of photosynthetic capacity, the maximum rates of RuBP carboxylation (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport based on NADPH requirement (Jmax), were obtained through standard gas exchange technique.CO2 response curves of net CO2 assimilation (An) against variable CO2 concentrations in the intracellular spaces (Ci) at constant environmental conditions were drawn and a Sharkey model was fit to the obtained data. Hyperspectral reflectance (λ = 350-2500 nm) of fresh leaves were obtained and the hyperspectral characteristics and their correlations with the photosynthetic parameters were drawn. Unique contributions from different spectral regions of the hyperspectral data were analyzed. Our results revealed that saline irrigation adversely affects some of the biochemical photosynthetic parameters while favors others and it can be reflected in shifts in patterns at various regions of the hyperspectral data. These results suggest a promising strategy for developing remote sensing methods to characterize photosynthetic activity of

  4. [On the use of the spectral speech characteristics for the determination of biometric parameters of the vocal tract in forensic medical identification of the speaker's personality].

    PubMed

    Kaganov, A Sh

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the relationship between the spectral speech characteristics and the biometric parameters of the speaker's vocal tract. The secondary objective was to consider the theoretical basis behind the medico-criminalistic personality identification from the biometric parameters of the speaker's vocal tract. The article is based on the results of real forensic medical investigations and the literature data.

  5. Groundwater Flow Model Including Deeper Part On The Basis Of Field Data - Especially Determination Of Boundary Conditions And Hydraulic Parameters-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, I.; Itadera, K.

    2005-12-01

    The final purpose of our study is to clarify the quantitative groundwater flow including deeper part, 500-1000m depth, in the basin in caldera on the mountain. The computer simulation is one the best methods to achieve this purpose. In such a study, however, it is difficult to determine the boundary conditions and hydraulic properties of geology in deeper part, generally. For this reason, we selected Gora basin as a study area, because many hydraulic data have been stored for more than 30 years in this basin. In addition, because the volcanic thermal water is mainly formed by mixing of groundwater and thermal component, the study for deeper groundwater flow can contribute the agenda for the protection of thermal groundwater which is regards as a limited resource. Gora basin, in Hakone area is one of the most famous spa (a resort having thermal groundwater or hot springs) in Japan. The area of the basin is approximately 10 square kilometers and has more than 200 deep wells. In our study, at first, the dataset of hydraulic head was created by using the stored data to construct the conceptual model for groundwater flow. The potential distribution exhibited that the groundwater flowed downward dominant. And the geomorphology can be regarded as hydraulic boundary even in deer part, that is to say, we can regard the ridge as no flow boundary in simulation model. Next, for quantitative understanding of groundwater flow, we need to obtain not only boundary conditions but also hydraulic property of geology, for example, hydraulic conductivity, K, as one of the important parameters. Generally, such a parameter has not been measured in past survey. So, we used the belief method for calculating the hydraulic conductivity by using the data of thermal logging test, which was similar to a slug test. As results of the analysis, the close relationship between K and well depth were obtained. This result implies that the K value depends on the overburden pressure of geology. That is

  6. Evaluation of intensity and energy interaction parameters for the complexation of Pr(III) with selected nucleoside and nucleotide through absorption spectral studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendangsenla, N.; Moaienla, T.; David Singh, Th.; Sumitra, Ch.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The interactions of Pr(III) with nucleosides and nucleotides have been studied in different organic solvents employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. The magnitudes of the variations in both energy and intensity interaction parameters were used to explore the degree of outer and inner sphere co-ordination, incidence of covalency and the extent of metal 4f-orbital involvement in chemical bonding. Various electronic spectral parameters like Slater-Condon (Fk), Racah (Ek), Lande parameter (ξ4f), Nephelauxatic ratio (β), bonding (b1/2), percentage covalency (δ) and intensity parameters like oscillator strength (P) and Judd Ofelt electronic dipole intensity parameter (Tλ, λ = 2, 4, 6) have been evaluated. The variation of these evaluated parameters were employed to interpret the nature of binding of Pr(III) with different ligands i.e. Adenosine/ATP in presence and absence of Ca2+.

  7. Neutrino masses and cosmological parameters from a Euclid-like survey: Markov Chain Monte Carlo forecasts including theoretical errors

    SciTech Connect

    Audren, Benjamin; Lesgourgues, Julien; Bird, Simeon; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Viel, Matteo E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch E-mail: haehnelt@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2013-01-01

    We present forecasts for the accuracy of determining the parameters of a minimal cosmological model and the total neutrino mass based on combined mock data for a future Euclid-like galaxy survey and Planck. We consider two different galaxy surveys: a spectroscopic redshift survey and a cosmic shear survey. We make use of the Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC) technique and assume two sets of theoretical errors. The first error is meant to account for uncertainties in the modelling of the effect of neutrinos on the non-linear galaxy power spectrum and we assume this error to be fully correlated in Fourier space. The second error is meant to parametrize the overall residual uncertainties in modelling the non-linear galaxy power spectrum at small scales, and is conservatively assumed to be uncorrelated and to increase with the ratio of a given scale to the scale of non-linearity. It hence increases with wavenumber and decreases with redshift. With these two assumptions for the errors and assuming further conservatively that the uncorrelated error rises above 2% at k = 0.4 h/Mpc and z = 0.5, we find that a future Euclid-like cosmic shear/galaxy survey achieves a 1-σ error on M{sub ν} close to 32 meV/25 meV, sufficient for detecting the total neutrino mass with good significance. If the residual uncorrelated errors indeed rises rapidly towards smaller scales in the non-linear regime as we have assumed here then the data on non-linear scales does not increase the sensitivity to the total neutrino mass. Assuming instead a ten times smaller theoretical error with the same scale dependence, the error on the total neutrino mass decreases moderately from σ(M{sub ν}) = 18 meV to 14 meV when mildly non-linear scales with 0.1 h/Mpc < k < 0.6 h/Mpc are included in the analysis of the galaxy survey data.

  8. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: New method to control the shape of spectral characteristics of Bragg gratings in electrooptical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamrai, A. V.; Kozlov, A. S.; Il'ichev, I. V.; Petrov, Mikhail P.

    2005-08-01

    A new method is proposed to control the shape of spectral characteristics of Bragg gratings, which is based on the introduction of electrically controlled shifts of the average refractive index. The shape of the spectral characteristics of Bragg gratings with a complex step structure of the spatial distribution of the average refractive index is calculated. The operative electric control of their shape in a channel optical LiNbO3 crystal waveguide is experimentally demonstrated.

  9. Estimation of vegetation parameter for modeling soil erosion using linear Spectral Mixture Analysis of Landsat ETM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asis, Alejandro M.; Omasa, Kenji

    Soil conservation planning often requires estimates of soil erosion at a catchment or regional scale. Predictive models such as Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and its subsequent Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) are useful tools to generate the quantitative estimates necessary for designing sound conservation measures. However, large-scale soil erosion model-factor parameterization and quantification is difficult due to the costs, labor and time involved. Among the soil erosion parameters, the vegetative cover or C factor has been one of the most difficult to estimate over broad geographic areas. The C factor represents the effects of vegetation canopy and ground covers in reducing soil loss. Traditional methods for the extraction of vegetation information from remote sensing data such as classification techniques and vegetation indices were found to be inaccurate. Thus, this study presents a new approach based on Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) of Landsat ETM data to map the C factor for use in the modeling of soil erosion. A desirable feature of SMA is that it estimates the fractional abundance of ground cover and bare soils simultaneously, which is appropriate for soil erosion analysis. Hence, we estimated the C factor by utilizing the results of SMA on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We specifically used a linear SMA (LSMA) model and performed a minimum noise fraction (MNF) transformation and pixel purity index (PPI) on Landsat ETM image to derive the proportion of ground cover (vegetation and non-photosynthetic materials) and bare soil within a pixel. The end-members were selected based on the purest pixels found using PPI with reference to very high-resolution QuickBird image and actual field data. Results showed that the C factor value estimated using LSMA correlated strongly with the values measured in the field. The correlation coefficient ( r) obtained was 0.94. A comparative analysis between NDVI- and LSMA-derived C factors also proved that the

  10. Diffuse reflectance of TiO 2 pigmented paints: Spectral dependence of the average pathlength parameter and the forward scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, William E.; Amador, Alvaro; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2006-05-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectra of paint coatings with different pigment concentrations, normally illuminated with unpolarized radiation, have been measured. A four-flux radiative transfer approach is used to model the diffuse reflectance of TiO2 (rutile) pigmented coatings through the solar spectral range. The spectral dependence of the average pathlength parameter and of the forward scattering ratio for diffuse radiation, are explicitly incorporated into this four-flux model from two novel approximations. The size distribution of the pigments has been taken into account to obtain the averages of the four-flux parameters: scattering and absorption cross sections, forward scattering ratios for collimated and isotropic diffuse radiation, and coefficients involved in the expansion of the single particle phase function in terms of Legendre polynomials.

  11. Nonlocal integrable partners to generalized MKdV and two-dimensional Toda lattice equation in the formalism of a dressing method with quantized spectral parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degasperis, A.; Lebedev, D.; Olshanetsky, M.; Pakuliak, S.; Perelomov, A.; Santini, P.

    1991-10-01

    Two new hierarchies, MILW2 and a two-dimensional nonlocal Toda lattice are constructed. The characteristic property of the first one is the connection with the ILW2 hierarchy by means of gl(2) Miura transformation. On the other hand, MILW2 equations turn out to be symmetry equations for a two-dimensional nonlocal Toda lattice. A new version of the dressing technique with quantized spectral parameter is proposed.

  12. Existence of two nontrivial solutions for sufficiently large values of the spectral parameter in eigenvalue problems for equations with discontinuous right-hand sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, V. N.; Potapov, D. K.

    2017-01-01

    The question on the existence of solutions to eigenvalue problems is treated for nonlinear equations with discontinuous operators in a real Hilbert space. Using a variational method, theorems on the existence of two nontrivial solutions for sufficiently large values of the spectral parameter are proved. As an application, eigenvalue problems for elliptic-type equations with nonlinear terms which are discontinuous in the phase variable are investigated. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  13. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Automated tuning of a CO2 laser to a required oscillation line without a spectral instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, V. O.; Gorobets, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    The method is proposed for tuning CO2 laser to a required oscillation line without a spectral instrument based on the coincidence of transition frequencies belonging to different vibrational—rotational bands of the CO2 molecule. This coincidence leads to the anomaly in the gain distribution over rotational sublevels, thereby affecting the laser output parameters. The method was successfully applied to a completely automated low-pressure, longitudinal-discharge cw CO2 laser and a pulsed TEA CO2 laser.

  14. Spectral shape parameters of pure CO2 transitions near 1.6 μm by tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larcher, G.; Landsheere, X.; Schwell, M.; Tran, H.

    2015-10-01

    Room temperature spectra of four lines of pure CO2 in the 1.6 μm region have been measured in a wide range of pressure using a tunable diode laser spectrometer. The spectra of each line have been adjusted using a multi-spectrum fitting procedure with various line-shape models, including the recently recommended Hartmann-Tran profile (HTP). The results show that the collision-induced velocity changes and the speed-dependence effects are clearly observed. It is also shown that taking into account the correlation between velocity- and internal state-changes is necessary to obtain physically-meaningful line-shape parameters. The latter are reported and discussed.

  15. Effect of Preload Alterations on Left Ventricular Systolic Parameters Including Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography Radial Strain During General Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ulrike; Base, Eva; Ristl, Robin; Mora, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Frequently used parameters for evaluation of left ventricular systolic function are load-sensitive. However, the impact of preload alterations on speckle-tracking echocardiographic parameters during anesthesia has not been validated. Therefore, two-dimensional (2D) speckle-tracking echocardiography radial strain (RS) was assessed during general anesthesia, simulating 3 different preload conditions. Single-center prospective observational study. University hospital. Thirty-three patients with normal left ventricular systolic function undergoing major surgery. Transgastric views of the midpapillary level of the left ventricle were acquired at 3 different positions. Fractional shortening (FS), fractional area change (FAC), and 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography RS were analyzed in the transgastric midpapillary view. Considerable correlation above 0.5 was found for FAC and FS in the zero and Trendelenburg positions (r = 0.629, r = 0.587), and for RS and FAC in the anti-Trendelenburg position (r = 0.518). In the repeated-measures analysis, significant differences among the values measured at the 3 positions were found for FAC and FS. For FAC, there were differences up to 2.8 percentage points between the anti-Trendelenburg position and the other 2 positions. For FS, only the difference between position zero and anti-Trendelenburg was significant, with an observed change of 1.66. Two-dimensional RS was not significantly different at all positions, with observed changes below 1 percentage point. Alterations in preload did not result in clinically relevant changes of RS, FS, or FAC. Observed changes for RS were smallest; however, the variation of RS was larger than that of FS or FAC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Corrigendum to "Enhancing endmember selection in multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) for urban impervious surface area mapping using spectral angle and spectral distance parameters" [Int. J. Appl. Earth Observ. Geoinf. 33 (2014) 290-301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fenglei; Deng, Yingbin

    2015-04-01

    Since publication, the authors have been advised of one prior methodological article not cited in our original paper. The missed reference from the paper is "Andreou, C., Karathanassi, V., 2012. A novel multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis using spectral angle distance. Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) 2012 IEEE International, 4110-4113." This reference "Andreou, C., Karathanassi, V., 2012 in proceeding of IGARSS" should be cited in the Part 3 and Table 1, whereby in the fist sentence of Part 3 and the last sentence of caption of Table 1. The following should be added (in Part 3: According to the traditional MESMA and referring to MESMA-SAD method which is reported by Andreou and Karathanassi; in caption of Table 1: Based on the MESMA-SAD method of Andreou and Karathanassi). We apologize to the authors and workers concerned for this oversight and are pleased to acknowledge their contributions.

  17. BISIP I: A program for Bayesian inference of spectral induced polarization parameters, and application to mineral exploration at the Canadian Malartic gold deposit, Québec, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafrenière-Bérubé, Charles; Chouteau, Michel; Shamsipour, Pejman; Olivo, Gema R.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) parameters can be extracted from field or laboratory complex resistivity measurements, and even airborne or ground frequency domain electromagnetic data. With the growing interest in application of complex resistivity measurements to environmental and mineral exploration problems, there is a need for accurate and easy-to-use inversion tools to estimate SIP parameters. These parameters, which often include chargeability and relaxation time may then be studied and related to other rock attributes such as porosity or metallic grain content, in the case of mineral exploration. We present an open source program, available both as a standalone application or Python module, to estimate SIP parameters using Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. The Python language is a high level, open source language that is now widely used in scientific computing. Our program allows the user to choose between the more common Cole-Cole (Pelton), Dias, or Debye decomposition models. Simple circuits composed of resistances and constant phase elements may also be used to represent SIP data. Initial guesses are required when using more classic inversion techniques such as the least-squares formulation, and wrong estimates are often the cause of bad curve fitting. In stochastic optimization using MCMC, the effect of the starting values disappears as the simulation proceeds. Our program is then optimized to do batch inversion over large data sets with as little user-interaction as possible. Additionally, the Bayesian formulation allows the user to do quality control by fully propagating the measurement errors in the inversion process, providing an estimation of the SIP parameters uncertainty. This information is valuable when trying to relate chargeability or relaxation time to other physical properties. We test the inversion program on complex resistivity measurements of 12 core samples from the world-class gold deposit of Canadian Malartic. Results show

  18. Helium broadening parameters of water vapor in the 10,200-11,200 cm-1 spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, T. M.; Solodov, A. M.; Solodov, A. A.; Deichuli, V. M.; Starikov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The He-broadening (γ) and shift (δ) coefficients of 76 rovibrational transitions belonging to the 3ν1, 3ν3, ν1 + 2ν2 + ν3, and 2ν1 + ν3 vibrational bands of H2O molecule were measured in the spectral range between 10,200 and 11,200 cm-1 with the spectral resolution of 0.01 cm-1 using a Bruker IFS 125HR FTIR spectrometer. The calculations of γ and δ were performed in the framework of the semi-classical method. It was shown that the vibrational dependence of the long-range as well as the short-range parts of an isotropic H2O-He interaction potential influence substantially the calculated broadening coefficients γ. The vibrationally and rotationally dependent analytical model for the broadening coefficients calculation is presented and discussed.

  19. Evolution of kappa distributions under velocity space diffusion: A model for the observed relationship between their spectral parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael R.

    Velocity space diffusion acting on superthermal ions whose distributions resemble kappa functions (Maxwellian core with a power law tail) will cause the distributions to evolve so that the high-energy spectral index κ is linearly related to core temperature with a constant of proportionality that (1) scales inversely with the distribution's characteristic energy, (2) is independent of the diffusion coefficient, and (3) has a positive intercept. This type of behavior has been observed in five different studies covering the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn as well as the solar wind. These results indicate the following: (1) velocity space diffusion frequently plays the dominant role in shaping particle distribution functions in many diverse space plasma environments and (2) hotter distributions with steeper spectral indices are ``older'' distributions in that they have evolved considerably from the source distribution.

  20. Including land use information for the spatial estimation of groundwater quality parameters - 2. Interpolation methods, results, and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslauer, C. P.; Heißerer, T.; Bárdossy, A.

    2016-04-01

    Two dominant processes determine solute concentration in groundwater: vertical infiltration and horizontal advection. The goal of this paper is to incorporate both processes into a geostatistical model for spatial estimation of solute concentrations in groundwater. A multivariate copula-based methodology is demonstrated that considers infiltration via the marginal distribution and solute transport via the multivariate spatial dependence structure. The novel approach is compared to traditional methods as Ordinary- and External Drift Kriging. Leave-one-out cross-validation demonstrates that the novel approach estimates better both in concentration and in probability space, and improves the quantification and quality of uncertainty. The gain in uncertainty reduction is equivalent to at least a few hundred additional observations when Ordinary Kriging was used. Both censored and not-censored measurements are included. An ideal neighborhood size is estimated via cross-validation. The methodology is general and can incorporate other kinds of secondary information. It can be used to evaluate effects of land use changes.

  1. Dependence of the dynamic speckle field spectral parameters on the force of isometric contraction of human skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Sergei C.; Tanin, Leonid V.; Vasilevskaya, Lyudmila A.; Bagrov, P. N.; Lebedeva, T. D.

    2001-07-01

    The results of an experimental study of the effect of vibrational motion of human skeletal muscles on the intensity fluctuating spectrum of the dynamic speckle field scattered by the skin are reported. It has been found by experiment that the area under the spectral curve of the speckle-optical myogram increases in proportion to the applied isotonic load until it reaches 80% of the maximum effort of the patient's brachial biceps. Further increase in isotonic load up to the maximum effort leads to a decrease in the vibrational activity of the muscle. Comparative analysis with electromyographic data has shown that traditional method fail to register this change.

  2. Differential diagnosis between Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis using integrated parameters including clinical manifestations, T-SPOT, endoscopy and CT enterography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyu; Fan, Rong; Wang, Zhengting; Hu, Shurong; Zhang, Maochen; Lin, Yun; Tang, Yonghua; Zhong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical manifestations, T-SPOT, endoscopy and CT enterography to differentiate Crohn’s disease (CD) from intestinal tuberculosis (ITB). Methods: 128 in patients with suspected CD and ITB were prospectively enrolled in the study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, endoscopic and CT enterographic data were collected. After treatment for 6 months, when a definite diagnosis was reached, the differential diagnostic value of each parameter was analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze further, parameters of statistical significance to establish a mathematical regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted. Results: Clinical parameters helpful in differentiating CD from ITB included diarrhea, night sweat and perianal disease. Endoscopic parameters were useful in differentiating CD from ITB including transverse ulcers, longitudinal ulcers, rodent-like ulcers and patulous ileocecal valve. CT enterographic parameters aided the identification of the two conditions. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of a mathematical regression model established for 6 parameters of clinical endoscopy and CT enterography were 97.8%, 96.8%, 97.6%, 98.9% and 93.7% respectively, whereas those for T-SPOT were 96.8%, 91.3%, 92.7%, 78.9% and 98.8% respectively. Conclusions: T-SPOT is useful to exclude a diagnosis of ITB. Differentiating CD from ITB is a difficult clinical problem that requires a consideration of clinical, T-SPOT, endoscopic and CT enterographic parameters for accurate diagnosis. PMID:26770348

  3. Effect of head tilt on repeatability of optic nerve head parameters using cirrus spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Lilian Hui Li; Ismail, Muhammad Amir; Yap, Sae Cheong; Wong, Elizabeth Poh Ying; Yip, Leonard Wei Leon

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the repeatability of measuring optic nerve head (ONH) parameters using the Cirrus optical coherence tomography (OCT), as well as to assess the effect of head tilt on these measurements. METHODS Thirty healthy participants with no evidence of glaucoma were recruited for the study. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, standard automated perimetry and ocular examination were performed for each participant. One eye was then randomly selected and scanned undilated with the Cirrus OCT in 3 positions (neutral, 30° right tilt and 30° left tilt). RESULTS Data collected from 29 eyes were used for analysis. One patient was omitted due to poor scan quality. The repeatability of the ONH parameters was analyzed using analysis of variance, coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference between 3 scans in a single position. There was good agreement between measurements (ICC 0.919-0.996, COV 1.94%-5.48%). Even with the presence of head tilt, repeated scans in the 3 positions showed good agreement as well (ICC 0.888-0.996, COV 2.04%-5.39%). CONCLUSION Serial measurements of ONH parameters using the Cirrus OCT are found to have good repeatability. The ONH parameters with Cirrus OCT also maintain good repeatability despite head tilt. PMID:27585788

  4. Measurement of spectral characteristics and CCT mixture of PDMS and the luminophore depending on the geometric parameters and the concentration of the samples of the special optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargus, Jan; Nedoma, Jan; Fajkus, Marcel; Novak, Martin; Bednarek, Lukas; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-05-01

    White light is produced by a suitable combination of spectral components RGB (colors) or through exposure excitation of blue light (the blue component of light). This blue part of the light is partly and suitably transformed by luminophore so that the resulting emitted spectrum corresponded to the spectral characteristics of white light with a given correlated color temperature (CCT). This paper deals with the measurement of optical properties of a mixture polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and luminophore, which is irradiated by the blue LED (Light-Emitting Diode) to obtain the white color of light. The subject of the investigation is the dependence of CCT on the concentration of the luminophore in a mixture of PDMS and different geometrical parameters of the samples. There are many kinds of PDMS and luminophore. We used PDMS Sylgard 184 and luminophore-labeled U2. More accurately Yttrium Aluminium Oxide: Cerium Y3Al5O12: Ce. From the analyzed data, we determined, which mutual combinations of concentration of the mixture of luminophore and PDMS together with the geometric parameters of the samples of the special optical fibers are suitable for illumination, while we get the desired CCT.

  5. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: II. Control of the H II Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A; Leitherer, C

    2006-03-01

    We examine from a theoretical viewpoint how the physical parameters of H II regions are controlled both in normal galaxies and in starburst environments. These parameters are the H II region luminosity function, the time-dependent size, the covering fraction of molecular clouds, the pressure in the ionized gas and the ionization parameter. The factors which control them are the initial mass function of the exciting stars, the cluster mass function, the metallicity and the mean pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the H{alpha} luminosity to the IMF, and find that this can translate to about 30% variation in derived star formation rates. The molecular cloud dissipation timescale is estimated from a case study of M17 to be {approx} 1 Myr. Based upon H II luminosity function fitting for nearby galaxies, we propose that the cluster mass function has a log-normal form peaking at {approx} 185M{sub {circle_dot}}. This suggests that the cluster mass function is the continuation of the stellar IMF to higher mass. The pressure in the H II regions is controlled by the mechanical luminosity flux from the central cluster. Since this is closely related to the ionizing photon flux, we show that the ionization parameter is not a free variable, and that the diffuse ionized medium may be composed of many large, faint and old H II regions. Finally, we derive theoretical probability distributions for the ionization parameter as a function of metallicity and compare these to those derived for SDSS galaxies.

  6. Spectral sampling tools for vegetation biophysical parameters and flux measurements in Europe: the European ES0903 COST Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovo, L.

    2010-12-01

    The estimate of carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems and the prediction of the global change impact on the ecosystem carbon balance are becoming urgent needs required by international agreements. To support the development of this knowledge, a deep insight into processes that regulate carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is fundamental. Flux towers remain a primary tool for understanding ecosystem carbon fluxes within the global flux networks. International initiatives such as SpecNet are developing to fill the temporal and spatial gap between ecosystem measurements and remote sensing by means of scale-appropriate optical measurements. In this framework, a new EU COST Action project has started in Europe. Up to now, 16 countries are participating to the Action. The COST Action project is open to researchers from European Cost Countries, but also from Near-Neighbour and non-COST countries can participate to the Action and, in some cases, can obtain some specific national funding (e.g. Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Argentina). According to the highlighted scientific questions, the objectives of ES0903 are i) to analyse the state of the art of the optical sampling research in Europe, ii) to standardize tools and methods in the optical sampling measurements, iii) to focus on the fluxes and biomass estimation problems as an input to the technological world for development of new sensors and iv) to involve the scientific instruments industries in designing and testing a common multi-band reflectance sensor for ground optical measurements in the European flux network. Thanks to the Action, the use of standardised protocols will be encouraged within a spectral measurements network, across site comparisons will be enabled and the use of new instruments and sensors will be promoted and tested. Some of the most common issues of the proximal sampling research, performed at ecosystem level, are: i)methods, protocols and

  7. Stark parameter dependence of the rest core charge of the emitters for multiply charged ions spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Šćepanović, M.; Purić, J.

    2016-03-25

    Stark width and shift simultaneous dependence on the upper level ionization potential and rest core charge of the emitter has been evaluated and discussed. It has been verified that the found relations, connecting Stark broadening parameters with upper level ionization potential and rest core charge of the emitters for particular electron temperature and density, can be used for prediction of Stark line width and shift data in case of ions for which observed data, or more detailed calculations, are not yet available. Stark widths and shifts published data are used to demonstrate the existence of other kinds of regularities within similar spectra of different elements and their ionization stages. The emphasis is on the Stark parameter dependence on the upper level ionization potential and on the rest core charge for the lines from similar spectra of multiply charged ions. The found relations connecting Stark widths and shift parameters with upper level ionization potential, rest core charge and electron temperature were used for a prediction of new Stark broadening data, thus avoiding much more complicated procedures.

  8. Study on spectral parameters and the support vector machine in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of serum for the detection of colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Li, Siqi; Yao, Jun; Song, Youtao; Wang, Deli; Ding, Jianhua

    2015-11-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been recognized as an effective tool for the analysis of tissue samples and biofluids. In this work, a total of 27 spectral parameters were chosen and compared using SERS. Four parameters with the highest prediction ability were selected for further support vector machine (SVM) analysis. As a comparison, principal component analysis (PCA) was used on the same dataset for feature extraction. SVM was used with the above two data reduction methods separately to differentiate colon cancer and the control groups. Serum taken from 52 colon cancer patients and 60 healthy volunteers were collected and tested by SERS. The accuracy for Parameter-SVM was 95.0%, the sensitivity was 96.2%, and the specificity was 95.5%, which was much higher than the results using only one parameter, while for PCA-SVM, the results are 93.3%, 92.3%, and 92.9%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SERS analysis method can be used to identify serum differences between colon cancer patients and normal people.

  9. Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters in equilibrium air including attached-shock solutions for surfaces at angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Souders, S. W.

    1975-01-01

    Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters for air in thermochemical equilibrium are tabulated as a function of shock angle for altitudes ranging from 15.24 km to 91.44 km in increments of 7.62 km at selected hypersonic speeds. Post-shock parameters tabulated include flow-deflection angle, velocity, Mach number, compressibility factor, isentropic exponent, viscosity, Reynolds number, entropy difference, and static pressure, temperature, density, and enthalpy ratios across the shock. A procedure is presented for obtaining oblique-shock flow properties in equilibrium air on surfaces at various angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral by use of the two-dimensional tabulations. Plots of the flow parameters against flow-deflection angle are presented at altitudes of 30.48, 60.96, and 91.44 km for various stream velocities.

  10. Departure of some parameter-dependent spectral statistics of irregular quantum graphs from random matrix theory predictions.

    PubMed

    Hul, Oleh; Seba, Petr; Sirko, Leszek

    2009-06-01

    Parameter-dependent statistical properties of spectra of totally connected irregular quantum graphs with Neumann boundary conditions are studied. The autocorrelation functions of level velocities c(x) and c[over ](omega,x) as well as the distributions of level curvatures and avoided crossing gaps are calculated. The numerical results are compared with the predictions of random matrix theory for Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) and for coupled GOE matrices. The application of coupled GOE matrices was justified by studying localization phenomena in graphs' wave functions Psi(x) using the inverse participation ratio and the amplitude distribution P(Psi(x)) .

  11. Apollo MEED mycology revisited and reviewed, including the Trichophyton terrestre keratinophilic growth at splashdown and 23 years after exposure to space parameters.

    PubMed

    Volz, P A; Long, J D; Veselenak, J M

    1995-01-01

    Keratinophilic Trichophyton terrestre conidia were exposed to selected parameters of space flight including 254, 280 and 300 nm UV light, full light and total darkness of space. Phenotypic isolates were grown on human hair collected from one source at years 1 and 23 after splashdown. The patterns of fungal growth on the hair, and the hair deterioration rates, were noted according to the space exposure. Growth and deterioration were consistent but slightly reduced at year 23.

  12. General integrable n-level, many-mode Janes-Cummings-Dicke models and classical r-matrices with spectral parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Skrypnyk, T. E-mail: tskrypnyk@imath.kiev.ua

    2015-02-15

    Using the technique of classical r-matrices and quantum Lax operators, we construct the most general form of the quantum integrable “n-level, many-mode” spin-boson Jaynes-Cummings-Dicke-type hamiltonians describing an interaction of a molecule of N n-level atoms with many modes of electromagnetic field and containing, in general, additional non-linear interaction terms. We explicitly obtain the corresponding quantum Lax operators and spin-boson analogs of the generalized Gaudin hamiltonians and prove their quantum commutativity. We investigate symmetries of the obtained models that are associated with the geometric symmetries of the classical r-matrices and construct the corresponding algebra of quantum integrals. We consider in detail three classes of non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices with spectral parameters and explicitly obtain the corresponding quantum Lax operators and Jaynes-Cummings-Dicke-type hamiltonians depending on the considered r-matrix.

  13. Intramolecular exchange energy transfer in a bridged bimetallic transition metal complex: Calculation of rate constants using emission spectral fitting parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.Y.; Baba, A.I.; Kim, W.Y.; Schmehl, R.H.; Atherton, S.J.

