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Sample records for including cross protection

  1. Listeria monocytogenes shows temperature-dependent and -independent responses to salt stress, including responses that induce cross-protection against other stresses.

    PubMed

    Bergholz, Teresa M; Bowen, Barbara; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2012-04-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes experiences osmotic stress in many habitats, including foods and the gastrointestinal tract of the host. During transmission, L. monocytogenes is likely to experience osmotic stress at different temperatures and may adapt to osmotic stress in a temperature-dependent manner. To understand the impact of temperature on the responses this pathogen uses to adapt to osmotic stress, we assessed genome-wide changes in the L. monocytogenes H7858 transcriptome during short-term and long-term adaptation to salt stress at 7°C and 37°C. At both temperatures, the short-term response to salt stress included increased transcript levels of sigB and SigB-regulated genes, as well as mrpABCDEFG, encoding a sodium/proton antiporter. This antiporter was found to play a role in adaptation to salt stress at both temperatures; ΔmrpABCDEFG had a significantly longer lag phase than the parent strain in BHI plus 6% NaCl at 7°C and 37°C. The short-term adaptation to salt stress at 7°C included increased transcript levels of two genes encoding carboxypeptidases that modify peptidoglycan. These carboxypeptidases play a role in the short-term adaptation to salt stress only at 7°C, where the deletion mutants had significantly different lag phases than the parent strain. Changes in the transcriptome at both temperatures suggested that exposure to salt stress could provide cross-protection to other stresses, including peroxide stress. Short-term exposure to salt stress significantly increased H(2)O(2) resistance at both temperatures. These results provide information for the development of knowledge-based intervention methods against this pathogen, as well as provide insight into potential mechanisms of cross-protection.

  2. Include heuristics in protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kobyakov, A.I. )

    1993-02-01

    Automatic systems based on interlock principles are the most popular method of protecting plants from hazards. Nevertheless, such systems have specific shortcomings. The major one comes from the fact that protection controls are activated at the stage of break down mode development, and not at the moments of pre-fault status origin. It is possible to design protection controls that account for information relating to pre-fault status, causes, locations, and potential danger severity. A method of recreating automatic protection systems (APS) with functioning and structural organization is based on the accepted strategy of potentially hazardous plant protection. APS features these basic functions: pre-fault status classification and diagnostic providing protection controls that depend on pre-fault status type and cause, and suppression process analysis and protection controls correction. The system functions as a parallel/series process. Pre-fault status location data with related classification and diagnostics are based on current startup information. A protection control vector is formed that guarantees pre-fault status suppression. This paper describes these features.

  3. A history of plant virology. Cross protection.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, S; Roggero, P; Conti, M

    2001-01-01

    Cross protection is a type of induced resistance developing in plants against viruses. Its basis is that prior infection with one virus affords protection against closely related ones. Its history started about seventy years ago, when the Dutchman Thung and the Englishman Salaman described the phenomenon independently. During the 1930s, several virologists confirmed the discovery, which was considered the first possibility to protect plants against virus infection. Growing interest also led plant virologists to formulate the first hypotheses on its mechanism, with the onset of a still unsolved debate. The hypotheses, that have been succeeded until the 1970s, included (i) antibody formation, (ii) exhaustion of essential metabolites, (iii) limited sites for virus multiplication, and (iv) specific adsorption by new cell compounds. These hypotheses were re-proposed and discussed on several occasions without arriving at a final conclusion. The statement of molecular genetics of viruses produced new interesting "theories", fundamentally based on the interference between virus strains. A model developed by the Americans Palukaitis and Zaitlin in 1984 indicates that excess of progeny positive-sense RNA of the protecting strain would sequester the minus-strand RNA of the challenging strain. Other models involve a function of the coat protein, or gene recombination. However, no model that could unify all the various facets of cross protection has hitherto been proposed. All that has not stopped the phenomenon having practical application. From the first attempts against a severe disease of cocoa in West Africa realized by Posnette in the 1940s, a number of crops (such as tomato, tobacco, citrus, cucurbits, grapevine, soybean, papaya, and so on) have been submitted to this practice. During the 1980s, cross protection came to a standstill because of the development of new resistant or tolerant cultivars. Its story is by no means ended, and much work is needed to understand its

  4. 49 CFR 236.787 - Protection, cross.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection, cross. 236.787 Section 236.787 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Protection, cross. An arrangement to prevent the improper operation of a signal, switch, movable-point...

  5. 49 CFR 236.787 - Protection, cross.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection, cross. 236.787 Section 236.787 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Protection, cross. An arrangement to prevent the improper operation of a signal, switch, movable-point...

  6. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of child abuse and neglect, abandonment, and conditions that may require referrals (such as mental or... SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.403 What do protective services include? Protective services provided to a child, family or elderly person will be documented in the...

  7. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... allegations of child abuse and neglect, abandonment, and conditions that may require referrals (such as mental... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.403 What do protective services include? Protective services provided to a child, family or elderly person will be documented...

  8. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... allegations of child abuse and neglect, abandonment, and conditions that may require referrals (such as mental... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.403 What do protective services include? Protective services provided to a child, family or elderly person will be documented...

  9. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... allegations of child abuse and neglect, abandonment, and conditions that may require referrals (such as mental... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.403 What do protective services include? Protective services provided to a child, family or elderly person will be documented...

  10. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... allegations of child abuse and neglect, abandonment, and conditions that may require referrals (such as mental... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.403 What do protective services include? Protective services provided to a child, family or elderly person will be documented...

  11. 21 CFR 886.1840 - Simulatan (including crossed cylinder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... given object is clearly in focus, as the examiner uses different lenses). (b) Classification. Class I... cylinder). (a) Identification. A simulatan (including crossed cylinder) is a device that is a set of...

  12. 21 CFR 886.1840 - Simulatan (including crossed cylinder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... given object is clearly in focus, as the examiner uses different lenses). (b) Classification. Class I... cylinder). (a) Identification. A simulatan (including crossed cylinder) is a device that is a set of...

  13. HPV vaccine cross-protection: Highlights on additional clinical benefit.

    PubMed

    De Vincenzo, Rosa; Ricci, Caterina; Conte, Carmine; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are administered in vaccination programs, targeted at young adolescent girls before sexual exposure, and in catch-up programs for young women in some countries. All the data indicate that HPV-virus-like particles (VLPs) effectively prevent papillomavirus infections with a high level of antibodies and safety. Since non-vaccine HPV types are responsible for about 30% of cervical cancers, cross-protection would potentially enhance primary cervical cancer prevention efforts. High levels of specific neutralizing antibodies can be generated after immunization with HPV VLPs. Immunity to HPV is type-specific. However, if we consider the phylogenetic tree including the different HPV types, we realize that a certain degree of cross-protection is possible, due to the high homology of some viral types with vaccine ones. The assessment of cross-protective properties of HPV vaccines is an extremely important matter, which has also increased public health implications and could add further value to their preventive potential. The impact of cross-protection is mostly represented by a reduction of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia CIN2-3 more than what expected. In this article we review the mechanisms and the effectiveness of Bivalent (HPV-16/-18) and Quadrivalent (HPV-6/-11/-16/-18) HPV vaccine cross-protection, focusing on the critical aspects and the potential biases in clinical trials, in order to understand how cross-protection could impact on clinical outcomes and on the new perspectives in post-vaccine era.

  14. Cross-protection among feline caliciviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Povey, C; Ingersoll, J

    1975-01-01

    Each of five groups of specific-pathogen-free and conventionally reared cats was infected with a different strain of feline calicivirus. Two of the strains were pathogenic, producing characteristically fever, depression, loss of appetite, buccal ulceration, and occasionally increased ocular and nasal secretion. Two of the other strains were midly pathogenic and associated with fever or buccal ulceration or both; the fifth strain was nonpathogenic. The two pathogenic strains plus three others shown also to be pathogenic were used 3 months after the initial infection to challenge the cats in rearranged groupings. Of the 28 conventional cats challenged six (21.4%) showed at least a febrile response, although none of the 30 specific-pathogen-free cats showed any clinical signs. After challenge, virus was recovered from throat swabs of 37 or the 58 cats (63.8%) including the six which showed symptoms, but the duration of the excretion of virus was significantly less than that seen with the initial infection. The homologous and heterotypic antibody responses correlated well with the clinical protection, or lack of it, seen on challenge. The results provide further evidence for significant cross-relationships between feline caliciviruses. PMID:1173064

  15. Expanding marine protected areas to include degraded coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Abelson, A; Nelson, P A; Edgar, G J; Shashar, N; Reed, D C; Belmaker, J; Krause, G; Beck, M W; Brokovich, E; France, R; Gaines, S D

    2016-12-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are a commonly applied solution to coral reef degradation, yet coral reefs continue to decline worldwide. We argue that expanding the range of MPAs to include degraded reefs (DR-MPA) could help reverse this trend. This approach requires new ecological criteria for MPA design, siting, and management. Rather than focusing solely on preserving healthy reefs, our approach focuses on the potential for biodiversity recovery and renewal of ecosystem services. The new criteria would help identify sites with the highest potential for recovery and the greatest resistance to future threats (e.g., increased temperature and acidification) and sites that contribute to MPA connectivity. The DR-MPA approach is a compliment rather than a substitute for traditional MPA design approaches. We believe that the DR-MPA approach can enhance the natural, or restoration-assisted, recovery of DRs and their ecosystem services; increase total reef area available for protection; promote more resilient and better-connected MPA networks; and improve conditions for human communities dependent on MPA ecosystem services.

  16. Cross-protection between experimental anti-leptospirosis bacterins

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Cristina Corsi; Gonçales, Amane Paldês; de Morais, Zenaide Maria; de Souza, Gisele Oliveira; Miraglia, Fabiana; Abreu, Patricia Antonia Estima; Vasconcellos, Silvio Arruda

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the existence of cross-protection between two anti-leptospirosis monovalent experimental bacterins produced with two strains of Leptospira serogroup Pomona: Fromm strain of serovar Kennewicky, isolated from pigs in the United States, and strain GR6 of serovar Pomona isolated from pigs in Brazil. Both were added of aluminum hydroxide as an adjuvant. Experimental bacterins were tested with the hamster potency test in order to assess protection provided against the disease and against the establishment of kidney infection. Controls were polyvalent commercial vaccine produced with Leptospira strains isolated outside Brazil, which included a representative of Pomona serovar, or Sorensen solution added of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. The challenge was performed with cross-strains of serogroup Pomona tested in accordance with international standards established for the potency test. After 21 days of the challenge, survivors were killed to evaluate the condition of Leptospira renal carrier. Experimental bacterins protected hamsters against homologous and heterologous strains, demonstrating the existence of cross-protection. The commercial vaccine protected the hamsters challenged with both strains, but there was a high proportion of animals diagnosed as renal carriers when the challenge was performed with strain GR6, isolated from pigs in Brazil. PMID:25477946

  17. Cross-protection between experimental anti-leptospirosis bacterins.

    PubMed

    Dib, Cristina Corsi; Gonçales, Amane Paldês; de Morais, Zenaide Maria; de Souza, Gisele Oliveira; Miraglia, Fabiana; Abreu, Patricia Antonia Estima; Vasconcellos, Silvio Arruda

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the existence of cross-protection between two anti-leptospirosis monovalent experimental bacterins produced with two strains of Leptospira serogroup Pomona: Fromm strain of serovar Kennewicky, isolated from pigs in the United States, and strain GR6 of serovar Pomona isolated from pigs in Brazil. Both were added of aluminum hydroxide as an adjuvant. Experimental bacterins were tested with the hamster potency test in order to assess protection provided against the disease and against the establishment of kidney infection. Controls were polyvalent commercial vaccine produced with Leptospira strains isolated outside Brazil, which included a representative of Pomona serovar, or Sorensen solution added of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. The challenge was performed with cross-strains of serogroup Pomona tested in accordance with international standards established for the potency test. After 21 days of the challenge, survivors were killed to evaluate the condition of Leptospira renal carrier. Experimental bacterins protected hamsters against homologous and heterologous strains, demonstrating the existence of cross-protection. The commercial vaccine protected the hamsters challenged with both strains, but there was a high proportion of animals diagnosed as renal carriers when the challenge was performed with strain GR6, isolated from pigs in Brazil.

  18. Does cortical mapping protect naming if surgery includes hippocampal resection?

    PubMed Central

    Hamberger, Marla J.; Seidel, William T.; Goodman, Robert R.; McKhann, Guy M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Pre-resection electrical stimulation mapping is frequently used to identify cortical sites critical for visual object naming. These sites are typically spared from surgical resection with the goal of preserving postoperative language. Recent studies, however, suggest a potential role of the hippocampus in naming, although this is inconsistent with neurocognitive models of language and memory. We sought to determine whether preservation of visual naming sites identified via cortical stimulation mapping protects against naming decline when resection includes the hippocampal region. Methods We assessed postoperative changes in visual naming in 33 patients, 14 who underwent left temporal resection including hippocamal removal and 19 patients who had left temporal resection without hippocampal removal. All patients had preresection cortical language mapping. Visual object naming sites identified via electrical stimulation were always preserved. Results Patients without hippocampal resection showed no significant naming decline, suggesting a clinical benefit from cortical mapping. In contrast, patients who had hippocampal resection exhibited significant postoperative naming decline, despite pre-resection mapping and preservation of all visual naming sites (P ≤ .02). These group effects were also evident in individual patients (P = .02). More detailed, post hoc examination of patients who had hippocampal resection revealed that overall, patients who declined were those with a preoperative, structurally intact hippocampus, whereas patients with preoperative hippocampal sclerosis did not exhibit significant decline. Interpretation Despite cortical language mapping with preservation of visual naming sites from resection, removal of an intact dominant hippocampus will likely result in visual naming decline postoperatively. PMID:20373346

  19. New protection method for HVDC lines including cables

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, H.; Ayakawa, H.; Tsumenaga, N.; Sanpei, M.

    1995-10-01

    For the third project of the Hokkaido-Honshu HVDC Link in Japan, called the HVDC Link III project (rated at 250 kVdc-1,200 A-300 MW), the authors developed an HVDC transmission line protection method based on a new working principle that allows high-speed and highly sensitive detection of faults, enhancing reliability in the supply of electric power. In general, increasing the sensitivity of relays will lead to an increased likelihood of undesired operation whereas lowering the sensitivity will impair the responsiveness of the relays. The proposed method meets these apparently incompatible requirements very well. Basically classified as a differential scheme, the HVDC transmission line protection method compensates for a charging and discharging current that flows through the line-to-ground capacitance at times of voltage variations caused by a line fault or by the operation of dc power systems. The developed protection method is also characterized in that it uses current changes induced by voltage variations to restrain the operation of a relay. This configuration has made the proposed method far superior in responsiveness and sensitivity to the conventional protection method. A simulation using an EMTP (Electro-Magnetic Transients Program) was conducted on this method. Developed relay equipment embodying the new protection method was subjected to various verification tests, where this equipment was connected to a power system simulator, before being delivered to the HVDC Link III facility.

  20. Microscopic description of production cross sections including deexcitation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Background: At the forefront of the nuclear science, production of new neutron-rich isotopes is continuously pursued at accelerator laboratories all over the world. To explore the currently unknown territories in the nuclear chart far away from the stability, reliable theoretical predictions are inevitable. Purpose: To provide a reliable prediction of production cross sections taking into account secondary deexcitation processes, both particle evaporation and fission, a new method called TDHF+GEMINI is proposed, which combines the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a sophisticated statistical compound-nucleus deexcitation model, GEMINI++. Methods: Low-energy heavy ion reactions are described based on three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations. Using the particle-number projection method, production probabilities, total angular momenta, and excitation energies of primary reaction products are extracted from the TDHF wave function after collision. Production cross sections for secondary reaction products are evaluated employing GEMINI++. Results are compared with available experimental data and widely used grazing calculations. Results: The method is applied to describe cross sections for multinucleon transfer processes in 40Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃128.54 MeV ), 48Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃125.44 MeV ), 40Ca+208Pb (Ec .m .≃208.84 MeV ), 58Ni+208Pb (Ec .m .≃256.79 MeV ), 64Ni+238U (Ec .m .≃307.35 MeV ), and 136Xe+198Pt (Ec .m .≃644.98 MeV ) reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. It is shown that the inclusion of secondary deexcitation processes, which are dominated by neutron evaporation in the present systems, substantially improves agreement with the experimental data. The magnitude of the evaporation effects is very similar to the one observed in grazing calculations. TDHF+GEMINI provides better description of the absolute value of the cross sections for channels involving transfer of more than one proton, compared to the grazing

  1. The need to include animal protection in public health policies.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Aysha

    2013-11-01

    Many critical public health issues require non-traditional approaches. Although many novel strategies are used, one approach not widely applied involves improving the treatment of animals. Emerging infectious diseases are pressing public health challenges that could benefit from improving the treatment of animals. Other human health issues, that overlap with animal treatment issues, and that warrant further exploration, are medical research and domestic violence. The diverse nature of these health issues and their connection with animal treatment suggest that there may be other similar intersections. Public health would benefit by including the treatment of animals as a topic of study and policy development.

  2. The need to include animal protection in public health policies

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Aysha

    2013-01-01

    Many critical public health issues require non-traditional approaches. Although many novel strategies are used, one approach not widely applied involves improving the treatment of animals. Emerging infectious diseases are pressing public health challenges that could benefit from improving the treatment of animals. Other human health issues, that overlap with animal treatment issues, and that warrant further exploration, are medical research and domestic violence. The diverse nature of these health issues and their connection with animal treatment suggest that there may be other similar intersections. Public health would benefit by including the treatment of animals as a topic of study and policy development. PMID:23803712

  3. Cross-protection against drifted influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Andrea; Ansaldi, Filippo; de Florentiis, Daniela; Ceravolo, Antonella; Parodi, Valentina; Canepa, Paola; Coppelli, Martina; Icardi, Giancarlo; Durando, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Antigenic drift, the evolutionary mechanism of influenza viruses, results in an increased susceptibility of vaccinated subjects against circulating viruses. New vaccines able to grant a broader and cross-reactive immune response against drifted influenza variants are needed. Several strategies were explored to enhance the immunogenicity of plain vaccines: adjuvants, carriers and intradermal administration of influenza vaccine emerge as a promising options. To evaluate the ability of a MF59™-adjuvanted and intradermal influenza vaccine to elicit an effective antibody response against circulating viruses presenting antigenic patterns different from those of the vaccine strains, we compared antibody responses elicited by “implemented” vaccines and conventional intramuscular trivalent inactivated vaccine against heterologous circulating influenza A viruses. Different studies, simulating different epidemiological pictures produced by the natural antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses, highlighted the superior cross-reactivity of the antibodies elicited by MF59™ and intradermal vaccines, compared with subunit or split vaccine against heterologous viruses. PMID:23295230

  4. A DIVA vaccine for cross-protection against Salmonella

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., a leading cause of human bacterial foodborne disease. Vaccination against Salmonella is effective for protection of animal health and enhancement of food safety. However, current vaccines for swine may only offer limited cross-protection agai...

  5. [Animal protection in constitutional law?--On the necessity of including animal protection in the constitution].

    PubMed

    Caspar, J

    1998-03-01

    The inclusion of animal protection in the constitution poses a lengthy legal-political demand, which is again being vehemently discussed at the present time. Under consideration of juristic aspects, the following treatise attempts to clarify the legal requirements which presently exist for anchoring animal protection in constitutional law. It is therefore necessary in the first instance to explain the present situation regarding animal protection law. The legal situation in this respect is marked by a fundamental collision between special democratic rights guaranteed by the constitution on the one hand, and the norms of animal protection law on the other hand, which tend to restrict these rights. Based on concrete examples taken from court decisions, it is shown that constitutional vacuum surrounding a major part of animal protection law greatly complicates or even renders impossible the application and enforcement of the latter in practice. A prerequisite for a proper legal framework for animal protection is that the different special basic democratic rights governing animal use must be counterpoised by animal protection laws backed up by the constitution. Only by this means it is possible to prevent the ineffectiveness of animal protection legislative norms in the long term.

  6. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Cross-Protected Phenotype of Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Kwenda, Stanford; Petrova, Olga; Osipova, Elena; Gogolev, Yuri; Moleleki, Lucy N

    2017-01-01

    The ability to adapt to adverse conditions permits many bacterial species to be virtually ubiquitous and survive in a variety of ecological niches. This ability is of particular importance for many plant pathogenic bacteria that should be able to exist, except for their host plants, in different environments e.g. soil, water, insect-vectors etc. Under some of these conditions, bacteria encounter absence of nutrients and persist, acquiring new properties related to resistance to a variety of stress factors (cross-protection). Although many studies describe the phenomenon of cross-protection and several regulatory components that induce the formation of resistant cells were elucidated, the global comparison of the physiology of cross-protected phenotype and growing cells has not been performed. In our study, we took advantage of RNA-Seq technology to gain better insights into the physiology of cross-protected cells on the example of a harmful phytopathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba) that causes crop losses all over the world. The success of this bacterium in plant colonization is related to both its virulence potential and ability to persist effectively under various stress conditions (including nutrient deprivation) retaining the ability to infect plants afterwards. In our previous studies, we showed Pba to be advanced in applying different adaptive strategies that led to manifestation of cell resistance to multiple stress factors. In the present study, we determined the period necessary for the formation of cross-protected Pba phenotype under starvation conditions, and compare the transcriptome profiles of non-adapted growing cells and of adapted cells after the cross-protective effect has reached the maximal level. The obtained data were verified using qRT-PCR. Genes that were expressed differentially (DEGs) in two cell types were classified into functional groups and categories using different approaches. As a result, we portrayed physiological features

  7. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Cross-Protected Phenotype of Pectobacterium atrosepticum

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Kwenda, Stanford; Petrova, Olga; Osipova, Elena; Gogolev, Yuri; Moleleki, Lucy N.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to adapt to adverse conditions permits many bacterial species to be virtually ubiquitous and survive in a variety of ecological niches. This ability is of particular importance for many plant pathogenic bacteria that should be able to exist, except for their host plants, in different environments e.g. soil, water, insect-vectors etc. Under some of these conditions, bacteria encounter absence of nutrients and persist, acquiring new properties related to resistance to a variety of stress factors (cross-protection). Although many studies describe the phenomenon of cross-protection and several regulatory components that induce the formation of resistant cells were elucidated, the global comparison of the physiology of cross-protected phenotype and growing cells has not been performed. In our study, we took advantage of RNA-Seq technology to gain better insights into the physiology of cross-protected cells on the example of a harmful phytopathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba) that causes crop losses all over the world. The success of this bacterium in plant colonization is related to both its virulence potential and ability to persist effectively under various stress conditions (including nutrient deprivation) retaining the ability to infect plants afterwards. In our previous studies, we showed Pba to be advanced in applying different adaptive strategies that led to manifestation of cell resistance to multiple stress factors. In the present study, we determined the period necessary for the formation of cross-protected Pba phenotype under starvation conditions, and compare the transcriptome profiles of non-adapted growing cells and of adapted cells after the cross-protective effect has reached the maximal level. The obtained data were verified using qRT-PCR. Genes that were expressed differentially (DEGs) in two cell types were classified into functional groups and categories using different approaches. As a result, we portrayed physiological features

  8. Differential two-body compound nuclear cross section, including the width-fluctuation corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Herman, M.

    2014-09-02

    We figure out the compound angular differential cross sections, following mainly Fröbrich and Lipperheide, but with the angular momentum couplings that make sense for optical model work. We include the width-fluctuation correction along with calculations.

  9. Oscillatory dynamics in a bacterial cross-protection mutualism.

    PubMed

    Yurtsev, Eugene Anatoly; Conwill, Arolyn; Gore, Jeff

    2016-05-31

    Cooperation between microbes can enable microbial communities to survive in harsh environments. Enzymatic deactivation of antibiotics, a common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, is a cooperative behavior that can allow resistant cells to protect sensitive cells from antibiotics. Understanding how bacterial populations survive antibiotic exposure is important both clinically and ecologically, yet the implications of cooperative antibiotic deactivation on the population and evolutionary dynamics remain poorly understood, particularly in the presence of more than one antibiotic. Here, we show that two Escherichia coli strains can form an effective cross-protection mutualism, protecting each other in the presence of two antibiotics (ampicillin and chloramphenicol) so that the coculture can survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either strain alone. Moreover, we find that daily dilutions of the coculture lead to large oscillations in the relative abundance of the two strains, with the ratio of abundances varying by nearly four orders of magnitude over the course of the 3-day period of the oscillation. At modest antibiotic concentrations, the mutualistic behavior enables long-term survival of the oscillating populations; however, at higher antibiotic concentrations, the oscillations destabilize the population, eventually leading to collapse. The two strains form a successful cross-protection mutualism without a period of coevolution, suggesting that similar mutualisms may arise during antibiotic treatment and in natural environments such as the soil.

  10. Oscillatory dynamics in a bacterial cross-protection mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsev, Eugene Anatoly; Conwill, Arolyn; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation between microbes can enable microbial communities to survive in harsh environments. Enzymatic deactivation of antibiotics, a common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, is a cooperative behavior that can allow resistant cells to protect sensitive cells from antibiotics. Understanding how bacterial populations survive antibiotic exposure is important both clinically and ecologically, yet the implications of cooperative antibiotic deactivation on the population and evolutionary dynamics remain poorly understood, particularly in the presence of more than one antibiotic. Here, we show that two Escherichia coli strains can form an effective cross-protection mutualism, protecting each other in the presence of two antibiotics (ampicillin and chloramphenicol) so that the coculture can survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either strain alone. Moreover, we find that daily dilutions of the coculture lead to large oscillations in the relative abundance of the two strains, with the ratio of abundances varying by nearly four orders of magnitude over the course of the 3-day period of the oscillation. At modest antibiotic concentrations, the mutualistic behavior enables long-term survival of the oscillating populations; however, at higher antibiotic concentrations, the oscillations destabilize the population, eventually leading to collapse. The two strains form a successful cross-protection mutualism without a period of coevolution, suggesting that similar mutualisms may arise during antibiotic treatment and in natural environments such as the soil. PMID:27194723

  11. Carbon Fragmentation Cross Sections for Hadrontherapy and Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Tropea, S.; Bondì, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.

    2014-05-01

    Fragmentation reactions represent a serious complication in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection. In order to predict their effects, both reliable Monte Carlo codes and experimental data are needed. The shortage of precise measurements, especially of double differential cross sections, has triggered many dedicated experiments at relativistic energies. Aiming to explore the Fermi energy regime, as well, where different reaction mechanisms are involved, we measured the 12C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a 12C and a 197Au target. A high granularity Si-CsI hodoscope allowed to identify the charge and the mass of detected fragments and measure their energy and emission angle. In this work we report the double differential cross sections for the production of different fragments as a function of the emission angle. Experimental results are compared with the GEANT-4 Monte Carlo predictions performed using two reaction models, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Binary Light Ion Cascade.

  12. Sugarcane aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): Host range and sorghum resistance including cross-resistance from greenbug sources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The graminous host range, and sources of sorghum plant resistance including cross resistance from greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rond.) sorghums, [Sorghum bicolor L.) Moench], were studied for the newly emerging sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari, (Zehntner) in greenhouse no-choice experiments and ...

  13. Prophylactic cross-face nerve flap for muscle protection prior to facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Koshima, Isao; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Mihara, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Iida, Takuya; Uchida, Gentaro

    2011-02-01

    The facial muscles of a 28-year-old woman with left acoustic neuroma were successfully protected with a vascularised cross-face nerve flap using a vascularised lateral femoral cutaneous nerve along with a perforator of the lateral circumflex femoral system. It was transferred as a vascularised cross-face nerve flap to bridge a 15-cm-long defect between the bilateral buccal branches. Three months after the nerve flap transfer, the total tumour including the facial nerve was resected. Postoperatively, rapid nerve sprouting through the nerve flap and excellent facial reanimation were obtained 3-6 months after resection. This method is a one-stage reconstruction procedure, has minimal donor-site morbidity and results in strong postoperative muscle contraction. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a prophylactic cross-face nerve flap technique for the protection of facial muscles before facial nerve transection, and also the usefulness of vascularised lateral femoral cutaneous nerve flap.

  14. 43 CFR 3272.12 - What environmental protection measures must I include in my utilization plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What environmental protection measures must I include in my utilization plan? 3272.12 Section 3272.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS...

  15. Do employers voluntarily include patient protections in self-insured managed care plans?

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Janice S; Hall, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    Managed care patient protection laws passed by states do not apply to health plans sponsored by self-insured employers, although 54% of workers who receive health insurance coverage through their employer are in self-insured plans. In-depth interviews conducted in five states with employers offering self-insured health benefits and with other knowledgeable market informants provide evidence that self-insured managed care plans nonetheless include important features that strengthen subscribers' access to medical providers. Less common in these plans were features providing for independent external appeal of coverage denials and for protecting network providers from undue influence by plan administrators.

  16. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  17. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  18. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  19. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  20. An X-Ray Analysis Database of Photoionization Cross Sections Including Variable Ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ping; Cohen, David H.; MacFarlane, Joseph J.; Cassinelli, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of research efforts in the following areas are discussed: review of the major theoretical and experimental data of subshell photoionization cross sections and ionization edges of atomic ions to assess the accuracy of the data, and to compile the most reliable of these data in our own database; detailed atomic physics calculations to complement the database for all ions of 17 cosmically abundant elements; reconciling the data from various sources and our own calculations; and fitting cross sections with functional approximations and incorporating these functions into a compact computer code.Also, efforts included adapting an ionization equilibrium code, tabulating results, and incorporating them into the overall program and testing the code (both ionization equilibrium and opacity codes) with existing observational data. The background and scientific applications of this work are discussed. Atomic physics cross section models and calculations are described. Calculation results are compared with available experimental data and other theoretical data. The functional approximations used for fitting cross sections are outlined and applications of the database are discussed.

  1. Cytotoxic T cells are the predominant players providing cross-protective immunity induced by {gamma}-irradiated influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoichi; Chan, Jennifer; Regner, Matthias; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Kok, Tuckweng; Manavis, Jim; Li, Peng; Müllbacher, Arno; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2010-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single dose of nonadjuvanted intranasal gamma-irradiated influenza A virus can provide robust protection in mice against both homologous and heterosubtypic challenges, including challenge with an H5N1 avian virus strain. We investigated the mechanism behind the observed cross-protection to define which arms of the adaptive immune response are involved in mediating this protection. Studies with gene knockout mice showed the cross-protective immunity to be mediated mainly by T cells and to be dependent on the cytolytic effector molecule perforin. Adoptive transfer of memory T cells from immunized mice, but not of memory B cells, protected naïve recipients against lethal heterosubtypic influenza virus challenge. Furthermore, gamma-irradiated influenza viruses induced cross-reactive Tc-cell responses but not cross-neutralizing or cross-protective antibodies. In addition, histological analysis showed reduced lung inflammation in vaccinated mice compared to that in unvaccinated controls following heterosubtypic challenge. This reduced inflammation was associated with enhanced early recruitment of T cells, both CD4(+) and CD8(+), and with early influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. Therefore, cross-protective immunity induced by vaccination with gamma-irradiated influenza A virus is mediated mainly by Tc-cell responses.

  2. Use of sun-protective items by Japanese pedestrians: a cross-sectional observational study.

    PubMed

    Ng, William; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2011-10-01

    To document the prevalence and characteristics of the use of sun-protective items by Japanese pedestrians during the midday hours of summer weekends. Cross-sectional study. Observations were undertaken at 5 locales in central Tokyo on weekends between 11 am and 2 pm from August 7 through 22, 2010. A total of 2338 Japanese pedestrians, from adolescents to senior citizens, were included in the study. Those wearing uniforms and formal attire and individuals of non-Japanese ethnicity were excluded. The study examined the prevalence of the use of sun-protective items by pedestrians, including hats, parasols, sunglasses, and gloves/protective sleeves, and its association with demographic factors. Japanese female pedestrians demonstrated greater use of 1 or more sun-protective items compared with their male counterparts (53.0% vs 30.2%, P < .001), with parasols being the most popular item (33.0%). The wearing of sunglasses by pedestrians was low overall (males, 8.5%; females, 6.5%), despite the high UV indices recorded during the observation period. A significant proportion of adolescents and young adults (males, 77.1%; females, 65.1%) did not use any sun-protective items. The promotion of sun-safety measures, including the use of sun-protective items among Japanese adolescents and young adults, may be warranted. The low use of sunglasses by Japanese pedestrians suggests a need to raise public awareness of UV-related ocular damage.

  3. Cross Protective Mucosal Immunity Mediated by Memory Th17 Cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Yongli; Li, Wenchao; Tian, Ying; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Ni, Xin; Shen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong Th17 responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4+ T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by IL-17A blockade. Transfer of memory CD4+ T cells from IL-17A knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells played a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells. PMID:27118490

  4. Bayesian Evaluation Including Covariance Matrices of Neutron-induced Reaction Cross Sections of {sup 181}Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, H. Schnabel, G.; Srdinko, Th.; Wildpaner, V.

    2015-01-15

    A new evaluation of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 181}Ta using a consistent procedure based on Bayesian statistics is presented. Starting point of the evaluation is the description of nuclear reactions via nuclear models implemented in TALYS 1.4. A retrieval of experimental data was performed and covariance matrices of the experiments were generated from an extensive study of the corresponding literature. All reaction channels required for a transport file up to 200 MeV have been considered and the covariance matrices of cross section uncertainties for the most important channels are determined. The evaluation has been performed in one step including all available experimental data. A comparison of the evaluated cross sections and spectra with experimental data and available evaluations is performed. In general the evaluated cross section reflect our best knowledge and give a fair description of the observables. However, there are few deviations from expectation which clearly indicate the impact of the prior and the need to account for model defects. Using the results of the evaluation a complete ENDF-file similarly to those of the TENDL library is generated.

  5. Substructure procedure for including tile flexibility in stress analysis of shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    A substructure procedure to include the flexibility of the tile in the stress analysis of the shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) is described. In this procedure, the TPS is divided into substructures of (1) the tile which is modeled by linear finite elements and (2) the SIP which is modeled as a nonlinear continuum. This procedure was applied for loading cases of uniform pressure, uniform moment, and an aerodynamic shock on various tile thicknesses. The ratios of through-the-thickness stresses in the SIP which were calculated using a flexible tile compared to using a rigid tile were found to be less than 1.05 for the cases considered.

  6. Environmental and Health Protection well inventory: Includes current and past monitoring (as of April 26, 1989)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.; Janssen, J.L.

    1989-10-01

    This report is an inventory of the wells contained in Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRS research wells. All wells listed in this inventory are monitoring wells unless otherwise indicated. The purpose of this report is as follows: to provide a historical record of the wells that EHP has monitored, to provide a document containing a list of wells that are currently in the Groundwater Monitoring Program, and to provide pertinent information about all wells listed in EHP documents

  7. Cross-protection in Neisseria meningitidis serogroups Y and W polysaccharides: A comparative conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuttel, Michelle M; Timol, Zaheer; Ravenscroft, Neil

    2017-06-29

    The capsular polysaccharide is the main virulence factor in meningococcus. The capsular polysaccharides for meningococcal serogroups Y and W are almost identical polymers of hexose-sialic acid, suggesting the possibility of cross-protection between group Y and W vaccines. However, early studies indicated that they elicit different levels of cross-protection. Here we explore the conformations of the meningococcal Y and W polysaccharides with molecular dynamics simulations of three repeating unit oligosaccharide strands. We find differences in Y and W antigen conformation: the Y polysaccharide has a single dominant conformation, whereas W exhibits a family of conformations including the Y conformation. This result is supported by our NMR NOESY analysis, which indicates key close contacts for W that are not present in Y. These conformational differences provide an explanation for the different levels of cross-protection measured for the Y and W monovalent vaccines and the high group W responses observed in HibMenCY-TT vaccinees. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. DOPA, a Digital Observatory for Protected Areas including Monitoring and Forecasting Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Gregoire; Hartley, Andrew; Peedell, Stephen; de Jesus, Jorge; Ó Tuama, Éamonn; Cottam, Andrew; May, Ian; Fisher, Ian; Nativi, Stefano; Bertrand, Francis

    2010-05-01

    The Digital Observatory for Protected Areas (DOPA) is a biodiversity information system currently developed as an interoperable web service at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission in collaboration with other international organizations, including GBIF, UNEP-WCMC, Birdlife International and RSPB. DOPA is designed to assess the state and pressure of Protected Areas (PAs) and to prioritize them accordingly, in order to support decision making and fund allocation processes. To become an operational web service allowing the automatic monitoring of protected areas, DOPA needs to be able to capture the dynamics of spatio-temporal changes in habitats and anthropogenic pressure on PAs as well as the changes in the species distributions. Because some of the most valuable natural ecosystems and species on the planet cover large areas making field monitoring methods very difficult for a large scale assessment, the automatic collection and processing of remote sensing data are processes at the heart of the problem. To further be able to forecast changes due to climate change, DOPA has to rely on an architecture that enables it to communicate with the appropriate modeling web services. The purpose of this presentation is to present the architecture of the DOPA with special attention to e-Habitat, its web processing service designed for assessing the irreplaceability of habitats as well as for the modeling of habitats under different climate change scenarios. The use of open standards for spatial data and of open source programming languages for the development of the core functionalities of the system are expected to encourage the participation of the scientific community beyond the current partnerships and to favour the sharing of such an observatory which could be installed at any other location. Acknowledgement: Part of this work is funded under the 7th Framework Programme by the EuroGEOSS (www.eurogeoss.eu) project of the European Commission. The views

  9. Topological phases protected by reflection symmetry and cross-cap states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gil Young; Hsieh, Chang-Tse; Morimoto, Takahiro; Ryu, Shinsei

    2015-05-01

    Twisting symmetries provides an efficient method to diagnose symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases. In this paper, edge theories of (2+1)-dimensional topological phases protected by reflection as well as other symmetries are studied by twisting reflection symmetry, which effectively puts the edge theories on an unoriented space-time, such as the Klein bottle. A key technical step taken in this paper is the use of the so-called cross-cap states, which encode entirely the unoriented nature of space-time, and can be obtained by rearranging the space-time geometry and exchanging the role of space and time coordinates. When the system is in a nontrivial SPT phase, we find that the corresponding cross-cap state is noninvariant under the action of the symmetries of the SPT phase, but acquires an anomalous phase. This anomalous phase, with a proper definition of a reference state, on which symmetry acts trivially, reproduces the known classification of (2+1)-dimensional bosonic and fermionic SPT phases protected by reflection symmetry, including in particular the Z8 classification of topological crystalline superconductors protected by reflection and time-reversal symmetries.

  10. NORs inheritance analysis in crossings including individuals from two stocks of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Oliveira, Claudio; Tabata, Yara Aiko; Rigolino, Marcos Guilherme; Foresti, Fausto

    2002-01-01

    Silver nitrate staining of rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss) chromosomes, for the identification of the nucleolar organizing regions (NORs), revealed that in individuals from Núcleo Experimental de Salmonicultura de Campos do Jordão (Brazil) NORs were located in the long arms of submetacentric pair while in specimens from Mount Shasta (USA) NORs were located in the short arms of a submetacentric pair. Cytogenetic analysis of the offspring, obtained through artificial crosses including individuals from both stocks, allowed the identification of NORs in two submetacentric chromosomes, one in the short arms and the other in the long arms, confirming the effectiveness of the hybridization process. Complementary results obtained using the FISH technique with 18S and 5S rDNA probes showed that NOR-bearing chromosomes exhibited a cluster of 5S genes located in tandem with the 18S gene cluster in both stocks. The results allow us to suggest that the difference in NOR-bearing chromosomes found between the two stocks is likely to be due to pericentric inversion involving the chromosome segment where 18S and 5S rDNA genes are located. The presence of ribosomal genes in the long arms of a submetacentric chromosome is apparently a particular characteristic of the rainbow trout stock of Campos do Jordão and might be used as a chromosome marker in studies of controlled crosses in this species.

  11. Cross-species infection of hepatitis E virus in a zoo-like location, including birds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Shen, Q; Mou, J; Yang, Z B; Yuan, C L; Cui, L; Zhu, J G; Hua, X G; Xu, C M; Hu, J

    2008-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic pathogen of which several species of animals are considered to be reservoirs. Thirty-eight faecal samples, obtained from 22 species of animals including birds in a wildlife first-aid centre in Eastern China, were tested for HEV RNA. Our survey revealed that in total 28.9% (95% confidence interval 14.5-43.4) of the faecal samples from various mammals and birds were HEV RNA positive. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the 11 isolates demonstrated that all sequences clustered in genotype 4 with 96-100% identity to each other. In addition, serum samples from seven animal handlers have shown that five (71.4%) were seropositive. The findings imply that cross-species infection of HEV had probably occurred in this zoo-like location, and moreover, birds can be infected naturally with mammalian HEV.

  12. Cross-protection study of the nine serovars of Haemophilus paragallinarum in the Kume haemagglutinin scheme.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Edgardo V; Garduño, Manuel Longinos; Téllez, Guillermo; Rosas, Pomposo Fernández; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Blackall, Patrick J

    2004-10-01

    The cross-protection and haemagglutination-inhibition antibodies present in chickens vaccinated with one of the nine currently recognized Kume haemagglutinin serovars of Haemophilus paragallinarum were investigated. The results confirmed the widely accepted dogma that serogroups A, B, and C represent three distinct immunovars. Within Kume serogroup A, there was generally good cross-protection among all four serovars. However, within Kume serogroup C, there was evidence of a reduced level of cross-protection between some of the four serovars. The haemagglutination-inhibition antibody levels generally showed the same trend as with the cross-protection results. This study suggests that some apparent field failures of infectious coryza vaccines may be due to a lack of cross-protection between the vaccine strains and the field strains. Our results will help guide the selection of strains for inclusion in infectious coryza vaccines.

  13. Evaluation of prescriptions of medicines not included in Iran medicine list: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zargaran, Marzieh; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Cheraghali, Abdol Majid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Iran Food and Drug Administration (IFDA) has the mission to regulate all aspects of pharmaceutical market including registration of the new medicines. Iran Drug Selection Committee has the responsibility to maintain and revise Iran Medicine List (IML). The National law has banned production, importation, distribution, and prescription of medicines not included in IML. Although, IFDA policy makers have created a mechanism to provide medicines not included in the list but might be essential for the treatment of specific patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on prescription of out of IML medicines during the year 2015. This study was conducted on a total of 1375 application forms received by Secretariat of Iran Drug Selection Committee for prescription of out of IML medicines. Findings: It has been shown that among 402 specialist physicians, the most out of IML medicine were prescribed by oncologist/hematologist. Antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents were the most frequently prescribed medicines both in terms of number and diversity. According to the collected data, more than 76% of all medicines were supplied by only 4 out of 25 pharmaceutical companies in 1 year. Conclusion: Results of this study show that despite its early intention this mechanism is easily abused by some pharmaceutical companies as an unethical way of induced demand and marketing of their products. Therefore, IFDA decision makers should revise this mechanism and decide based on its real benefits and harms both to the patients and Iran national health system. PMID:27843958

  14. HPV16/18 L1 VLP Vaccine Induces Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies that May Mediate Cross-Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Troy J.; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Dauner, Joseph G.; Pan, Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 VLP-based vaccines are protective against HPV vaccine-related types; however, the correlates of protection have not been defined. We observed that vaccination with Cervarix™ induced cross-neutralizing antibodies for HPV types for which evidence of vaccine efficacy has been demonstrated (HPV31/45) but not for other types (HPV52/58). In addition, HPV31/45 cross-neutralizing titers showed a significant increase with number of doses (HPV31, p<0.001; HPV45, p<0.001) and correlated with HPV16/18 neutralizing titers, respectively. These findings raise the possibility that cross-neutralizing antibodies are effectors of cross-protection observed for the HPV16/18 vaccine. PMID:21241731

  15. Hot DA white dwarf model atmosphere calculations: including improved Ni PI cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preval, S. P.; Barstow, M. A.; Badnell, N. R.; Hubeny, I.; Holberg, J. B.

    2017-02-01

    To calculate realistic models of objects with Ni in their atmospheres, accurate atomic data for the relevant ionization stages need to be included in model atmosphere calculations. In the context of white dwarf stars, we investigate the effect of changing the Ni IV-VI bound-bound and bound-free atomic data on model atmosphere calculations. Models including photoionization cross-section (PICS) calculated with AUTOSTRUCTURE show significant flux attenuation of up to ˜80 per cent shortward of 180 Å in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region compared to a model using hydrogenic PICS. Comparatively, models including a larger set of Ni transitions left the EUV, UV, and optical continua unaffected. We use models calculated with permutations of these atomic data to test for potential changes to measured metal abundances of the hot DA white dwarf G191-B2B. Models including AUTOSTRUCTURE PICS were found to change the abundances of N and O by as much as ˜22 per cent compared to models using hydrogenic PICS, but heavier species were relatively unaffected. Models including AUTOSTRUCTURE PICS caused the abundances of N/O IV and V to diverge. This is because the increased opacity in the AUTOSTRUCTURE PICS model causes these charge states to form higher in the atmosphere, more so for N/O V. Models using an extended line list caused significant changes to the Ni IV-V abundances. While both PICS and an extended line list cause changes in both synthetic spectra and measured abundances, the biggest changes are caused by using AUTOSTRUCTURE PICS for Ni.

  16. Cross-Neutralizing and Protective Human Antibody Specificities to Poxvirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Gilchuk, Iuliia; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Sapparapu, Gopal; Lampley, Rebecca; Singh, Vidisha; Kose, Nurgun; Blum, David L; Hughes, Laura J; Satheshkumar, Panayampalli S; Townsend, Michael B; Kondas, Ashley V; Reed, Zachary; Weiner, Zachary; Olson, Victoria A; Hammarlund, Erika; Raue, Hans-Peter; Slifka, Mark K; Slaughter, James C; Graham, Barney S; Edwards, Kathryn M; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Joyce, Sebastian; Crowe, James E

    2016-10-20

    Monkeypox (MPXV) and cowpox (CPXV) are emerging agents that cause severe human infections on an intermittent basis, and variola virus (VARV) has potential for use as an agent of bioterror. Vaccinia immune globulin (VIG) has been used therapeutically to treat severe orthopoxvirus infections but is in short supply. We generated a large panel of orthopoxvirus-specific human monoclonal antibodies (Abs) from immune subjects to investigate the molecular basis of broadly neutralizing antibody responses for diverse orthopoxviruses. Detailed analysis revealed the principal neutralizing antibody specificities that are cross-reactive for VACV, CPXV, MPXV, and VARV and that are determinants of protection in murine challenge models. Optimal protection following respiratory or systemic infection required a mixture of Abs that targeted several membrane proteins, including proteins on enveloped and mature virion forms of virus. This work reveals orthopoxvirus targets for human Abs that mediate cross-protective immunity and identifies new candidate Ab therapeutic mixtures to replace VIG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 10 CFR 709.26 - Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. 709.26 Section 709.26 Energy... Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and...

  18. Naming and outline of Dothideomycetes–2014 including proposals for the protection or suppression of generic names

    PubMed Central

    Wijayawardene, Nalin N.; Crous, Pedro W.; Kirk, Paul M.; Hawksworth, David L.; Boonmee, Saranyaphat; Braun, Uwe; Dai, Dong-Qin; D’souza, Melvina J.; Diederich, Paul; Dissanayake, Asha; Doilom, Mingkhuan; Hongsanan, Singang; Jones, E. B.Gareth; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Jayawardena, Ruvishika; Lawrey, James D.; Liu, Jian-Kui; Lücking, Robert; Madrid, Hugo; Manamgoda, Dimuthu S.; Muggia, Lucia; Nelsen, Matthew P.; Phookamsak, Rungtiwa; Suetrong, Satinee; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Thambugala, Kasun M.; Wanasinghe, Dhanushka N.; Wikee, Saowanee; Zhang, Ying; Aptroot, André; Ariyawansa, H. A.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Bhat, D. Jayarama; Gueidan, Cécile; Chomnunti, Putarak; De Hoog, G. Sybren; Knudsen, Kerry; Li, Wen-Jing; McKenzie, Eric H. C.; Miller, Andrew N.; Phillips, Alan J. L.; Piątek, Marcin; Raja, Huzefa A.; Shivas, Roger S.; Slippers, Bernad; Taylor, Joanne E.; Tian, Qing; Wang, Yong; Woudenberg, Joyce H. C.; Cai, Lei; Jaklitsch, Walter M.

    2016-01-01

    Article 59.1, of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants (ICN; Melbourne Code), which addresses the nomenclature of pleomorphic fungi, became effective from 30 July 2011. Since that date, each fungal species can have one nomenclaturally correct name in a particular classification. All other previously used names for this species will be considered as synonyms. The older generic epithet takes priority over the younger name. Any widely used younger names proposed for use, must comply with Art. 57.2 and their usage should be approved by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi (NCF). In this paper, we list all genera currently accepted by us in Dothideomycetes (belonging to 23 orders and 110 families), including pleomorphic and nonpleomorphic genera. In the case of pleomorphic genera, we follow the rulings of the current ICN and propose single generic names for future usage. The taxonomic placements of 1261 genera are listed as an outline. Protected names and suppressed names for 34 pleomorphic genera are listed separately. Notes and justifications are provided for possible proposed names after the list of genera. Notes are also provided on recent advances in our understanding of asexual and sexual morph linkages in Dothideomycetes. A phylogenetic tree based on four gene analyses supported 23 orders and 75 families, while 35 families still lack molecular data. PMID:27284275

  19. Naming and outline of Dothideomycetes-2014 including proposals for the protection or suppression of generic names.

    PubMed

    Wijayawardene, Nalin N; Crous, Pedro W; Kirk, Paul M; Hawksworth, David L; Boonmee, Saranyaphat; Braun, Uwe; Dai, Dong-Qin; D'souza, Melvina J; Diederich, Paul; Dissanayake, Asha; Doilom, Mingkhuan; Hongsanan, Singang; Jones, E B Gareth; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Jayawardena, Ruvishika; Lawrey, James D; Liu, Jian-Kui; Lücking, Robert; Madrid, Hugo; Manamgoda, Dimuthu S; Muggia, Lucia; Nelsen, Matthew P; Phookamsak, Rungtiwa; Suetrong, Satinee; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Thambugala, Kasun M; Wanasinghe, Dhanushka N; Wikee, Saowanee; Zhang, Ying; Aptroot, André; Ariyawansa, H A; Bahkali, Ali H; Bhat, D Jayarama; Gueidan, Cécile; Chomnunti, Putarak; De Hoog, G Sybren; Knudsen, Kerry; Li, Wen-Jing; McKenzie, Eric H C; Miller, Andrew N; Phillips, Alan J L; Piątek, Marcin; Raja, Huzefa A; Shivas, Roger S; Slippers, Bernad; Taylor, Joanne E; Tian, Qing; Wang, Yong; Woudenberg, Joyce H C; Cai, Lei; Jaklitsch, Walter M; Hyde, Kevin D

    2014-11-01

    Article 59.1, of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants (ICN; Melbourne Code), which addresses the nomenclature of pleomorphic fungi, became effective from 30 July 2011. Since that date, each fungal species can have one nomenclaturally correct name in a particular classification. All other previously used names for this species will be considered as synonyms. The older generic epithet takes priority over the younger name. Any widely used younger names proposed for use, must comply with Art. 57.2 and their usage should be approved by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi (NCF). In this paper, we list all genera currently accepted by us in Dothideomycetes (belonging to 23 orders and 110 families), including pleomorphic and nonpleomorphic genera. In the case of pleomorphic genera, we follow the rulings of the current ICN and propose single generic names for future usage. The taxonomic placements of 1261 genera are listed as an outline. Protected names and suppressed names for 34 pleomorphic genera are listed separately. Notes and justifications are provided for possible proposed names after the list of genera. Notes are also provided on recent advances in our understanding of asexual and sexual morph linkages in Dothideomycetes. A phylogenetic tree based on four gene analyses supported 23 orders and 75 families, while 35 families still lack molecular data.

  20. Extending the actor-partner interdependence model to include cross-informant data.

    PubMed

    van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Goncy, Elizabeth A

    2010-12-01

    This paper illustrates an extension of the APIM technique within a path analysis framework by using cross-informant data on the outcome variable. Data for the current study were derived from a sample of young adult heterosexual couples who had been in a romantic relationship for at least four months (N = 115 couples). The findings from the current study indicate that romantic relationship satisfaction is associated with externalizing behavior problems among both females and males, but that both dyadic data and cross-informant reports are needed to understand this association. Not considering dyadic or cross-informant data may lead to different, and potentially misleading, claims. The findings from the current study provide clear evidence that incorporating cross-informant data in dyadic data analyses provides important new insights into understanding the association between romantic relationship functioning and individual outcomes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Protected zone ventilation and reduced personal exposure to airborne cross-infection.

    PubMed

    Cao, G; Nielsen, P V; Jensen, R L; Heiselberg, P; Liu, L; Heikkinen, J

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the performance of protected zone ventilation (PZV) and hybrid protected zone ventilation (HPZV) to reduce the direct exposure to exhaled air from others' breathing. Experimental measurements are carried out to test the performance of PZV in a full-scale office room with two breathing thermal manikins. The measurements were performed under three configurations, including two standing manikins at different distances: 0.35, 0.5, and 1.1 m. When the supply air velocity is increased to 4 m/s in the downward plane jet, the dimensionless concentration is 40% lower than for fully mixed ventilation, which can be considered as a measure of protection from the zoning condition. The measurement results showed that in both the PZV and the HPZV system it is possible to decrease the transmission of tracer gas from one manikin to the opposite manikin; therefore, it probably would reduce the risk of air borne cross-infection between two people at the same relative positions. The results suggest that PZV and HPZV may be used to reduce the exposure of people in a protected zone from indoor pollutants emitted in a source zone.