    1996-11-21

    The photophysical behavior of the transition metal complexes [[(bpy){sub 2}Ru]{sub 2}(bphb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4}, [[(tpy)(CN)Ru]{sub 2}(bhpb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 2} and [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bhpb)Ru(tpy)(CN)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4} (bpy = 2,2`-bipyridine, typ = 2,2`,6`,2{double_prime}-terpyridine, bphb = 1,4-bis(2,2`-bipyrid-4-yl)benzene) was investigated in acetonitrile solution and low-temperature glasses. Luminescence spectra, excitation spectra, and transient absorption decays of the three complexes serve to show that intermolecular electronic energy transfer from the MLCT excited state of the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the MLCT state of the tpy-containing chromophore occurs in the unsymmetric bimetallic complex. Nearly complete energy transfer from the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the tpy-containing chromophore was observed even in 4:1 ethanol: methanol glasses at 20K. A semiclassical exchange energy transfer mechanism was used to treat the available data; the Franck-Condon weighted density of state (FCWD) was obtained using parameters determined from fits of luminescence spectra. Give the FCWD at room temperature and the experimental rate constant, an electronic coupling matrix element of approximately 60 cm{sup -1} was determined for this system. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The pulse-pair algorithm as a robust estimator of turbulent weather spectral parameters using airborne pulse Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Lee, Jonggil

    1991-01-01

    The pulse pair method for spectrum parameter estimation is commonly used in pulse Doppler weather radar signal processing since it is economical to implement and can be shown to be a maximum likelihood estimator. With the use of airborne weather radar for windshear detection, the turbulent weather and strong ground clutter return spectrum differs from that assumed in its derivation, so the performance robustness of the pulse pair technique must be understood. Here, the effect of radar system pulse to pulse phase jitter and signal spectrum skew on the pulse pair algorithm performance is discussed. Phase jitter effect may be significant when the weather return signal to clutter ratio is very low and clutter rejection filtering is attempted. The analysis can be used to develop design specifications for airborne radar system phase stability. It is also shown that the weather return spectrum skew can cause a significant bias in the pulse pair mean windspeed estimates, and that the poly pulse pair algorithm can reduce this bias. It is suggested that use of a spectrum mode estimator may be more appropriate in characterizing the windspeed within a radar range resolution cell for detection of hazardous windspeed gradients.

  15. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between O and 3000 GHz (such as; wavelengths longer than 100 m) is discussed. The catalogue was used as a planning guide and as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances.

  16. Data including GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of mixed, asymmetric bilayers including molecular topologies, equilibrated structures, and force field for lipids compatible with OPLS-AA parameters.

    PubMed

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia; Skotland, Tore; Sylvänne, Tuulia; Kauhanen, Dimple; Ekroos, Kim; Sandvig, Kirsten; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-06-01

    In this Data in Brief article we provide a data package of GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of multicomponent, asymmetric lipid bilayers using the OPLS-AA force field. These data include 14 model bilayers composed of 8 different lipid molecules. The lipids present in these models are: cholesterol (CHOL), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (SOPE), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (SOPS), N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM16), and N-lignoceroyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM24). The bilayers׳ compositions are based on lipidomic studies of PC-3 prostate cancer cells and exosomes discussed in Llorente et al. (2013) [1], showing an increase in the section of long-tail lipid species (SOPS, SOPE, and SM24) in the exosomes. Former knowledge about lipid asymmetry in cell membranes was accounted for in the models, meaning that the model of the inner leaflet is composed of a mixture of PC, PS, PE, and cholesterol, while the extracellular leaflet is composed of SM, PC and cholesterol discussed in Van Meer et al. (2008) [2]. The provided data include lipids׳ topologies, equilibrated structures of asymmetric bilayers, all force field parameters, and input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp). The data is associated with the research article "Interdigitation of Long-Chain Sphingomyelin Induces Coupling of Membrane Leaflets in a Cholesterol Dependent Manner" (Róg et al., 2016) [3].

  17. Real-time monitoring of process parameters in rice wine fermentation by a portable spectral analytical system combined with multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Pan, Wenxiu; Chen, Quansheng

    2016-01-01

    A portable and low-cost spectral analytical system was developed and used to monitor real-time process parameters, i.e. total sugar content (TSC), alcohol content (AC) and pH during rice wine fermentation. Various partial least square (PLS) algorithms were implemented to construct models. The performance of a model was evaluated by the correlation coefficient (Rp) and the root mean square error (RMSEP) in the prediction set. Among the models used, the synergy interval PLS (Si-PLS) was found to be superior. The optimal performance by the Si-PLS model for the TSC was Rp = 0.8694, RMSEP = 0.438; the AC was Rp = 0.8097, RMSEP = 0.617; and the pH was Rp = 0.9039, RMSEP = 0.0805. The stability and reliability of the system, as well as the optimal models, were verified using coefficients of variation, most of which were found to be less than 5%. The results suggest this portable system is a promising tool that could be used as an alternative method for rapid monitoring of process parameters during rice wine fermentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Recommended Procedure for Estimating the Cosmic-Ray Spectral Parameter of a Simple Power Law With Applications to Detector Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2001-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index alpha-1 is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV. Two procedures for estimating alpha-1 the method of moments and maximum likelihood (ML), are developed and their statistical performance compared. It is concluded that the ML procedure attains the most desirable statistical properties and is hence the recommended statistical estimation procedure for estimating alpha-1. The ML procedure is then generalized for application to a set of real cosmic-ray data and thereby makes this approach applicable to existing cosmic-ray data sets. Several other important results, such as the relationship between collecting power and detector energy resolution, as well as inclusion of a non-Gaussian detector response function, are presented. These results have many practical benefits in the design phase of a cosmic-ray detector as they permit instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of one of the science objectives. This is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of caffeine in the microcirculation and edema on thighs and buttocks using the orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and clinical parameters.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar; Semenovitch, Ivan Jorge; Treu, Curt; Bottino, Daniel; Bouskela, Eliete

    2007-06-01

    Gynoid lipodystrophy, also known as cellulite, is a common multifactorial entity that affects millions of women around the world. There have been few scientific articles dealing with its physiology and treatment in the past few years, and vascular changes seem to play an important role in its pathophysiology. Skin microvascular alterations can be observed noninvasively with a new method called orthogonal polarization spectral imaging, which was used to evaluate the effectiveness of an anticellulite drug composed mainly of a 7% caffeine solution. Microcirculatory parameters evaluated were functional capillary density (FCD; number of flowing capillaries per unit area), diameter of the dermic papilla (DPD), and capillary diameter (CD). The clinical parameters analyzed were centimetrical measurements of thighs and hips and the influence of tobacco, alcohol, and physical activities on the efficacy of the treatment. After 1 month of treatment, statistical application of chi-squared and Z approximation tests showed, in treated patients, statistically significant reduction of thigh circumferences in more than 80% of the cases and reduction of hip circumference in 67.7%. FCD, DPD, and CD did not change significantly after treatment. Smoking as well as alcohol consumption and regular physical activity were not significantly related to the centimetrical reduction observed in treated thighs and hips.

  20. Spectral P-wave magnitudes, magnitude spectra and other source parameters for the 1990 southern Sudan and the 2005 Lake Tanganyika earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Hesham Hussein Mohamed

    2008-10-01

    Teleseismic Broadband seismograms of P-waves from the May 1990 southern Sudan and the December, 2005 Lake Tanganyika earthquakes; the western branch of the East African Rift System at different azimuths have been investigated on the basis of magnitude spectra. The two earthquakes are the largest shocks in the East African Rift System and its extension in southern Sudan. Focal mechanism solutions along with geological evidences suggest that the first event represents a complex style of the deformation at the intersection of the northern branch of the western branch of the East African Rift and Aswa Shear Zone while the second one represents the current tensional stress on the East African Rift. The maximum average spectral magnitude for the first event is determined to be 6.79 at 4 s period compared to 6.33 at 4 s period for the second event. The other source parameters for the two earthquakes were also estimated. The first event had a seismic moment over fourth that of the second one. The two events are radiated from patches of faults having radii of 13.05 and 7.85 km, respectively. The average displacement and stress drop are estimated to be 0.56 m and 1.65 MPa for the first event and 0.43 m and 2.20 MPa for the second one. The source parameters that describe inhomogeneity of the fault are also determined from the magnitude spectra. These additional parameters are complexity, asperity radius, displacements across the asperity and ambient stress drop. Both events produce moderate rupture complexity. Compared to the second event, the first event is characterized by relatively higher complexity, a low average stress drop and a high ambient stress. A reasonable explanation for the variations in these parameters may suggest variation in the strength of the seismogenic fault which provides the relations between the different source parameters. The values of stress drops and the ambient stresses estimated for both events indicate that these earthquakes are of interplate

  1. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  2. Prediction of oxidation parameters of purified Kilka fish oil including gallic acid and methyl gallate by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Asnaashari, Maryam; Farhoosh, Reza; Farahmandfar, Reza

    2016-10-01

    As a result of concerns regarding possible health hazards of synthetic antioxidants, gallic acid and methyl gallate may be introduced as natural antioxidants to improve oxidative stability of marine oil. Since conventional modelling could not predict the oxidative parameters precisely, artificial neural network (ANN) and neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) modelling with three inputs, including type of antioxidant (gallic acid and methyl gallate), temperature (35, 45 and 55 °C) and concentration (0, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 mg L(-1) ) and four outputs containing induction period (IP), slope of initial stage of oxidation curve (k1 ) and slope of propagation stage of oxidation curve (k2 ) and peroxide value at the IP (PVIP ) were performed to predict the oxidation parameters of Kilka oil triacylglycerols and were compared to multiple linear regression (MLR). The results showed ANFIS was the best model with high coefficient of determination (R(2)  = 0.99, 0.99, 0.92 and 0.77 for IP, k1 , k2 and PVIP , respectively). So, the RMSE and MAE values for IP were 7.49 and 4.92 in ANFIS model. However, they were to be 15.95 and 10.88 and 34.14 and 3.60 for the best MLP structure and MLR, respectively. So, MLR showed the minimum accuracy among the constructed models. Sensitivity analysis based on the ANFIS model suggested a high sensitivity of oxidation parameters, particularly the induction period on concentrations of gallic acid and methyl gallate due to their high antioxidant activity to retard oil oxidation and enhanced Kilka oil shelf life. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. X-ray spectral measurement of high-temperature plasma parameters in porous targets irradiated with high-power laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V V; Gol'tsov, A Yu; Koval'skii, N G; Koptyaev, S N; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya

    2001-12-31

    The X-ray spectra of multiply charged ions were recorded from planar agar (C{sub 12}H{sub 18}O{sub 9}){sub n} based targets with an average density of 2 mg cm{sup -3} irradiated by high-power laser pulses ({lambda}=1.054 {mu}m, {tau}=2.5 ns, I {approx} 5 x10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}). The spectra were recorded with a high spectral and spatial resolution employing spherically bent (focusing) crystals of mica and quartz. An analysis of the experimental data obtained by the irradiation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped agar samples allowed us to determine the main parameters of the plasma produced inside the targets. The ion temperature of plasma in low-density porous targets was estimated for the first time to be 1.5 - 2 times higher than the electron temperature. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  4. Size-dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for photon-counting spectral CT system in pediatric imaging: simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Xu, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We are developing a photon-counting spectral CT detector with a small pixel size of 0.4× 0.5 mm2, offering a potential advantage for better visualization of small structures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient size dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for pediatric CT in two imaging cases: adipose imaging and iodinated blood imaging. Cylindrical soft-tissue phantoms of diameters between 10-25 cm were used to mimic patients of different ages from 0 to 15 y. For adipose imaging, a 5 mm diameter adipose sphere was assumed as an imaging target, while in the case of iodinated imaging, an iodinated blood sphere of 1 mm in diameter was assumed. By applying the geometry of a commercial CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT), simulations were carried out to calculate the detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2} , with tube potentials varying from 40 to 140 kVp. The optimal kVp for each phantom in each imaging case was determined such that the dose-normalized detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2}/ dose, is maximized. With the assumption that the detectability index in pediatric imaging is required the same as in typical adult imaging, the value of mAs at optimal kVp for each phantom was selected to achieve a reference detectability index that was obtained by scanning an adult phantom (30 cm in diameter) in a typical adult CT procedure (120 kVp and 200 mAs) using a modeled energy-integrating system. For adipose imaging, the optimal kVps are 50, 60, 80, and 120 kVp, respectively, for phantoms of 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm in diameter. The corresponding mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability index are only 9%, 23%, 24%, and 54% of the mAs that is used for adult patients at 120 kVp, for 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm diameter phantoms, respectively. In the case of iodinated imaging, a tube potential of 60 kVp was found optimal for all phantoms investigated, and the mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability

  5. Size-dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for photon-counting spectral CT system in pediatric imaging: simulation study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Xu, Cheng

    2016-06-07

    We are developing a photon-counting spectral CT detector with a small pixel size of [Formula: see text] mm(2), offering a potential advantage for better visualization of small structures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient size dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for pediatric CT in two imaging cases: adipose imaging and iodinated blood imaging. Cylindrical soft-tissue phantoms of diameters between 10-25 cm were used to mimic patients of different ages from 0 to 15 y. For adipose imaging, a 5 mm diameter adipose sphere was assumed as an imaging target, while in the case of iodinated imaging, an iodinated blood sphere of 1 mm in diameter was assumed. By applying the geometry of a commercial CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT), simulations were carried out to calculate the detectability index, [Formula: see text], with tube potentials varying from 40 to 140 kVp. The optimal kVp for each phantom in each imaging case was determined such that the dose-normalized detectability index, [Formula: see text]dose, is maximized. With the assumption that the detectability index in pediatric imaging is required the same as in typical adult imaging, the value of mAs at optimal kVp for each phantom was selected to achieve a reference detectability index that was obtained by scanning an adult phantom (30 cm in diameter) in a typical adult CT procedure (120 kVp and 200 mAs) using a modeled energy-integrating system. For adipose imaging, the optimal kVps are 50, 60, 80, and 120 kVp, respectively, for phantoms of 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm in diameter. The corresponding mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability index are only 9%, 23%, 24%, and 54% of the mAs that is used for adult patients at 120 kVp, for 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm diameter phantoms, respectively. In the case of iodinated imaging, a tube potential of 60 kVp was found optimal for all phantoms investigated, and the mAs values required to achieve the reference

  6. The effect of variations in relative spectral response on the retrieval of land surface parameters from multiple sources of remotely sensed imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.J.; Chander, G.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) images , collected over Sioux Falls, South Dakota, were used to quantify the effect of spectral response on different surface materials and to develop spectral "figures-of-merit" for spectral responses covering similar, but not identical spectral bands. In this simulation, AVIRIS images were converted to radiance, then spectrally resampled to six wavelength bands commonly used for terrestrial observation. Preliminary results indicate that differences between the simulations can be attributed to variations in surface reflectance within spectral bands, and suggest influences due to water vapor absorption. Radiance simulated from the spectrally narrow Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Relative Spectral Responses (RSR) was generally higher than that using the broader Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) RSRs over most targets encountered over the test area. This is consistent with many MODIS bands being biased toward shorter wavelengths compared to corresponding ETM+ bands when viewing targets whose radiance decreases with wavelength. In some cases the higher radiance values appeared to occur where the MODIS RSR is better situated over peak reflected wavelengths. Simulation differences between MODIS & ETM+ bands in the near-infrared indicated higher MODIS radiance values that suggest the influence of water vapor absorption at 820 nanometers. This result agreed with water vapor values retrieved from the AVIRIS images themselves at around 2.7 cm precipitable water, and measurements made at a nearby AERONET node at around 2.8cm during the AVIRIS overflight ?? 2007 IEEE.

  7. Modified spectral count index (mSCI) for estimation of protein abundance by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro): a new proteomic technological parameter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Chunping; Yang, Dong; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-11-01

    Peptides Count (SC) was widely used for protein abundance estimation in proteomics. On the basis of that, Mann and co-workers corrected the SC by dividing spectrum counts by the number of observable peptides per protein and named it PAI. Here we present modified spectral count index (mSCI) for protein abundance estimation, which was defined as the number of observed peptides divided by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro). RIPpro was derived from 6788 mRNA and protein expression data (collected from human liver samples) and related to proteins' three physical and chemical properties (MW/pI/Hp). For 46 proteins in mouse neuro2a cells, mSCI shows a linear relationship with the actual protein concentration, similar or better than PAI abundance. Also, multiple linear regressions were performed to quantitative assess several factors' impact on the mRNA/protein abundance correlation. Our results shown that the primary factor affecting protein levels was mRNA abundance (32-37%), followed by variability in protein measurement, MW and protein turnover (7-12%,7-9% and 2-3%, respectively). Interestingly, we found that the concordance between mRNA transcripts and protein expression was not consistent among all protein functional categories. This correlation was lower for signaling proteins as compared to metabolism genes. It was determined that RIPpro was the primary factor affecting signaling protein abundance (23% on average), followed by mRNA abundance (17%). In contrast, only 5% (on average) of the variability of metabolic protein abundance was explained by RIPpro, much lower than mRNA abundance (40%). These results provide the impetus for further investigation of the biological significance of mechanisms regulating the mRNA/protein abundance correlation and provide additional insight into the relative importance of the technological parameter (RIPpro) in mRNA/protein correlation research.

  8. Improvements in Nimbus 7 limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere ozone profiles as obtained with updated spectral line parameters and radiance algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, Ellis; Burton, John; Gordley, Larry; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Bhatt, Praful; Miles, Thomas

    1995-08-01

    Ozone distributions from the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment of 1978-1979 are generally in good agreement with other concurrent ozone measurements in the middle and upper stratosphere, but not at lower altitudes. LIMS ozone is too large below about the 15-hPa (or millibar) level, particularly at lower latitudes. A new LIMS ozone distribution is presented for 1 day of profiles, May 5, 1979, obtained with an improved forward radiance algorithm and using the spectral line parameters for the 9- to 10-μm region in the HITRAN 92 compilation. However, we also divided our single day of retrieved ozone mixing ratio profiles by a suggested factor of 1.051, which makes them compatible with the ozone distributions from several of the UARS experiments. Our revised distribution still agrees with the archived LIMS ozone to better than ±5% above about the 15-hPa level, but there is a significant decrease for the revised ozone in the lower stratosphere. That decrease approaches 25% at 50 hPa in the tropics. In general, the revised LIMS ozone is now in accord with the comparison data sets for the stratosphere, except for the lowest levels (Umkehr layer 3 or 63-127 hPa), where the effects of interfering species and small biases in LIMS temperatures are most pronounced. It is concluded that the current 9- to 10-μm ozone line list is adequate for obtaining good quality ozone mixing ratio profiles from satellite broadband limb-infrared measurements.

  9. Semi-supervised segmentation of multispectral remote sensing image based on spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangrong; Wang, Ting; Jiao, Licheng; Yang, Chun

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, a new multi-spectral remote sensing image segmentation method based on multi-parameter semi-supervised spectral clustering (STS3C) is proposed. Two types of instance-level constraints: must-link and cannot-link are incorporated into spectral cluster to construct semi-supervised spectral clustering in which the self-tuning parameter is applied to avoid the selection of the scaling parameter. Further, when STS3C is applied to multi-spectral remote sensing image segmentation, the uniform sampling technique combined with nearest neighbor rule is used to reduce the computation complexity. Segmentation results show that STS3C outperforms the semi-supervised spectral clustering with fixed parameter and the well-known clustering methods including k-means and FCM in multi-spectral remote sensing image segmentation.

  10. Arrange and average algorithm for the retrieval of aerosol parameters from multiwavelength high-spectral-resolution lidar/Raman lidar data.

    PubMed

    Chemyakin, Eduard; Müller, Detlef; Burton, Sharon; Kolgotin, Alexei; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of a feasibility study in which a simple, automated, and unsupervised algorithm, which we call the arrange and average algorithm, is used to infer microphysical parameters (complex refractive index, effective radius, total number, surface area, and volume concentrations) of atmospheric aerosol particles. The algorithm uses backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm as input information. Testing of the algorithm is based on synthetic optical data that are computed from prescribed monomodal particle size distributions and complex refractive indices that describe spherical, primarily fine mode pollution particles. We tested the performance of the algorithm for the "3 backscatter (β)+2 extinction (α)" configuration of a multiwavelength aerosol high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) or Raman lidar. We investigated the degree to which the microphysical results retrieved by this algorithm depends on the number of input backscatter and extinction coefficients. For example, we tested "3β+1α," "2β+1α," and "3β" lidar configurations. This arrange and average algorithm can be used in two ways. First, it can be applied for quick data processing of experimental data acquired with lidar. Fast automated retrievals of microphysical particle properties are needed in view of the enormous amount of data that can be acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center's airborne "3β+2α" High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). It would prove useful for the growing number of ground-based multiwavelength lidar networks, and it would provide an option for analyzing the vast amount of optical data acquired with a future spaceborne multiwavelength lidar. The second potential application is to improve the microphysical particle characterization with our existing inversion algorithm that uses Tikhonov's inversion with regularization. This advanced algorithm has recently undergone development to allow automated and

  11. DC parameter extraction of equivalent circuit model in InGaAsSb heterojunction bipolar transistors including non-ideal effects in the base region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yang-Hua; Cheng, Zong-Tai

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the DC parameter extraction of the equivalent circuit model in an InP-InGaAsSb double heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). The non-ideal collector current is modeled by a non-ideal doping distribution in the base region. Then several consequent non-ideal effects, which have always been neglected in typical HBTs, are studied using Medici device simulator. Moreover, the associated DC parameters of VBIC model are extracted accordingly. The equivalent circuit model is in good agreement with the measured data in I C- V CE characteristics.

  12. Determination of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling parameters in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor structure including oxide field correction using a vertical optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, S.; Ouennoughi, Z.; Strenger, K. C.; Frey, L.

    2016-08-01

    Current conduction mechanisms through a Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor structure are characterized via Fowler-Nordheim (FN) plots. The extraction of the FN parameters like the electron/hole effective mass in oxide mox and in semiconductor msc, the barrier height at the semiconductor-oxide interface ϕB, and the correction oxide voltage Vcorr for a MOS structure is made using a vertical optimization process on the current density without any assumption about ϕB or mox. An excellent agreement is obtained between the FN plots calculated with the FN parameters extracted using a vertical optimization process with the experimental one.

  13. Diurnal patterns of wheat spectral reflectances and their importance in the assessment of canopy parameters from remotely sensed observations. [Phoenix, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinter, P. J.; Jackson, R. D.; Idso, S. B.; Reginato, R. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Spectral reflectances of Produra wheat were measured at 13 different times of the day at Phoenix, Arizona, during April 1979 using a nadir-oriented hand-held 4-band radiometer which had bandpass characteristics similar to those on LANDSAT satellites. Different Sun altitude and azimuth angles caused significant diurnal changes in radiant return in both visible and near-IR regions of the spectrum and in several vegetation indices derived from them. The magnitude of these changes were related to different canopy architecture, percent cover and green leaf area conditions. Spectral measurements taken at each time period were well correlated with green leaf area index but the nature of the relationship changed significantly with time of day. Thus, a significant bias in the estimation of the green leaf area index from remotely sensed spectral data could occur if sun angles are not properly accounted for.

  14. An analysis of the effect of biological and physical parameters of a wetlands grass biome on the spectral modeling of phytomass and primary productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K.; Frick, A.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft simulated thematic mapper data and field data were acquired in the fall and spring to analyze the relationship of spectral response and biomass for the marsh grass Spartina patens. Regression results indicate no simple relationship exists for TMS spectral response and biomass with a high R sq. However, results show a consistent relationship between spectral response and the percent live vegetation (by weight) and percent interstitial standing surface water (by area) as independent variables. It is suggested that the reflected energy of a pixel represents a mixture of surface constituents. It is recommended that alternative remote sensors be employed to account for the pixel constituents of live and dead vegetation, litter, and standing water.

  15. An analysis of the effect of biological and physical parameters of a wetlands grass biome on the spectral modeling of phytomass and primary productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K.; Frick, A.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft simulated thematic mapper data and field data were acquired in the fall and spring to analyze the relationship of spectral response and biomass for the marsh grass Spartina patens. Regression results indicate no simple relationship exists for TMS spectral response and biomass with a high R sq. However, results show a consistent relationship between spectral response and the percent live vegetation (by weight) and percent interstitial standing surface water (by area) as independent variables. It is suggested that the reflected energy of a pixel represents a mixture of surface constituents. It is recommended that alternative remote sensors be employed to account for the pixel constituents of live and dead vegetation, litter, and standing water.

  16. [Study on second filtering algorithm based on tracing the interfering spectral peaks of radar non-contact life-parameter detection system].

    PubMed

    Lu, Guohua; Yang, Guosheng; Wang, Jianqi; Ni, Ansheng; Jing, Xijing

    2006-08-01

    To develop a filtering algorithm which could trace the spectral peaks of the interference and which was used to extract the breath signal with the same band interference in radar non-contact life-detecting system, second filtering algorithm was studied. Through first filtering,the probable interfering spectral peaks (ISP) could be detected by Yule-Walker spectrum estimating and could be located by calculating the coefficients of normalized cross-correlation function according to standard breath signal. Thus the breath signal could be extracted through a second filtering. By using the second filtering algorithm (SFA), the same band interfering spectral peaks with breath signal could be recognized and inhibited. So we conclude that the same band mono-ISP could be inhibited by using SFA and breath signals could be effectively extracted.

  17. Assessment of total- and partial-body irradiation in a baboon model: preliminary results of a kinetic study including clinical, physical, and biological parameters.

    PubMed

    Hérodin, Francis; Richard, Sandrine; Grenier, Nancy; Arvers, Philippe; Gérome, Patrick; Baugé, Stéphane; Denis, Josiane; Chaussard, Hervé; Gouard, Stéphane; Mayol, Jean-François; Agay, Diane; Drouet, Michel

    2012-08-01

    This biodosimetry study used irradiated baboons to investigate the efficacy of a kinetic multiparameter (clinical, physical, and biological) approach for discriminating partial-body irradiation (PBI) and total-body irradiation (TBI). Animals were unilaterally (front) exposed to 60Co gamma rays (8 to 32 cGy min) using either TBI or vertical left hemi-body irradiation (HBI), as follows: 2.5 Gy TBI (n = 2), 5 Gy TBI (n = 2), 5 Gy HBI (n = 2), and 10 Gy HBI (n = 2). Midline tissue doses were measured at the anterior iliac crest level with an ionization chamber, and body dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Blood samples were collected before exposure and from 1 h until 200 d after irradiation. Clinical status, complete blood cell count, biochemical parameters, and cytogenetic analysis were evaluated. The partial least square discriminant analysis chosen for statistical analysis showed that the four groups of irradiated baboons were clearly separated. However, the dicentric chromosome assay may not distinguish HBI from TBI in confounding situations where equivalent whole-body doses are similar and the time of exposure is sufficient for peripheral blood lymphocyte homogenization. Interestingly, as bone marrow shielding in HBI animals prevented aplasia from happening, hematologic parameters such as the platelet count and Flt-3 ligand level helped to distinguish HBI and TBI. Moreover, the ratio of neutrophil to lymphocyte counts, creatine kinase, and citrulline levels may be discriminating biomarkers of dose or injury. Both early and delayed clinical signs and bioindicators appear to be useful for assessment of heterogeneous irradiation.

  18. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Study of the spectral width of intermode beats and optical spectrum of an actively mode-locked three-mirror semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharyash, Valerii F.; Kashirsky, Aleksandr V.; Klementyev, Vasilii M.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Pivtsov, V. S.

    2005-09-01

    Various oscillation regimes of an actively mode-locked semiconductor laser are studied experimentally. Two types of regimes are found in which the minimal spectral width (~3.5 kHz) of intermode beats is achieved. The width of the optical spectrum of modes is studied as a function of their locking and the feedback coefficients. The maximum width of the spectrum is ~3.7 THz.

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Generation of Stark spectral components in Nd:YAP and Nd:YAG lasers by using volume Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai S.; Glebov, L. B.; Smirnov, V. I.; Chapurin, I. V.

    2009-01-01

    Generation of Stark spectral components in free-running Q-switched Nd:YAP (1064 nm and 1073 nm) and Nd:YAG (1062 nm) lasers is obtained. For this purpose reflecting volume Bragg gratings placed into the laser resonator and permitting to tune the laser emission spectrum were used. Stable generation of Stark components in both lasers is obtained. The possibility of obtaining two-frequency generation in an Nd-glass laser with the help of these gratings is shown.

  20. Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry of photothermal, photocarrier, and photoluminescence response of CdSe crystals: Determination of optical, thermal, and electronic transport parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Pelzl, J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry (SR-MIRR) with super-band gap photoexcitation is introduced as a self-consistent method for semiconductor characterization (CdSe crystals grown under different conditions). Starting from a theoretical model combining the contributions of the photothermal (PT) and photocarrier (PC) signal components, an expression is derived for the thermal-to-plasma wave transition frequency ftc which is found to be wavelength-independent. The deviation of the PC component from the model at high frequency is quantitatively explained by a quasi-continuous distribution of carrier recombination lifetimes. The integral, broad frequency band (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) MIRR measurements simultaneously yielded the thermal diffusivity a, the effective IR optical absorption coefficient βeff, and the bulk carrier lifetime τc. Spectrally resolved frequency scans were conducted with interchangeable IR bandpass filters (2.2-11.3 μm) in front of the detector. The perfect spectral match of the PT and PC components is the direct experimental evidence of the key assumption in MIRR that de-exciting carriers are equivalent to blackbody (Planck) radiators. The exploitation of the β spectrum measured by MIRR allowed determining the background (equilibrium) free carrier concentration n0. At the shortest wavelength (3.3 μm), the photoluminescence (PL) component supersedes the PC one and has distinct features. The average sample temperature influences the PC component but not the PT one.

  1. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 3000 GHZ (i.e., wavelengths longer than 100 mu m) is presented which can be used a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (133 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  2. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers). The catalogue can be used as a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue has been constructed using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (151 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available from the authors as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  3. The EBLM project. I. Physical and orbital parameters, including spin-orbit angles, of two low-mass eclipsing binaries on opposite sides of the brown dwarf limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Hebb, L.; Anderson, D. R.; Cargile, P.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P.; Naef, D.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Stassun, K.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a series of papers aiming to study the dozens of low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBLM), with F, G, K primaries, that have been discovered in the course of the WASP survey. Our objects are mostly single-line binaries whose eclipses have been detected by WASP and were initially followed up as potential planetary transit candidates. These have bright primaries, which facilitates spectroscopic observations during transit and allows the study of the spin-orbit distribution of F, G, K+M eclipsing binaries through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Here we report on the spin-orbit angle of WASP-30b, a transiting brown dwarf, and improve its orbital parameters. We also present the mass, radius, spin-orbit angle and orbital parameters of a new eclipsing binary, J1219-39b (1SWAPJ121921.03-395125.6, TYC 7760-484-1), which, with a mass of 95 ± 2 Mjup, is close to the limit between brown dwarfs and stars. We find that both objects have projected spin-orbit angles aligned with their primaries' rotation. Neither primaries are synchronous. J1219-39b has a modestly eccentric orbit and is in agreement with the theoretical mass-radius relationship, whereas WASP-30b lies above it. Using WASP-South photometric observations (Sutherland, South Africa) confirmed with radial velocity measurement from the CORALIE spectrograph, photometry from the EulerCam camera (both mounted on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope), radial velocities from the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO's 3.6 m Telescope (prog ID 085.C-0393), and photometry from the robotic 60 cm TRAPPIST telescope, all located at ESO, La Silla, Chile. The data is publicly available at the CDS Strasbourg and on demand to the main author.Tables A.1-A.3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometry tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A18

  4. Spectral Line Shape Parameters for the ν_1, ν_2, and ν_3 Bands of Hdo: Self and CO_2 Broadened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Gamache, Robert R.; Renaud, Candice L.; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2016-06-01

    To provide precise information relevant to Martian atmospheric remote sensing, high resolution high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of HDO in mixture with CO_2 were recorded in the ν_1, ν_2, and ν_3 fundamental bands between 2.7 and 7 μm regions. The spectra were obtained with the Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory along with two specially built coolable absorption cells with path lengths of 0.2038 m and 20.941 m at various sample gas temperatures (˜220 - 296 K), total sample pressures and volume mixing ratios. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique was applied to fit simultaneously all the spectra obtained. The measured line parameters include accurate line positions, intensities, self- and CO_2-broadened Lorentz halfwidth and pressure-shift coefficients, and temperature dependences of CO_2 broadened HDO halfwidth and pressure-shift coefficients. Line mixing coefficients using the relaxation matrix formalism and quadratic speed dependence parameters were also measured where appropriate. Example results for select transitions in each band will be presented and comparisons made to other measured/calculated values. K. Sung, A.W. Mantz, M.A.H. Smith, L.R. Brown, T.J. Crawford, V.M. Devi, D.C. Benner. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 162 (2010) 124-134. A.W. Mantz, K. Sung, T.J. Crawford, L.R. Brown, M.A.H. Smith, V.M. Devi, D.C. Benner, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 304 (2014) 12-24. D.C. Benner, C.P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M.A. H. Smith, and D. Atkins. JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. Research described in this paper are performed at the College of William and Mary, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley Research Center under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. RRG and CLR were supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant # AGS-1156862.

  5. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  6. Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry of photothermal, photocarrier, and photoluminescence response of CdSe crystals: Determination of optical, thermal, and electronic transport parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, M.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Pelzl, J.

    2016-03-28

    Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry (SR-MIRR) with super-band gap photoexcitation is introduced as a self-consistent method for semiconductor characterization (CdSe crystals grown under different conditions). Starting from a theoretical model combining the contributions of the photothermal (PT) and photocarrier (PC) signal components, an expression is derived for the thermal-to-plasma wave transition frequency f{sub tc} which is found to be wavelength-independent. The deviation of the PC component from the model at high frequency is quantitatively explained by a quasi-continuous distribution of carrier recombination lifetimes. The integral, broad frequency band (0.1 Hz–1 MHz) MIRR measurements simultaneously yielded the thermal diffusivity a, the effective IR optical absorption coefficient β{sub eff}, and the bulk carrier lifetime τ{sub c}. Spectrally resolved frequency scans were conducted with interchangeable IR bandpass filters (2.2–11.3 μm) in front of the detector. The perfect spectral match of the PT and PC components is the direct experimental evidence of the key assumption in MIRR that de-exciting carriers are equivalent to blackbody (Planck) radiators. The exploitation of the β spectrum measured by MIRR allowed determining the background (equilibrium) free carrier concentration n{sub 0}. At the shortest wavelength (3.3 μm), the photoluminescence (PL) component supersedes the PC one and has distinct features. The average sample temperature influences the PC component but not the PT one.

  7. Phenotypic Parameters in Genotypically Selected Type 2B von Willebrand Disease Patients: A Large, Single-Center Experience Including a New Novel Mutation.

    PubMed

    Woods, Adriana Ines; Kempfer, Ana Catalina; Paiva, Juvenal; Sanchez-Luceros, Analia; Bermejo, Emilse; Chuit, Roberto; Alberto, Maria Fabiana; Blanco, Alicia Noemi; Lazzari, Maria Angela

    2017-02-01

    von Willebrand disease type 2B (VWD2B) expresses gain-of-function mutations that enhance binding of an individual's von Willebrand factor (VWF) to its platelet ligand, glycoprotein Ib (GPIb), and which are usually identified by increased ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA). We describe here the phenotypic profile of 38 genotypically selected VWD2B-affected family members (AFMs) belonging to 19 unrelated families. Major bleeding was observed in 68.4% of AFMs (previous to their diagnosis and registered by lifetime interviews), with a total of 46 episodes (1.21/patient), and was found to be highly related to the individual bleeding score and presence of thrombocytopenia, but otherwise unrelated to other laboratory parameters. Excessive muco-cutaneous bleeding symptoms were often reported, the most frequent of which comprised menorrhagia, epistaxis, easy bruising, and bleeding after teeth extraction/in oral cavity. Eight unaffected family members were also studied. The prevalence of VWD2B within families was 0.826, and the penetrance of mutations was complete, making it mandatory to study entire family sets to complete diagnostic profiles. Seven heterozygous missense mutations were found, the most common being p.V1316M. In the p.R1308C group, 75% of the AFMs showed absence of RIPA at 0.5 mg/mL, 66.6% of whom had VWF:RCo < 10 IU/dL, and 50% of whom had VWF:CB < 10 IU/dL. In the p.S1310F group, none of the AFMs had VWF:RCo/VWF:Ag < 0.6 (RCo/Ag), but 100% had VWF:CB/VWF:Ag < 0.6/(CB/Ag). Patients with p.P1266L and p.R1304V were characterized as atypical VWD2B. Two de novo mutations were found in four AFMs belonging to two families. We also describe a novel mutation: p.Y1258C. Of our patients, 70.5% had O blood group. In conclusion, a normal RCo/Ag and a negative RIPA at 0.5 mg/mL do not necessarily rule out a diagnosis of VWD2B.

  8. OSSE spectral analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Brown, K. M.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Matz, S. M.; Strickman, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the spectra from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) is complicated because of the typically low signal to noise (approx. 0.1 percent) and the large background variability. The OSSE instrument was designed to address these difficulties by periodically offset-pointing the detectors from the source to perform background measurements. These background measurements are used to estimate the background during each of the source observations. The resulting background-subtracted spectra can then be accumulated and fitted for spectral lines and/or continua. Data selection based on various environmental parameters can be performed at various stages during the analysis procedure. In order to achieve the instrument's statistical sensitivity, however, it will be necessary for investigators to develop a detailed understanding of the instrument operation, data collection, and the background spectrum and its variability. A brief description of the major steps in the OSSE spectral analysis process is described, including a discussion of the OSSE background spectrum and examples of several observational strategies.

  9. A Successful Attempt to Obtain the Linear Dependence Between One-Photon and Two-Photon Spectral Properties and Hammett Parameters of Various Aromatic Substituents in New π-Extended Asymmetric Organic Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nvdan; Gong, Yulong; Wang, Xinchao; Lu, Yao; Peng, Guangyue; Yang, Long; Zhang, Shengtao; Luo, Ziping; Li, Hongru; Gao, Fang

    2015-11-01

    A series of new asymmetric chromophores containing aromatic substituents and possessing the excellent π-extension in space were prepared through multi-steps routes. One-photon and two-photon spectral properties of these new chromophores could be tuned by these substituents finely and simultaneously. The linear correlation of the wave numbers of the one-photon absorption and emission maxima to Hammett parameters of these substituents was presented. Near infrared two-photon absorption emission integrated areas of the target chromophores were correlated linearly to Hammett constants of these substituted groups.

  10. An experimental palladium-103 seed (OptiSeed{sup exp}) in a biocompatible polymer without a gold marker: Characterization of dosimetric parameters including the interseed effect

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, F.; Scalliet, P.; Vynckier, S.

    2008-12-15

    Permanent implantation of {sup 125}I (iodine) or {sup 103}Pd (palladium) sources is a popular treatment option in the management of early stage prostate cancer. New sources are being developed, some of which are being marketed for different clinical applications. A new technique of adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant, similar to that used in the treatment of prostate cancer, has been proposed by [N. Jansen et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 67, 1052-1058 (2007)] with encouraging results. The presence of artifacts from the metallic seeds, however, can disturb follow-up imaging. The development of plastic seeds has reduced these artifacts. This paper presents a feasibility study of the advantages of palladium-103 seeds, encapsulated with a biocompatible polymer, for future clinical applications, and on the effect of the gold marker on the dosimetric characteristics of such seeds. Experimental palladium seeds, OptiSeed{sup exp}, were manufactured by International Brachytherapy (IBt), Seneffe, Belgium, from a biocompatible polymer, including the marker. Apart from the absence of a gold marker, the studied seed has an identical design to the OptiSeed{sup 103}[Phys. Med. Biol. 50, 1493-1504 (2005)]; [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 63, 311-321 (2005)]. Polymer encapsulation was preferred by IBt in order to reduce the quantity of radioactive material needed for a given dose rate and to reduce the anisotropy of the radiation field around the seed. In addition, this design is intended to decrease the interseed effects that can occur as a result of the marker and the encapsulation. Dosimetric measurements were performed using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (1 mm{sup 3}) in solid water phantoms (WT1). Measured data were compared to Monte Carlo simulated data in solid water using the MCNP code, version 4C. Updated cross sections [Med. Phys. 30, 701-711 (2003)] were used. As the measured and calculated data were in agreement, Monte Carlo calculations were then

  11. General spectral utility metric for spectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Rulon E.; Elder, Timothy D.; Stewart, David J.; Cincotta, Eric J.; Kennedy, Carolyn S.; Van Nostrand, R. Craig

    2005-06-01

    Published approaches to assessing and predicting spectral image utility are generally based on regression methods which fit coefficients to an equation with terms representing spatial scale, spectral fidelity, and signal-to-noise. Such approaches are patterned after the National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale General Image Quality Equation (NIIRS GIQE) designed for use with remotely-sensed panchromatic imagery. Preliminary testing of these approaches suggests that they will work for some subsets of spectral imagery applications but are not generally applicable to all spectral imaging problems. We present here an approach that gets at the heart of the general problem-assessing the confidence of an image analyst in performing a specified task with a specific spectral image. While applicable in other areas such as health imaging, our approach to spectral utility assessment is presented in this paper from a remote sensing point of view. Our approach allows trade-offs in tasking and system design across the "spectrum" of imagers including panchromatic, multispectral, hyperspectral, and even ultraspectral. Our approach is based on a fusion concept called "semantic transformation." We assume that spectral and spatial information are largely separable with both contributing to the overall utility of the image. The "semantic transformation" combines the spatial and spectral information in a common term (in our case confidence) to give an overall confidence in performing the specified task. Addressing the spatial and spectral information separately allows us the freedom to assess the information contained in each in ways that the information is actually assimilated (i.e., usually spatial information in exploited visually while spectral information consisting of more than three or four bands is usually exploited by computer algorithms). For the spectral information, we can use either generic exploitation algorithms or the specific algorithms that the image analyst

  12. DFT studies of structural and some spectral parameters of copper(II) complexes with N,N,N‧,N″-tetrakis (2-hydroxyethyl/propyl) ethylenediamine and tris(2-hydroxyethyl)amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Obrai, Sangeeta; Mitra, Joyee; Sharma, Aparna

    2013-11-01

    The structures and some spectral parameters of three copper(II) complexes; [Cu(THEEN)(H2O)](PIC)2 (1), [Cu(THPEN)] (PIC)2 C3H8O (2) and [Cu(TEAH3)(PIC)] (PIC)ṡ(H2O) (3), previously synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, are here computationally studied by using density functional theory (DFT) in its hybrid form B3LYP. In these complexes, THEEN is N,N,N‧,N″-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine and THPEN is N,N,N‧,N″-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl) ethylenediamine, tetrapodal ligands and TEAH3 is tris(2-hydroxyethyl)amine, a tripodal ligand. The primary coordination sphere of copper(II) ion in complexes (1), (2) and (3) are optimized, structural parameters are calculated, vibrational bands are assigned and energy gaps of frontier orbital (HOMO-LUMO) have been calculated with B3LYP/6-31G/LANL2DZ level of theory using DMSO as solvent. The calculated geometric and spectral results reproduced the experimental data with well agreement. Theoretical calculated molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO) and their energies have been calculated that suggest charge transfer occurs within the complexes.

  13. UV and Heating Effects on CR-39 Etch Parameters with Spectral Analysis of CR-39 in the UV-Vis-NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLauchlin, Christopher; Dodge, Kenneth; McLean, James; Padalino, Stephen; Burke, Michelle; Sangster, Craig

    2014-03-01

    CR-39 plastic is a common ion detector used in nuclear experiments. High-energy charged particles leave tracks of chemical damage along their path, which form pits when etched with NaOH. It has been found that exposure to UV light after ion exposure enhances the etch rate in both the bulk material as well as along the latent track while maintaining a constant track-to-bulk etch rate ratio. The addition of heat was found to dramatically increase the etch rates by a factor of five, although at higher temperatures pits became irregular in shape. The spectral reflection and transmission of CR-39 for wavelengths between 200 nm and 2500 nm for various thicknesses of plastic were measured. Using an exponential decay model for absorption the decay depth was calculated from the gathered data. CR-39 was found to be nearly transparent for light between 400 nm to 1100 nm while strong absorption was present for UV light shorter than 400 nm. The reflection of CR-39 was found to be relatively constant averaging at 7%. An anomalous dispersion feature was found centered at 290 nm.

  14. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  15. Estimation of spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2017-03-01

    Rolling bearings are the most important elements in rotating machinery. Bearing frequently fall out of service for various reasons: heavy loads, unsuitable lubrications, ineffective sealing. Bearing faults may cause a decrease in performance. Analysis of bearing vibration signals has attracted attention in the field of monitoring and fault diagnosis. Bearing vibration signals give rich information for early detection of bearing failures. Spectral kurtosis, SK, is a parameter in frequency domain indicating how the impulsiveness of a signal varies with frequency. Faults in rolling bearings give rise to a series of short impulse responses as the rolling elements strike faults, SK potentially useful for determining frequency bands dominated by bearing fault signals. SK can provide a measure of the distance of the analyzed bearings from a healthy one. SK provides additional information given by the power spectral density (psd). This paper aims to explore the estimation of spectral kurtosis using short time Fourier transform known as spectrogram. The estimation of SK is similar to the estimation of psd. The estimation falls in model-free estimation and plug-in estimator. Some numerical studies using simulations are discussed to support the methodology. Spectral kurtosis of some stationary signals are analytically obtained and used in simulation study. Kurtosis of time domain has been a popular tool for detecting non-normality. Spectral kurtosis is an extension of kurtosis in frequency domain. The relationship between time domain and frequency domain analysis is establish through power spectrum-autocovariance Fourier transform. Fourier transform is the main tool for estimation in frequency domain. The power spectral density is estimated through periodogram. In this paper, the short time Fourier transform of the spectral kurtosis is reviewed, a bearing fault (inner ring and outer ring) is simulated. The bearing response, power spectrum, and spectral kurtosis are plotted to

  16. The 19 May 2011 Simav Earthquake (Mw=5.8) and its aftershocks, Western Turkey: Source mechanisms and spectral source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, A.; Bekler, T.; Ozden, S.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the focal parameters of Simav earthquake with a moment magnitude of 5.83 in western Turkey, and its aftershocks (M > 3.5), were estimated from time-domain moment tensor inversion method. The data were obtained from seismological network of Kandilli Observatory-Earhquake Research Institute and two broadband and one short period seismometers which were temporary deployed in the scope of the study. 2466 events (M >1.9), were located with the Geiger's conventional absolute location method and then these events were relocated by using double difference algorithm. The computed locations in a depth range between 2 km and 15 km are consistent with Coloumb stress variation in the area. Focal mechanism solutions indicate that the area is dominated by normal faults with mainly WNW-ESE trending and the main shock occurred on Simav Fault which is dipping towards north. The average variance reduction of solutions was calculated as 70%. Based on the solutions of focal mechanism, focal parameters of the main shock occurred at the depth of 11 km, were calculated as 277 / 62 / -92 (strike, dip, rake). The aftershocks were relatively shallow with variable dip direction and dip angle. Thus, this variation may point out the existence of antithetic faults of the Simav Fault. The ones having high signal to noise ratio were also studied and it was concluded that principal stress axes orientations which were calculated by Carey (1979) stress tensor inversion method that these result confirm a NNE-SSW extension (sigma 3 in horizontal plane) stress regime in the region. Additionally, by using circular source model of Brune (1970), dynamic source parameters were computed with the analysis of displacement amplitude spectra of near-field P waves from 26 earthquakes in the moment magnitude range of between 3.53 and 5.83 to estimate empirical relationships between the source parameters (stress drop, source radius and average slip). Corner frequencies vary between 1.05 and 5.40 Hz

  17. Spectral assignments and NMR parameter-structure relationships in borates using high-resolution 11B NMR and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Oliver L G; Iuga, Dinu; Howes, Andrew P; Pike, Kevin J; Holland, Diane; Dupree, Ray

    2013-06-07

    High-resolution, solid-state (11)B NMR spectra have been obtained at high magnetic fields for a range of polycrystalline borates using double-rotation (DOR), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning and isotopic dilution. DOR linewidths can be less than 0.2 ppm in isotopically diluted samples, allowing highly accurate values for the isotropic chemical shift, δiso, and electric field gradient to be obtained. The experimental values are used as a test of density functional calculations using both projector augmented wave based CASTEP and WIEN2k. The CASTEP calculations of δiso are generally in very good agreement with experiment, having r.m.s. deviation 0.40 ppm. WIEN2k calculations of electric field gradient magnitude, CQ, and asymmetry, η, are also in excellent agreement with experiment, with r.m.s. deviations 0.038 MHz and 0.042 respectively. However, whilst CASTEP gives a similar deviation for η (0.043) it overestimates CQ by ∼15%. After scaling of the calculated electric field gradient by 0.842 the deviation in CQ is practically identical to that of the WIEN2k calculations. The spectral assignments that follow from the experimental and computational results allow identification of correlations between δiso and (a) the average B-O-B bond angle, θ[combining overline], for both three and four coordinated boron, giving δiso(B(III)) = (185.1 -θ[combining overline])/3.42 ppm and δiso(B(IV)) = (130.2 -θ[combining overline])/5.31 ppm; and (b) the ring-site T(3) unit trigonal planar angular deviation, Stri, giving δiso(T(3)(ring)) = (1.642 × 10(-2)-Stri)/(8.339 × 10(-4)) ppm.

  18. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  19. Revision of Spectral Parameters for the b- and γ-BANDS of Oxygen and Their Validation Using Atmospheric Spectra with the Sun as Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Toon, G. C.

    2011-06-01

    Until recently the B (B1ΣG+ (v=1)←X3Σ-G (v=0)) and γ (B1ΣG+ (v=2)←X3Σ-G (v=0)) bands of oxygen in the visible region had not been used extensively in satellite remote sensing. However, these bands (in particular the B-band) are now being considered for future satellite missions. In this light, it is important to make sure that the reference spectroscopic parameters are accurate enough to provide means of deducing important physical characteristics from the atmospheric spectra. The energy levels and intensities currently given for these bands in the HITRAN spectroscopic database had not been updated for over two decades. We have collected the best available measured line positions that involve the B1ΣG+ (v=1 and v=2) states for the three most abundant isotopologues of oxygen and performed a combined fit to obtain a consistent set of spectroscopic constants. These constants were then used to calculate the line positions. A careful review of the available intensity and line-shape measurements was also carried out, and new parameters were derived based on that review. In particular, line shift parameters that were not previously available were introduced. The new data have been tested in application to high-resolution atmospheric spectra measured with the Fourier transform spectrometers at Park Falls, WI (B-band) and Kitt Peak, AZ (γ-band) and have yielded substantial improvement. In addition, we report the first direct observation and analysis of the 16O18O lines in the γ-band. L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.Chris Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al, ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009).

  20. 1H and 13C{1H} NMR spectral parameters of sulfur mustards, nitrogen mustards, and lewisites: computing and predicting of reference spectra for chemical identification.

    PubMed

    Haapaniemi, Esa; Mesilaakso, Markku

    2012-03-01

    The (1)H and (13)C{(1)H} chemical shifts and (1)H spin-spin couplings of sulfur mustards, nitrogen mustards, and lewisites scheduled in the Chemical Weapons Convention, and those of bis(2-chloromethyl)disulfide, were determined in CDCl(3), CD(2)Cl(2), and (CD(3))(2)CO. Accurate parameters of this kind of series can be used for evaluating the current molecular modeling programs and the chemical shift and coupling constant prediction possibilities of the programs. Several prediction tests were made with commercial programs, and the results are reported here. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. PASCAL - Planetary Atmospheres Spectral Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Laurence; Gordon, Iouli

    2010-05-01

    Spectroscopic observation of planetary atmospheres, stellar atmospheres, comets, and the interstellar medium is the most powerful tool for extracting detailed information concerning the properties of these objects. The HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database1 has traditionally served researchers involved with terrestrial atmospheric problems, such as remote-sensing of constituents in the atmosphere, pollution monitoring at the surface, identification of sources seen through the atmosphere, and numerous environmental issues. A new thrust of the HITRAN program is to extend this longstanding database to have capabilities for studying the above-mentioned planetary and astronomical systems. The new extension is called PASCAL (Planetary Atmospheres Spectral Catalog). The methodology and structure are basically identical to the construction of the HITRAN and HITEMP databases. We will acquire and assemble spectroscopic parameters for gases and spectral bands of molecules that are germane to the studies of planetary atmospheres. These parameters include the types of data that have already been considered for transmission and radiance algorithms, such as line position, intensity, broadening coefficients, lower-state energies, and temperature dependence values. Additional parameters beyond what is currently considered for the terrestrial atmosphere will be archived. Examples are collision-broadened halfwidths due to various foreign partners, collision-induced absorption, and temperature dependence factors. New molecules (and their isotopic variants), not currently included in the HITRAN database, will be incorporated. That includes hydrocarbons found on Titan but not archived in HITRAN (such as C3H4, C4H2, C3H8). Other examples include sulfur-bearing molecules such as SO and CS. A further consideration will be spectral bands that arise as opportunities to study exosolar planets. The task involves acquiring the best high-resolution data, both experimental and theoretical

  2. Cross correlation and cross spectral analyses of solar activity and solar wind parameters and car accident events in Poland for last 11-year period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M.; Gil, A.

    Data of solar and geomagnetic activities, solar wind parameters and g lactic cosmica ray intensity on the one side and car accident events in Poland on the other have been analyzed in order to reveal the statistical relationships between them for the period of 1990-2001. First of all the cross correlation and cross spectrum of the relative sunspots numbers, sunspots areas, solar wind velocities, the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field, galactic cosmic ray intensity and car accident events have been carried out. It is shown that in some epochs of the above-mentioned period there is found a reliable relationship between car accident events and solar and geomagnetic activities parameters in the region of the different periodicities, 27 - days, 7-9 days and 3-5 days. At the same time there are found epochs where hardly could be stated about any kind of the reasonable relationships. The superposition method has been used to find the influences of the outstanding phenomena -solar and geomagnetic storms and Forbush effects of galactic cosmic rays on the car accident events. There are found the cases when during the solar and geomagnetic storms and Forbush effects of galactic cosmic rays the number of car accidents increases, even about 15 percents, but in parallel there are found cases when to reveal the explicit relationship is practically impossible. It is concluded that in many cases the significant meteorological and social effects masquerade an existing relationship of the car accident evens with the solar and geomagnetic activities.

  3. A Spectral Map Of Mercury From MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Pahsai, P.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Goudge, T. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Mercury Surface and Atmospheric Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Visible and Near Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study subtle compositional variations across the surface of Mercury. VIRS reflectance spectra obtained from orbit allow identification and classification of spectral units, many of which collocate with geologic features such as pyroclastic deposits; low-reflectance material (LRM); bright, fresh-appearing impact craters; and hollows. The vast majority of the surface is composed of plains units with brightness and spectral reflectance ratios (e.g., 415 nm / 750 nm and 310 nm / 390 nm) that vary within a small range about mean values for the planet. Analysis of VIRS reflectance data in the context of Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) color and high-resolution images enables identification of large regions with similar spectral properties. Our spectral map of Mercury covers approximately 70% of the planet (excluding polar regions and two regions for which calibration refinement is pending). On the basis of brightness, spectral ratio variations, and superposition relationships in the image data, we define four large-scale spectral units in Mercury plains, as well as six additional spectral units of smaller area. The four large-scale spectral units cover (1) 48.7% (brightness and spectral ratio parameters within a few percent of planetary mean values) (2) 31.6% (higher reflectance, higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean), (3) 12.9% (higher reflectance, lower 415 nm / 750 nm values than mean), and (4) 6.8% (lower reflectance and higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean) of the mapped area. Spectrally defined plains units correspond broadly to plains units defined by morphology and color imaging; e.g., unit 2 corresponds to the previously defined high-reflectance red plains (HRP), unit 3 to the northern smooth plains and the smooth plains

  4. Quantum graph as a quantum spectral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, Ondřej; Cheon, Taksu

    2013-03-01

    We study the transmission of a quantum particle along a straight input-output line to which a graph Γ is attached at a point. In the point of contact we impose a singularity represented by a certain properly chosen scale-invariant coupling with a coupling parameter α. We show that the probability of transmission along the line as a function of the particle energy tends to the indicator function of the energy spectrum of Γ as α → ∞. This effect can be used for a spectral analysis of the given graph Γ. Its applications include a control of a transmission along the line and spectral filtering. The result is illustrated with an example where Γ is a loop exposed to a magnetic field. Two more quantum devices are designed using other special scale-invariant vertex couplings. They can serve as a band-stop filter and as a spectral separator, respectively.

  5. Quantum graph as a quantum spectral filter

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, Ondrej; Cheon, Taksu

    2013-03-15

    We study the transmission of a quantum particle along a straight input-output line to which a graph {Gamma} is attached at a point. In the point of contact we impose a singularity represented by a certain properly chosen scale-invariant coupling with a coupling parameter {alpha}. We show that the probability of transmission along the line as a function of the particle energy tends to the indicator function of the energy spectrum of {Gamma} as {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. This effect can be used for a spectral analysis of the given graph {Gamma}. Its applications include a control of a transmission along the line and spectral filtering. The result is illustrated with an example where {Gamma} is a loop exposed to a magnetic field. Two more quantum devices are designed using other special scale-invariant vertex couplings. They can serve as a band-stop filter and as a spectral separator, respectively.

  6. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Study of the spectral characteristics of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser after propagation of its radiation through a tapered fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Denisov, V. I.; Zakharyash, Valerii F.; Klementyev, Vasilii M.; Korel', I. I.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Pivtsov, V. S.; Chepurov, S. V.

    2003-10-01

    The method and results of precision measurements of the intermode frequency of a Ti:sapphire laser after the propagation of its radiation through a tapered optical fibre are described. It is shown that the stability of the intermode frequency is impaired by half at short averaging times (10 s) and by a factor of 1.1 at long averaging times (1000 s). The results of investigations of the spectrum of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, which is broadened in a tapered optical fibre are presented. It is shown that, by varying the fibre parameters and the characteristics of input pulses, the envelope of the broadened spectrum can be profiled, which is important for practical applications.

  7. Effect of GaAsP barrier layers on the parameters of InGaAs/AlGaAs laser diodes emitting in the 1050-1100-nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Padalitsa, A A; Petrovskii, A V; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Sumarokov, M A; Sukharev, A V

    2005-10-31

    To improve the parameters of laser diodes emitting in the 1000-1070-nm spectral range and develop highly efficient laser diodes emitting in the 1070-1100-nm range, it is proposed to introduce GaAsP barrier layers into the active region of the quantum-well InGaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, which compensate for enhanced mechanical stresses. This considerably improves the luminescence characteristics of heterostructures and changes conditions for generating misfit dislocations. The long-wavelength lasing at 1100 nm becomes possible due to an increase in the thickness of quantum wells and in the molar fraction of InAs in them. The manufactured laser diodes emitting in the 1095-1100-nm range have low threshold currents, the high output power and high reliability. (lasers)

  8. Influence of gamma ray irradiation and annealing temperature on the optical constants and spectral dispersion parameters of metal-free and zinc tetraphenylporphyrin thin films: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zeyada, H M; Makhlouf, M M; El-Nahass, M M

    2015-09-05

    In this work, we report on the effect of γ-ray irradiation and annealing temperature on the optical properties of metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin, H2TPP, and zinc tetraphenylporphyrin, ZnTPP, thin films. Thin films of H2TPP and ZnTPP were successfully prepared by the thermal evaporation technique. The optical properties of H2TPP and ZnTPP films were investigated using spectrophotometric measurements of the transmittance and reflectance at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range from 200 to 2500 nm. The absorption spectra of H2TPP showed four absorption bands, namely the Q, B, N and M bands. The effect of inserting Zn atom into the cavity of porphyrin macrocycle in ZnTPP molecule distorted the Q and B bands, reduced the width of absorption region and influenced the optical constants and dispersion parameters. In all conditions, the type of electron transition is indirect allowed transition. Anomalous dispersion is observed in the absorption region but normal dispersion occurs in the transparent region of spectra. We adopted multi-oscillator model and the single oscillator model to interpret the anomalous and normal dispersion, respectively. We have found that the annealing temperature has mostly the opposite effect of γ-ray irradiation on absorption and dispersion characteristics of these films. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of gamma ray irradiation and annealing temperature on the optical constants and spectral dispersion parameters of metal-free and zinc tetraphenylporphyrin thin films: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyada, H. M.; Makhlouf, M. M.; El-Nahass, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we report on the effect of γ-ray irradiation and annealing temperature on the optical properties of metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin, H2TPP, and zinc tetraphenylporphyrin, ZnTPP, thin films. Thin films of H2TPP and ZnTPP were successfully prepared by the thermal evaporation technique. The optical properties of H2TPP and ZnTPP films were investigated using spectrophotometric measurements of the transmittance and reflectance at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range from 200 to 2500 nm. The absorption spectra of H2TPP showed four absorption bands, namely the Q, B, N and M bands. The effect of inserting Zn atom into the cavity of porphyrin macrocycle in ZnTPP molecule distorted the Q and B bands, reduced the width of absorption region and influenced the optical constants and dispersion parameters. In all conditions, the type of electron transition is indirect allowed transition. Anomalous dispersion is observed in the absorption region but normal dispersion occurs in the transparent region of spectra. We adopted multi-oscillator model and the single oscillator model to interpret the anomalous and normal dispersion, respectively. We have found that the annealing temperature has mostly the opposite effect of γ-ray irradiation on absorption and dispersion characteristics of these films.