  2. Periictal and interictal headache including migraine in Dutch patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, W A; Hageman, G; de Weerd, A W

    2015-03-01

    As early as in 1898, it was noted that there was a need to find "a plausible explanation of the long recognized affinities of migraine and epilepsy". However, results of recent studies are clearly conflicting on this matter. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to define the prevalence and characteristics of both seizure-related and interictal headaches in patients with epilepsy (5-75years) seeking help in the tertiary epilepsy clinic SEIN in Zwolle. Using a questionnaire, subjects were surveyed on the existence of headaches including characteristics, duration, severity, and accompanying symptoms. Furthermore, details on epilepsy were retrieved from medical records (e.g., syndrome, seizure frequency, and use of drugs). Diagnoses of migraine, tension-type headache, or unclassifiable headache were made based on criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Between March and December 2013, 29 children and 226 adults were evaluated, 73% of whom indicated having current headaches, which is significantly more often when compared with the general population (p<0.001). Forty-nine percent indicated having solely interictal headache, while 29% had solely seizure-related headaches and 22% had both. Migraine occurs significantly more often in people with epilepsy in comparison with the general population (p<0.001), and the occurrence of tension-type headaches conforms to results in the general population. These results show that current headaches are a significantly more frequent problem amongst people with epilepsy than in people without epilepsy. When comparing migraine prevalence, this is significantly higher in the population of patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibody-Mediated Protection Against SHIV Challenge Includes Systemic Clearance of Distal Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyan; Ghneim, Khader; Sok, Devin; Bosche, William J.; Li, Yuan; Chipriano, Elizabeth; Berkemeier, Brian; Oswald, Kelli; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Jimenez, Jessica; Mondesir, Jade; Lee, Benjamin; Giglio, Patricia; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Abbink, Peter; Colantonio, Arnaud; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G.; Li, Wenjun; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can protect rhesus monkeys against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, the site of antibody interception of virus and the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection remain unclear. We administered a fully protective dose of the bNAb PGT121 to rhesus monkeys and challenged them intravaginally with SHIV-SF162P3. In PGT121 treated animals, we detected low levels of viral RNA and viral DNA in distal tissues for several days following challenge. Viral RNA positive tissues showed transcriptomic changes indicative of innate immune activation, and cells from these tissues initiated infection following adoptive transfer into naïve hosts. These data demonstrate that bNAb mediated protection against a mucosal virus challenge can involve clearance of infectious virus in distal tissues. PMID:27540005

  4. 43 CFR 3272.12 - What environmental protection measures must I include in my utilization plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... minimum, your proposed measures to: (1) Prevent or control fires; (2) Prevent soil erosion; (3) Protect... resources; (6) Minimize air and noise pollution; and (7) Minimize hazards to public health and safety...

  5. Developing an understanding of cross-protection by Citrus tristeza virus

    PubMed Central

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y.

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes two citrus diseases that have caused devastating losses in global citrus production. The first disease is quick decline of trees propagated on the sour orange rootstock. The second disease is stem pitting, which severely affects a number of economically important citrus varieties regardless of the rootstock used and results in reduced tree growth and vigor as well as in reduced fruit size and quality. Both diseases continue to invade new areas. While quick decline could be effectively managed by the use of resistant and/or tolerant rootstocks, the only means to protect commercial citrus against endemic stem pitting isolates of CTV has been cross-protection with mild isolates of the virus. In some citrus areas cross-protection has been successful and allowed production of certain citrus cultivars despite the presence of severe stem pitting isolates in those regions. However, many other attempts to find isolates that would provide sustained protection against aggressive isolates of the virus had failed. In general, there has been no understanding why some mild isolates were effective and others failed to protect. We have been working on the mechanism of cross-protection by CTV. Recent considerable progress has significantly advanced our understanding of how cross-protection may work in the citrus/CTV pathosystem. As we demonstrated, only isolates that belong to the same strain of the virus cross protect against each other, while isolates from different strains do not. We believe that the results of our research could now make finding protecting isolates relatively straightforward. This review discusses some of the history of CTV cross-protection along with the recent findings and our “recipe” for selection of protecting isolates. PMID:23577008

  6. Developing an understanding of cross-protection by Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes two citrus diseases that have caused devastating losses in global citrus production. The first disease is quick decline of trees propagated on the sour orange rootstock. The second disease is stem pitting, which severely affects a number of economically important citrus varieties regardless of the rootstock used and results in reduced tree growth and vigor as well as in reduced fruit size and quality. Both diseases continue to invade new areas. While quick decline could be effectively managed by the use of resistant and/or tolerant rootstocks, the only means to protect commercial citrus against endemic stem pitting isolates of CTV has been cross-protection with mild isolates of the virus. In some citrus areas cross-protection has been successful and allowed production of certain citrus cultivars despite the presence of severe stem pitting isolates in those regions. However, many other attempts to find isolates that would provide sustained protection against aggressive isolates of the virus had failed. In general, there has been no understanding why some mild isolates were effective and others failed to protect. We have been working on the mechanism of cross-protection by CTV. Recent considerable progress has significantly advanced our understanding of how cross-protection may work in the citrus/CTV pathosystem. As we demonstrated, only isolates that belong to the same strain of the virus cross protect against each other, while isolates from different strains do not. We believe that the results of our research could now make finding protecting isolates relatively straightforward. This review discusses some of the history of CTV cross-protection along with the recent findings and our "recipe" for selection of protecting isolates.

  7. Parametrizations and dynamical analysis of angle-integrated cross sections for double photoionization including nondipole effects

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Andrei Y.; Starace, Anthony F.; Manakov, N. L.; Meremianin, A. V.; Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, Igor

    2005-11-15

    Similarly to differential cross sections for one-electron photoionization, the doubly differential cross section for double photoionization (DPI) may be conveniently described by four parameters: the singly differential (with respect to energy sharing) cross section ({sigma}{sub 0}), the dipole asymmetry parameter ({beta}), and two nondipole asymmetry parameters ({gamma} and {delta}). Here we derive two model-independent representations for these parameters for DPI from a {sup 1}S{sub 0} atomic bound state: (i) in terms of one-dimensional integrals of the polarization-invariant DPI amplitudes and (ii) in terms of the exact two-electron reduced matrix elements. For DPI of He at excess energies, E{sub exc}, of 100 eV, 450 eV, and 1 keV, we present numerical results for the asymmetry parameters within the framework of the convergent close-coupling theory and compare them with results of lowest-order (in the interelectron interaction) perturbation theory (LOPT). The results for E{sub exc}=1 keV exhibit a nondipole asymmetry that is large enough to be easily measured experimentally. We find excellent agreement between our LOPT results and other theoretical predictions and experimental data for total cross sections and ratios of double to single ionization cross sections for K-shell DPI from several multielectron atoms.

  8. Cross-protective efficacy of two human papillomavirus vaccines: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Malagón, Talía; Drolet, Mélanie; Boily, Marie-Claude; Franco, Eduardo L; Jit, Mark; Brisson, Jacques; Brisson, Marc

    2012-10-01

    The extent of cross-protection is a key element in the choice of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to use in vaccination programmes. We compared the cross-protective efficacy of the bivalent vaccine (HPV 16 and 18; Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium) and quadrivalent vaccine (HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18; Gardasil, Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA) against non-vaccine type HPVs. We searched Medline and Embase databases, conference abstracts, and manufacturers' websites for randomised clinical trials assessing the efficacy of bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines against persistent infections (lasting ≥6 months) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) associated with the non-vaccine type HPVs (types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58). We included studies of participants who were HPV DNA negative before vaccination for all HPV types assessed. We assessed heterogeneity in vaccine efficacy estimates between trials with I(2) and χ(2) statistics. We identified two clinical trials (Females United to Unilaterally Reduce Endo/Ectocervical Disease [FUTURE] I and II) of the quadrivalent vaccine and three (Papilloma Trial Against Cancer In Young Adults [PATRICIA], HPV007, and HPV-023) of the bivalent vaccine. Analysis of the most comparable populations (pooled FUTURE I/II data vs PATRICIA) suggested that cross-protective vaccine efficacy estimates against infections and lesions associated with HPV 31, 33, and 45 were usually higher for the bivalent vaccine than the quadrivalent vaccine. Vaccine efficacy in the bivalent trial was higher than it was in the quadrivalent trial against persistent infections with HPV 31 (77·1% [95% CI 67·2 to 84·4] for bivalent vaccine vs 46·2% [15·3 to 66·4] for quadrivalent vaccine; p=0·003) and HPV 45 (79·0% [61·3 to 89·4] vs 7·8% [-67·0 to 49·3]; p=0·0003), and against CIN grade 2 or worse associated with HPV 33 (82·3% [53·4 to 94·7] vs 24·0% [-71·2 to 67·2]; p=0·02) and HPV 45 (100% [41·7 to 100] vs -51·9

  9. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation.

  10. [Bipolar disorder and quality of life: A cross-sectional study including 104 Tunisian patients].

    PubMed

    Marrag, I; Hajji, K; Hadj Ammar, M; Zarrouk, L; Kachouri, R; Nasr, M

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder affects many psychosocial and functional aspects, leading to a real social handicap and an alteration in quality of life. To evaluate bipolar patients' quality of life and to identify the risk factors responsible for a deterioration. Our cross-sectional study lasted for four months and included 104 bipolar patients treated at the psychiatry consultation of the university hospital in Mahdia. The data were collected through a questionnaire composed of 52 items exploring the general characteristics of subjects, the clinical and evolutional characteristics of bipolar disorder and providing information on the treatment. Quality of life was measured using the SF-36 (Short form) generic scale. A global average score was calculated and it was considered that quality of life was altered if the score was less than 66.7, according to the threshold value of Léan. Moreover, an average score was calculated for each dimension, thus permitting us to identify those most affected. We standardized initial average scores. The assessment of quality of life revealed a global average of 52.2 and an alteration in 78.8% of patients. The study of the dimensional average scores revealed that all dimensions were affected. The standardization also revealed deterioration in all dimensions, the mental component being particularly more affected than the physical component with respectively estimated scores of 31.7 and 40.5. The analytic approach concerned the relationship between qualitative and quantitative variables and the occurrence of an alteration in quality of life. For this effect, a bivariate study displayed a statistically significant correlation between the eight dimensions of the SF-36 and 8 variables. In order to take into account the relationships that link each variable to the others, and to avoid the bias of the bivariate study, a logistic regression analysis was performed. Only 4 variables with discriminating weight emerged from this analysis. According to the

  11. Live Chimeric and Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccines Differ in Their Cross-Protective Values against Murray Valley Encephalitis Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Lobigs, Mario; Larena, Maximilian; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Lee, Eva; Pavy, Megan

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex, which also includes Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV), is a group of antigenically closely related, mosquito-borne flaviviruses that are responsible for severe encephalitic disease in humans. While vaccines against the prominent members of this serocomplex are available or under development, it is unlikely that they will be produced specifically against those viruses which cause less-frequent disease, such as MVEV. Here we have evaluated the cross-protective values of an inactivated JEV vaccine (JE-VAX) and a live chimeric JEV vaccine (ChimeriVax-JE) against MVEV in two mouse models of flaviviral encephalitis. We show that (i) a three-dose vaccination schedule with JE-VAX provides cross-protective immunity, albeit only partial in the more severe challenge model; (ii) a single dose of ChimeriVax-JE gives complete protection in both challenge models; (iii) the cross-protective immunity elicited with ChimeriVax-JE is durable (≥5 months) and broad (also giving protection against West Nile virus); (iv) humoral and cellular immunities elicited with ChimeriVax-JE contribute to protection against lethal challenge with MVEV; (v) ChimeriVax-JE remains fully attenuated in immunodeficient mice lacking type I and type II interferon responses; and (vi) immunization with JE-VAX, but not ChimeriVax-JE, can prime heterologous infection enhancement in recipients of vaccination on a low-dose schedule, designed to mimic vaccine failure or waning of vaccine-induced immunity. Our results suggest that the live chimeric JEV vaccine will protect against other viruses belonging to the JEV serocomplex, consistent with the observation of cross-protection following live virus infections. PMID:19109382

  12. Live chimeric and inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus vaccines differ in their cross-protective values against Murray Valley encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lobigs, Mario; Larena, Maximilian; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Lee, Eva; Pavy, Megan

    2009-03-01

    The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex, which also includes Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV), is a group of antigenically closely related, mosquito-borne flaviviruses that are responsible for severe encephalitic disease in humans. While vaccines against the prominent members of this serocomplex are available or under development, it is unlikely that they will be produced specifically against those viruses which cause less-frequent disease, such as MVEV. Here we have evaluated the cross-protective values of an inactivated JEV vaccine (JE-VAX) and a live chimeric JEV vaccine (ChimeriVax-JE) against MVEV in two mouse models of flaviviral encephalitis. We show that (i) a three-dose vaccination schedule with JE-VAX provides cross-protective immunity, albeit only partial in the more severe challenge model; (ii) a single dose of ChimeriVax-JE gives complete protection in both challenge models; (iii) the cross-protective immunity elicited with ChimeriVax-JE is durable (>or=5 months) and broad (also giving protection against West Nile virus); (iv) humoral and cellular immunities elicited with ChimeriVax-JE contribute to protection against lethal challenge with MVEV; (v) ChimeriVax-JE remains fully attenuated in immunodeficient mice lacking type I and type II interferon responses; and (vi) immunization with JE-VAX, but not ChimeriVax-JE, can prime heterologous infection enhancement in recipients of vaccination on a low-dose schedule, designed to mimic vaccine failure or waning of vaccine-induced immunity. Our results suggest that the live chimeric JEV vaccine will protect against other viruses belonging to the JEV serocomplex, consistent with the observation of cross-protection following live virus infections.

  13. Extending the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to Include Cross-Informant Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.; Goncy, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper illustrates an extension of the APIM technique within a path analysis framework by using cross-informant data on the outcome variable. Data for the current study were derived from a sample of young adult heterosexual couples who had been in a romantic relationship for at least four months (N = 115 couples). The findings from the current…

  14. Extending the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to Include Cross-Informant Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.; Goncy, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper illustrates an extension of the APIM technique within a path analysis framework by using cross-informant data on the outcome variable. Data for the current study were derived from a sample of young adult heterosexual couples who had been in a romantic relationship for at least four months (N = 115 couples). The findings from the current…

  15. Sun-protective behaviors in patients with cutaneous hyperpigmentation: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Maymone, Mayra B C; Neamah, Hind H; Wirya, Stephen A; Patzelt, Nicole M; Zancanaro, Pedro Q; Vashi, Neelam A

    2017-05-01

    Disorders of hyperpigmentation are seen commonly in clinical practice. Despite numerous studies investigating sun-protective habits among healthy persons, little is known about these behaviors within patient populations with hyperpigmentation disorders. We sought to examine photo-protective behaviors and their associations in individuals with disorders of hyperpigmentation. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 404 adults who complained of cutaneous hyperpigmentation. About 67.5% reported using a product containing sunscreen, and 91% endorsed using one with a sun protection factor of 21 or higher. Among the participants, 48.5% were not sure if their sunscreen provided broad-spectrum protection, and only 7.6% reapplied every 2 hours. The odds of a patient with melasma using sunscreen were 6.7 times the odds of a patient with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation using sunscreen (P < .001). Additional predictors for sunscreen use were female sex (OR = 3.8, P = .0004) and disease duration of ≥1 year (OR = 2.1, P = .003). In a multivariate analysis, the odds ratio of sunscreen use among African Americans compared to whites was 0.31 (P = .008). Limitations included recall bias, question misinterpretation, and reporter bias. Patients diagnosed with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, men, and those with disease duration <1 year reported lower sunscreen usage. These groups might benefit from increased counseling on sun-protective behaviors. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Slender body theory programmed for bodies with arbitrary cross section. [including fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, J.; Krenkel, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program developed for determining the subsonic pressure, force, and moment coefficients for a fuselage-type body using slender body theory is described. The program is suitable for determining the angle of attack and sideslipping characteristics of such bodies in the linear range where viscous effects are not predominant. Procedures developed which are capable of treating cross sections with corners or regions of large curvature are outlined.

  17. Photoprotection beyond ultraviolet radiation--effective sun protection has to include protection against infrared A radiation-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, P; Calles, C; Benesova, T; Macaluso, F; Krutmann, J

    2010-01-01

    Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 760-1,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches human skin. While infrared radiation of longer wavelengths (IRB and IRC) does not penetrate deeply into the skin, more than 65% of the shorter wavelength (IRA) reaches the dermis. IRA radiation has been demonstrated to alter the collagen equilibrium of the dermal extracellular matrix in at least two ways: (a) by leading to an increased expression of the collagen-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 1, and (b) by decreasing the de novo synthesis of the collagen itself. IRA radiation exposure therefore induces similar biological effects to UV radiation, but the underlying mechanisms are substantially different, specifically, the cellular response to IRA irradiation involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Effective sun protection requires specific strategies to prevent IRA radiation-induced skin damage. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Flow Axis Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines, Including Effects of Waves and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new test bed for Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy at the University of New Hampshire (UNH-CORE) was used to evaluate the performance of different cross-flow axis hydrokinetic turbines, and investigate the effects of waves and turbulence on these devices. The test bed was designed and built to operate in the UNH tow and wave tank, which has a cross section of 3.67m (width) x 2.44m (depth). In the present configuration, tow speeds of up to 3 m/s can be achieved for smaller turbine models, and up to 1.5 m/s for large turbine models with low gear ratio. It features a flap style wave maker at one end that is capable of producing waves with 1-5 s periods up to 0.4 m wave height. Turbine thrust (drag) and mechanical power output (torque, angular velocity) were measured at tow speeds of 0.6-1.5 m/s for two cross-flow axis MHK turbines: a Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT) and a Lucid spherical turbine (LST). Both were provided by Lucid Energy Technologies, LLP, and have frontal areas of 1.3 (GHT) and 1.0 (LST) square meters, respectively. GHT performance was also measured in progressive waves of various periods, grid turbulence, and in the wake of a cylinder, installed upstream at various cross-stream locations. Overall, the GHT performs with higher power and thrust (drag) coefficients than the LST. A 2nd law efficiency, or kinetic exergy efficiency, was defined to calculate what fraction of the kinetic energy removed from the flow is converted to usable shaft work by each turbine. The exergy efficiency varies with tip speed ratio but approaches 90% for the optimum operating conditions for each turbine. The fraction of kinetic energy removed from the fluid that is not converted to shaft work is redistributed into turbulent kinetic energy in the wake. Quantifying the kinetic energy flowing out of the turbine is important for modeling of environmental transport processes and for predicting performance when turbines are used in arrays

  19. Protection of folic acid through encapsulation in mesoporous silica particles included in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rico, María; Pérez-Esteve, Édgar; Lerma-García, María J; Marcos, María D; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Barat, José M

    2017-03-01

    Folic acid (FA) is a synthetic vitamin commonly used for food fortification. However, its vulnerability to processing and storage implies loss of efficiency, which would induce over-fortification by processors to obtain a minimum dose upon consumption. Recent studies have indicated potential adverse effects of FA overdoses, and FA protection during processing and storage could lead to more accurate fortification. In addition, sustained vitamin release after consumption would help improve its metabolism. The objective of this work was to study controlled FA delivery and stability in fruit juices to reduce potential over-fortification risks by using gated mesoporous silica particles (MSPs). The obtained results indicated that FA encapsulation in MSPs significantly improved its stability and contributed to controlled release after consumption by modifying vitamin bioaccessibility. These results confirmed the suitability of MSPs as support for controlled release and protection of bioactive molecules in food matrices in different food production and storage stages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Holistic Approach Including Biological and Geological Criteria for Integrative Management in Protected Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Lorena; Monge-Ganuzas, Manu; Onaindia, Miren; De Manuel, Beatriz Fernández; Mendia, Miren

    2017-02-01

    Biodiversity hotspots and geosites are indivisible parts of natural heritage. Therefore, an adequate spatial delimitation and understanding of both and their linkages are necessary in order to be able to establish conservation policies. Normally, biodiversity hotspots are a typical target for those policies but, generally, geosites are not taken into account. Thus, this paper aims to fill this gap by providing an easily replicable method for the identification and integration of the geosites and the biodiversity hotspots in a Network for Integrative Nature Conservation that highlights their linkages. The method here presented has been applied to Urdaibai Biosphere Reserve situated in southeastern of the Bay of Biscay. The obtained results indicate that some geosites that are not directly related with biodiversity hotspots remain unprotected. Thus, from the study carried out, it can be stated that we conserving just the biodiversity hotspots is not enough to conserve the whole natural heritage of a protected area, as some plots interesting due to their relevant geoheritage remain unprotected. Therefore, it is necessary to fully integrate geosites into the planning documents of protected areas as a part of an ecosystem approach. The ecosystem approach recognizes the integrity of abiotic and biotic elements in nature conservation policies. Moreover, the proposed framework and the innovative methodology can be used as an easy input to identify priority areas for conservation, to improve the protected areas conservation planning, and to demonstrate the linkages between biodiversity hotspots and geosites.

  1. A Holistic Approach Including Biological and Geological Criteria for Integrative Management in Protected Areas.

    PubMed

    Peña, Lorena; Monge-Ganuzas, Manu; Onaindia, Miren; De Manuel, Beatriz Fernández; Mendia, Miren

    2017-02-01

    Biodiversity hotspots and geosites are indivisible parts of natural heritage. Therefore, an adequate spatial delimitation and understanding of both and their linkages are necessary in order to be able to establish conservation policies. Normally, biodiversity hotspots are a typical target for those policies but, generally, geosites are not taken into account. Thus, this paper aims to fill this gap by providing an easily replicable method for the identification and integration of the geosites and the biodiversity hotspots in a Network for Integrative Nature Conservation that highlights their linkages. The method here presented has been applied to Urdaibai Biosphere Reserve situated in southeastern of the Bay of Biscay. The obtained results indicate that some geosites that are not directly related with biodiversity hotspots remain unprotected. Thus, from the study carried out, it can be stated that we conserving just the biodiversity hotspots is not enough to conserve the whole natural heritage of a protected area, as some plots interesting due to their relevant geoheritage remain unprotected. Therefore, it is necessary to fully integrate geosites into the planning documents of protected areas as a part of an ecosystem approach. The ecosystem approach recognizes the integrity of abiotic and biotic elements in nature conservation policies. Moreover, the proposed framework and the innovative methodology can be used as an easy input to identify priority areas for conservation, to improve the protected areas conservation planning, and to demonstrate the linkages between biodiversity hotspots and geosites.

  2. Cross-protection induced by Japanese encephalitis vaccines against different genotypes of Dengue viruses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jieqiong; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Ziyang; Fu, Shihong; Liang, Guodong; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause very high global disease burdens. Although cross-reactivity and cross-protection within flaviviruses have been demonstrated, the effect of JEV vaccination on susceptibility to DENV infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that vaccination with the JEV inactivated vaccine (INV) and live attenuated vaccine (LAV) could induce cross-immune responses and cross-protection against DENV1-4 in mice. Despite the theoretical risk of immune enhancement, no increased mortality was observed in our mouse model. Additionally, low but consistently detectable cross-neutralizing antibodies against DENV2 and DENV3 were also observed in the sera of JEV vaccine-immunized human donors. The results suggested that both JEV-LAV and JEV-INV could elicit strong cross-immunity and protection against DENVs, indicating that inoculation with JEV vaccines may influence the distribution of DENVs in co-circulated areas and that the cross-protection induced by JEV vaccines against DENVs might provide important information in terms of DENV prevention. PMID:26818736

  3. Cross-protection induced by Japanese encephalitis vaccines against different genotypes of Dengue viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieqiong; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Ziyang; Fu, Shihong; Liang, Guodong; An, Jing

    2016-01-28

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause very high global disease burdens. Although cross-reactivity and cross-protection within flaviviruses have been demonstrated, the effect of JEV vaccination on susceptibility to DENV infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that vaccination with the JEV inactivated vaccine (INV) and live attenuated vaccine (LAV) could induce cross-immune responses and cross-protection against DENV1-4 in mice. Despite the theoretical risk of immune enhancement, no increased mortality was observed in our mouse model. Additionally, low but consistently detectable cross-neutralizing antibodies against DENV2 and DENV3 were also observed in the sera of JEV vaccine-immunized human donors. The results suggested that both JEV-LAV and JEV-INV could elicit strong cross-immunity and protection against DENVs, indicating that inoculation with JEV vaccines may influence the distribution of DENVs in co-circulated areas and that the cross-protection induced by JEV vaccines against DENVs might provide important information in terms of DENV prevention.

  4. Evaluation of the Immune Responses to and Cross-Protective Efficacy of Eurasian H7 Avian Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Kim, Young-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Song, Min-Suk; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Se Mi; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, In-Won; Song, Byung-Min; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Yun, Seok Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Young Ki

    2017-06-01

    Due to increasing concerns about human infection by various H7 influenza viruses, including recent H7N9 viruses, we evaluated the genetic relationships and cross-protective efficacies of three different Eurasian H7 avian influenza viruses. Phylogenic and molecular analyses revealed that recent Eurasian H7 viruses can be separated into two different lineages, with relatively high amino acid identities within groups (94.8 to 98.8%) and low amino acid identities between groups (90.3 to 92.6%). In vivo immunization with representatives of each group revealed that while group-specific cross-reactivity was induced, cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers were approximately 4-fold lower against heterologous group viruses than against homologous group viruses. Moreover, the group I (RgW109/06) vaccine protected 100% of immunized mice from various group I viruses, while only 20 to 40% of immunized mice survived lethal challenge with heterologous group II viruses and exhibited high viral titers in the lung. Moreover, while the group II (RgW478/14) vaccine also protected mice from lethal challenge with group II viruses, it failed to elicit cross-protection against group I viruses. However, it is noteworthy that vaccination with RgAnhui1/13, a virus of a sublineage of group I, cross-protected immunized mice against lethal challenge with both group I and II viruses and significantly attenuated lung viral titers. Interestingly, immune sera from RgAnhui1/13-vaccinated mice showed a broad neutralizing spectrum rather than the group-specific pattern observed with the other viruses. These results suggest that the recent human-infective H7N9 strain may be a candidate broad cross-protective vaccine for Eurasian H7 viruses.IMPORTANCE Genetic and phylogenic analyses have demonstrated that the Eurasian H7 viruses can be separated into at least two different lineages, both of which contain human-infective fatal H7 viruses, including the recent novel H7N9 viruses isolated in

  5. Near resonant bubble acoustic cross-section corrections, including examples from oceanography, volcanology, and biomedical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2009-11-01

    The scattering cross-section sigma(s) of a gas bubble of equilibrium radius R(0) in liquid can be written in the form sigma(s)=4piR(0) (2)[(omega(1) (2)omega(2)-1)(2)+delta(2)], where omega is the excitation frequency, omega(1) is the resonance frequency, and delta is a frequency-dependent dimensionless damping coefficient. A persistent discrepancy in the frequency dependence of the contribution to delta from radiation damping, denoted delta(rad), is identified and resolved, as follows. Wildt's [Physics of Sound in the Sea (Washington, DC, 1946), Chap. 28] pioneering derivation predicts a linear dependence of delta(rad) on frequency, a result which Medwin [Ultrasonics 15, 7-13 (1977)] reproduces using a different method. Weston [Underwater Acoustics, NATO Advanced Study Institute Series Vol. II, 55-88 (1967)], using ostensibly the same method as Wildt, predicts the opposite relationship, i.e., that delta(rad) is inversely proportional to frequency. Weston's version of the derivation of the scattering cross-section is shown here to be the correct one, thus resolving the discrepancy. Further, a correction to Weston's model is derived that amounts to a shift in the resonance frequency. A new, corrected, expression for the extinction cross-section is also derived. The magnitudes of the corrections are illustrated using examples from oceanography, volcanology, planetary acoustics, neutron spallation, and biomedical ultrasound. The corrections become significant when the bulk modulus of the gas is not negligible relative to that of the surrounding liquid.

  6. Viscoelastic Model of Cross-Linked Polyethylene Including Effects of Temperature and Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasz, L.; Gudmundson, P.

    2005-12-01

    Characterization of the mechanical behavior of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) commonly used in high voltage cable insulation was performed by an extensive set of isothermal uniaxial tensile relaxation tests. Tensile relaxation experiments were complemented by pressure-volume-temperature experiments as well as density and crystallinity measurements. Based on the experimental results, a viscoelastic power law model with four parameters was formulated, incorporating temperature and crystallinity dependence. It was found that a master curve can be developed by both horizontal and vertical shifting of the relaxation curves. The model was evaluated by making comparisons of the predicted stress responses with the measured responses in relaxation tests with transient temperature histories.

  7. The Acetic Acid Tolerance Response induces cross-protection to salt stress in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Greenacre, E J; Brocklehurst, T F

    2006-10-15

    Salmonella typhimurium induces an Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) upon exposure to mildly acidic conditions in order to protect itself against severe acid shock. This response can also induce cross-protection to other stresses such as heat and salt. We investigated whether both the acetic acid induced and lactic acid induced ATR in S. typhimurium provided cross-protection to a salt stress at 20 degrees C. Acid-adapted cells were challenged with both a sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) shock and their ability to survive ascertained. Acetic acid adaptation provided cells with protection against both NaCl and KCl stress. However, lactic acid adaptation did not protect against either osmotic stressor and rendered cells hypersensitive to NaCl. These results have implications for the food industry where hurdle technology means multiple sub-lethal stresses such as mild pH and low salt are commonly used in the preservation of products.

  8. The Langley thermal protection system test facility: A description including design operating boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A description of the Langley thermal protection system test facility is presented. This facility was designed to provide realistic environments and times for testing thermal protection systems proposed for use on high speed vehicles such as the space shuttle. Products from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures, having a maximum total enthalpy of 10.3 MJ/kg, are used as a test medium. Test panels with maximum dimensions of 61 cm x 91.4 cm are mounted in the side wall of the test region. Static pressures in the test region can range from .005 to .1 atm and calculated equilibrium temperatures of test panels range from 700 K to 1700 K. Test times can be as long as 1800 sec. Some experimental data obtained while using combustion products of methane-air mixtures are compared with theory, and calibration of the facility is being continued to verify calculated values of parameters which are within the design operating boundaries.

  9. Adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines and perpetual viral metamorphosis: the importance of cross-protection.

    PubMed

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Canepa, Paola; Parodi, Valentina; Bacilieri, Sabrina; Orsi, Andrea; Compagnino, Federica; Icardi, Giancarlo; Durando, Paolo

    2009-05-26

    Vaccination is considered the most effective means of reducing influenza burden, providing substantial benefits in terms of reduction of morbidity, complications, hospitalizations and deaths, even if vaccines have been associated with a reduced immune response and lower effectiveness in older adults, in particular when a mismatch between the vaccine and the circulating virus strains occurred. Several strategies have been proposed to enhance vaccine protection against drifted strains, including the use of adjuvants. Among oil-emulsion adjuvants, MF-59 was approved for human use more than a decade ago and it is largely used for adjuvantation of influenza vaccine. Recent studies have demonstrated that addition of the MF-59 to subunit influenza vaccine can lead to higher haemagglutination-inhibiting seroprotection rates and to higher neutralization antibody titers against drifted strains not included in the vaccine respect to non-adjuvanted vaccine. Promising results were obtained using a new generation of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvants, named AS, offering cross-protection against heterologous challenge in ferrets.

  10. Cross-protective Immunity Against Leptospirosis Elicited by a Live, Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Srikram, Amporn; Zhang, Kunkun; Bartpho, Thanatchaporn; Lo, Miranda; Hoke, David E.; Sermswan, Rasana W.; Adler, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Background. Leptospira species cause leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease found worldwide. Current vaccines against leptospirosis provide protection only against closely related serovars. Methods. We evaluated an attenuated transposon mutant of Leptospira interrogans serovar Manilae (M1352, defective in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis) as a live vaccine against leptospirosis. Hamsters received a single dose of vaccine and were challenged with the homologous serovar (Manilae) and a serologically unrelated heterologous serovar (Pomona). Comparisons were made with killed vaccines. Potential cross-protective antigens against leptospirosis were investigated. Results. Live M1352 vaccine induced superior protection in hamsters against homologous challenge. The live vaccine also stimulated cross-protection against heterologous challenge, with 100% survival (live M1352) versus 40% survival (killed vaccine). Hamsters receiving either vaccine responded to the dominant membrane proteins LipL32 and LipL41. Hamsters receiving the live vaccine additionally recognized LA3961/OmpL36 (unknown function), Loa22 (OmpA family protein, recognized virulence factor), LA2372 (general secretory protein G), and LA1939 (hypothetical protein). Manilae LigA was recognized by M1352 vaccinates, whereas LipL36 was detected in Pomona. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that a live, attenuated vaccine can stimulate cross-protective immunity to L. interrogans and has identified antigens that potentially confer cross-protection against leptospirosis. PMID:21220775

  11. Immediate pigment darkening: its evolutionary roles may include protection against folate photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Moan, Johan; Nielsen, Kristian Pagh; Juzeniene, Asta

    2012-03-01

    The evolution of dark human skin colors in tropical areas is possibly related to photoprotection of folates. However, natural folates absorb mainly UVB radiation, and too little UVB can penetrate down to folates in dermal vessels to cause serious damage. However, endogenous photosensitizers, like riboflavin and uroporphyrin, absorbing UVA and visible light, can cause photosensitization of folates. Immediate pigment darkening (IPD), generated by UVA, has an absorption spectrum covering those of the endogenous photosensitizers. IPD is most prominent for darker skin types, which were typical for populations living under tropical solar fluences. We here propose that the biological role of IPD is protection of folates against photodegradation, which would be of large evolutionary importance for early hominids.

  12. A new formulation for the ionospheric cross polar cap potential including saturation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    It is known that the ionospheric cross polar cap potential (CPCP) saturates when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz becomes very large. Few studies have offered physical explanations as to why the polar cap potential saturates. We present 13 events in which the reconnection electric field (REF) goes above 12mV/m at some time. When these events are examined as typically done in previous studies, all of them show some signs of saturation (i.e., over-prediction of the CPCP based on a linear relationship between the IMF and the CPCP). We show that by taking into account the size of the magnetosphere and the fact that the post-shock magnetic field strength is strongly dependent upon the solar wind Mach number, we can better specify the ionospheric CPCP. The CPCP (Φ) can be expressed as Φ=(10-4v2+11.7B(1-e-Ma/3)sin3(θ/2)) {rms/9 (where v is the solar wind velocity, B is the combined Y and Z components of the interplanetary magnetic field, Ma is the solar wind Mach number, θ=acos(Bz/B), and rms is the stand-off distance to the magnetopause, assuming pressure-balance between the solar wind and the magnetosphere). This is a simple modification of the original Boyle et al. (1997) formulation.

  13. Cardiovascular evaluation, including resting and exercise electrocardiography, before participation in competitive sports: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Capalbo, Andrea; Pucci, Nicola; Giuliattini, Jacopo; Condino, Francesca; Alessandri, Flavio; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Califano, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical usefulness of complete preparticipation cardiovascular screening in a large cohort of sports participants. Design Cross sectional study of data over a five year period. Setting Institute of Sports Medicine in Florence, Italy. Participants 30 065 (23 570 men) people seeking to obtain clinical eligibility for competitive sports. Main outcome measures Results of resting and exercise 12 lead electrocardiography. Results Resting 12 lead ECG patterns showed abnormalities in 1812 (6%) participants, with the most common abnormalities (>80%) concerning innocent ECG changes. Exercise ECG showed an abnormal pattern in 1459 (4.9%) participants. Exercise ECG showed cardiac anomalies in 1227 athletes with normal findings on resting ECG. At the end of screening, 196 (0.6%) participants were considered ineligible for competitive sports. Among the 159 participants who were disqualified at the end of the screening for cardiac reasons, a consistent proportion (n=126, 79.2%) had shown innocent or negative findings on resting 12 lead ECG but clear pathological alterations during the exercise test. After adjustment for possible confounders, logistic regression analysis showed that age >30 years was significantly associated with an increased risk of being disqualified for cardiac findings during exercise testing. Conclusions Among people seeking to take part in competitive sports, exercise ECG can identify those with cardiac abnormalities. Follow-up studies would show if disqualification of such people would reduce the incidence of CV events among athletes. PMID:18599474

  14. A Novel IL-17 Dependent Mechanism of Cross Protection: Respiratory Infection with Mycoplasma Protects Against a Secondary Listeria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sieve, Amy N.; Meeks, Karen D.; Bodhankar, Sheetal; Lee, Suheung; Kolls, Jay K.; Simecka, Jerry W.; Berg, Rance E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Immune responses to pathogens occur within the context of current and previous infections. Cross protection refers to the phenomena where infection with a particular pathogen provides enhanced resistance to a subsequent unrelated pathogen in an antigen independent manner. Proposed mechanisms of antigen-independent cross protection have involved the secretion of IFN-γ, which activates macrophages thus providing enhanced innate immunity against the secondary viral or bacterial pathogen. Here we provide evidence that a primary infection with the chronic respiratory pathogen, Mycoplasma pulmonis, provides a novel form of cross protection against a secondary infection with Listeria monocytogenes that is not mediated by IFN-γ, but instead relies upon IL-17 and mobilization of neutrophils. Mice infected with M. pulmonis have enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes from the spleen and liver which is associated with increased numbers of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells and higher levels of IL-17. This enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes was absent in mice depleted of Gr-1+ cells or in mice deficient in the IL-17 receptor. Additionally, both the IL-17 receptor and neutrophils were essential for optimal clearance of M. pulmonis. Thus, a natural component of the immune response directed against M. pulmonis was able to enhance clearance of L. monocytogenes. PMID:19180464

  15. Cytotoxic T Cells Are the Predominant Players Providing Cross-Protective Immunity Induced by γ-Irradiated Influenza A Viruses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Yoichi; Chan, Jennifer; Regner, Matthias; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Kok, Tuckweng; Manavis, Jim; Li, Peng; Müllbacher, Arno; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single dose of nonadjuvanted intranasal γ-irradiated influenza A virus can provide robust protection in mice against both homologous and heterosubtypic challenges, including challenge with an H5N1 avian virus strain. We investigated the mechanism behind the observed cross-protection to define which arms of the adaptive immune response are involved in mediating this protection. Studies with gene knockout mice showed the cross-protective immunity to be mediated mainly by T cells and to be dependent on the cytolytic effector molecule perforin. Adoptive transfer of memory T cells from immunized mice, but not of memory B cells, protected naïve recipients against lethal heterosubtypic influenza virus challenge. Furthermore, γ-irradiated influenza viruses induced cross-reactive Tc-cell responses but not cross-neutralizing or cross-protective antibodies. In addition, histological analysis showed reduced lung inflammation in vaccinated mice compared to that in unvaccinated controls following heterosubtypic challenge. This reduced inflammation was associated with enhanced early recruitment of T cells, both CD4+ and CD8+, and with early influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. Therefore, cross-protective immunity induced by vaccination with γ-irradiated influenza A virus is mediated mainly by Tc-cell responses. PMID:20164231

  16. Movements of a male Canada lynx crossing the greater Yellowstone Area, including highways

    Treesearch

    John R. Squires; Robert Oakleaf

    2005-01-01

    From 1999-2001, a male Canada lynx engaged in yearly exploratory movements across the greater Yellowstone area including the Teton Wilderness Area and Yellowstone National Park. For three consecutive summers, the lynx traversed a similar path in a northwesterly direction from the animal’s home range in the Wyoming Range near Big Piney, Wyoming, to as far as...

  17. Successful protection against heterologous strains of Haemophilus parasuis: the quest for cross protective factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) infection in swine causes polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis. Within the 15 serovars, there is a combination of virulent and nonvirulent strains, which has left the pathogenicity and subsequent protection from H. parasuis disease unclear. Here we used bacteri...

  18. Microneedle delivery of trivalent influenza vaccine to the skin induces long-term cross-protection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Lee, Su-Hwa; Choi, Won-Hyung; Choi, Hyo-Jick; Goo, Tae-Won; Lee, Ju-Hie; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2016-12-01

    A painless self-immunization method with effective and broad cross-protection is urgently needed to prevent infections against newly emerging influenza viruses. In this study, we investigated the cross-protection efficacy of trivalent influenza vaccine containing inactivated A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), A/Hong Kong/68 (H3N2) and B/Lee/40 after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with this vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin provided 100% protection against lethal challenges with heterologous pandemic strain influenza A/California/04/09, heterogeneous A/Philippines/2/82 and B/Victoria/287 viruses 8 months after boost immunization. Cross-reactive serum IgG antibody responses against heterologous influenza viruses A/California/04/09, A/Philippines/2/82 and B/Victoria/287 were induced at high levels. Hemagglutination inhibition titers were also maintained at high levels against these heterogeneous viruses. Microneedle vaccination induced substantial levels of cross-reactive IgG antibody responses in the lung and cellular immune responses, as well as cross-reactive antibody-secreting plasma cells in the spleen. Viral loads in the lung were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced. All mice survived after viral challenges. These results indicate that skin vaccination with trivalent vaccine using a microneedle array could provide protection against seasonal epidemic or new pandemic strain of influenza viruses.

  19. Identification of Group B Streptococcal Sip Protein, Which Elicits Cross-Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Brodeur, Bernard R.; Boyer, Martine; Charlebois, Isabelle; Hamel, Josée; Couture, France; Rioux, Clément R.; Martin, Denis

    2000-01-01

    A protein of group B streptococci (GBS), named Sip for surface immunogenic protein, which is distinct from previously described surface proteins, was identified after immunological screening of a genomic library. Immunoblots using a Sip-specific monoclonal antibody indicated that a protein band with an approximate molecular mass of 53 kDa which did not vary in size was present in every GBS strain tested. Representatives of all nine GBS serotypes were included in the panel of strains. Cloning and sequencing of the sip gene revealed an open reading frame of 1,305 nucleotides coding for a polypeptide of 434 amino acid residues, with a calculated pI of 6.84 and molecular mass of 45.5 kDa. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences from six different strains confirmed with 98% identity that the sip gene is highly conserved among GBS isolates. N-terminal amino acid sequencing also indicated the presence of a 25-amino-acid signal peptide which is cleaved in the mature protein. More importantly, immunization with the recombinant Sip protein efficiently protected CD-1 mice against deadly challenges with six GBS strains of serotypes Ia/c, Ib, II/R, III, V, and VI. The data presented in this study suggest that this highly conserved protein induces cross-protective immunity against GBS infections and emphasize its potential as a universal vaccine candidate. PMID:10992461

  20. Evaluation of cross-protection of bluetongue virus serotype 4 with other serotypes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Zulu, Gcwalisile B; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-10-16

    Bluetongue (BT) is a non-contagious disease of sheep and other domestic and wild ruminants caused by the bluetongue virus (BTV). Currently 26 serotypes of the virus have been identified. In South Africa, 22 serotypes have been identified and BT is controlled mainly by annual vaccinations using a freeze-dried live attenuated polyvalent BTV vaccine. The vaccine is constituted of 15 BTV serotypes divided into three separate bottles and the aim is to develop a vaccine using fewer serotypes without compromising the immunity against the disease. This study is based on previously reported cross-neutralisation of specific BTV serotypes in in vitro studies. Bluetongue virus serotype 4 was selected for this trial and was tested for cross-protection against serotype 4 (control), 1 (unrelated serotype), 9, 10 and 11 in sheep using the serum neutralisation test. The purpose of the study was to determine possible cross-protection of different serotypes in sheep. Of those vaccinated with BTV-4 and challenged with BTV-1, which is not directly related to BTV-4, 20% were completely protected and 80% showed clinical signs, but the reaction was not as severe as amongst the unvaccinated animals. In the group challenged with BTV-10, some showed good protection and some became very sick. Those challenged with BTV-9 and BTV-11 had good protection. The results showed that BTV-4 does not only elicit a specific immune response but can also protect against other serotypes.

  1. A theoretical and experimental study of planing surfaces including effects of cross section and plan form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuford, Charles L , Jr

    1957-01-01

    A summary is given of the background and present status of pure-planing theory. Data for models having sharp chines have been obtained for a rectangular flat plate and two V-bottom surfaces having constant angles of dead rise of 20 degrees and 40 degrees and also for rectangular-flat-plate surfaces having very slightly rounded chines. The theory presented in NACA Technical Note 3233 for a rectangular flat plate is revised and extended to include triangular flat plates planing with base forward and V-shaped prismatic surfaces having a constant angle of dead rise, horizontal chine flare, or vertical chine strips. The agreement between the results calculated by the proposed theory and the experimental data is satisfactory for engineering calculations of lift and center-of-pressure location.

  2. Cannabidiol protects liver from binge alcohol-induced steatosis by mechanisms including inhibition of oxidative stress and increase in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Wu, Defeng; Devi, Lakshmi A; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Cederbaum, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Acute alcohol drinking induces steatosis, and effective prevention of steatosis can protect liver from progressive damage caused by alcohol. Increased oxidative stress has been reported as one mechanism underlying alcohol-induced steatosis. We evaluated whether cannabidiol, which has been reported to function as an antioxidant, can protect the liver from alcohol-generated oxidative stress-induced steatosis. Cannabidiol can prevent acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis in mice, possibly by preventing the increase in oxidative stress and the activation of the JNK MAPK pathway. Cannabidiol per se can increase autophagy both in CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells and in mouse liver. Importantly, cannabidiol can prevent the decrease in autophagy induced by alcohol. In conclusion, these results show that cannabidiol protects mouse liver from acute alcohol-induced steatosis through multiple mechanisms including attenuation of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress, prevention of JNK MAPK activation, and increasing autophagy.

  3. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptaion and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced...

  4. 18 CFR 35.44 - Protections against affiliate cross-subsidization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND TARIFFS Cross-Subsidization Restrictions on Affiliate Transactions § 35.44 Protections against.... (b) Non-power goods or services. (1) Unless otherwise permitted by Commission rule or order, and except as permitted by paragraph (b)(4) of this section, sales of any non-power goods or services by...

  5. A protective and broadly cross-neutralizing epitope of human papillomavirus L2.

    PubMed

    Gambhira, Ratish; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Jagu, Subhashini; Roberts, Jeffrey N; Buck, Christopher B; Bossis, Ioannis; Alphs, Hannah; Culp, Timothy; Christensen, Neil D; Roden, Richard B S

    2007-12-01

    We generated a monoclonal antibody, RG-1, that binds to highly conserved L2 residues 17 to 36 and neutralizes human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) and HPV18. Passive immunotherapy with RG-1 was protective in mice. Antiserum to the HPV16 L2 peptide comprising residues 17 to 36 (peptide 17-36) neutralized pseudoviruses HPV5, HPV6, HPV16, HPV 18, HPV31, HPV 45, HPV 52, HPV 58, bovine papillomavirus 1, and HPV11 native virions. Depletion of HPV16 L2 peptide 17-36-reactive antibodies from cross-neutralizing rabbit and human L2-specific sera abolished cross-neutralization and drastically reduced neutralization of the cognate type. This cross-neutralization of diverse HPVs associated with cervical cancer, genital warts, and epidermodysplasia verruciformis suggests the possibility of a broadly protective, peptide-based vaccine.

  6. Iterative protecting group-free cross-coupling leading to chiral multiply arylated structures.

    PubMed

    Crudden, Cathleen M; Ziebenhaus, Christopher; Rygus, Jason P G; Ghozati, Kazem; Unsworth, Phillip J; Nambo, Masakazu; Voth, Samantha; Hutchinson, Marieke; Laberge, Veronique S; Maekawa, Yuuki; Imao, Daisuke

    2016-04-04

    The Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling is one of the most often utilized reactions in the synthesis of pharmaceutical compounds and conjugated materials. In its most common form, the reaction joins two sp(2)-functionalized carbon atoms to make a biaryl or diene/polyene unit. These substructures are widely found in natural products and small molecules and thus the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling has been proposed as the key reaction for the automated assembly of such molecules, using protecting group chemistry to affect iterative coupling. We present herein, a significant advance in this approach, in which multiply functionalized cross-coupling partners can be employed in iterative coupling without the use of protecting groups. To accomplish this, the orthogonal reactivity of different boron substituents towards the boron-to-palladium transmetalation reaction is exploited. The approach is illustrated in the preparation of chiral enantioenriched compounds, which are known to be privileged structures in active pharmaceutical compounds.

  7. Iterative protecting group-free cross-coupling leading to chiral multiply arylated structures

    PubMed Central

    Crudden, Cathleen M.; Ziebenhaus, Christopher; Rygus, Jason P. G.; Ghozati, Kazem; Unsworth, Phillip J.; Nambo, Masakazu; Voth, Samantha; Hutchinson, Marieke; Laberge, Veronique S.; Maekawa, Yuuki; Imao, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    The Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling is one of the most often utilized reactions in the synthesis of pharmaceutical compounds and conjugated materials. In its most common form, the reaction joins two sp2-functionalized carbon atoms to make a biaryl or diene/polyene unit. These substructures are widely found in natural products and small molecules and thus the Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling has been proposed as the key reaction for the automated assembly of such molecules, using protecting group chemistry to affect iterative coupling. We present herein, a significant advance in this approach, in which multiply functionalized cross-coupling partners can be employed in iterative coupling without the use of protecting groups. To accomplish this, the orthogonal reactivity of different boron substituents towards the boron-to-palladium transmetalation reaction is exploited. The approach is illustrated in the preparation of chiral enantioenriched compounds, which are known to be privileged structures in active pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:27040494

  8. Oral Fluids as a Live-Animal Sample Source for Evaluating Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protection following Intranasal Influenza A Virus Vaccination in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Holly R.; Vincent, Amy L.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Pena, Lindomar; Santos, Jefferson; Braucher, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    In North American swine, there are numerous antigenically distinct H1 influenza A virus (IAV) variants currently circulating, making vaccine development difficult due to the inability to formulate a vaccine that provides broad cross-protection. Experimentally, live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines demonstrate increased cross-protection compared to inactivated vaccines. However, there is no standardized assay to predict cross-protection following LAIV vaccination. Hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody in serum is the gold standard correlate of protection following IAV vaccination. LAIV vaccination does not induce a robust serum HI antibody titer; however, a local mucosal antibody response is elicited. Thus, a live-animal sample source that could be used to evaluate LAIV immunogenicity and cross-protection is needed. Here, we evaluated the use of oral fluids (OF) and nasal wash (NW) collected after IAV inoculation as a live-animal sample source in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to predict cross-protection in comparison to traditional serology. Both live-virus exposure and LAIV vaccination provided heterologous protection, though protection was greatest against more closely phylogenetically related viruses. IAV-specific IgA was detected in NW and OF samples and was cross-reactive to representative IAV from each H1 cluster. Endpoint titers of cross-reactive IgA in OF from pigs exposed to live virus was associated with heterologous protection. While LAIV vaccination provided significant protection, LAIV immunogenicity was reduced compared to live-virus exposure. These data suggest that OF from pigs inoculated with wild-type IAV, with surface genes that match the LAIV seed strain, could be used in an ELISA to assess cross-protection and the antigenic relatedness of circulating and emerging IAV in swine. PMID:26291090

  9. Oral Fluids as a Live-Animal Sample Source for Evaluating Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protection following Intranasal Influenza A Virus Vaccination in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Holly R; Vincent, Amy L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Gauger, Phillip C; Pena, Lindomar; Santos, Jefferson; Braucher, Douglas R; Perez, Daniel R; Loving, Crystal L

    2015-10-01

    In North American swine, there are numerous antigenically distinct H1 influenza A virus (IAV) variants currently circulating, making vaccine development difficult due to the inability to formulate a vaccine that provides broad cross-protection. Experimentally, live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines demonstrate increased cross-protection compared to inactivated vaccines. However, there is no standardized assay to predict cross-protection following LAIV vaccination. Hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody in serum is the gold standard correlate of protection following IAV vaccination. LAIV vaccination does not induce a robust serum HI antibody titer; however, a local mucosal antibody response is elicited. Thus, a live-animal sample source that could be used to evaluate LAIV immunogenicity and cross-protection is needed. Here, we evaluated the use of oral fluids (OF) and nasal wash (NW) collected after IAV inoculation as a live-animal sample source in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to predict cross-protection in comparison to traditional serology. Both live-virus exposure and LAIV vaccination provided heterologous protection, though protection was greatest against more closely phylogenetically related viruses. IAV-specific IgA was detected in NW and OF samples and was cross-reactive to representative IAV from each H1 cluster. Endpoint titers of cross-reactive IgA in OF from pigs exposed to live virus was associated with heterologous protection. While LAIV vaccination provided significant protection, LAIV immunogenicity was reduced compared to live-virus exposure. These data suggest that OF from pigs inoculated with wild-type IAV, with surface genes that match the LAIV seed strain, could be used in an ELISA to assess cross-protection and the antigenic relatedness of circulating and emerging IAV in swine.

  10. Dye lasing arrangement including an optical assembly for altering the cross-section of its pumping beam and method

    DOEpatents

    O'Neil, Richard W.; Sweatt, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An optical assembly is disclosed herein along with a method of operation for use in a dye lasing arrangement, for example a dye laser oscillator or a dye amplifier, in which a continuous stream of dye is caused to flow through a given zone in a cooperating dye chamber while the zone is being illuminated by light from a pumping beam which is directed into the given zone. This in turn causes the dye therein to lase and thereby produce a new dye beam in the case of a dye laser oscillator or amplify a dye beam in the case of a dye amplifier. The optical assembly so disclosed is designed to alter the pump beam such that the beam enters the dye chamber with a different cross-sectional configuration, preferably one having a more uniform intensity profile, than its initially produced cross-sectional configuration. To this end, the assembly includes a network of optical components which first act on the beam while the latter retains its initially produced cross-sectional configuration for separating it into a plurality of predetermined segments and then recombines the separated components in a predetermined way which causes the recombined beam to have the different cross-sectional configuration.