  10. Report on the recent advances performed in the determination of radiative parameters for spectral lines of astrophysical interest in heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Heavy atoms and ions of the periodic table, in particular those with Z > 36, have been rather little investigated up to until very recently, due to the numerous difficulties met both on the theoretical and on the experimental sides. In relation with the recent needs in astrophysics, the situtaion has considerably evolved over the past few years and substantial progress has been reported. This progress has been made easier by the developments of theoretical methods and also by the extensive use of laser spectroscopy.Having in mind the astrophysical context, we have started a systematic investigation of radiative parameters of these ions (neutral, singly and doubly ionized elements) about 15 years ago. As a consequence, a large number of new results have been obtained. About 700 radiative lifetimes have been measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The combination of these lifetimes with theoretical (and, when possible, experimental) branching fractions has led to transition probabilities for about 100000 transitions in atoms and ions belonging to the lanthanide group as well as to the fifth and the sixth rows of the periodic table.

  11. Determination of circular dichroism and ultraviolet spectral parameters of norgestimate- and other Delta(4)-3-ketosteroid oxime isomers via normal phase HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Szentesi, A; Gergely, A; Horváth, P; Mahó, S; Mátyus, P; Szász, G

    2001-09-01

    The oxime formation reaction of therapeutical progestogen (levonorgestrel, levonorgestrel acetate, norethisterone), androgen (methyltestosterone, testosterone phenylpropionate) and anabolic (nortestosterone phenylpropionate) Delta(4)-3-ketosteroids has been investigated. The ketosteroid-hydroxylamine reaction was monitored by reversed phase HPLC system. It was established, that under the experimental conditions applied the oxime formation was complete within 2 h. The reaction leads to the formation of Z and E oxime isomers. The isomers of norgestimate (levonorgestrel 17-acetate oxime) and other Delta(4)-3-ketosteroid oximes have been separated by a new normal phase HPLC method. The identification (elution order assignation) and determination of the formation ratio of the isomers have been performed by 1H NMR spectroscopy on the basis of the chemical shift differences of 4-H signals. The on-line CD and UV spectra of the pure oxime isomers were recorded and then molar ellipticities and absorbances of the isomers were calculated in the wavelength range of 200-300 nm via parameter estimation method.

  12. Determination of Kamlet-Taft solvent parameters pi* of high pressure and supercritical water by the UV-Vis absorption spectral shift of 4-nitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Minami, Kimitaka; Mizuta, Masamichi; Suzuki, Muneyuki; Aizawa, Takafumi; Arai, Kunio

    2006-05-21

    Kamlet-Taft solvent parameters, pi*, of high pressure and supercritical water were determined from 16-420 degrees C based on solvatochromic measurements of 4-nitroanisole. For the measurements, an optical cell that could be used at high temperatures and pressures was developed with the specification of minimal dead space. The low dead space cell allowed us to measure the absorption spectra of 4-nitroanisole at high temperature conditions before appreciable decomposition occurred. The behavior of pi* in terms of water density (pi* = 1.77rho- 0.71) was found to be linear, except in the near critical region, in which deviations were observed that could be attributed to local density augmentation. Excess density, which was defined as the difference between local density and bulk density, showed a maximum near the critical density of water. The frequencies of UV-Vis spectra of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile and N,N-dimethyl-4-nitroaniline were correlated with pi* based on a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) theory. Local density augmentation around 4-nitroanisole and that around 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile were similar but the augmentation observed around N,N-dimethyl-4-nitroaniline was larger.

  13. [A Terahertz Spectral Database Based on Browser/Server Technique].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-yong; Song, Yue

    2015-09-01

    With the solution of key scientific and technical problems and development of instrumentation, the application of terahertz technology in various fields has been paid more and more attention. Owing to the unique characteristic advantages, terahertz technology has been showing a broad future in the fields of fast, non-damaging detections, as well as many other fields. Terahertz technology combined with other complementary methods can be used to cope with many difficult practical problems which could not be solved before. One of the critical points for further development of practical terahertz detection methods depends on a good and reliable terahertz spectral database. We developed a BS (browser/server) -based terahertz spectral database recently. We designed the main structure and main functions to fulfill practical requirements. The terahertz spectral database now includes more than 240 items, and the spectral information was collected based on three sources: (1) collection and citation from some other abroad terahertz spectral databases; (2) collected from published literatures; and (3) spectral data measured in our laboratory. The present paper introduced the basic structure and fundament functions of the terahertz spectral database developed in our laboratory. One of the key functions of this THz database is calculation of optical parameters. Some optical parameters including absorption coefficient, refractive index, etc. can be calculated based on the input THz time domain spectra. The other main functions and searching methods of the browser/server-based terahertz spectral database have been discussed. The database search system can provide users convenient functions including user registration, inquiry, displaying spectral figures and molecular structures, spectral matching, etc. The THz database system provides an on-line searching function for registered users. Registered users can compare the input THz spectrum with the spectra of database, according to

  14. Modelling and validation of spectral reflectance for the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of the colon is known to be affected by malignant and pre-malignant changes in the tissue. As part of long-term research on the derivation of diagnostically important parameters characterizing colon histology, we have investigated the effects of the normal histological variability on the remitted spectra. This paper presents a detailed optical model of the normal colon comprising mucosa, submucosa and the smooth muscle layer. Each layer is characterized by five variable histological parameters: the volume fraction of blood, the haemoglobin saturation, the size of the scattering particles, including collagen, the volume fraction of the scattering particles and the layer thickness, and three optical parameters: the anisotropy factor, the refractive index of the medium and the refractive index of the scattering particles. The paper specifies the parameter ranges corresponding to normal colon tissue, including some previously unpublished ones. Diffuse reflectance spectra were modelled using the Monte Carlo method. Validation of the model-generated spectra against measured spectra demonstrated that good correspondence was achieved between the two. The analysis of the effect of the individual histological parameters on the behaviour of the spectra has shown that the spectral variability originates mainly from changes in the mucosa. However, the submucosa and the muscle layer must be included in the model as they have a significant constant effect on the spectral reflectance above 600 nm. The nature of variations in the spectra also suggests that it may be possible to carry out model inversion and to recover parameters characterizing the colon from multi-spectral images. A preliminary study, in which the mucosal blood and collagen parameters were modified to reflect histopathological changes associated with colon cancer, has shown that the spectra predicted by our model resemble measured spectral reflectance of adenocarcinomas. This suggests that

  15. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  16. High-performance lighting evaluated by photobiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Gunde, Marta Klanjšek

    2014-08-10

    The human reception of light includes image-forming and non-image-forming effects which are triggered by spectral distribution and intensity of light. Ideal lighting is similar to daylight, which could be evaluated by spectral or chromaticity match. LED-based and CFL-based lighting were analyzed here, proposed according to spectral and chromaticity match, respectively. The photobiological effects were expressed by effectiveness for blue light hazard, cirtopic activity, and photopic vision. Good spectral match provides light with more similar effects to those obtained by the chromaticity match. The new parameters are useful for better evaluation of complex human responses caused by lighting.

  17. Visible and Near Infrared Fluorescence Spectral Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, John P.; Condello, Danilo; Duggan, Erika; Naivar, Mark; Novo, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a long standing interest in measuring complete emission spectra from individual cells in flow cytometry. We have developed flow cytometry instruments and analysis approaches to enable this to be done routinely and robustly. Our spectral flow cytometers use a holographic grating to disperse light from single cells onto a CCD for high speed, wavelength-resolved detection. Customized software allows the single cell spectral data to be displayed and analyzed to produce new spectra-derived parameters. We show that familiar reference and calibration beads can be employed to quantitatively assess instrument performance. We use microspheres stained with six different quantum dots to compare a virtual bandpass filter approach with classic least squares (CLS) spectral unmixing, and then use antibody capture beads and CLS unmixing to demonstrate immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using spectral flow cytometry. Finally, we characterize and evaluate several near infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophores for use in spectral flow cytometry. Spectral flow cytometry offers a number of attractive features for single cell analysis, including a simplified optical path, high spectral resolution, and streamlined approaches to quantitative multiparameter measurements. The availability of robust instrumentation, software, and analysis approaches will facilitate the development of spectral flow cytometry applications. PMID:23225549

  18. Visible and near infrared fluorescence spectral flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Nolan, John P; Condello, Danilo; Duggan, Erika; Naivar, Mark; Novo, David

    2013-03-01

    There is a long standing interest in measuring complete emission spectra from individual cells in flow cytometry. We have developed flow cytometry instruments and analysis approaches to enable this to be done routinely and robustly. Our spectral flow cytometers use a holographic grating to disperse light from single cells onto a CCD for high speed, wavelength-resolved detection. Customized software allows the single cell spectral data to be displayed and analyzed to produce new spectra-derived parameters. We show that familiar reference and calibration beads can be employed to quantitatively assess instrument performance. We use microspheres stained with six different quantum dots to compare a virtual bandpass filter approach with classic least squares (CLS) spectral unmixing, and then use antibody capture beads and CLS unmixing to demonstrate immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using spectral flow cytometry. Finally, we characterize and evaluate several near infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophores for use in spectral flow cytometry. Spectral flow cytometry offers a number of attractive features for single cell analysis, including a simplified optical path, high spectral resolution, and streamlined approaches to quantitative multiparameter measurements. The availability of robust instrumentation, software, and analysis approaches will facilitate the development of spectral flow cytometry applications.

  19. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  20. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  1. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  2. Spectral Searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouse, James F.

    1985-12-01

    Infrared Spectral Searching has progressed rapidly over the past two years since the last FT-IR Conference in Durham, England. In addition, if we compare the searching capabilities available to the Infrared Spectroscopist today with those that were available a short four years ago at the last North American Conference held in Columbia, South Carolina, then the advancements are even more impressive. In retrospect, I would describe the state-of-the-art in Spectral Searching at the 1981 FT-IR Conference as "Level 1 Searching", where the spectroscopist was limited to measuring a spectrum for his unknown material, and automatically searching it against very limited libraries at that time to obtain a search report. The report generally provided an ordered ranking of the best matches, chemical name, and a spectrum number so the reference spectrum could be located and reviewed in books. In 1981, there existed a total of three commercially available infrared search packages at the instrument level. Two of the packages were available for FT-IR instruments and the third was available on a dispersive instrument. Only the FT-IR packages allowed viewing the reference spectra on the CRT along with the unknown spectrum by automated spectral retrieval from the reference libraries stored on disk. However, the primary source of reference spectra was still predominantly hard copy.

  3. Multipurpose Spectral Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigernes, Fred; Lorentzen, Dag Arne; Heia, Karsten; Svenøe, Trond

    2000-06-01

    A small spectral imaging system is presented that images static or moving objects simultaneously as a function of wavelength. The main physical principle is outlined and demonstrated. The instrument is capable of resolving both spectral and spatial information from targets throughout the entire visible region. The spectral domain has a bandpass of 12 . One can achieve the spatial domain by rotating the system s front mirror with a high-resolution stepper motor. The spatial resolution range from millimeters to several meters depends mainly on the front optics used and whether the target is fixed (static) or movable relative to the instrument. Different applications and examples are explored, including outdoor landscapes, industrial fish-related targets, and ground-level objects observed in the more traditional way from an airborne carrier (remote sensing). Through the examples, we found that the instrument correctly classifies whether a shrimp is peeled and whether it can disclose the spectral and spatial microcharacteristics of targets such as a fish nematode (parasite). In the macroregime, we were able to distinguish a marine vessel from the surrounding sea and sky. A study of the directional spectral albedo from clouds, mountains, snow cover, and vegetation has also been included. With the airborne experiment, the imager successfully classified snow cover, leads, and new and rafted ice, as seen from 10.000 ft (3.048 m).

  4. Compilation of Stratospheric Trace Gas Spectral Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-15

    on our intensity calculations, they were compared with the cal- culations of S.A. Golden (J. Quant. Spectry. Radiat . Transfer, 2, 201-214, 1962), the...and Walter J. Harrop, "Infrared Transmission of the Atmosphere to Solar Radiation ," Appl. Opt. 2, 887-898, (1963). 22 30. H. A. Gebbie, W. R... Radiation from 4.2y to 5y," Appl. Opt. 4, 1624-1631, (1965). 43. James L. Griggs? Jr., K. N. Rao, L. H. Jones and ’*. M. Potter, "v.. Band of 15N9

  5. The analytical design of spectral measurements for multispectral remote sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiersma, D. J.; Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In order to choose a design which will be optimal for the largest class of remote sensing problems, a method was developed which attempted to represent the spectral response function from a scene as accurately as possible. The performance of the overall recognition system was studied relative to the accuracy of the spectral representation. The spectral representation was only one of a set of five interrelated parameter categories which also included the spatial representation parameter, the signal to noise ratio, ancillary data, and information classes. The spectral response functions observed from a stratum were modeled as a stochastic process with a Gaussian probability measure. The criterion for spectral representation was defined by the minimum expected mean-square error.

  6. Association of nutrition parameters including bioelectrical impedance and systemic inflammatory response with quality of life and prognosis in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lara, Karla; Turcott, Jenny G; Juárez, Eva; Guevara, Patricia; Núñez-Valencia, Carolina; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F; Flores, Diana; Arrieta, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Early identification and treatment of nutritional deficiencies can lead to improved outcomes in the quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Noninvasive techniques are needed to evaluate changes in body composition as part of determining nutritional status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of nutritional parameters in health-related quality of life (HRQL) and survival in patients with advanced NSCLC. Chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced NSCLC with good performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2 were included prospectively in the study. We evaluated inflammatory parameters such as C-reactive protein, platelet/lymphocyte index, neutrophil/lymphocyte index, serum interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and nutritional variables such as body mass index (BMI) and serum albumin levels. Bioelectrical impedance analysis including phase angle was obtained before cisplatin-based chemotherapy was started. HRQL was assessed by application of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30 and QLQ-LC13 instruments at baseline. Overall survival (OS) was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed with log-rank and Cox proportional hazard models. One hundred nineteen patients were included. Mean BMI was 24.8 ± 4.5 kg/m(2), average weight loss of patients was 8.4%, and median phase angle was 5.8°. Malnutrition measured by subjective global assessment (SGA), weight loss >10%, BMI >20 was associated with lower HRQL scales. Patients with ECOG 2, high content serum IL-6, lower phase angle, and malnutrition parameters showed lower OS; however, after multivariate analysis, only ECOG 2 [Hazard ratio (HR), 2.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.5-4.7; P = 0.001], phase angle ≤5.8° (HR = 3.02; 95% CI: 1.2-7.11; P = 0.011), and SGA (HR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.31-5.5; P = 0.005) were associated with poor survival. Patients

  7. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  8. Status of MODIS spatial and spectral characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Dan; Wang, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-05-01

    Since launch, both Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments have continued to operate and make measurements of the earth's top of atmospheric (TOA) radiances and reflectance. MODIS collects data in 36 spectral bands covering wavelengths from 0.41 to 14.4 μm. These spectral bands and detectors are located on four focal plane assemblies (FPAs). MODIS on-board calibrators (OBC) include a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA), which was designed to characterize and monitor sensor spatial and spectral performance, such as on-orbit changes in the band-to-band registration (BBR), modulation transfer function (MTF), spectral band center wavelengths (CW) and bandwidths (BW). In this paper, we provide a status update of MODIS spatial and spectral characterization and performance, following a brief description of SRCA functions and on-orbit calibration activities. Sensor spatial and spectral performance parameters derived from SRCA measurements are introduced and discussed. Results show that on-orbit spatial performance has been very stable for both Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments. The large BBR shifts in Aqua MODIS, an issue identified pre-launch, have remained the same over its entire mission. On-orbit changes in CW and BW are less than 0.5 nm and 1 nm, respectively, for most VIS/NIR spectral bands of both instruments.

  9. Measures of Spectral Slope Using an Excised Larynx Model

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.; Finnegan, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Spectral measures of the glottal source were investigated using an excised canine larynx model for various aerodynamic and phonatory conditions. These measures included spectral harmonic difference H1-H2 and spectral slope that are highly correlated with voice quality but not reported in a systematic manner using an excised larynx model. It was hypothesized that the acoustic spectra of the glottal source were significantly influenced by the subglottal pressure, glottal adduction, and vocal fold elongation, and the resulting vibration pattern. Canine larynges were prepared, mounted on the bench with and without false vocal folds, and made to oscillate with flow of heated and humidified air. Major control parameters were subglottal pressure, adduction, and elongation. Electroglottograph (EGG), subglottal pressure, flowrate, and audio signals were analyzed using custom software. Results suggest that an increase in subglottal pressure and glottal adduction may change the energy balance between harmonics by increasing the spectral energy of the first few harmonics in an unpredictable manner. It is suggested that changes in the dynamics of vocal fold motion may be responsible for different spectral patterns. The finding that the spectral harmonics do not conform to previous findings was demonstrated through various cases. Results of this study may shed light on phonatory spectral control when the larynx is part of a complete vocal tract system. PMID:22056893

  10. Spectral Morphology for Feature Extraction from Multi- and Hyper-spectral Imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, N. R.; Porter, R. B.

    2005-01-01

    For accurate and robust analysis of remotely-sensed imagery it is necessary to combine the information from both spectral and spatial domains in a meaningful manner. The two domains are intimately linked: objects in a scene are defined in terms of both their composition and their spatial arrangement, and cannot accurately be described by information from either of these two domains on their own. To date there have been relatively few methods for combining spectral and spatial information concurrently. Most techniques involve separate processing for extracting spatial and spectral information. In this paper we will describe several extensions to traditional morphological operators that can treat spectral and spatial domains concurrently and can be used to extract relationships between these domains in a meaningful way. This includes the investgation and development of suitable vector-ordering metrics and machine-learning-based techniques for optimizing the various parameters of the morphological operators, such as morphological operator, structuring element and vector ordering metric. We demonstrate their application to a range of multi- and hyper-spectral image analysis problems.

  11. Integrated criteria of gamma-ray bursts spectral hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Voevodina, E. V.; Zenin, A. A.

    2013-02-01

    Most part of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) spectra are well described by Band model with following parameters: α, β (spectral indices in low and high energy bands) and Epeak (energy of spectral peak). For several GRB parameter β characterizing the spectral shape in the region up to some hundred MeV (for example, GRB100724B). Moreover, Band spectrum of GRB080916C covering 6 orders of magnitude. Until recently spectral hardness parameter H32 (the ratio of total counts in the 100 - 300 keV and 50 - 100 keV energy range) was used for additional classification events on hard and soft, for GRBs groups selection on hardness and duration distributions (subgroup of intermediate bursts) and so on. However, H32 is defined in energy intervals 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV, but for some GRB Epeak> 300 keV and this value is outside regions of H32 definition. Thus, parameter H32 is incompletely represents spectral properties of such events. Basing on Band model we introduce new integral criteria could be used in the wide energy band for data analysis in past experiments such as BATSE (0.02 - 2 MeV), COMPTEL (0.8 - 30 MeV); EGRET (20 MeV - 30 GeV); in now operated experiments Fermi (8 keV - 1MeV, 200 keV - 40 MeV and 300 MeV - 300 GeV), AGILE (18 - 60 keV and 30 MeV - 50 GeV) and in future experiments: GAMMA-400 (0.1 - 3000 GeV) and so on. In the present work spectral parameters taken from BATSE and from Fermi catalogues were analyzed and the new integral criteria were investigated. Results of data studying have shown that new criteria allow making GRB classification including intermediate bursts subgroup separation.

  12. Spectral functions in ultracold Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, William; Randeria, Mohit

    2011-03-01

    We study the fermion spectral function in the superfluid state across the BEC-BCS crossover and in the normal Fermi liquid phase in highly imbalanced Fermi gases. We focus on features that can be measured in momentum-resolved radio frequency spectroscopy experiments. We go beyond mean field theory and include the effects of Gaussian order parameter fluctuations in a manner that gives excellent agreement with asymptotically exact results for the T = 0 equation of state in the BEC and BCS limits, as well as quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) results near unitarity. We show that sharp Bogoliubov quasiparticles, with a substantial coherent spectral weight, exist near unitarity. We argue that this is true generally even beyond the Gaussian approximation. In addition, quasiparticle scattering and interaction with collective modes produces incoherent spectral weight. We show that the dispersion is strongly renormalized at unitarity with its minimum shifted up from its mean field value √{ 2 mμ } and compare our results with existing QMC data. We discuss how the spectral function changes qualitatively compared with its mean field form as 1 / (kF a) increases and the chemical potential changes sign. Supported by NSF-DMR 0706203 and ARO W911NF-08-1-0338.

  13. Source parameters of microearthquakes at Mount St Helens (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tusa, Giuseppina; Brancato, Alfonso; Gresta, Stefano; Malone, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    We estimate the source parameters for a selection of microearthquakes that occurred at Mount St Helens in the period 1995–1998. Excluding the activity of 2004 September, this time period includes the most intense episode of earthquake activity since the last dome-building eruption in 1986 October. 200 seismograms were processed to obtain seismic moments, source radii, stress drops and average fault slip. The source parameters were determined from the spectral analysis of P waves, after correction for attenuation and site effects. In particular, P-wave quality (Qp) and site (S) factors have been previously calculated in the frequency ranges 2–7 Hz and 18–30 Hz. Because it was impossible to perform corrections for Qp and S over the whole spectrum we applied a new approach, based on the notion of ‘holed spectrum’, to estimate spectral parameters. The term ‘holed spectrum’ indicates a spectrum lacking corrected spectral amplitude values at certain frequencies. We carried out a statistical study to verify that dealing with the ‘holed spectrum’ does not lead to significant differences in the estimates of spectral parameters. We also investigated the dependence of spectral parameters (low-frequency level, corner frequency and high-frequency decay) on the bandwidth of spectral hole, and defined the threshold values for three different spectral models. Displacement ‘holed spectra’, corrected by attenuation and site response, are then used to determine spectral parameters in order to calculate seismic source parameters. Seismic moments range from 1017 to 1019 dyne-cm, source dimensions from 100 to 350 m, and average fault slip from 0.003 to 0.1 cm. Self-similarity seems to break down in that stress drops are very low (0.1–1 bars). We postulate that seismicity is associated with a brittle shear failure mechanism occurring in a highly heterogeneous material under a relatively low stress regime.

  14. CCFpams: Atmospheric stellar parameters from cross-correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, Luca; Lovis, Christophe; Pepe, Francesco; Sneden, Christopher; Udry, Stephane

    2017-07-01

    CCFpams allows the measurement of stellar temperature, metallicity and gravity within a few seconds and in a completely automated fashion. Rather than performing comparisons with spectral libraries, the technique is based on the determination of several cross-correlation functions (CCFs) obtained by including spectral features with different sensitivity to the photospheric parameters. Literature stellar parameters of high signal-to-noise (SNR) and high-resolution HARPS spectra of FGK Main Sequence stars are used to calibrate the stellar parameters as a function of CCF areas.

  15. Potential energy curves and spectroscopic parameters of the 24 Λ-S states and 54 Ω states of the F2 + cation including the spin-orbit coupling effect*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-11-01

    This work calculated the PECs of 24 Λ-S states and 54 Ω states of F2+ cation. The calculations were done with the CASSCF method, which was followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach. Core-valence correlation correction, scalar relativistic correction and basis set extrapolation were taken into account. Of these 24 Λ-S states, the 22Σg-, 22Σu-, 24Σg-, 14Δu, and 24Πg states were found to be repulsive. The X2Πg, A2Πu 14Δg, 14Πg and 24Πg states were found to be inverted with the spin-orbit coupling effect included. The 12Δg, 24Πu, 14Πg, 14Σu+, 22Πu, 14Σg-, 24Σu-, and 12Σg+ states were found to be weakly bound. The 24Σu- state had double wells. The avoided crossings of PECs were observed between the A2Πu and 22Πu states, the X2Πg and 22Πg states, the 12Σu- and 22Σu- states, the 14Πu and 24Πu states, and the 14Σ-g and 24Σ-g states. Some spectroscopic parameters were determined and the vibrational properties of several weakly-bound states were predicted. The spin-orbit coupling effect on the spectroscopic parameters was evaluated. Comparison with available experimental data shows that the methodology used in this paper is highly accurate for this system. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70388-9

  16. [Spectral parameters of heart rate variability and frequency of detection of autoantibodies to beta(1)-adrenoreceptors in patients with tachyarrhythmias: idiopathic and at the background of primary myocardial diseases].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, T Ia; Bekbosynova, M S; Golitsyn, S P; Novikova, D S; Loladze, N V; Tonevitskiĭ, A G

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess parameters of heart rate variability (HRV) and prevalence of autoantibodies against the beta(1)-adrenoreceptors in patients with cardiac arrhythmias we studied 42 patients with arrhythmias and 20 healthy control subjects. Thirty one patients with idiopathic arrhythmias were included in group I: with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or flutter (n=13), paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (n=2) and paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia (n=16). Group II was formed of 11 patients with paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia and dilated cardiomyopathy or chronic myocarditis. ab1-AR were determined in blood serum by direct immunoassay. Synthetic fragment containing 26 amino acids of ab1-AR second loop was used as antigen. Groups I (54.8%) and II (63.6%) showed similar prevalence of ab1-AR, which was significantly higher than in control subjects (10%) (p<0.005). HRV parameters in I group were lower in ab1-AR-positive compared with ab1-AR-negative patients. At the same time HRV parameters in ab1-AR-positive patients were significantly different from those in controls (p<0.05). In group II HRV parameters of ab1-AR-positive and ab1-AR-negative patients were significantly lower than in control subjects (p<0.05). We suppose, that ab1-AR could participate in dysfunction of chronotropic heart regulation and contribute to development of arrhythmias in patients with structurally normal hearts.

  17. Evolutionary Computing Methods for Spectral Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, Richard; Fink, Wolfgang; Huntsberger, Terrance; Lee, Seugwon; Tisdale, Edwin; VonAllmen, Paul; Tinetti, Geivanna

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for processing spectral images to retrieve information on underlying physical, chemical, and/or biological phenomena is based on evolutionary and related computational methods implemented in software. In a typical case, the solution (the information that one seeks to retrieve) consists of parameters of a mathematical model that represents one or more of the phenomena of interest. The methodology was developed for the initial purpose of retrieving the desired information from spectral image data acquired by remote-sensing instruments aimed at planets (including the Earth). Examples of information desired in such applications include trace gas concentrations, temperature profiles, surface types, day/night fractions, cloud/aerosol fractions, seasons, and viewing angles. The methodology is also potentially useful for retrieving information on chemical and/or biological hazards in terrestrial settings. In this methodology, one utilizes an iterative process that minimizes a fitness function indicative of the degree of dissimilarity between observed and synthetic spectral and angular data. The evolutionary computing methods that lie at the heart of this process yield a population of solutions (sets of the desired parameters) within an accuracy represented by a fitness-function value specified by the user. The evolutionary computing methods (ECM) used in this methodology are Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing, both of which are well-established optimization techniques and have also been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. These are embedded in a conceptual framework, represented in the architecture of the implementing software, that enables automatic retrieval of spectral and angular data and analysis of the retrieved solutions for uniqueness.

  18. Parameters Describing Earth Observing Remote Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanoni, Vicki; Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Davis, Bruce; Markham, Brian; Storey, Jim

    2003-01-01

    The Earth science community needs to generate consistent and standard definitions for spatial, spectral, radiometric, and geometric properties describing passive electro-optical Earth observing sensors and their products. The parameters used to describe sensors and to describe their products are often confused. In some cases, parameters for a sensor and for its products are identical; in other cases, these parameters vary widely. Sensor parameters are bound by the fundamental performance of a system, while product parameters describe what is available to the end user. Products are often resampled, edge sharpened, pan-sharpened, or compressed, and can differ drastically from the intrinsic data acquired by the sensor. Because detailed sensor performance information may not be readily available to an international science community, standardization of product parameters is of primary performance. Spatial product parameters described include Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), point spread function, line spread function, edge response, stray light, edge sharpening, aliasing, ringing, and compression effects. Spectral product parameters discussed include full width half maximum, ripple, slope edge, and out-of-band rejection. Radiometric product properties discussed include relative and absolute radiometry, noise equivalent spectral radiance, noise equivalent temperature diffenence, and signal-to-noise ratio. Geometric product properties discussed include geopositional accuracy expressed as CE90, LE90, and root mean square error. Correlated properties discussed include such parameters as band-to-band registration, which is both a spectral and a spatial property. In addition, the proliferation of staring and pushbroom sensor architectures requires new parameters to describe artifacts that are different from traditional cross-track system artifacts. A better understanding of how various system parameters affect product performance is also needed to better ascertain the

  19. spectral-cube: Read and analyze astrophysical spectral data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Thomas; Ginsburg, Adam; Beaumont, Chris; Leroy, Adam; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Spectral-cube provides an easy way to read, manipulate, analyze, and write data cubes with two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension, optionally with Stokes parameters. It is a versatile data container for building custom analysis routines. It provides a uniform interface to spectral cubes, robust to the wide range of conventions of axis order, spatial projections, and spectral units that exist in the wild, and allows easy extraction of cube sub-regions using physical coordinates. It has the ability to create, combine, and apply masks to datasets and is designed to work with datasets too large to load into memory, and provide basic summary statistic methods like moments and array aggregates.

  20. Spectral amplification models for response spectrum addressing the directivity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, Saed; Akkar, Sinan

    2017-04-01

    Ground motions with forward directivity effects are known with their significantly large spectral ordinates in medium-to-long periods. The large spectral ordinates stem from the impulsive characteristics of the forward directivity ground motions. The quantification of these spectral amplifications requires the identification of major seismological parameters that play a role in their generation. After running a suite of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, Moghimi and Akkar (2016) have shown that fault slip rate, fault characteristic magnitude, fault-site geometry as well as mean annual exceedance rate are important parameters that determine the level of spectral amplification due to directivity. These parameters are considered to develop two separate spectral amplification equations in this study. The proposed equations rely on Shahi and Baker (SHB11; 2011) and Chiou and Spudich (CHS13; Spudic et al., 2013) narrow-band forward directivity models. The presented equations only focus on the estimation of maximum spectral amplifications that occur at the ends of the fault segments. This way we eliminate the fault-site parameter in our equations for simplification. The proposed equations show different trends due to differences in the narrow-band directivity models of SHB11 and CHS13. The equations given in this study can form bases for describing forward directivity effects in seismic design codes. REFERENCES Shahi. S., Baker, J.W. (2011), "An Empirically Calibrated Framework for Including the Effects of Near-Fault Directivity in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis", Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 101(2): 742-755. Spudich, P., Watson-Lamprey, J., Somerville, P., Bayless, J., Shahi, S. K., Baker, J. W., Rowshandel, B., and Chiou, B. (2013), "Final Report of the NGA-West2 Directivity Working Group", PEER Report 2013/09. Moghimi. S., Akkar, S. (2016), "Implications of Forward Directivity Effects on Design Ground Motions", Seismological Society of

  1. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  2. Spectral Synthesis with Empirical Priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodre, L., Jr.

    2017-07-01

    We have been developing a Bayesian parameter estimator which is very competitive compared with other machine learning methods, as evidenced by several experiments performed by our group (e.g., on photometric redshifts and galaxy spectral synthesis). Our approach relies on a training set, i.e., a (empirical, theoretical or mixed) data set with known parameters, and outputs the probability distribution function of a certain parameter, as well as other statistical summaries of this distribution, for all galaxies in the survey. We propose to build a large training set using theoretical libraries and use them to derive galaxy parameters from S-PLUS, J-PLUS and J-PAS observations.

  3. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  4. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  5. The Complete Spectral Catalog of Bright BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Band, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We present a systematic spectral analysis of 350 bright Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; approx. 30 keV - 2 MeV; including 17 short GRBs) with high energy and time resolution. Our sample was selected from the complete set of 2704 BATSE GRBs based on their energy fluence or peak photon flux values to assure good statistics. To obtain well-constrained, model-unbiased spectral parameters, a set of various photon models is used to fit each spectrum, and internal characteristics of each model are also investigated. A thorough analysis has been performed on 342 time-integrated and 8459 time-resolved burst spectra, and the effects of integration times in determining the spectral parameters are explored. The analysis results presented here provide the most detailed perspective of spectral aspects of the GRB prompt emission to date. Using the results, we study correlations among spectral parameters and spectral evolutions. The results of all spectral fits are available electronically in FITS format, from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  6. The Complete Spectral Catalog of Bright BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Band, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We present a systematic spectral analysis of 350 bright Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; approx. 30 keV - 2 MeV; including 17 short GRBs) with high energy and time resolution. Our sample was selected from the complete set of 2704 BATSE GRBs based on their energy fluence or peak photon flux values to assure good statistics. To obtain well-constrained, model-unbiased spectral parameters, a set of various photon models is used to fit each spectrum, and internal characteristics of each model are also investigated. A thorough analysis has been performed on 342 time-integrated and 8459 time-resolved burst spectra, and the effects of integration times in determining the spectral parameters are explored. The analysis results presented here provide the most detailed perspective of spectral aspects of the GRB prompt emission to date. Using the results, we study correlations among spectral parameters and spectral evolutions. The results of all spectral fits are available electronically in FITS format, from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  7. Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Egger, Ann

    2001-11-01

    SPEX enables the user to interactively create, display, compare, and analyze spectra (in particular gamma-ray spectra). It includes features from the INEEL GAUSS software series and the ORNL DAMM program. Input data is spectrum histograms, energy calibration, peakwidth calibrationb, and peak energy listgs. Output data includes new spectra created from projections, postscript for printing current view, summary log, gaussian fit log, exported energy calibratgion, exported peak lists and banana gates.

  8. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  9. Spectral density of Cooper pairs in two level quantum dot-superconductors Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhyani, A.; Rawat, P. S.; Tewari, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, we report the role of quantum dot energy levels on the electronic spectral density for a two level quantum dot coupled to s-wave superconducting leads. The theoretical arguments in this work are based on the Anderson model so that it necessarily includes dot energies, single particle tunneling and superconducting order parameter for BCS superconductors. The expression for single particle spectral function is obtained by using the Green's function equation of motion technique. On the basis of numerical computation of spectral function of superconducting leads, it has been found that the charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by the positions and availability of the dot levels.

  10. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  11. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  12. Studying Spectral Variability of an Igneous Stratified Complex as a Tool to Map Lunar Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Sgavetti, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Serventi, G.

    2012-07-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper data have revealed different portion of magmatic chambers or separate plutons. We analysed Stillwater Complex (SWC) rock suite. Spectral signatures and spectral parameters could help to interpret the new spectral lunar data.

  13. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue, revision 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.; Poynter, R. L.; Cohen, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    A computer-accessible catalog of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10,000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers) is described. The catalog can be used as a planning or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, the lower state energy, and the quantum number assignment. This edition of the catalog has information on 206 atomic and molecular species and includes a total of 630,924 lines. The catalog was constructed by using theoretical least square fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalog will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings as new data appear. The catalog is available as a magnetic data tape recorded in card images, with one card image per spectral line, from the National Space Science Data Center, located at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  14. Standard methods for spectral estimation and prewhitening

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, S.D.

    1986-07-01

    A standard FFT periodogram-averaging method for power spectral estimation is described in detail, with examples that the reader can use to verify his own software. The parameters that must be specified in order to repeat a given spectral estimate are listed. A standard technique for prewhitening is also described, again with repeatable examples and a summary of the parameters that must be specified.

  15. Planar-waveguide integrated spectral comparator.

    PubMed

    Mossberg, T W; Iazikov, D; Greiner, C

    2004-06-01

    A cost-effective yet robust and versatile dual-channel spectral comparator is presented. The silica-on-silicon planar-waveguide integrated device includes two holographic Bragg-grating reflectors (HBRs) with complementary spectral transfer functions. Output comprises projections of input signal spectra onto the complementary spectral channels. Spectral comparators may be useful in optical code-division multiplexing, optical packet decoding, spectral target recognition, and the identification of molecular spectra. HBRs may be considered to be mode-specific photonic crystals.

  16. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  17. Dynamics of modulated beams in spectral domain

    DOE PAGES

    Yampolsky, Nikolai A.

    2017-07-16

    General formalism for describing dynamics of modulated beams along linear beamlines is developed. We describe modulated beams with spectral distribution function which represents Fourier transform of the conventional beam distribution function in the 6-dimensional phase space. The introduced spectral distribution function is localized in some region of the spectral domain for nearly monochromatic modulations. It can be characterized with a small number of typical parameters such as the lowest order moments of the spectral distribution. We study evolution of the modulated beams in linear beamlines and find that characteristic spectral parameters transform linearly. The developed approach significantly simplifies analysis ofmore » various schemes proposed for seeding X-ray free electron lasers. We use this approach to study several recently proposed schemes and find the bandwidth of the output bunching in each case.« less

  18. The Simple Spectral Access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, Markus; Tody, Doug

    2004-09-01

    The goal of the Simple Spectral Access (SSA) specification is to define a uniform interface to spectral data including spectral energy distributions (SEDs), 1D spectra, and time series data. In contrast to 2D images, spectra are stored in a wide variety of formats and there is no widely used standard in astronomy for representing spectral data, hence part of the challenge of specifying SSA was defining a general spectrophotometric data model as well as definitions of standard serializations in a variety of data formats including XML and FITS. Access is provided to both atlas (pre-computed) data and to virtual data which is computed on demand. The term simple in Simple Spectrum Access refers to the design goal of simplicity in both implementing spectral data services and in retrieving spectroscopic data from distributed data collections. SSA is a product of the data access layer (DAL) working group of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The requirements were derived from a survey among spectral data providers and data consumers and were further refined in a broad discussion in meetings and electronic forums as well as by prototyping efforts within the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and the US National Virtual Observatory (NVO).

  19. Spectral disentangling with Spectangular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablowski, Daniel P.; Weber, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The paper introduces the software Spectangular for spectral disentangling via singular value decomposition with global optimisation of the orbital parameters of the stellar system or radial velocities of the individual observations. We will describe the procedure and the different options implemented in our program. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the performance and the applicability using tests on artificial data. Additionally, we use high-resolution spectra of Capella to demonstrate the performance of our code on real-world data. The novelty of this package is the implemented global optimisation algorithm and the graphical user interface (GUI) for ease of use. We have implemented the code to tackle SB1 and SB2 systems with the option of also dealing with telluric (static) lines. Based in part on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.

  20. Theoretical and experimental study of spectral characteristics of the photoacoustic signal from stochastically distributed particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohua; Tao, Chao; Yang, Yiqun; Wang, Xueding; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique which inherits the merits of optical imaging and ultrasonic imaging. However, classical photoacoustic imaging mainly makes use of the time-domain parameters of signals. In contrast to previous studies, we theoretically investigate the spectral characteristics of the photoacoustic signal from stochastic distributed particles. The spectral slope is extracted and used for describing the spectral characteristics of the photoacoustic signal. Both Gaussian and spherical distributions of optical absorption in particles are considered. For both situations, the spectral slope is monotonically decreased with the increase of particle size. In addition, the quantitative relationship between the spectral slope and the imaging system factors, including the laser pulse envelope, directivity of ultrasound transducer, and signal bandwidth, are theoretically analyzed. Finally, an idealized phantom experiment is performed to validate the analyses and examine the instrument independent of the spectral slope. This work provides a theoretical framework and new experimental evidence for spectrum analysis of the photoacoustic signal. This could be helpful for quantitative tissue evaluation and imaging based on the spectral parameters of the photoacoustic signal.

  1. Validation of buoyancy driven spectral tensor model using HATS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougule, A.; Mann, J.; Kelly, M.; Larsen, G. C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a homogeneous spectral tensor model for wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, driven by mean vertical shear and mean temperature gradient. Results from the model, including one-dimensional velocity and temperature spectra and the associated co-spectra, are shown in this paper. The model also reproduces two-point statistics, such as coherence and phases, via cross-spectra between two points separated in space. Model results are compared with observations from the Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program (Horst et al. 2004). The spectral velocity tensor in the model is described via five parameters: the dissipation rate (ɛ), length scale of energy-containing eddies (L), a turbulence anisotropy parameter (Γ), gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing the atmospheric stability and the rate of destruction of temperature variance (ηθ).

  2. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  3. Machine learning and spectral techniques for lithological classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parakh, Khushboo; Thakur, Sanchari; Chudasama, Bijal; Tirodkar, Siddhesh; Porwal, Alok; Bhattacharya, Avik

    2016-04-01

    Experimentations with applications of machine learning algorithms such as random forest (RF), support vector machines (SVM) and fuzzy inference system (FIS) to lithological classification of multispectral datasets are described. The input dataset such as LANDSAT-8 and Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) in conjunction with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation are used. The training data included image pixels with known lithoclasses as well as the laboratory spectra of field samples of the major lithoclasses. The study area is a part of Ajmer and Pali Districts, Western Rajasthan, India. The main lithoclasses exposed in the area are amphibolite, granite, calc-silicates, mica-schist, pegmatite and carbonates. In a parallel implementation, spectral parameters derived from the continuum-removed laboratory spectra of the field samples (e.g., band depth) were used in spectral matching algorithms to generate geological maps from the LANDSAT-8 and ASTER data. The classification results indicate that, as compared to the SVM, the RF algorithm provides higher accuracy for the minority class, while for the rest of the classes the two algorithms are comparable. The RF algorithm effectively deals with outliers and also ranks the input spectral bands based on their importance in classification. The FIS approach provides an efficient expert-driven system for lithological classification. It based on matching the image spectral features with the absorption features of the laboratory spectra of the field samples, and returns comparable results for some lithoclasses. The study also establishes spectral parameters of amphibolite, granite, calc-silicates, mica-schist, pegmatite and carbonates that can be used in generating geological maps from multispectral data using spectral matching algorithms.

  4. Spectral phase-shift detection of surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliakova, M.; Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.

    2016-12-01

    A two-step spectral interferometric technique to detect the spectral phase shift of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the Kretschmann configuration is proposed and demonstrated. The technique utilizes a polarimetry setup to record two channeled spectra, one including reflection of p- and s-polarized waves from an SPR structure for air when the SPR phenomenon does not occur, and the other one for an analyte when the SPR phenomenon occurs. The channeled spectra are used to detect the SPR spectral phase shift and first, an SF10 glass prism and a gold coated SF10 slide with a chromium adhesion layer is used to measure the SPR phase shift for aqueous solutions of ethanol. In addition, the position of a sharp maximum in the spectral derivative of the SPR phase shift is measured as a function of the analyte parameter. Second, the setup with a gold coated SF10 glass prism is used to measure the SPR phase shift for the same analyte. It is revealed that the detection accuracy of the measurement of the spectral derivative of the SPR phase shift in the second setup is lower than that in the first setup. For the first case, the measurements are accompanied by theoretical modeling of the SPR responses using the material dispersion characteristics.

  5. Constrained spectral clustering under a local proximity structure assumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Xu, Qianjun; des Jardins, Marie

    2005-01-01

    This work focuses on incorporating pairwise constraints into a spectral clustering algorithm. A new constrained spectral clustering method is proposed, as well as an active constraint acquisition technique and a heuristic for parameter selection. We demonstrate that our constrained spectral clustering method, CSC, works well when the data exhibits what we term local proximity structure.

  6. Spectral imaging toolbox: segmentation, hyperstack reconstruction, and batch processing of spectral images for the determination of cell and model membrane lipid order.

    PubMed

    Aron, Miles; Browning, Richard; Carugo, Dario; Sezgin, Erdinc; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Eggeling, Christian; Stride, Eleanor

    2017-05-12

    Spectral imaging with polarity-sensitive fluorescent probes enables the quantification of cell and model membrane physical properties, including local hydration, fluidity, and lateral lipid packing, usually characterized by the generalized polarization (GP) parameter. With the development of commercial microscopes equipped with spectral detectors, spectral imaging has become a convenient and powerful technique for measuring GP and other membrane properties. The existing tools for spectral image processing, however, are insufficient for processing the large data sets afforded by this technological advancement, and are unsuitable for processing images acquired with rapidly internalized fluorescent probes. Here we present a MATLAB spectral imaging toolbox with the aim of overcoming these limitations. In addition to common operations, such as the calculation of distributions of GP values, generation of pseudo-colored GP maps, and spectral analysis, a key highlight of this tool is reliable membrane segmentation for probes that are rapidly internalized. Furthermore, handling for hyperstacks, 3D reconstruction and batch processing facilitates analysis of data sets generated by time series, z-stack, and area scan microscope operations. Finally, the object size distribution is determined, which can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying changes in membrane properties and is desirable for e.g. studies involving model membranes and surfactant coated particles. Analysis is demonstrated for cell membranes, cell-derived vesicles, model membranes, and microbubbles with environmentally-sensitive probes Laurdan, carboxyl-modified Laurdan (C-Laurdan), Di-4-ANEPPDHQ, and Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA (FE), for quantification of the local lateral density of lipids or lipid packing. The Spectral Imaging Toolbox is a powerful tool for the segmentation and processing of large spectral imaging datasets with a reliable method for membrane segmentation and no ability in programming required. The

  7. A spectral approach for damage quantification in stochastic dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, M. R.; Adhikari, S.; Santos, J. M. C. Dos

    2017-05-01

    Intrinsic to all real structures, parameter uncertainty can be found in material properties and geometries. Many structural parameters, such as, elastic modulus, Poisson's rate, thickness, density, etc., are spatially distributed by nature. The Karhunen-Loève expansion is a method used to model the random field expanded in a spectral decomposition. Once many structural parameters can not be modelled as a Gaussian distribution the memoryless nonlinear transformation is used to translate a Gaussian random field in a non-Gaussian. Thus, stochastic methods have been used to include these uncertainties in the structural model. The Spectral Element Method (SEM) is a wave-based numerical approach used to model structures. It is also developed to express parameters as spatially correlated random field in its formulation. In this paper, the problem of structural damage detection under the presence of spatially distributed random parameter is addressed. Explicit equations to localize and assess damage are proposed based on the SEM formulation. Numerical examples in an axially vibrating undamaged and damaged structure with distributed parameters are analysed.

  8. Stingray: Spectral-timing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Bachetti, Matteo; Stevens, Abigail L.; Migliari, Simone; Balm, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Stingray is a spectral-timing software package for astrophysical X-ray (and more) data. The package merges existing efforts for a (spectral-)timing package in Python and is composed of a library of time series methods (including power spectra, cross spectra, covariance spectra, and lags); scripts to load FITS data files from different missions; a simulator of light curves and event lists that includes different kinds of variability and more complicated phenomena based on the impulse response of given physical events (e.g. reverberation); and a GUI to ease the learning curve for new users.

  9. Basic elements of power spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    The basic elements of power spectral analysis with emphasis on the Blackman-Tukey method are presented. Short discussions are included on the topics of pre-whitening, frequency and spectral windows, and statistical reliability. Examples are included whenever possible, and a FORTRAN subroutine for calculating a power spectrum is presented.

  10. On the spectral function of carriers in the pseudogap state

    SciTech Connect

    Belemuk, A. M.; Barabanov, A. F.

    2016-09-15

    We consider the evolution of the spectral function of charge carriers for a 2D Kondo lattice depending on the parameters of the model. A self-consistent solution is obtained for the spectral function using the formalism of irreducible Green’s functions. In the low doping level regime, the behavior of the spectral function exhibits suppression of the spectral weight of carriers in the low-frequency range, which is typical of the pseudogap state.

  11. Spectral simulations of reacting turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Givi, Peyman

    1991-01-01

    Spectral methods for simulating flows are reviewed, emphasizing their recent applications to reacting flow problems. Various classifications of spectral methods and their convergence properties are described and the 'spectral element' method is presented, highlighting its flexibility in dealing with complex flow geometries. The applications considered include chemical reactions in homogeneous turbulence, temporally evolving mixing layers, variable-density simulations, nonequilibrium chemistry, and spatially evolving mixing layers.

  12. Variable anelastic attenuation and site effect in estimating source parameters of various major earthquakes including M w 7.8 Nepal and M w 7.5 Hindu kush earthquake by using far-field strong-motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Kumar, Parveen; Chauhan, Vishal; Hazarika, Devajit

    2016-12-01

    Strong-motion records of recent Gorkha Nepal earthquake (M w 7.8), its strong aftershocks and seismic events of Hindu kush region have been analysed for estimation of source parameters. The M w 7.8 Gorkha Nepal earthquake of 25 April 2015 and its six aftershocks of magnitude range 5.3-7.3 are recorded at Multi-Parametric Geophysical Observatory, Ghuttu, Garhwal Himalaya (India) >600 km west from the epicentre of main shock of Gorkha earthquake. The acceleration data of eight earthquakes occurred in the Hindu kush region also recorded at this observatory which is located >1000 km east from the epicentre of M w 7.5 Hindu kush earthquake on 26 October 2015. The shear wave spectra of acceleration record are corrected for the possible effects of anelastic attenuation at both source and recording site as well as for site amplification. The strong-motion data of six local earthquakes are used to estimate the site amplification and the shear wave quality factor (Q β) at recording site. The frequency-dependent Q β(f) = 124f 0.98 is computed at Ghuttu station by using inversion technique. The corrected spectrum is compared with theoretical spectrum obtained from Brune's circular model for the horizontal components using grid search algorithm. Computed seismic moment, stress drop and source radius of the earthquakes used in this work range 8.20 × 1016-5.72 × 1020 Nm, 7.1-50.6 bars and 3.55-36.70 km, respectively. The results match with the available values obtained by other agencies.

  13. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  14. Agile dual-channel spectral imaging with spectral zooming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Wang, Michael R; Yang, Jame J

    2008-08-10

    A dual-channel spectral imaging system with agile spectral band access and spectral bandwidth tuning capability is presented. A diffractive grating and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) are respectively used as spectral dispersion and spectral filtering elements for the two channels. A 4f spectral filtering channel using an adjustable slit is set up at the first diffraction order of the grating to realize coarse spectral band selection. The AOTF selectively filters the spectrum of the nondispersed zero order to realize fine spectral imaging. The spectral zooming function is achieved without increasing spectral frame number facilitating real-time spectral imaging operation. Feasibility of the spectral imaging has been demonstrated through preliminary experiments. Minimum 6 nm spectral resolution and 1.2 degrees field of view have been achieved. The real-time spectral imaging capable of wide spectral band operation without loosing desired fine spectral capability is particularly useful for a variety of defense, medical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  15. The VITRO Score (Von Willebrand Factor Antigen/Thrombocyte Ratio) as a New Marker for Clinically Significant Portal Hypertension in Comparison to Other Non-Invasive Parameters of Fibrosis Including ELF Test

    PubMed Central

    Hametner, Stephanie; Ferlitsch, Arnulf; Ferlitsch, Monika; Etschmaier, Alexandra; Schöfl, Rainer; Ziachehabi, Alexander; Maieron, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically significant portal hypertension (CSPH), defined as hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) ≥10 mmHg, causes major complications. HVPG is not always available, so a non-invasive tool to diagnose CSPH would be useful. VWF-Ag can be used to diagnose. Using the VITRO score (the VWF-Ag/platelet ratio) instead of VWF-Ag itself improves the diagnostic accuracy of detecting cirrhosis/ fibrosis in HCV patients. Aim This study tested the diagnostic accuracy of VITRO score detecting CSPH compared to HVPG measurement. Methods All patients underwent HVPG testing and were categorised as CSPH or no CSPH. The following patient data were determined: CPS, D’Amico stage, VITRO score, APRI and transient elastography (TE). Results The analysis included 236 patients; 170 (72%) were male, and the median age was 57.9 (35.2–76.3; 95% CI). Disease aetiology included ALD (39.4%), HCV (23.4%), NASH (12.3%), other (8.1%) and unknown (11.9%). The CPS showed 140 patients (59.3%) with CPS A; 56 (23.7%) with CPS B; and 18 (7.6%) with CPS C. 136 patients (57.6%) had compensated and 100 (42.4%) had decompensated cirrhosis; 83.9% had HVPG ≥10 mmHg. The VWF-Ag and the VITRO score increased significantly with worsening HVPG categories (P<0.0001). ROC analysis was performed for the detection of CSPH and showed AUC values of 0.92 for TE, 0.86 for VITRO score, 0.79 for VWF-Ag, 0.68 for ELF and 0.62 for APRI. Conclusion The VITRO score is an easy way to diagnose CSPH independently of CPS in routine clinical work and may improve the management of patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26895398

  16. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  17. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  18. Multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubin; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a spectrally resolved photoacoustic imaging method, namely multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography (PAET) for quantifying the physiological parameters and elastic modulus of biological tissues. We theoretically and experimentally examined the PAET imaging method using simulations and in vitro experimental tests. Our simulation and in vitro experimental results indicated that the reconstructions were quantitatively accurate in terms of sizes, the physiological and elastic properties of the targets. PMID:27699101

  19. Multi Spectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical imaging system provides automatic co-registration of a plurality of multi spectral images of an object which are generated by a plurality of video cameras or other optical detectors. The imaging system includes a modular assembly of beam splitters, lens tubes, camera lenses and wavelength selective filters which facilitate easy reconfiguration and adjustment of the system for various applications. A primary lens assembly generates a real image of an object to be imaged on a reticle which is positioned at a fixed length from a beam splitter assembly. The beam splitter assembly separates a collimated image beam received from the reticle into multiple image beams, each of which is projected onto a corresponding one of a plurality of video cameras. The lens tubes which connect the beam splitter assembly to the cameras are adjustable in length to provide automatic co-registration of the images generated by each camera.

  20. [Modern spectral estimation of ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Jia, Q; Liu, S; Guo, L; Chen, H; Zeng, X

    2000-06-01

    The inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and its signal characteristics were discussed using modern spectral estimation technique. The power spectra density (PSD) was calculated using the auto-regression (AR) model of modern spectra estimation. The Levinson-Durbin recursion method was used to estimate the model parameters which were used for the PSD computation. The results obtained with actual ICP-AES spectra and measurements showed that the spectral estimation technique was helpful for the better understanding about spectral composition and signal characteristics.

  1. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  2. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  3. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  4. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  5. Ensemble spectral variability study of Active Galactic Nuclei from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafinelli, R.; Vagnetti, F.; Middei, R.

    2016-02-01

    The variability of the X-Ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) usually includes a change of the spectral slope. This has been investigated for a small sample of local AGNs by Sobolewska and Papadakis [1], who found that slope variations are well correlated with flux variations, and that the spectra are typically steeper in the bright phase (softer when brighter behaviour). Not much information is available for the spectral variability of high-luminosity AGNs and quasars. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we use data from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, Data Release 5, which contains X- Ray observations for a large number of active galactic nuclei in a wide luminosity and redshift range, for several different epochs. This allows to perform an ensemble analysis of the spectral variability for a large sample of quasars. We quantify the spectral variability through the spectral variability parameter β, defined by Trevese and Vagnetti [2] as the ratio between the change in spectral slope and the corresponding logarithmic flux variation. We find that the spectral variability of quasars has a softer when brighter behaviour, similarly to local AGNs.

  6. Spectral Variability of Romano's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryeva, O.; Abolmasov, P.

    2010-10-01

    We combine archival spectral observations of the LBV star V532 (Romano's star) together with existing photometric data in the B band. Spectroscopic data cover 15 years of observations (from 1992 to 2007). We show that the object in maximum of brightness behaves as an emission line supergiant while in minimum V532 moves along the sequence of late WN stars. In this sense, the object behaves similarly to the well-known Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars AG Car and R127, but is somewhat hotter at the minima. We identify about 100 spectral lines in the 3700-7300Å range. As of today, our spectroscopy is the most comprehensive for this object. The velocity of the wind is derived using the He I triplet lines (360±30 km s(-1) ). Physical parameters of the nebula around V532 are estimated.

  7. The pulsar spectral index distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, S. D.; Lorimer, D. R.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2013-05-01

    The flux-density spectra of radio pulsars are known to be steep and, to first order, described by a power-law relationship of the form Sν ∝ να, where Sν is the flux density at some frequency ν and α is the spectral index. Although measurements of α have been made over the years for several hundred pulsars, a study of the intrinsic distribution of pulsar spectra has not been carried out. From the result of pulsar surveys carried out at three different radio frequencies, we use population synthesis techniques and a likelihood analysis to deduce what underlying spectral index distribution is required to replicate the results of these surveys. We find that in general the results of the surveys can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution of spectral indices with a mean of -1.4 and unit standard deviation. We also consider the impact of the so-called gigahertz-peaked spectrum pulsars proposed by Kijak et al. The fraction of peaked-spectrum sources in the population with any significant turnover at low frequencies appears to be at most 10 per cent. We demonstrate that high-frequency (>2 GHz) surveys preferentially select flatter spectrum pulsars and the converse is true for lower frequency (<1 GHz) surveys. This implies that any correlations between α and other pulsar parameters (for example age or magnetic field) need to carefully account for selection biases in pulsar surveys. We also expect that many known pulsars which have been detected at high frequencies will have shallow, or positive, spectral indices. The majority of pulsars do not have recorded flux density measurements over a wide frequency range, making it impossible to constrain their spectral shapes. We also suggest that such measurements would allow an improved description of any populations of pulsars with `non-standard' spectra. Further refinements to this picture will soon be possible from the results of surveys with the Green Bank Telescope and LOFAR.

  8. Quantifying the influences of spectral resolution on uncertainty in leaf trait estimates through a Bayesian approach to RTM inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Shiklomanov, Alexey N.; Dietze, Michael C.; Viskari, Toni; ...

    2016-06-09

    The remote monitoring of plant canopies is critically needed for understanding of terrestrial ecosystem mechanics and biodiversity as well as capturing the short- to long-term responses of vegetation to disturbance and climate change. A variety of orbital, sub-orbital, and field instruments have been used to retrieve optical spectral signals and to study different vegetation properties such as plant biochemistry, nutrient cycling, physiology, water status, and stress. Radiative transfer models (RTMs) provide a mechanistic link between vegetation properties and observed spectral features, and RTM spectral inversion is a useful framework for estimating these properties from spectral data. However, existing approaches tomore » RTM spectral inversion are typically limited by the inability to characterize uncertainty in parameter estimates. Here, we introduce a Bayesian algorithm for the spectral inversion of the PROSPECT 5 leaf RTM that is distinct from past approaches in two important ways: First, the algorithm only uses reflectance and does not require transmittance observations, which have been plagued by a variety of measurement and equipment challenges. Second, the output is not a point estimate for each parameter but rather the joint probability distribution that includes estimates of parameter uncertainties and covariance structure. We validated our inversion approach using a database of leaf spectra together with measurements of equivalent water thickness (EWT) and leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA). The parameters estimated by our inversion were able to accurately reproduce the observed reflectance (RMSEVIS = 0.0063, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0098) and transmittance (RMSEVIS = 0.0404, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0551) for both broadleaved and conifer species. Inversion estimates of EWT and LMA for broadleaved species agreed well with direct measurements (CVEWT = 18.8%, CVLMA = 24.5%), while estimates for conifer species were less accurate (CVEWT = 53.2%, CVLMA = 63.3%). To

  9. Quantifying the influences of spectral resolution on uncertainty in leaf trait estimates through a Bayesian approach to RTM inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shiklomanov, Alexey N.; Dietze, Michael C.; Viskari, Toni; Townsend, Philip A.; Serbin, Shawn P.

    2016-06-09

    The remote monitoring of plant canopies is critically needed for understanding of terrestrial ecosystem mechanics and biodiversity as well as capturing the short- to long-term responses of vegetation to disturbance and climate change. A variety of orbital, sub-orbital, and field instruments have been used to retrieve optical spectral signals and to study different vegetation properties such as plant biochemistry, nutrient cycling, physiology, water status, and stress. Radiative transfer models (RTMs) provide a mechanistic link between vegetation properties and observed spectral features, and RTM spectral inversion is a useful framework for estimating these properties from spectral data. However, existing approaches to RTM spectral inversion are typically limited by the inability to characterize uncertainty in parameter estimates. Here, we introduce a Bayesian algorithm for the spectral inversion of the PROSPECT 5 leaf RTM that is distinct from past approaches in two important ways: First, the algorithm only uses reflectance and does not require transmittance observations, which have been plagued by a variety of measurement and equipment challenges. Second, the output is not a point estimate for each parameter but rather the joint probability distribution that includes estimates of parameter uncertainties and covariance structure. We validated our inversion approach using a database of leaf spectra together with measurements of equivalent water thickness (EWT) and leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA). The parameters estimated by our inversion were able to accurately reproduce the observed reflectance (RMSEVIS = 0.0063, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0098) and transmittance (RMSEVIS = 0.0404, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0551) for both broadleaved and conifer species. Inversion estimates of EWT and LMA for broadleaved species agreed well with direct measurements (CVEWT = 18.8%, CVLMA = 24.5%), while estimates for conifer species

  10. Quantifying the influences of spectral resolution on uncertainty in leaf trait estimates through a Bayesian approach to RTM inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shiklomanov, Alexey N.; Dietze, Michael C.; Viskari, Toni; Townsend, Philip A.; Serbin, Shawn P.