  11. Boosting of Cross-Reactive and Protection-Associated T Cells in Children After Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Kristin G I; Zhou, Fan; Brokstad, Karl A; Sridhar, Saranya; Cox, Rebecca J

    2017-05-15

    Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) stimulate a multifaceted immune response including cellular immunity, which may provide protection against newly emerging strains. This study shows proof of concept that LAIVs boost preexisting, cross-reactive T cells in children to genetically diverse influenza A virus (IAV) strains to which the children had not been exposed. We studied the long-term cross-reactive T-cell response in 14 trivalent LAIV-vaccinated children using the fluorescent immunospot assay (FluoroSpot) with heterologous H1N1 and H3N2 IAVs and CD8+ peptides from the internal proteins (matrix protein 1 [M1], nucleoprotein [NP], polymerase basic protein 1 [PB1]). Serum antibody responses were determined by means of hemagglutination inhibition assay. Blood samples were collected before vaccination and up to 1 year after vaccination. Preexisting cross-reactive T cells to genetically diverse IAV strains were found in the majority of the children, which were further boosted in 50% of them after receipt of LAIV. Further analyses of these T cells showed significant increases in CD8+ T cells, mainly dominated by NP-specific responses. After vaccination with LAIV, the youngest children showed the highest increase in T-cell responses. LAIV boosts durable, cross-reactive T-cell responses in children and may have a clinically protective effect at the population level. LAIV may be a first step toward the desired universal influenza vaccine.

  12. Development of the model of protected cross-border information interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biyashev, R. G.; Nyssanbayeva, S. E.; Begimbayeva, Ye. Y.

    2016-08-01

    This article investigates a proposed model of cross-border exchange and information security in the cross-border interaction in the integration system. A structural scheme of protected cross-border information exchange is proposed. Cross-border interaction of sides for information exchange in the integrated system is provided by the creation and use of the integration segment and national segments. The main tasks of a trusted third party are formulated. The model of sides' interaction scheme of the integration system using the integration gateway is presented. In this paper, a model of modified nonconventional digital signature system based on the scheme of the Digital Signature Algorithm and nonpositional polynomial number systems (NPNs) are described. Application of NPNs allows creating effective cryptographic systems of high reliability, which enables the confidentiality, authentication, integrity of stored and transmitted information.

  13. Protective Role of Cross-Reactive CD8 T Cells Against Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Elong Ngono, Annie; Chen, Hui-Wen; Tang, William W; Joo, Yunichel; King, Kevin; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Shresta, Sujan

    2016-11-01

    Infection with one of the four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) presumably leads to lifelong immunity against the infecting serotype but not against heterotypic reinfection, resulting in a greater risk of developing Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) during secondary infection. Both antibodies and T cell responses have been implicated in DHF/DSS pathogenesis. According to the T cell-based hypothesis termed "original antigenic sin," secondary DENV infection is dominated by non-protective, cross-reactive T cells that elicit an aberrant immune response. The goal of our study was to compare the roles of serotype-specific and cross-reactive T cells in protection vs. pathogenesis during DENV infection in vivo. Specifically, we utilized IFN-α/βR(-/-) HLA*B0702 transgenic mice in the context of peptide vaccination with relevant human CD8 T cell epitopes. IFN-α/βR(-/-) HLA*B0702 transgenic mice were immunized with DENV serotype 2 (DENV2)-specific epitopes or variants found in any of the other three serotypes (DENV1, DENV3 or DENV4), followed by challenge with DENV. Although cross-reactive T cell responses were lower than responses elicited by serotype-specific T cells, immunization with either serotype-specific or variant peptide epitopes enhanced viral clearance, demonstrating that both serotype-specific and cross-reactive T cells can contribute to protection in vivo against DENV infection.

  14. Arthritis protective regulatory potential of self–heat shock protein cross-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, Willem; Wendling, Uwe; Paul, Liesbeth; Prakken, Berent; van Kooten, Peter; van der Zee, Ruurd

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with heat shock proteins has protective effects in models of induced arthritis. Analysis has shown a reduced synovial inflammation in such protected animals. Adoptive transfer and immunization with selected T cell epitopes (synthetic peptides) have indicated the protection to be mediated by T cells directed to conserved hsp epitopes. This was shown first for mycobacterial hsp60 and later for mycobacterial hsp70. Fine specificity analysis showed that such T cells were cross-reactive with the homologous self hsp. Therefore protection by microbial hsp reactive T cells can be by cross-recognition of self hsp overexpressed in the inflamed tissue. Preimmunization with hsp leads to a relative expansion of such self hsp cross-responsive T cells. The regulatory nature of such T cells may originate from mucosal tolerance maintained by commensal flora derived hsp or from partial activation through recognition of self hsp as a partial agonist (Altered Peptide Ligand) or in the absence of proper costimulation. Recently, we reported the selective upregulation of B7.2 on microbial hsp60 specific T cells in response to self hsp60. Through a preferred interaction with CTLA-4 on proinflammatory T cells this may constitute an effector mechanism of regulation. Also, regulatory T cells produced IL10. PMID:11189451

  15. Outer membrane vesicles derived from Salmonella Typhimurium mutants with truncated LPS induce cross-protective immune responses against infection of Salmonella enterica serovars in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Liu, Tian; Roland, Kenneth L; Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella enterica cause diarrheal and systemic diseases and are of considerable concern worldwide. Vaccines that are cross-protective against multiple serovars could provide effective control of Salmonella-mediated diseases. Bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are highly immunogenic and are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Alterations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) length can result in outer membrane remodeling and composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) changing. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncated LPS on both the production and immunogenicity of Salmonella OMVs, including the ability of OMVs to elicit cross-protection against challenge by heterologous Salmonella strains. We found that mutations in waaJ and rfbP enhanced vesiculation, while mutations in waaC, waaF and waaG inhibited this process. Animal experiments indicated that OMVs from waaC, rfaH and rfbP mutants induced stronger serum immune responses compared to OMVs from the parent strain, while all elicited protective responses against the wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge. Furthermore, intranasal or intraperitoneal immunization with OMVs derived from the waaC and rfbP mutants elicited significantly higher cross-reactive IgG responses and provided enhanced cross-protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge than the wild-type OMVs. These results indicate that truncated-LPS OMVs are capable of conferring cross protection against multiple serotypes of Salmonella infection.

  16. Investigation of seedling yellows cross protection by mild components of the Dekopon strain of Citrus tristeza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virulent strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) can be controlled by pre-infection by mild strains of CTV which is called cross protection. However, the mode of action of cross protection is unknown and its durability unpredictable. RNA silencing is a regulatory mechanism to maintain genome integri...

  17. Profiling of Genes Related to Cross Protection and Competition for NbTOM1 by HLSV and TMV

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Lim, Grace Xiao-Yun; Wong, Sek-Man

    2013-01-01

    Cross protection is the phenomenon through which a mild strain virus suppresses symptoms induced by a closely related severe strain virus in infected plants. Hibiscus latent Singapore virus (HLSV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are species within the genus tobamovirus. HLSV can protect Nicotianabenthamiana against TMV-U1 strain, resulting in mild symptoms instead of severe systemic necrosis. The mechanism of cross protection between HLSV and TMV is unknown. In the past, some researchers suggest that the protecting virus strain might occupy virus-specific replication sites within a cell leaving no room for the challenge virus. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed to detect viral RNA levels during cross protection. HLSV accumulation increased in cross protected plants compared with that of single HLSV infected plants, while TMV decreased in cross protected plants. This suggests that there is a competition for host factors between HLSV and TMV for replication. To investigate the mechanism under the cross protection between HLSV and TMV, microarray analysis was conducted to examine the transcriptional levels of global host genes during cross protection, using Tobacco Gene Expression Microarray, 4x44 k slides. The transcriptional level of some host genes corresponded to accumulation level of TMV. Some host genes were up-regulated only by HLSV. Tobamovirus multiplication gene 1 (TOM1), essential for tobamovirus multiplication, was involved in competition for replication by HLSV and TMV during cross protection. Both HLSV and TMV accumulation decreased when NbTOM1 was silenced. A large quantity of HLSV resulted in decreased TMV accumulation in HLSV+TMV (100:1) co-infection. These results indicate that host genes involved in the plant defense response and virus multiplication are up-regulated by challenge virus TMV but not by protecting virus HLSV during cross protection. PMID:24023899

  18. Profiling of genes related to cross protection and competition for NbTOM1 by HLSV and TMV.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yi; Lim, Grace Xiao-Yun; Wong, Sek-Man

    2013-01-01

    Cross protection is the phenomenon through which a mild strain virus suppresses symptoms induced by a closely related severe strain virus in infected plants. Hibiscus latent Singapore virus (HLSV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are species within the genus tobamovirus. HLSV can protect Nicotianabenthamiana against TMV-U1 strain, resulting in mild symptoms instead of severe systemic necrosis. The mechanism of cross protection between HLSV and TMV is unknown. In the past, some researchers suggest that the protecting virus strain might occupy virus-specific replication sites within a cell leaving no room for the challenge virus. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed to detect viral RNA levels during cross protection. HLSV accumulation increased in cross protected plants compared with that of single HLSV infected plants, while TMV decreased in cross protected plants. This suggests that there is a competition for host factors between HLSV and TMV for replication. To investigate the mechanism under the cross protection between HLSV and TMV, microarray analysis was conducted to examine the transcriptional levels of global host genes during cross protection, using Tobacco Gene Expression Microarray, 4 x 44 k slides. The transcriptional level of some host genes corresponded to accumulation level of TMV. Some host genes were up-regulated only by HLSV. Tobamovirus multiplication gene 1 (TOM1), essential for tobamovirus multiplication, was involved in competition for replication by HLSV and TMV during cross protection. Both HLSV and TMV accumulation decreased when NbTOM1 was silenced. A large quantity of HLSV resulted in decreased TMV accumulation in HLSV+TMV (100:1) co-infection. These results indicate that host genes involved in the plant defense response and virus multiplication are up-regulated by challenge virus TMV but not by protecting virus HLSV during cross protection.

  19. Yeast adapts to a changing stressful environment by evolving cross-protection and anticipatory gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Riddhiman; Sägesser, Rudolf; Weikert, Christian; Wagner, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Organisms can protect themselves against future environmental change. An example is cross-protection, where physiological adaptation against a present environmental stressor can protect an organism against a future stressor. Another is anticipation, where an organism uses information about its present environment to trigger gene expression and other physiological changes adaptive in future environments. "Predictive" abilities like this exist in organisms that have been exposed to periodic changes in environments. It is unknown how readily they can evolve. To answer this question, we carried out laboratory evolution experiments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, we exposed three replicate populations of yeast to environments that varied cyclically between two stressors, salt stress and oxidative stress, every 10 generations, for a total of 300 generations. We evolved six replicate control populations in only one of these stressors for the same amount of time. We analyzed fitness changes and genome-scale expression changes in all these evolved populations. Our populations evolved asymmetric cross protection, where oxidative stress protects against salt stress but not vice versa. Gene expression data also suggest the evolution of anticipation and basal gene expression changes that occur uniquely in cyclic environments. Our study shows that highly complex physiological states that are adaptive in future environments can evolve on very short evolutionary time scales.

  20. Ethanol adaptation induces direct protection and cross-protection against freezing stress in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhou, X; Shi, C; Shi, X

    2016-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salm. Enteritidis) encounters mild ethanol stress during its life cycle. However, adaptation to a stressful condition may affect bacterial resistance to subsequent stresses. Hence, this work was undertaken to investigate the influences of ethanol adaptation on stress tolerance of Salm. Enteritidis. Salmonella Enteritidis was subjected to different ethanol adaptation treatments (2·5-10% ethanol for 1 h). Cellular morphology and tolerance to subsequent environmental stresses (15% ethanol, -20°C, 4°C, 50°C and 10% NaCl) were evaluated. It was found that 10% was the maximum ethanol concentration that allowed growth of the target bacteria. Ethanol adaptation did not cause cell-surface damage in Salm. Enteritidis as revealed by membrane permeability measurements and electron micrograph analysis. Salmonella Enteritidis adapted with 2·5-10% ethanol displayed an enhanced resistance to a 15%-ethanol challenge compared with an unchallenged control. The maximum ethanol resistance was observed when ethanol concentration used for ethanol adaptation was increased to 5·0%. Additionally, pre-adaptation to 5·0% ethanol cross-protected Salm. Enteritidis against -20°C, but not against 4°C, 50°C or 10% NaCl. Ethanol adaptation provided Salm. Enteritidis direct protection from a high level ethanol challenge and cross-protection from freezing, but not other stresses tested (low temperature, high salinity or high temperature). The results are valuable in developing adequate and efficient control measures for Salm. Enteritidis in foods. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. A Multivalent and Cross-Protective Vaccine Strategy against Arenaviruses Associated with Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kotturi, Maya F.; Botten, Jason; Sidney, John; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Giancola, Lori; Maybeno, Matt; Babin, Josie; Oseroff, Carla; Pasquetto, Valerie; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Peters, Bjoern; Ting, Joey; Do, Danh; Vang, Lo; Alexander, Jeff; Grey, Howard; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Sette, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Arenaviruses are the causative pathogens of severe hemorrhagic fever and aseptic meningitis in humans, for which no licensed vaccines are currently available. Pathogen heterogeneity within the Arenaviridae family poses a significant challenge for vaccine development. The main hypothesis we tested in the present study was whether it is possible to design a universal vaccine strategy capable of inducing simultaneous HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses against 7 pathogenic arenaviruses (including the lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Lassa, Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Whitewater Arroyo viruses), either through the identification of widely conserved epitopes, or by the identification of a collection of epitopes derived from multiple arenavirus species. By inoculating HLA transgenic mice with a panel of recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACVs) expressing the different arenavirus proteins, we identified 10 HLA-A02 and 10 HLA-A03-restricted epitopes that are naturally processed in human antigen-presenting cells. For some of these epitopes we were able to demonstrate cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses, further increasing the coverage afforded by the epitope set against each different arenavirus species. Importantly, we showed that immunization of HLA transgenic mice with an epitope cocktail generated simultaneous CD8+ T cell responses against all 7 arenaviruses, and protected mice against challenge with rVACVs expressing either Old or New World arenavirus glycoproteins. In conclusion, the set of identified epitopes allows broad, non-ethnically biased coverage of all 7 viral species targeted by our studies. PMID:20019801

  2. Cross-protection elicited by primary and booster vaccinations against Japanese encephalitis: a two-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Erra, Elina O; Askling, Helena Hervius; Yoksan, Sutee; Rombo, Lars; Riutta, Jukka; Vene, Sirkka; Lindquist, Lars; Vapalahti, Olli; Kantele, Anu

    2013-12-17

    The inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine (JE-VC, IXIARO) has replaced the traditional mouse brain-derived preparations (JE-MB) in travelers' vaccinations against Japanese encephalitis. We showed recently that a single JE-VC dose efficiently boosts immunity in JE-MB-primed vaccinees, and that JE-VC elicits cross-protective immunity against non-vaccine genotypes, including the emerging genotype I. While these studies only provided short-term data, the present investigation evaluates the longevity of seroprotection in the same volunteers. The study comprised 48 travelers who had received (1) JE-VC primary series, (2) JE-MB primary series followed by a single JE-VC booster dose, or (3) JE-MB primary series and a single JE-MB booster dose. Serum samples were collected two years after the last vaccine dose, and evaluated with the plaque-reduction neutralization test against seven Japanese encephalitis virus strains representing genotypes I-IV. PRNT50 titers ≥ 10 were considered protective. Two years after the primary series with JE-VC, 87-93% of the vaccinees proved to be cross-protected against test strains representing genotypes II-IV and 73% against those of genotype I. After a single homologous or heterologous booster dose to JE-MB-primed subjects, the two-year seroprotection rates against genotype I-IV strains were 89-100%. After JE-VC primary series, seroprotection appeared to wane first against genotype I. The first booster should not be delayed beyond two years. In JE-MB-primed subjects, a single JE-VC booster provided cross-protective immunity against genotype I-IV strains in almost all vaccinees, suggesting an interval of two years or even longer for the second booster. These data further support the use of a single JE-VC dose for boosting JE-MB immunity. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Lack of cross-protection against Bordetella holmesii after pertussis vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuqing; Weyrich, Laura S; Lavine, Jennie S; Karanikas, Alexia T; Harvill, Eric T

    2012-11-01

    Bordetella holmesii, a species closely related to B. pertussis, has been reported sporadically as a cause of whooping cough-like symptoms. To investigate whether B. pertussis-induced immunity is protective against infection with B. holmesii, we conducted an analysis using 11 human respiratory B. holmesii isolates collected during 2005-2009 from a highly B. pertussis-vaccinated population in Massachusetts. Neither whole-cell (wP) nor acellular (aP) B. pertussis vaccination conferred protection against these B. holmesii isolates in mice. Although T-cell responses induced by wP or aP cross-reacted with B. holmesii, vaccine-induced antibodies failed to efficiently bind B. holmesii. B. holmesii-specific antibodies provided in addition to wP were sufficient to rapidly reduce B. holmesii numbers in mouse lungs. Our findings suggest the established presence of B. holmesii in Massachusetts and that failure to induce cross-reactive antibodies may explain poor vaccine-induced cross-protection.

  4. Development of a Salmonella cross-protective vaccine for food animal production systems.

    PubMed

    Heithoff, Douglas M; House, John K; Thomson, Peter C; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is associated with increased Salmonella exposure, transmission, animal disease, and contamination of food and water supplies. Modified live Salmonella enterica vaccines that lack a functional DNA adenine methylase (Dam) confer cross-protection to a diversity of salmonellae in experimental models of murine, avian, ovine, and bovine models of salmonellosis. However, the commercial success of any vaccine is dependent upon the therapeutic index, the ratio of safety/efficacy. Herein, secondary virulence-attenuating mutations targeted to genes involved in intracellular and/or systemic survival were introduced into Salmonella dam vaccines to screen for vaccine candidates that were safe in the animal and the environment, while maintaining the capacity to confer cross-protective immunity to pathogenic salmonellae serotypes. Salmonella dam mgtC, dam sifA, and dam spvB vaccine strains exhibited significantly improved vaccine safety as evidenced by the failure to give rise to virulent revertants during the infective process, contrary to the parental Salmonella dam vaccine. Further, these vaccines exhibited a low grade persistence in host tissues that was associated with reduced vaccine shedding, reduced environmental persistence, and induction of cross-protective immunity to pathogenic serotypes derived from infected livestock. These data indicate that Salmonella dam double mutant vaccines are suitable for commercial applications against salmonellosis in livestock production systems. Reducing pre-harvest salmonellae load through vaccination will promote the health and productivity of livestock and reduce contamination of livestock-derived food products, while enhancing overall food safety.

  5. A design assessment of multiwall, metallic stand-off, and RSI reusable thermal protection systems including space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, L. R.; Dixon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The design and assessment of reusable surface insulation (RSI), metallic stand off and multiwall thermal protection systems (TPS) is discussed. Multiwall TPS is described in some detail, and analyses useful for design of multiwall are included. Results indicate that multiwall has the potential to satisfy the TPS design goals better than the other systems. The total mass of the stand-off TPS and of the metallic systems require less primary structure mass than the RSI system, since the nonbuckling skin criteria required for RSI may be removed. Continued development of multiwall TPS is required to verify its potential and to provide the necessary data base for design.

  6. Environmental Protection Department`s well inventory: Includes current and past monitoring (through the second quarter of 1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1990-11-01

    This report is an inventory of the wells contained in Environmental Protection Department /Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRS research wells. All wells listed in this inventory are monitoring wells unless otherwise indicated. The purpose of this report is as follows: to provide a historical record of the wells that EPD/EMS has monitored, to provide a document containing a list of wells that are currently in the EPD/EMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, and to provide pertinent information about all wells listed in EPD/EMS documents

  7. Fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondi, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Tropea, S.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear fragmentation studies, historically driven by the interest of the nuclear physicists, are nowadays the subject of great attention for the hadrontherapy and the space radiation protection communities. In both fields, fragmentation cross sections are needed to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the patient's and the astronaut's body. Indeed, the the Monte Carlo codes used in planning tumor treatments and space missions must be tuned and validated by experimental data. However, only a limited set of fragmentation cross sections are available in literature, especially at Fermi energies. Therefore we have studied the production of secondary fragments in the 12C+12C and 12C+ 197Au reactions at 62 AMeV. Some of the measured cross sections are presented in this work.

  8. BA71ΔCD2: A new recombinant live attenuated African swine fever virus with cross-protective capabilities.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Paula L; Lacasta, Anna; López, Elisabeth; Bosch, Laia; Collado, Javier; Pina-Pedrero, Sonia; Correa-Fiz, Florencia; Accensi, Francesc; Navas, María Jesús; Vidal, Enric; Bustos, María J; Rodríguez, Javier M; Gallei, Andreas; Nikolin, Veljko; Salas, María L; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2017-08-16

    Georgia in 2007. Since then, ASFV has spread towards neighboring countries reaching the European Union's East border in 2014. Lack of available vaccines against ASFV make its control difficult and so far, only live attenuated viruses have demonstrated solid protection against homologous experimental challenges, but have failed at inducing solid cross-protective immunity against heterologous viruses. Here we describe a new LAV candidate with unique cross-protective abilities: BA71ΔCD2. Thus, inoculation of BA71ΔCD2 protected pigs not only against the experimental challenge with BA71, the virulent parental strain, but also against heterologous viruses, including Georgia 2007/1, the genotype II strain of ASFV currently circulating in East Europe. Copyright © 2017 Monteagudo et al.

  9. Identification of Zika virus epitopes reveals immunodominant and protective roles for dengue virus cross-reactive CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jinsheng; Tang, William Weihao; Sheets, Nicholas; Ellison, Julia; Sette, Alessandro; Kim, Kenneth; Shresta, Sujan

    2017-03-13

    CD8(+) T cells play an important role in controlling Flavivirus infection, including Zika virus (ZIKV). Here, we have identified 25 HLA-B*0702-restricted epitopes and 1 HLA-A*0101-restricted epitope using interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in ZIKV-infected IFN-α/β receptor-deficient HLA transgenic mice. The cross-reactivity of ZIKV epitopes to dengue virus (DENV) was tested using IFN-γ-ELISPOT and IFN-γ-ICS on CD8(+) T cells from DENV-infected mice, and five cross-reactive HLA-B*0702-binding peptides were identified by both assays. ZIKV/DENV cross-reactive CD8(+) T cells in DENV-immune mice expanded post ZIKV challenge and dominated in the subsequent CD8(+) T cell response. ZIKV challenge following immunization of mice with ZIKV-specific and ZIKV/DENV cross-reactive epitopes elicited CD8(+) T cell responses that reduced infectious ZIKV levels, and CD8(+) T cell depletions confirmed that CD8(+) T cells mediated this protection. These results identify ZIKV-specific and ZIKV/DENV cross-reactive epitopes and demonstrate both an altered immunodominance pattern in the DENV-immune setting relative to naive, as well as a protective role for epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells against ZIKV. These results have important implications for ZIKV vaccine development and provide a mouse model for evaluating anti-ZIKV CD8(+) T cell responses of human relevance.

  10. Myocardial protection in operations requiring more than 2 h of aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Bar-El, Y; Adler, Z; Kophit, A; Kertzman, V; Sawaed, S; Ross, A; Cohen, O; Milo, S

    1999-03-01

    Long periods of aortic cross-clamping time during cardiac surgery are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality because of damage to the myocardium. Recently, we have used a method of myocardial protection based on the principles of hyperkalemic cardioplegic arrest. We use antegrade administration of warm, undiluted blood followed by continuous retrograde infusion of tepid, undiluted blood supplemented with potassium and magnesium. In this study, we have retrospectively reviewed our experience with this method of cardioprotection in operations requiring more than 2 h of cross-clamp time. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1280 patients who underwent myocardial revascularization, valve repair or replacement, or a combination of both operations between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 1997. Patients were divided into two groups: the short cross-clamp group (SXC) (n = 1144) had cross-clamp times < 120 min (mean, 78 +/- 20 min; range, 35-119 min) and the long cross-clamp group (LXC) (n = 136) had cross-clamp times > 120 min (mean, 154 +/- 31 min; range, 120-277 min). We compared preoperative, operative, and postoperative variables between the two groups. Significantly more patients in the long cross-clamp group (43.4%) underwent the combined operation than in the short cross-clamp group (2.3%), and the rate of reoperation was significantly higher in the long cross-clamp group (12%) than in the short cross-clamp group (5%). Despite these differences in operative complexity, we found no difference in hospital mortality rates between the two groups. The only significant postoperative differences were that the long cross-clamp group had a greater need for inotropic agents (43 vs. 29%), higher serum levels of creatine kinase (880 +/- 583 vs. 613 +/- 418) and CK-MB (10.9 +/- 6.4 vs. 5.9 +/- 5.2), and a longer hospital stay (9.6 vs. 6.1 days). Long, complex operations requiring more than 2 h of cross-clamping can be performed safely with our method

  11. The National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs: Understanding Risk, Protection, and Substance Use among High-Risk Youth. Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, J. Fred; Sambrano, Soledad; Sale, Elizabeth; Kasim, Rafa; Hermann, Jack

    This document summarizes findings from the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention's National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs, which identified characteristics associated with strong substance abuse prevention outcomes in 48 prevention programs. Major findings include: as youth age, levels of risk and protection shift considerably,…

  12. Mild strain cross protection of tristeza: a review of research to protect against decline on sour orange in Florida.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard F; Keremane, Manjunath L

    2013-09-06

    Tristeza, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), has long been present in Florida but outbreaks of decline on sour orange rootstock were occasional events until the late 1970s. Sour orange rootstock was valued for the high quality of fruit produced and was widely used because of its tolerance of citrus blight, a disease of unknown etiology. Research was directed towards the selection and screening of mild strains of CTV which could protect against sour orange decline strains. Following the introduction of Toxoptera citricida (also known as the brown citrus aphid) in 1995 there was a greater concern for maintaining production of existing blocks of citrus on sour orange rootstock. Availability of the CTV genome sequence around the same time as well as molecular characterization of in planta CTV populations led to the selection of mild CTV isolates which when inoculated into existing field trees, extended the productive life of the groves and enabled a more graduate replanting of trees on CTV-tolerant rootstocks. The history of CTV in Florida and the methods developed to select mild isolates for use for mild strain cross protection will be reviewed.

  13. Mild strain cross protection of tristeza: a review of research to protect against decline on sour orange in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Richard F.; Keremane, Manjunath L.

    2013-01-01

    Tristeza, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), has long been present in Florida but outbreaks of decline on sour orange rootstock were occasional events until the late 1970s. Sour orange rootstock was valued for the high quality of fruit produced and was widely used because of its tolerance of citrus blight, a disease of unknown etiology. Research was directed towards the selection and screening of mild strains of CTV which could protect against sour orange decline strains. Following the introduction of Toxoptera citricida (also known as the brown citrus aphid) in 1995 there was a greater concern for maintaining production of existing blocks of citrus on sour orange rootstock. Availability of the CTV genome sequence around the same time as well as molecular characterization of in planta CTV populations led to the selection of mild CTV isolates which when inoculated into existing field trees, extended the productive life of the groves and enabled a more graduate replanting of trees on CTV-tolerant rootstocks. The history of CTV in Florida and the methods developed to select mild isolates for use for mild strain cross protection will be reviewed. PMID:24046764

  14. Starvation-induced cross protection against heat or H2O2 challenge in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D E; Schultz, J E; Matin, A

    1988-09-01

    Glucose- or nitrogen-starved cultures of Escherichia coli exhibited enhanced resistance to heat (57 degrees C) or H2O2 (15 mM) challenge, compared with their exponentially growing counterparts. The degree of resistance increased with the time for which the cells were starved prior to the challenge, with 4 h of starvation providing the maximal protection. Protein synthesis during starvation was essential for these cross protections, since chloramphenicol addition at the onset of starvation prevented the development of thermal or oxidative resistance. Starved cultures also demonstrated stronger thermal and oxidative resistance than did growing cultures adapted to heat, H2O2, or ethanol prior to the heat or H2O2 challenge. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 35S-pulse-labeled proteins showed that subsets of the 30 glucose starvation proteins were also synthesized during heat or H2O2 adaptation; three proteins were common to all three stresses. Most of the common proteins were among the previously identified Pex proteins (J.E. Schultz, G. I. Latter, and A. Matin, J. Bacteriol. 170:3903-3909, 1988), which are independent of cyclic AMP positive control for their induction during starvation. Induction of starvation proteins dependent on cyclic AMP was not important in these cross protections, since a delta cya strain of E. coli K-12 exhibited the same degree of resistance to heat or H2O2 as the wild-type parent did during both growth and starvation.

  15. Coverage of related pathogenic species by multivalent and cross-protective vaccine design: arenaviruses as a model system.

    PubMed

    Botten, Jason; Sidney, John; Mothé, Bianca R; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Kotturi, Maya F

    2010-06-01

    The arenaviruses are a family of negative-sense RNA viruses that cause severe human disease ranging from aseptic meningitis to hemorrhagic fever syndromes. There are currently no FDA-approved vaccines for the prevention of arenavirus disease, and therapeutic treatment is limited to the use of ribavirin and/or immune plasma for a subset of the pathogenic arenaviruses. The considerable genetic variability observed among the seven arenaviruses that are pathogenic for humans illustrates one of the major challenges for vaccine development today, namely, to overcome pathogen heterogeneity. Over the past 5 years, our group has tested several strategies to overcome pathogen heterogeneity, utilizing the pathogenic arenaviruses as a model system. Because T cells play a prominent role in protective immunity following arenavirus infection, we specifically focused on the development of human vaccines that would induce multivalent and cross-protective cell-mediated immune responses. To facilitate our vaccine development and testing, we conducted large-scale major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II epitope discovery on murine, nonhuman primate, and human backgrounds for each of the pathogenic arenaviruses, including the identification of protective HLA-restricted epitopes. Finally, using the murine model of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, we studied the phenotypic characteristics associated with immunodominant and protective T cell epitopes. This review summarizes the findings from our studies and discusses their application to future vaccine design.

  16. The Campylobacter jejuni Ferric Uptake Regulator Promotes Acid Survival and Cross-Protection against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Sarvan, Sabina; Couture, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The mechanisms by which C. jejuni survives stomach acidity remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C. jejuni ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays an important role in C. jejuni acid survival and acid-induced cross-protection against oxidative stress. A C. jejuni Δfur mutant was more sensitive to acid than the wild-type strain. Profiling of the acid stimulon of the C. jejuni Δfur mutant allowed us to uncover Fur-regulated genes under acidic conditions. In particular, Fur was found to upregulate genes involved in flagellar and cell envelope biogenesis upon acid stress, and mutants with deletions of these genes were found to be defective in surviving acid stress. Interestingly, prior acid exposure of C. jejuni cross-protected against oxidative stress in a catalase (KatA)- and Fur-dependent manner. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of KatA upon acid stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the binding affinity between Fur and the katA promoter is reduced in vitro under conditions of low pH, rationalizing the higher levels of expression of katA under acidic conditions. Strikingly, the Δfur mutant exhibited reduced virulence in both human epithelial cells and the Galleria mellonella infection model. Altogether, this is the first study showing that, in addition to its role in iron metabolism, Fur is an important regulator of C. jejuni acid responses and this function cross-protects against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results clearly demonstrate Fur's important role in C. jejuni pathogenesis. PMID:26883589

  17. Neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross-sections for radiation therapy and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, M B

    1998-12-01

    I review recent work at Los Alamos undertaken to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross-sections up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. In radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross-section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given.

  18. Cross-protection induced by Toxoplasma gondii virus-like particle vaccine upon intraperitoneal route challenge.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Ah-Ra; Lee, Su-Hwa; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2016-12-01

    The inner membrane complex sub-compartment has a critical role in Toxoplasma gondii endodyogeny. In this study, we investigated the protection upon intraperitoneal route (IP) challenge induced by the virus-like particles (VLPs) vaccine containing Toxoplasma gondii IMC ISP (RH strain) (Type I). Intranasal immunization with the VLPs in mice elicited enhanced systemic and mucosal Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgA antibody responses, and CD4+ and CD8+ responses. Immunized mice significantly reduced T. gondii cyst burden and size in brain, resulting in cross-protection upon T. gondii (ME49) (Type II) challenge infection. These results indicate that the IP route challenge infection induced by T. gondii IMC ISP VLPs might be a very good target for vaccination representing novel approach to reduce infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Is religiosity a protective factor against attempted suicide: a cross-cultural case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sisask, Merike; Varnik, Airi; Kolves, Kairi; Bertolote, Jose M; Bolhari, Jafar; Botega, Neury J; Fleischmann, Alexandra; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Wasserman, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    This cross-cultural study investigates whether religiosity assessed in three dimensions has a protective effect against attempted suicide. Community controls (n = 5484) were more likely than suicide attempters (n = 2819) to report religious denomination in Estonia (OR = 0.5) and subjective religiosity in four countries: Brazil (OR = 0.2), Estonia (OR = 0.5), Islamic Republic of Iran (OR = 0.6), and Sri Lanka (OR = 0.4). In South Africa, the effect was exceptional both for religious denomination (OR = 5.9) and subjective religiosity (OR = 2.7). No effects were found in India and Vietnam. Organizational religiosity gave controversial results. In particular, subjective religiosity (considering him/herself as religious person) may serve as a protective factor against non-fatal suicidal behavior in some cultures.

  20. Gut Catalase-Positive Bacteria Cross-Protect Adjacent Bifidobacteria from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Eva; Peirotén, Ángela; Landete, José María; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria isolated from infant gut and breast milk exhibited different abilities to grow under microaerobic conditions, alone or in the presence of added catalase. In the present study, we demonstrated that some Bifidobacterium strains unable to grow under microaerobic conditions were cross-protected on solid media from oxidative stress by adjacent colonies of gut catalase-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis or Escherichia coli, but not by a catalase-deficient E. coli. The results of this study support the possible contribution of catalase-positive bacteria to the establishment of certain bifidobacteria in non-anaerobic human niches of the infant gastrointestinal tract or mammary gland. PMID:26040451

  1. Gut Catalase-Positive Bacteria Cross-Protect Adjacent Bifidobacteria from Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Eva; Peirotén, Ángela; Landete, José María; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria isolated from infant gut and breast milk exhibited different abilities to grow under microaerobic conditions, alone or in the presence of added catalase. In the present study, we demonstrated that some Bifidobacterium strains unable to grow under microaerobic conditions were cross-protected on solid media from oxidative stress by adjacent colonies of gut catalase-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis or Escherichia coli, but not by a catalase-deficient E. coli. The results of this study support the possible contribution of catalase-positive bacteria to the establishment of certain bifidobacteria in non-anaerobic human niches of the infant gastrointestinal tract or mammary gland.

  2. Atypical adaptive and cross-protective responses against peroxide killing in a bacterial plant pathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2003-10-01

    Physiological adaptive and cross-protection responses to oxidants were investigated in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Exposure of A. tumefaciens to sublethal concentrations of H2O2 induced adaptive protection to lethal concentrations of H2O2. Similar treatments with organic peroxide and menadione did not produce adaptive protection to subsequent exposure to lethal concentrations of these oxidants. Pretreatment of A. tumefaciens with an inducing concentration of menadione conferred cross-protection against H2O2, but not to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH), killing. The menadione induced cross-protection to H2O2 was due to the compound's ability to highly induce the peroxide scavenging enzyme, catalase. The levels of catalase directly correlated with the bacterium's ability to survive H2O2 treatment. Some aspects of the oxidative stress response of A. tumefaciens differ from other bacteria, and these differences may be important in plant/microbe interactions.

  3. Processing Narratives Concerning Protected Values: A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Neural Correlates.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jonas T; Gimbel, Sarah I; Dehghani, Morteza; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Sagae, Kenji; Wong, Jennifer D; Tipper, Christine M; Damasio, Hanna; Gordon, Andrew S; Damasio, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Narratives are an important component of culture and play a central role in transmitting social values. Little is known, however, about how the brain of a listener/reader processes narratives. A receiver's response to narration is influenced by the narrator's framing and appeal to values. Narratives that appeal to "protected values," including core personal, national, or religious values, may be particularly effective at influencing receivers. Protected values resist compromise and are tied with identity, affective value, moral decision-making, and other aspects of social cognition. Here, we investigated the neural mechanisms underlying reactions to protected values in narratives. During fMRI scanning, we presented 78 American, Chinese, and Iranian participants with real-life stories distilled from a corpus of over 20 million weblogs. Reading these stories engaged the posterior medial, medial prefrontal, and temporo-parietal cortices. When participants believed that the protagonist was appealing to a protected value, signal in these regions was increased compared with when no protected value was perceived, possibly reflecting the intensive and iterative search required to process this material. The effect strength also varied across groups, potentially reflecting cultural differences in the degree of concern for protected values.

  4. Anthocyanin and flavonoid production from Perilla frutescens: pilot plant scale processing including cross-flow microfiltration and reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Linghua; Lozano, Yves; Bombarda, Isabelle; Gaydou, Emile; Li, Bin

    2006-06-14

    Extraction and concentration at a pilot plant scale of anthocyanins and flavonoids from Perilla frutescens var. frutescens harvested in the Guangzhou area of China were investigated. The study of extraction efficiency using mineral acids and organic acids showed that 0.01 mol/L nitric acid was the most suitable to extract flavonoids from this slightly red leaf cultivar. The red extract contained 12 mg/L (as cyanidin equivalent) anthocyanins and other flavones. The multistep process included cross-flow microfiltration (CFM) with a ceramic type membrane, reverse osmosis (RO), and rotating evaporation (RE). The filtration fluxes were high and constant for CFM (150 L/h/m2 at 0.6 b) and for RO (22 L/h/m2 at 40 b). The red extract was concentrated 9.4 times by RO and then 5.4 times by RE. It contained 422 mg/L anthocyanins, representing 77% of the total extracted anthocyanin. The proportion of flavonoids was found unchanged during processing. The concentrated extract showed a pH of 2.7, and its free acidity was found to be 46% of the acidity added for extraction, because of the buffering capacity of the extract. At the concentration level reached, a crystallized deposit occurred and was identified as tartrate.

  5. A cross-reactive monoclonal antibody to nematode haemoglobin enhances protective immune responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E; Meter, Jeanne M; Horsnell, William G; Hoving, J Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F; Darby, Matthew G; Parihar, Suraj P; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-01-01

    Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four -HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm infection.

  6. A Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibody to Nematode Haemoglobin Enhances Protective Immune Responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Meter, Jeanne M.; Horsnell, William G.; Hoving, J. Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F.; Darby, Matthew G.; Parihar, Suraj P.; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four –HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. Conclusion The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm

  7. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Numerical Study of Low-Loss Cross Left-Handed Metamaterials at Visible Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei-Ren; Zhao, Xiao-Peng

    2009-07-01

    We present a numerical study of left-handed metamaterials (LHMs) composed of double cross pairs at visible frequency. The S-parameter retrieval method is adopted to confirm the negative refractive characteristic of this design. Compared with fishnet LHMs, the proposed cross LHMs have a much lower loss, which will greatly facilitate practical applications. It is also found that, with the same size of resonant cells, the cross LHMs have a higher frequency than fishnet LHMs, which is explained using a simple effective LC circuit model.

  8. DNA vaccine expressing the mimotope of GD2 ganglioside induces protective GD2 cross-reactive antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Bolesta, Elizabeth; Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Rotkiewicz, Piotr; Bambach, Barbara; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Horwacik, Irena; Kolinski, Andrzej; Rokita, Hanna; Brecher, Martin; Wang, Xinhui; Ferrone, Soldano; Kozbor, Danuta

    2005-04-15

    The GD2 ganglioside expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors, including neuroblastoma and melanoma, is weakly immunogenic in tumor-bearing patients and induces predominantly immunoglobulin (Ig)-M antibody responses in the immunized host. Here, we investigated whether interconversion of GD2 into a peptide mimetic form would induce GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses in mice. Screening of the X(15) phage display peptide library with the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 14G2a led to isolation of mimetic peptide 47, which inhibited the binding of 14G2a antibody to GD2-positive tumor cells. The peptide was also recognized by GD2-specific serum antibodies from a patient with neuroblastoma, suggesting that it bears an internal image of GD2 ganglioside expressed on the tumor cells. The molecular basis for antigenicity of the GD2 mimetic peptide, established by molecular modeling and mutagenesis studies, led to the generation of a 47-LDA mutant with an increased mimicry to GD2. Immunization of mice with peptide 47-LDA-encoded plasmid DNA elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses, which were increased on subsequent boost with GD2 ganglioside. The vaccine-induced antibodies recognized GD2-positive tumor cells, mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and exhibited protection against s.c. human GD2-positive melanoma growth in the severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model. The results from our studies provide insights into approaches for boosting GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses by minigene vaccination with a protective epitope of GD2 ganglioside.

  9. Single- and multiple-clade influenza A H5N1 vaccines induce cross protection in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Heather L.; Khalenkov, Alexey M.; Govorkova, Elena A.; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Giudice, Giuseppe Del; Webster, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, and increasing human infection with avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses highlight the need for an efficacious cross-clade vaccine. Using the ferret model, we compared induction of cross-reactive immunity and protective efficacy of three single-clade H5N1 vaccines and a novel multiple-clade H5N1 vaccine, with and without MF59 adjuvant. Reverse genetics (rg) was used to generate vaccine viruses containing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase genes of wild-type H5N1 viruses. Ferrets received 2 doses of inactivated whole-virus vaccine separated by 3 weeks. Single-clade vaccines (7.5 μg HA per dose) included rg-A/Vietnam/1203/04 (clade 1), rg-A/Hong Kong/213/03 (clade 1), and rg-A/Japanese white eye/Hong Kong/1038/06 (clade 2.3). The multiple-clade vaccine contained 3.75 μg HA per dose of each single-clade vaccine and of rg-A/Whooper Swan/Mongolia/244/05 (clade 2.2). Two doses of vaccine were required to substantially increase anti-HA and virus neutralizing antibody titers to H5N1 viruses. MF59 adjuvant enhanced induction of clade-specific and cross-clade serum antibody responses, reduced frequency of infection (as determined by upper respiratory tract virus shedding and seroconversion data), and eliminated disease signs. The rg-A/Hong Kong/213/03 vaccine induced the highest antibody titers to homologous and heterologous H5N1 viruses, while rg-A/Japanese white eye/Hong Kong/1038/06 vaccine induced the lowest. The multiple-clade vaccine was broadly immunogenic against clade 1 and 2 viruses. The rg-A/Vietnam/1203/04 vaccine (the currently stockpiled H5N1 vaccine) most effectively reduced upper respiratory tract virus shedding after challenge with clade 1 and 2 viruses. Importantly, all vaccines protected against lethal challenge with A/Vietnam/1203/04 virus and provided cross-clade protection. PMID:19406182

  10. No evidence for cross-protection of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against HPV-6/11 positivity in female STI clinic visitors.

    PubMed

    Woestenberg, Petra J; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Donken, Robine; Leussink, Suzan; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2017-04-01

    Data from a vaccine trial and from post-vaccine surveillance in the United Kingdom have suggested that the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine offers cross-protection against HPV-6/11 and protection against anogenital warts (AGW). We studied the effect of the bivalent vaccine on genital HPV-6/11 positivity and AGW in the Netherlands. We included all vaccine-eligible women from the PASSYON study, a biennial cross-sectional study among 16- to 24-year-old sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic attendants. Vaginal self-swabs were analyzed for type specific HPV and AGW were diagnosed at the STI-clinic. Prevalence of HPV-6 and/or HPV-11 and AGW were compared between self-reported vaccinated and unvaccinated women by log-binomial regression analysis, adjusted for demographics and risk behavior. Of the 1198 women included, 56% reported to be vaccinated at least once. Relative to unvaccinated women, the adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) for HPV-6/11 was 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-1.43) for women vaccinated at least once. The crude PR for AGW was 0.67 (95% CI 0.22-2.07) for women vaccinated at least once. Adjustment did not change these results. We observed no cross-protective effect of the bivalent vaccine on genital HPV-6/11 positivity and a non-significant partially protective effect on AGW. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral fluids as a live-animal sample for evaluating cross-reactivity and cross-protection following intranasal influenza A virus vaccination in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In North American swine there are numerous antigenically distinct influenza A virus (IAV) H1 subtypes currently circulating, making vaccine development difficult due to the inability to formulate a vaccine that provides broad cross-protection. Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines provide ...

  12. Value-Affirmative and Value-Protective Processing of Alcohol Education Messages That Include Statistical Evidence or Anecdotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Michael D.; Rouner, Donna

    1996-01-01

    Studies persuasion processes in a value-relevant context. Tests effects of the presence/absence of anecdotal evidence, crossed across three base messages regarding different alcohol use issues. Suggests that a variant of central processing was used: involvement predicted greater message-relevant responses only when the message was congruent with…

  13. An influenza viral vector Brucella abortus vaccine induces good cross-protection against Brucella melitensis infection in pregnant heifers.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2015-07-17

    Brucella melitensis can be transmitted and cause disease in cattle herds as a result of inadequate management of mixed livestock farms. Ideally, vaccines against Brucella abortus for cattle should also provide cross-protection against B. melitensis. Previously we created a novel influenza viral vector B. abortus (Flu-BA) vaccine expressing the Brucella ribosomal proteins L7/L12 or Omp16. This study demonstrated Flu-BA vaccine with adjuvant Montanide Gel01 provided 100% protection against abortion in vaccinated pregnant heifers and good cross-protection of the heifers and their calves or fetuses (90-100%) after challenge with B. melitensis 16M; the level of protection provided by Flu-BA was comparable to the commercial vaccine B. abortus S19. In terms of the index of infection and colonization of Brucella in tissues, both vaccines demonstrated significant (P=0.02 to P<0.0001) protection against B. melitensis 16M infection compared to the negative control group (PBS+Montanide Gel01). Thus, we conclude the Flu-BA vaccine provides cross-protection against B. melitensis infection in pregnant heifers.

  14. Cross-protective immunity against multiple influenza virus subtypes by a novel modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vectored vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Brewoo, Joseph N; Powell, Tim D; Jones, Jeremy C; Gundlach, Nancy A; Young, Ginger R; Chu, Haiyan; Das, Subash C; Partidos, Charalambos D; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2013-04-03

    Development of an influenza vaccine that provides cross-protective immunity remains a challenge. Candidate vaccines based on a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) viral vector expressing antigens from influenza (MVA/Flu) viruses were constructed. A vaccine candidate, designated MVA/HA1/C13L/NP, that expresses the hemagglutinin from pandemic H1N1 (A/California/04/09) and the nucleoprotein (NP) from highly pathogenic H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04) fused to a secretory signal sequence from vaccinia virus was highly protective. The vaccine elicited strong antibody titers to homologous H1N1 viruses while cross-reactive antibodies to heterologous viruses were not detectable. In mice, this MVA/HA1/C13L/NP vaccine conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1), A/Norway/3487-2/09 (pandemic H1N1) or A/Influenza/Puerto Rico/8/34 (seasonal H1N1) and partial protection (57.1%) against challenge with seasonal H3N2 virus (A/Aichi/68). The protective efficacy of the vaccine was not affected by pre-existing immunity to vaccinia. Our findings highlight MVA as suitable vector to express multiple influenza antigens that could afford broad cross-protective immunity against multiple subtypes of influenza virus.

  15. Qualitative analysis of the level of cross-protection between epidemic waves of the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Rios-Doria, D; Chowell, G

    2009-12-21

    The 1918-1919 influenza pandemic was composed of multiple waves within a period of nine months in several regions of the world. Increasing our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for this multi-wave profile has important public health implications. We model the transmission dynamics of two strains of influenza interacting via cross-immunity to simulate two temporal waves of influenza and explore the impact of the basic reproduction number, as a measure of transmissibility associated to each influenza strain, cross-immunity and the timing of the onset of the second influenza epidemic on the pandemic profile. We use time series of case notifications during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Geneva, Switzerland, for illustration. We calibrate our mathematical model to the initial wave of infection to estimate the basic reproduction number of the first wave and the corresponding timing of onset of the second influenza variant. We use this information to explore the impact of cross-immunity levels on the dynamics of the second wave of influenza. Our results for the 1918 pandemic in Geneva, Switzerland, indicate that a second wave can occur whenever R 01 < 1.5 or when cross-immunity levels are less than 0.58 for our estimated R 02 of 2.4. We also explore qualitatively profiles of two-wave pandemics and compare them with real temporal profiles of the 1918 influenza pandemic in other regions of the world including several Scandinavian cities, New York City, England and Wales, and Sydney, Australia. Pandemic profiles are classified into three broad categories namely "right-handed", "left-handed", and "M-shape". Our results indicate that avoiding a second influenza epidemic is plausible given sufficient levels of cross-protection are attained via natural infection during an early (herald) wave of infection or vaccination campaigns prior to a second wave. Furthermore, interventions aimed at mitigating the first pandemic wave may be counterproductive by increasing the

  16. Effect of cross-diffusion on the stationary problem of a prey-predator model with a protection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeda, Kazuhiro

    This paper is concerned with the stationary problem of a prey-predator cross-diffusion system with a protection zone for the prey. We discuss the existence and non-existence of coexistence states of the two species by using the bifurcation theory. As a result, it is shown that the cross-diffusion for the prey has beneficial effects on the survival of the prey when the intrinsic growth rate of the predator is positive. We also study the asymptotic behavior of positive stationary solutions as the cross-diffusion coefficient of the prey tends to infinity.

  17. A water-based training program that include perturbation exercises to improve stepping responses in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Itshak; Elbar, Ori; Tsedek, Irit; Oddsson, Lars IE

    2008-01-01

    Background Gait and balance impairments may increase the risk of falls, the leading cause of accidental death in the elderly population. Fall-related injuries constitute a serious public health problem associated with high costs for society as well as human suffering. A rapid step is the most important protective postural strategy, acting to recover equilibrium and prevent a fall from initiating. It can arise from large perturbations, but also frequently as a consequence of volitional movements. We propose to use a novel water-based training program which includes specific perturbation exercises that will target the stepping responses that could potentially have a profound effect in reducing risk of falling. We describe the water-based balance training program and a study protocol to evaluate its efficacy (Trial registration number #NCT00708136). Methods/Design The proposed water-based training program involves use of unpredictable, multi-directional perturbations in a group setting to evoke compensatory and volitional stepping responses. Perturbations are made by pushing slightly the subjects and by water turbulence, in 24 training sessions conducted over 12 weeks. Concurrent cognitive tasks during movement tasks are included. Principles of physical training and exercise including awareness, continuity, motivation, overload, periodicity, progression and specificity were used in the development of this novel program. Specific goals are to increase the speed of stepping responses and improve the postural control mechanism and physical functioning. A prospective, randomized, cross-over trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of the water-based training program. A total of 36 community-dwelling adults (age 65–88) with no recent history of instability or falling will be assigned to either the perturbation-based training or a control group (no training). Voluntary step reaction times

  18. In vivo cross-protection to African horse sickness Serotypes 5 and 9 after vaccination with Serotypes 8 and 6.

    PubMed

    von Teichman, Beate F; Dungu, Baptiste; Smit, Theresa K

    2010-09-07

    The polyvalent African horsesickness (AHS) attenuated live virus (AHS-ALV) vaccine produced at Onderstepoort Biological Products incorporates 7 of the 9 known serotypes circulating in southern Africa. Serological cross-reaction has been shown in vitro to Serotypes 5 and 9 by Serotypes 8 and 6 respectively, but the degree of in vivo cross-protection between these serotypes in vaccinated horses has not previously been reported. Due to the increasing incidence of AHS Serotypes 5 and 9 in the field, over the last 3-4 seasons of AHS in South Africa, and the absence of Serotypes 5 and 9 in the AHS-ALV vaccine, it was necessary to conduct a vaccination-challenge study to determine in vivo cross-protection of vaccine-incorporated Serotypes 8 and 6 respectively. Groups of horses were vaccinated with either the polyvalent AHS-ALV vaccine or a monovalent Serotype 6 (vAHSV6) or 8 (vAHSV8) vaccine to determine the cross-protection of vaccinated horses following challenge with virulent AHS virus (AHSV) of either Serotype 5, 6, 8 or 9. Serial vaccination of naive horses with the polyvalent AHS-ALV vaccine generated a broad neutralizing antibody response to all vaccine strains as well as cross-neutralizing antibodies to Serotypes 5 and 9. Booster vaccination of horses with monovalent vaccine vAHSV6 or vAHSV8 induced an adequate protective immune response to challenge with homologous and heterologous virulent virus. In vivo cross-protection between AHSV6 and AHSV9 and AHSV8 and AHSV5 respectively, was demonstrated.