    2016-06-09

    The remote monitoring of plant canopies is critically needed for understanding of terrestrial ecosystem mechanics and biodiversity as well as capturing the short- to long-term responses of vegetation to disturbance and climate change. A variety of orbital, sub-orbital, and field instruments have been used to retrieve optical spectral signals and to study different vegetation properties such as plant biochemistry, nutrient cycling, physiology, water status, and stress. Radiative transfer models (RTMs) provide a mechanistic link between vegetation properties and observed spectral features, and RTM spectral inversion is a useful framework for estimating these properties from spectral data. However, existing approaches to RTM spectral inversion are typically limited by the inability to characterize uncertainty in parameter estimates. Here, we introduce a Bayesian algorithm for the spectral inversion of the PROSPECT 5 leaf RTM that is distinct from past approaches in two important ways: First, the algorithm only uses reflectance and does not require transmittance observations, which have been plagued by a variety of measurement and equipment challenges. Second, the output is not a point estimate for each parameter but rather the joint probability distribution that includes estimates of parameter uncertainties and covariance structure. We validated our inversion approach using a database of leaf spectra together with measurements of equivalent water thickness (EWT) and leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA). The parameters estimated by our inversion were able to accurately reproduce the observed reflectance (RMSEVIS = 0.0063, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0098) and transmittance (RMSEVIS = 0.0404, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0551) for both broadleaved and conifer species. Inversion estimates of EWT and LMA for broadleaved species agreed well with direct measurements (CVEWT = 18.8%, CVLMA = 24.5%), while estimates for conifer species

  11. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  12. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  13. The Measurement, Treatment, and Impact of Spectral Covariance and Bayesian Priors in Integral-field Spectroscopy of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Johnny P.; Brandt, Timothy D.

    2016-12-01

    The recovery of an exoplanet’s atmospheric parameters from its spectrum requires accurate knowledge of the spectral errors and covariances. Unfortunately, the complex image processing used in high-contrast integral-field spectrograph (IFS) observations generally produces spectral covariances that are poorly understood and often ignored. In this work, we show how to measure the spectral errors and covariances and include them self-consistently in parameter retrievals. By combining model exoplanet spectra with a realistic noise model generated from the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) early science data, we show that ignoring spectral covariance in high-contrast IFS data can both bias inferred parameters and lead to unreliable confidence regions on those parameters. This problem is made worse by the common practice of scaling the χ 2 per degree of freedom to unity; the input parameters then fall outside the 95% confidence regions in as many as ∼80% of noise realizations. The biases we observe can approach the typical levels of precision achieved in high-contrast spectroscopy. Accounting for realistic priors in fully Bayesian retrievals can also have a significant impact on the inferred parameters. Plausible priors on effective temperature and surface gravity can vary by an order of magnitude across the confidence regions appropriate for objects with weak age constraints; priors for objects with good age constraints are dominated by modeling uncertainties. Our methods are directly applicable to existing high-contrast IFSs including GPI and SPHERE, as well as upcoming instruments like CHARIS and, ultimately, WFIRST-AFTA.

  14. Spectral methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Streett, Craig L.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of these notes is to provide a basic introduction to spectral methods with a particular emphasis on applications to computational fluid dynamics. Another objective is to summarize some of the most important developments in spectral methods in the last two years. The fundamentals of spectral methods for simple problems will be covered in depth, and the essential elements of several fluid dynamical applications will be sketched.

  15. Evolution-Free Hamiltonian Parameter Estimation through Zeeman Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarth, Daniel; Ajoy, Ashok

    2017-07-01

    We provide a protocol for Hamiltonian parameter estimation which relies only on the Zeeman effect. No time-dependent quantities need to be measured; it fully suffices to observe spectral shifts induced by fields applied to local "markers." We demonstrate the idea with a simple tight-binding Hamiltonian and numerically show stability with respect to Gaussian noise on the spectral measurements. Then we generalize the result to show applicability to a wide range of systems, including quantum spin chains, networks of qubits, and coupled harmonic oscillators, and suggest potential experimental implementations.

  16. Evolution-Free Hamiltonian Parameter Estimation through Zeeman Markers.

    PubMed

    Burgarth, Daniel; Ajoy, Ashok

    2017-07-21

    We provide a protocol for Hamiltonian parameter estimation which relies only on the Zeeman effect. No time-dependent quantities need to be measured; it fully suffices to observe spectral shifts induced by fields applied to local "markers." We demonstrate the idea with a simple tight-binding Hamiltonian and numerically show stability with respect to Gaussian noise on the spectral measurements. Then we generalize the result to show applicability to a wide range of systems, including quantum spin chains, networks of qubits, and coupled harmonic oscillators, and suggest potential experimental implementations.

  17. Multi-spectral pyrometry—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, António

    2017-08-01

    In pyrometry measurements, the unknown target emissivity is a critical source of uncertainty, especially when the emissivity is low. Aiming to overcome this problem, various multi-spectral pyrometry systems and processing techniques have been proposed in the literature. Basically, all multi-spectral systems are based on the same principle: the radiation emitted by the target is measured at different channels having different spectral characteristics, and the emissivity is modelled as a function of wavelength with adjustable parameters to be obtained empirically, resulting in a system of equations whose solution is the target temperature and the parameters of the emissivity function. The present work reviews the most important multi-spectral developments. Concerning the spectral width of the measurement channels, multi-spectral systems are divided into multi-wavelength (monochromatic channels) and multi-band (wide-band channels) systems. Regarding the number of unknowns and equations (one equation per channel), pyrometry systems can either be determined (same number of unknowns and equations, having a unique solution) or overdetermined (more equations than unknowns, to be solved by least-squares). Generally, higher-order multi-spectral systems are overdetermined, since the uncertainty of the solutions obtained from determined systems increases as the number of channels increases, so that determined systems normally have less than four channels. In terms of the spectral characteristics of the measurement channels, narrow bands, far apart from each other and shifted towards lower wavelengths, seem to provide more accurate solutions. Many processing techniques have been proposed, but they strongly rely on the relationship between emissivity and wavelength, which is, in turn, strongly dependent on the characteristics of a particular target. Several accurate temperature and/or emissivity results have been reported, but no universally accepted multi-spectral technique has

  18. Characterisation of spectrophotometers used for spectral solar ultraviolet radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Gröbner, J

    2001-01-01

    Spectrophotometers used for spectral measurements of the solar ultraviolet radiation need to be well characterised to provide accurate and reliable data. Since the characterisation and calibration are usually performed in the laboratory under conditions very different from those encountered during solar measurements, it is essential to address all issues concerned with the representativity of the laboratory characterisation with respect to the solar measurements. These include among others the instrument stability, the instrument linearity, the instrument responsivity, the wavelength accuracy, the spectral resolution, stray light rejection and the instrument dependence on ambient temperature fluctuations. These instrument parameters need to be determined often enough so that the instrument changes only marginally in the period between successive characterisations and therefore provides reliable data for the intervening period.

  19. Stark broadening of several Bi IV spectral lines of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, C.; Moreno-Díaz, C.; de Andrés-García, I.; Alonso-Medina, A.

    2017-09-01

    The presence of spectral lines of bismuth in stellar atmospheres has been reported in different stars. The anomalous values of the spectral intensities of Bi II and Bi iii, compared to the theoretical Local Termodinamic Equilibrium (LTE) standards of Bi i/Bi ii/Bi iii, have been reported in the spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph of the Hubble/Goddard Space Telescope in the chemically peculiar stars HgMn stars χ Lupi and HR 7775. Spectral lines of 1436.8, 1902.3, 2630.9 and 2936.7 Å of Bi II and 1423.4 Å of Bi III were reported and their relative intensities were measured in these studies Litzén & Wahlgren 2002. These lines are overlapped with spectral lines of 1437.65, 2630.1 and 2937.1 Å of Bi iv. A study of the Stark broadening parameters of Bi IV spectral lines can help to study these overlaps. In this paper, using the Griem semi-empirical approach, we report calculated values of the Stark parameters for 64 spectral lines of Bi iv. The matrix elements used in these calculations have been determined from 17 configurations of Bi iv. They were calculated using the cowan code including core polarization effects. Data are displayed for an electron density of 1017 cm-3 and temperatures T = 10 000-160 000 K. Also calculated radiative lifetimes for 12 levels with experimental lifetime are presented, in order to test the goodness of our calculations. Theoretical trends of the Stark width and shift parameters versus the temperature for spectral lines of astrophysical interest are displayed.

  20. Evaluation of the CT Parameters to Suppress Renal Cysts Pseudoenhancement Effect: Influence of the Virtual Monochromatic Spectral Images, the Model-based Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm and the Aperture Size in Phantom Model.

    PubMed

    Sugisawa, Koichi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Minamishima, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the virtual monochromatic spectral images (VMSI) and the model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) images, to evaluate the influence of the aperture size (40- and 20-mm beam) on renal pseudoenhancement (PE) compared with the filtered back projection (FBP) images. The renal compartment-CT phantom was filled with iodinated contrast material diluted to the attenuation of 180 Hounsfield units (HU) at 120 kV. The water-filled spherical structures, which simulate cyst, were inserted into the renal compartment. Those diameters were 7, 15 and 25 mm. These were scanned by conventional mode (helical scan, 120 kV-FBP) and dual energy mode. 70 keV-VMSI were reconstructed from the dual energy mode, and MBIR images were reconstructed from conventional mode at 40- and 20-mm aperture. Additionally, the phantom was scanned using non-helical mode with 20-mm aperture, and FBP images were reconstructed. The CT value of the PE for cyst areas was measured for these images. The CT values of the cysts were 20.0-14.3 HU on the FBP images, 12.8-12.7 HU on the 70 keV-VMSI (PE-inhibition ratio was 36.0-11.2%) and 16.2-14.0 HU on the MBIR images (19.0-2.1%), respectively, at 40-mm aperture. The PE-inhibition ratio scanned by 20-mm aperture was improved by 28.0% with FBP, 32.8% with 70 keV-VMSI and 29.6% with MBIR compared with 40-mm aperture. One of the FBP images with non-helical mode was 11.6 HU. The best CT technique to minimize PE was the combination of 70 keV-VMSI and 20-mm aperture.

  1. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  2. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  3. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  4. Spectral collocation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers the theory and application of spectral collocation methods. Section 1 describes the fundamentals, and summarizes results pertaining to spectral approximations of functions. Some stability and convergence results are presented for simple elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Applications of these methods to fluid dynamics problems are discussed in Section 2.

  5. Cavity-controlled spectral singularity.

    PubMed

    Nireekshan Reddy, K; Dutta Gupta, S

    2014-08-01

    We study theoretically a parity-time (PT)-symmetric, saturable, balanced gain-loss system in a ring-cavity configuration. The saturable gain and loss are modeled by a two-level medium with or without population inversion. We show that the specifics of the spectral singularity can be fully controlled by the cavity and the atomic detuning parameters. The theory is based on the mean-field approximation, as in the standard theory of optical bistability. Further, in the linear regime we demonstrate the regularization of the singularity in detuned systems, while larger input power levels are shown to be adequate to limit the infinite growth in absence of detunings.

  6. Spectral solution of the inverse Mie problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Andrey V.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Yastrebova, Ekaterina S.; Gilev, Konstantin V.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Yurkin, Maxim A.

    2017-10-01

    We developed a fast method to determine size and refractive index of homogeneous spheres from the power Fourier spectrum of their light-scattering patterns (LSPs), measured with the scanning flow cytometer. Specifically, we used two spectral parameters: the location of the non-zero peak and zero-frequency amplitude, and numerically inverted the map from the space of particle characteristics (size and refractive index) to the space of spectral parameters. The latter parameters can be reliably resolved only for particle size parameter greater than 11, and the inversion is unique only in the limited range of refractive index with upper limit between 1.1 and 1.25 (relative to the medium) depending on the size parameter and particular definition of uniqueness. The developed method was tested on two experimental samples, milk fat globules and spherized red blood cells, and resulted in accuracy not worse than the reference method based on the least-square fit of the LSP with the Mie theory. Moreover, for particles with significant deviation from the spherical shape the spectral method was much closer to the Mie-fit result than the estimated uncertainty of the latter. The spectral method also showed adequate results for synthetic LSPs of spheroids with aspect ratios up to 1.4. Overall, we present a general framework, which can be used to construct an inverse algorithm for any other experimental signals.

  7. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Fritz, Shannon G.

    2011-04-01

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm2, and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc-1 CaCO3 contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc-1 iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc-1 gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a major

  8. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Fritz, Shannon G

    2011-04-07

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm(2), and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc(-1) CaCO(3) contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc(-1) iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc(-1) gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a

  9. Different approaches of spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacoume, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of the calculation of spectral power density of a random function from an estimate of the autocorrelation function were studied. A comparative study was presented of these different methods. The principles on which they are based and the hypothesis implied were pointed out. Some indications on the optimization of the length of the estimated correlation function was given. An example of application of the different methods discussed in this paper was included.

  10. The interpretation of spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and extent of data which is obtainable by electromagnetic spectrum sensing and the application to earth resources survey are discussed. The wavelength and frequency ranges of operation for various remote sensors are tabulated. The spectral sensitivities of various sensing instruments are diagrammed. Examples of aerial photography to show the effects of lighting and seasonal variations on earth resources data are provided. Specific examples of multiband photography and multispectral imagery to crop analysis are included.

  11. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  12. SPECTRAL SMILE CORRECTION IN CRISM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Doute, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is affected by a common artifact in "push-broom" sensors, the so-called "spectral smile". As a consequence, both central wavelength and spectral width of the spectral response vary along the across-track dimension, thus giving rise to a shifting and smoothing of spectra (see Fig. 1 (left)). In fact, both effects are greater for spectra on the edges, while they are minimum for data acquired by central detectors, the so-called "sweet spot". The prior artifacts become particularly critical for Martian observations which contain steep spectra such as CO2 ice-rich polar images. Fig. 1 (right) shows the horizontal brightness gradient which appears in every band corresponding to a steep portion of spectra. The correction of CRISM spectral smile is addressed using a two-step method which aims at modifying data sensibly in order to mimic the optimal CRISM response. First, all spectra, which are previously interpolated by cubic splines, are resampled to the "sweet spot" wavelengths in order to overcome the spectra shift. Secondly, the non-uniform spectral width is overcome by mimicking an increase of spectral resolution thanks to a spectral sharpening. In order to minimize noise, only bands particularly suffering from smile are selected. First, bands corresponding to the outliers of the Minimum Noise Transformation (MNF) eigenvector, which corresponds to the MNF band related to smile (MNF-smile), are selected. Then, a spectral neighborhood Θi, which takes into account the local spectral convexity or concavity, is defined for every selected band in order to maximize spectral shape preservation. The proposed sharpening technique takes into account both the instrument parameters and the observed spectra. First, every reflectance value belonging to a Θi is reevaluated by a sharpening which depends on a ratio of the spectral width of the current detector and the "sweet spot" one. Then, the optimal degree of

  13. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets.

  14. Spectral decomposition of black-hole perturbations on hyperboloidal slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansorg, Marcus; Macedo, Rodrigo Panosso

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a spectral decomposition of solutions to relativistic wave equations described on horizon-penetrating hyperboloidal slices within a given Schwarzschild-black-hole background. The wave equation in question is Laplace transformed, which leads to a spatial differential equation with a complex parameter. For initial data which are analytic with respect to a compactified spatial coordinate, this equation is treated with the help of the Mathematica package in terms of a sophisticated Taylor series analysis. Thereby, all ingredients of the desired spectral decomposition arise explicitly to arbitrarily prescribed accuracy, including quasinormal modes and quasinormal mode amplitudes as well as the jump of the Laplace transform along the branch cut. Finally, all contributions are put together to obtain, via the inverse Laplace transformation, the spectral decomposition in question. The paper explains extensively this procedure and includes detailed discussions of relevant aspects, such as the definition of quasinormal modes and the question regarding the contribution of infinity frequency modes to the early time response of the black hole.

  15. Comprehensive view of high-spectral-resolution lidar technique from the perspective of spectral discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Yupeng; Zhou, Yudi; Bai, Jian; Liu, Chong; Shen, Yibing

    2016-05-01

    As already known commonly, high-spectral-resolution lidar technique (HSRL) employs a narrowband spectroscopic filter to separate the elastic backscattered aerosol signal from the thermal Doppler broadened molecular backscattered contribution. This paper presents a new and comprehensive view of HSRL technique from the perspective of spectral discrimination, without concretizing the analysis into a specific spectral discrimination filter. Based on a general HSRL layout with three-channel configuration, a theoretical model of retrieval error evaluation is introduced. In this model, we only take the error sources related to the spectral discrimination parameters into account, and ignore other error sources not associated with these focused parameters. This theoretical model is subsequently verified by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Both the model and MC simulations demonstrate that a large molecular transmittance and a large spectral discrimination ratio (SDR, i.e., ratio of the molecular transmittance to the aerosol transmittance) are beneficial to reduce the retrieval error. Moreover, we find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SDR of the lidar system are often tradeoffs, and we suggest considering a suitable SDR for higher molecular transmittance (thus higher SNR) instead of using unnecessarily high SDR when designing the spectral discrimination filter. This view interprets the function of the narrowband spectroscopic filter in HSRL system essentially, and will provide some general guidelines for the reasonable design of the spectral discrimination filter for HSRL community.

  16. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (includingthe level of out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors to a known source of electromagnetic radiation individually. This was determined by measuring the interferometric output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. Knowledge of the relative variations in the spectral response between HFI detectors allows for a more thorough analysis of the HFI data. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. While previous papers describe the pre-flight experiments conducted on the Planck HFI, this paper focusses on the analysis of the pre-flight spectral response measurements and the derivation of data products, e.g. band-average spectra, unit conversion coefficients, and colour correction coefficients, all with related uncertainties. Verifications of the HFI spectral response data are provided through comparisons with photometric HFI flight data. This validation includes use of HFI zodiacal emission observations to demonstrate out-of-band spectral signal rejection better than 108. The accuracy of the HFI relative spectral response data is verified through comparison with complementary flight-data based unit conversion coefficients and colour correction

  17. Adaptive stellar spectral subclass classification based on Bayesian SVMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Changde; Luo, Ali; Yang, Haifeng

    2017-02-01

    Stellar spectral classification is one of the most fundamental tasks in survey astronomy. Many automated classification methods have been applied to spectral data. However, their main limitation is that the model parameters must be tuned repeatedly to deal with different data sets. In this paper, we utilize the Bayesian support vector machines (BSVM) to classify the spectral subclass data. Based on Gibbs sampling, BSVM can infer all model parameters adaptively according to different data sets, which allows us to circumvent the time-consuming cross validation for penalty parameter. We explored different normalization methods for stellar spectral data, and the best one has been suggested in this study. Finally, experimental results on several stellar spectral subclass classification problems show that the BSVM model not only possesses good adaptability but also provides better prediction performance than traditional methods.

  18. Temporal Lorentzian spectral triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    We present the notion of temporal Lorentzian spectral triple which is an extension of the notion of pseudo-Riemannian spectral triple with a way to ensure that the signature of the metric is Lorentzian. A temporal Lorentzian spectral triple corresponds to a specific 3 + 1 decomposition of a possibly noncommutative Lorentzian space. This structure introduces a notion of global time in noncommutative geometry. As an example, we construct a temporal Lorentzian spectral triple over a Moyal-Minkowski spacetime. We show that, when time is commutative, the algebra can be extended to unbounded elements. Using such an extension, it is possible to define a Lorentzian distance formula between pure states with a well-defined noncommutative formulation.

  19. Wide spectral range characterization of antireflective coatings and their optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Ohlídal, Ivan; Jankuj, Jiří

    2015-09-01

    Development of antireflective coatings realized by thin film systems requires their characterization and optimization of their properties. Functional properties of such interference devices are determined by optical constants and thicknesses of the individual films and various defects taking place in these systems. In optics industry the characterization of the films is mostly performed in a relatively narrow spectral range using simple dispersion models and, moreover, the defects are not taken into account at all. This manner of characterization fails if applied to real-world non-ideal thin film systems because the measured data do not contain sufficient information about all the parameters describing the system including imperfections. Reliable characterization requires the following changes: extension of spectral range of measurements, combination of spectrophotometry and ellipsometry, utilization of physically correct dispersion models (Kramers-Kronig consistency, sum rules), inclusion of structural defects instrument imperfection into the models and simultaneous processing of all experimental data. This enables us to remove or reduce a correlation among the parameters searched so that correct and sufficiently precise determination of parameter values is achieved. Since the presence and properties of the defects are difficult to control independently by tuning of the deposition conditions, the optimization does not in general involve the elimination of defects. Instead they are taken into account in the design of the film systems. The outlined approach is demonstrated on the characterization and optimization of ultraviolet antireflective coating formed by double layer of Al2O3 and MgF2 deposited on fused silica.

  20. Field-widened Michelson interferometer for spectral discrimination in high-spectral-resolution lidar: theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Luo, Jing; Yang, Yongying; Zhou, Yudi; Zhang, Yupeng; Duan, Lulin; Su, Lin; Yang, Liming; Shen, Yibing; Wang, Kaiwei; Bai, Jian

    2015-05-04

    A field-widened Michelson interferometer (FWMI) is developed to act as the spectral discriminator in high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). This realization is motivated by the wide-angle Michelson interferometer (WAMI) which has been used broadly in the atmospheric wind and temperature detection. This paper describes an independent theoretical framework about the application of the FWMI in HSRL for the first time. In the framework, the operation principles and application requirements of the FWMI are discussed in comparison with that of the WAMI. Theoretical foundations for designing this type of interferometer are introduced based on these comparisons. Moreover, a general performance estimation model for the FWMI is established, which can provide common guidelines for the performance budget and evaluation of the FWMI in the both design and operation stages. Examples incorporating many practical imperfections or conditions that may degrade the performance of the FWMI are given to illustrate the implementation of the modeling. This theoretical framework presents a complete and powerful tool for solving most of theoretical or engineering problems encountered in the FWMI application, including the designing, parameter calibration, prior performance budget, posterior performance estimation, and so on. It will be a valuable contribution to the lidar community to develop a new generation of HSRLs based on the FWMI spectroscopic filter.

  1. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  2. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  3. The U. S. Geological Survey, Digital Spectral Library: Version 1 (0.2 to 3.0um)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Gallagher, Andrea J.; King, Trude V.V.; Calvin, Wendy M.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a digital reflectance spectral library, with management and spectral analysis software. The library includes 498 spectra of 444 samples (some samples include a series of grain sizes) measured from approximately 0.2 to 3.0 um . The spectral resolution (Full Width Half Maximum) of the reflectance data is <= 4 nm in the visible (0.2-0.8 um) and <= 10 nm in the NIR (0.8-2.35 um). All spectra were corrected to absolute reflectance using an NIST Halon standard. Library management software lets users search on parameters (e.g. chemical formulae, chemical analyses, purity of samples, mineral groups, etc.) as well as spectral features. Minerals from borate, carbonate, chloride, element, halide, hydroxide, nitrate, oxide, phosphate, sulfate, sulfide, sulfosalt, and the silicate (cyclosilicate, inosilicate, nesosilicate, phyllosilicate, sorosilicate, and tectosilicate) classes are represented. X-Ray and chemical analyses are tabulated for many of the entries, and all samples have been evaluated for spectral purity. The library also contains end and intermediate members for the olivine, garnet, scapolite, montmorillonite, muscovite, jarosite, and alunite solid-solution series. We have included representative spectra of H2O ice, kerogen, ammonium-bearing minerals, rare-earth oxides, desert varnish coatings, kaolinite crystallinity series, kaolinite-smectite series, zeolite series, and an extensive evaporite series. Because of the importance of vegetation to climate-change studies we have include 17 spectra of tree leaves, bushes, and grasses. The library and software are available as a series of U.S.G.S. Open File reports. PC user software is available to convert the binary data to ascii files (a separate U.S.G.S. open file report). Additionally, a binary data files are on line at the U.S.G.S. in Denver for anonymous ftp to users on the Internet. The library search software enables a user to search on documentation parameters as well as spectral features. The

  4. Spectral solar radiation: new data

    SciTech Connect

    Hulstrom, R

    1983-06-01

    Several areas of solar research require an accurate knowledge (data) of the spectral content of solar radiation at the earth's surface for various atmospheric conditions, times during the day (air masses), geographic locations, and for the various seasons (monthly). Areas of solar research include photovoltaics, biomass, materials studies, and solar simulation. As one of its major research thrusts, the Renewable Resource Assessment and Instrumentation Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute, has been developing improved analytical models, instrumentation, and data sets to meet the various needs for such by the previously mentioned areas of solar energy conversion research. A brief summary of selected results of such research is presented. References are given for detailed descriptions of the various individual areas of effort/research and new spectral solar radiation data sets.

  5. MS-ONLINE Mass Spectral Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokizane, Soichi; Nagaoka, Nobuaki

    A mass spectral database, MS-ONLINE, is described which is produced by FIZ Chemie, in Federal Republic of Germany and offered online through the INKADATA system. The data source of this database is WILEY/NBS MASS SPECTRAL DATA BASE and it includes 80,680 spectra. Spectral data can be retrieved from a substance search (by assigning molecular weight, molecular formula or name), a specific peak search, or a similarity search of peak patterns called SISCOM search. Further more, the system has functions supporting the component identification of mixtures and the identification from an isotopic abundance. The algorism of the SISCOM search is explained in detail.

  6. Interference method for measuring central moments of spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kozhevatov, I.E.; Kulikova, E.Kh.; Cheragin, N.P.

    1995-04-01

    A method of unconventional spectral analysis, which was developed for simultaneous measurements of integral parameters of spectral lines such as an area under the line, and its shift, half-width, asymmetry, etc., is substantiated. The basic concepts of the method are described and examples of its use with two- and multibeam interferometers are given.

  7. Atmospheric Properties of T Dwarfs Inferred from Model Fits at Low Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Paige A.; Rice, Emily L.; Filippazzo, Joe; Douglas, Stephanie; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are substellar objects that cool over time because they are not massive enough to sustain hydrogen fusion at their cores. While spectral types (M, L, T, Y) generally correlate with decreasing temperature, spectral subclasses (T0, T1, T2, etc.) do not, suggesting that secondary parameters (gravity, metallicity, dust) play a role in the spectral type-temperature relationship. We investigate this relationship for T dwarfs, which make up the coolest fully-populated spectral class of substellar objects. Our sample consists of 154 T dwarfs with low resolution (R~75-100) near-infrared (~0.8-2.5 micron) spectra from the SpeX Prism Library and the literature. We compare each observed spectrum to synthetic spectra from four model grids using a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis to determine robust best-fit parameters and uncertainties. We evaluate the best fit parameters from each model grid per object to constrain how spectral type relates to decreasing temperature and increasing surface gravity and to compare the consistency of each model grid. To test for discrepant results when fitting to relatively narrow wavelength ranges, this analysis is performed on the full spectrum of the Y, J, H, and K bands and on each band separately. New detections of cooler objects extending into the Y dwarf and exoplanet regimes motivate our model comparisons and search for trends with spectral type and other observational properties across the decreasing temperatures in order to better understand the atmospheres of substellar objects, including cool gas giant exoplanets.

  8. Spectral characteristics of voiceless fricatives in Arabic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Al-Makarem, Ali S.; Cooper, Donald S.

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acoustics of the voiceless fricatives of Al-Khat spoken Arabic. The FFT of the eight Arabic voiceless fricatives followed by /a: i: u:/ was investigated in four healthy adult males. The speech samples were collected in a sound-attenuated booth using a microphone with a frequency response flat 0.5 dB from 10 Hz to 11000 Hz, and digital recording. All recordings were sampled at a rate of 24 kHz. The FFT was computed for each waveform token using a 1024-point Hamming window. A 42.67-ms analysis window located in the middle of the fricative was used to compute each spectrum. The effects of vowel context on all examined acoustic parameters appeared minimal. The most effective acoustic parameter distinguishing fricatives place of articulation was spectral skewness, followed by spectral mean and spectral standard deviation of the FFT spectra. Spectral skewness distinguished the seven places of articulation for Arabic voiceless fricatives. Skewness increased as place of articulation moved from the front to the back of the vocal tract. This result extended the findings of Forrest et al. (1988) and Jongman et al. (2000) that spectral skewness reliably distinguished English fricative spectra from four places of articulation.

  9. "Calibration" system for spectral measurements and its experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchkouskaya, Sviatlana I.; Katkovsky, Leonid V.; Belyaev, Boris I.; Malyshev, Vladislav B.

    2017-04-01

    "Calibration" system has been developed at A. N. Sevchenko Research Institute of Applied Physical Problems of the Belarusian State University. It was designed for measuring the characteristics of spectral reflectance of all types of natural surfaces (test sites) in ground conditions or on board of aircraft carriers and has the following components: - Photospectroradiometr (PhSR) of high resolution with a range of 400-900 nm, equipped with a digital time-lapse video system; - Two-channel modular spectroradiometer (TMS) with a range of 400-900 nm, designed for simultaneous measurements of reflected light brightness of the underlying surface and the incident radiation from the upper hemisphere; - Two portable spectroradiometers (PSR-700 and PSR-1300) with a spectral range 800-1500 nm; 1200-2500 nm; - Scanning solar spectropolarimeter (SSP-600) with a range of 350-950 nm for measurements of direct sunlight and scattered by the atmosphere at different angles; "Calibration" system provides spectral resolution of 5.2 nm in a range of 400-900 nm, 10 nm in a range of 800-1500 nm and 15 nm in a range of 1200-2500 nm. Measurements of the optical characteristics of solar radiation (for determining parameters of the atmosphere) and that of underlying surface are synchronous. There is also a set of special nozzles for measurements of spectral brightness coefficients, polarization characteristics and spectral albedo. Spectra and images are geotagged to the navigation data (time, GPS). For the measurements of spectral reflection dependencies within "Monitoring-SG" framework expeditions to the Kuril Islands, Kursk aerospace test site and Kamchatka Peninsula were conducted in 2015 and 2016. The spectra of different underlying surfaces have been obtained: soils, plants and water objects, sedimentary and volcanic rocks. These surveys are a valuable material for further researches and selection of test facilities for flight calibration of space imaging systems. Information obtained

  10. Display Parameters and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  11. Spectral Super-Resolution for Hyperspectral Images via Sparse Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiadou, Konstantina; Tsagkatakis, Grigorios; Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    2016-08-01

    The spectral dimension of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems plays a fundamental role in numerous terrestrial and earth observation applications, including spectral unmixing, target detection, and classification among others. However, in several cases the spectral resolution of HSI systems is sacrificed for the shake of spatial resolution, as such in the case of snapshot spectral imaging systems that acquire simultaneously the 3D data- cube. We address these limitations by introducing an efficient post-acquisition spectral resolution enhancement scheme that synthesizes the full spectrum from only few acquired spectral bands. To achieve this goal we utilize a regularized sparse-based learning procedure where the relations between high and low-spectral resolution hyper-pixels are efficiently encoded via a coupled dictionary learning scheme. Experimental results and quantitative validation on data acquired by NASA's EO-1 mission's Hyperion sensor, demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach for accurate spectral resolution enhancement of hyperspectral imaging systems.

  12. Computation of energy interaction parameters as well as electric dipole intensity parameters for the absorption spectral study of the interaction of Pr(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Singh, Th. David; Singh, N. Rajmuhon; Devi, M. Indira

    2009-10-01

    Studying the absorption difference and comparative absorption spectra of the interaction of Pr(III) and Nd(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents, various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon ( FK), Racah ( Ek), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding ( b1/2), percentage-covalency ( δ) have been evaluated applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( P) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been computed. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( P) and Tλ values reveal the mode of binding with different ligands.

  13. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib05a

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard K.; Livo, Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Steve J.

    2003-01-01

    We have assembled a digital reflectance spectral library of spectra that covers wavelengths from the ultraviolet to near-infrared along with sample documentation. The library includes samples of minerals, rocks, soils, physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures, vegetation, microorganisms, and man-made materials. The samples and spectra collected were assembled for the purpose of using spectral features for the remote detection of these and similar materials.

  14. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  15. iSEDfit: Bayesian spectral energy distribution modeling of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, John

    2017-08-01

    iSEDfit uses Bayesian inference to extract the physical properties of galaxies from their observed broadband photometric spectral energy distribution (SED). In its default mode, the inputs to iSEDfit are the measured photometry (fluxes and corresponding inverse variances) and a measurement of the galaxy redshift. Alternatively, iSEDfit can be used to estimate photometric redshifts from the input photometry alone. After the priors have been specified, iSEDfit calculates the marginalized posterior probability distributions for the physical parameters of interest, including the stellar mass, star-formation rate, dust content, star formation history, and stellar metallicity. iSEDfit also optionally computes K-corrections and produces multiple "quality assurance" (QA) plots at each stage of the modeling procedure to aid in the interpretation of the prior parameter choices and subsequent fitting results. The software is distributed as part of the impro IDL suite.

  16. Modeling of spectral variability of Romano's star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryeva, O.; Polcaro, V. F.; Rossi, C.; Viotti, R.

    We present results of investigation of spectral variability of one of the most interesting massive stars, Romano's star (M33/V532 or GR290), located in the M33 galaxy. Brightness of the star changes together with its spectral class, which varies from WN11 to WN8. Using CMFGEN code we estimated parameters of stellar atmosphere and found that during last ten years bolometric luminosity of the star changed synchronously with stellar magnitude. Our calculations argue in favor of the hypothesis of a post-LBV status of GR290.

  17. CCN Spectral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, James G.

    2009-02-27

    Detailed aircraft measurements were made of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra associated with extensive cloud systems off the central California coast in the July 2005 MASE project. These measurements include the wide supersaturation (S) range (2-0.01%) that is important for these polluted stratus clouds. Concentrations were usually characteristic of continental/anthropogenic air masses. The most notable feature was the consistently higher concentrations above the clouds than below. CCN measurements are so important because they provide a link between atmospheric chemistry and cloud-climate effects, which are the largest climate uncertainty. Extensive comparisons throughout the eleven flights between two CCN spectrometers operated at different but overlapping S ranges displayed the precision and accuracy of these difficult spectral determinations. There are enough channels of resolution in these instruments to provide differential spectra, which produce more rigorous and precise comparisons than traditional cumulative presentations of CCN concentrations. Differential spectra are also more revealing than cumulative spectra. Only one of the eleven flights exhibited typical maritime concentrations. Average below cloud concentrations over the two hours furthest from the coast for the 8 flights with low polluted stratus was 614?233 at 1% S, 149?60 at 0.1% S and 57?33 at 0.04% S cm-3. Immediately above cloud average concentrations were respectively 74%, 55%, and 18% higher. Concentration variability among those 8 flights was a factor of two. Variability within each flight excluding distances close to the coast ranged from 15-56% at 1% S. However, CN and probably CCN concentrations sometimes varied by less than 1% over distances of more than a km. Volatility and size-critical S measurements indicated that the air masses were very polluted throughout MASE. The aerosol above the clouds was more polluted than the below cloud aerosol. These high CCN concentrations from

  18. Noncomputable Spectral Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teutsch, Jason

    2007-01-01

    It is possible to enumerate all computer programs. In particular, for every partial computable function, there is a shortest program which computes that function. f-MIN is the set of indices for shortest programs. In 1972, Meyer showed that f-MIN is Turing equivalent to 0'', the halting set with halting set oracle. This paper generalizes the notion of shortest programs, and we use various measures from computability theory to describe the complexity of the resulting "spectral sets." We show that under certain Godel numberings, the spectral sets are exactly the canonical sets 0', 0'', 0''', ... up to Turing equivalence. This is probably not true in general, however we show that spectral sets always contain some useful information. We show that immunity, or "thinness" is a useful characteristic for distinguishing between spectral sets. In the final chapter, we construct a set which neither contains nor is disjoint from any infinite arithmetic set, yet it is 0-majorized and contains a natural spectral set. Thus a pathological set becomes a bit more friendly. Finally, a number of interesting open problems are left for the inspired reader.

  19. Detecting Climate Signatures with High Spectral Resolution Infrared Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslover, D. H.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R. O.; Revercomb, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    Upwelling atmospheric infrared radiances can be accurately monitored from high spectral resolution satellite observations. The high spectral resolution nature of these measurements affords the ability to track various climate relevant parameters such as window channels sensitive to surface temperature and clouds, channels with higher sensitivity to trace gases including CO2, CH4, SO2, HNO3, as well as channels sensitive only to upper tropospheric or lower stratospheric temperature. NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) provides a data record that extends from its 2002 launch to the present. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard Metop- (A launched in 2006, B in 2012), as well as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) launched in 2011, complement this data record. Future infrared sounders with similar capabilities will augment these measurements into the distant future. We have created a global data set from the aforementioned satellite observations. Our analysis yields a channel dependent approach that can be further constrained in terms of diurnal, seasonal and geographic limits, with measurement accuracies of better than a few tenths of degree Kelvin. In this study, we have applied this concept to obtain a better understanding of long-term stratospheric temperature trends. We will present a survey of temperature trends for spectral channels that were chosen to be sensitive to stratospheric emission. Results will be shown for tropical, mid-latitude and polar stratospheric observations.

  20. [Research on New Type of Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Huan; Zhao, Hai-bo

    2015-10-01

    Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement technology (SMPM) is a new type of polarization modulation technology, with an achromatic /4 retarder, a multiple-order retarder and a polarizer the polarization information of incident light can be encoded into the spectral dimension, sinusoidal which amplitude scales with the degree of the linear polarization and phase scales with the angle of the linear polarization can be acquired directly. With a dedicated algorithm for the modulated spectrum, we can get degree and angle of the linear polarization, spectral information and radiation information of the target. This paper expounds the basic principle of SMPM and concrete implementation scheme is proposed. Demodulation algorithm is designed before experimental platform are set up. Experiment which verified the correctness on the SMPM has carried on. The experimental results show the correctness and feasibility of SMPM. Compared with traditional polarization modulate techniques no moving parts and electronic components are including in this scheme. It's also has the advantages of compact and low mass. We can get all the polarization information through one single measurement rather than get Stokes parameters for further calculations. This study provides a new kind of technological approaches for the development of new space polarization detecting sensor.

  1. Optimizing interconnections to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huashan; Zhao, Xiuyan; Liu, Feng; Xu, Shouhuai; Lu, Wenlian

    2017-03-01

    The spectral radius (i.e., the largest eigenvalue) of the adjacency matrices of complex networks is an important quantity that governs the behavior of many dynamic processes on the networks, such as synchronization and epidemics. Studies in the literature focused on bounding this quantity. In this paper, we investigate how to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks by optimally linking k internetwork connections (or interconnections for short). We derive formulas for the estimation of the spectral radius of interdependent networks and employ these results to develop a suite of algorithms that are applicable to different parameter regimes. In particular, a simple algorithm is to link the k nodes with the largest k eigenvector centralities in one network to the node in the other network with a certain property related to both networks. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithms via extensive simulations. We discuss the physical implications of the results, including how the optimal interconnections can more effectively decrease the threshold of epidemic spreading in the susceptible-infected-susceptible model and the threshold of synchronization of coupled Kuramoto oscillators.

  2. Spectral dynamics of a collective free electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Eecen, P.J.; Schep, T.J.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A theoretical and numerical study of the nonlinear spectral dynamics of a Free Electron Maser (FEM) is reported. The electron beam is modulated by a step-tapered undulator consisting of two sections with different strengths and lengths. The sections have equal periodicity and are separated by a field-free gap. The millimeter wave beam is guided through a rectangular corrugated waveguide. The electron energy is rather low and the current density is large, therefore, the FEM operates in the collective (Raman) regime. Results of a computational study on the spectral dynamics of the FEM are presented. The numerical code is based on a multifrequency model in the continuous beam limit with a 3D description of the electron beam. Space-charge forces are included by a Fourier expansion. These forces strongly influence the behaviour of the generated spectrum of the FEM. The linear gain of the FEM is high, therefore, the system quickly reaches the nonlinear regime. In saturation the gain is still relatively high and the spectral signal at the resonant frequency of the second undulator is suppressed. The behaviour of the sidebands is analysed and their dependence on mirror reflectivity and undulator parameters will be discussed.

  3. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  4. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  5. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  6. Spectral Redundancy in Tissue Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tomy

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattered signals from material comprised of quasi-periodic scatterers exhibit redundancy over both its phase and magnitude spectra. This dissertation addresses the problem of estimating the mean scatterer spacing and scatterer density from the backscattered ultrasound signal using spectral redundancy characterized by the spectral autocorrelation (SAC) function. The SAC function exploits characteristic differences between the phase spectrum of the resolvable quasi-periodic (regular) scatterers and the unresolvable uniformly distributed (diffuse) scatterers to improve estimator performance over other estimators that operate directly on the magnitude spectrum. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results (liver and breast tissue) indicate the potential of utilizing phase information using the SAC function. A closed form analytical expression for the SAC function is derived for gamma distributed scatterer spacings. The theoretical expression for the SAC function demonstrate the increased regular-to-diffuse scatterer signal ratio in the off-diagonal components of the SAC function, since the diffuse component contributes only to the diagonal components (power spectrum). The A-scan is modelled as a cyclostationary signal whose statistical parameters vary in time with single or multiple periodicities. A-scan models consist of a collection of regular scatterers with gamma distributed spacings embedded in diffuse scatterers with uniform distributed spacings. The model accounts for attenuation by convolving the frequency dependent backscatter coefficients of the scatterer centers with a time-varying system response. Simulation results show that SAC-based estimates converge more reliably over smaller amounts of data than previously used cepstrum-based estimates. A major reason for the performance advantage is the use of phase information by the SAC function, while the cepstnun uses a phaseless power spectral density, that is directly affected by the system

  7. [Spectral electromyographic analysis of essential tremor].

    PubMed

    Ivanova-Smolenskaia, I A; Kandel', E I; Andreeva, E A; Smirnova, S N; Khutorskaia, O E

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a new method of computerized statistical analysis of the spectral parameters of the circumscribing electromyogram in patients with essential tremor (ET), making use of objective frequency and amplitude parameters. The results have shown that ET differed from physiological tremor not only by amplitude but also by frequency characteristics. Four groups of patients have been identified which differed in relation to both parameters. Clear-cut criteria have been defined which may be used in the differential diagnosis between ET and parkinsonism-associated tremor. It has been suggested that the pathological mechanisms of ET and parkinsonism-associated tremor differ in their location.

  8. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  9. Assessment of MSS spectral indexes for monitoring arid rangeland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    The utility of MSS spectral indexes for monitoring arid rangeland vegetation was tested by determining correlations between spectral indexes and vegetation parameters and by examining retrospective MSS data to determine if vegetation change could be detected and measured using spectral indexes. MSS Band 5, albedo, and the Kauth-Thomas Brightness component appear to be useful for monitoring total vegetation cover. Multiseasonal green vegetation indexes could be used to estimate changes in the shrub/grass ratio. In retrospective monitoring, spectral index change appeared to be offset from true change, indicating that the methods used to standardize data sets for differences in solar elevation and sensor radiometric response were not completely successful.

  10. Diffusion in κ-deformed space and spectral dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjana, V.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we derive the expression for spectral dimension using a modified diffusion equation in the κ-deformed spacetime. We start with the Beltrami-Laplace operator in the κ-Minkowski spacetime and obtain the deformed diffusion equation. From the solution of this deformed diffusion equation, we calculate the spectral dimension which depends on the deformation parameter “a = 1 κ” and also on an integer “l”, apart from the topological dimension. Using this, we show that, for large diffusion times the spectral dimension approaches the usual topological dimension whereas spectral dimension diverges to + ∞ for l ≥ 0 and -∞ for l < 0 at high energies.

  11. Initial study of Schroedinger eigenmaps for spectral target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado-Munoz, Leidy P.; Messinger, David W.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral target detection refers to the process of searching for a specific material with a known spectrum over a large area containing materials with different spectral signatures. Traditional target detection methods in hyperspectral imagery (HSI) require assuming the data fit some statistical or geometric models and based on the model, to estimate parameters for defining a hypothesis test, where one class (i.e., target class) is chosen over the other classes (i.e., background class). Nonlinear manifold learning methods such as Laplacian eigenmaps (LE) have extensively shown their potential use in HSI processing, specifically in classification or segmentation. Recently, Schroedinger eigenmaps (SE), which is built upon LE, has been introduced as a semisupervised classification method. In SE, the former Laplacian operator is replaced by the Schroedinger operator. The Schroedinger operator includes by definition, a potential term V that steers the transformation in certain directions improving the separability between classes. In this regard, we propose a methodology for target detection that is not based on the traditional schemes and that does not need the estimation of statistical or geometric parameters. This method is based on SE, where the potential term V is taken into consideration to include the prior knowledge about the target class and use it to steer the transformation in directions where the target location in the new space is known and the separability between target and background is augmented. An initial study of how SE can be used in a target detection scheme for HSI is shown here. In-scene pixel and spectral signature detection approaches are presented. The HSI data used comprise various target panels for testing simultaneous detection of multiple objects with different complexities.

  12. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  13. Iterative spectral methods and spectral solutions to compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Zang, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    A spectral multigrid scheme is described which can solve pseudospectral discretizations of self-adjoint elliptic problems in O(N log N) operations. An iterative technique for efficiently implementing semi-implicit time-stepping for pseudospectral discretizations of Navier-Stokes equations is discussed. This approach can handle variable coefficient terms in an effective manner. Pseudospectral solutions of compressible flow problems are presented. These include one dimensional problems and two dimensional Euler solutions. Results are given both for shock-capturing approaches and for shock-fitting ones.

  14. Infrared transform spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Pajo; Lee, Jamine; Gregor, Brian; Goldstein, Neil; Panfili, Raphael; Fox, Marsha

    2012-10-01

    A dispersive transform spectral imager named FAROS (FAst Reconfigurable Optical Sensor) has been developed for high frame rate, moderate-to-high resolution hyperspectral imaging. A programmable digital micromirror array (DMA) modulator makes it possible to adjust spectral, temporal and spatial resolution in real time to achieve optimum tradeoff for dynamic monitoring requirements. The system's F/2.8 collection optics produces diffraction-limited images in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectral region. The optical system is based on a proprietary dual-pass Offner configuration with a single spherical mirror and a confocal spherical diffraction grating. FAROS fulfills two functions simultaneously: one output produces two-dimensional polychromatic imagery at the full focal plane array (FPA) frame rate for fast object acquisition and tracking, while the other output operates in parallel and produces variable-resolution spectral images via Hadamard transform encoding to assist in object discrimination and classification. The current version of the FAROS spectral imager is a multispectral technology demonstrator that operates in the MWIR with a 320 x 256 pixel InSb FPA running at 478 frames per second resulting in time resolution of several tens of milliseconds per hypercube. The instrument has been tested by monitoring small-scale rocket engine firings in outdoor environments. The instrument has no macro-scale moving parts, and conforms to a robust, small-volume and lightweight package, suitable for integration with small surveillance vehicles. The technology is also applicable to multispectral/hyperspectral imaging applications in diverse areas such as atmospheric contamination monitoring, agriculture, process control, and biomedical imaging, and can be adapted for use in any spectral domain from the ultraviolet (UV) to the LWIR region.

  15. Basaltic asteroids in the main belt: Spectral and mineralogical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, M.; Migliorini, A.; Lazzaro, D.; Ammannito, E.

    2014-07-01

    Most of the basaltic asteroids are thought to be fragments of Vesta, forming its dynamical family, but few others do not appear to have a clear dynamical link, suggesting, thus, the existence of other basaltic parent bodies. Excluding Vesta and its family, the lack of intact differentiated asteroids introduces a strong constraint to the formation scenario of basaltic material. The spectral investigation of the basaltic asteroids in the main belt can help in understanding if there are V-type asteroids that show a differing mineralogy with respect to Vesta and its family members. We present new NIR reflectance spectra of V-type candidate asteroids obtained at the 3.6-m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo covering the spectral range 0.7 to 2.5 microns. The observed objects were selected from diverse datasets of putative V-type asteroids in order to characterize them, and hence better understand their relationship with Vesta. All the spectra of the asteroids here reported show two prominent absorption features at 1 and 2 microns that are typical of V-class objects, indicating that the methods based on the photometric surveys to infer the basaltic asteroid distribution are quite robust. The spectra of these asteroids are examined and compared to those of Vesta and the HED meteorites, for which Vesta is believed to be the parent body, and other V-type asteroids previously observed. To enlarge the data set and increase the statistical significance of the analysis, we included the data presented in our previous articles (De Sanctis et al., 2011ab). It is important to note that all these objects have been observed at the same telescope with the same instrumental set up. We derive spectral parameters from the NIR spectra to infer mineralogical information on the observed asteroids. The V-type asteroids here examined show a large variability of band parameters. These parameters have been compared with those of the HED meteorites and with the parameters derived for Vesta using the

  16. ADE spectral networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro; Park, Chan Y.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new perspective and a generalization of spectral networks for 4d {N} = 2 theories of class S associated to Lie algebras {g} = A n , D n , E6, and E7. Spectral networks directly compute the BPS spectra of 2d theories on surface defects coupled to the 4d theories. A Lie algebraic interpretation of these spectra emerges naturally from our construction, leading to a new description of 2d-4d wall-crossing phenomena. Our construction also provides an efficient framework for the study of BPS spectra of the 4d theories. In addition, we consider novel types of surface defects associated with minuscule ccrepresentations of {g}.

  17. Chromatic confocal spectral interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Papastathopoulos, Evangelos; Koerner, Klaus; Osten, Wolfgang

    2006-11-10

    Chromatic confocal spectral interferomertry (CCSI) is a novel scheme for topography measurements that combines the techniques of spectral interferometry and chromatic confocal microscopy. This hybrid method allows for white-light interferometric detection with a high NA in a single-shot manner. To the best of our knowledge, CCSI is the first interferometric method that utilizes a confocally filtered and chromatically dispersed focus for detection and simultaneously allows for retrieval of the depth position of reflecting or scattering objects utilizing the phase (modulation frequency) of the interferometric signals acquired. With the chromatically dispersed focus, the depth range of the sensor is decoupled from the NA of the microscope objective.

  18. A Subspace Approach to Spectral Quantification for MR Spectroscopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yudu; Lam, Fan; Clifford, Bryan; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2017-08-18

    To provide a new approach for incorporating both spatial and spectral priors into the solution of the spectral quantification problem for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). A novel signal model is proposed, which represents the spectral distributions of each molecule as a subspace and the entire spectrum as a union-of-subspaces. Based on this model, the spectral quantification can be solved in two steps: a) subspace estimation based on the empirical distributions of the spectral parameters estimated using spectral priors, and b) parameter estimation for the union-of-subspaces model incorporating spatial priors. The proposed method has been evaluated using both simulated and experimental data, producing impressive results. The proposed union-of-subspaces representation of spatiospectral functions provides an effective computational framework for solving the MRSI spectral quantification problem with spatiospectral constraints. The proposed approach transforms how the MRSI spectral quantification problem is solved and enables efficient and effective use of spatiospectral priors to improve parameter estimation. The resulting algorithm is expected to be useful for a wide range of quantitative metabolic imaging studies using MRSI.

  19. Atmospheric stellar parameters from cross-correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Sneden, C.; Udry, S.

    2017-08-01

    The increasing number of spectra gathered by spectroscopic sky surveys and transiting exoplanet follow-up has pushed the community to develop automated tools for atmospheric stellar parameters determination. Here we present a novel approach that allows the measurement of temperature (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]) and gravity (log g) within a few seconds and in a completely automated fashion. Rather than performing comparisons with spectral libraries, our technique is based on the determination of several cross-correlation functions (CCFs) obtained by including spectral features with different sensitivity to the photospheric parameters. We use literature stellar parameters of high signal-to-noise (SNR), high-resolution HARPS spectra of FGK main-sequence stars to calibrate Teff, [Fe/H] and log g as a function of CCF parameters. Our technique is validated using low-SNR spectra obtained with the same instrument. For FGK stars we achieve a precision of σ _{{T_eff}} = 50 K, σlog g = 0.09 dex and σ _{{{[Fe/H]}}} =0.035 dex at SNR = 50, while the precision for observation with SNR ≳ 100 and the overall accuracy are constrained by the literature values used to calibrate the CCFs. Our approach can easily be extended to other instruments with similar spectral range and resolution or to other spectral range and stars other than FGK dwarfs if a large sample of reference stars is available for the calibration. Additionally, we provide the mathematical formulation to convert synthetic equivalent widths to CCF parameters as an alternative to direct calibration. We have made our tool publicly available.

  20. Atomic Data for Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene

    Collisional excitation and ionization cross sections suitable to highly excited states of the target atom at low and intermediate kinetic energy of the scattering particle have been derived following the semiclassical Impact Parameter approximation. An analytical expression for cross section involving transitions with Δ l > 1 has been obtained when the semiclassical requirement and the Ehrhardt conditions are valid. The analytical cross sections are explicit functions of the initial quantum number of the target atom, the incident velocity of the colliding particle and Δ n (for bound-bound transitions), allowing a generalization to any transition needed in a spectral modeling code. The cross sections obtained with the Impact Parameter approximation present a close agreement with previous theoretical results for dipole and quadrupole (Δ l = 2) cross sections of bound-bound transitions. Results of octupolar (Δ l = 3) cross sections are also given for Δ n = 1 and Δ n = 2 and a wide range of incident energies. The results indicate that the cross sections corresponding to transitions with Δ l > 1 are significant up to incident energies about 100 times the transition energy. The Impact Parameter cross sections for bound-free transitions present a very good agreement with experimental values, in particular at low incident energies.

  1. Learning theory of distributed spectral algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zheng-Chu; Lin, Shao-Bo; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2017-07-01

    Spectral algorithms have been widely used and studied in learning theory and inverse problems. This paper is concerned with distributed spectral algorithms, for handling big data, based on a divide-and-conquer approach. We present a learning theory for these distributed kernel-based learning algorithms in a regression framework including nice error bounds and optimal minimax learning rates achieved by means of a novel integral operator approach and a second order decomposition of inverse operators. Our quantitative estimates are given in terms of regularity of the regression function, effective dimension of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space, and qualification of the filter function of the spectral algorithm. They do not need any eigenfunction or noise conditions and are better than the existing results even for the classical family of spectral algorithms.

  2. Spectral features of solar plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhatov, N. A.; Revunov, S. E.

    2014-11-01

    Research to the identification of plasma flows in the Solar wind by spectral characteristics of solar plasma flows in the range of magnetohydrodynamics is devoted. To do this, the wavelet skeleton pattern of Solar wind parameters recorded on Earth orbit by patrol spacecraft and then executed their neural network classification differentiated by bandwidths is carry out. This analysis of spectral features of Solar plasma flows in the form of magnetic clouds (MC), corotating interaction regions (CIR), shock waves (Shocks) and highspeed streams from coronal holes (HSS) was made. The proposed data processing and the original correlation-spectral method for processing information about the Solar wind flows for further classification as online monitoring of near space can be used. This approach will allow on early stages in the Solar wind flow detect geoeffective structure to predict global geomagnetic disturbances.

  3. The SUMER spectral atlas of solar-disk features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curdt, W.; Brekke, P.; Feldman, U.; Wilhelm, K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Schühle, U.; Lemaire, P.

    2001-11-01

    A far-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet (FUV, EUV) spectral atlas of the Sun between 670 Å and 1609 Å in first order of diffraction has been derived from observations obtained with the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) [1]. The atlas contains spectra of the average quiet Sun, a coronal hole and a sunspot on disk. Different physical parameters prevalent in the bright network (BN) and in the cell interior (CI)-contributing in a distinct manner to the average quiet-Sun emission-have their imprint on the BN/CI ratio, which is also shown for the entire spectral range. With a few exceptions, all major lines are given with their identifications and wavelengths. Lines that appear in second order are superimposed on the first order spectra, but below 500 Å the responsivity of the normal-incidence optical system is very low. The spectra include emissions from atoms and ions in the temperature range 6 103 K to 2 106 K, i.e., continua and mission lines emitted from the lower chromosphere to the corona. This spectral atlas, with its broad wavelength coverage, provides a rich source of new diagnostic tools for studying the physical parameters in the chromosphere, the transition region and the corona. In particular, the wavelength range below 1100 Å as observed by SUMER represents a significant improvement over the spectra produced in the past. In view of the manifold appearance and temporal variation of the solar atmosphere it is obvious that our atlas can only be a-hopefully typical-snapshot. The spectral radiances are determined with a relative uncertainty of 0.15 to 0.30 (1σ), and the wavelength scale is accurate to typically 10 mÅ, which is the level achievable with semi-automatic processing. The SUMER solar-disk spectral atlas will be published in the near future by Curdt et al. [2]. It includes profiles of the average quiet Sun, an equatorial coronal hole, and a

  4. Including Jews in Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langman, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the lack of attention to Jews as an ethnic minority within multiculturalism both by Jews and non-Jews; why Jews and Jewish issues need to be included; and addresses some of the issues involved in the ethical treatment of Jewish clients. (Author)

  5. Diffuse and global solar spectral irradiance under cloudless skies

    SciTech Connect

    Brine, D.T.; Iqbal, M.

    1982-01-01

    A simple empirical model to calculate solar spectral diffuse and global irradiance under cloudless skies was investigated. This formulation takes into account absorption of radiation by molecules such as O/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O and the uniformly-mixed absorbing gases CO/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. Attenuation by Rayleigh-scattering and aerosol extinction are included. Aerosol attenuation is calculated through Angstroem's turbidity parameters ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... The diffuse radiation is assumed to be composed of three parts: (1) Rayleigh-scattered diffuse irradiance; (2) aerosol-scattered diffuse irradiance; and (3) irradiance arising out of multiple reflections between the atmosphere and the ground. The global irradiance is the sum of these three components of diffuse irradiance plus the direct irradiance. The input parameters include an extraterrestrial spectrum, zenith angle theta, turbidity coefficient ..beta.., wavelength exponent ..cap alpha.., ground albedo rho/sub g/, water vapor content and ozone content. The model is shown to yield very good results up to air mass two when compared to accurate theoretical calculations. No comparisons with measured spectra are presented because of a lack of accurate specifications of the input parameters. Results are presented to show the effect of variation of certain of the input parameters.

  6. Spectral switches of partially coherent light focused by a filter-lens system with chromatic aberration.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Cai, Chao; Nemoto, Shojiro

    2004-06-01

    It is shown that when partially coherent polychromatic light is focused by a filter-lens system with chromatic aberration, a spectral shift exists in the focused field, and a spectral switch that is defined as a sharp transition of the spectral shift also takes place at some positions of the focused field. The influence of the chromatic aberration of the lens, the coherence of the partially coherent light in the filter (a circular aperture), the radius of the aperture, and the spectral width of the partially coherent light in the aperture on the spectral shift and the spectral switch are investigated in detail. The numerical results show that these parameters affect the spectral shift and the spectral switch significantly. Potential applications of the spectral shift and the spectral switch of the partially coherent light are discussed.

  7. Lunar spectral types.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, T. B.; Charette, M. P.; Johnson, T. V.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Adams, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Results of observations of the spectral reflectance properties (0.3 to 1.1 micron) of a number of lunar mare, upland, and bright crater areas with the use of ground-based telescopes. These new data are discussed in view of earlier studies in an attempt to provide a basis for more detailed interpretation. The spectral reflectivity curves (0.3 to 1.1 micron) for all lunar areas studied consist of a positive sloping continuum with a superimposed symmetric absorption band centered at 0.95 micron. Upland, mare, and bright crater materials can be identified by their spectral curves. The curves for upland and mare regions show a range of shapes from fresh, bright craters to progressively darker background material that correlates with the apparent age of the surface features. The observed upland material has uniform spectral properties, but the mare material shows some variety, probably due to Ti(3+) dispersed in lunar-soil glass. Copernicus and Aristarchus appear to have exposed upland material from beneath the mare but Kepler has not. This observation suggests that the mare is no deeper than about 15 km in the Copernicus area and about 6 km deep in the Aristarchus area, but in the Kepler area the mare must be at least about 5 km deep.

  8. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the ¯eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identi¯cation is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identi¯cation is possible. We show that unique identi¯cation becomes less likely as p increases.