  19. Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase Terminal Domains in Cross-Protective Immunotherapy Against Leishmania amazonensis Murine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nico, Dirlei; Gomes, Daniele Crespo; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Iam; Morrot, Alexandre; Palatnik, Marcos; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolases of the Leishmania genus are vital enzymes for the replication of the DNA and conserved phylogenetic markers of the parasites. Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase (NH36) induced a main CD4+ T cell driven protective response against L. chagasi infection in mice which is directed against its C-terminal domain. In this study, we used the three recombinant domains of NH36: N-terminal domain (F1, amino acids 1–103), central domain (F2 aminoacids 104–198), and C-terminal domain (F3 amino acids 199–314) in combination with saponin and assayed their immunotherapeutic effect on Balb/c mice previously infected with L. amazonensis. We identified that the F1 and F3 peptides determined strong cross-immunotherapeutic effects, reducing the size of footpad lesions to 48 and 64%, and the parasite load in footpads to 82.6 and 81%, respectively. The F3 peptide induced the strongest anti-NH36 antibody response and intradermal response (IDR) against L. amazonenis and a high secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α with reduced levels of IL-10. The F1 vaccine, induced similar increases of IgG2b antibodies and IFN-γ and TNF-α levels, but no IDR and no reduction of IL-10. The multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was used to assess the immune response after immunotherapy and disclosed that the degree of the immunotherapeutic effect is predicted by the frequencies of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IL-2 or TNF-α or both. Total frequencies and frequencies of double-cytokine CD4 T cell producers were enhanced by F1 and F3 vaccines. Collectively, our multifunctional analysis disclosed that immunotherapeutic protection improved as the CD4 responses progressed from 1+ to 2+, in the case of the F1 and F3 vaccines, and as the CD8 responses changed qualitatively from 1+ to 3+, mainly in the case of the F1 vaccine, providing new correlates of immunotherapeutic protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice based on T-helper TH1 and CD8+ mediated immune responses

  20. Molecular characterization of Cirus tristeza virus isolates associated with stem pitting CTV cross-protection in Peru

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, the Peruvian citrus industry was destroyed by severe Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains spread by the brown citrus aphid. The Topara Nursery, located 180 km south of Lima Peru, selected and identified CTV isolates that confer cross-protection against virulent stem...

  1. Determinants of inadequate parental sun protection behaviour in their children--results of a cross-sectional study in Germany.

    PubMed

    Klostermann, Swaantje; Bolte, Gabriele

    2014-03-01

    Unprotected sun exposure especially during childhood is a risk factor for skin cancer. A combined use of sun protection measures is recommended to protect children. However, the prevalence and determinants for combined use have been scarcely studied in children. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of parental sun protection behaviour. A cross-sectional survey was performed in five regions in Bavaria (Germany) during school entrance health examination (2010/2011). Parents of 4579 children (47% female, aged 5-6 years) completed a self-administered questionnaire (response 61%). Most children were regularly protected with single measures (shade (69%), clothes (80%), hat (83%), sunscreen (89%), sunglasses (20%)). However, regarding regular and combined use, >50% of children were inadequately protected. Larger family size, lower household equivalent income, darker skin and sunburn history were associated with inadequate use of different sun protection measures. The less frequent use of one sun protection measure was associated with less frequent use of the others. Child's sex, migration background, parental education and sun exposure showed inconsistent results regarding the different sun protection outcomes. Based on our results a regular, combined and correct use of multiple sun protection for children should be promoted independent of sociodemographic characteristics. Priority of shade, clothes and hat before sunscreen should be clarified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunization of N terminus of enterovirus 71 VP4 elicits cross-protective antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is major cause of hand, foot and mouth disease. Large epidemics of EV71 infection have been recently reported in the Asian-Pacific region. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent EV71 infection. Results The peptide (VP4N20) consisting of the first 20 amino acids at the N-terminal of VP4 of EV71 genotype C4 were fused to hepatitis B core (HBcAg) protein. Expression of fusion proteins in E. coli resulted in the formation of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs). Mice immunized with the chimeric VLPs elicited anti-VP4N20 antibody response. In vitro microneutralization experiments showed that anti-chimeric VLPs sera were able to neutralize not only EV71 of genotype C4 but also EV71 of genotype A. Neonatal mice model confirmed the neutralizing ability of anti-chimeric VLPs sera. Eiptope mapping led to the identification of a “core sequence” responsible for antibody recognition within the peptide. Conclusions Immunization of chimeric VLPs is able to elicit antibodies displaying a broad neutralizing activity against different genotypes of EV71 in vitro. The “core sequence” of EV71-VP4 is highly conserved across EV71 genotypes. The chimeric VLPs have a great potential to be a novel vaccine candidate with a broad cross-protection against different EV71 genotypes. PMID:24320792

  3. Review of current typhoid fever vaccines, cross-protection against paratyphoid fever, and the European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Hatz, Christoph; Kantele, Anu

    2017-10-01

    Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain a global health problem, which - in non-endemic countries - are mainly seen in travelers, particularly in VFRs (visiting friends and relatives), with occasional local outbreaks occurring. A rise in anti-microbial resistance emphasizes the role of preventive measures, especially vaccinations against typhoid and paratyphoid fever for travelers visiting endemic countries. Areas covered: This state-of-the-art review recapitulates the epidemiology and mechanisms of disease of typhoid and paratyphoid fever, depicts the perspective of non-endemic countries and travelers (VFRs), and collectively presents current European recommendations for typhoid fever vaccination. We provide a brief overview of available (and developmental) vaccines in Europe, present current data on cross-protection to S. Paratyphi, and aim to provide a background for typhoid vaccine decision-making in travelers. Expert commentary: European recommendations are not harmonized. Experts must assess vaccination of travelers based on current country-specific recommendations. Travel health practitioners should be aware of the issues surrounding vaccination of travelers and be motivated to increase awareness of typhoid and paratyphoid fever risks.

  4. Protective environments and health status: cross-talk between human and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Singer, Burton; Friedman, Elliot; Seeman, Teresa; Fava, Giovanni A; Ryff, Carol D

    2005-12-01

    Although aging populations tend to have increased prevalence of a diversity of diseases and disabilities, there are substantial numbers of people who, nevertheless, maintain good health into old age. Human studies frequently demonstrate associations between environmental factors, particularly supportive social environments, and positive states of health. Identifying the pathways from protective social environments to reduced disease risk necessitates the use of animal models as a basis of explanation and a source of suggestions for further human research. We present two examples of this kind of cross-talk: (i) the possibility that the success of well-being therapy following pharmacological treatment for depression as a means of preventing recurrent depressive episodes is based on the stimulation of enrichment of dendritic networks in the hippocampus and spine retraction in the basolateral amygdala; (ii) the possibility that the release of intracerebral oxytocin is a mediating factor between persistently supportive social environments and reduced disease in later life, as exemplified by low levels of allostatic load.

  5. Cross-Species Protection Mediated by a Bordetella bronchiseptica Strain Lacking Antigenic Homologs Present in Acellular Pertussis Vaccines▿

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Neelima; Sloan, Gina Parise; Conover, Matt S.; Love, Cheraton F.; Mattoo, Seema; Kock, Nancy D.; Deora, Rajendar

    2010-01-01

    The Bordetella species are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that are characterized by long-term colonization of the mammalian respiratory tract and are causative agents of respiratory diseases in humans and animals. Despite widespread and efficient vaccination, there has been a world-wide resurgence of pertussis, which remains the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in developed countries. It has been proposed that current acellular vaccines (Pa) composed of only a few bacterial proteins may be less efficacious because of vaccine-induced antigenic shifts and adaptations. To gain insight into the development of a newer generation of vaccines, we constructed a Bordetella bronchiseptica strain (LPaV) that does not express the antigenic homologs included in any of the Pa vaccines currently in use. This strain also lacks adenylate cyclase toxin, an essential virulence factor, and BipA, a surface protein. While LPaV colonized the mouse nose as efficiently as the wild-type strain, it was highly deficient in colonization of the lower respiratory tract and was attenuated in induction of inflammation and injury to the lungs. Strikingly, to our surprise, we found that in an intranasal murine challenge model, LPaV elicited cross-species protection against both B. bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis. Our data suggest the presence of immunogenic protective components other than those included in the pertussis vaccine. Combined with the whole-genome sequences of many Bordetella spp. that are available, the results of this study should serve as a platform for strategic development of the next generation of acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:20176797

  6. Cross-protection against Vibrio cholerae infection by monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio vulnificus RtxA1/MARTXVv.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hee; Cha, Sun-Shin; Lee, Chang-Seop; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Woo, Hye Ryun; Chung, Kyung Min

    2016-11-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio species secrete multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxins associated with bacterial pathogenesis. Here, the cross-reactivity and cross-protectivity of mAbs against V. vulnificus RtxA1/MARTXVv was evaluated. Passive administration of any of these mAbs (21RA, 24RA, 46RA, 47RA and 50RA) provided strong protection against lethal V. cholerae infection. Interestingly, 24RA and 46RA, which map to the cysteine protease domain of V. cholerae MARTXVc , inhibited CPD autocleavage in vitro; this process is involved in V. cholerae pathogenesis. These results generate new insight into the development of broadly protective mAbs and/or vaccines against Vibrio species with MARTX toxins. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Cross-scale feedbacks and scale mismatches as influences on cultural services and the resilience of protected areas.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Kristine; De Vos, Alta; Cumming, Graeme S; Moore, Christine; Biggs, Duan

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are a central strategy for achieving global conservation goals, but their continued existence depends heavily on maintaining sufficient social and political support to outweigh economic interests or other motives for land conversion. Thus, the resilience of protected areas can be considered a function of their perceived benefits to society. Nature-based tourism (NBT), a cultural ecosystem service, provides a key source of income to protected areas, facilitating a sustainable solution to conservation. The ability of tourism to generate income depends, however, on both the scales at which this cultural service is provided and the scales at which tourists respond to services on offer. This observation raises a set of location-, context-, and scale-related questions that need to be confronted before we can understand and value cultural service provision appropriately. We combine elements of resilience analysis with a systems ecology framework and apply this to NBT in protected areas to investigate cross-scale interactions and scale mismatches. We postulate that cross-scale effects can either have a positive effect on protected area resilience or lead to scale mismatches, depending on their interactions with cross-scale feedbacks. To demonstrate this, we compare spatial scales and nested levels of institutions to develop a typology of scale mismatches for common scenarios in NBT. In our new typology, the severity of a scale mismatch is expressed as the ratio of spatial scale to institutional level, producing 25 possible outcomes with differing consequences for system resilience. We predict that greater differences between interacting scales and levels, and greater magnitudes of cross-scale interactions, will lead to greater magnitudes of scale mismatch. Achieving a better understanding of feedbacks and mismatches, and finding ways of aligning spatial and institutional scales, will be critical for strengthening the resilience of protected areas that

  8. Cross-protective efficacy of dendritic cells targeting conserved influenza virus antigen expressed by Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Tao; Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Gui-Lian; Jiang, Yan-Long; Zhao, Liang; Li, Yu; Wang, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) can infect birds and mammals, including humans, and are thus a serious threat to public health. Vaccination is vital for controlling AIV circulation. In this study, we generated a recombinant lactobacillus expressing the NP-M1-DCpep of H9N2 avian influenza virus and evaluated the activation effect of NC8-pSIP409-NP-M1-DCpep on dendritic cells (DCs) in a mouse model. The specific mucosal antibody responses and B and T cell responses in lymphoid tissues were also characterized. Importantly, we confirmed that specific CD8 T cells presented in vitro and antigen-specific cytotoxicity (activated the expression of CD107a) and in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxicity after vaccination. The adoptive transfer of NC8-pSIP409-NP-M1-DCpep-primed CD8+ T cells into NOD-SCID mice resulted in effective protection against mouse-adapted AIV infection. In addition, we observed protection in immunized mice challenged with mouse-adapted H9N2 AIV and H1N1 influenza virus, as evidenced by reductions in the lung virus titers, improvements in lung pathology, and weight loss and complete survival. Our data are promising for the generation of effective, non-traditional influenza vaccines against AIVs. PMID:28004787

  9. Track and Field Guide including Cross Country, Pentathlon Scoring Tables and Rules for Intercollegiate Meets and Championships with Official Rules. Janauary 1974-January 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Donnis H., Ed.

    This guide includes information on cross country running, pentathlon scoring tables, and rules for intercollegiate meets and championships, following an introductory portion on the organization's credo and standards. The first section covers track activities for children, coaching techniques, the benefits of weight training, and some practical…

  10. The Right to Be Included: Homeschoolers Combat the Structural Discrimination Embodied in Their Lawful Protection in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kašparová, Irena

    2015-01-01

    There is a 240-year tradition of compulsory school attendance in the Czech Republic. To many, compulsory school attendance is synonymous with the right to be educated. After the collapse of communism in 1989, along with the democratization of the government, the education system was slowly opened to alternatives, including the right to educate…

  11. Cross-protection between controlled acid-adaptation and thermal inactivation for 48 Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Haberbeck, Leticia Ungaretti; Wang, Xiang; Michiels, Chris; Devlieghere, Frank; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Geeraerd, Annemie H

    2017-01-16

    Given the importance of pH reduction and thermal treatment in food processing and food preservation strategies, the cross-protection between acid adaptation and subsequent thermal inactivation for 48 Escherichia coli strains was investigated. Those strains were selected among 188 E. coli strains according to their odds of growth under low pH conditions as determined by Haberbeck et al. (2015) [Haberbeck, L.U., Oliveira, R.C., Vivijs, B., Wenseleers, T., Aertsen, A., Michiels, C., Geeraerd, A.H., 2015. Variability in growth/no growth boundaries of 188 different Escherichia coli strains reveals that approximately 75% have a higher growth probability under low pH conditions than E. coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43888. Food Microbiol. 45, 222-230]. E. coli cells were acid and nonacid-adapted during overnight growth in controlled acidic pH (5.5) and neutral pH (7.0), respectively, in buffered Lysogenic Broth (LB). Then, they were heat inactivated at 58°C in non-buffered LB adjusted to pH6.2 and 7.0. Thus, four conditions were tested in total by combining the different pH values during growth/thermal inactivation: 5.5/6.2, 5.5/7.0, 7.0/6.2 and 7.0/7.0. Acid adaptation in buffered LB at pH5.5 increased the heat resistance of E. coli strains in comparison with nonacid-adaptation at pH7.0. For instance, the median D58-value of strains inactivated at pH7.0 was approximately 6 and 4min for acid-adapted and nonacid-adapted strains, respectively. For the nonacid-adapted strains, the thermal inactivation at pH6.2 and 7.0 was not significantly (p=0.06) different, while for the acid-adapted strains, the thermal treatment at pH6.2 showed a higher heat resistance than at pH7.0. The correlation between the odds of growth under low pH previously determined and the heat resistance was significant (p<0.05). Remarkably, a great variability in heat resistance among the strains was observed for all pH combinations, with D58-values varying between 1.0 and 69.0min. In addition, highly heat

  12. Cross-protective immunity can account for the alternating epidemic pattern of dengue virus serotypes circulating in Bangkok

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.; Holmes, E. C.; Zhang, C.; Mammen, M. P.; Nimmannitya, S.; Kalayanarooj, S.; Boots, M.

    2006-01-01

    Dengue virus, the causative agent of dengue fever and its more serious manifestation dengue hemorrhagic fever, is widespread throughout tropical and subtropical regions. The virus exists as four distinct serotypes, all of which have cocirculated in Bangkok for several decades with epidemic outbreaks occurring every 8–10 years. We analyze time-series data of monthly infection incidence, revealing a distinctive pattern with epidemics of serotypes 1, 2, and 3 occurring at approximately the same time and an isolated epidemic of serotype 4 occurring in the intervening years. Phylogenetic analysis of virus samples collected over the same period shows that clade replacement events are linked to the epidemic cycle and indicates that there is an interserotypic immune reaction. Using an epidemic model with stochastic seasonal forcing showing 8- to 10-year epidemic oscillations, we demonstrate that moderate cross-protective immunity gives rise to persistent out-of-phase oscillations similar to those observed in the data, but that strong or weak cross-protection or cross-enhancement only produces in-phase patterns. This behavior suggests that the epidemic pattern observed in Bangkok is the result of cross-protective immunity and may be significantly altered by changes in the interserotypic immune reaction. PMID:16966609

  13. Genetic structure and variability of virus populations in cross-protected grapevines superinfected by Grapevine fanleaf virus.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Emmanuelle; Marmonier, Aurélie; Komar, Véronique; Lemaire, Olivier; Fuchs, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Recombination was assessed in a vineyard site in which grapevines cross-protected with mild strains GHu of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) or Ta of Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV) were superinfected with GFLV field isolates following transmission by the nematode vector Xiphinema index. The genetic structure and variability within RNA2 of isolates from grapevines co-infected with GFLV field isolates and either GFLV-GHu or ArMV-Ta were characterized to identify intra- and interspecies recombinants. Sequence analysis and phylogenetic relationships inferred intraspecies recombination among GFLV field isolates but not between field isolates and GFLV-GHu. SISCAN analysis confirmed a mosaic structure for two GFLV field isolates for which recombination sites were located in the movement protein and coat protein genes. One of the recombinants was found in eight grapevines that were in close spatial proximity within the vineyard site, suggesting its transmission by X. index. No interspecies recombination was detected between GFLV field isolates and ArMV-Ta. Altogether, our findings suggest that mild protective strains GFLV-GHu and ArMV-Ta did not assist the emergence of viable recombinants to detectable level during a 12-year cross-protection trial. To our knowledge, this is the first extensive characterization of the genetic structure and variability of virus isolates in cross-protected plants.

  14. Effects of vaccination against paratuberculosis on tuberculosis in goats: diagnostic interferences and cross-protection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most countries carrying out campaigns of bovine tuberculosis (TB) eradication impose a ban on the use of mycobacterial vaccines in cattle. However, vaccination against paratuberculosis (PTB) in goats is often allowed even when its effect on TB diagnosis has not been fully evaluated. To address this issue, goat kids previously vaccinated against PTB were experimentally infected with TB. Results Evaluation of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion induced by avian and bovine tuberculins (PPD) showed a predominant avian PPD-biased response in the vaccinated group from week 4 post-vaccination onward. Although 60% of the animals were bovine reactors at week 14, avian PPD-biased responses returned at week 16. After challenge with M. caprae, the IFN-γ responses radically changed to show predominant bovine PPD-biased responses from week 18 onward. In addition, cross-reactions with bovine PPD that had been observed in the vaccinated group at week 14 were reduced when using the M. tuberculosis complex-specific antigens ESAT-6/CFP-10 and Rv3615c as new DIVA (differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals) reagents, which further maintained sensitivity post-challenge. Ninety percent of the animals reacted positively to the tuberculin cervical comparative intradermal test performed at 12 weeks post-infection. Furthermore, post-mortem analysis showed reductions in tuberculous lesions and bacterial burden in some vaccinated animals, particularly expressed in terms of the degree of extrapulmonary dissemination of TB infection. Conclusions Our results suggest a degree of interference of PTB vaccination with current TB diagnostics that can be fully mitigated when using new DIVA reagents. A partial protective effect associated with vaccination was also observed in some vaccinated animals. PMID:23072619

  15. Cationic Lipid/DNA Complex-Adjuvanted Influenza A Virus Vaccination Induces Robust Cross-Protective Immunity▿

    PubMed Central

    Hong, David K.; Chang, Stella; Botham, Crystal M.; Giffon, Thierry D.; Fairman, Jeffery; Lewis, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a negative-strand segmented RNA virus in which antigenically distinct viral subtypes are defined by the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) major viral surface proteins. An ideal inactivated vaccine for influenza A virus would induce not only highly robust strain-specific humoral and T-cell immune responses but also cross-protective immunity in which an immune response to antigens from a particular viral subtype (e.g., H3N2) would protect against other viral subtypes (e.g., H1N1). Cross-protective immunity would help limit outbreaks from newly emerging antigenically novel strains. Here, we show in mice that the addition of cationic lipid/noncoding DNA complexes (CLDC) as adjuvant to whole inactivated influenza A virus vaccine induces significantly more robust adaptive immune responses both in quantity and quality than aluminum hydroxide (alum), which is currently the most widely used adjuvant in clinical human vaccination. CLDC-adjuvanted vaccine induced higher total influenza virus-specific IgG, particularly for the IgG2a/c subclass. Higher levels of multicytokine-producing influenza virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells were induced by CLDC-adjuvanted vaccine than with alum-adjuvanted vaccine. Importantly, CLDC-adjuvanted vaccine provided significant cross-protection from either a sublethal or lethal influenza A viral challenge with a different subtype than that used for vaccination. This superior cross-protection afforded by the CLDC adjuvant required CD8 T-cell recognition of viral peptides presented by classical major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Together, these results suggest that CLDC has particular promise for vaccine strategies in which T cells play an important role and may offer new opportunities for more effective control of human influenza epidemics and pandemics by inactivated influenza virus vaccine. PMID:20943978

  16. Pheromone dispensers, including organic polymer fibers, described in the crop protection literature: comparison of their innovation potential.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Hans E; Langner, S S; Eisinger, M-T

    2013-01-01

    parameters, they hold considerable promise for future pest control against a variety of pest insects. In combination with well known synthetic sex pheromones, they can be used for communication disruption studies. One example, the pheromone of the European grape vine moth Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in combination with Ecoflex fibers, has been thoroughly tested in vineyards of Freiburg, Southwest Germany, with promising results. Seven weeks of communication disruption have been achieved, long enough to cover any one of several flights of this multivoltine grape pest. Disruption effects of around 95% have been achieved which are statistically indistinguishable from positive controls tested simultaneously with Isonet LE fibers, while an untreated negative control is significantly different. Ecoflex is a cheap organic co-polyester and completely biodegradable within half a year. Thus, an extra recovery step as with some other dispensers is unnecessary. This co-polyester is also of proven non-toxicity. The extension of the seven week disruption period towards half a year (the entire duration of all 3 Lobesia flights combined) is desirable and is under additional investigation in the near future. The discovery of suitable mesofibers is protected by European and US patents. The pheromone literature appearing between 1959 and today contains more than 25,000 references. This wealth of information is immediately applicable to pest management. It has major impacts on chemical ecology and IPM. In this paper, an attempt is made to compare the systems described in the literature and to derive some predictions about their prospective innovation potential. Special emphasis is given to the new development of organic biodegradable microfibers. To this end, a new electronic searching algorithm is introduced for reviewing the entries to be found in 4 specific databases. Its prominent features will be described. Surprisingly we found no previous entries in the literature linking

  17. Protective mAbs and Cross-Reactive mAbs Raised by Immunization with Engineered Marburg Virus GPs.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Cassan, Robyn; Biggins, Julia E; Murin, Charles D; Warfield, Kelly L; Li, Sheng; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Olinger, Gene G; Kim, Do H; Whaley, Kevin J; Zeitlin, Larry; Ward, Andrew B; Nykiforuk, Cory; Aman, M Javad; Berry, Jody D; Berry, Jody; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-06-01

    The filoviruses, which include the marburg- and ebolaviruses, have caused multiple outbreaks among humans this decade. Antibodies against the filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) have been shown to provide life-saving therapy in nonhuman primates, but such antibodies are generally virus-specific. Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described against Ebola virus. In contrast, relatively few have been described against Marburg virus. Here we present ten mAbs elicited by immunization of mice using recombinant mucin-deleted GPs from different Marburg virus (MARV) strains. Surprisingly, two of the mAbs raised against MARV GP also cross-react with the mucin-deleted GP cores of all tested ebolaviruses (Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, Reston), but these epitopes are masked differently by the mucin-like domains themselves. The most efficacious mAbs in this panel were found to recognize a novel "wing" feature on the GP2 subunit that is unique to Marburg and does not exist in Ebola. Two of these anti-wing antibodies confer 90 and 100% protection, respectively, one hour post-exposure in mice challenged with MARV.

  18. Characterization of PTV-12, a newly described porcine teschovirus serotype: in vivo infection and cross-protection studies.

    PubMed

    Cano-Gómez, Cristina; Fernández-Pinero, Jovita; García-Casado, María Ana; Zell, Roland; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel

    2017-07-01

    Porcine teschoviruses (PTVs) constitute 1 of the 31 genera within the Picornaviridae family, comprising at least 13 genetic types (PTV-1 to PTV-13), of which only 11 (PTV-1 to PTV-11) have been recognized as serotypes to date. Specific for swine and wild boars, most PTVs are usually non-pathogenic, but some viral variants cause severe disorders in the central nervous system (Teschen disease) or milder signs (Talfan disease), as well as reproductive, digestive and respiratory disorders and skin lesions. Previous studies revealed a high diversity of teschoviruses circulating in Spanish pig populations. Phylogenetic analysis performed with these sequences and others available in GenBank disclosed 13 clusters, 11 of which corresponded to the known PTV serotypes, and 1 of 2 additional groups is represented by isolate CC25, whose full-length genomic sequence has been obtained. This group is new to science, and was putatively named PTV-12. Here, a complete characterization of this isolate is presented, including the experimental infection of minipigs to assess tissue tropism and possible pathogenicity in vivo in the host species. In addition, using this experimental animal model, we investigated whether a pre-existing infection with this PTV-12 isolate could confer cross-protection against infection with a heterotypic PTV-1 virulent strain. Based on phylogenetic analysis and serological data, we propose CC25 as the prototype strain of a new teschovirus serotype, PTV-12.

  19. Protecting group-free, selective cross-coupling of alkyltrifluoroborates with borylated aryl bromides via photoredox/nickel dual catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yohei; Tellis, John C.; Molander, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Orthogonal reactivity modes offer substantial opportunities for rapid construction of complex small molecules. However, most strategies for imparting orthogonality to cross-coupling reactions rely on differential protection of reactive sites, greatly reducing both atom and step economies. Reported here is a strategy for orthogonal cross-coupling wherein a mechanistically distinct activation mode for transmetalation of sp3-hybridized organoboron reagents enables C-C bond formation in the presence of various protected and unprotected sp2-hybridized organoborons. This manifold has the potential for broad application, because orthogonality is inherent to the activation mode itself. The diversification potential of this platform is shown in the rapid elaboration of a trifunctional lynchpin through various transition metal-catalyzed processes without nonproductive deprotection or functional group manipulation steps. PMID:26371299

  20. Protecting group-free, selective cross-coupling of alkyltrifluoroborates with borylated aryl bromides via photoredox/nickel dual catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yohei; Tellis, John C; Molander, Gary A

    2015-09-29

    Orthogonal reactivity modes offer substantial opportunities for rapid construction of complex small molecules. However, most strategies for imparting orthogonality to cross-coupling reactions rely on differential protection of reactive sites, greatly reducing both atom and step economies. Reported here is a strategy for orthogonal cross-coupling wherein a mechanistically distinct activation mode for transmetalation of sp(3)-hybridized organoboron reagents enables C-C bond formation in the presence of various protected and unprotected sp(2)-hybridized organoborons. This manifold has the potential for broad application, because orthogonality is inherent to the activation mode itself. The diversification potential of this platform is shown in the rapid elaboration of a trifunctional lynchpin through various transition metal-catalyzed processes without nonproductive deprotection or functional group manipulation steps.

  1. Hepatitis B virus vaccination booster does not provide additional protection in adolescents: a cross-sectional school-based study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Jun-Song; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-09-23

    Current consensus does not support the use of a universal booster of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine because there is an anamnestic response in almost all children 15 years after universal infant HBV vaccination. We aimed to provide a booster strategy among adolescents as a result of their changes in lifestyle and sexual activity. This study comprised a series of cross-sectional serological surveys of HBV markers in four age groups between 2004 and 2012. The seropositivity rates of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and its reciprocal antibody (anti-HBs) for each age group were collected. There were two parts to this study; age-specific HBV seroepidemiology and subgroup analysis, including effects of different vaccine types, booster response for immunogenicity at 15 years of age, and longitudinal follow-up to identify possible additional protection by HBV booster. Within the study period, data on serum anti-HBs and HBsAg in a total of 6950 students from four age groups were collected. The overall anti-HBs and HBsAg seropositivity rates were 44.3% and 1.2%, respectively. The anti-HBs seropositivity rate in the plasma-derived subgroup was significantly higher in both 15- and 18-year age groups. Overall response rate in the double-seronegative recipients at 15 years of age was 92.5% at 6 weeks following one recombinant HBV booster dose. Among the 24 recipients showing anti-HBs seroconversion at 6 weeks after booster, seven subjects (29.2%) had lost their anti-HBs seropositivity again within 3 years. Increased seropositivity rates and titers of anti-HBs did not provide additional protective effects among subjects comprehensively vaccinated against HBV in infancy. HBV booster strategy at 15 years of age was the main contributor to the unique age-related phenomenon of anti-HBs seropositivity rate and titer. No increase in HBsAg seropositivity rates within different age groups was observed. Vaccination with plasma-derived HBV vaccines in infancy provided higher

  2. Does intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation provide equivalent myocardial protection compared to cardioplegia in patients undergoing bypass graft revascularisation?

    PubMed

    Scarci, Marco; Fallouh, Hazem B; Young, Christopher P; Chambers, David J

    2009-11-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: does intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation provide equivalent myocardial protection compared to cardioplegia in patients undergoing bypass graft revascularisation? Altogether, 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 13 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We identified 13 studies, of which eight were randomised prospective trials. None of these studies found increased mortality, seven analyzed serum cardiac enzymes and showed that intermittent ischemic arrest provides equal or better protection compared to cardioplegic techniques. Two studies found an increased usage of inotropes and intra aortic balloon pump (IABP) in the intermittent ischemic arrest group. We conclude that intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation is a versatile and cost-effective method of myocardial protection, with the immediate postoperative outcome comparable to cardioplegic arrest in first-time coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The ischaemic duration associated with intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation is invariably shorter than that associated with cardioplegic arrest, and this may be one explanation for the comparable outcomes. There may also be an element of preconditioning protection during the intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation method, as has been shown experimentally. During elective CABG in patients with no clinical evidence of aortic or cerebro-vascular disease, the incidence of peri-operative microemboli (ME) and postoperative neuropsychological disturbances are shown to be comparable with both techniques of myocardial preservation.

  3. Outer membrane vesicles from flagellin-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induce cross-reactive immunity and provide cross-protection against heterologous Salmonella challenge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xiangmin; Curtiss, Roy; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium are potentially useful for developing subunit vaccines because of high immunogenicity and protective efficacy. However, flagella might remain in OMV pellets following OMV purification, resulting in non-essential immune responses and counteraction of bacterial protective immune responses when developing a vaccine against infection of multiple serotypes Salmonella. In this study, a flagellin-deficient S. Typhimurium mutant was constructed. Lipopolysaccharide profiles, protein profiles and cryo-electron microscopy revealed that there were no significant differences between the wild-type and mutant OMVs, with the exception of a large amount of flagellin in the wild-type OMVs. Neither the wild-type OMVs nor the non-flagellin OMVs were toxic to macrophages. Mice immunized with the non-flagellin OMVs produced high concentrations of IgG. The non-flagellin OMVs elicited strong mucosal antibody responses in mice when administered via the intranasal route in addition to provoking higher cross-reactive immune responses against OMPs isolated from S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis. Both intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization with the non-flagellin OMVs provided efficient protection against heterologous S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge. Our results indicate that the flagellin-deficient OMVs may represent a new vaccine platform that could be exploited to facilitate the production of a broadly protective vaccine. PMID:27698383

  4. Cross-Reactivity, Epitope Spreading, and De Novo Immune Stimulation Are Possible Mechanisms of Cross-Protection of Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Recipients of HPV Therapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, William; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Coleman, Hannah N.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous versions of human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccines designed to treat individuals with established HPV infection, including those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), are in development because approved prophylactic vaccines are not effective once HPV infection is established. As human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) is the most commonly detected type worldwide, all versions of HPV therapeutic vaccines contain HPV-16, and some also contain HPV-18. While these two HPV types are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases, there are other high-risk HPV types known to cause malignancy. Therefore, it would be of interest to assess whether these HPV therapeutic vaccines may confer cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types. Data available from a few clinical trials that enrolled subjects with CINs regardless of the HPV type(s) present demonstrated clinical responses, as measured by CIN regression, in subjects with both vaccine-matched and nonvaccine HPV types. The currently available evidence demonstrating cross-reactivity, epitope spreading, and de novo immune stimulation as possible mechanisms of cross-protection conferred by investigational HPV therapeutic vaccines is discussed. PMID:25947147

  5. Cross-Reactivity, Epitope Spreading, and De Novo Immune Stimulation Are Possible Mechanisms of Cross-Protection of Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Recipients of HPV Therapeutic Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Mayumi; Greenfield, William; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Coleman, Hannah N

    2015-07-01

    Numerous versions of human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccines designed to treat individuals with established HPV infection, including those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), are in development because approved prophylactic vaccines are not effective once HPV infection is established. As human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) is the most commonly detected type worldwide, all versions of HPV therapeutic vaccines contain HPV-16, and some also contain HPV-18. While these two HPV types are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases, there are other high-risk HPV types known to cause malignancy. Therefore, it would be of interest to assess whether these HPV therapeutic vaccines may confer cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types. Data available from a few clinical trials that enrolled subjects with CINs regardless of the HPV type(s) present demonstrated clinical responses, as measured by CIN regression, in subjects with both vaccine-matched and nonvaccine HPV types. The currently available evidence demonstrating cross-reactivity, epitope spreading, and de novo immune stimulation as possible mechanisms of cross-protection conferred by investigational HPV therapeutic vaccines is discussed.

  6. Identification of broadly conserved cross-species protective Leishmania antigen and its responding CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zhirong; Li, Jintao; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Hamana, Hiroshi; Ezzati, Peyman; Hu, Chuanmin; Yi, Weijing; Liu, Dong; Khadem, Forough; Okwor, Ifeoma; Jia, Ping; Shitaoka, Kiyomi; Wang, Shufeng; Ndao, Momar; Petersen, Christine; Chen, Jianping; Rafati, Sima; Louzir, Hechmi; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Wilkins, John A; Uzonna, Jude E

    2015-10-21

    There is currently no clinically effective vaccine against leishmaniasis because of poor understanding of the antigens that elicit dominant T cell immunity. Using proteomics and cellular immunology, we identified a dominant naturally processed peptide (PEPCK335-351) derived from Leishmania glycosomal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). PEPCK was conserved in all pathogenic Leishmania, expressed in glycosomes of promastigotes and amastigotes, and elicited strong CD4(+) T cell responses in infected mice and humans. I-A(b)-PEPCK335-351 tetramer identified protective Leishmania-specific CD4(+) T cells at a clonal level, which comprised ~20% of all Leishmania-reactive CD4(+) T cells at the peak of infection. PEPCK335-351-specific CD4(+) T cells were oligoclonal in their T cell receptor usage, produced polyfunctional cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor), and underwent expansion, effector activities, contraction, and stable maintenance after lesion resolution. Vaccination with PEPCK peptide, DNA expressing full-length PEPCK, or rPEPCK induced strong durable cross-species protection in both resistant and susceptible mice. The effectiveness and durability of protection in vaccinated mice support the development of a broadly cross-species protective vaccine against different forms of leishmaniasis by targeting PEPCK. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. 18 CFR 35.44 - Protections against affiliate cross-subsidization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... affiliate cross-subsidization. (a) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy. No wholesale sale of electric energy may be made between a franchised public utility with captive customers and a market... affiliate cross-subsidization. 35.44 Section 35.44 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL...

  8. 18 CFR 35.44 - Protections against affiliate cross-subsidization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... affiliate cross-subsidization. (a) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy. No wholesale sale of electric energy may be made between a franchised public utility with captive customers and a market... affiliate cross-subsidization. 35.44 Section 35.44 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL...

  9. 18 CFR 35.44 - Protections against affiliate cross-subsidization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affiliate cross-subsidization. (a) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy. No wholesale sale of electric energy may be made between a franchised public utility with captive customers and a market... affiliate cross-subsidization. 35.44 Section 35.44 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL...

  10. Curiosity protects against interpersonal aggression: cross-sectional, daily process, and behavioral evidence.

    PubMed

    Kashdan, Todd B; DeWall, C Nathan; Pond, Richard S; Silvia, Paul J; Lambert, Nathaniel M; Fincham, Frank D; Savostyanova, Antonina A; Keller, Peggy S

    2013-02-01

    Curiosity is the propensity to recognize and seek out new information and experience, including an intrinsic interest in learning and developing one's knowledge. With few exceptions, researchers have often ignored the social consequences of being curious. In four studies using cross-sectional (N = 64), daily diary (Ns = 150 and 110, respectively), and behavioral experimental (N= 132) designs, we tested the hypothesis that individual differences in curiosity are linked to less aggression, even when people are provoked. We showed that both trait and daily curiosity were linked to less aggressive responses toward romantic relationship partners and people who caused psychological hurt. In time-lagged analyses, daily curiosity predicted less aggression from one day to the next, with no evidence for the reverse direction. Studies 3 and 4 showed that the inverse association between curiosity and aggression was strongest in close relationships and in fledgling (as opposed to long-lasting) romantic relationships. That is, highly curious people showed evidence of greater context sensitivity. Intensity of hurt feelings and other personality and relationship variables failed to account for these effects. Curiosity is a neglected mechanism of resilience in understanding aggression. © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Comparison of multiple viral population characterization methods on a candidate cross-protection Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) source.

    PubMed

    Kleynhans, Jackie; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2016-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus found on citrus and influences production worldwide. The 3' half of the RNA genome is generally conserved amongst sources, whereas the 5' portion is more divergent, allowing for the classification of the virus into a number of genotypes based on sequence diversity. The acknowledged genotypes of CTV are continually being expanded, and thus far include T36, T30, T3, VT, B165, HA16-5, T68 and RB. The genotype composition of the CTV populations of a potential cross protection source in Mexican lime was studied whilst comparing different techniques of viral population characterization. Cloning and sequencing of an ORF 1a fragment, genotype specific RT-PCRs and Illumina sequencing of the p33 gene as well as RNA template enrichment through immuno-capture was done. Primers used in the cloning and sequencing proved to be biased towards detection of the VT genotype. RT-PCR and Illumina sequencing using the two different templates provided relatively comparable results, even though the immuno-captured enriched template provided less than expected CTV specific data, while the RT-PCRs and p33 sequencing cannot be used to make inferences about the rest of the genome; which may vary due to recombination. The source was found to contain multiple genotypes, including RB and VT. When choosing a characterization method, the features of the virus under study should be considered. It was found that Illumina sequencing offers an opportunity to gain a large amount of information regarding the entire viral genome, but challenges encountered are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress induced cross-protection against environmental challenges on prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Drauzio E N

    2011-06-01

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes thrive successfully in stressful environments such as high osmolarity, acidic or alkali, solar heat and u.v. radiation, nutrient starvation, oxidative stress, and several others. To live under these continuous stress conditions, these microbes must have mechanisms to protect their proteins, membranes, and nucleic acids, as well as other mechanisms that repair nucleic acids. The stress responses in bacteria are controlled by master regulators, which include alternative sigma factors, such as RpoS and RpoH. The sigma factor RpoS integrates multiple signals, such as the general stress response regulators and the sigma factor RpoH regulates the heat shock proteins. These response pathways extensively overlap and are induced to various extents by the same environmental stresses. In eukaryotes, two major pathways regulate the stress responses: stress proteins, termed heat shock proteins (HSP), which appear to be required only for growth during moderate stress, and stress response elements (STRE), which are induced by different stress conditions and these elements result in the acquisition of a tolerant state towards any stress condition. In this review, the mechanisms of stress resistance between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes will be described and compared.

  13. Characterization of highly informative cross-species microsatellite panels for the Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) including five novel primers.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret Kellogg; Broderick, Damien; Ovenden, Jennifer R; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Bonde, Robert K; McGuire, Peter M; Lanyon, Janet M

    2010-03-01

    The Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are threatened species of aquatic mammals in the order Sirenia. Sirenian conservation and management actions would benefit from a more complete understanding of genetic diversity and population structure. Generally, species-specific microsatellite markers are employed in conservation genetic studies; however, robust markers can be difficult and costly to isolate. To increase the number of available markers, dugong and manatee microsatellite primers were evaluated for cross-species amplification. Furthermore, one manatee and four dugong novel primers are reported. After polymerase chain reaction optimization, 23 (92%) manatee primers successfully amplified dugong DNA, of which 11 (48%) were polymorphic. Of the 32 dugong primers tested, 27 (84%) yielded product in the manatee, of which 17 (63%) were polymorphic. Dugong and manatee primers were compared and the most informative markers were selected to create robust and informative marker-panels for each species. These cross-species microsatellite marker-panels can be employed to assess other sirenian populations and can provide beneficial information for the protection and management of these unique mammals.

  14. Cervarix®: a bivalent vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, with cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types.

    PubMed

    Szarewski, Anne

    2012-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide and often affects women under 40 years of age with young families. Vaccination against HPV is a major advancement, as it offers primary prevention against the infectious agent that is the main cause of the disease. The bivalent AS04-adjuvanted prophylactic HPV vaccine provides high efficacy against disease associated with HPV 16 and 18, as well as significant cross-protection against some HPV types not included in the vaccine. Protection against HPV 45 may be particularly important, as it is relatively more common in adenocarcinoma. The vaccine's antibody response profile suggests a long duration of immunity. Safety data have been reassuring, which is not unexpected, given that the vaccine is composed of virus-like particles, rather than being a live-virus vaccine.

  15. Cross-protection conferred by filovirus virus-like particles containing trimeric hybrid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen; Carra, John H; Cooper, Christopher L; Kwilas, Steven A; Robinson, Camenzind G; Shurtleff, Amy C; Schokman, Rowena D; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Wells, Jay B; Steffens, Jesse T; van Tongeren, Sean A; Hooper, Jay W; Bavari, Sina

    2015-02-01

    Filoviruses are causative agents of hemorrhagic fever, and to date no effective vaccine or therapeutic has been approved to combat infection. Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) is the critical immunogenic component of filovirus vaccines, eliciting high levels of antibody after successful vaccination. Previous work has shown that protection against both Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) can be achieved by vaccinating with a mixture of virus-like particles (VLPs) expressing either EBOV GP or MARV GP. In this study, the potential for eliciting effective immune responses against EBOV, Sudan virus, and MARV with a single GP construct was tested. Trimeric hybrid GPs were produced that expressed the sequence of Marburg GP2 in conjunction with a hybrid GP1 composed EBOV and Sudan virus GP sequences. VLPs expressing these constructs, along with EBOV VP40, provided comparable protection against MARV challenge, resulting in 75 or 100% protection. Protection from EBOV challenge differed depending upon the hybrid used, however, with one conferring 75% protection and one conferring no protection. By comparing the overall antibody titers and the neutralizing antibody titers specific for each virus, it is shown that higher antibody responses were elicited by the C terminal region of GP1 than by the N terminal region, and this correlated with protection. These data collectively suggest that GP2 and the C terminal region of GP1 are highly immunogenic, and they advance progress toward the development of a pan-filovirus vaccine.

  16. Conservation of the Critically Endangered Eastern Australian Population of the Grey Nurse Shark ( Carcharias taurus) Through Cross-Jurisdictional Management of a Network of Marine-Protected Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Tim P.; Harcourt, Robert; Edgar, Graham; Barrett, Neville

    2013-12-01

    Between 2001 and 2009, 26 marine-protected areas (MPA) were established on the east Australian seaboard, at least in part, to manage human interactions with a critically endangered population of grey nurse shark, Carcharias taurus. This network is spread across six MPA systems and includes all 19 sites outlined in the National Recovery Plan for C. taurus, though five sites remain open to some forms of fishing. The reserve network has complex cross-jurisdictional management, as the sharks occur in waters controlled by the Australian states of New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland, as well as by the Commonwealth (Federal) government. Jurisdiction is further complicated by fisheries and conservation departments both engaging in management activities within each state. This has resulted in protected area types that include IUCN category II equivalent zones in NSW, Queensland, and Commonwealth marine parks that either overlay or complement another large scaled network of protected sites called critical habitats. Across the network, seven and eight rule permutations for diving and fishing, respectively, are applied to this population of sharks. Besides sites identified by the recovery plan, additional sites have been protected as part of the general development of MPA networks. A case study at one of these sites, which historically was known to be occupied by C. taurus but had been abandoned, appears to shows re-establishment of an aggregation of juvenile and sub-adult sharks. Concurrent with the re-establishment of the aggregation, a local dive operator increased seasonal dive visitation rates at the site fourfold. As a precautionary measure, protection of abandoned sites, which includes nursery and gestating female habitats are options that may assist recovery of the east coast population of C. taurus.

  17. Conservation of the critically endangered eastern Australian population of the grey nurse shark (Carcharias taurus) through cross-jurisdictional management of a network of marine-protected areas.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim P; Harcourt, Robert; Edgar, Graham; Barrett, Neville

    2013-12-01

    Between 2001 and 2009, 26 marine-protected areas (MPA) were established on the east Australian seaboard, at least in part, to manage human interactions with a critically endangered population of grey nurse shark, Carcharias taurus. This network is spread across six MPA systems and includes all 19 sites outlined in the National Recovery Plan for C. taurus, though five sites remain open to some forms of fishing. The reserve network has complex cross-jurisdictional management, as the sharks occur in waters controlled by the Australian states of New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland, as well as by the Commonwealth (Federal) government. Jurisdiction is further complicated by fisheries and conservation departments both engaging in management activities within each state. This has resulted in protected area types that include IUCN category II equivalent zones in NSW, Queensland, and Commonwealth marine parks that either overlay or complement another large scaled network of protected sites called critical habitats. Across the network, seven and eight rule permutations for diving and fishing, respectively, are applied to this population of sharks. Besides sites identified by the recovery plan, additional sites have been protected as part of the general development of MPA networks. A case study at one of these sites, which historically was known to be occupied by C. taurus but had been abandoned, appears to shows re-establishment of an aggregation of juvenile and sub-adult sharks. Concurrent with the re-establishment of the aggregation, a local dive operator increased seasonal dive visitation rates at the site fourfold. As a precautionary measure, protection of abandoned sites, which includes nursery and gestating female habitats are options that may assist recovery of the east coast population of C. taurus.

  18. Characterization and cross-protection evaluation of M949_1603 gene deletion Riemerella anatipestifer mutant RA-M1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiechi; Wang, Xiaolan; Ding, Chan; Tian, Mingxing; Han, Xiangan; Wang, Shaohui; Yu, Shengqing

    2015-12-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer infection causes high mortality for ducks which results in major economic losses in the duck industry. In this study, we identified a mutant strain RA-M1 by Tn4351 transposon mutagenesis, in which the M949_1603 gene encoding glycosyl transferase was inactivated. PCR analysis revealed that M949_1603 gene is specifically existed in R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strains. RA-M1 presented no reactivity to the anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) MAb in an indirect ELISA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blotting demonstrated that RA-M1 LPS had a deficiency in ladder-like binding pattern to rabbit antiserum against R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strain CH3, indicating that the O-antigen structure of RA-M1 was changed. RA-M1 showed significant attenuated virulence in ducks and higher sensitivity to normal duck serum, compared with its parent strain CH3. Furthermore, cross-protection of RA-M1 for R. anatipestifer serotypes 1, 2, and 10 strains was evaluated. Ducks that received two immunizations with inactivated RA-M1 vaccine were 100% protected from challenge with R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strain WJ4, serotype 2 strain Yb2, and serotype 10 strain HXb2. No changes were observed in the liver, heart, or spleen samples from the protected ducks during autopsy and histological examination. Furthermore, vaccination generated high antibody titers of 1:12,800 against serotypes 1, 2, and 10 strains and enhanced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-4 in ducks. These results suggested that M949_1603 gene is associated with serotype 1 O-antigen biosynthesis, and mutant RA-M1 could be used as a novel cross-protection vaccine candidate to protect ducks against R. anatipestifer infection.

  19. Recombinant influenza H7 hemagglutinin containing CFLLC minidomain in the transmembrane domain showed enhanced cross-protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Wu, Jialing; Lin, Ying; Wu, Zhihui; Wei, Ying; Wei, Xiaona; Qin, Jianru; Xue, Chunyi; Liu, George Dacai; Cao, Yongchang

    2017-09-12

    Since February 2013, H7N9 influenza virus, causing human infections with high mortality in China, has been a potential pandemic threat. The H7N9 viruses are found to diverge into distinct genotypes as other influenza viruses; thus a vaccine that can provide sufficient cross-protection against different genotypes of H7N9 viruses is urgently needed. Our previous studies demonstrated that the HA-based structural design approach by introducing a CFLLC minidomain into transmembrane domain (TM) of H1, H5 or H9 hemagglutinin (HA) proteins by replacing with H3 subtype HA TM could enhance their cross-protection. In this study, we used Sf9 insect cell expression system to express recombinant H7 HA proteins H7-53WT, in which HA gene was derived from H7N9-53 strain, and H7-53TM containing CFLLC minidomian by replacing its TM domain with H3 HA TM. We investigated whether introduction of CFLLC minidomain into H7 HA (H7-53TM) could increase its cross-reactivity and cross-protection against different genotypes of H7N9 viruses. The results showed that the H7-53TM either with or without squalene adjuvant induced increased HI antibodies, serum IgG antibodies, and IFN-γ production to a panel of 7 H7N9 viruses in mice. Vaccinated animals with H7-53TM alone showed complete protection against challenge with heterologous H7N9-MCX strain, while H7-53WT alone showed incomplete protection (80%). Furthermore, mice vaccinated with H7-53TM HA showed less body weight loss and less pulmonary lesions and inflammation after challenge with homologous or heterologous H7N9 viruses, comparing to H7-53WT. In summary, this study presents a better subunit vaccine candidate (H7-53TM) against potential H7N9 pandemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chimeric porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus containing shuffled multiple envelope genes confers cross-protection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Debin; Ni, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Lei; Opriessnig, Tanja; Cao, Dianjun; Piñeyro, Pablo; Yugo, Danielle M; Overend, Christopher; Cao, Qian; Lynn Heffron, C; Halbur, Patrick G; Pearce, Douglas S; Calvert, Jay G; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    The extensive genetic diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains is a major obstacle for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that chimeric PRRSVs in which a single envelope gene (ORF3, ORF4, ORF5 or ORF6) was shuffled via DNA shuffling had an improved heterologous cross-neutralizing ability. In this study, we incorporate all of the individually-shuffled envelope genes together in different combinations into an infectious clone backbone of PRRSV MLV Fostera(®) PRRS. Five viable progeny chimeric viruses were rescued, and their growth characteristics were characterized in vitro. In a pilot pig study, two chimeric viruses (FV-SPDS-VR2,FV-SPDS-VR5) were found to induce cross-neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains. A subsequent vaccination/challenge study in 72 pigs revealed that chimeric virus FV-SPDS-VR2 and parental virus conferred partial cross-protection when challenged with heterologous strains NADC20 or MN184B. The results have important implications for future development of an effective PRRSV vaccine that confers heterologous protection.

  1. Role of sigma B factor in the alkaline tolerance response of Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and cross-protection against subsequent ethanol and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Giotis, Efstathios S; Julotok, Mudcharee; Wilkinson, Brian J; Blair, Ian S; McDowell, David A

    2008-07-01

    Many of the considerable abilities of Listeria monocytogenes to persist and grow in a wide range of adverse environmental conditions are thought to be at least partly under the control of the alternative sigma factor (sigmaB), encoded by the sigB gene. However, little is known about the role of this master regulon in the impressive ability of Listeria to persist and grow under conditions of alkaline pH. In this study, Northern blot analysis of parent Listeria mRNA revealed that alkali adaptation (pH 9.5 for 1 h) significantly increased the expression of sigB-derived mRNA. The study included a comparison of the relative survival of mid-exponential populations of adapted and nonadapted parent type (sigmaB expressing) and mutant (not sigmaB expressing, deltasigB) Listeria strains during subsequent alkaline (pH 12.0), osmotic (25% NaCl, wt/vol), or ethanol (16.5%) stress. Alkali-adapted parent strains were more resistant to pH 12.0 than were adapted deltasigB type strains, but both alkali-adapted parent and deltasigB strains were more resistant to pH 12.0 than were nonadapted strains. Alkali-adapted parent strains were more resistant to osmotic stress than were adapted deltasigB type strains. No significant differences in viability were observed between alkali-adapted parent and deltasigB strains after ethanol stress, suggesting that cross-protection against osmotic stress is mediated by sigmaB whereas cross-protection against ethanol is sigmaB independent. Overall, alkali-induced cross-protection against osmotic and ethanol challenges may have serious implications for food safety and human health because such stress conditions are routinely used as part of food preservation and surface cleaning processes.

  2. Mechanism of cross-sectoral coordination between nature protection and forestry in the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Sarvašová, Zuzana; Sálka, Jaroslav; Dobšinská, Zuzana

    2013-09-01

    Nature protection as a policy sector is not isolated and is directly or indirectly influenced by many other sectors (e.g. forestry, water management, rural development, energy, etc.). These policy sectors are neither completely segmented nor unaffected by the decisions taken in other policy sectors. Policy formulation in nature protection is therefore also influenced by different sectors. For that reason it is inevitable to stress the need for inter-sectoral coordination to assure their policy coherence. The aim of this article is to describe the mechanism and modes of cross-sectoral coordination and to analyze the relevant actors and their interaction, using the case of the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia. The European Union (EU) set up an ecological network of special protected areas, known as Natura 2000 to ensure biodiversity by conserving natural habitats and wild fauna and flora in the territory of the Member States. An optimized nature protection must therefore carefully consider existing limits and crossdisciplinary relationships at the EU, national and regional levels. The relations between forestry and biodiversity protection are analyzed using the advocacy coalition framework (ACF). The ACF is used for analyzing how two coalitions, in this case ecological and forest owners' coalitions, advocate or pursue their beliefs from the nature protection and forestry policy field. The whole process is illustrated at the regional scale on the case study of Natura 2000 sites formulation in the Slovak Republic. For better reliability and validity of research, a combination of various empiric research methods was used, supported by existing theories. So called triangulation of sociological research or triangulation of methods consists of mutual results testing of individual methodological steps through identifying corresponding political-science theories, assessing their formal points using primary and secondary document analysis and assessing their

  3. Protection of corneal epithelial stem cells prevents ultraviolet A damage during corneal collagen cross-linking treatment for keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jonathan E; Atkinson, Sarah D; Azar, Dimitri T; Worthington, Jenny; Downes, C Stephen; Courtney, David G; Moore, C B Tara

    2014-02-01

    Cross-linking of the cornea is usually carried out at a young age as a treatment to manage ectasia. The corneal limbal region contains delicate long-lived stem cells, which could potentially be deleteriously affected by Ultraviolet A (UV-A) radiation. Damage to these stem cells may not demonstrate as a clinical problem for many years subsequent to cross-linking treatment. UV-A radiation is known to have potential mutagenic effects upon mammalian DNA and can result in cancer. Cultured corneal epithelial cells and ex vivo corneal tissue were treated with the standard clinical cross-linking protocol for UV-A irradiation. 8-hydroxydeoxyguansoine (8-OHdG) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes (CDKN1A and CDKN2A) were assayed as markers of DNA damage using immunohistochemistry, ELISA and quantitative real time PCR. Staining of treated limbal tissue demonstrated the presence of 8-OHdG within p63 positive basal limbal cells. Levels of 8-OHdG and CDKN1A mRNA were found to be significantly increased in cultured corneal epithelial cells and limbal epithelial cells but no increase was demonstrated with the use of a polymethyl methylacrylate protective cover. This study provides evidence that oxidative nuclear DNA damage can occur through cross-linking in layers of corneal epithelial cells at the limbus and that this can be easily prevented by covering the limbus.

  4. Immune mechanisms associated with enhanced influenza A virus disease versus cross-protection in vaccinated pigs.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) has been described in pigs vaccinated with whole-inactivated influenza virus (WIV) following infection with heterologous influenza A virus (IAV). WIV vaccination elicits production of cross-reactive, non-neutralizing antibody to the challenge I...

  5. Protective effect of Withania somnifera (Solanaceae) on collagen glycation and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Gokulakrishnan, Adikesavan; Dhandayuthabani, Rajendra; Ameethkhan, Dowlath; Kumar, Chandrasekara Vimal Pradeep; Ahamed, Md Iqbal Niyas

    2007-06-01

    Modification of collagen such as non-enzymatic glycation and cross-linking plays an important role in diabetic complications and age-related diseases. We evaluate the effect of Withania somnifera on glucose-mediated collagen glycation and cross-linking in vitro. Extent of glycation, viscosity, collagen-linked fluorescence and pepsin solubility were assessed in different experimental procedures to investigate the effect of W. somnifera. Tail tendons obtained from rats (Rattus norvegicus) weighing 250-275 g were incubated with 50 mM glucose and 100 mg of metformin or Withania root powder or ethanolic extract of Withania under physiological conditions of temperature and pH for 30 days. Formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) was measured by fluorescent method whereas the cross-linking of collagen was assessed by pepsin digestion and viscosity measurements. Tendon collagen incubated with glucose showed an increase in glycation, AGE and cross-linking of collagen. The collagen incubated with W. somnifera and metformin ameliorates these modifications. The ethanolic extract of Withania showed more prominent effect than Withania root powder. The activity of ethanolic extract of Withania is comparable to metformin, a known antiglycating agent. In conclusion, Withania could have therapeutic role in the prevention of glycation induced pathogenesis in diabetes mellitus and aging.

  6. The quest for cross protective factors of Haemophilus parasuis using 2-D gel electrophoresis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In swine, Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) infection causes polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis. A range of virulent to nonvirulent strains exists between and within the 15 serovars. Because of this, the pathogenicity and subsequent protection from H. parasuis disease has yet to be elucidated...

  7. People Crossing Borders: An Analysis of U.S. Border Protection Policies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-13

    Publications, 2010). 41 See footnote 40. 42 This layering is sometimes referred to as a “Swiss Cheese Model” (see footnote 40). 43 Two assumptions...the strong conclusions ringing from academic circles on the ineffectiveness of the current border protection approach, analysis of open source data

  8. Characterization of highly informative cross-species microsatellite panels for the Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) including five novel primers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret Kellogg; Broderick, Damien; Ovenden, Jennifer R.; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Bonde, Robert K.; McGuire, Peter M.; Lanyon, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    The Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are threatened species of aquatic mammals in the order Sirenia. Sirenian conservation and management actions would benefit from a more complete understanding of genetic diversity and population structure. Generally, species-specific microsatellite markers are employed in conservation genetic studies; however, robust markers can be difficult and costly to isolate. To increase the number of available markers, dugong and manatee microsatellite primers were evaluated for cross-species amplification. Furthermore, one manatee and four dugong novel primers are reported. After polymerase chain reaction optimization, 23 (92%) manatee primers successfully amplified dugong DNA, of which 11 (48%) were polymorphic. Of the 32 dugong primers tested, 27 (84%) yielded product in the manatee, of which 17 (63%) were polymorphic. Dugong and manatee primers were compared and the most informative markers were selected to create robust and informative marker-panels for each species. These crossspecies microsatellite marker-panels can be employed to assess other sirenian populations and can provide beneficial information for the protection and management of these unique mammals.

  9. Cross-protective efficacy of recombinant transferrin-binding protein A of Haemophilus parasuis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Yu; Fu, Yuguang; Ji, Yanhong; Lian, Kaiqi; Zheng, Haixue; Wei, Jianzhong; Cai, Xuepeng; Zhu, Qiyun

    2013-06-01

    The causative agent of Glasser's disease in swine is Haemophilus parasuis. Commercial bacterins are widely used for protection of the swine population. However, cross protection is limited because H. parasuis has more than 15 serovars. Transferrin-binding protein A has shown potential as a broad-spectrum vaccine candidate against homologous and heterologous strains. Here we amplified the full-length tbpA gene from an H. parasuis serovar 13 isolate and cloned it into a pET-SUMO expression vector. We then expressed and purified the TbpA protein by Ni affinity chromatography. First, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the protein were evaluated in guinea pigs by two subcutaneous immunizations with different doses of Montanide IMS 206 VG adjuvant. The immunized guinea pigs were, respectively, challenged on week 3 after a booster immunization with homologous strain LJ3 (serovar 13) and heterologous strain FX1 (serovar 4), and vaccine-inoculated groups were compared with nonvaccinated controls. All immunized groups showed serum antibody titers higher than those of negative-control groups. Furthermore, the cytokine and chemokine levels were evaluated at the transcriptional level by the real-time PCR analysis of six cytokines and chemokines. Gamma interferon and interleukin-5 in groups immunized with 100 μg were elevated more than 15-fold over those in negative-control groups. The protection rates were 80 and 60% after a challenge with strains LJ3 and FX1, respectively, in the groups vaccinated with 100 μg of recombinant TbpA protein. Subsequently, the data showed that guinea pigs immunized with a single dose (100 μg) were protected at levels of 80, 80, and 60% against LJ3, FX1, and another heterologous strain, SZ (serovar 14), respectively. The results indicate for the first time that TbpA protein cross protects guinea pigs against serovars 13, 4, and 14 of H. parasuis. Taken together, these results suggest that the recombinant TbpA protein is a promising

  10. Cross-Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Transferrin-Binding Protein A of Haemophilus parasuis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Yu; Fu, Yuguang; Ji, Yanhong; Lian, Kaiqi; Zheng, Haixue; Wei, Jianzhong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2013-01-01

    The causative agent of Glasser's disease in swine is Haemophilus parasuis. Commercial bacterins are widely used for protection of the swine population. However, cross protection is limited because H. parasuis has more than 15 serovars. Transferrin-binding protein A has shown potential as a broad-spectrum vaccine candidate against homologous and heterologous strains. Here we amplified the full-length tbpA gene from an H. parasuis serovar 13 isolate and cloned it into a pET-SUMO expression vector. We then expressed and purified the TbpA protein by Ni affinity chromatography. First, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the protein were evaluated in guinea pigs by two subcutaneous immunizations with different doses of Montanide IMS 206 VG adjuvant. The immunized guinea pigs were, respectively, challenged on week 3 after a booster immunization with homologous strain LJ3 (serovar 13) and heterologous strain FX1 (serovar 4), and vaccine-inoculated groups were compared with nonvaccinated controls. All immunized groups showed serum antibody titers higher than those of negative-control groups. Furthermore, the cytokine and chemokine levels were evaluated at the transcriptional level by the real-time PCR analysis of six cytokines and chemokines. Gamma interferon and interleukin-5 in groups immunized with 100 μg were elevated more than 15-fold over those in negative-control groups. The protection rates were 80 and 60% after a challenge with strains LJ3 and FX1, respectively, in the groups vaccinated with 100 μg of recombinant TbpA protein. Subsequently, the data showed that guinea pigs immunized with a single dose (100 μg) were protected at levels of 80, 80, and 60% against LJ3, FX1, and another heterologous strain, SZ (serovar 14), respectively. The results indicate for the first time that TbpA protein cross protects guinea pigs against serovars 13, 4, and 14 of H. parasuis. Taken together, these results suggest that the recombinant TbpA protein is a promising

  11. "Rickettsia amblyommii" induces cross protection against lethal Rocky Mountain spotted fever in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Mendell, Nicole L; Walker, David H; Bouyer, Donald H

    2014-08-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a severe illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii for which there is no available vaccine. We hypothesize that exposure to the highly prevalent, relatively nonpathogenic "Rickettsia amblyommii" protects against R. rickettsii challenge. To test this hypothesis, guinea pigs were inoculated with "R. amblyommii." After inoculation, the animals showed no signs of illness. When later challenged with lethal doses of R. rickettsii, those previously exposed to "R. amblyommii" remained well, whereas unimmunized controls developed severe illness and died. We conclude that "R. amblyommii" induces an immune response that protects from illness and death in the guinea pig model of RMSF. These results provide a basis for exploring the use of low-virulence rickettsiae as a platform to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to prevent severe rickettsioses.

  12. Yersinia pestis Caf1 Protein: Effect of Sequence Polymorphism on Intrinsic Disorder Propensity, Serological Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protectivity of Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Pavel Kh.; Platonov, Mikhail E.; Ablamunits, Vitaly G.; Kombarova, Tat’yana I.; Ivanov, Sergey A.; Kadnikova, Lidiya A.; Somov, Aleksey N.; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis Caf1 is a multifunctional protein responsible for antiphagocytic activity and is a key protective antigen. It is generally conserved between globally distributed Y. pestis strains, but Y. pestis subsp. microtus biovar caucasica strains circulating within populations of common voles in Georgia and Armenia were reported to carry a single substitution of alanine to serine. We investigated polymorphism of the Caf1 sequences among other Y. pestis subsp. microtus strains, which have a limited virulence in guinea pigs and in humans. Sequencing of caf1 genes from 119 Y. pestis strains belonging to different biovars within subsp. microtus showed that the Caf1 proteins exist in three isoforms, the global type Caf1NT1 (Ala48 Phe117), type Caf1NT2 (Ser48 Phe117) found in Transcaucasian-highland and Pre-Araks natural plague foci #4–7, and a novel Caf1NT3 type (Ala48 Val117) endemic in Dagestan-highland natural plague focus #39. Both minor types are the progenies of the global isoform. In this report, Caf1 polymorphism was analyzed by comparing predicted intrinsic disorder propensities and potential protein-protein interactivities of the three Caf1 isoforms. The analysis revealed that these properties of Caf1 protein are minimally affected by its polymorphism. All protein isoforms could be equally detected by an immunochromatography test for plague at the lowest protein concentration tested (1.0 ng/mL), which is the detection limit. When compared to the classic Caf1NT1 isoform, the endemic Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 had lower immunoreactivity in ELISA and lower indices of self- and cross-protection. Despite a visible reduction in cross-protection between all Caf1 isoforms, our data suggest that polymorphism in the caf1 gene may not allow the carriers of Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 variants escaping from the Caf1NT1-mediated immunity to plague in the case of a low-dose flea-borne infection. PMID:27606595

  13. Cross-presenting CD103+ dendritic cells are protected from influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Helft, Julie; Manicassamy, Balaji; Guermonprez, Pierre; Hashimoto, Daigo; Silvin, Aymeric; Agudo, Judith; Brown, Brian D.; Schmolke, Mirco; Miller, Jennifer C.; Leboeuf, Marylene; Murphy, Kenneth M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T cells are critical for viral clearance from the lungs upon influenza virus infection. The contribution of antigen cross-presentation by DCs to the induction of anti-viral cytotoxic T cells remains controversial. Here, we used a recombinant influenza virus expressing a nonstructural 1–GFP (NS1-GFP) reporter gene to visualize the route of antigen presentation by lung DCs upon viral infection in mice. We found that lung CD103+ DCs were the only subset of cells that carried intact GFP protein to the draining LNs. Strikingly, lung migratory CD103+ DCs were not productively infected by influenza virus and thus were able to induce virus-specific CD8+ T cells through the cross-presentation of antigens from virally infected cells. We also observed that CD103+ DC resistance to infection correlates with an increased anti-viral state in these cells that is dependent on the expression of type I IFN receptor. These results show that efficient cross-priming by migratory lung DCs is coupled to the acquisition of an anti-viral status, which is dependent on the type I IFN signaling pathway. PMID:23041628

  14. Sun Exposure and Sun Protection at Primary Schools in The Netherlands: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Boog, Matthijs C; Nederend, Annelies; Ultee, Jetske

    2016-01-01

    In The Netherlands, skin cancer incidence rates have dramatically increased during the last decades. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the most important environmental risk factor for developing skin cancer. The present study aimed to determine the level of sun exposure and sun protection of children at Dutch primary schools. Registered members of an Internet panel of a private research company with a child 6 to 12 years of age completed a standardized questionnaire on sun exposure, sun protection and sunburn for their child on school days during the spring and summer. A total of 1103 parents completed the questionnaire. Most parents reported that their child spent 31 minutes to 1 hour (39.7%) or 1 hour to 1.5 hours (26.1%) outside at school during the spring and summer, 29.3% reported that sunscreen is always or often applied to the skin of their child in the morning on school days, 37% reported that they always or often paid attention to sun protection when selecting their child's outfit, 19.3% of the parents stated that their child could not play in the shade outside at school, and 19.9% of the parents reported that their child had ever had a sunburn at school. With most children, this consistent and repetitive pattern of sun exposure at school will probably lead to damage of exposed skin, because sun protection is insufficiently achieved among children during school days in the spring and summer. Future school-based interventions are necessary to alert and change behavior of parents, children, and primary school teachers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cross-protection provided by live Shigella mutants lacking major antigens.

    PubMed

    Szijártó, Valéria; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Eva; Emődy, Levente; Pál, Tibor; Nagy, Gábor

    2013-05-01

    The immune response elicited by Shigella infections is dominated by serotype-specific antibodies recognizing the LPS O-antigens. Although a marked antibody response to invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa-s) shared by all virulent strains is also induced, the varying level of immunity elicited by natural infections is serotype-restricted. Previous vaccines have tried to mimic and achieve this serotype-specific, infection-induced immunity. As, however, the four Shigella species can express 50 different types of O-antigens, current approaches with the aim to induce a broad coverage use a mixture of the most common O-antigens combined in single vaccines. In the current study we present data on an alternative approach to generate immunity protective against multiple serotypes. Mutants lacking both major immune-determinant structures (i.e. the Ipa and O-antigens) were not only highly attenuated, but, unlike their avirulent counterparts still expressing these antigens, elicited a protective immune response to heterologous serotypes in a murine model. Evidence is provided that protection was mediated by the enhanced immunogenic potential of minor conserved antigens. Furthermore, the rough, non-invasive double mutants triggered an immune response different from that induced by the smooth, invasive strains regarding the isotype of antibodies generated. These non-invasive, rough mutants may represent promising candidates for further development into live vaccines for the prophylaxis of bacillary dysentery in areas with multiple endemic serotypes.

  16. Cross stratum resources protection in fog-computing-based radio over fiber networks for 5G services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shaoyong; Shao, Sujie; Wang, Yao; Yang, Hui

    2017-09-01

    In order to meet the requirement of internet of things (IoT) and 5G, the cloud radio access network is a paradigm which converges all base stations computational resources into a cloud baseband unit (BBU) pool, while the distributed radio frequency signals are collected by remote radio head (RRH). A precondition for centralized processing in the BBU pool is an interconnection fronthaul network with high capacity and low delay. However, it has become more complex and frequent in the interaction between RRH and BBU and resource scheduling among BBUs in cloud. Cloud radio over fiber network has been proposed in our previous work already. In order to overcome the complexity and latency, in this paper, we first present a novel cross stratum resources protection (CSRP) architecture in fog-computing-based radio over fiber networks (F-RoFN) for 5G services. Additionally, a cross stratum protection (CSP) scheme considering the network survivability is introduced in the proposed architecture. The CSRP with CSP scheme can effectively pull the remote processing resource locally to implement the cooperative radio resource management, enhance the responsiveness and resilience to the dynamic end-to-end 5G service demands, and globally optimize optical network, wireless and fog resources. The feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture with CSP scheme are verified on our software defined networking testbed in terms of service latency, transmission success rate, resource occupation rate and blocking probability.

  17. Vaccination with Adjuvanted Recombinant Neuraminidase Induces Broad Heterologous, but Not Heterosubtypic, Cross-Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Xu, Haoming; Tan, Gene S.; Hirsh, Ariana; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to assess the cross-protective potential of the influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) as a vaccine antigen, different subtypes of recombinant NA were expressed in a baculovirus system and used to vaccinate mice prior to lethal challenge with homologous, heterologous, or heterosubtypic viruses. Mice immunized with NA of subtype N2 were completely protected from morbidity and mortality in a homologous challenge and displayed significantly reduced viral lung titers. Heterologous challenge with a drifted strain resulted in morbidity but no mortality. Similar results were obtained for challenge experiments with N1 NA. Mice immunized with influenza B virus NA (from B/Yamagata/16/88) displayed no morbidity when sublethally infected with the homologous strain and, importantly, were completely protected from morbidity and mortality when lethally challenged with the prototype Victoria lineage strain or a more recent Victoria lineage isolate. Upon analyzing the NA content in 4 different inactivated-virus vaccine formulations from the 2013-2014 season via Western blot assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay quantification, we found that the amount of NA does indeed vary across vaccine brands. We also measured hemagglutinin (HA) and NA endpoint titers in pre- and postvaccination human serum samples from individuals who received a trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine from the 2004-2005 season; the induction of NA titers was statistically less pronounced than the induction of HA titers. The demonstrated homologous and heterologous protective capacity of recombinant NA suggests that supplementing vaccine formulations with a standard amount of NA may offer increased protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:25759506

  18. Foetal cross-protection experiments between type 1 and type 2 bovine viral diarrhoea virus in pregnant ewes.

    PubMed

    Paton, D J; Sharp, G; Ibata, G

    1999-01-01

    A flock of 82 non-pregnant ewes was split into three immunisation groups and given an intranasal dose of either cell culture medium, or a type 1 or a type 2 bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV-1 or BVDV-2). Two months later the flock was reconstituted and after a further three weeks, the ewes were bred to pestivirus negative rams after synchronisation of oestrus using progesterone sponges. Fifty-five ewes were segregated into three challenge groups, each of which comprised ewes from different immunisation groups. At 7 weeks gestation, one challenge group was given an intranasal dose of cell culture medium, whilst the other two were given intranasal doses of either BVDV-1 or BVDV-2, using the same inocula as for the immunisations. Three weeks later, the ewes were killed and their foetuses tested for the presence of BVDV-1 and BVDV-2. The results showed that immunisation of six ewes without subsequent challenge did not lead to infection of any of their 11 foetuses. Challenge with BVDV-1 or BVDV-2 in the absence of immunisation lead to 15 out of 15 or 11 out of 14 foetuses becoming infected, respectively. Immunisation with the homologous virus to that used for challenge resulted in complete protection of 32 foetuses from 15 ewes. Heterologous protection was one way. All 12 foetuses from ewes immunised with BVDV-1 were protected from challenge with BVDV-2, whereas 18 foetuses from ewes immunised with BVDV-2 were all infected after challenge with BVDV-1. This provides evidence that a recent exposure to infection with one pestivirus does not necessarily induce foetal protection against another. The one-way result suggests that factors other than antigenic differences are involved in cross-protection.

  19. Cross-protection of Lactococcus lactis-displayed HA2 subunit against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Zhao, Daxian; Jiao, Huifeng; Ouyang, Jiexiu

    2015-12-01

    Current influenza vaccines provide strain-specific protection against homologous subtypes and need to be updated annually. Therefore, it is essential to develop a universal vaccine that would induce broadly cross-protective immunity against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses. The highly conserved HA2 subunit is a promising candidate for developing a universal influenza vaccine. Here, we hypothesized that the HA2 subunit could be displayed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), using Spax as an anchor protein (L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2) and that L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 would have immunogenicity by oral administration without the use of adjuvant in the mouse model. To address this hypothesis, we show that oral vaccination of mice with L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 elicited significant humoral and mucosal immune responses. Importantly, L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 provided 100% protection against homologous H5N1 or heterologous H1N1 virus challenge. These results suggest that an HA2 subunit presented on the surface of L. lactis is an effective universal vaccine candidate against influenza A viruses in the poultry industry and in humans.

  20. Leishmania infantum sterol 24-c-methyltransferase formulated with MPL-SE induces cross-protection against L. major infection

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Bhatia, Ajay; Raman, Vanitha S.; Vidal, Silvia E. Z.; Bertholet, Sylvie; Coler, Rhea N.; Howard, Randall F.; Reed, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme sterol 24-c-methyltranferase (SMT) is required for the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major membrane sterol in Leishmania parasites. SMT and ergosterol are not found in mammals, so this protein may be an attractive target for anti-leishmanial vaccines and drugs. We have previously demonstrated that SMT from L. infantum, which causes visceral leishmaniasis, is a protective antigen against this parasite. Because this protein is highly conserved among Leishmania species, we evaluated the potential of SMT to cross-protect against a different form of leishmaniasis. Here, we show that immunization with L. infantum SMT, formulated with monophosphoryl lipid A in stable emulsion (MPL-SE), protects mice from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major. In BALB/c mice the vaccine preparation induced antigen-specific multifunctional CD4+ T cells capable of producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and/or TNF-α upon antigen re-exposure, and MPL-SE was indispensable to direct immune responses to SMT towards Th1. Mice immunized with the SMT/MPL-SE vaccine developed significantly smaller lesions following ear challenge with L. major. These results suggest that SMT is a promising vaccine antigen for multiple forms of leishmaniasis. PMID:19428898

  1. Leishmania infantum sterol 24-c-methyltransferase formulated with MPL-SE induces cross-protection against L. major infection.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Bhatia, Ajay; Raman, Vanitha S; Vidal, Silvia E Z; Bertholet, Sylvie; Coler, Rhea N; Howard, Randall F; Reed, Steven G

    2009-05-11

    The enzyme sterol 24-c-methyltranferase (SMT) is required for the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major membrane sterol in Leishmania parasites. SMT and ergosterol are not found in mammals, so this protein may be an attractive target for anti-leishmanial vaccines and drugs. We have previously demonstrated that SMT from L. infantum, which causes visceral leishmaniasis, is a protective antigen against this parasite. Because this protein is highly conserved among Leishmania species, we evaluated the potential of SMT to cross-protect against a different form of leishmaniasis. Here, we show that immunization with L. infantum SMT, formulated with monophosphoryl lipid A in stable emulsion (MPL-SE), protects mice from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major. In BALB/c mice the vaccine preparation induced antigen-specific multi-functional CD4(+) T cells capable of producing IFN-gamma, IL-2, and/or TNF-alpha upon antigen re-exposure, and MPL-SE was indispensable to direct immune responses to SMT towards Th1. Mice immunized with the SMT/MPL-SE vaccine developed significantly smaller lesions following ear challenge with L. major. These results suggest that SMT is a promising vaccine antigen for multiple forms of leishmaniasis.

  2. A novel inactivated enterovirus 71 vaccine can elicit cross-protective immunity against coxsackievirus A16 in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisheng; Liu, Yajing; Li, Shuxuan; Zhao, Huan; Lin, Qiaona; Yu, Hai; Huang, Xiumin; Zheng, Qingbing; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-21

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a highly contagious disease that mainly affects infants and children. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) are the major pathogens of HFMD. Two EV71 vaccines were recently licensed in China and the administration of the EV71 vaccines is believed to significantly reduce the number of HFMD-related severe or fatal cases. However, a monovalent EV71 vaccine cannot cross-protect against CA16 infection, this may result in that it cannot effectively control the overall HFMD epidemic. In this study, a chimeric EV71, whose VP1/210-225 epitope was replaced by that of CA16, was constructed using a reverse genetics technique to produce a candidate EV71/CA16 bivalent vaccine strain. The chimeric EV71 was infectious and showed similar growth characteristics as its parental strain. The replacement of the VP1/210-225 epitope did not significantly affect the antigenicity and immunogenicity of EV71. More importantly, the chimeric EV71 could induce protective immunity against both EV71 and CA16, and protect neonatal mice against either EV71 or CA16 lethal infections, the chimeric EV71 constructed in this study was shown to be a feasible and promising candidate bivalent vaccine against both EV71 and CA16. The construction of a chimeric enterovirus also provides an alternative platform for broad-spectrum HFMD vaccines development.

  3. Cross Protection against Influenza A Virus by Yeast-Expressed Heterologous Tandem Repeat M2 Extracellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) is well conserved across human influenza A subtypes, but there are few residue changes among avian and swine origin influenza A viruses. We expressed a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e sequences (M2e5x) derived from human, swine, and avian origin influenza A viruses using the yeast expression system. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AS04-adjuvanted M2e5x protein vaccines was effective in inducing M2e-specific antibodies reactive to M2e peptide and native M2 proteins on the infected cells with human, swine, or avian influenza virus, mucosal and systemic memory cellular immune responses, and cross-protection against H3N2 virus. Importantly, M2e5x immune sera were found to confer protection against different subtypes of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses in naïve mice. Also, M2e5x-immune complexes of virus-infected cells stimulated macrophages to secrete cytokines via Fc receptors, indicating a possible mechanism of protection. The present study provides evidence that M2e5x proteins produced in yeast cells could be developed as a potential universal influenza vaccine. PMID:26366729

  4. Lung-protective Ventilation in Patients with Brain Injury: A Multicenter Cross-sectional Study and Questionnaire Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Hu, Ying-Hong; Cao, Xiang-Yuan; Kang, Yan; Liu, Li-Ping; Wang, Shou-Hong; Yu, Rong-Guo; Yu, Xiang-You; Zhang, Xia; Li, Bao-Shan; Ma, Zeng-Xiang; Weng, Yi-Bing; Zhang, Heng; Chen, De-Chang; Chen, Wei; Chen, Wen-Jin; Chen, Xiu-Mei; Du, Bin; Duan, Mei-Li; Hu, Jin; Huang, Yun-Feng; Jia, Gui-Jun; Li, Li-Hong; Liang, Yu-Min; Qin, Bing-Yu; Wang, Xian-Dong; Xiong, Jian; Yan, Li-Mei; Yang, Zheng-Ping; Dong, Chen-Ming; Wang, Dong-Xin; Zhan, Qing-Yuan; Fu, Shuang-Lin; Zhao, Lin; Huang, Qi-Bing; Xie, Ying-Guang; Huang, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Xu, Wang-Bin; Xu, Yuan; Liu, Ya-Ling; Zhao, He-Ling; Sun, Rong-Qing; Sun, Ming; Cheng, Qing-Hong; Qu, Xin; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Ming; Shi, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Han; He, Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lin; Chen, Guang-Qiang; Sun, Xiu-Mei; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the years, the mechanical ventilation (MV) strategy has changed worldwide. The aim of the present study was to describe the ventilation practices, particularly lung-protective ventilation (LPV), among brain-injured patients in China. Methods: This study was a multicenter, 1-day, cross-sectional study in 47 Intensive Care Units (ICUs) across China. Mechanically ventilated patients (18 years and older) with brain injury in a participating ICU during the time of the study, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, postoperation with intracranial tumor, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial infection, and idiopathic epilepsy, were enrolled. Demographic data, primary diagnoses, indications for MV, MV modes and settings, and prognoses on the 60th day were collected. Multivariable logistic analysis was used to assess factors that might affect the use of LPV. Results: A total of 104 patients were enrolled in the present study, 87 (83.7%) of whom were identified with severe brain injury based on a Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8 points. Synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) was the most frequent ventilator mode, accounting for 46.2% of the entire cohort. The median tidal volume was set to 8.0 ml/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 7.0–8.9 ml/kg) of the predicted body weight; 50 (48.1%) patients received LPV. The median positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was set to 5 cmH2O (IQR, 5–6 cmH2O). No PEEP values were higher than 10 cmH2O. Compared with partially mandatory ventilation, supportive and spontaneous ventilation practices were associated with LPV. There were no significant differences in mortality and MV duration between patients subjected to LPV and those were not. Conclusions: Among brain-injured patients in China, SIMV was the most frequent ventilation mode. Nearly one-half of the brain-injured patients received LPV. Patients under supportive and spontaneous ventilation were more likely to receive LPV. Trial Registration: Clinical

  5. The influence of the amount of sunscreen applied and its sun protection factor (SPF): evaluation of two sunscreens including the same ingredients at different concentrations.

    PubMed

    Schalka, Sergio; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Cucé, Luis Carlos

    2009-08-01

    To estimate labeled sun protection factor (SPF) for sunscreen, the amount of product applied on volunteers, according to food and drug administration (FDA) and International protocols, is 2 mg/cm(2). However, different studies have shown that consumers actually apply much less product when exposed to the sun. Previous studies have reported contradictory findings in an attempt to correlate the amount applied in relation to SPF. The objective of the present study was to estimate the influence of the quantity of sunscreen applied in the determination of SPF, according to the FDA methodology. Forty volunteers were included in two groups (SPF 15 and 30). The selected sunscreen was then applied in four different quantities (2, 1.5, 1.0 and 0.5 mg/cm(2)). All areas were irradiated with a solar simulator. After 24 h, the minimal erythemal dose (MED) and SPF were determined. In both groups, we observed that the SPF decreased when the amount of sunscreen applied was decreased. The differences between the 2 mg/cm(2) area and the others were significant in both groups (P<0.001). The correlation between specified SPF and applied amount grew exponentially. The protection provided by sunscreen is related to the amount of product applied. It is essential to educate consumers to apply larger amounts of sunscreen for adequate photoprotection.

  6. Cross-Face Nerve Grafting with Infraorbital Nerve Pathway Protection: Anatomic and Histomorphometric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Joseph; Demsey, Daniel R.B.; Ho, Emily S.; Zuker, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Smiling is an important aspect of emotional expression and social interaction, leaving facial palsy patients with impaired social functioning and decreased overall quality of life. Although there are several techniques available for facial reanimation, staged facial reanimation using donor nerve branches from the contralateral, functioning facial nerve connected to a cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) is the only technique that can reliably reproduce an emotionally spontaneous smile. Although CFNGs provide spontaneity, they typically produce less smile excursion than when the subsequent free functioning muscle flap is innervated with the motor nerve to the masseter muscle. This may be explained in part by the larger number of donor motor axons when using the masseter nerve, as studies have shown that only 20% to 50% of facial nerve donor axons successfully cross the nerve graft to innervate their targets. As demonstrated in our animal studies, increasing the number of donor axons that grow into and traverse the CFNG to innervate the free muscle transfer increases muscle movement, and this phenomenon may provide patients with the benefit of improved smile excursion. We have previously shown in animal studies that sensory nerves, when coapted to a nerve graft, improve axonal growth through the nerve graft and improve muscle excursion. Here, we describe the feasibility of and our experience in translating these results clinically by coapting the distal portion of the CFNG to branches of the infraorbital nerve. PMID:27757349

  7. A Kinetic Modeling study on the Oxidation of Primary Reference Fuel?Toluene Mixtures Including Cross Reactions between Aromatics and Aliphatics

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y; Miyoshi, A; Koshi, M; Pitz, W J

    2008-01-09

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for the mixtures of Primary Reference Fuel (PRF: n-heptane and iso-octane) and toluene has been proposed. This model is divided into three parts; a PRF mechanism [T. Ogura et al., Energy & Fuels 21 (2007) 3233-3239], toluene sub-mechanism and cross reactions between PRF and toluene. Toluene sub-mechanism includes the low temperature kinetics relevant to engine conditions. A chemical kinetic mechanism proposed by Pitz et al. [Proc. the 2nd Joint Meeting of the U.S. Combust. Institute (2001)] was used as a starting model and modified by updating rate coefficients. Theoretical estimations of rate coefficients were performed for toluene and benzyl radical reactions important at low temperatures. Cross-reactions between alkane, alkene, and aromatics were also included in order to account for the acceleration by the addition of toluene into iso-octane recently found in the shock tube study of the ignition delay [Y. Sakai et al, SAE 2007-01-4014 (2007)]. Validations of the model were performed with existing shock tube and flow tube data. The model well predicts the ignition characteristics of toluene and PRF/Toluene mixtures under the wide range of temperatures (500-1700 K) and pressures (2-50 atm). It is found that reactions of benzyl radical with oxygen molecule determine the reactivity of toluene at low temperature. Although the effect of toluene addition to iso-octane is not fully resolved, the reactions of alkene with benzyl radical have the possibility to account for the kinetic interactions between PRF and toluene.

  8. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nandre, Rahul M.; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge. PMID:25673904

  9. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge.

  10. Cross-Protection against Lethal H5N1 Challenge in Ferrets with an Adjuvanted Pandemic Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Baras, Benoît; Stittelaar, Koert J.; Simon, James H.; Thoolen, Robert J. M. M.; Mossman, Sally P.; Pistoor, Frank H. M.; van Amerongen, Geert; Wettendorff, Martine A.; Hanon, Emmanuel; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Unprecedented spread between birds and mammals of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAI) of the H5N1 subtype has resulted in hundreds of human infections with a high fatality rate. This has highlighted the urgent need for the development of H5N1 vaccines that can be produced rapidly and in sufficient quantities. Potential pandemic inactivated vaccines will ideally induce substantial intra-subtypic cross-protection in humans to warrant the option of use, either prior to or just after the start of a pandemic outbreak. In the present study, we evaluated a split H5N1 A/H5N1/Vietnam/1194/04, clade 1 candidate vaccine, adjuvanted with a proprietary oil-in- water emulsion based Adjuvant System proven to be well-tolerated and highly immunogenic in the human (Leroux-Roels et al. (2007) The Lancet 370:580–589), for its ability to induce intra-subtypic cross-protection against clade 2 H5N1/A/Indonesia/5/05 challenge in ferrets. Methodology and Principal Findings All ferrets in control groups receiving non-adjuvanted vaccine or adjuvant alone failed to develop specific or cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies and all died or had to be euthanized within four days of virus challenge. Two doses of adjuvanted split H5N1 vaccine containing ≥1.7 µg HA induced neutralizing antibodies in the majority of ferrets to both clade 1 (17/23 (74%) responders) and clade 2 viruses (14/23 (61%) responders), and 96% (22/23) of vaccinees survived the lethal challenge. Furthermore lung virus loads and viral shedding in the upper respiratory tract were reduced in vaccinated animals relative to controls suggesting that vaccination might also confer a reduced risk of viral transmission. Conclusion These protection data in a stringent challenge model in association with an excellent clinical profile highlight the potential of this adjuvanted H5N1 candidate vaccine as an effective tool in pandemic preparedness. PMID:18167560

  11. Combined Alphavirus Replicon Particle Vaccine Induces Durable and Cross-Protective Immune Responses against Equine Encephalitis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Pamela J.; Bakken, Russell R.; Barth, James F.; Lind, Cathleen M.; da Silva, Luis; Hart, Mary Kate; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Dudek, Jeanne; Owens, Gary; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Parker, Michael D.; Smith, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alphavirus replicons were evaluated as potential vaccine candidates for Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), or eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) when given individually or in combination (V/W/E) to mice or cynomolgus macaques. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in mice to their respective alphavirus. Protection from either subcutaneous or aerosol challenge with VEEV, WEEV, or EEEV was demonstrated out to 12 months after vaccination in mice. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in macaques and demonstrated good protection against aerosol challenge with an epizootic VEEV-IAB virus, Trinidad donkey. Similarly, the EEEV replicon and V/W/E combination vaccine elicited neutralizing antibodies against EEEV and protected against aerosol exposure to a North American variety of EEEV. Both the WEEV replicon and combination V/W/E vaccination, however, elicited poor neutralizing antibodies to WEEV in macaques, and the protection conferred was not as strong. These results demonstrate that a combination V/W/E vaccine is possible for protection against aerosol challenge and that cross-interference between the vaccines is minimal. IMPORTANCE Three related viruses belonging to the genus Alphavirus cause severe encephalitis in humans: Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Normally transmitted by mosquitoes, these viruses can cause disease when inhaled, so there is concern that these viruses could be used as biological weapons. Prior reports have suggested that vaccines for these three viruses might interfere with one another. We have developed a combined vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalitis expressing the

  12. SU-E-T-138: Automated Chart Review Module Including Cross-Vendor Data Transfer Verification Developed for IHE-RO Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, M; Gordon, C; Tien, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To follow the Integrating Healthcare Enterprise - Radiation Oncology (IHE-RO) initiative of proper cross-vendor technology integration, an automated chart checker (ACC) was developed. ACC compares extracted data from an approved patient plan in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) against data existing in the Mosaiq treatment management system (TMS). ACC automatically analyzes these parameters using built-in quality checklists to provide further aid in chart review. Methods: Eclipse TPS data are obtained using Eclipse scripting API (ESAPI) while Mosaiq TMS data are obtained from a radiotherapy-treatment-planning (RTP) file. Using this information, ACC identifies TPS-TMS discrepancies in 18 primary beam parameters including MU, energy, jaw positions, gantry angle, table angle, accessories, and bolus for up to 31 beams. Next, approximately 40 items from traditional quality checklists are evaluated such as prescription consistency, DRR graticule placement, plan approval status, global max dose, and dose tracking coefficients. Parameters were artificially modified to determine if ACC would detect an error in data transfer and to test each component of quality checklists. Results: Using ESAPI scripting and RTP file-processing, ACC was able to properly aggregate data from TPS and TMS for up to 31 beams. Errors were artificially introduced into each plan parameter, and ACC was able to successfully detect all of them within seconds. Next, ACC was able to successfully detect mistakes in the chart by identifying deviations with its quality checklists, within seconds. Conclusion: ACC effectively addresses the potential issue of faulty cross-vendor data transfer, as described by IHE-RO. In addition, ACC was also able to detect deviations from its built-in quality checklists. ACC is already an invaluable tool for efficient and standardized chart review and will continue to improve as its incorporated checklists become more comprehensive.

  13. Living conditions, including life style, in primary-care patients with nonacute, nonspecific spinal pain compared with a population-based sample: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Odd; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Strender, Lars-Erik

    2010-11-24

    Nonspecific spinal pain (NSP), comprising back and/or neck pain, is one of the leading disorders behind long-term sick-listing, including disability pensions. Early interventions to prevent long-term sick-listing require the identification of patients at risk. The aim of this study was to compare living conditions associated with long-term sick-listing for NSP in patients with nonacute NSP, with a nonpatient population-based sample. Nonacute NSP is pain that leads to full-time sick-listing >3 weeks. One hundred and twenty-five patients with nonacute NSP, 2000-2004, were included in a randomized controlled trial in Stockholm County with the objective of comparing cognitive-behavioral rehabilitation with traditional primary care. For these patients, a cross-sectional study was carried out with baseline data. Living conditions were compared between the patients and 338 nonpatients by logistic regression. The conditions from univariate analyses were included in a multivariate analysis. The nonsignificant variables were excluded sequentially to yield a model comprising only the significant factors (P < 0.05). The results are shown as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. In the univariate analyses, 13 of the 18 living conditions had higher odds for the patients with a dominance of physical work strains and Indication of alcohol over-consumption, odds ratio (OR) 14.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.2-67.6). Five conditions qualified for the multivariate model: High physical workload, OR 13.7 (CI 5.9-32.2); Hectic work tempo, OR 8.4 (CI 2.5-28.3); Blue-collar job, OR 4.5 (CI 1.8-11.4); Obesity, OR 3.5 (CI 1.2-10.2); and Low education, OR 2.7 (CI 1.1-6.8). As most of the living conditions have previously been insufficiently studied, our findings might contribute a wider knowledge of risk factors for long-term sick-listing for NSP. As the cross-sectional design makes causal conclusions impossible, our study should be complemented by prospective research.

  14. Living conditions, including life style, in primary-care patients with nonacute, nonspecific spinal pain compared with a population-based sample: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, Odd; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Strender, Lars-Erik

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonspecific spinal pain (NSP), comprising back and/or neck pain, is one of the leading disorders behind long-term sick-listing, including disability pensions. Early interventions to prevent long-term sick-listing require the identification of patients at risk. The aim of this study was to compare living conditions associated with long-term sick-listing for NSP in patients with nonacute NSP, with a nonpatient population-based sample. Nonacute NSP is pain that leads to full-time sick-listing >3 weeks. Methods One hundred and twenty-five patients with nonacute NSP, 2000–2004, were included in a randomized controlled trial in Stockholm County with the objective of comparing cognitive–behavioral rehabilitation with traditional primary care. For these patients, a cross-sectional study was carried out with baseline data. Living conditions were compared between the patients and 338 nonpatients by logistic regression. The conditions from univariate analyses were included in a multivariate analysis. The nonsignificant variables were excluded sequentially to yield a model comprising only the significant factors (P < 0.05). The results are shown as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results In the univariate analyses, 13 of the 18 living conditions had higher odds for the patients with a dominance of physical work strains and Indication of alcohol over-consumption, odds ratio (OR) 14.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.2–67.6). Five conditions qualified for the multivariate model: High physical workload, OR 13.7 (CI 5.9–32.2); Hectic work tempo, OR 8.4 (CI 2.5–28.3); Blue-collar job, OR 4.5 (CI 1.8–11.4); Obesity, OR 3.5 (CI 1.2–10.2); and Low education, OR 2.7 (CI 1.1–6.8). Conclusions As most of the living conditions have previously been insufficiently studied, our findings might contribute a wider knowledge of risk factors for long-term sick-listing for NSP. As the cross-sectional design makes causal conclusions impossible, our study

  15. Protection against tetanus in the aged people in the Czech Republic--cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Janout, Vladimir; Matouskova, Ivanka; Machova, Lucie; Cizek, Ludek; Janoutova, Gabriela; Hoskova, Jana

    2005-01-01

    The aged people belong to most vulnerable group for tetanus infection in terms of their vaccination history, frequency of injuries, which may serve as gate of entry for this infection and declared decrease of general as well as specific immunity. The examinations of the aged people for antitetanus antibodies have been done to assess the immunity against tetanus in this particular group of people in the Czech republic. Blood samples were collected from people living in hostels for senior citizens on the bases of signed informed consent. The study focused on people older than 60 years of age. TETANUS ELISA Genzyme Virotech GmbH kit was used for detection of IgG antibodies against tetanus. The level of >0.1 IU/ml was used as protective level of antibodies. Total number of 341 samples was investigated for antibodies against tetanus. Nonprotective (<0.1 IU/ml) titer of antibodies was found in 9.1% of subjects and 90.9% of people possessed protective titers of antibodies against tetanus. The interval between the last vaccination (or revaccination) against tetanus and collection of blood sample was ascertained in 257 subjects and this interval was 10 years or less in 89.9% of subjects. Geometric mean of titers was calculated for different intervals between the last vaccination and collection of blood sample. There was an increasing trend of geometric mean values found with decreasing interval from the last vaccination. But there were also good values of geometric mean of titers found in subjects vaccinated long before collection of blood (intervals up to 27 years). Due to completely different situation in the Czech Republic, where adult people were repeatedly revaccinated in military service (males), in the employment with higher risk of tetanus infection, in context with treatment of injuries and finally during mass vaccination campaigns, organized in the Czech Republic for all adult people in 1974-1976 and in 1984-1986, even the aged people can reach acceptable immunity

  16. Bidirectional cross-kingdom RNAi and fungal uptake of external RNAs confer plant protection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Weiberg, Arne; Lin, Feng-Mao; Thomma, Bart; Huang, Hsien-Da; Jin, Hailing

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive fungal pathogens such as Botrytis and Verticillium spp. cause severe crop losses worldwide. We recently discovered that Botrytis cinerea delivers small RNAs (Bc-sRNAs) into plant cells to silence host immunity genes. Such sRNA effectors are mostly produced by B. cinerea Dicer-like protein 1 (Bc-DCL1) and Bc-DCL2. Here we show that expressing sRNAs that target Bc-DCL1 and Bc-DCL2 in Arabidopsis and tomato silences Bc-DCL genes and attenuates fungal pathogenicity and growth, exemplifying bidirectional cross-kingdom RNAi and sRNA trafficking between plants and fungi. This strategy can be adapted to simultaneously control multiple fungal diseases. We also show that Botrytis can take up external sRNAs and double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). Applying sRNAs or dsRNAs that target Botrytis DCL1 and DCL2 genes on the surface of fruits, vegetables, and flowers significantly inhibits gray mold disease. Such pathogen gene-targeting RNAs represent a new generation of environmentally-friendly fungicides. PMID:27643635

  17. An in vitro attenuated strain of Histomonas meleagridis provides cross-protective immunity in turkeys against heterologous virulent isolates.

    PubMed

    Sulejmanovic, T; Bilic, I; Hess, M; Liebhart, D

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, cross-protective immunity induced by a well-defined clonal strain of Histomonas meleagridis, attenuated by prolonged in vitro cultivation against different clonal heterologous isolates of the same parasite was investigated. For this purpose, 86 turkey poults were assigned to groups consisting of 9-10 birds. Birds of four groups were vaccinated on their 1st day of life followed by re-vaccination on their 14th day of life when the remaining turkeys were left untreated. The challenge was performed using four strains of H. meleagridis that were isolated from chickens or turkeys from different outbreaks of histomonosis in Europe and three of them showed diversities in their genome. Hence, every strain used for the challenge was applied to a group of vaccinated and a group of non-vaccinated birds while birds of the negative control group were sham inoculated. Non-vaccinated birds suffered from severe histomonosis due to the challenge with fatalities reaching from 5 to 10 turkeys per group. Vaccinated birds did not contract clinical signs of the disease following challenge and the increase in weight was unaffected compared to birds of the negative control group. A significant difference in lesion scores was recorded between vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups, with very few instances of liver involvement in the former groups. Livers of vaccinated birds that were without recordable macroscopic lesions were also found negative by immunohistochemical investigation. According to the data obtained, the present study demonstrates, for the first time, the cross-protective capability of a tentative vaccine strain of H. meleagridis attenuated in vitro against heterologous virulent isolates of different origin.

  18. Cross-protection of the Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Against Variants of Genetically Related High-Risk HPV Infections

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Ariana; Chen, Zigui; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Porras, Carolina; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Befano, Brian; Burk, Robert D.; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background. Results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) demonstrated partial cross-protection by the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which targets HPV-16 and HPV-18, against HPV-31, -33, and -45 infection and an increased incidence of HPV-51 infection. Methods. A study nested within the CVT intention-to-treat cohort was designed to assess high-risk HPV variant lineage–specific vaccine efficacy (VE). The 2 main end points were (1) long-term incident infections persisting for ≥2 years and/or progression to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 [CIN 2/3]) and (2) incident transient infections lasting for <2 years. For efficiency, incident infections due to HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -45, and -51 resulting in persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 were matched (ratio, 1:2) to the more-frequent transient viral infections, by HPV type. Variant lineages were determined by sequencing the upstream regulatory region and/or E6 region. Results. VEs against persistent or transient infections with HPV-16, -18, -33, -35, -45, and -51 did not differ significantly by variant lineage. As the possible exception, VEs against persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 due to HPV-31 A/B and HPV-31C variants were −7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], −33.9% to 0%) and 86.4% (95% CI, 65.1%–97.1%), respectively (P = .02 for test of equal VE). No difference in VE was observed by variant among transient HPV-31 infections (P = .68). Conclusions. Overall, sequence variation at the variant level does not appear to explain partial cross-protection by the bivalent HPV vaccine. PMID:26518044

  19. Cross-protection of the Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Against Variants of Genetically Related High-Risk HPV Infections.

    PubMed

    Harari, Ariana; Chen, Zigui; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Porras, Carolina; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Panagiotou, Orestis A; Befano, Brian; Burk, Robert D; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-03-15

    Results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) demonstrated partial cross-protection by the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which targets HPV-16 and HPV-18, against HPV-31, -33, and -45 infection and an increased incidence of HPV-51 infection. A study nested within the CVT intention-to-treat cohort was designed to assess high-risk HPV variant lineage-specific vaccine efficacy (VE). The 2 main end points were (1) long-term incident infections persisting for ≥2 years and/or progression to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 [CIN 2/3]) and (2) incident transient infections lasting for <2 years. For efficiency, incident infections due to HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -45, and -51 resulting in persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 were matched (ratio, 1:2) to the more-frequent transient viral infections, by HPV type. Variant lineages were determined by sequencing the upstream regulatory region and/or E6 region. VEs against persistent or transient infections with HPV-16, -18, -33, -35, -45, and -51 did not differ significantly by variant lineage. As the possible exception, VEs against persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 due to HPV-31 A/B and HPV-31C variants were -7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -33.9% to 0%) and 86.4% (95% CI, 65.1%-97.1%), respectively (P = .02 for test of equal VE). No difference in VE was observed by variant among transient HPV-31 infections (P = .68). Overall, sequence variation at the variant level does not appear to explain partial cross-protection by the bivalent HPV vaccine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Feasibility of reconstructed ancestral H5N1 influenza viruses for cross-clade protective vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Ducatez, Mariette F.; Bahl, Justin; Griffin, Yolanda; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Franks, John; Barman, Subrata; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Webb, Ashley; Guan, Yi; Webster, Robert G.; Smith, Gavin J. D.; Webby, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Since the reemergence of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses in humans in 2003, these viruses have spread throughout avian species in Asia, Europe, and Africa. Their sustained circulation has resulted in the evolution of phylogenetically diverse lineages. Viruses from these lineages show considerable antigenic variation, which has confounded vaccine planning efforts. We reconstructed ancestral protein sequences at several nodes of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene phylogenies that represent ancestors to diverse H5N1 virus clades. By using the same methods that have been used to generate currently licensed inactivated H5N1 vaccines, we were able to produce a panel of replication competent influenza viruses containing synthesized HA and NA genes representing the reconstructed ancestral proteins. We identified two of these viruses that showed promising in vitro cross-reactivity with clade 1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3.4, and 4 viruses. To confirm that vaccine antigens derived from these viruses were able to elicit functional antibodies following immunization, we created whole-virus vaccines and compared their protective efficacy versus that of antigens from positive control, naturally occurring, and broadly reactive H5N1 viruses. The ancestral viruses’ vaccines provided robust protection against morbidity and mortality in ferrets challenged with H5N1 strains from clades 1, 2.1, and 2.2 in a manner similar to those based on the control strains. These findings provide proof of principle that viable, computationally derived vaccine seed viruses can be constructed within the context of currently licensed vaccine platforms. Such technologies should be explored to enhance the cross reactivity and availability of H5N1 influenza vaccines. PMID:21173241

  1. Deriving site-specific soil clean-up values for metals and metalloids: rationale for including protection of soil microbial processes.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Roman G; Siciliano, Steven D; Römbke, Jörg; Oorts, Koen

    2014-07-01

    Although it is widely recognized that microorganisms are essential for sustaining soil fertility, structure, nutrient cycling, groundwater purification, and other soil functions, soil microbial toxicity data were excluded from the derivation of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States. Among the reasons for such exclusion were claims that microbial toxicity tests were too difficult to interpret because of the high variability of microbial responses, uncertainty regarding the relevance of the various endpoints, and functional redundancy. Since the release of the first draft of the Eco-SSL Guidance document by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, soil microbial toxicity testing and its use in ecological risk assessments have substantially improved. A wide range of standardized and nonstandardized methods became available for testing chemical toxicity to microbial functions in soil. Regulatory frameworks in the European Union and Australia have successfully incorporated microbial toxicity data into the derivation of soil threshold concentrations for ecological risk assessments. This article provides the 3-part rationale for including soil microbial processes in the development of soil clean-up values (SCVs): 1) presenting a brief overview of relevant test methods for assessing microbial functions in soil, 2) examining data sets for Cu, Ni, Zn, and Mo that incorporated soil microbial toxicity data into regulatory frameworks, and 3) offering recommendations on how to integrate the best available science into the method development for deriving site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability of metals and metalloids in soil. Although the primary focus of this article is on the development of the approach for deriving SCVs for metals and metalloids in the United States, the recommendations provided in this article may also be applicable in other jurisdictions that aim at developing ecological soil threshold values for protection of

  2. Deriving site-specific soil clean-up values for metals and metalloids: Rationale for including protection of soil microbial processes

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, Roman G; Siciliano, Steven D; Römbke, Jörg; Oorts, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely recognized that microorganisms are essential for sustaining soil fertility, structure, nutrient cycling, groundwater purification, and other soil functions, soil microbial toxicity data were excluded from the derivation of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States. Among the reasons for such exclusion were claims that microbial toxicity tests were too difficult to interpret because of the high variability of microbial responses, uncertainty regarding the relevance of the various endpoints, and functional redundancy. Since the release of the first draft of the Eco-SSL Guidance document by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, soil microbial toxicity testing and its use in ecological risk assessments have substantially improved. A wide range of standardized and nonstandardized methods became available for testing chemical toxicity to microbial functions in soil. Regulatory frameworks in the European Union and Australia have successfully incorporated microbial toxicity data into the derivation of soil threshold concentrations for ecological risk assessments. This article provides the 3-part rationale for including soil microbial processes in the development of soil clean-up values (SCVs): 1) presenting a brief overview of relevant test methods for assessing microbial functions in soil, 2) examining data sets for Cu, Ni, Zn, and Mo that incorporated soil microbial toxicity data into regulatory frameworks, and 3) offering recommendations on how to integrate the best available science into the method development for deriving site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability of metals and metalloids in soil. Although the primary focus of this article is on the development of the approach for deriving SCVs for metals and metalloids in the United States, the recommendations provided in this article may also be applicable in other jurisdictions that aim at developing ecological soil threshold values for protection of

  3. Comparison of representative strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by serological neutralization and cross protection assays

    SciTech Connect

    Engelking, H.M.; Leong, J.C. ); Harry, J.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a pathogen of young salmon and trout. Viral epizootics among these fish in private and public rearing facilities have been a problem in the northwestern United States from California to Alaska, and an IHNV vaccine has been sought by the aquaculture experts. Since an IHNV vaccine must be designed to immunize against all viral serotypes, an analysis of IHNV serotypes was made. A large number of viruses from widely separated geographic locations and different fish species had already been placed in one of five electropherotypes by the migration of the virion proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Also, there was evidence that some of these virus isolates had differences in virulence for chinook salmon, rainbow trout, or kokanee salmon. An extensive comparison was made of 10 different IHNV isolates representing the five electropherotypes. This report shows that the glycoprotein from a single isolate of IHNV can induce a protective immune response in vivo to the five IHNV electropherotypes. Plaque reduction neutralization assays indicated that there was only one serotype. Thus, despite the differences observed in the migration of the structural proteins for IHNV isolated from separate geographic locations and different fish species, only one neutralizing virus type was identified.

  4. Cross-protective efficacy from a immunogen firstly identified in Leishmania infantum against tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Martins, V T; Lage, D P; Duarte, M C; Costa, L E; Chávez-Fumagalli, M A; Roatt, B M; Menezes-Souza, D; Tavares, C A P; Coelho, E A F

    2016-02-01

    Experimental vaccine candidates have been evaluated to prevent leishmaniasis, but no commercial vaccine has been proved to be effective against more than one parasite species. LiHyT is a Leishmania-specific protein that was firstly identified as protective against Leishmania infantum. In this study, LiHyT was evaluated as a vaccine to against two Leishmania species causing tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL): Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis. BALB/c mice were immunized with rLiHyT plus saponin and lately challenged with promastigotes of the two parasite species. The immune response generated was evaluated before and 10 weeks after infection, as well as the parasite burden at this time after infection. The vaccination induced a Th1 response, which was characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and GM-CSF, as well as by high levels of IgG2a antibodies, after in vitro stimulation using both the protein and parasite extracts. After challenge, vaccinated mice showed significant reductions in their infected footpads, as well as in the parasite burden in the tissue and organs evaluated, when compared to the control groups. The anti-Leishmania Th1 response was maintained after infection, being the IFN-γ production based mainly on CD4(+) T cells. We described one conserved Leishmania-specific protein that could compose a pan-Leishmania vaccine.

  5. Social protection and tuberculosis control in 21 European countries, 1995-2012: a cross-national statistical modelling analysis.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Aaron; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David; Sandgren, Andreas; Semenza, Jan

    2014-11-01

    WHO stresses the need to act on the social determinants of tuberculosis. We tested whether alternative social protection programmes have affected tuberculosis case notifications, prevalence, and mortality, and case detection and treatment success rates in 21 European countries from 1995 to 2012. We obtained tuberculosis case notification data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control's 2014 European Surveillance System database. We also obtained data for case detection, treatment success, prevalence, and mortality rates from WHO's 2014 tuberculosis database. We extracted data for 21 countries between Jan 1, 1995, and Dec 31, 2012. Social protection data were from EuroStat, 2014 edition. We used multivariate cross-national statistical models to quantify the association of differing types of social protection programmes with tuberculosis outcomes. All analyses were prespecified. After we controlled for economic output, public health spending, and country fixed effects, each US$100 increase in social protection spending was associated with a decrease per 100,000 population in the number of tuberculosis case notifications of -1·53% (95% CI -0·28 to -2·79; p=0·0191), estimated incidence rates of -1·70% (-0·30 to -3·11; p=0·0201), non-HIV-related tuberculosis mortality rate of -2·74% (-0·66 to -4·82; p=0·0125), and all-cause tuberculosis mortality rate of -3·08% (-0·73 to -5·43; p=0·0127). We noted no relation between increased social spending and tuberculosis prevalence (-1·50% [-3·10 to 0·10] per increase of $100; p=0·0639) or smear-positive treatment success rates (-0·079% [-0·18 to 0·34] per increase of $100; p=0·5235) or case detection (-0·59% [-1·31 to 0·14] per increase of $100; p=0·1066). Old age pension expenditure seemed to have the strongest association with reductions in tuberculosis case notification rates for those aged 65 years or older (-3·87% [-0·95 to -6·78]; p=0·0137). Investment in social protection

  6. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Pandey, Badri N

    2014-01-01

    Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549-A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549-WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Welcome to the wild west: protecting access to cross border fertility care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mutcherson, Kimberley M

    2012-01-01

    As has been the case with other types of medical tourism, the phenomenon of cross border fertility care ("CBFC") has sparked concern about the lack of global or even national harmonization in the regulation of the fertility industry. The diversity of laws around the globe leads would-be parents to forum shop for a welcoming place to make babies. Focusing specifically on the phenomenon of travel to the United States, this Article takes up the question of whether there should be any legal barriers to those who come to the United States seeking CBFC. In part, CBFC suffers from the same general concerns raised about the use of fertility treatment in general, but it is possible to imagine a subset of arguments that would lead to forbidding or at least discouraging people from coming to the United States for CBFC, either as a matter of law or policy. This paper stands in opposition to any such effort and contemplates the moral and ethical concerns about CBFC and how, and if, those concerns warrant expression in law. Part I describes the conditions that lead some couples and individuals to leave their home countries to access fertility treatments abroad and details why the United States, with its comparatively liberal regulation of ART, has become a popular CBFC destination for travelers from around the world. Part II offers and refutes arguments supporting greater domestic control over those who seek to satisfy their desires for CBFC in the United States by reasserting the importance of the right of procreation while also noting appropriate concerns about justice and equality in the market for babies. Part III continues the exploration of justice by investigating the question of international cooperation in legislating against perceived wrongs. This Part concludes that consistent legislation across borders is appropriate where there is consensus about the wrong of an act, but it is unnecessary and inappropriate where there remain cultural conflicts about certain

  8. Bovine herpesvirus type 1 marker vaccine induces cross-protection against bubaline herpesvirus type 1 in water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Montagnaro, Serena; De Martinis, Claudio; Iovane, Valentina; Ciarcia, Roberto; Damiano, Sara; Nizza, Sandra; De Martino, Luisa; Iovane, Giuseppe; Pagnini, Ugo

    2014-09-01

    Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) are susceptible to bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) and a species-specific herpesvirus, bubaline herpesvirus type 1 (BuHV-1). In this study, an attenuated marker BoHV-1 based vaccine against BuHV-1 challenge was evaluated to determine whether it induces protection from viral replication. One group of water buffalo calves was immunized with an attenuated BoHV-1 marker vaccine. A second group was not vaccinated and used as the control. During the post-vaccination period, we monitored the humoral immune response. The efficacy of the vaccine was tested after intranasal challenge of the calves with a BuHV-1 strain. The experiment showed that after vaccination, BuHV-1 replication was significantly reduced by approximately three titer points compared to the controls. The control animals showed high levels of viral shedding and mild signs associated with BuHV-1 infection. Therefore, our study provides evidence for the existence of cross-protection between BoHV-1 and BuHV-1 in buffalo calves.

  9. Intranasal DNA Vaccination Induces Potent Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses and Cross-protective Immunity Against Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Torrieri-Dramard, Lea; Lambrecht, Bénédicte; Ferreira, Helena Lage; Van den Berg, Thierry; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The induction of potent virus-specific immune responses at mucosal surfaces where virus transmission occurs is a major challenge for vaccination strategies. In the case of influenza vaccination, this has been achieved only by intranasal delivery of live-attenuated vaccines that otherwise pose safety problems. Here, we demonstrate that potent mucosal and systemic immune responses, both cellular and humoral, are induced by intranasal immunization using formulated DNA. We show that formulation with the DNA carrier polyethylenimine (PEI) improved by a 1,000-fold the efficiency of gene transfer in the respiratory track following intranasal administration of luciferase-coding DNA. Using PEI formulation, intranasal vaccination with DNA-encoding hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A H5N1 or (H1N1)2009 viruses induced high levels of HA-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies that were detected in bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) and the serum. No mucosal responses could be detected after parenteral or intranasal immunization with naked-DNA. Furthermore, intranasal DNA vaccination with HA from a given H5N1 virus elicited full protection against the parental strain and partial cross-protection against a distinct highly pathogenic H5N1 strain that could be improved by adding neuraminidase (NA) DNA plasmids. Our observations warrant further investigation of intranasal DNA as an effective vaccination route. PMID:20959813

  10. Effect of inactivation method on the cross-protective immunity induced by whole 'killed' influenza A viruses and commercial vaccine preparations.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoichi; Regner, Matthias; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Müllbacher, Arno; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2010-06-01

    We have recently shown that intranasal (i.n.) administration of gamma-irradiated A/PR/8 [A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1)] protects mice against lethal avian influenza A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) and other heterosubtypic influenza A infections. Here, we used gamma-irradiated, formalin- and UV-inactivated A/PC [A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2)] virus preparations and compared their ability to induce both homologous and heterosubtypic protective immunity. Our data show that, in contrast to i.n. vaccination with formalin- or UV-inactivated virus, or the present commercially available trivalent influenza vaccine, a single dose of gamma-ray-inactivated A/PC (gamma-A/PC) conferred significant protection in mice against both homologous and heterosubtypic virus challenges. A multiple immunization regime was required for formalin-inactivated virus preparations to induce protective immunity against a homotypic virus challenge, but did not induce influenza A strain cross-protective immunity. The highly immunogenic gamma-A/PC, but not formalin- or UV-inactivated A/PC, nor the currently available subvirion vaccine, elicited cytotoxic T-cell responses that are most likely responsible for the cross-protective and long-lasting immunity against highly lethal influenza A infections in mice. Finally, freeze-drying of gamma-A/PC did not affect the ability to induce cross-protective immunity.

  11. Induction of heterosubtypic cross-protection against influenza by a whole inactivated virus vaccine: the role of viral membrane fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Budimir, Natalija; Huckriede, Anke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Boon, Louis; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Wilschut, Jan; de Haan, Aalzen

    2012-01-01

    The inability of seasonal influenza vaccines to effectively protect against infection with antigenically drifted viruses or newly emerging pandemic viruses underlines the need for development of cross-reactive influenza vaccines that induce immunity against a variety of virus subtypes. Therefore, potential cross-protective vaccines, e.g., whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine, that can target conserved internal antigens such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and/or matrix protein (M1) need to be explored. In the current study we show that a WIV vaccine, through induction of cross-protective cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), protects mice from heterosubtypic infection. This protection was abrogated after depletion of CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice, indicating that CTLs were the primary mediators of protection. Previously, we have shown that different procedures used for virus inactivation influence optimal activation of CTLs by WIV, most likely by affecting the membrane fusion properties of the virus. Specifically, inactivation with formalin (FA) severely compromises fusion activity of the virus, while inactivation with β-propiolactone (BPL) preserves fusion activity. Here, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with BPL-inactivated H5N1 WIV vaccine induces solid protection from lethal heterosubtypic H1N1 challenge. By contrast, vaccination with FA-inactivated WIV, while preventing death after lethal challenge, failed to protect against development of disease and severe body weight loss. Vaccination with BPL-inactivated WIV, compared to FA-inactivated WIV, induced higher levels of specific CD8+ T cells in blood, spleen and lungs, and a higher production of granzyme B in the lungs upon H1N1 virus challenge. The results underline the potential use of WIV as a cross-protective influenza vaccine candidate. However, careful choice of the virus inactivation procedure is important to retain membrane fusion activity and full immunogenicity of the vaccine.

  12. Cross-protective vaccine efficacy of the bivalent HPV vaccine against HPV31 is associated with humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kemp, Troy J.; Pan, David Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Cortes, Bernal; Katki, Hormuzd; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiller, John T.; Gonzalez, Paula; Penrose, Kerri; Lowy, Douglas R.; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigated the role of antibody responses as potential mechanism for the cross-protective vaccine-efficacies (VE) observed from randomized clinical trials of the HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine. Results: HPV31 cases had lower HPV16 antibody levels than controls (OR4th quartile compared with 1st quartile = 0.63; 95%CI: 0.36–1.08; p-trend = 0.03). HPV31 cases were also less likely to have detectable HPV31 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity than controls. No statistically significant differences by HPV18 antibody or HPV45 neutralization were observed among HPV45 cases and controls. Protection against HPV58 was not associated with any of the markers, confirming the specificity of our findings. Methods: Samples are from three-dose HPV vaccine recipients from the Costa Rica HPV16/18 vaccine trial. Women with a new HPV31, HPV45, or HPV58 infections over four years of follow-up were compared with randomly selected control women—with no new infection with HPV31/45/58—with respect to HPV16 and HPV18 antibody, HPV31, HPV45, and HPV58 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity. Conclusions: High HPV16 levels and avidity, and the ability to neutralize HPV31 were associated with protection against newly detected HPV31 infections, suggesting that the partial VE demonstrated for HPV31 is likely to be mediated at least in part through antibodies induced by HPV16/18 vaccination. PMID:23571174

  13. Lack of cross-protection against Mycoplasma haemofelis infection and signs of enhancement in "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis"-recovered cats.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Julia; Novacco, Marilisa; Willi, Barbara; Riond, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-09-24

    "Mycoplasma haemofelis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" are feline hemoplasmas that induce hemolytic anemia. Protection from homologous re-challenge was recently demonstrated in cats recovered from primary infection. Here, we determined if cats recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" infection were protected against infections with the more pathogenic M. haemofelis. Ten specified pathogen-free cats were exposed to M. haemofelis. Five of the ten cats had recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" bacteremia (group A), and five cats were naïve controls (group B). No cross-protection was observed. By contrast, the "Cand. M. turicensis"-recovered cats displayed faster M. haemofelis infection onset (earlier PCR-positive and anemic) than the controls. No "Cand. M. turicensis" was detected in any cat. M. haemofelis shedding was observed in saliva, feces and urine. In both groups, evidence of a Th1 response was observed (high IFN-γ, low IL-4), but IL-10 levels were also high. In group A, total, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased within days after M. haemofelis exposure. At times of maximal bacteremia, macrocytic hypochromic anemia, neutropenia, monocytosis and a decrease in leukocyte, eosinophil, and lymphocyte counts and subsets thereof (B- and T-cells, CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD25+ cells) were particularly significant in group A. Moreover, an increase in protein concentrations, hypoalbuminemia and a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia were observed. Five of ten M. haemofelis-infected cats subsequently cleared bacteremia without antibiotic treatment. In conclusion, the study suggests that a previous hemoplasma infection, even when the cat has ostensibly recovered, may influence subsequent infections, lead to an enhancement phenomenon and other differences in infection kinetics.

  14. Determinants of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Including Hookah Smoking and Opium Use– A Cross-Sectional Analysis of 50,000 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Islami, Farhad; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Semnani, Shahryar; Kamangar, Farin; Etemadi, Arash; Merat, Shahin; Khoshnia, Masoud; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Brennan, Paul; Abnet, Christian C.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common cause of discomfort and morbidity worldwide. However, information on determinants of GERD from large-scale studies in low- to medium-income countries is limited. We investigated the factors associated with different measures of GERD symptoms, including frequency, patient-perceived severity, and onset time. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from a population-based cohort study of ∼50,000 individuals in in Golestan Province, Iran. GERD symptoms in this study included regurgitation and/or heartburn. Results Approximately 20% of participants reported at least weekly symptoms. Daily symptoms were less commonly reported by men, those of Turkmen ethnicity, and nass chewers. On the other hand, age, body mass index, alcohol drinking, cigarette smoking, opium use, lower socioeconomic status, and lower physical activity were associated with daily symptoms. Most of these factors showed similar associations with severe symptoms. Women with higher BMI and waist to hip ratio were more likely to report frequent and severe GERD symptoms. Hookah smoking (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.02–1.75) and opium use (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.55–1.87) were associated with severe symptoms, whereas nass chewing had an inverse association (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76–0.99). After exclusion of cigarette smokers, hookah smoking was still positively associated and nass chewing was inversely associated with GERD symptoms (all frequencies combined). Conclusion GERD is common in this population. The associations of hookah and opium use and inverse association of nass use with GERD symptoms are reported for the first time. Further studies are required to investigate the nature of these associations. Other determinants of GERD were mostly comparable to those reported elsewhere. PMID:24586635

  15. Determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease, including hookah smoking and opium use- a cross-sectional analysis of 50,000 individuals.

    PubMed

    Islami, Farhad; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Semnani, Shahryar; Kamangar, Farin; Etemadi, Arash; Merat, Shahin; Khoshnia, Masoud; Dawsey, Sanford M; Pharoah, Paul D; Brennan, Paul; Abnet, Christian C; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common cause of discomfort and morbidity worldwide. However, information on determinants of GERD from large-scale studies in low- to medium-income countries is limited. We investigated the factors associated with different measures of GERD symptoms, including frequency, patient-perceived severity, and onset time. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from a population-based cohort study of ∼ 50,000 individuals in in Golestan Province, Iran. GERD symptoms in this study included regurgitation and/or heartburn. Approximately 20% of participants reported at least weekly symptoms. Daily symptoms were less commonly reported by men, those of Turkmen ethnicity, and nass chewers. On the other hand, age, body mass index, alcohol drinking, cigarette smoking, opium use, lower socioeconomic status, and lower physical activity were associated with daily symptoms. Most of these factors showed similar associations with severe symptoms. Women with higher BMI and waist to hip ratio were more likely to report frequent and severe GERD symptoms. Hookah smoking (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.02-1.75) and opium use (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.55-1.87) were associated with severe symptoms, whereas nass chewing had an inverse association (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76-0.99). After exclusion of cigarette smokers, hookah smoking was still positively associated and nass chewing was inversely associated with GERD symptoms (all frequencies combined). GERD is common in this population. The associations of hookah and opium use and inverse association of nass use with GERD symptoms are reported for the first time. Further studies are required to investigate the nature of these associations. Other determinants of GERD were mostly comparable to those reported elsewhere.

  16. Protection from Secondary Dengue Virus Infection in a Mouse Model Reveals the Role of Serotype Cross-reactive B and T cells1,2

    PubMed Central

    Zompi, Simona; Santich, Brian H.; Beatty, P. Robert; Harris, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes cause dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Although severe disease has been associated with heterotypic secondary DENV infection, most secondary DENV infections are asymptomatic or result in classic DF. The role of cross-reactive immunity in mediating cross-protection against secondary heterotypic DENV infection is not well-understood. DENV infection of interferon-α/β and -γ receptor-deficient (AG129) mice reproduces key features of human disease. We previously demonstrated a role in cross-protection for pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies, maintained by long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs). Here we use a sequential infection model, infecting AG129 mice with DENV-1 followed by DENV-2 6–8 weeks later. We find that increased DENV-specific avidity during acute secondary heterotypic infection is mediated by cross-reactive memory B cells, as evidenced by increased numbers of DENV-1-specific cells by ELISPOT and higher avidity against DENV-1 of supernatants from polyclonally-stimulated splenocytes isolated from mice experiencing secondary DENV-2 infection. However, increased DENV-specific avidity is not associated with increased DENV-specific neutralization, which appears to be mediated by naïve B cells. Adoptive transfer of DENV-1-immune B and T cells into naïve mice prior to secondary DENV-2 infection delayed mortality. Mice depleted of T cells developed signs of disease but recovered after secondary DENV infection. Overall, we found that protective cross-reactive antibodies are secreted by both LLPCs and memory B cells and that both cross-reactive B cells and T cells provide protection against a secondary heterotypic DENV infection. Understanding the protective immunity that develops naturally against DENV infection may help design future vaccines. PMID:22131327

  17. Priming Cross-Protective Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Specific Immunity Using Live-Vectored Mosaic Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xin; Waghela, Suryakant D.; Bray, Jocelyn; Njongmeta, Leo M.; Herring, Andy; Abdelsalam, Karim W.; Chase, Christopher; Mwangi, Waithaka

    2017-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) plays a key role in bovine respiratory disease complex, which can lead to pneumonia, diarrhea and death of calves. Current vaccines are not very effective due, in part, to immunosuppressive traits and failure to induce broad protection. There are diverse BVDV strains and thus, current vaccines contain representative genotype 1 and 2 viruses (BVDV-1 & 2) to broaden coverage. BVDV modified live virus (MLV) vaccines are superior to killed virus vaccines, but they are susceptible to neutralization and complement-mediated destruction triggered by passively acquired antibodies, thus limiting their efficacy. We generated three novel mosaic polypeptide chimeras, designated NproE2123; NS231; and NS232, which incorporate protective determinants that are highly conserved among BVDV-1a, 1b, and BVDV-2 genotypes. In addition, strain-specific protective antigens from disparate BVDV strains were included to broaden coverage. We confirmed that adenovirus constructs expressing these antigens were strongly recognized by monoclonal antibodies, polyclonal sera, and IFN-γ-secreting T cells generated against diverse BVDV strains. In a proof-of-concept efficacy study, the multi-antigen proto-type vaccine induced higher, but not significantly different, IFN-γ spot forming cells and T-cell proliferation compared to a commercial MLV vaccine. In regards to the humoral response, the prototype vaccine induced higher BVDV-1 specific neutralizing antibody titers, whereas the MLV vaccine induced higher BVDV-2 specific neutralizing antibody titers. Following BVDV type 2a (1373) challenge, calves immunized with the proto-type or the MLV vaccine had lower clinical scores compared to naïve controls. These results support the hypothesis that a broadly protective subunit vaccine can be generated using mosaic polypeptides that incorporate rationally selected and validated protective determinants from diverse BVDV strains. Furthermore, regarding biosafety of using a

  18. Priming Cross-Protective Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Specific Immunity Using Live-Vectored Mosaic Antigens.

    PubMed

    Lokhandwala, Shehnaz; Fang, Xin; Waghela, Suryakant D; Bray, Jocelyn; Njongmeta, Leo M; Herring, Andy; Abdelsalam, Karim W; Chase, Christopher; Mwangi, Waithaka

    2017-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) plays a key role in bovine respiratory disease complex, which can lead to pneumonia, diarrhea and death of calves. Current vaccines are not very effective due, in part, to immunosuppressive traits and failure to induce broad protection. There are diverse BVDV strains and thus, current vaccines contain representative genotype 1 and 2 viruses (BVDV-1 & 2) to broaden coverage. BVDV modified live virus (MLV) vaccines are superior to killed virus vaccines, but they are susceptible to neutralization and complement-mediated destruction triggered by passively acquired antibodies, thus limiting their efficacy. We generated three novel mosaic polypeptide chimeras, designated NproE2123; NS231; and NS232, which incorporate protective determinants that are highly conserved among BVDV-1a, 1b, and BVDV-2 genotypes. In addition, strain-specific protective antigens from disparate BVDV strains were included to broaden coverage. We confirmed that adenovirus constructs expressing these antigens were strongly recognized by monoclonal antibodies, polyclonal sera, and IFN-γ-secreting T cells generated against diverse BVDV strains. In a proof-of-concept efficacy study, the multi-antigen proto-type vaccine induced higher, but not significantly different, IFN-γ spot forming cells and T-cell proliferation compared to a commercial MLV vaccine. In regards to the humoral response, the prototype vaccine induced higher BVDV-1 specific neutralizing antibody titers, whereas the MLV vaccine induced higher BVDV-2 specific neutralizing antibody titers. Following BVDV type 2a (1373) challenge, calves immunized with the proto-type or the MLV vaccine had lower clinical scores compared to naïve controls. These results support the hypothesis that a broadly protective subunit vaccine can be generated using mosaic polypeptides that incorporate rationally selected and validated protective determinants from diverse BVDV strains. Furthermore, regarding biosafety of using a

  19. Hospital and unit characteristics associated with nursing turnover include skill mix but not staffing level: an observational cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Dunton, Nancy

    2012-09-01

    Nursing turnover is expensive and may have adverse effects on patient care. Little is known about turnover's association with most hospital and nursing unit characteristics, including nurse staffing level and registered nurse skill mix. To explore associations between nursing unit turnover rates and several hospital- and unit-level variables, including staffing level and skill mix. Observational cross-sectional study of longitudinal data. 1884 nursing units in 306 U.S. acute care hospitals. During a 2-year period units reported monthly data on staffing and turnover. Total nursing staff turnover and registered nurse turnover rates were modeled as dependent variables in hierarchical Poisson regression models. The following hospital characteristics were considered as predictors: Magnet(®) status, ownership (government or non-government), teaching status, locale (metropolitan, micropolitan, or rural), and size (average daily census). The U.S. state in which the hospital was located was included as a covariate. Unit-level variables included total nursing hours per patient day, size of nursing staff, registered nurse skill mix, population age group (neonatal, pediatric, or adult), and service line (critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, medical/surgical, psychiatric, or rehabilitation). Government ownership, Magnet designation, and higher skill mix were associated with lower total turnover and registered nurse turnover. Neonatal units had lower total and registered nurse turnover than pediatric units, which had lower total and registered nurse turnover than adult units. Unit service line was associated only with total turnover. Psychiatric, critical care, and rehabilitation units had the lowest mean turnover rates, but most differences between service lines were not significant. The other explanatory variables considered were not significant. Several hospital and unit characteristic variables have significant associations with nursing turnover; these associations

  20. Gadd45a and Gadd45b protect hematopoietic cells from UV-induced apoptosis via distinct signaling pathways, including p38 activation and JNK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mamta; Gupta, Shiv Kumar; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2006-06-30

    Gadd45a, Gadd45b, and Gadd45g (Gadd45/MyD118/CR6) are genes that are rapidly induced by genotoxic stress and have been implicated in genotoxic stress-induced responses, notably in apoptosis. Recently, using myeloid-enriched bone marrow (BM) cells obtained from wild-type (WT), Gadd45a-deficient, and Gadd45b-deficient mice, we have shown that in hematopoietic cells Gadd45a and Gadd45b play a survival function to protect hematopoietic cells from DNA-damaging agents, including ultra violet (UV)-induced apoptosis. The present study was undertaken to decipher the molecular paths that mediate the survival functions of Gadd45a and Gadd45b against genotoxic stress induced by UV radiation. It is shown that in hematopoietic cells exposed to UV radiation Gaddd45a and Gadd45b cooperate to promote cell survival via two distinct signaling pathways involving activation of the GADD45a-p38-NF-kappaB-mediated survival pathway and GADD45b-mediated inhibition of the stress response MKK4-JNK pathway.

  1. Physiological and transcriptional responses and cross protection of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 under acid stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renhui; Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Shah, Nagendra P; Tao, Xueying; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Acid tolerance responses (ATR) in Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 were investigated at physiological and molecular levels. A comparison of composition of cell membrane fatty acids (CMFA) between acid-challenged and unchallenged cells showed that acid adaptation evoked a significantly higher percentage of saturated fatty acids and cyclopropane fatty acids in acid-challenged than in unchallenged cells. In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR analysis in acid-adapted cells at different pH values (ranging from 3.0 to 4.0) indicated that several genes were differently regulated, including those related to proton pumps, amino acid metabolism, sugar metabolism, and class I and class III stress response pathways. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and production of alkali was significantly upregulated. Upon exposure to pH 4.5 for 2 h, a higher survival rate (higher viable cell count) of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 was achieved following an additional challenge to 40 mM hydrogen peroxide for 60 min, but no difference in survival rate of cells was found with further challenge to heat, ethanol, or salt. Therefore, we concluded that the physiological and metabolic changes of acid-treated cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 help the cells resist damage caused by acid, and further initiated global response signals to bring the whole cell into a state of defense to other stress factors, especially hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Occurrence and impact of negative behaviour, including domestic violence and abuse, in men attending UK primary care health clinics: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Hester, M; Ferrari, G; Jones, S K; Williamson, E; Bacchus, L J; Peters, T J; Feder, G

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure the experience and perpetration of negative behaviour, including domestic violence and abuse (DVA), and investigate its associations with health conditions and behaviours in men attending general practice. Design Cross-sectional questionnaire-based study conducted between September 2010 and June 2011. Setting 16 general practices in the south west of England. Participants Male patients aged 18 or older, attending alone, who could read and write English. A total of 1403 of eligible patients (58%) participated in the survey and 1368 (56%) completed the questions relevant to this paper. 97% of respondents reported they were heterosexual. Main outcome measures Lifetime occurrence of negative behaviour consistent with DVA, perceived health impact of negative behaviours, associations with anxiety and depression symptoms, and cannabis use in the past 12 months and binge drinking. Results 22.7% (95% CI 20.2% to 24.9%) of men reported ever experiencing negative behaviour (feeling frightened, physically hurt, forced sex, ask permission) from a partner. All negative behaviours were associated with a twofold to threefold increased odds of anxiety and depression symptoms in men experiencing or perpetrating negative behaviours or both. 34.9% (95% CI 28.7% to 41.7%) of men who reported experiencing negative behaviour from a partner, and 30.8% (95% CI 23.7% to 37.8%) of men who perpetrated negative behaviours said they had been in a domestically violent or abusive relationship. No associations with problematic drinking were found; there was a weak association with cannabis use. Conclusions DVA is experienced or perpetrated by a large minority of men presenting to general practice, and these men were more likely to have current symptoms of depression and anxiety. Presentation of anxiety or depression to clinicians may be an indicator of male experience or perpetration of DVA victimisation. PMID:25991450

  3. Occurrence and impact of negative behaviour, including domestic violence and abuse, in men attending UK primary care health clinics: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Hester, M; Ferrari, G; Jones, S K; Williamson, E; Bacchus, L J; Peters, T J; Feder, G

    2015-05-19

    To measure the experience and perpetration of negative behaviour, including domestic violence and abuse (DVA), and investigate its associations with health conditions and behaviours in men attending general practice. Cross-sectional questionnaire-based study conducted between September 2010 and June 2011. 16 general practices in the south west of England. Male patients aged 18 or older, attending alone, who could read and write English. A total of 1403 of eligible patients (58%) participated in the survey and 1368 (56%) completed the questions relevant to this paper. 97% of respondents reported they were heterosexual. Lifetime occurrence of negative behaviour consistent with DVA, perceived health impact of negative behaviours, associations with anxiety and depression symptoms, and cannabis use in the past 12 months and binge drinking. 22.7% (95% CI 20.2% to 24.9%) of men reported ever experiencing negative behaviour (feeling frightened, physically hurt, forced sex, ask permission) from a partner. All negative behaviours were associated with a twofold to threefold increased odds of anxiety and depression symptoms in men experiencing or perpetrating negative behaviours or both. 34.9% (95% CI 28.7% to 41.7%) of men who reported experiencing negative behaviour from a partner, and 30.8% (95% CI 23.7% to 37.8%) of men who perpetrated negative behaviours said they had been in a domestically violent or abusive relationship. No associations with problematic drinking were found; there was a weak association with cannabis use. DVA is experienced or perpetrated by a large minority of men presenting to general practice, and these men were more likely to have current symptoms of depression and anxiety. Presentation of anxiety or depression to clinicians may be an indicator of male experience or perpetration of DVA victimisation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. The conserved surface M-protein SiMA of Streptococcus iniae is not effective as a cross-protective vaccine against differing capsular serotypes in farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Fabian; Zhang, Meiman May; Chan, Janlin; Delamare-Deboutteville, Jerome; Green, Timothy J; Dang, Cecile; Barnes, Andrew C

    2013-02-22

    Streptococcus iniae causes invasive infections in fresh and saltwater fish and occasional zoonoses. Vaccination against S. iniae is complicated by serotypic variation determined by capsular polysaccharide. A potential target for serologically cross-protective vaccines is the M-like protein SiMA, an essential virulence factor in S. iniae that is highly conserved amongst virulent strains. The present study determined how SiMA is regulated and investigated potential as a cross-protective vaccine for fish. Electrophoretic mobility shift suggested that SiMA is regulated by the multigene regulator Mgx via a binding site in the -35 region of the simA promoter. Moreover, expression of simA and mgx was highly correlated, with the highest level of simA and mgx expression during exponential growth under iron limitation (20-fold increase in relative expression compared to growth in Todd-Hewitt broth). Based on these results, a vaccination and challenge experiment was conducted in barramundi (Lates calcarifer) to determine whether SiMA is protective against S. iniae infection and cross-protective against a different capsular serotype. The challenge resulted in 60% mortality in control fish. Formalin-killed bacterins prepared from the challenge strain resulted in 100% protection, whereas bacterins prepared from a serotypically heterologous strain resulted in significantly reduced protection, even when culture conditions were manipulated to optimise SiMA expression. Moreover, recombinant SiMA protein was not protective against the challenge strain in spite of eliciting specific antibody response in vaccinated fish. Specific antibody did not increase oxidative activity or phagocytosis by barramundi macrophages. Indeed incubating S. iniae with antisera significantly reduced phagocytosis. Lack of specific-antibody mediated opsonisation in spite of 100% protection against challenge with the homologous vaccine suggests that other immune parameters result in protection of challenged

  5. Vegetarianism as a protective factor for reflux esophagitis: a retrospective, cross-sectional study between Buddhist priests and general population.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Gu; Kang, Hyoun Woo; Hahn, Suk Jae; Kim, Jae Hak; Lee, Jun Kyu; Lim, Yun Jeong; Koh, Moon-Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2013-08-01

    Several risk factors for reflux esophagitis, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, are recognized. But vegetarianism as a protective factor for reflux esophagitis has not been reported. The aim of this study is to elucidate the protective effect of vegetarianism for reflux esophagitis. This is a cross-sectional study that compared the prevalence of reflux esophagitis of 148 Buddhist priests, who are obligatory vegetarians with that of age- and sex-matched controls who underwent health checkups in a health promotion center. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis was higher in the control group than in the Buddhist priest group (21.6 vs 12.2 %). Weight, body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and abdominal adipose tissue area were higher and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and total cholesterol were lower in the Buddhist priest group. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in the Buddhist priest group than the control group (30.4 vs 17.6 %). In univariate analysis, male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 3.325; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.659-6.666), current smoking (OR = 3.37; 95 % CI, 1.439-7.881), alcohol consumption (OR = 2.75; 95 % CI, 1.375-5.481), waist circumference (OR = 1.99; 95 % CI, 1.062-3.739), negative for Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody (OR = 1.89; 95 % CI, 1.018-3.491) and non-vegetarianism (OR = 1.99; 95 % CI, 1.062-3.739) were associated with reflux esophagitis. According to multivariate analysis, male sex (OR = 3.44; 95 % CI, 1.698-6.970), non-vegetarianism (OR = 2.08; 95 % CI, 1.086-3.974) and negative H. pylori IgG antibody (OR = 1.96; 95 % CI, 1.039-3.712) were significantly associated with reflux esophagitis. A non-vegetarian diet is associated with reflux esophagitis.

  6. Supplementation of H1N1pdm09 split vaccine with heterologous tandem repeat M2e5x virus-like particles confers improved cross-protection in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Music, Nedzad; Reber, Adrian J.; Kim, Min-Chul; York, Ian A.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines induce strain-specific immunity to the highly variable hemagglutinin (HA) protein. It is therefore a high priority to develop vaccines that induce broadly cross-protective immunity to different strains of influenza. Since influenza A M2 proteins are highly conserved among different strains, five tandem repeats of the extracellular peptide of M2 in a membrane-anchored form on virus-like particles (VLPs) have been suggested to be a promising candidate for universal influenza vaccine. In this study, ferrets were intramuscularly immunized with 2009 H1N1 split HA vaccine (“Split”) alone, influenza split vaccine supplemented with M2e5x VLP (“Split+M2e5x”), M2e5x VLP alone (“M2e5x”), or mock immunized. Vaccine efficacy was measured serologically and by protection against a serologically distinct viral challenge. Ferrets immunized with Split+M2e5x induced HA strain specific and conserved M2e immunity. Supplementation of M2e5x VLP to split vaccination significantly increased the immunogenicity of split vaccine compared to split alone. The Split+M2e5x ferret group showed evidence of cross-reactive protection, including faster recovery from weight loss, and reduced inflammation, as inferred from changes in peripheral leukocyte subsets, compared to mock-immunized animals. In addition, ferrets immunized with Split+M2e5x shed lower viral nasal-wash titers than the other groups. Ferrets immunized with M2e5x alone also show some protective effects, while those immunized with split vaccine alone induced no protective effects compared to mock-immunized ferrets. These studies suggest that supplementation of split vaccine with M2e5x-VLP may provide broader and improved cross-protection than split vaccine alone. PMID:26709639

  7. Supplementation of H1N1pdm09 split vaccine with heterologous tandem repeat M2e5x virus-like particles confers improved cross-protection in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Music, Nedzad; Reber, Adrian J; Kim, Min-Chul; York, Ian A; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-01-20

    Current influenza vaccines induce strain-specific immunity to the highly variable hemagglutinin (HA) protein. It is therefore a high priority to develop vaccines that induce broadly cross-protective immunity to different strains of influenza. Since influenza A M2 proteins are highly conserved among different strains, five tandem repeats of the extracellular peptide of M2 in a membrane-anchored form on virus-like particles (VLPs) have been suggested to be a promising candidate for universal influenza vaccine. In this study, ferrets were intramuscularly immunized with 2009 H1N1 split HA vaccine ("Split") alone, influenza split vaccine supplemented with M2e5x VLP ("Split+M2e5x"), M2e5x VLP alone ("M2e5x"), or mock immunized. Vaccine efficacy was measured serologically and by protection against a serologically distinct viral challenge. Ferrets immunized with Split+M2e5x induced HA strain specific and conserved M2e immunity. Supplementation of M2e5x VLP to split vaccination significantly increased the immunogenicity of split vaccine compared to split alone. The Split+M2e5x ferret group showed evidence of cross-reactive protection, including faster recovery from weight loss, and reduced inflammation, as inferred from changes in peripheral leukocyte subsets, compared to mock-immunized animals. In addition, ferrets immunized with Split+M2e5x shed lower viral nasal-wash titers than the other groups. Ferrets immunized with M2e5x alone also show some protective effects, while those immunized with split vaccine alone induced no protective effects compared to mock-immunized ferrets. These studies suggest that supplementation of split vaccine with M2e5x-VLP may provide broader and improved cross-protection than split vaccine alone. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Cross-priming of long lived protective CD8+ T cells against Trypanosoma cruzi infection: importance of a TLR9 agonist and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Araújo, Adriano F S; Penido, Marcus L O; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2007-08-10

    We recently described that vaccination of mice with a glutathione S transferase fusion protein representing amino acids 261-500 of the Amastigote Surface Protein-2 efficiently cross-primed protective CD8+ T cells against a lethal challenge with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. In this study, we initially established that this protective immunity was long lived. Subsequently, we studied the importance of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN 1826, TLR4 and CD4+ T cells for the generation of these protective CD8+ T cells. We found that: (i) the TLR9 agonist CpG ODN 1826 improved the efficiency of protective immunity; (ii) TLR4 is not relevant for priming of specific CD8+ T cells; (iii) CD4+ T cells are critical for priming of memory/protective CD8+ T cells.

  9. Cross-protection of newly emerging HPAI H5 viruses by neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies: A viable alternative to oseltamivir

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Huanhuan; Wang, Guiqin; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Hu, Hongxing; Cheng, Genhong; Zhou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Newly emerging highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2, H5N3, H5N5, H5N6, H5N8 and H5N9 viruses have been spreading in poultry and wild birds. The H5N6 viruses have also caused 10 human infections with 4 fatal cases in China. Here, we assessed the cross-neutralization and cross-protection of human and mouse monoclonal antibodies against 2 viruses: a HPAI H5N8 virus, A/chicken/Netherlands/14015526/2014 (NE14) and a HPAI H5N6 virus, A/Sichuan/26221/2014 (SC14). The former was isolated from an infected chicken in Netherlands in 2014 and the latter was isolated from an infected human patient in Sichuan, China. We show that antibodies FLA5.10, FLD21.140, 100F4 and 65C6, but not AVFluIgG01, AVFluIgG03, S139/1 and the VRC01 control, potently cross-neutralize the H5N8 NE14 and H5N6 SC14 viruses. Furthermore, we show that a single injection of >1 mg/kg of antibody 100F4 at 4 hours before, or 20 mg/kg antibody 100F4 at 72 hours after, a lethal dose of H5N8 NE14 enables mice to withstand the infection. Finally, we show that a single injection of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg antibody 100F4 prophylactically or 10 mg/kg 100F4 therapeutically outperforms a 5-day course of 10 mg/kg/day oseltamivir treatment against lethal H5N8 NE14 or H5N6 SC14 infection in mice. Our results suggest that further preclinical evaluation of human monoclonal antibodies against newly emerging H5 viruses is warranted. PMID:27167234

  10. Proton pump inhibitors protect mice from acute systemic inflammation and induce long-term cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Balza, E; Piccioli, P; Carta, S; Lavieri, R; Gattorno, M; Semino, C; Castellani, P; Rubartelli, A

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of sepsis is increasing, representing a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Death in acute sepsis is attributed to hyperinflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We report here that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block gastric acid secretion, selectively inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated human monocytes in vitro, in the absence of toxic effects. Remarkably, the oversecretion of IL-1β that represents a hallmark of monocytes from patients affected by cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is also blocked. Based on these propaedeutic experiments, we tested the effects of high doses of PPIs in vivo in the mouse model of endotoxic shock. Our data show that a single administration of PPI protected mice from death (60% survival versus 5% of untreated mice) and decreased TNF-α and IL-1β systemic production. PPIs were efficacious even when administered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PPI-treated mice that survived developed a long-term cross-tolerance, becoming resistant to LPS- and zymosan-induced sepsis. In vitro, their macrophages displayed impaired TNF-α and IL-1β to different TLR ligands. PPIs also prevented sodium thioglycollate-induced peritoneal inflammation, indicating their efficacy also in a non-infectious setting independent of TLR stimulation. Lack of toxicity and therapeutic effectiveness make PPIs promising new drugs against sepsis and other severe inflammatory conditions. PMID:27441656

  11. Elevated ultraviolet-B radiation induces cross-protection to cold in leaves of Rhododendron under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Chalker-Scott, Linda; Scott, James D

    2004-02-01

    Previously, we have shown a cold-hardening response in Rhododendron 'English Roseum' exposed to elevated ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) under growth chamber conditions. We have conducted the present study under field conditions to provide for a higher ratio of photosynthetically active radiation to UV-B (PAR:UV-B) than is possible in the laboratory and to more accurately reflect natural conditions of solar irradiance. Leaf disks taken after 3 months from UV-B-exposed plants exhibited a greater tolerance to freezing temperatures than those from control plants that received no supplemental UV-B exposure during this time. Leaf disks taken from UV-B-irradiated plants survived temperatures below -8 degrees C, whereas control disks were killed at -6 degrees C. Cold hardiness did not significantly increase until September, when environmental cues such as decreasing day length and night temperatures also may have enhanced hardening. Our field findings confirm our previous laboratory study, demonstrating that elevated UV-B induces cross-protection to cold in Rhododendron leaf tissues.

  12. Classical swine H1N1 influenza viruses confer cross protection from swine-origin 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Young; Chen, Grace L; Santos, Celia; Lamirande, Elaine W; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-12-05

    The hemagglutinin of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus is a derivative of and is antigenically related to classical swine but not to seasonal human H1N1 viruses. We compared the A/California/7/2009 (CA/7/09) virus recommended by the WHO as the reference virus for vaccine development, with two classical swine influenza viruses A/swine/Iowa/31 (sw/IA/31) and A/New Jersey/8/1976 (NJ/76) to establish the extent of immunologic cross-reactivity and cross-protection in animal models. Primary infection with 2009 pandemic or NJ/76 viruses elicited antibodies against the CA/7/09 virus and provided complete protection from challenge with this virus in ferrets; the response in mice was variable and conferred partial protection. Although ferrets infected with sw/IA/31 virus developed low titers of cross-neutralizing antibody, they were protected from pulmonary replication of the CA/7/09 virus. The data suggest that prior exposure to antigenically related H1N1 viruses of swine-origin provide some protective immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus.

  13. Design and Validation of a Novel Method to Measure Cross-Sectional Area of Neck Muscles Included during Routine MR Brain Volume Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kilgour, Alixe H. M.; Subedi, Deepak; Gray, Calum D.; Deary, Ian J.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Starr, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Low muscle mass secondary to disease and ageing is an important cause of excess mortality and morbidity. Many studies include a MR brain scan but no peripheral measure of muscle mass. We developed a technique to measure posterior neck muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) on volumetric MR brain scans enabling brain and muscle size to be measured simultaneously. Methods We performed four studies to develop and test: feasibility, inter-rater reliability, repeatability and external validity. We used T1-weighted MR brain imaging from young and older subjects, obtained on different scanners, and collected mid-thigh MR data. Results After developing the technique and demonstrating feasibility, we tested it for inter-rater reliability in 40 subjects. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between raters were 0.99 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.98–1.00) for the combined group (trapezius, splenius and semispinalis), 0.92 (CI 0.85–0.96) for obliquus and 0.92 (CI 0.85–0.96) for sternocleidomastoid. The first unrotated principal component explained 72.2% of total neck muscle CSA variance and correlated positively with both right (r = 0.52, p = .001) and left (r = 0.50, p = .002) grip strength. The 14 subjects in the repeatability study had had two MR brain scans on three different scanners. The ICC for between scanner variation for total neck muscle CSA was high at 0.94 (CI 0.86–0.98). The ICCs for within scanner variations were also high, with values of 0.95 (CI 0.86–0.98), 0.97 (CI 0.92–0.99) and 0.96 (CI 0.86–0.99) for the three scanners. The external validity study found a correlation coefficient for total thigh CSA and total neck CSA of 0.88. Discussion We present a feasible, valid and reliable method for measuring neck muscle CSA on T1-weighted MR brain scans. Larger studies are needed to validate and apply our technique with subjects differing in age, ethnicity and geographical location. PMID:22509305

  14. Malaria protection in β2-microglobulin-deficient mice lacking major histocompatibility complex class I antigens: essential role of innate immunity, including γδT cells

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Tachikawa, Saoko; Kanda, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Tomiyama-Miyaji, Chikako; Li, Changchun; Watanabe, Hisami; Sekikawa, Hiroho; Abo, Toru

    2007-01-01

    It is still controversial whether malaria protection is mediated by conventional immunity associated with T and B cells or by innate immunity associated with extrathymic T cells and autoantibody-producing B cells. Given this situation, it is important to examine the mechanism of malaria protection in β2-microglobulin-deficient (β2m(–/–)) mice. These mice lack major histocompatibility complex class I and CD1d antigens, which results in the absence of CD8+ T cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells. When C57BL/6 and β2m(–/–) mice were injected with parasitized (Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL) erythrocytes, both survived from the infection and showed a similar level of parasitaemia. The major expanding T cells were NK1.1– αβΤ-cell receptorint cells in both mice. The difference was a compensatory expansion of NK and γδT cells in β2m(–/–) mice, and an elimination experiment showed that these lymphocytes were critical for protection in these mice. These results suggest that malaria protection might be events of the innate immunity associated with multiple subsets with autoreactivity. CD8+ T and NKT cells may be partially related to this protection. PMID:17916163

  15. Lack of cross-protection against invasive pneumonia caused by heterologous strains following murine Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal colonisation despite whole cell ELISAs showing significant cross-reactive IgG.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan M; Wilson, Robert; Shah, Pranali; Baxendale, Helen E; Brown, Jeremy S

    2013-05-01

    Prior exposure to intact Streptococcus pneumoniae can induce a protective antibody response to proteins antigens, which prevents subsequent invasive disease. This may be achieved either by colonisation with live bacteria or by immunisation with killed cells. Such approaches could provide novel vaccine strategies that overcome the serotype restriction of conjugate vaccines, and would aim to prevent disease caused by all strains of S. pneumoniae. Serum antibody is required to prevent invasive disease, but which in vitro measure of antibody response correlates best with protective immunity has not been established for protein antigens. Using a model of homologous protection induced through D39 colonisation of CD1 mice, we investigate the potential for heterologous protection against two distinct serotype strains and its serological correlates. Serum IgG from colonised mice bound to heterologous strains in whole cell ELISA at titres similar to the homologous D39. However, no cross-protection was observed, correlating with lack of surface binding of IgG to whole bacteria as measured by flow cytometry. Serum antibody binding to pre-lysed and untreated bacteria in the whole cell ELISA was similar suggesting that ELISA does not discriminate between surface and subcapsular antigens, unlike the flow cytometric approach. Thus, flow cytometric binding to whole bacteria maybe a more reliable correlate of cross-protection for novel species-wide vaccines than whole cell ELISA.

  16. An inactivated cell culture Japanese encephalitis vaccine (JE-ADVAX) formulated with delta inulin adjuvant provides robust heterologous protection against West Nile encephalitis via cross-protective memory B cells and neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Larena, Maximilian; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Prow, Natalie A; Hall, Roy A; Lobigs, Mario; Morrey, John

    2013-09-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), currently the cause of a serious U.S. epidemic, is a mosquito-borne flavivirus and member of the Japanese encephalitis (JE) serocomplex. There is currently no approved human WNV vaccine, and treatment options remain limited, resulting in significant mortality and morbidity from human infection. Given the availability of approved human JE vaccines, this study asked whether the JE-ADVAX vaccine, which contains an inactivated cell culture JE virus antigen formulated with Advax delta inulin adjuvant, could provide heterologous protection against WNV infection in wild-type and β2-microglobulin-deficient (β2m(-/-)) murine models. Mice immunized twice or even once with JE-ADVAX were protected against lethal WNV challenge even when mice had low or absent serum cross-neutralizing WNV titers prior to challenge. Similarly, β2m(-/-) mice immunized with JE-ADVAX were protected against lethal WNV challenge in the absence of CD8(+) T cells and prechallenge WNV antibody titers. Protection against WNV could be adoptively transferred to naive mice by memory B cells from JE-ADVAX-immunized animals. Hence, in addition to increasing serum cross-neutralizing antibody titers, JE-ADVAX induced a memory B-cell population able to provide heterologous protection against WNV challenge. Heterologous protection was reduced when JE vaccine antigen was administered alone without Advax, confirming the importance of the adjuvant to induction of cross-protective immunity. In the absence of an approved human WNV vaccine, JE-ADVAX could provide an alternative approach for control of a major human WNV epidemic.

  17. Impact of wash water quality on sensory and microbial quality, including Escherichia coli cross-contamination, of fresh-cut escarole.

    PubMed

    Allende, Ana; Selma, Maria V; López-Gálvez, Francisco; Villaescusa, Raquel; Gil, María I

    2008-12-01

    The influence of wash water quality on the microbial load and sensory quality of fresh-cut escarole was evaluated. Additionally, the degree of Escherichia coli cross-contamination between inoculated and uninoculated products after washing was also studied. Three types of wash water, i.e., potable water, diluted recirculated water, and recirculated water, containing different microbial counts and organic loads, were used. Results showed that microbial load (P > or = 0.02) and sensory quality (P > 0.625) of the product were not influenced by the water quality after washing and storage. Cross-contamination between inoculated and uninoculated products was observed after washing, as there was significant transmission of E. coli cells from the product to the wash water (P < 0.001). When fresh-cut escarole was contaminated at a high inoculum level (5.1 log CFU/g), wash water quality influenced the level of cross-contamination, as the highest E. coli load (P < 0.001) was shown in uninoculated fresh-cut escarole washed with recirculated water. However, when fresh-cut escarole was contaminated at a low inoculum level (3.2 log CFU/g), the wash water quality did not influence the level of cross-contamination, as E. coli slightly increased, although not at a statistically significant level, after the uninoculated product was washed with recirculated water (P > 0.035). Therefore, the contamination level may impact the effectiveness of water quality to reduce pathogen concentrations. It was clearly observed that cross-contamination of fresh-cut escarole with E. coli occurs, thereby suggesting that small amounts of contamination could impact the overall product and indicating the necessity of using wash water sanitizers to eliminate pathogens.

  18. A protein chimera including PspA in fusion with PotD is protective against invasive pneumococcal infection and reduces nasopharyngeal colonization in mice.

    PubMed

    Converso, T R; Goulart, C; Darrieux, M; Leite, L C C

    2017-09-12

    Despite the success of the available polysaccharide-based vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae in preventing invasive diseases, this bacterium remains a major cause of death in many parts of the world. New vaccine strategies are needed in order to increase protection. Thus, the utilization of fusion proteins is being investigated as an alternative to the current formulations. In the present work, we demonstrate that a chimeric protein, composed of PspA and PotD in fusion is able to maintain the protective characteristics of both parental proteins, providing protection against systemic infection while reducing nasal colonization. The hybrid was not able to improve the response against invasive disease elicited by PspA alone, but the inclusion of PotD was able to reduce colonization, an effect never observed using subcutaneous immunization with PspA. The mechanisms underlying the protective efficacy of the rPspA-PotD hybrid protein were investigated, revealing the production of antibodies with an increased binding capacity to pneumococcal strains of diverse serotypes and genetic backgrounds, enhanced opsonophagocytosis, and secretion of IL-17 by splenocytes. These findings reinforce the use of chimeric proteins based on surface antigens as an effective strategy against pneumococcal infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective efficacy of oral immunization with heat-killed Shigella flexneri 2a in animal model: study of cross protection, immune response and antigenic recognition.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhaya, A; Mahalanabis, D; Khanam, J; Chakrabarti, M K

    2003-06-20

    Oral immunization of rabbits with four doses of 10(11) heat-killed Shigella flexneri 2a showed 100% protection against challenge with virulent S. flexneri 2a. After orally immunizing Guinea pigs with four doses of heat-killed S. flexneri 2a 100% protection could be shown against ocular challenge with the same virulent S. flexneri 2a strain but this conferred no protection against challenge with Shigella dysenteriae type 1. In enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot experiments both whole cell lysate-envelope (WCL-E) fraction and outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were recognized by the antisera. Though protective mechanism in shigellosis is not established with certainty, outer membrane proteins (specially 38, 34, 23 and 20kDa proteins) may be the major antigens in the induction of protective immune responses as indicated by this observation.

  20. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Wavelet Cross-Spectrum Analysis of Multi-Scale Disturbance Instability and Transition on Sharp Cone Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian; Jiang, Nan

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurement of hypersonic boundary layer stability and transition on a sharp cone with a half angle of 5° is carried out at free-coming stream Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel. Mean and fluctuation surface-thermal-flux characteristics of the hypersonic boundary layer flow are measured by Pt-thin-film thermocouple temperature sensors installed at 28 stations on the cone surface along longitudinal direction. At hypersonic speeds, the dominant flow instabilities demonstrate that the growth rate of the second mode tends to exceed that of the low-frequency mode. Wavelet-based cross-spectrum technique is introduced to obtain the multi-scale cross-spectral characteristics of the fluctuating signals in the frequency range of the second mode. Nonlinear interactions both of the second mode disturbance and the first mode disturbance are demonstrated to be dominant instabilities in the initial stage of laminar-turbulence transition for hypersonic shear flow.

  1. Cross-clade protective immune responses of NS1-truncated live attenuated H5N1 avian influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shaohua; Chen, Sujuan; Han, Weizhou; Wu, Bai; Zhang, Xiaojian; Tang, Ying; Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Yinbiao; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan

    2016-01-12

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) has raised global concern for causing huge economic losses in poultry industry, and an effective vaccine against HPAI is highly desirable. Live attenuated influenza vaccine with trunctated NS1 protein as a potential strategy will be extremely useful for improving immune efficacy. A series of H5N1 avian influenza virus reassortants harboring amino-terminal 48, 70, 73, and 99 aa in NS1 proteins, along with a modified low pathogenic HA protein was generated, and named as S-HALo/NS48, S-HALo/NS70, S-HALo/NS73, and S-HALo/NS99, respectively. In addition, their biological and immunological characteristics were further analyzed. The viruses S-HALo/NS70, S-HALo/NS73, and S-HALo/NS99, but not S-HALo/NS48, had a comparable growth property with the full-length NS1 virus, S-HALo/NSFu. Mice and chickens studies demonstrated that the viruses with truncated NS1 protein were further attenuated when compared to the virus S-HALo/NSFu. Vaccination with the virus S-HALo/NS73 in chickens induced significant cross-protection against homologous clade 2.3.4 H5 virus and heterologous clade 7.2, 2.3.2.1, and 2.3.4.4 H5 viruses. A 70-aa amino-terminal fragment of NS1 protein may be long enough for viral replication. The recombinant virus S-HALo/NS73 is a broad-spectrum live attenuated H5N1 avian influenza vaccine candidate in chickens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of an avirulent FCV strain with a broad serum cross-neutralization profile and protection against challenge of a highly virulent vs feline calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Rong, Sing; Lowery, David; Floyd-Hawkins, Kim; King, Vickie

    2014-08-08

    Highly virulent, systemic strains of Feline calicivirus (vs FCV) have been described in recent years. These vs FCV isolates cause severe edema, cutaneous ulcers, lameness and other upper respiratory and oral clinical signs typically associated with FCV infection in cats. Vs FCV isolates can cause high mortality even in cats vaccinated with currently available commercial vaccines. This study reports identification and characterization of an avirulent FCV strain (FCV 21). This strain offers a broader serum cross-neutralization profile in comparison with the commonly used vaccine strain (FCV F9), as tested with two separate viral panels of FCV isolates. The first viral panel consists of 45 FCV strains isolated around 1993. The second viral panel consists of 26 FCV strains with most isolated around 2003. The potential of using this strain as a vaccine, in a 3-way (FCV+FHV+FPV) or 4-way (FCV+FHV+FPV+FCp) format, was tested by using a highly virulent vs FCV strain (FCV-33585) as a challenge virus. The mortality induced by this vs FCV in unvaccinated control cats was 78% (7 out of 9 cats). The mortality decreased to 44% (4 out of 9 cats) in cats vaccinated with a 4-way vaccine containing FCV F9. However, when this novel FCV vaccine strain (FCV 21) was used, either in combination with FCV F9 or by itself, the mortality decreased to 0% (0 out of 10 cats). The 3-way vaccine (FCV+FHV+FPV) that contained both FCV 21 and FCV F9 also had mortality of 0% (0 out of 10 cats). The clinical scores, as calculated taking into consideration the frequency and severity of various clinical signs, correlated with mortality data. The results suggested this FCV vaccine has the potential to be broadly protective against newly emergent FCV isolates, including complete protection against challenge with a highly virulent vs FCV 33585. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Cross-Protection of a Lineage 1 West Nile Virus Inactivated Vaccine against Natural Infections from a Virulent Lineage 2 Strain in Horses, under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chaintoutis, Serafeim C; Diakakis, Nikolaos; Papanastassopoulou, Maria; Banos, Georgios; Dovas, Chrysostomos I

    2015-09-01

    Although experimental data regarding cross-protection of horse West Nile virus (WNV) vaccines against lineage 2 infections exist, the cross-protective efficacy of these vaccines under field conditions has not been demonstrated. This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of an inactivated lineage 1 vaccine (Equip WNV) to protect against natural infections from the Nea Santa-Greece-2010 lineage 2 strain. In total, 185 WNV-seronegative horses in Thessaloniki, Greece, were selected during 2 consecutive years (2011 and 2012); 140 were immunized, and 45 were used as controls. Horses were examined for signs compatible with WNV infection. Neutralizing antibody titers against the Greek strain and the PaAn001/France lineage 1 strain were determined in immunized horses. WNV circulation was detected during both years in the study area. It was estimated that 37% and 27% of the horses were infected during 2011 and 2012, respectively. Three control animals developed clinical signs, and the WNV diagnosis was confirmed. Signs related to WNV infection were not observed in the vaccinated animals. The nonvaccinated animals had a 7.58% ± 1.82% higher chance of exhibiting signs than immunized animals (P < 0.05). Neutralizing antibodies raised against both strains in all immunized horses were detectable 1 month after the initial vaccination course. The cross-protective capacity of the lowest titer (1:40) was evident in 19 animals which were subsequently infected and did not exhibit signs. Neutralizing antibodies were detectable until the annual booster, when strong anamnestic responses were observed (geometrical mean titer ratio [GMTR] for lineage 1 of 30.2; GMTR for lineage 2 of 27.5). The results indicate that Equip WNV is capable of inducing cross-protection against natural infections from a virulent lineage 2 WNV strain in horses.

  4. Evaluation of Cross-Protection of a Lineage 1 West Nile Virus Inactivated Vaccine against Natural Infections from a Virulent Lineage 2 Strain in Horses, under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chaintoutis, Serafeim C.; Diakakis, Nikolaos; Papanastassopoulou, Maria; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Although experimental data regarding cross-protection of horse West Nile virus (WNV) vaccines against lineage 2 infections exist, the cross-protective efficacy of these vaccines under field conditions has not been demonstrated. This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of an inactivated lineage 1 vaccine (Equip WNV) to protect against natural infections from the Nea Santa-Greece-2010 lineage 2 strain. In total, 185 WNV-seronegative horses in Thessaloniki, Greece, were selected during 2 consecutive years (2011 and 2012); 140 were immunized, and 45 were used as controls. Horses were examined for signs compatible with WNV infection. Neutralizing antibody titers against the Greek strain and the PaAn001/France lineage 1 strain were determined in immunized horses. WNV circulation was detected during both years in the study area. It was estimated that 37% and 27% of the horses were infected during 2011 and 2012, respectively. Three control animals developed clinical signs, and the WNV diagnosis was confirmed. Signs related to WNV infection were not observed in the vaccinated animals. The nonvaccinated animals had a 7.58% ± 1.82% higher chance of exhibiting signs than immunized animals (P < 0.05). Neutralizing antibodies raised against both strains in all immunized horses were detectable 1 month after the initial vaccination course. The cross-protective capacity of the lowest titer (1:40) was evident in 19 animals which were subsequently infected and did not exhibit signs. Neutralizing antibodies were detectable until the annual booster, when strong anamnestic responses were observed (geometrical mean titer ratio [GMTR] for lineage 1 of 30.2; GMTR for lineage 2 of 27.5). The results indicate that Equip WNV is capable of inducing cross-protection against natural infections from a virulent lineage 2 WNV strain in horses. PMID:26178384

  5. Neuraminidase-Inhibiting Antibody Is a Correlate of Cross-Protection against Lethal H5N1 Influenza Virus in Ferrets Immunized with Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lorena E.; Barr, Ian G.; Gilbertson, Brad; Lowther, Sue; Kachurin, Anatoly; Kachurina, Olga; Klippel, Jessica; Bodle, Jesse; Pearse, Martin; Middleton, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    In preparing for the threat of a pandemic of avian H5N1 influenza virus, we need to consider the significant delay (4 to 6 months) necessary to produce a strain-matched vaccine. As some degree of cross-reactivity between seasonal influenza vaccines and H5N1 virus has been reported, this was further explored in the ferret model to determine the targets of protective immunity. Ferrets were vaccinated with two intramuscular inoculations of trivalent inactivated split influenza vaccine or subcomponent vaccines, with and without adjuvant, and later challenged with a lethal dose of A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) influenza virus. We confirmed that vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine afforded partial protection against lethal H5N1 challenge and showed that use of either AlPO4 or Iscomatrix adjuvant with the vaccine resulted in complete protection against disease and death. The protection was due exclusively to the H1N1 vaccine component, and although the hemagglutinin contributed to protection, the dominant protective response was targeted toward the neuraminidase (NA) and correlated with sialic acid cleavage-inhibiting antibody titers. Purified heterologous NA formulated with Iscomatrix adjuvant was also protective. These results suggest that adjuvanted seasonal trivalent vaccine could be used as an interim measure to decrease morbidity and mortality from H5N1 prior to the availability of a specific vaccine. The data also highlight that an inducer of cross-protective immunity is the NA, a protein whose levels are not normally monitored in vaccines and whose capacity to induce immunity in recipients is not normally assessed. PMID:23283953

  6. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  7. Method for Calculation of Laminar Heat Transfer in Air Flow Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section (including Large Temperature Differences and Transpiration Cooling)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R; Livingood, John N B

    1953-01-01

    The solution of heat-transfer problems has become vital for many aeronautical applications. The shapes of objects to be cooled can often be approximated by cylinders of various cross sections with flow normal to the axis as, for instance heat transfer on gas-turbine blades and on air foils heated for deicing purposes. A laminar region always exists near the stagnation point of such objects. A method previously presented by E. R. G. Eckert permits the calculation of local heat transfer around the periphery of cylinders of arbitrary cross section in the laminar region for flow of a fluid with constant property values with an accuracy sufficient for engineering purposes. The method is based on exact solutions of the boundary-layer equations for incompressible wedge-type flow and on the postulate that at any point on the cylinder the boundary-layer growth is the same as that on a wedge with comparable flow conditions. This method is extended herein to take into account the influence of large temperature differences between the cylinder wall and the flow as well as the influence of transpiration cooling when the same medium as the outside flow is used as coolant.

  8. Emerging importance of mismatch repair components including UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with the development of drug resistance in malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-12-01

    Human malaria is an important parasitic infection responsible for a significant number of deaths worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. The recent scenario has worsened mainly because of the emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites having the potential to spread across the world. Drug-resistant parasites possess a defective mismatch repair (MMR); therefore, it is essential to explore its mechanism in detail to determine the underlying cause. Recently, artemisinin-resistant parasites have been reported to exhibit nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in MMR pathways such as MutL homolog (MLH) and UvrD. Plasmodium falciparum MLH is an endonuclease required to restore the defective MMR in drug-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. Although the role of helicases in eukaryotic MMR has been questioned, the identification and characterization of the UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with MLH in P. falciparum suggests the possible involvement of UvrD in MMR. A comparative genome-wide analysis revealed the presence of the UvrD helicase in Plasmodium species, while it is absent in human host. Therefore, PfUvrD may emerge as a suitable drug target to control malaria. This review study is focused on recent developments in MMR biochemistry, emerging importance of the UvrD helicase, possibility of its involvement in MMR and the emerging cross-talk between MMR components and drug resistance in malaria parasite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Trends in access to health services and financial protection in China between 2003 and 2011: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qun; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Yaoguang; Qian, Juncheng; Cai, Min; Xin, Ying; Gao, Jun; Xu, Ke; Boerma, J Ties; Barber, Sarah L

    2012-03-03

    achieving equal access to services and insurance coverage across and within regions. However, these increases have not been accompanied by reductions in catastrophic health expenses. With the achievement of basic health-services coverage, future challenges include stronger risk protection, and greater efficiency and quality of care. None. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intranasal immunization with a formalin-inactivated human influenza A virus whole-virion vaccine alone and intranasal immunization with a split-virion vaccine with mucosal adjuvants show similar levels of cross-protection.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuoka, Sumiko; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Haredy, Ahmad M; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Mori, Yasuko; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2012-07-01

    The antigenicity of seasonal human influenza virus changes continuously; thus, a cross-protective influenza vaccine design needs to be established. Intranasal immunization with an influenza split-virion (SV) vaccine and a mucosal adjuvant induces cross-protection; however, no mucosal adjuvant has been assessed clinically. Formalin-inactivated intact human and avian viruses alone (without adjuvant) induce cross-protection against the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. However, it is unknown whether seasonal human influenza formalin-inactivated whole-virion (WV) vaccine alone induces cross-protection against strains within a subtype or in a different subtype of human influenza virus. Furthermore, there are few reports comparing the cross-protective efficacy of the WV vaccine and SV vaccine-mucosal adjuvant mixtures. Here, we found that the intranasal human influenza WV vaccine alone induced both the innate immune response and acquired immune response, resulting in cross-protection against drift variants within a subtype of human influenza virus. The cross-protective efficacy conferred by the WV vaccine in intranasally immunized mice was almost the same as that conferred by a mixture of SV vaccine and adjuvants. The level of cross-protective efficacy was correlated with the cross-reactive neutralizing antibody titer in the nasal wash and bronchoalveolar fluids. However, neither the SV vaccine with adjuvant nor the WV vaccine induced cross-reactive virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity. These results suggest that the intranasal human WV vaccine injection alone is effective against variants within a virus subtype, mainly through a humoral immune response, and that the cross-protection elicited by the WV vaccine and the SV vaccine plus mucosal adjuvants is similar.

  11. A Cross-Cultural Study in Germany, Russia, and China: Are Resilient and Social Supported Students Protected Against Depression, Anxiety, and Stress?

    PubMed

    Brailovskaia, Julia; Schönfeld, Pia; Zhang, Xiao Chi; Bieda, Angela; Kochetkov, Yakov; Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This study cross-culturally investigated resilience and social support as possible protective factors for mental health. The values of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, resilience and social support were collected from German (N = 4433), Russian (N = 3774), and Chinese students (N = 4982). The samples were split (two-thirds vs. one-third) to cross-validate the results. In all samples, resilience and social support were significantly negatively associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. While in Germany those associations were stronger for social support, in Russia and in China stronger associations were found for resilience. Furthermore, in all samples, resilience was found to mediate the association between social support and the negative mental health variables significantly. In conclusion, resilience and social support are universal interrelated protective factors for mental health independently of historical, cultural, social, and geographical conditions of a country.

  12. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection with HPV 16 and 18, the major causative agents of cervical cancer, can be prevented through vaccination with a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine. Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides additional protection against HPV 31, 33, and 45 and the quadrivalent vaccine against HPV31. The quadrivalent vaccine additionally protects against low-risk HPV type 6 and 11, responsible for most cases of genital warts. In this study, we made an analytical comparison of the two vaccines in terms of cost-effectiveness including the additional benefits of cross-protection and protection against genital warts in comparison with a screening-only strategy. Methods We used a Markov model, simulating the progression from HPV infection to cervical cancer or genital warts. The model was used to estimate the difference in future costs and health effects of both HPV-vaccines separately. Results In a cohort of 100,000 women, use of the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine (both at 50% vaccination coverage) reduces the cervical cancer incidence by 221 and 207 cases, corresponding to ICERs of €17,600/QALY and €18,900/QALY, respectively. It was estimated that the quadrivalent vaccine additionally prevents 4390 cases of genital warts, reducing the ICER to €16,300/QALY. Assuming a comparable willingness to pay for cancer and genital warts prevention, the difference in ICERs could justify a slightly higher price (~7% per dose) in favor of the quadrivalent vaccine. Conclusions Clearly, HPV vaccination has been implemented for the prevention of cervical cancer. From this perspective, use of the bivalent HPV vaccine appears to be most effective and cost-effective. Including the benefits of prevention against genital warts, the ICER of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was found to be slightly more favourable. However, current decision-making on the introduction of HPV is driven by the primary

  13. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Westra, Tjalke A; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Dorsman, Sara; Tutuhatunewa, Eric D; de Vrij, Edwin L; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2013-02-07

    Infection with HPV 16 and 18, the major causative agents of cervical cancer, can be prevented through vaccination with a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine. Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides additional protection against HPV 31, 33, and 45 and the quadrivalent vaccine against HPV31. The quadrivalent vaccine additionally protects against low-risk HPV type 6 and 11, responsible for most cases of genital warts. In this study, we made an analytical comparison of the two vaccines in terms of cost-effectiveness including the additional benefits of cross-protection and protection against genital warts in comparison with a screening-only strategy. We used a Markov model, simulating the progression from HPV infection to cervical cancer or genital warts. The model was used to estimate the difference in future costs and health effects of both HPV-vaccines separately. In a cohort of 100,000 women, use of the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine (both at 50% vaccination coverage) reduces the cervical cancer incidence by 221 and 207 cases, corresponding to ICERs of €17,600/QALY and €18,900/QALY, respectively. It was estimated that the quadrivalent vaccine additionally prevents 4390 cases of genital warts, reducing the ICER to €16,300/QALY. Assuming a comparable willingness to pay for cancer and genital warts prevention, the difference in ICERs could justify a slightly higher price (~7% per dose) in favor of the quadrivalent vaccine. Clearly, HPV vaccination has been implemented for the prevention of cervical cancer. From this perspective, use of the bivalent HPV vaccine appears to be most effective and cost-effective. Including the benefits of prevention against genital warts, the ICER of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was found to be slightly more favourable. However, current decision-making on the introduction of HPV is driven by the primary cervical cancer outcome. New vaccine

  14. A cross-sectional study to assess the long-term health status of patients with lower respiratory tract infections, including Q fever.

    PubMed

    van Dam, A S G; van Loenhout, J A F; Peters, J B; Rietveld, A; Paget, W J; Akkermans, R P; Olde Loohuis, A; Hautvast, J L A; van der Velden, J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) might be at risk for long-term impaired health status. We assessed whether LRTI patients without Q fever are equally at risk for developing long-term symptoms compared to LRTI patients with Q fever. The study was a cross-sectional cohort design. Long-term health status information of 50 Q fever-positive and 32 Q fever-negative LRTI patients was obtained. Health status was measured by the Nijmegen Clinical Screening Instrument. The most severely affected subdomains of the Q fever-positive group were 'general quality of life' (40%) and 'fatigue' (40%). The most severely affected subdomains of the Q fever-negative group were 'fatigue' (64%) and 'subjective pulmonary symptoms' (35%). Health status did not differ significantly between Q fever-positive LRTI patients and Q fever-negative LRTI patients for all subdomains, except for 'subjective pulmonary symptoms' (P = 0·048).

  15. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: A new mammalian circadian oscillator model including the cAMP module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Wei; Zhou, Tian-Shou

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we develop a new mathematical model for the mammalian circadian clock, which incorporates both transcriptional/translational feedback loops (TTFLs) and a cAMP-mediated feedback loop. The model shows that TTFLs and cAMP signalling cooperatively drive the circadian rhythms. It reproduces typical experimental observations with qualitative similarities, e.g. circadian oscillations in constant darkness and entrainment to light-dark cycles. In addition, it can explain the phenotypes of cAMP-mutant and Rev-erbα-/--mutant mice, and help us make an experimentally-testable prediction: oscillations may be rescued when arrhythmic mice with constitutively low concentrations of cAMP are crossed with Rev-erbα-/- mutant mice. The model enhances our understanding of the mammalian circadian clockwork from the viewpoint of the entire cell.

  16. Cu(I)-assisted click chemistry strategy for conjugation of non-protected cross-bridged macrocyclic chelators to tumour-targeting peptides.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengxin; Li, Barbara T Y; Wong, Edward H; Weisman, Gary R; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2015-03-07

    Copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry has inherent challenges for copper-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. An azide-modified phosphonate-based cross-bridged macrocyclic chelator was synthesized for click chemistry conjugation with azide-modified Y3-TATE (a somatostatin analogue) on resin, without the need for protecting the chelator. The (64)Cu-labeled bioconjugate shows favourable in vitro and in vivo behaviour.

  17. rBCG30-Induced Immunity and Cross-Protection against Mycobacterium leprae Challenge Are Enhanced by Boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-Kilodalton Antigen 85B

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Thomas P.; Tullius, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine model of leprosy. rBCG30 overexpresses the M. tuberculosis 30-kDa major secretory protein antigen 85B, which is 85% homologous with the M. leprae homolog (r30ML). Mice were sham immunized or immunized intradermally with BCG or rBCG30 and challenged 2.5 months later by injection of viable M. leprae into each hind footpad. After 7 months, vaccine efficacy was assessed by enumerating the M. leprae bacteria per footpad. Both BCG and rBCG30 induced significant protection against M. leprae challenge. In the one experiment in which a comparison between BCG and rBCG30 was feasible, rBCG30 induced significantly greater protection than did BCG. Immunization of mice with purified M. tuberculosis or M. leprae antigen 85B also induced protection against M. leprae challenge but less so than BCG or rBCG30. Notably, boosting rBCG30 with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B significantly enhanced r30ML-specific immune responses, substantially more so than boosting BCG, and significantly augmented protection against M. leprae challenge. Thus, rBCG30, a vaccine that induces improved protection against M. tuberculosis, induces cross-protection against M. leprae that is comparable or potentially superior to that induced by BCG, and boosting rBCG30 with antigen 85B further enhances immune responses and protective efficacy. PMID:25001602

  18. rBCG30-induced immunity and cross-protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge are enhanced by boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-kilodalton antigen 85B.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Thomas P; Tullius, Michael V; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2014-09-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine model of leprosy. rBCG30 overexpresses the M. tuberculosis 30-kDa major secretory protein antigen 85B, which is 85% homologous with the M. leprae homolog (r30ML). Mice were sham immunized or immunized intradermally with BCG or rBCG30 and challenged 2.5 months later by injection of viable M. leprae into each hind footpad. After 7 months, vaccine efficacy was assessed by enumerating the M. leprae bacteria per footpad. Both BCG and rBCG30 induced significant protection against M. leprae challenge. In the one experiment in which a comparison between BCG and rBCG30 was feasible, rBCG30 induced significantly greater protection than did BCG. Immunization of mice with purified M. tuberculosis or M. leprae antigen 85B also induced protection against M. leprae challenge but less so than BCG or rBCG30. Notably, boosting rBCG30 with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B significantly enhanced r30ML-specific immune responses, substantially more so than boosting BCG, and significantly augmented protection against M. leprae challenge. Thus, rBCG30, a vaccine that induces improved protection against M. tuberculosis, induces cross-protection against M. leprae that is comparable or potentially superior to that induced by BCG, and boosting rBCG30 with antigen 85B further enhances immune responses and protective efficacy.

  19. Physicians involved in the care of patients with high risk of skin cancer should be trained regarding sun protection measures: evidence from a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Rioual, E; Adamski, H; Roguedas, A-M; Misery, L; Michel, M; Chastel, F; Schmutz, J-L; Aubin, F; Marguery, M-C; Meyer, N

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge, regarding sun protection, is essential to change behaviour and to reduce sun exposure of patients at risk for skin cancer. Patient education regarding appropriate or sun protection measures, is a priority to reduce skin cancer incidence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge about sun protection and the recommendations given in a population of non-dermatologists physicians involved in the care of patients at high risk of skin cancer. This study is a cross-sectional study. Physicians were e-mailed an anonymous questionnaire evaluating the knowledge about risk factors for skin cancer, sun protection and about the role of the physician in providing sun protection recommendations. Of the responders, 71.4% considered that the risk of skin cancer of their patients was increased when compared with the general population. All the responders knew that UV-radiations can contribute to induce skin cancers and 71.4% of them declared having adequate knowledge about sun protection measures. A proportion of 64.2% of them declared that they were able to give sun protection advices: using sunscreens (97.8%), wearing covering clothes (95.5%), performing regular medical skin examination (91.1%), to avoid direct sunlight exposure (77.8%), avoiding outdoor activities in the hottest midday hours (73.3%) and practising progressive exposure (44.4%). Non-dermatologist physicians reported a correct knowledge of UV-induced skin cancer risk factors. The majority of responders displayed adequate knowledge of sun protection measures and declared providing patients with sun protection recommendation on a regular basis. Several errors persisted. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Alcohol Consumption Has a Protective Effect against Hematological Malignancies: a Population-Based Study in Sweden Including 420,489 Individuals with Alcohol Use Disorders12345

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of a few solid cancers, although studies that examined the association with hematological malignancies have shown inconsistent results. In this study, we examined the risk of hematological malignancies among individuals who had alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in Sweden. METHODS: Individuals with AUDs were identified from the nationwide Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and Outpatient Register, the Crime Register, and the Prescription Drug Register, and they were linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of hematological malignancies, using those Swedes without AUDs as a reference. In addition, we used a quasi-experimental sibling design to investigate the odds ratios among sibling pairs who were discordant with AUDs. RESULTS: A total of 420,489 individuals were identified with AUDs. After more than 15 million person-years of follow-up, a total of 1755 individuals developed hematological malignancies demonstrating a low risk, i.e., SIR = 0.60 (95% confidence interval = 0.57-0.63). People with AUDs had low risks for developing specific types of malignancies. The lowest risk (0.51) was for leukemia, followed by myeloma (0.52), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (0.65), and Hodgkin disease (0.71). The risk was lower among AUDs identified at an older age. The low risks of hematological malignancies were also noted using sibling analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that alcohol consumption has a protective effect against hematological malignancies. However, further studies are needed to identity the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of alcohol consumption against hematological malignancies. PMID:24783999

  1. Inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine adjuvanted with Montanide™ Gel 01 ST elicits virus-specific cross-protective inter-genotypic response in piglets.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kairat; Sansyzbay, Abylay; Tulemissova, Zhanara; Tabynov, Kaissar; Dhakal, Santosh; Samoltyrova, Aigul; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Mambetaliyev, Muratbay

    The efficacy of a novel BEI-inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) candidate vaccine in pigs, developed at RIBSP Republic of Kazakhstan and delivered with an adjuvant Montanide™ Gel 01 ST (D/KV/ADJ) was compared with a commercial killed PRRSV vaccine (NVDC-JXA1, C/KV/ADJ) used widely in swine herds of the Republic of Kazakhstan. Clinical parameters (body temperature and respiratory disease scores), virological and immunological profiles [ELISA and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody titers], macroscopic lung lesions and viral load in the lungs (quantitative real-time PCR and cell culture assay) were assessed in vaccinated and both genotype 1 and 2 PRRSV challenged pigs. Our results showed that the commercial vaccine failed to protect pigs adequately against the clinical disease, viremia and lung lesions caused by the challenged field isolates, Kazakh strains of PRRSV type 1 and type 2 genotypes. In contrast, clinical protection, absence of viremia and lung lesions in D/KV/ADJ vaccinated pigs was associated with generation of VN antibodies in both homologous vaccine strain LKZ/2010 (PRRSV type 2) and a heterogeneous type 1 PRRSV strain (CM/08) challenged pigs. Thus, our data indicated the induction of cross-protective VN antibodies by D/KV/ADJ vaccine, and importantly demonstrated that an inactivated PRRSV vaccine could also induce cross-protective response across the viral genotype.

  2. The kinase mTOR modulates the antibody response to provide cross-protective immunity to lethal infection with influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Keating, Rachael; Hertz, Tomer; Wehenkel, Marie; Harris, Tarsha L; Edwards, Benjamin A; McClaren, Jennifer L; Brown, Scott A; Surman, Sherri; Wilson, Zachary S; Bradley, Philip; Hurwitz, Julia; Chi, Hongbo; Doherty, Peter C; Thomas, Paul G; McGargill, Maureen A

    2013-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses pose a continuing global threat. Current vaccines will not protect against newly evolved pandemic viruses. The creation of 'universal' vaccines has been unsuccessful because the immunological mechanisms that promote heterosubtypic immunity are incompletely defined. We found here that rapamycin, an immunosuppressive drug that inhibits the kinase mTOR, promoted cross-strain protection against lethal infection with influenza virus of various subtypes when administered during immunization with influenza virus subtype H3N2. Rapamycin reduced the formation of germinal centers and inhibited class switching in B cells, which yielded a unique repertoire of antibodies that mediated heterosubtypic protection. Our data established a requirement for the mTORC1 complex in B cell class switching and demonstrated that rapamycin skewed the antibody response away from high-affinity variant epitopes and targeted more conserved elements of hemagglutinin. Our findings have implications for the design of a vaccine against influenza virus.

  3. Potential protective immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid and Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197) when used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Bröker, Michael

    2016-03-03

    When tetanus toxoid (TT), diphtheria toxoid (DT) or Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197), a non-toxic diphtheria toxin mutant protein, are used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugate vaccines, these carriers induce a protein specific antibody response as measured by in vitro assays. Here, it was evaluated whether or not glycoconjugates based on TT, DT or CRM197 can induce a protective immune response as measured by potency tests according to the European Pharmacopoeia. It could be shown, that the conjugate carriers TT and DT can induce a protective immune response against a lethal challenge by toxins in animals, while glycoconjugates based on CRM197 failed to induce a protective immune response. Opportunities for new applications of glycoconjugates are discussed.

  4. Cross-linking of anaplasma marginale outer membrane proteins enhances immunogenicity, but is not required for protection from challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial outer membrane proteins are the primary targets of a protective immune response. The specific characteristics of outer membrane-based immunogens, in terms of antigen content and context that are required for protective immunity remain unknown for a wide variety of bacterial pathogens. Usin...

  5. Effect of small versus large clusters of fish school on the yield of a purse-seine small pelagic fishery including a marine protected area.

    PubMed

    Hieu, Nguyen Trong; Brochier, Timothée; Tri, Nguyen-Huu; Auger, Pierre; Brehmer, Patrice

    2014-09-01

    We consider a fishery model with two sites: (1) a marine protected area (MPA) where fishing is prohibited and (2) an area where the fish population is harvested. We assume that fish can migrate from MPA to fishing area at a very fast time scale and fish spatial organisation can change from small to large clusters of school at a fast time scale. The growth of the fish population and the catch are assumed to occur at a slow time scale. The complete model is a system of five ordinary differential equations with three time scales. We take advantage of the time scales using aggregation of variables methods to derive a reduced model governing the total fish density and fishing effort at the slow time scale. We analyze this aggregated model and show that under some conditions, there exists an equilibrium corresponding to a sustainable fishery. Our results suggest that in small pelagic fisheries the yield is maximum for a fish population distributed among both small and large clusters of school.

  6. Association of knee pain with a reduction in thigh muscle strength - a cross-sectional analysis including 4553 osteoarthritis initiative participants.

    PubMed

    Ruhdorfer, A; Wirth, W; Eckstein, F

    2017-05-01

    To cross-sectionally determine the quantitative relationship of age-adjusted, sex-specific isometric knee extensor and flexor strength to patient-reported knee pain. Difference of thigh muscle strength by age, and that of age-adjusted strength per unit increase on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) knee pain scale, was estimated from linear regression analysis of 4553 Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) participants (58% women). Strata encompassing the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in knee pain were compared to evaluate a potentially non-linear relationship between WOMAC pain levels and muscle strength. In OAI participants without pain, the age-related difference in isometric knee extensor strength was -9.0%/-8.2% (women/men) per decade, and that of flexor strength was -11%/-6.9%. Differences in age-adjusted strength values for each unit of WOMAC pain (1/20) amounted to -1.9%/-1.6% for extensor and -2.5%/-1.7% for flexor strength. Differences in torque/weight for each unit of WOMAC pain ranged from -3.3 to -2.1%. There was no indication of a non-linear relationship between pain and strength across the range of observed WOMAC values, and similar results were observed in women and men. Each increase by 1/20 units in WOMAC pain was associated with a ∼2% lower age-adjusted isometric extensor and flexor strength in either sex. As a reduction in muscle strength is known to prospectively increase symptoms in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and as pain appears to reduce thigh muscle strength, adequate therapy of pain and muscle strength is required in KOA patients to avoid a vicious circle of self-sustaining clinical deterioration. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mumps-specific cross-neutralization by MMR vaccine-induced antibodies predicts protection against mumps virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gouma, Sigrid; Ten Hulscher, Hinke I; Schurink-van 't Klooster, Tessa M; de Melker, Hester E; Boland, Greet J; Kaaijk, Patricia; van Els, Cécile A C M; Koopmans, Marion P G; van Binnendijk, Rob S

    2016-07-29

    Similar to other recent mumps genotype G outbreaks worldwide, most mumps patients during the recent mumps genotype G outbreaks in the Netherlands had received 2 doses of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine during childhood. Here, we investigate the capacity of vaccine-induced antibodies to neutralize wild type mumps virus strains, including mumps virus genotype G. In this study, we tested 105 pre-outbreak serum samples from students who had received 2 MMR vaccine doses and who had no mumps virus infection (n=76), symptomatic mumps virus infection (n=10) or asymptomatic mumps virus infection (n=19) during the mumps outbreaks. In all samples, mumps-specific IgG concentrations were measured by multiplex immunoassay and neutralization titers were measured against the Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain and against wild type genotype G and genotype D mumps virus strains. The correlation between mumps-specific IgG concentrations and neutralization titers against Jeryl Lynn was poor, which suggests that IgG concentrations do not adequately represent immunological protection against mumps virus infection by antibody neutralization. Pre-outbreak neutralization titers in infected persons were significantly lower against genotype G than against the vaccine strain. Furthermore, antibody neutralization of wild type mumps virus genotype G and genotype D was significantly reduced in pre-outbreak samples from infected persons as compared with non-infected persons. No statistically significant difference was found for the vaccine strain. The sensitivity/specificity ratio was largest for neutralization of the genotype G strain as compared with the genotype D strain and the vaccine strain. The reduced neutralization of wild type mumps virus strains in MMR vaccinated persons prior to infection indicates that pre-outbreak mumps virus neutralization is partly strain-specific and that neutralization differs between infected and non-infected persons. Therefore, we recommend the use of wild

  8. A microacoustic analysis including viscosity and thermal conductivity to model the effect of the protective cap on the acoustic response of a MEMS microphone.

    PubMed

    Homentcovschi, D; Miles, R N; Loeppert, P V; Zuckerwar, A J

    2014-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of the protective cover on the acoustic response of a miniature silicon microphone. The microphone diaphragm is contained within a small rectangular enclosure and the sound enters through a small hole in the enclosure's top surface. A numerical model is presented to predict the variation in the sound field with position within the enclosure. An objective of this study is to determine up to which frequency the pressure distribution remains sufficiently uniform so that a pressure calibration can be made in free space. The secondary motivation for this effort is to facilitate microphone design by providing a means of predicting how the placement of the microphone diaphragm in the package affects the sensitivity and frequency response. While the size of the package is typically small relative to the wavelength of the sounds of interest, because the dimensions of the package are on the order of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer, viscosity can significantly affect the distribution of sound pressure around the diaphragm. In addition to the need to consider viscous effects, it is shown here that one must also carefully account for thermal conductivity to properly represent energy dissipation at the system's primary acoustic resonance frequency. The sound field is calculated using a solution of the linearized system consisting of continuity equation, Navier-Stokes equations, the state equation and the energy equation using a finite element approach. The predicted spatial variation of both the amplitude and phase of the sound pressure is shown over the range of audible frequencies. Excellent agreement is shown between the predicted and measured effects of the package on the microphone's sensitivity.

  9. A microacoustic analysis including viscosity and thermal conductivity to model the effect of the protective cap on the acoustic response of a MEMS microphone

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, D.; Miles, R. N.; Loeppert, P. V.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of the protective cover on the acoustic response of a miniature silicon microphone. The microphone diaphragm is contained within a small rectangular enclosure and the sound enters through a small hole in the enclosure's top surface. A numerical model is presented to predict the variation in the sound field with position within the enclosure. An objective of this study is to determine up to which frequency the pressure distribution remains sufficiently uniform so that a pressure calibration can be made in free space. The secondary motivation for this effort is to facilitate microphone design by providing a means of predicting how the placement of the microphone diaphragm in the package affects the sensitivity and frequency response. While the size of the package is typically small relative to the wavelength of the sounds of interest, because the dimensions of the package are on the order of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer, viscosity can significantly affect the distribution of sound pressure around the diaphragm. In addition to the need to consider viscous effects, it is shown here that one must also carefully account for thermal conductivity to properly represent energy dissipation at the system's primary acoustic resonance frequency. The sound field is calculated using a solution of the linearized system consisting of continuity equation, Navier-Stokes equations, the state equation and the energy equation using a finite element approach. The predicted spatial variation of both the amplitude and phase of the sound pressure is shown over the range of audible frequencies. Excellent agreement is shown between the predicted and measured effects of the package on the microphone's sensitivity. PMID:24701031

  10. Effects of photoaging information and UV photo on sun protection intentions and behaviours: a cross-regional comparison.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Heike I M; Kulik, James A; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X

    2013-01-01

    There is limited empirical evidence regarding differences in sun protection practices in different regions of the USA. This study examined whether there are regional differences in the efficacy of exposure to UV photographs and photoaging information (e.g. wrinkles and age spots) for increasing sun protection behaviours. Students attending a public university in either the Midwestern (Iowa) or Southwestern (Southern California) US reported baseline sun exposure and protection practices and were then randomly assigned to either receive information about photoaging, have a UV photo taken, both receive photoaging information and have a UV photo taken, or to receive neither intervention. Sun protection intentions were assessed immediately after the interventions, and both self-reported sun protection behaviours and an objective assessment (via spectrophotometry) of skin colour change were measured at the end of summer and one year following the interventions. The results showed a pervasive pattern of more risky UV exposure and less sun protection use at the Iowa site than at the Southern California site both prior to and following the interventions. Both interventions increased future sun protection intentions regardless of region. However, the intervention effects on skin colour and UV exposure differed across region, with generally more reliable effects at the Iowa site.

  11. Tubular bioreactor models that include Onsager-Curie scalar cross-phenomena to describe stress-dependent rates of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Belfiore, Laurence A; Karim, M Nazmul; Belfiore, Carol J

    2008-06-01

    The theory of heterogeneous catalysis in chemical reactors is employed to simulate laminar flow through tubes at large mass transfer Peclet numbers in which anchorage-dependent cells (i) adhere to a protein coating on the inner surface at r=R(wall), (ii) receive nutrients and oxygen from an aqueous medium via transverse diffusion toward the active wall, and (iii) proliferate in the presence of viscous shear at the cell/aqueous-medium interface. This process is modeled as convective diffusion in cylindrical coordinates with chemical reaction at the boundary, where chemical reaction describes the rate of nutrient consumption. The formalism of irreversible thermodynamics is employed to describe an unusual coupling between viscous shear, or velocity gradients at the cell/aqueous-medium interface, and rates of nutrient consumption. Linear transport laws in chemically reactive systems that obey Curie's theorem predict the existence of cross-phenomena between fluxes (i.e., scalar reaction rates) and driving forces (i.e., 2nd-rank velocity gradient tensor) whose tensorial ranks differ by an even integer-in this case, two. This methodology for stress-dependent chemical reactions yields an additional zeroth-order contribution, via the magnitude of the velocity gradient tensor, to heterogeneous kinetic rate expressions because nutrient consumption and cell proliferation are stress-sensitive. Computer simulations of nutrient consumption suggest that bioreactor designs should consider stress-sensitive reactions when the shear-rate-based Damköhler number (i.e., defined for the first time in this study as the stress-dependent zeroth-order rate of nutrient consumption relative to the rate of nutrient diffusion toward active cells adhered to the tube wall) is greater than 10-20% of the stress-free Damköhler number. Models of bioreactor performance are presented for simple 1st-order, simple 2nd-order, and complex chemical kinetic rate expressions, where the latter considers

  12. o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption: syntheses and uncaging cross-sections for one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Aujard, Isabelle; Benbrahim, Chouaha; Gouget, Marine; Ruel, Odile; Baudin, Jean-Bernard; Neveu, Pierre; Jullien, Ludovic

    2006-09-06

    We evaluated the o-nitrobenzyl platform for designing photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption that could be photolyzed upon one- and two-photon excitation. Several synthetic pathways to build different conjugated o-nitrobenzyl backbones, as well as to vary the benzylic position, are reported. Relative to the reference 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl group, several o-nitrobenzyl derivatives exhibit a large and red-shifted one-photon absorption within the near-UV range. Uncaging after one-photon excitation was studied by measuring UV-visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence emission on model caged ethers and esters. In the whole series investigated, the caged substrates were released cleanly upon photolysis. Quantum yields of uncaging after one-photon absorption lie within the 0.1-1 % range. We observed that these drop as the maximum wavelength absorption of the o-nitrobenzyl protecting group is increased. A new method based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) after two-photon excitation was used to measure the action uncaging cross section for two-photon excitation. The series of o-nitrobenzyl caged fluorescent coumarins investigated exhibit values within the 0.1-0.01 Goeppert-Mayer (GM) range. Such results are in line with the low quantum yields of uncaging associated with cross-sections of 1-50 GM for two-photon absorption. Although the cross-sections for one- and two-photon absorption of o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups can be readily improved, we emphasize the difficulty in enlarging the corresponding action uncaging cross-sections in view of the observed trend of their quantum yield of uncaging.

  13. Prediction of Supersonic Store Separation Characteristics Including Fuselage and Stores of Noncircular Cross Section, Volume IV. Appendices C and D, Details of Program II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    whose methods are described in Reference 2. A listing of Program II is presented in Figure C-i and a schematic showing the subroutine calling sequence is...The initialization sequence includes reading the file produced in Program I, reading data defining the properties of the separating store body and...presented in Figure C-l(t) of this report. The sequence of calculations for the locations of the image store and the first influence of the reflected shock

  14. Substrate-Controlled Diastereoselectivity Reversal in NHC-Catalyzed Cross-Benzoin Reactions Using N-Boc-N-Bn-Protected α-Amino Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, Pouyan; Quail, J Wilson; Gravel, Michel

    2016-12-16

    The effectiveness of utilizing N-Bn-N-Boc-α-amino aldehydes in cross-benzoin reactions with heteroaromatic aldehydes is demonstrated. The reaction is both chemoselective and syn-selective, making it complementary to the anti-selective cross-benzoin reaction of NHBoc-α-amino aldehydes. Good diastereoselectivity is obtained for a variety of amino aldehydes, including nonhindered ones. A Felkin-Anh model can be used to rationalize the observed diastereoselectivity.

  15. The influence of increased cross-linker chain length in thermosensitive microspheres on potential sun-protection activity.

    PubMed

    Musiał, Witold; Kokol, Vanja; Voncina, Bojana

    2010-01-01

    The sun protection should involve substances with protecting activity against both UVB and UVA radiation. In this research the evaluation of thermosensitive microspheres as potential molecules for sunscreen formulations was approached, using modified Boots star rating system. The microspheres, thermosensitive N-isopropylacrylamide derivatives, have potential protecting activity against UV radiation. The MX and DX microspheres, with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and diethylene glycol dimethacrylate crosslinker respectively, due to theirs thermosensitivity exhibit increase in protecting activity against UV radiation when heated to 45 degrees C. The MX microspheres have higher increase in terms of UV absorbance, comparing to DX microspheres, when heated in the 25 degrees C to 45 degrees C range. Studied microspheres have high potential for application as components of sun-screens used in elevated temperatures.

  16. Immunization against Clostridium perfringens cells elicits protection against Clostridium tetani in mouse model: identification of cross-reactive proteins using proteomic methodologies.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Bansod, Sunita; Singh, Lokendra

    2008-11-11

    Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens are among the medically important clostridial pathogens causing diseases in man and animals. Several homologous open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified in the genomes of the two pathogens by comparative genomic analysis. We tested a likelihood of extensive sharing of common epitopes between homologous proteins of these two medically important pathogens and the possibility of cross-protection using active immunization. Eight predominant cross-reactive spots were identified by mass spectrometry and had hits in the C. tetani E88 proteome with significant MOWSE scores. Most of the cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani shared 65-78% sequence similarity with their closest homologues in C. perfringens ATCC13124. Electron transfer flavoprotein beta-subunit (CT3) was the most abundant protein (43.3%), followed by methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (36.8%) and 2-phosphoglycerate dehydratase (35.6%). All the proteins were predicted to be cytoplasmic by PSORT protein localization algorithm. Active immunization with C. perfringens whole cells elicited cross-protective immunity against C. tetani infection in a mouse model. Most of the dominant cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani belonged to the cluster of orthologous group (COG) functional category, either of posttranslational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones (O) or energy production and conversion (C). The homologs of the identified proteins have been shown to play role in pathogenesis in other Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Our findings provide basis for the search of potential vaccine candidates with broader coverage, encompassing more than one pathogenic clostridial species.

  17. Immunization against Clostridium perfringens cells elicits protection against Clostridium tetani in mouse model: identification of cross-reactive proteins using proteomic methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Bansod, Sunita; Singh, Lokendra

    2008-01-01

    Background Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens are among the medically important clostridial pathogens causing diseases in man and animals. Several homologous open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified in the genomes of the two pathogens by comparative genomic analysis. We tested a likelihood of extensive sharing of common epitopes between homologous proteins of these two medically important pathogens and the possibility of cross-protection using active immunization. Results Eight predominant cross-reactive spots were identified by mass spectrometry and had hits in the C. tetani E88 proteome with significant MOWSE scores. Most of the cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani shared 65–78% sequence similarity with their closest homologues in C. perfringens ATCC13124. Electron transfer flavoprotein beta-subunit (CT3) was the most abundant protein (43.3%), followed by methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (36.8%) and 2-phosphoglycerate dehydratase (35.6%). All the proteins were predicted to be cytoplasmic by PSORT protein localization algorithm. Active immunization with C. perfringens whole cells elicited cross-protective immunity against C. tetani infection in a mouse model. Conclusion Most of the dominant cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani belonged to the cluster of orthologous group (COG) functional category, either of posttranslational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones (O) or energy production and conversion (C). The homologs of the identified proteins have been shown to play role in pathogenesis in other Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Our findings provide basis for the search of potential vaccine candidates with broader coverage, encompassing more than one pathogenic clostridial species. PMID:19000325

  18. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

    PubMed

    Huber, Bettina; Schellenbacher, Christina; Jindra, Christoph; Fink, Dieter; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr) mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC), a subset of cervical cancer (CxC). Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP) screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent) HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP) of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7) includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18) targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1) of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1). Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent vaccine

  19. Prior infection of pigs with a recent human H3N2 influenza virus confers minimal cross-protection against a European swine H3N2 virus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; van der Meulen, Karen; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2013-11-01

    H3N2 influenza viruses circulating in humans and European pigs originate from the pandemic A/Hong Kong/68 virus. Because of slower antigenic drift in swine, the antigenic divergence between swine and human viruses has been increasing. It remains unknown to what extent this results in a reduced cross-protection between recent human and swine H3N2 influenza viruses. We examined whether prior infection of pigs with an old [A/Victoria/3/75 (A/Vic/75)] or a more recent [A/Wisconsin/67/05 (A/Wis/05)] human H3N2 virus protected against a European swine H3N2 virus [sw/Gent/172/08 (sw/Gent/08)]. Genetic and antigenic relationships between sw/Gent/08 and a selection of human H3N2 viruses were also assessed. After challenge with sw/Gent/08, all challenge controls had high virus titers in the entire respiratory tract at 3 days post-challenge and nasal virus excretion for 5-6 days. Prior infection with sw/Gent/08 or A/Vic/75 offered complete virological protection against challenge. Pigs previously inoculated with A/Wis/05 showed similar virus titers in the respiratory tract as challenge controls, but the mean duration of nasal shedding was 1·3 days shorter. Unlike sw/Gent/08- and A/Vic/75-inoculated pigs, A/Wis/05-inoculated pigs lacked cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against sw/Gent/08 before challenge, but they showed a more rapid antibody response to sw/Gent/08 than challenge controls after challenge. Cross-protection and serological responses correlated with genetic and antigenic differences. Infection immunity to a recent human H3N2 virus confers minimal cross-protection against a European swine H3N2 virus. We discuss our findings with regard to the recent zoonotic infections of humans in the United States with a swine-origin H3N2 variant virus. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 protects Arabidopsis desiccating and germinating seeds from stress and mediates cross talk between reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid, and auxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changming; Letnik, Ilya; Hacham, Yael; Dobrev, Petre; Ben-Daniel, Bat-Hen; Vanková, Radomíra; Amir, Rachel; Miller, Gad

    2014-09-01

    A seed's ability to properly germinate largely depends on its oxidative poise. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is controlled by a large gene network, which includes the gene coding for the hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme, cytosolic ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 (APX6), yet its specific function has remained unknown. In this study, we show that seeds lacking APX6 accumulate higher levels of ROS, exhibit increased oxidative damage, and display reduced germination on soil under control conditions and that these effects are further exacerbated under osmotic, salt, or heat stress. In addition, ripening APX6-deficient seeds exposed to heat stress displayed reduced germination vigor. This, together with the increased abundance of APX6 during late stages of maturation, indicates that APX6 activity is critical for the maturation-drying phase. Metabolic profiling revealed an altered activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, changes in amino acid levels, and elevated metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin in drying apx6 mutant seeds. Further germination assays showed an impaired response of the apx6 mutants to ABA and to indole-3-acetic acid. Relative suppression of abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) and ABI5 expression, two of the major ABA signaling downstream components controlling dormancy, suggested that an alternative signaling route inhibiting germination was activated. Thus, our study uncovered a new role for APX6, in protecting mature desiccating and germinating seeds from excessive oxidative damage, and suggested that APX6 modulate the ROS signal cross talk with hormone signals to properly execute the germination program in Arabidopsis. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 Protects Arabidopsis Desiccating and Germinating Seeds from Stress and Mediates Cross Talk between Reactive Oxygen Species, Abscisic Acid, and Auxin1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changming; Letnik, Ilya; Hacham, Yael; Dobrev, Petre; Ben-Daniel, Bat-Hen; Vanková, Radomíra; Amir, Rachel; Miller, Gad

    2014-01-01

    A seed’s ability to properly germinate largely depends on its oxidative poise. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is controlled by a large gene network, which includes the gene coding for the hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme, cytosolic ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 (APX6), yet its specific function has remained unknown. In this study, we show that seeds lacking APX6 accumulate higher levels of ROS, exhibit increased oxidative damage, and display reduced germination on soil under control conditions and that these effects are further exacerbated under osmotic, salt, or heat stress. In addition, ripening APX6-deficient seeds exposed to heat stress displayed reduced germination vigor. This, together with the increased abundance of APX6 during late stages of maturation, indicates that APX6 activity is critical for the maturation-drying phase. Metabolic profiling revealed an altered activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, changes in amino acid levels, and elevated metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin in drying apx6 mutant seeds. Further germination assays showed an impaired response of the apx6 mutants to ABA and to indole-3-acetic acid. Relative suppression of abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) and ABI5 expression, two of the major ABA signaling downstream components controlling dormancy, suggested that an alternative signaling route inhibiting germination was activated. Thus, our study uncovered a new role for APX6, in protecting mature desiccating and germinating seeds from excessive oxidative damage, and suggested that APX6 modulate the ROS signal cross talk with hormone signals to properly execute the germination program in Arabidopsis. PMID:25049361

  2. Staphylococcus epidermidis Protection Against Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus in an Inner-City Outpatient Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sean B.; Kamath, Suneel; McConville, Thomas H.; Gray, Brett T.; Lowy, Franklin D.; Gordon, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. People living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH) have been disproportionally affected by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization and infection, in particular by clones USA300 and USA500. However, the contribution of epidemiological, bacterial, and immunological risk factors to the excess of S aureus in PLWH remain incompletely understood. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, we determined the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of S aureus colonization in 93 PLWH attending an urban human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinic. Participants completed a structured interview assessing demographic information and risk factors for MRSA. Swabs were obtained from the nose, throat, and groin and cultured for S aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results. Most participants had well controlled HIV infection (89, 96% CD4 >200). Thirty-six (39%) individuals were colonized with S aureus at 1 or more body sites, including 6 (6%) with MRSA. Regular gym use was a risk factor for S aureus but not MRSA carriage. In contrast, S epidermidis was present in almost all individuals (n = 84, 90%), predominantly in the nares (n = 66, 71%). Using generalized estimating equation models, we observed that the odds of S aureus colonization were significantly and drastically reduced when S epidermidis was detected (P = .0001). After controlling for site, gender, and age, we identified that the odds of S aureus colonization were 80% less if S epidermidis was present (adjusted odds ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, .09–.45; P < .0001). Conclusions. Taken together, we observed a lower prevalence of S aureus and MRSA colonization than has been previously reported in PLWH. In this cohort, colonization with S epidermidis was protective against S aureus colonization. PMID:28018932

  3. Hydrogel microspheres for stabilization of an antioxidant enzyme: effect of emulsion cross-linking of a dual polysaccharide system on the protection of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Deh-Wei; Yu, Shu-Huei; Wu, Wen-Shin; Hsieh, Hao-Ying; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme abundant in natural resources. However, the enzyme is usually inactivated by gastric acid and digestive enzymes after oral ingestion. In this study, carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate hydrogel microspheres have been prepared by an emulsion cross-linking technique to retain the activity of catalase in simulated gastrointestinal (GI) fluids. Cross-linking reduced the swelling capability and increased the resistance toward hyaluronidase digestion of prepared HA-CM-chitosan hydrogel microspheres. Catalase entrapped in the hydrogel microspheres exhibited superior stability over a wide pH range (pH 2.0 and 6.0-8.0) as compared to the native enzyme. The entrapped catalase was also protected against degradation by digestive enzymes. Following the treatments, the catalase-loaded microspheres, in contrast to native catalase, could effectively decrease the intracellular H2O2 level and protect HT-29 colonic epithelial cells against H2O2-induced oxidative damage to preserve cell viability. These results suggested that the HA-CM-chitosan hydrogel microspheres can be used for entrapment, protection and intestinal delivery of catalase for H2O2 scavenging.

  4. Cross-protective efficacy of engineering serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine against the two pandemic strains in swine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haixue; Lian, Kaiqi; Yang, Fan; Jin, Ye; Zhu, Zixiang; Guo, Jianhong; Cao, Weijun; Liu, Huanan; He, Jijun; Zhang, Keshan; Li, Dan; Liu, Xiangtao

    2015-10-26

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious vesicular disease that affects domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals worldwide. Recently, a series of outbreaks of type A FMDV occurred in Southeast Asian countries, China, the Russia Federation, Mongolia, Kazakhstan and South Korea. The FMD virus (A/GDMM/CHA/2013) from China's Guangdong province (2013) is representative of those responsible for the latest epidemic, and has low amino acid identity (93.9%) in VP1 protein with the epidemic strain A/WH/CHA/09 from Wuhan, China in 2009. Both of isolates belong to the Sea-97 genotype of ASIA topotype. Therefore, the application of a new vaccine strain with cross-protective efficacy is of fundamental importance to control the spread of the two described pandemic strains. A chimeric strain rA/P1-FMDV constructed by our lab previously through replacing the P1 gene in the vaccine strain O/CHA/99 with that from the epidemic stain A/WH/CHA/09, has been demonstrated to exhibit good growth characteristics in culture, and the rA/P1-FMDV inactivated vaccine can provide protection against epidemic strain A/WH/CHA/09 in cattle. However, it is still unclear whether the vaccine produces efficient protection against the new pandemic strain (A/GDMM/CHA/2013). Here, vaccine matching and pig 50% protective dose (PD50) tests were performed to assess the vaccine potency. The vaccine matching test showed cross-reactivity of sera from full dose vaccine vaccinated pigs with A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 isolates, with average r1 values of 0.94±0.12 and 0.68±0.06 (r1≥0.3), which indicates that the rA/P1-FMDV vaccine is likely to confer good cross-protection against the two isolates. When challenged with two pandemic isolates A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 strain, the vaccine achieved 12.51 PD50 and 10.05 PD50 per dose (2.8μg), respectively. The results indicated that the rA/P1-FMDV inactivated vaccine could protect pigs against both A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 pandemic isolates.

  5. Usefulness of In Vivo and In Vitro Diagnostic Tests in the Diagnosis of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Quinolones and in the Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity: A Comprehensive Study Including the Latest Quinolone Gemifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Gelincik, Asli; Akdeniz, Nilgun; Aktas-Cetin, Esin; Olgac, Muge; Unal, Derya; Ertek, Belkis; Coskun, Raif; Colakoğlu, Bahattin; Deniz, Gunnur; Buyukozturk, Suna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Reports evaluating diagnosis and cross reactivity of quinolone hypersensitivity have revealed contradictory results. Furthermore, there are no reports investigating the cross-reactivity between gemifloxacin (GFX) and the others. We aimed to detect the usefulness of diagnostic tests of hypersensitivity reactions to quinolones and to evaluate the cross reactivity between different quinolones including the latest quinolone GFX. Methods We studied 54 patients (mean age 42.31±10.39 years; 47 female) with 57 hypersensitivity reactions due to different quinolones and 10 nonatopic quinolone tolerable control subjects. A detailed clinical history, skin test (ST), and single-blind placebo-controlled drug provocation test (SBPCDPT), as well as basophil activation test (BAT) and lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) were performed with the culprit and alternative quinolones including ciprofloxacin (CFX), moxifloxacin (MFX), levofloxacin (LFX), ofloxacin (OFX), and GFX. Results The majority (75.9%) of the patients reported immediate type reactions to various quinolones. The most common culprit drug was CFX (52.6%) and the most common reaction type was urticaria (26.3%). A quarter of the patients (24.1%) reacted to SBPCDPTs, although their STs were negative; while false ST positivity was 3.5% and ST/SBPCDPTs concordance was only 1.8%. Both BAT and LTT were not found useful in quinolone hypersensitivity. Cross-reactivity was primarily observed between LFX and OFX (50.0%), whereas it was the least between MFX and the others, and in GFX hypersensitive patients the degree of cross-reactivity to the other quinolones was 16.7%. Conclusions These results suggest that STs, BAT, and LTT are not supportive in the diagnosis of a hypersensitivity reaction to quinolone as well as in the prediction of cross-reactivity. Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are necessary to identify both culprit and alternative quinolones. PMID:28497922

  6. Usefulness of In Vivo and In Vitro Diagnostic Tests in the Diagnosis of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Quinolones and in the Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity: A Comprehensive Study Including the Latest Quinolone Gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Demir, Semra; Gelincik, Asli; Akdeniz, Nilgun; Aktas-Cetin, Esin; Olgac, Muge; Unal, Derya; Ertek, Belkis; Coskun, Raif; Colakoğlu, Bahattin; Deniz, Gunnur; Buyukozturk, Suna

    2017-07-01

    Reports evaluating diagnosis and cross reactivity of quinolone hypersensitivity have revealed contradictory results. Furthermore, there are no reports investigating the cross-reactivity between gemifloxacin (GFX) and the others. We aimed to detect the usefulness of diagnostic tests of hypersensitivity reactions to quinolones and to evaluate the cross reactivity between different quinolones including the latest quinolone GFX. We studied 54 patients (mean age 42.31±10.39 years; 47 female) with 57 hypersensitivity reactions due to different quinolones and 10 nonatopic quinolone tolerable control subjects. A detailed clinical history, skin test (ST), and single-blind placebo-controlled drug provocation test (SBPCDPT), as well as basophil activation test (BAT) and lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) were performed with the culprit and alternative quinolones including ciprofloxacin (CFX), moxifloxacin (MFX), levofloxacin (LFX), ofloxacin (OFX), and GFX. The majority (75.9%) of the patients reported immediate type reactions to various quinolones. The most common culprit drug was CFX (52.6%) and the most common reaction type was urticaria (26.3%). A quarter of the patients (24.1%) reacted to SBPCDPTs, although their STs were negative; while false ST positivity was 3.5% and ST/SBPCDPTs concordance was only 1.8%. Both BAT and LTT were not found useful in quinolone hypersensitivity. Cross-reactivity was primarily observed between LFX and OFX (50.0%), whereas it was the least between MFX and the others, and in GFX hypersensitive patients the degree of cross-reactivity to the other quinolones was 16.7%. These results suggest that STs, BAT, and LTT are not supportive in the diagnosis of a hypersensitivity reaction to quinolone as well as in the prediction of cross-reactivity. Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are necessary to identify both culprit and alternative quinolones.

  7. Effective treatment of glioblastoma requires crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting tumors including cancer stem cells: The promise of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Harford, Joe B; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-12-18

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal type of brain tumor. Both therapeutic resistance and restricted permeation of drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) play a major role in the poor prognosis of GBM patients. Accumulated evidence suggests that in many human cancers, including GBM, therapeutic resistance can be attributed to a small fraction of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been shown to have stem cell-like properties that enable them to evade traditional cytotoxic therapies, and so new CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies are needed. Nanoparticles have been designed to selectively deliver payloads to relevant target cells in the body, and there is considerable interest in the use of nanoparticles for CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies. Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine offer new possibilities for overcoming CSC-mediated therapeutic resistance and thus significantly improving management of GBM. In this review, we will examine the current nanomedicine approaches for targeting CSCs and their therapeutic implications. The inhibitory effect of various nanoparticle-based drug delivery system towards CSCs in GBM tumors is the primary focus of this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of cross-protection in mice against dolphin Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolates with a swine commercial vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lacave, G; Cox, E; Hermans, J; Devriese, L; Goddeeris, B M

    2001-06-06

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is well known to cause disease in dolphins. This disease occurs either in an peracute way, leading to mortality even before clinical signs are observed or in a sub-acute way, characterized by rhomboidal skin lesions, that can be treated with penicillin or its derivatives. Commercial swine vaccines, containing inactivated serotype 2 strains, are currently used for vaccination but it is not known whether these vaccines induce protection against E. rhusiopathiae isolates from dolphins. In the present study, it was demonstrated in a mouse model that vaccination with a commercial swine vaccine (Eurovac Ery, Eurovet, Belgium) containing inactivated serotype 2 E. rhusiopathiae strains induced protection against challenge with three E. rhusiopathiae isolates from dolphins. The duration of the protection varied, depending on the challenging isolate, between 8 and >23 weeks. There was however no positive correlation between the amount of antibodies at the moment of challenge and the observed protection. In conclusion, vaccination trials in mice indicate that commercial serotype 2 swine Erysipelothrix vaccines induce protection against erysipelas caused by dolphin pathogenic isolates.

  9. Outdoor workers' sun-related knowledge, attitudes and protective behaviours: a systematic review of cross-sectional and interventional studies.

    PubMed

    Reinau, D; Weiss, M; Meier, C R; Diepgen, T L; Surber, C

    2013-05-01

    Sun protection is a major concern for outdoor workers as they are particularly exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation and therefore at increased risk of developing some forms of skin cancer, cataract and ocular neoplasm. In order to provide an overview of outdoor workers' sun-related knowledge, attitudes and protective behaviours as reported in the literature and to evaluate the effectiveness of sun-safety education programmes in outdoor occupational settings, we conducted a systematic review of the literature by searching three electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO) from their inception up to 25 April 2012. An extensive hand search complemented the database searches. We identified 34 relevant articles on descriptive studies and 18 articles on interventional studies. Considerable numbers of outdoor workers were found to have sun-sensitive skin types; sunburn rates per season ranged from 50% to 80%. Data concerning outdoor workers' sun-related knowledge and attitudes were scarce and controversial. The reported sun-protective behaviours were largely inadequate, with many workers stating that they never or only rarely wore a long-sleeved shirt (50-80%), sun-protective headgear (30-80%) and sunscreen (30-100%) while working in the sun. However, there is growing evidence that occupational sun-safety education is effective in increasing outdoor workers' sun-protection habits and presumably in decreasing sunburn rates. Occupational sun-safety education programmes offer great potential for improving outdoor workers' largely insufficient sun-protective behaviours. It is hoped that, in the future, committed support from healthcare authorities, cancer foundations, employers and dermatologists will open the way for rapid and uncomplicated implementation of sun-safety education programmes. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Modifications of the Helper Component-Protease of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus for Generation of Attenuated Mutants for Cross Protection Against Severe Infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Shun; Wu, Hui-Wen; Jan, Fuh-Jyh; Hou, Roger F; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT A nonpathogenic mild strain is essential for control of plant viruses by cross protection. Three amino acid changes, Arg(180)-->Ile(180) (GA mutation), Phe(205)-->Leu(205) (GB mutation), and Glu(396)-->Asn(396) (GC mutation), of the conserved motifs of the helper component-protease (HC-Pro) of a severe strain TW-TN3 of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, were generated from an infectious cDNA clone that carried a green fluorescent protein reporter. The infectivity of individual mutants containing single, double, or triple mutations was assayed on local and systemic hosts. On Chenopodium quinoa plants, the GB mutant induced necrotic lesions; the GA, GC, and GBC mutants induced chlorotic spots; and the GAB and GAC mutants induced local infection only visualized by fluorescence microscopy. On squash plants, the GA, GB, GC, and GBC mutants caused milder mosaic; the GAC mutant induced slight leaf mottling followed by recovering; and the GAB mutant did not induce conspicuous symptoms. Also, the GAC mutant, but not the GAB mutant, conferred complete cross protection against the parental virus carrying a mite allergen as a reporter. When tested on transgene-silenced transgenic squash, the ability of posttranscriptional gene silencing suppression of the mutated HC-Pro of GAC was not significantly affected. We concluded that the mutations of the HC-Pro of ZYMV reduce the degrees of pathogenicity on squash and also abolish the ability for eliciting the hypersensitive reaction on C. quinoa, and that the mutant GAC is a useful mild strain for cross protection.

  11. Adjuvanted poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticle-entrapped inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine elicits cross-protective immune response in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Ouyang, Kang; Wu, Yun; Lee, Ly James; Torrelles, Jordi B; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV), is an economically devastating disease, causing daily losses of approximately $3 million to the US pork industry. Current vaccines have failed to completely prevent PRRS outbreaks. Recently, we have shown that poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticle-entrapped inactivated PRRSV vaccine (NP-KAg) induces a cross-protective immune response in pigs. To further improve its cross-protective efficacy, the NP-KAg vaccine formulation was slightly modified, and pigs were coadministered the vaccine twice intranasally with a potent adjuvant: Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole-cell lysate. In vaccinated virulent heterologous PRRSV-challenged pigs, the immune correlates in the blood were as follows: 1) enhanced PRRSV-specific antibody response with enhanced avidity of both immunoglobulin (Ig)-G and IgA isotypes, associated with augmented virus-neutralizing antibody titers; 2) comparable and increased levels of virus-specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibody subtypes and production of high levels of both T-helper (Th)-1 and Th2 cytokines, indicative of a balanced Th1–Th2 response; 3) suppressed immunosuppressive cytokine response; 4) increased frequency of interferon-γ+ lymphocyte subsets and expanded population of antigen-presenting cells; and most importantly 5) complete clearance of detectable replicating challenged heterologous PRRSV and close to threefold reduction in viral ribonucleic acid load detected in the blood. In conclusion, intranasal delivery of adjuvanted NP-KAg vaccine formulation to growing pigs elicited a broadly cross-protective immune response, showing the potential of this innovative vaccination strategy to prevent PRRS outbreaks in pigs. A similar approach to control other respiratory diseases in food animals and humans appears to be feasible. PMID:24493925

  12. [Stress-protective and cross action of the extracellular reactivating factor of the microorganisms of the domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryota].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, L I; Khodzhaev, E Iu; Novikova, T M; Muliukin, A L; Chudinova, E M; Kozlova, A N; Él'-rgistan, G I

    2013-01-01

    Cross protection of members of the domains Bacteria, Archaea, and lower Eukaryota from stress factors due to the action of extracellular low-molecular metabolites with adaptogenic functions was shown. The adaptogen produced by Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei and described previously as a reactivating factor (RF) was shown to protect the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, archaea Haloarcula marismorti, and the cells of higher eukaryotes (HeLa) against weak stressor impacts. Production of an archaeal extracellular metabolite with a weak adaptogenic effect of the producer cells and capable of a threefold increase in survival of heat-inactivated yeast cells was discovered. Our results confirm the similarity of the compensatory adaptive reactions in prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and eukaryotes.

  13. Successful induction of protective antibody responses against Haemophilus influenzae type b and diphtheria after transcutaneous immunization with the glycoconjugate polyribosyl ribitol phosphate-cross-reacting material 197 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mawas, Fatme; Peyre, Marisa; Beignon, Anne-Sophie; Frost, Laura; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Muller, Sylviane; Sesardic, Dorothea; Partidos, Charalambos D

    2004-09-15

    We examined the antibody responses elicited in rats after transcutaneous immunization (TCI) with the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-cross-reacting material (CRM(197)) glycoconjugate vaccine coadministered with cholera toxin or mutants of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LTK63 and LTR72) as adjuvants. The glycoconjugate vaccine was immunogenic, eliciting high antibody responses to the capsular polysaccharide of Hib and to diphtheria toxin. Passively transferred immune serum protected infant rats against challenge with the Hib Eagan strain and exhibited strong neutralizing activity against diphtheria toxin both in vitro and in vivo. The finding that TCI of rats can elicit antibody responses surpassing the minimum levels required for protective immunity against Hib and diphtheria suggests that this immunization strategy holds a lot of promise for future pediatric use. However, further studies are required to confirm the potential of TCI with glycoconjugate vaccines in humans.

  14. Characterization of a novel citrus tristeza virus genotype within three cross-protecting source GFMS12 sub-isolates in South Africa by means of Illumina sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zablocki, Olivier; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    Tristeza disease (caused by citrus tristeza virus, CTV) is currently controlled in South Africa by means of cross-protection. In this study, we characterized the CTV populations of three grapefruit mild strain 12 (GFMS12) single-aphid-transmission-derived sub-isolates at the whole-genome level using Illumina sequencing technology. A novel South African isolate (CT-ZA3, of the T68 genotype) was shown to be the dominant genotype in all GFMS12 sub-isolates tested, along with reads unique to various other genotypes occurring as minor components. Uncertainty remains as to the significance of these minor components.

  15. Informing Food Protection Education: A Project to Define and Classify Resources for a Cross-Disciplinary Expert Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck-Hamlin, Donna; Pierquet, Jennifer; McClellan, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of the September 2001 attacks, the U.S. government founded the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) with responsibility to develop a National Infrastructure Protection Plan for securing critical infrastructures and key resources. DHS established interdisciplinary networks of academic expertise administered through Centers of…

  16. Cross protection against fowl cholera disease with the use of recombinant Pasteurella multocida FHAB2 peptides vaccine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been demonstrated that fhaB2 (filamentous hemagglutinin) is an important virulence factor for P. multocida in development of fowl cholera disease and that recombinant FHAB2 peptides derived from P. multocida, Pm-1059, protect turkeys against Pm-1059 challenge. To test the hypothesis that rFHA...

  17. Informing Food Protection Education: A Project to Define and Classify Resources for a Cross-Disciplinary Expert Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck-Hamlin, Donna; Pierquet, Jennifer; McClellan, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of the September 2001 attacks, the U.S. government founded the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) with responsibility to develop a National Infrastructure Protection Plan for securing critical infrastructures and key resources. DHS established interdisciplinary networks of academic expertise administered through Centers of…

  18. Toll-like receptor 2- and 6-mediated stimulation by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 induces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cross tolerance in mice, which results in protection from tumor necrosis factor alpha but in only partial protection from lethal LPS doses.

    PubMed

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F

    2003-08-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cytokine release was studied in mice pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of MALP-2. No biologically active TNF-alpha could be detected in the serum of MALP-2-treated animals when challenged with LPS 24 or 72 h later, whereas suppression of LPS-dependent interleukin (IL)-6 lasted for only 24 h. Protection from lethal TNF-alpha shock was studied in galactosamine-treated mice. Dose dependently, MALP-2 prevented death from lethal TNF-alpha doses in TLR4(-/-) but not in TLR2(-/-) mice, with protection lasting from 5 to 24 h. To assay protection from LPS, mice were pretreated with MALP-2 doses of up to 10 micro g. Five and 24 h later, the animals were simultaneously sensitized and challenged by intravenous coinjection of galactosamine and a lethal dose of 50 ng of LPS. There was only limited protection (four of seven mice survived) when mice were challenged 5 h after MALP-2 pretreatment, and no protection when mice were challenged at later times. The high effectiveness of MALP-2 in suppressing TNF-alpha, the known ways of biological inactivation, and low pyrogenicity make MALP-2 a potential candidate for clinical use.

  19. Genotype composition of populations of grapefruit-cross-protecting citrus tristeza virus strain GFMS12 in different host plants and aphid-transmitted sub-isolates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katherine Anne; Hlela, Quinsile; Zablocki, Olivier; Read, David; van Vuuren, Stephanus; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes severe losses in grapefruit production in South Africa and requires mild-strain cross-protection to maintain production. Unfortunately, cross-protection breakdown of the pre-immunizing CTV grapefruit mild source GFMS12 is prevalent in grapefruit in South Africa. The CTV genotype composition of the GFMS12 population inoculated onto different hosts was determined by sequencing part of ORF1a and the p23 gene of multiple clones from each plant. Analysis of the GFMS12 population in Mexican lime and Marsh and Star Ruby grapefruit varieties revealed that at least four genotypes occur in the GFMS12 population and that genotype compositions differed amongst the populations in different host plants. Single-aphid-transmitted sub-isolates derived from the GFMS12 mother population on Mexican lime appeared to contain three populations of a mixture of VT-like and recombinant B165/VT-like genotypes; a mixture of recombinant RB/VT- and B165/VT-like genotypes; and a single recombinant B165/VT-like genotype. This study underlines the importance of determining the genotype composition of a potential CTV pre-immunizing source on a range of inoculated host species before utilization.

  20. Cross-protection against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus mediated by a CD4+ T-cell clone specific for an envelope glycoprotein epitope of Lassa virus.

    PubMed Central

    La Posta, V J; Auperin, D D; Kamin-Lewis, R; Cole, G A

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the Lassa virus (LV) envelope glycoprotein precursor, V-LSGPC, was used to study the basis of LV-induced cross-protective immunity against the closely related arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). C3H/HeJ mice primed with V-LSGPC developed neither circulating antibodies nor CD8+ cytotoxic T cells specific for LCMV, yet they resisted a normally lethal LCMV challenge. Spleen cells from such mice gave a proliferative response to LCMV in vitro that was inhibitable by anti-CD4 antibody. Synthetic peptides corresponding to predicted T-cell sites common to the envelope glycoprotein precursor (GP-C) of LV and that of LCMV were used to map the specificity of the proliferative response to an epitope located between amino acids 403 and 417 of LV GP-C. Several CD4+ T-cell clones specific for the 403-417 peptide were isolated and found to produce gamma interferon in response to both the peptide and LCMV. One of these clones, C9, was selected for further study. C9 lysed I-AK-bearing target cells, and when adoptively transferred to C3H/HeJ mice, it was capable of mediating both a peptide-specific delayed hypersensitivity reaction and resistance to lethal LCMV challenge. These collective findings demonstrate, for the first time, that CD4+ T cells can play a major role in arenavirus-specific cross-protective immunity. PMID:7684468

  1. Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil and its majority compound 1,8-cineole at sublethal amounts induce no direct and cross protection in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538.

    PubMed

    Gomes Neto, Nelson Justino; Luz, Isabelle da Silva; Tavares, Adassa Gama; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the inhibitory efficacy of Rosmarinus officinalis essential L. (ROEO) and 1,8-cineole (CIN) in inhibiting the growth and survival of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and the induction of direct and bacterial cross protection (lactic acid pH 5.2; NaCl 100 g/L; high temperature 45°C) were evaluated following exposure to sublethal and increasing amounts of these treatments in meat broth. All of the concentrations of the ROEO and CIN examined in this study (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], 1/2 MIC, and 1/4 MIC) inhibited the viability of S. aureus throughout the 120 min of exposure. The overnight exposure of S. aureus to sublethal amounts of both ROEO or CIN in meat broth did not result in direct or cross protection. Cells progressively subcultured (24-h cycles) in meat broth with increasing amounts of ROEO or CIN showed no increased direct tolerance. These results reveal the antimicrobial efficacy of ROEO and CIN for use in food conservation systems as anti-S. aureus compounds given their efficacy at inhibiting bacterial growth, in addition to their lack of induction for the development of homologous and heterologous resistance.

  2. Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Antibodies Directed against Pandemic H1N1 2009 Virus Are Protective in a Highly Sensitive DBA/2 Mouse Influenza Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Adrianus C. M.; deBeauchamp, Jennifer; Krauss, Scott; Rubrum, Adam; Webb, Ashley D.; Webster, Robert G.; McElhaney, Janet; Webby, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to rapidly respond to an emerging influenza pandemic is hampered somewhat by the lack of a susceptible small-animal model. To develop a more sensitive model, we pathotyped 18 low-pathogenic non-mouse-adapted influenza A viruses of human and avian origin in DBA/2 and C57BL/6 mice. The majority of the isolates (13/18) induced severe morbidity and mortality in DBA/2 mice upon intranasal challenge with 1 million infectious doses. Also, at a 100-fold-lower dose, more than 50% of the viruses induced severe weight loss, and mice succumbed to the infection. In contrast, only two virus strains were pathogenic for C57BL/6 mice upon high-dose inoculation. Therefore, DBA/2 mice are a suitable model to validate influenza A virus vaccines and antiviral therapies without the need for extensive viral adaptation. Correspondingly, we used the DBA/2 model to assess the level of protection afforded by preexisting pandemic H1N1 2009 virus (H1N1pdm) cross-reactive human antibodies detected by a hemagglutination inhibition assay. Passive transfer of these antibodies prior to infection protected mice from H1N1pdm-induced pathogenicity, demonstrating the effectiveness of these cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies in vivo. PMID:20484500

  3. Cross protection between the first and second waves of the 1918 influenza pandemic among soldiers of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Kandace

    2015-12-16

    This research analyses morbidity and mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic among Ontario soldiers in the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). This paper asks: did exposure to influenza during the first wave confer protection against illness and death during the second wave of the pandemic? Pneumonia and influenza (P&I) cases and deaths among Ontario soldiers were transcribed from the 1918 Admission and Discharge books for the CEF. Following the methods of Barry et al. [10], hospital admission and mortality rates for P&I were compared for new recruits (<1 month service) and seasoned soldiers (>1 month service) in order to assess the possibility of cross protection during successive waves of the pandemic. The first wave of the 1918 influenza pandemic occurred between March and May of 1918, with the second wave erupting from September to December. Mortality in the second wave was more severe, with a case fatality rate of 4.7%, which was more than double the rate of 2.3% from March to May. Seasoned soldiers experienced 82.5% protection from illness due to P&I illness in the fall, and 84% protection from death. The morbidity data for the soldier population of Ontario, data unavailable for civilians, confirms the presence of a herald wave in Ontario. The findings support the hypothesis that exposure to influenza during the first wave of the pandemic had a protective effect during the second more deadly wave in the fall. Regional heterogeneity characterized the pandemic among soldiers in Ontario. Conscription practices may have funnelled vulnerable recruits, such as rural farmers, into training camps after the first wave of the pandemic, but prior to the second wave. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adverse life events and delinquent behavior among Kenyan adolescents: a cross-sectional study on the protective role of parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kabiru, Caroline W; Elung'ata, Patricia; Mojola, Sanyu A; Beguy, Donatien

    2014-01-01

    Past research provides strong evidence that adverse life events heighten the risk of delinquent behavior among adolescents. Urban informal (slum) settlements in sub-Saharan Africa are marked by extreme adversity. However, the prevalence and consequences of adverse life events as well as protective factors that can mitigate the effects of exposure to these events in slum settlements is largely understudied. We examine two research questions. First, are adverse life events experienced at the individual and household level associated with a higher likelihood of delinquent behavior among adolescents living in two slums in Nairobi, Kenya? Second, are parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem protective against delinquency in a context of high adversity? We used cross-sectional data from 3,064 males and females aged 12-19 years who participated in the Transitions to Adulthood Study. We examined the extent to which a composite index of adverse life events was associated with delinquent behavior (measured using a composite index derived from nine items). We also examined the direct and moderating effects of three protective factors: parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem. Fifty-four percent of adolescents reported at least one adverse life event, while 18% reported three or more adverse events. For both males and females, adversity was positively and significantly associated with delinquency in bivariate and multivariate models. Negative associations were observed between the protective factors and delinquency. Significant adverse events × protective factor interaction terms were observed for parental monitoring (females and males), religiosity (males), and self-esteem (females). Similar to research in high income countries, adverse life events are associated with an increased likelihood of delinquent behavior among adolescents living in urban slums in Kenya, a low-income country. However, parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem may

  5. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Jiro; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Saito, Noriko; Shimuta, Ken; Koizumi, Nobuo; Koley, Hemanta

    2017-07-01

    Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  6. CD4+ T Cells Recognizing PE/PPE Antigens Directly or via Cross Reactivity Are Protective against Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sayes, Fadel; Pawlik, Alexandre; Frigui, Wafa; Gröschel, Matthias I.; Crommelynck, Samuel; Fayolle, Catherine; Cia, Felipe; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Bottai, Daria; Leclerc, Claude; Brosch, Roland; Majlessi, Laleh

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), possesses at least three type VII secretion systems, ESX-1, -3 and -5 that are actively involved in pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction. We recently showed that an attenuated Mtb vaccine candidate (Mtb Δppe25-pe19), which lacks the characteristic ESX-5-associated pe/ppe genes, but harbors all other components of the ESX-5 system, induces CD4+ T-cell immune responses against non-esx-5-associated PE/PPE protein homologs. These T cells strongly cross-recognize the missing esx-5-associated PE/PPE proteins. Here, we characterized the fine composition of the functional cross-reactive Th1 effector subsets specific to the shared PE/PPE epitopes in mice immunized with the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate. We provide evidence that the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 strain, despite its significant attenuation, is comparable to the WT Mtb strain with regard to: (i) its antigenic repertoire related to the different ESX systems, (ii) the induced Th1 effector subset composition, (iii) the differentiation status of the Th1 cells induced, and (iv) its particular features at stimulating the innate immune response. Indeed, we found significant contribution of PE/PPE-specific Th1 effector cells in the protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection. These results offer detailed insights into the immune mechanisms underlying the remarkable protective efficacy of the live attenuated Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate, as well as the specific potential of PE/PPE proteins as protective immunogens. PMID:27467705

  7. Immunogenicity and Cross Protection in Mice Afforded by Pandemic H1N1 Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Containing Wild-Type Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Petukhova, Galina; Korenkov, Daniil; Losev, Igor; Smolonogina, Tatiana; Tretiak, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Shcherbik, Svetlana; Bousse, Tatiana; Rudenko, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    Since conserved viral proteins of influenza virus, such as nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 protein, are the main targets for virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), we hypothesized that introduction of the NP gene of wild-type virus into the genome of vaccine reassortants could lead to better immunogenicity and afford better protection. This paper describes in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies of two new reassortants of pandemic H1N1 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) candidates. One had the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from A/South Africa/3626/2013 H1N1 wild-type virus on the A/Leningrad/134/17/57 master donor virus backbone (6 : 2 formulation) while the second had the HA, NA, and NP genes of the wild-type virus on the same backbone (5 : 3 formulation). Although both LAIVs induced similar antibody immune responses, the 5 : 3 LAIV provoked greater production of virus-specific CTLs than the 6 : 2 variant. Furthermore, the 5 : 3 LAIV-induced CTLs had higher in vivo cytotoxic activity, compared to 6 : 2 LAIV. Finally, the 5 : 3 LAIV candidate afforded greater protection against infection and severe illness than the 6 : 2 LAIV. Inclusion in LAIV of the NP gene from wild-type influenza virus is a new approach to inducing cross-reactive cell-mediated immune responses and cross protection against pandemic influenza. PMID:28210631

  8. Induction of cross-protective immunity against influenza A virus H5N1 by an intranasal vaccine with extracts of mushroom mycelia.

    PubMed

    Ichinohe, Takeshi; Ainai, Akira; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Yukihito; Maeyama, Jun-Ichi; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Takahashi, Hidehiro; Sawa, Hirofumi; Tamura, Shin-Ichi; Chiba, Joe; Kurata, Takeshi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    The identification of a safe and effective adjuvant that is able to enhance mucosal immune responses is necessary for the development of an efficient inactivated intranasal influenza vaccine. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of extracts of mycelia derived from edible mushrooms as adjuvants for intranasal influenza vaccine. The adjuvant effect of extracts of mycelia was examined by intranasal co-administration of the extracts and inactivated A/PR8 (H1N1) influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine in BALB/c mice. The inactivated vaccine in combination with mycelial extracts induced a high anti-A/PR8 HA-specific IgA and IgG response in nasal washings and serum, respectively. Virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses were also induced by administration of the vaccine with extract of mycelia, resulting in protection against lethal lung infection with influenza virus A/PR8. In addition, intranasal administration of NIBRG14 vaccine derived from the influenza A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1) virus strain administered in conjunction with mycelial extracts from Phellinus linteus conferred cross-protection against heterologous influenza A/Indonesia/6/2005 virus challenge in the nasal infection model. In addition, mycelial extracts induced proinflammatory cytokines and CD40 expression in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. These results suggest that mycelial extract-adjuvanted vaccines can confer cross-protection against variant H5N1 influenza viruses. The use of extracts of mycelia derived from edible mushrooms is proposed as a new safe and effective mucosal adjuvant for use for nasal vaccination against influenza virus infection. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. CD4+ T Cells Recognizing PE/PPE Antigens Directly or via Cross Reactivity Are Protective against Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Sayes, Fadel; Pawlik, Alexandre; Frigui, Wafa; Gröschel, Matthias I; Crommelynck, Samuel; Fayolle, Catherine; Cia, Felipe; Bancroft, Gregory J; Bottai, Daria; Leclerc, Claude; Brosch, Roland; Majlessi, Laleh

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), possesses at least three type VII secretion systems, ESX-1, -3 and -5 that are actively involved in pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction. We recently showed that an attenuated Mtb vaccine candidate (Mtb Δppe25-pe19), which lacks the characteristic ESX-5-associated pe/ppe genes, but harbors all other components of the ESX-5 system, induces CD4+ T-cell immune responses against non-esx-5-associated PE/PPE protein homologs. These T cells strongly cross-recognize the missing esx-5-associated PE/PPE proteins. Here, we characterized the fine composition of the functional cross-reactive Th1 effector subsets specific to the shared PE/PPE epitopes in mice immunized with the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate. We provide evidence that the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 strain, despite its significant attenuation, is comparable to the WT Mtb strain with regard to: (i) its antigenic repertoire related to the different ESX systems, (ii) the induced Th1 effector subset composition, (iii) the differentiation status of the Th1 cells induced, and (iv) its particular features at stimulating the innate immune response. Indeed, we found significant contribution of PE/PPE-specific Th1 effector cells in the protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection. These results offer detailed insights into the immune mechanisms underlying the remarkable protective efficacy of the live attenuated Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate, as well as the specific potential of PE/PPE proteins as protective immunogens.

  10. Comparative studies of infectivity, immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccines containing nucleoprotein from cold-adapted or wild-type influenza virus in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Korenkov, Daniil; Smolonogina, Tatiana; Tretiak, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Rekstin, Andrey; Naykhin, Anatoly; Shcherbik, Svetlana; Pearce, Nicholas; Chen, Li-Mei; Bousse, Tatiana; Rudenko, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to improve an existing live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) by including nucleoprotein (NP) from wild-type virus rather than master donor virus (MDV). H7N9 LAIV reassortants with 6:2 (NP from MDV) and 5:3 (NP from wild-type virus) genome compositions were compared with regard to their growth characteristics, induction of humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and ability to protect mice against homologous and heterologous challenge viruses. Although, in general, the 6:2 reassortant induced greater cell-mediated immunity in C57BL6 mice than the 5:3 vaccine, mice immunized with the 5:3 LAIV were better protected against heterologous challenge. The 5:3 LAIV-induced CTLs also had better in vivo killing activity against target cells loaded with the NP366 epitope of recent influenza viruses. Modification of the genome of reassortant vaccine viruses by incorporating the NP gene from wild-type viruses represents a simple strategy to improve the immunogenicity and cross-protection of influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative studies of infectivity, immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccines containing nucleoprotein from cold-adapted or wild-type influenza virus in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Korenkov, Daniil; Smolonogina, Tatiana; Tretiak, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Rekstin, Andrey; Naykhin, Anatoly; Shcherbik, Svetlana; Pearce, Nicholas; Chen, Li-Mei; Bousse, Tatiana; Rudenko, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to improve an existing live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) by including nucleoprotein (NP) from wild-type virus rather than master donor virus (MDV). H7N9 LAIV reassortants with 6:2 (NP from MDV) and 5:3 (NP from wild-type virus) genome compositions were compared with regard to their growth characteristics, induction of humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and ability to protect mice against homologous and heterologous challenge viruses. Although, in general, the 6:2 reassortant induced greater cell-mediated immunity in C57BL6 mice than the 5:3 vaccine, mice immunized with the 5:3 LAIV were better protected against heterologous challenge. The 5:3 LAIV-induced CTLs also had better in vivo killing activity against target cells loaded with the NP366 epitope of recent influenza viruses. Modification of the genome of reassortant vaccine viruses by incorporating the NP gene from wild-type viruses represents a simple strategy to improve the immunogenicity and cross-protection of influenza vaccines. PMID:27829176

  12. Microneedle delivery of an M2e-TLR5 ligand fusion protein to skin confers broadly cross-protective influenza immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Zhong; Gill, Harvinder S; He, Cheng; Ou, Changbo; Wang, Li; Wang, Ying-Chun; Feng, Hao; Zhang, Han; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W

    2014-03-28

    Influenza vaccines with broad cross-protection are urgently needed to prevent an emerging influenza pandemic. A fusion protein of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5-agonist domains from flagellin and multiple repeats of the conserved extracellular domain of the influenza matrix protein 2 (M2e) was constructed, purified and evaluated as such a vaccine. A painless vaccination method suitable for possible self-administration using coated microneedle arrays was investigated for skin-targeted delivery of the fusion protein in a mouse model. The results demonstrate that microneedle immunization induced strong humoral as well as mucosal antibody responses and conferred complete protection against homo- and heterosubtypic lethal virus challenges. Protective efficacy with microneedles was found to be significantly better than that seen with conventional intramuscular injection, and comparable to that observed with intranasal immunization. Because of its advantages for administration, safety and storage, microneedle delivery of M2e-flagellin fusion protein is a promising approach for an easy-to-administer universal influenza vaccine.

  13. Satellite tobacco mosaic virus sequence variants with only five Nucleotide differences can interfere with each other in a cross protection-like phenomenon in plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Dodds, J. Allan

    1994-01-01

    The type strain of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) contains two major variants, designated type 5 (T5) and type 6 (T6), which can be easily distinguished by RNase protection analyses. Clones containing cDNA of representative T5 and T6 STMV genomes have only five single-base differences in the entire 1059-nucleotide genome, and RNA transcribed from each clone is highly infectious when inoculated onto tobacco plants. The different RNase protection assay patterns can be used as genetic markers to identify individual STMV variants and to follow the interactions of variants and their progeny during coinfections in plants. The study described here investigated the effects of coinoculation and various delayed inoculations of T5 and T6 variants on the composition of the progeny STMV populations in systemically infected tobacco tissues. When T5 and T6 STMV RNAs were coinoculated or inoculated with 1-hr delays, the progeny from individual plants most often contained a mixture of T5 and T6 genomes. However, when there was a 24-hr delay between inoculations, the balance of T5 and T6 components in the progeny populations shifted toward predominance of the first variant inoculated. With delays of 3 or 7 days only the first variant was evident in the progeny populations, indicating that established replication of one STMV variant interferes with replication of another in a manner similar to the cross protection phenomenon.

  14. Cross-protective vaccine efficacy of the bivalent HPV vaccine against HPV31 is associated with humoral immune responses: results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kemp, Troy J; Pan, David Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Cortes, Bernal; Katki, Hormuzd; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiller, John T; Gonzalez, Paula; Penrose, Kerri; Lowy, Douglas R; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the role of antibody responses as potential mechanism for the cross-protective vaccine-efficacies (VE) observed from randomized clinical trials of the HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine. Results HPV31 cases had lower HPV16 antibody levels than controls (OR 4th quartile compared with 1st quartile = 0.63; 95%CI: 0.36-1.08; p-trend = 0.03). HPV31 cases were also less likely to have detectable HPV31 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity than controls. No statistically significant differences by HPV18 antibody or HPV45 neutralization were observed among HPV45 cases and controls. Protection against HPV58 was not associated with any of the markers, confirming the specificity of our findings. Samples are from three-dose HPV vaccine recipients from the Costa Rica HPV16/18 vaccine trial. Women with a new HPV31, HPV45, or HPV58 infections over four years of follow-up were compared with randomly selected control women--with no new infection with HPV31/45/58--with respect to HPV16 and HPV18 antibody, HPV31, HPV45, and HPV58 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity. High HPV16 levels and avidity, and the ability to neutralize HPV31 were associated with protection against newly detected HPV31 infections, suggesting that the partial VE demonstrated for HPV31 is likely to be mediated at least in part through antibodies induced by HPV16/18 vaccination.

  15. Cross-Reactive Protection against Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Infection by Enteropathogenic E. coli in a Mouse Model ▿

    PubMed Central

    Calderon Toledo, Carla; Arvidsson, Ida; Karpman, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are related attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens. The genes responsible for the A/E pathology are carried on a chromosomal pathogenicity island termed the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Both pathogens share a high degree of homology in the LEE and additional O islands. EHEC prevalence is much lower in areas where EPEC is endemic. This may be due to the development of antibodies against common EPEC and EHEC antigens. This study investigated the hypothesis that EPEC infections may protect against EHEC infections. We used a mouse model to inoculate BALB/c mice intragastrically, first with EPEC and then with EHEC (E. coli O157:H7). Four control groups received either a nonpathogenic E. coli (NPEC) strain followed by EHEC (NPEC/EHEC), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) followed by EHEC (PBS/EHEC), EPEC/PBS, or PBS/PBS. Mice were monitored for weight loss and symptoms. EPEC colonized the intestine after challenge, and mice developed serum antibodies to intimin and E. coli secreted protein B (encoded in the LEE). Prechallenge with an EPEC strain had a protective effect after EHEC infection, as only a few mice developed mild symptoms, from which they recovered. These mice had an increase in body weight similar to that in control animals, and tissue morphology exhibited mild intestinal changes and normal renal histology. All mice that were not prechallenged with the EPEC strain developed mild to severe symptoms after EHEC infection, with weight loss as well as intestinal and renal histopathological changes. These data suggest that EPEC may protect against EHEC infection in this mouse model. PMID:21402761

  16. The non-pathogenic Australian rabbit calicivirus RCV-A1 provides temporal and partial cross protection to lethal Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus infection which is not dependent on antibody titres

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The endemic non-pathogenic Australian rabbit calicivirus RCV-A1 is known to provide some cross protection to lethal infection with the closely related Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV). Despite its obvious negative impacts on viral biocontrol of introduced European rabbits in Australia, little is known about the extent and mechanisms of this cross protection. In this study 46 rabbits from a colony naturally infected with RCV-A1 were exposed to RHDV. Survival rates and survival times did not correlate with titres of serum antibodies specific to RCV-A1 or cross reacting to RHDV, but were instead influenced by the time between infection with the two viruses, demonstrating for the first time that the cross protection to lethal RHDV infection is transient. These findings are an important step towards a better understanding of the complex interactions of co-occurring pathogenic and non-pathogenic lagoviruses. PMID:23834204

  17. Brominated 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-ylmethyls: Photolabile protecting groups with biologically useful cross-sections for two photon photolysis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Toshiaki; Wang, Samuel S.-H.; Dantzker, Jami L.; Dore, Timothy M.; Bybee, Wendy J.; Callaway, Edward M.; Denk, Winfried; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1999-01-01

    Photochemical release (uncaging) of bioactive messengers with three-dimensional spatial resolution in light-scattering media would be greatly facilitated if the photolysis could be powered by pairs of IR photons rather than the customary single UV photons. The quadratic dependence on light intensity would confine the photolysis to the focus point of the laser, and the longer wavelengths would be much less affected by scattering. However, previous caged messengers have had very small cross sections for two-photon excitation in the IR region. We now show that brominated 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-ylmethyl esters and carbamates efficiently release carboxylates and amines on photolysis, with one- and two-photon cross sections up to one or two orders of magnitude better than previously available. These advantages are demonstrated on neurons in brain slices from rat cortex and hippocampus excited by glutamate uncaged from N-(6-bromo-7-hydroxycoumarin-4-ylmethoxycarbonyl)-l-glutamate (Bhc-glu). Conventional UV photolysis of Bhc-glu requires less than one-fifth the intensities needed by one of the best previous caged glutamates, γ-(α-carboxy-2-nitrobenzyl)-l-glutamate (CNB-glu). Two-photon photolysis with raster-scanned femtosecond IR pulses gives the first three-dimensionally resolved maps of the glutamate sensitivity of neurons in intact slices. Bhc-glu and analogs should allow more efficient and three-dimensionally localized uncaging and photocleavage, not only in cell biology and neurobiology but also in many technological applications. PMID:9990000

  18. Peptide nanofiber hydrogel adjuvanted live virus vaccine enhances cross-protective immunity to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangdong; Galliher-Beckley, Amy; Huang, Hongzhou; Sun, Xiuzhi; Shi, Jishu

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is prevalent in swine farms worldwide and is a major source of economic loss and animal suffering. Rapid genetic variation of PRRSV makes it difficult for current vaccines to confer protection against newly emerging strains. We recently demonstrated that a novel peptide nanofiber hydrogel (H9e) could act as a potent adjuvant for killed H1N1 vaccines. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate H9e as an adjuvant for PRRSV modified live virus (MLV) vaccines. Pigs were vaccinated with Ingelvac PRRSV MLV with or without H9e adjuvant before being challenged with the VR-2332 (parental vaccine strain) or MN184A (genetically diverse strain) PRRSV. Pigs vaccinated with MLV+H9e had higher levels of circulating vaccine virus. More importantly, pigs vaccinated with MLV+H9e had improved protection against challenge by both PRRSV strains, as demonstrated by reduced challenge-induced viremia compared with pigs vaccinated with MLV alone. Pigs vaccinated with MLV+H9e had lower frequency of T-regulatory cells and IL-10 production but higher frequency of Th/memory cells and IFN-γ secretion than that in pigs vaccinated with MLV alone. Taken together, our studies suggest that the peptide nanofiber hydrogel H9e, when combined with the PRRSV MLV vaccine, can enhance vaccine efficacy against two different PRRSV strains by modulating both host humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:23933333

  19. Cross-protective effect of a novel multi-antigen-chimeric vaccine against Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liquan; Fan, Ziyao; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Song, Baifen; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcal and streptococcal species are the most common pathogens that cause bovine mastitis. Induction of a broad-spectrum protective immunity against staphylococci and streptococci by combining multiple antigens into a single vaccine is highlighted. To develop a universal vaccine candidate, a GapC1-tIsdB-TRAP (GIT) construct was generated. The GIT contained the truncated GapC from Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and truncated IsdB and full-length TRAP from Staphylococcus aureus. The humoral and cellular immune responses elicited by GIT were evaluated in mice. Antibody levels against GIT displayed a consistent tendency with antibody levels against GapC, IsdB and TRAP. The level of IFN-γ was higher in the GIT group than in the IsdB group (P<0.05), and the level of IL-4 was higher in the GIT group than in the GapC or TRAP groups (P<0.05). The GIT group showed an improved protection against Streptococcus in comparison with GapC group. A significant difference in S. aureus challenge test was detected between the GIT group and the IsdB or TRAP groups (P<0.05) in per cent survival of mice, and a synergistic immunoprotection against S. aureus or S. dysgalactiae was produced in the GIT group. These results suggested that the GIT would be a promising common vaccine candidate against S. aureus and Streptococcus. © 2014 The Authors.

  20. Evaluation of the antigenic relatedness and cross-protective immunity of the neuraminidase between human influenza A (H1N1) virus and highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuhua; Liu, Feng; Zeng, Hui; Sheu, Tiffany; Achenbach, Jenna E; Veguilla, Vic; Gubareva, Larisa V; Garten, Rebecca; Smith, Catherine; Yang, Hua; Stevens, James; Xu, Xiyan; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2014-04-01

    To determine the genetic and antigenic relatedness as well as the cross-protective immunity of human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza virus neuraminidase (NA), we immunized rabbits with either a baculovirus-expressed recombinant NA from A/Beijing/262/95 (BJ/262) H1N1 or A/Hong Kong/483/97 (HK/483) H5N1 virus. Cross-reactive antibody responses were evaluated by multiple serological assays and cross-protection against H5N1 virus challenge was evaluated in mice. In a neuraminidase inhibition (NI) test, the antisera exhibited substantial inhibition of NA activity of the homologous virus, but failed to inhibit the NA activity of heterologous virus. However, these antisera exhibited low levels of cross-reactivity measured by plaque size reduction, replication inhibition, single radial hemolysis, and ELISA assays. Passive immunization with HK/483 NA-specific antisera significantly reduced virus replication and disease, and afforded almost complete protection against lethal homologous virus challenge in mice. However, passive immunization with BJ/262 (H1N1) NA-specific antisera was ineffective at providing cross-protection against lethal H5N1 virus challenge and only slightly reduced weight loss. Substantial amino acid variation among the NA antigenic sites was observed between BJ/262 and HK/483 virus, which was consistent with the lack of cross-reactive NI activity by the antibody and limited cross-protective immunity in mice. These results show a strong correlation between the lack of cross-protective immunity and low structural similarities of NA from a human seasonal H1N1 virus and an avian H5N1 influenza virus.

  1. Cross-protective efficacy of Leishmania infantum LiHyD protein against tegumentary leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis species.

    PubMed

    Lage, Daniela Pagliara; Martins, Vívian Tamietti; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Costa, Lourena Emanuele; Tavares, Grasiele de Sousa Vieira; Ramos, Fernanda Fonseca; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel Angel; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2016-06-01

    Vaccination can be considered the most cost-effective strategy to control neglected diseases, but nowadays there is not an effective vaccine available against leishmaniasis. In the present study, a vaccine based on the combination of the Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein (LiHyD) with saponin was tested in BALB/c mice against infection caused by Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis species. This antigen was firstly identified in Leishmania infantum and showed to be protective against infection of BALB/c mice using this parasite species. The immunogenicity of rLiHyD/saponin vaccine was evaluated, and the results showed that immunized mice produced high levels of IFN-γ, IL-12 and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with rLiHyD, as well as by using L. major or L. braziliensis protein extracts. After challenge, vaccinated animals showed significant reductions in the infected footpad swellings, as well as in the parasite burden in the infection site, liver, spleen, and infected paws draining lymph nodes, when compared to those that were inoculated with the vaccine diluent (saline) or immunized with saponin. The immunization of rLiHyD without adjuvant was not protective against both challenges. The partial protection obtained by the rLiHyD/saponin vaccine was associated with a parasite-specific IL-12-dependent IFN-γ secretion, which was produced mainly by CD4(+) T cells. In these animals, a decrease in the parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 responses, associated with the presence of high levels of LiHyD- and parasite-specific IgG2a isotype antibodies, were also observed. The present study showed that a hypothetical protein that was firstly identified in L. infantum, when combined to a Th1 adjuvant, was able to confer a cross-protection against highly infective stationary-phase promastigotes of two Leishmania species causing tegumentary leishmaniasis.

  2. Protection against lethal enterovirus 71 challenge in mice by a recombinant vaccine candidate containing a broadly cross-neutralizing epitope within the VP2 EF loop.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longfa; He, Delei; Li, Zhiqun; Zheng, Jun; Yang, Lisheng; Yu, Miao; Yu, Hai; Chen, Yixin; Que, Yuqiong; Shih, James Wai Kuo; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2014-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and is associated with several severe neurological complications in the Asia-Pacific region. Here, we evaluated that while passive transfer of neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nMAb) against the VP2 protein protect against lethal EV71 infection in BALB/c mice. Protective nMAb were mapped to residues 141-155 of VP2 by peptide ELISA. High-resolution structural analysis showed that the epitope is part of the VP2 EF loop, which is the "puff" region that forms the "southern rim" of the canyon. Moreover, a three-dimensional structural characterization for the puff region with prior neutralizing epitopes and receptor-binding sites that can serve to inform vaccine strategies. Interestingly, using hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier, we demonstrated that the cross-neutralizing EV71 antibodies were induced, and the VP2 epitope immunized mice serum also conferred 100% in vivo passive protection. The mechanism of in vivo protection conferred by VP2 nMAb is in part attributed to the in vitro neutralizing titer and ability to bind authentic viral particles. Importantly, the anti-VP2(aa141-155) antibodies could inhibit the binding of human serum to EV71 virions showed that the VP2 epitope is immunodominant. Collectively, our results suggest that a broad-spectrum vaccine strategy targeting the high-affinity epitope