  9. Microwave spectral line listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency, intensity, and identification of 9615 spectral lines belonging to 75 molecules are tabulated in order of increasing frequency. Measurements for all 75 molecules were made in the frequency range from 26500 to 40000 MHz by a computer controlled spectrometer. Measurements were also made in the 18000 to 26500 MHz range for some of the molecules.

  10. Lunar spectral types.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, T. B.; Charette, M. P.; Johnson, T. V.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Adams, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Results of observations of the spectral reflectance properties (0.3 to 1.1 micron) of a number of lunar mare, upland, and bright crater areas with the use of ground-based telescopes. These new data are discussed in view of earlier studies in an attempt to provide a basis for more detailed interpretation. The spectral reflectivity curves (0.3 to 1.1 micron) for all lunar areas studied consist of a positive sloping continuum with a superimposed symmetric absorption band centered at 0.95 micron. Upland, mare, and bright crater materials can be identified by their spectral curves. The curves for upland and mare regions show a range of shapes from fresh, bright craters to progressively darker background material that correlates with the apparent age of the surface features. The observed upland material has uniform spectral properties, but the mare material shows some variety, probably due to Ti(3+) dispersed in lunar-soil glass. Copernicus and Aristarchus appear to have exposed upland material from beneath the mare but Kepler has not. This observation suggests that the mare is no deeper than about 15 km in the Copernicus area and about 6 km deep in the Aristarchus area, but in the Kepler area the mare must be at least about 5 km deep.

  11. Using electroretinograms and multi-model inference to identify spectral classes of photoreceptors and relative opsin expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how individual photoreceptor cells factor in the spectral sensitivity of a visual system is essential to explain how they contribute to the visual ecology of the animal in question. Existing methods that model the absorption of visual pigments use templates which correspond closely to data from thin cross-sections of photoreceptor cells. However, few modeling approaches use a single framework to incorporate physical parameters of real photoreceptors, which can be fused, and can form vertical tiers. Akaike’s information criterion (AICc) was used here to select absorptance models of multiple classes of photoreceptor cells that maximize information, given visual system spectral sensitivity data obtained using extracellular electroretinograms and structural parameters obtained by histological methods. This framework was first used to select among alternative hypotheses of photoreceptor number. It identified spectral classes from a range of dark-adapted visual systems which have between one and four spectral photoreceptor classes. These were the velvet worm, Principapillatus hitoyensis, the branchiopod water flea, Daphnia magna, normal humans, and humans with enhanced S-cone syndrome, a condition in which S-cone frequency is increased due to mutations in a transcription factor that controls photoreceptor expression. Data from the Asian swallowtail, Papilio xuthus, which has at least five main spectral photoreceptor classes in its compound eyes, were included to illustrate potential effects of model over-simplification on multi-model inference. The multi-model framework was then used with parameters of spectral photoreceptor classes and the structural photoreceptor array kept constant. The goal was to map relative opsin expression to visual pigment concentration. It identified relative opsin expression differences for two populations of the bluefin killifish, Lucania goodei. The modeling approach presented here will be useful in selecting the most likely

  12. Physics-based modeling tool development for spectral-sensing measurements under atmospheric attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xifeng; Voelz, David G.; Montoya, Joseph; Salinas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    In an experimental setting where new sensing techniques are being developed and the source/medium/system parameters are in a constant state of change, a flexible radiometric prediction tool can be essential for experimental design and analysis. The Spectral Signature Sensing (SSS) analysis and visualization software development is a user-friendly analytic tool that is designed for radiometric analysis and modeling of radiant optical energy from a source to a detection system. Transmission through the atmosphere is computed with MODTRAN and the code features multiple-source options and a flexible set of parameters for the detector. It also provides a Google Earth display function to visualize the simulation scenario. In this paper a summary is presented of the radiometric calculations applied in this modeling tool. The essential components and the main features are briefly described including the system-component inputs, other options such as save and load inputs, and the resulting spectral plots and radiometric output.

  13. Spectral Properties and Stability of One-Parameter Semigroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F. L.

    Let A be the infinitesimal generator of a strongly continuous semigroup e tA of bounded linear operators in a Banach space X with norm || · || and assume that Y ⊂ X is also a Banach space with norm || · || Y which is stronger than the norm || · || and Y is dense in X. Moreover, suppose that e tAY ⊂ Y for t 0 and e tA is also a strongly continuous semigroup in Y with the infinitesimal generator B. We show, when e tA is an isometric group, that (a) if λ ∈ σ( A), the spectrum of A, is isolated, then λ ∈ σ p ( A), the point spectrum of A; (b) if σ( B) ∩ ( iR) is countable, then σ( A) = σ( B) and σ p( B) (⊂ σ p ( A)) is nonempty. As an application of (a) and (b), we show that if e tA is uniformly bounded, σ( B) ∩ ( iR) is contained in σ c( B) and is countable, than lim t → ∞e tAx = 0 for all x ∈ X, where σ c( B) denotes the continuous spectrum of B.

  14. Radiation-driven winds of hot luminous stars. XVIII. The unreliability of stellar and wind parameter determinations from optical vs. UV spectral analysis of selected central stars of planetary nebulae and the possibility of some CSPNs as single-star supernova Ia progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Kaschinski, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    that of moderate clumping factors. Moderate clumping factors leave the UV spectra mostly unaffected, indicating that the influence on the ionization balance, and thus on the radiative acceleration, is small. Instead of the erratic behavior of the clumping factors claimed from the optical analyses, our analysis based on the velocity field computed from radiative driving yields similar clumping factors for all CSPNs, with a typical value of fcl = 4. With and without clumping, wind strengths and terminal velocities consistent with the stellar parameters from the optical analysis give spectra incompatible with both optical and UV observations, whereas a model that consistently implements the physics of radiation-driven winds achieves a good fit to both the optical and UV observations with a proper choice of stellar parameters. The shock temperatures and the ratios of X-ray to bolometric luminosity required to reproduce the highly ionized O vi line in the FUSE spectral range agree with those known from massive O stars (LX/Lbol ~ 10-7...10-6), again confirming the similarity of O-type CSPN and massive O star atmospheres and further strengthening the claim that both have identical wind driving mechanisms. Conclusions: The similarity of the winds of O-type CSPNs and those of massive O stars justifies using the same methods based on the dynamics of radiation-driven winds in their analysis, thus supporting the earlier result that several of the CSPNs in the sample have near-Chandrasekhar-limit masses and may thus be possible single-star progenitors of type Ia supernovae.

  15. USGS Spectral Library Version 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Pearson, Neil C.; Wise, Richard A.; Benzel, William M.; Lowers, Heather A.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Klein, Anna J.

    2017-04-10

    We have assembled a library of spectra measured with laboratory, field, and airborne spectrometers. The instruments used cover wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.2 to 200 microns [μm]). Laboratory samples of specific minerals, plants, chemical compounds, and manmade materials were measured. In many cases, samples were purified, so that unique spectral features of a material can be related to its chemical structure. These spectro-chemical links are important for interpreting remotely sensed data collected in the field or from an aircraft or spacecraft. This library also contains physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures. Four different spectrometer types were used to measure spectra in the library: (1) Beckman™ 5270 covering the spectral range 0.2 to 3 µm, (2) standard, high resolution (hi-res), and high-resolution Next Generation (hi-resNG) models of Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) field portable spectrometers covering the range from 0.35 to 2.5 µm, (3) Nicolet™ Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) interferometer spectrometers covering the range from about 1.12 to 216 µm, and (4) the NASA Airborne Visible/Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer AVIRIS, covering the range 0.37 to 2.5 µm. Measurements of rocks, soils, and natural mixtures of minerals were made in laboratory and field settings. Spectra of plant components and vegetation plots, comprising many plant types and species with varying backgrounds, are also in this library. Measurements by airborne spectrometers are included for forested vegetation plots, in which the trees are too tall for measurement by a field spectrometer. This report describes the instruments used, the organization of materials into chapters, metadata descriptions of spectra and samples, and possible artifacts in the spectral measurements. To facilitate greater application of the spectra, the library has also been convolved to selected spectrometer and imaging spectrometers sampling and

  16. Tethys - Geological and Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Wagner, Roland; Clark, Roger N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Cristina; Brown, Robert H.; Giese, Bernd; Roatsch, Thomas; Matson, Dennis; Baines, Kevin H.; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccione, Fabrizio; Burratti, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Phil D.; Rodriguez, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Despite the spectral dominance of H2O ice on Tethys' surface, distinct spectral variations derived by the Cassini VIMS instrument could be detected. The ice infrared absorption strengths are very different from what was expected from the visible albedo derived from Voyager and Cassini camera data. Although on Tethys, the major ice absorptions at 1.5 and 2µm are general stronger on the leading hemisphere of the satellite similar to that seen on the neighboring satellites Dione and Rhea, the detailed mapping shows a more complex pattern. Two relatively narrow N/S trending bands enriched in H2O ice of relatively large particle size separate the Saturn-facing and the anti-Saturnian hemisphere. The largest impact crater Odysseus (33°N/129°W) is included in the N/S trending band of deeper H2O absorptions on the leading hemisphere, whereas the geologically older and fourth largest impact crater Penelope (11°S/249°W) is excluded from the 'icy' band on the trailing hemisphere - supporting an exogenic origin of these bands. The oval shaped dark albedo unit observed by Voyager in the equatorial region of Tethys' leading hemisphere, which could be related to magnetospheric 'dust' impacting the surface, exhibits slightly surpressed H2O ice absorptions compared to their surrounding regions. Variations in the spectral slope from the visible to the ultra-violet wavelength range are similar to the variations observed by Cassini ISS. The spectral slope is steepest (i.e. the effect of an ultra-violet absorber other than H2O ice is strongest) on the leading as well on the trailing hemisphere. No spectral properties could be exclusively associated with Tethys' extended graben system Ithaca Chasma. Local variations, i.e. local deepening of H2O ice absorptions, are mostly related to several probably fresh impact craters and to locations where topographic slope is high like crater walls. However, only a few such fresh impact craters could be observed.

  17. Ground-Based Correction of Remote-Sensing Spectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alder-Golden, Steven M.; Rochford, Peter; Matthew, Michael; Berk, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Software has been developed for an improved method of correcting for the atmospheric optical effects (primarily, effects of aerosols and water vapor) in spectral images of the surface of the Earth acquired by airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing instruments. In this method, the variables needed for the corrections are extracted from the readings of a radiometer located on the ground in the vicinity of the scene of interest. The software includes algorithms that analyze measurement data acquired from a shadow-band radiometer. These algorithms are based on a prior radiation transport software model, called MODTRAN, that has been developed through several versions up to what are now known as MODTRAN4 and MODTRAN5 . These components have been integrated with a user-friendly Interactive Data Language (IDL) front end and an advanced version of MODTRAN4. Software tools for handling general data formats, performing a Langley-type calibration, and generating an output file of retrieved atmospheric parameters for use in another atmospheric-correction computer program known as FLAASH have also been incorporated into the present soft-ware. Concomitantly with the soft-ware described thus far, there has been developed a version of FLAASH that utilizes the retrieved atmospheric parameters to process spectral image data.

  18. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  19. Spectral-collocation variational integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiqun; Wu, Boying; Leok, Melvin

    2017-03-01

    Spectral methods are a popular choice for constructing numerical approximations for smooth problems, as they can achieve geometric rates of convergence and have a relatively small memory footprint. In this paper, we introduce a general framework to convert a spectral-collocation method into a shooting-based variational integrator for Hamiltonian systems. We also compare the proposed spectral-collocation variational integrators to spectral-collocation methods and Galerkin spectral variational integrators in terms of their ability to reproduce accurate trajectories in configuration and phase space, their ability to conserve momentum and energy, as well as the relative computational efficiency of these methods when applied to some classical Hamiltonian systems. In particular, we note that spectrally-accurate variational integrators, such as the Galerkin spectral variational integrators and the spectral-collocation variational integrators, combine the computational efficiency of spectral methods together with the geometric structure-preserving and long-time structural stability properties of symplectic integrators.

  20. Spectral Indices of Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Hansung B.; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Yun, Min Su

    2015-01-01

    The significant improvement in bandwidth and the resultant sensitivity offered by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) allows us to explore the faint radio source population. Through the study of the radio continuum we can explore the spectral indices of these radio sources. Robust radio spectral indices are needed for accurate k-corrections, for example in the study of the radio - far-infrared (FIR) correlation. We present an analysis of measuring spectral indices using two different approaches. In the first, we use the standard wideband imaging algorithm in the data reduction package CASA. In the second, we use a traditional approach of imaging narrower bandwidths to derive the spectral indices. For these, we simulated data to match the observing parameter space of the CHILES Con Pol survey (Hales et al. 2014). We investigate the accuracy and precision of spectral index measurements as a function of signal-to noise, and explore the requirements to reliably probe possible evolution of the radio-FIR correlation in CHILES Con Pol.

  1. Singular value decomposition based regularization prior to spectral mixing improves crosstalk in dynamic imaging using spectral diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yuxuan; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Culver, Joseph P.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    The spectrally constrained diffuse optical tomography (DOT) method relies on incorporating spectral prior information directly into the image reconstruction algorithm, thereby correlating the underlying optical properties across multiple wavelengths. Although this method has been shown to provide a solution that is stable, the use of conventional Tikhonov-type regularization techniques can lead to additional crosstalk between parameters, particularly in linear, single-step dynamic imaging applications. This is due mainly to the suboptimal regularization of the spectral Jacobian matrix, which smoothes not only the image-data space, but also the spectral mapping space. In this work a novel regularization technique based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) is presented that preserves the spectral prior information while regularizing the Jacobian matrix, leading to dramatically reduced crosstalk between the recovered parameters. Using simulated data, images of changes in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentrations are reconstructed via the SVD-based approach and compared with images reconstructed by using non-spectral and conventional spectral methods. In a 2D, two wavelength example, it is shown that the proposed approach provides a 98% reduction in crosstalk between recovered parameters as compared with conventional spectral reconstruction algorithms, and 60% as compared with non-spectrally constrained algorithms. Using a subject specific multilayered model of the human head, a noiseless dynamic simulation of cortical activation is performed to further demonstrate such improvement in crosstalk. However, with the addition of realistic noise in the data, both non-spectral and proposed algorithms perform similarly, indicating that the use of spectrally constrained reconstruction algorithms in dynamic DOT may be limited by the contrast of the signal as well as the noise characteristics of the system. PMID:23024899

  2. Interactive Spectral Analysis and Computation (ISAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Isaac is a task in the NSO external package for IRAF. A descendant of a FORTRAN program written to analyze data from a Fourier transform spectrometer, the current implementation has been generalized sufficiently to make it useful for general spectral analysis and other one dimensional data analysis tasks. The user interface for Isaac is implemented as an interpreted mini-language containing a powerful, programmable vector calculator. Built-in commands provide much of the functionality needed to produce accurate line lists from input spectra. These built-in functions include automated spectral line finding, least squares fitting of Voigt profiles to spectral lines including equality constraints, various filters including an optimal filter construction tool, continuum fitting, and various I/O functions.

  3. Aspiring to Spectral Ignorance in Earth Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Enabling robust, defensible and integrated decision making in the Era of Big Earth Data requires the fusion of data from multiple and diverse sensor platforms and networks. While the application of standardised global grid systems provides a common spatial analytics framework that facilitates the computationally efficient and statistically valid integration and analysis of these various data sources across multiple scales, there remains the challenge of sensor equivalency; particularly when combining data from different earth observation satellite sensors (e.g. combining Landsat and Sentinel-2 observations). To realise the vision of a sensor ignorant analytics platform for earth observation we require automation of spectral matching across the available sensors. Ultimately, the aim is to remove the requirement for the user to possess any sensor knowledge in order to undertake analysis. This paper introduces the concept of spectral equivalence and proposes a methodology through which equivalent bands may be sourced from a set of potential target sensors through application of equivalence metrics and thresholds. A number of parameters can be used to determine whether a pair of spectra are equivalent for the purposes of analysis. A baseline set of thresholds for these parameters and how to apply them systematically to enable relation of spectral bands amongst numerous different sensors is proposed. The base unit for comparison in this work is the relative spectral response. From this input, determination of a what may constitute equivalence can be related by a user, based on their own conceptualisation of equivalence.

  4. Spectral Indices to Monitor Nitrogen-Driven Carbon Uptake in Field Corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corp, Lawrence A.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Campbell, Peya E.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Daughtry, Craig S. T.; Russ, Andrew; Cheng, Yen-Ben

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is heavily impacted by changing vegetation cover and productivity with large scale monitoring of vegetation only possible with remote sensing techniques. The goal of this effort was to evaluate existing reflectance (R) spectroscopic methods for determining vegetation parameters related to photosynthetic function and carbon (C) dynamics in plants. Since nitrogen (N) is a key constituent of photosynthetic pigments and C fixing enzymes, biological C sequestration is regulated in part by N availability. Spectral R information was obtained from field corn grown at four N application rates (0, 70, 140, 280 kg N/ha). A hierarchy of spectral observations were obtained: leaf and canopy with a spectral radiometer; aircraft with the AISA sensor; and satellite with EO-1 Hyperion. A number of spectral R indices were calculated from these hyperspectral observations and compared to geo-located biophysical measures of plant growth and physiological condition. Top performing indices included the R derivative index D730/D705 and the normalized difference of R750 vs. R705 (ND705), both of which differentiated three of the four N fertilization rates at multiple observation levels and yielded high correlations to these carbon parameters: light use efficiency (LUE); C:N ratio; and crop grain yield. These results advocate the use of hyperspectral sensors for remotely monitoring carbon cycle dynamics in managed terrestrial ecosystems.

  5. Spectral Indices to Monitor Nitrogen-Driven Carbon Uptake in Field Corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corp, Lawrence A.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Campbell, Peya E.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Daughtry, Craig S. T.; Russ, Andrew; Cheng, Yen-Ben

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is heavily impacted by changing vegetation cover and productivity with large scale monitoring of vegetation only possible with remote sensing techniques. The goal of this effort was to evaluate existing reflectance (R) spectroscopic methods for determining vegetation parameters related to photosynthetic function and carbon (C) dynamics in plants. Since nitrogen (N) is a key constituent of photosynthetic pigments and C fixing enzymes, biological C sequestration is regulated in part by N availability. Spectral R information was obtained from field corn grown at four N application rates (0, 70, 140, 280 kg N/ha). A hierarchy of spectral observations were obtained: leaf and canopy with a spectral radiometer; aircraft with the AISA sensor; and satellite with EO-1 Hyperion. A number of spectral R indices were calculated from these hyperspectral observations and compared to geo-located biophysical measures of plant growth and physiological condition. Top performing indices included the R derivative index D730/D705 and the normalized difference of R750 vs. R705 (ND705), both of which differentiated three of the four N fertilization rates at multiple observation levels and yielded high correlations to these carbon parameters: light use efficiency (LUE); C:N ratio; and crop grain yield. These results advocate the use of hyperspectral sensors for remotely monitoring carbon cycle dynamics in managed terrestrial ecosystems.

  6. Individual Sensitivity to Spectral and Temporal Cues in Listeners with Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Pamela E.; Wright, Richard A.; Blackburn, Michael C.; Tatman, Rachael; Gallun, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to evaluate use of spectral and temporal cues under conditions in which both types of cues were available. Method: Participants included adults with normal hearing and hearing loss. We focused on 3 categories of speech cues: static spectral (spectral shape), dynamic spectral (formant change), and temporal…

  7. Individual Sensitivity to Spectral and Temporal Cues in Listeners with Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Pamela E.; Wright, Richard A.; Blackburn, Michael C.; Tatman, Rachael; Gallun, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to evaluate use of spectral and temporal cues under conditions in which both types of cues were available. Method: Participants included adults with normal hearing and hearing loss. We focused on 3 categories of speech cues: static spectral (spectral shape), dynamic spectral (formant change), and temporal…

  8. The US Geological Survey, digital spectral reflectance library: version 1: 0.2 to 3.0 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; King, Trude V. V.; Gallagher, Andrea J.; Calvin, Wendy M.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a digital reflectance spectral library, with management and spectral analysis software. The library includes 500 spectra of 447 samples (some samples include a series of grain sizes) measured from approximately 0.2 to 3.0 microns. The spectral resolution (Full Width Half Maximum) of the reflectance data is less than or equal to 4 nm in the visible (0.2-0.8 microns) and less than or equal 10 nm in the NIR (0.8-2.35 microns). All spectra were corrected to absolute reflectance using an NBS Halon standard. Library management software lets users search on parameters (e.g. chemical formulae, chemical analyses, purity of samples, mineral groups, etc.) as well as spectral features. Minerals from sulfide, oxide, hydroxide, halide, carbonate, nitrate, borate, phosphate, and silicate groups are represented. X-ray and chemical analyses are tabulated for many of the entries, and all samples have been evaluated for spectral purity. The library also contains end and intermediate members for the olivine, garnet, scapolite, montmorillonite, muscovite, jarosite, and alunite solid-solution series. We have included representative spectra of H2O ice, kerogen, ammonium-bearing minerals, rare-earth oxides, desert varnish coatings, kaolinite crystallinity series, kaolinite-smectite series, zeolite series, and an extensive evaporite series. Because of the importance of vegetation to climate-change studies we have include 17 spectra of tree leaves, bushes, and grasses.

  9. Retrieving Soil Hydraulic Properties by Diffuse Spectral Reflectance Data in Vis-NIR-SWIR Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeian, E.; Homaee, M.; Vereecken, H.; Montzka, C.; Norouzi, A. A.; Van Genuchten, M.

    2014-12-01

    Information about the soil water characteristics is necessary for modeling water flow and solute transport processes in vadose zone. Soil spectroscopy in the visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared (Vis-NIR-SWIR) range has been widely used as a rapid, cost-effective and non-destructive technique to predict basic soil properties. In this paper we used three different approaches to retrieve soil hydraulic parameters from spectral data in the visible, near-infrared and shortwave-infrared (Vis-NIR-SWIR) region and basic soil properties. Using stepwise multiple linear statistics coupled with bootstrapping, we derived and validated three types of point and parametric transfer functions: i) spectral transfer functions (STFs), ii) pedotransfer functions (PTFs) and iii) spectral pedotransfer functions (SPTFs) which respectively used spectral data, basic soil properties and spectral based basic soil predictions as their inputs. We further evaluated a direct fit of the van Genuchten (VG) and Brooks-Corey (BC) retention models to the predicted water contents obtained with each approach. According to the results, soil water contents, the VG and BC parameters as well as basic soil properties showed significant (p<0.01) correlation with spectral reflectance values, especially for the SWIR region. The STFs performed slightly better than the PTFs in terms of R2 and RMSE in estimating water contents in the mid and dry parts of retention curve. In the wet range, PTFs were found to perform better than the other two approaches. Compared to the STFs, however, better water content estimates were obtained using the SPTFs in the wet range. The parametric STFs and SPTFs of both the VG and BC models developed from spectral data performed slightly better than parametric PTFs for the retention curve. The best predictions were obtained with a direct fit of the retention models to soil water contents estimated with point transfer functions. Our findings suggest that spectral information

  10. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-15

    We compute the e⁺e⁻ C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(α3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O(ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≅ 2.5% at Q=mZ.

  11. Using Retrieved Aerosol Spectral Properties to Characterize Aerosol Composition and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral dependence of aerosol properties, such as aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA), can be used to infer aerosol composition. In particular, aerosol mixtures dominated by dust absorption will have monotonically increasing SSA with wavelength while that dominated by black carbon absorption has monotonically decreasing SSA spectra. However, spectral AAOD and SSA measured in reality may differ from these extreme cases, due to the complicated composition and mixing states. In this study, we use spectral SSA and AAOD retrieved from AERONET measurements, assisted by CALIPSO aerosol type product and Mie calculations, to characterize aerosol mixtures over representative regions. Moreover, in addition to the monotonically increasing or decreasing AAOD and SSA spectra, we find the spectral dependence of these two parameters are frequently peaked (at 675 nm or 870 nm) over several places including East Asia, India, West Africa and South America. We thus suggest that SSA spectral curvature, defined as the negative of the second derivative of SSA as a function of wavelength, can provide additional information on the composition of these aerosol mixtures. Further analysis indicates that moderate mixing of black carbon with dust or organic carbon is mainly responsible for producing the SSA curvature. An optimization scheme was developed to match the observed AAOD and SSA spectra with Mie calculations assuming different aerosol composition and mixing states. Results suggest that while external mixing can explain most of the observed AAOD and SSA spectral dependence, internal mixing or core-shell mode is also likely under many circumstances, such as East Asia during winter and post-monsoon and winter seasons over India. This method offers the potential to quantitatively infer aerosol composition from these spectral measurements of aerosol optical properties.

  12. Articulatory Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladefoged, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the 16 parameters hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for linguistic phonetic specifications. Suggests seven parameters affecting tongue shapes, three determining the positions of the lips, one controlling the position of the velum, four varying laryngeal actions, and one controlling respiratory activity. (RL)

  13. Nutritional therapies (including fosteum).

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2009-03-01

    Nutrition is important in promoting bone health and in managing an individual with low bone mass or osteoporosis. In adult women and men, known losses of bone mass and microarchitecture occur, and nutrition can help minimize these losses. In every patient, a healthy diet with adequate protein, fruits, vegetables, calcium, and vitamin D is required to maintain bone health. Recent reports on nutritional remedies for osteoporosis have highlighted the importance of calcium in youth and continued importance in conjunction with vitamin D as the population ages. It is likely that a calcium intake of 1200 mg/d is ideal, and there are some concerns about excessive calcium intakes. However, vitamin D intake needs to be increased in most populations. The ability of soy products, particularly genistein aglycone, to provide skeletal benefit has been recently studied, including some data that support a new medical food marketed as Fosteum (Primus Pharmaceuticals, Scottsdale, AZ).

  14. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 µm [C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  15. SPECTRAL CONFUSION FOR COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS OF REDSHIFTED C II EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-06-20

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencil-beam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150–1300 μm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 μm [C ii] line and other lines. Although the [C ii] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C ii] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20″ and 10′, sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  16. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 µm [C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  17. The Advantage of Cyclic Spectral Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    it provides a richer domain for signal analysis; and (3) the theory of spectral correlation allows a much more complete mechanism for modeling ...stationarity assumption and are in fact better modelled as cyclostationary processes where the statis- tical parameters of the signals are assumed to be varying...6.0 APPLICATIONS OF THE CYCLOSTATIONARY MODEL ................ 14 6.1 DETECTION .................................... 15 6.2 CLASSIFICATION

  18. Computationally Fast Algorithms for ARMA Spectral Estimation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    0 i lp mniazo. 47 resultant 15-th order high performance AROMA spectral estimate obtained is shown in Fig. 4.5.2 where the ability to resolve the two...method for selections of t = 4, 8, and 20. It is also possible to use the high performance ARMA method for synthesizing digital filters. To illustrate...Walker equations, it is shown that when the data length n adequately exceeds the order parameter p and q then these estimates are virtually unbiased

  19. Chiral Asymmetry and the Spectral Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfäffle, Frank; Stephan, Christoph A.

    2013-07-01

    We consider orthogonal connections with arbitrary torsion on compact Riemannian manifolds. For the induced Dirac operators, twisted Dirac operators and Dirac operators of Chamseddine-Connes type we compute the spectral action. In addition to the Einstein-Hilbert action and the bosonic part of the Standard Model Lagrangian we find the Holst term from Loop Quantum Gravity, a coupling of the Holst term to the scalar curvature and a prediction for the value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter.

  20. Ultraviolet Spectral Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally; Lindler, Don

    2009-01-01

    At redshifts, z>l, the rest-frame mid-UV is brought into view of large, ground-based telescopes. Here, we report on a study of the potential of the rest-frame UV spectrum for deriving the age since the last major episode of star formation in a galaxy. We base this investigation on wide-band (0.2-1.0 microns), low-resolution (R-1000) spectra of single stars in Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). We find that a combination of mid-UV spectral indices and colors can indeed yield the age of a stellar population, but only if light from the stellar population is unreddened.

  1. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2016-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral-line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It converges rapidly and is very flexible in that it can be used with any fitting function. We present examples of cubic-spline and Gaussian fits and give special attention to measurements of blue-red asymmetries of coronal emission lines.

  2. Spectral quantification of Southern Baltic seabed roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefler, K.; Tegowski, J.; Nowak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The work presents the fast and efficient tool for seafloor classification, where scales and shapes of geomorphological forms were taken into account. The precise bathymetry and seafloor texture was developed with multibeam echosounder at six different areas of size up to 10 by 20 km. This areas demonstrate typical geomorphological seafloor features of bottom relief at the southern Baltic Sea coastal waters. The acoustical measurements were accompanied by geological sampling and video inspection. High resolution mosaic maps were obtained as a result of multi-survey measurements with maximal spatial resolution of 0.05m. Such accuracy of the measurements allows to observe small geomorphologic forms as ripplemarks or pebbles. The most investigated polygons have bottom relief of polygenetic origin with relicts of periglacial forms together with contemporary forms of marine origin. In the studied areas different forms of sand accumulation were found, beginning with small ripplemarks ending at big sandy waves. In the seabed erosion zones the bottom surface is rough and varied with clearly formed embankments, abrasive platforms, inselbergs and stony gravely abrasive pavements on the bottom surface. Such geomorphic diversity of the bottom surface has allowed for development of consistent geomorphological classification system based mainly on spectral properties of seafloor roughness. Each analysed area was divided into squares (200 by 200 m) with an overlap between adjacent subareas of 75% a square size. Next, subdivided areas were spectrally transformed using a two dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT). The spectral parameters as maximal value of spectral density function, spectral exponent and strength, spectral moments, mean frequency, spectral width and skewness for each characteristic type of bottom surface were determined relaying on the calculated 2D spectra. Moreover, other features characterised the corrugated surface as fractal dimension, radius of

  3. [The application of spectral geological profile in the alteration mapping].

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Ting; Lin, Qi-Zhong; Zhang, Bing; Lu, Lin-Lin

    2012-07-01

    Geological section can help validating and understanding of the alteration information which is extracted from remote sensing images. In the paper, the concept of spectral geological profile was introduced based on the principle of geological section and the method of spectral information extraction. The spectral profile can realize the storage and vision of spectra along the geological profile, but the spectral geological spectral profile includes more information besides the information of spectral profile. The main object of spectral geological spectral profile is to obtain the distribution of alteration types and content of minerals along the profile which can be extracted from spectra measured by field spectrometer, especially for the spatial distribution and mode of alteration association. Technical method and work flow of alteration information extraction was studied for the spectral geological profile. The spectral geological profile was set up using the ground reflectance spectra and the alteration information was extracted from the remote sensing image with the help of typical spectra geological profile. At last the meaning and effect of the spectral geological profile was discussed.

  4. Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon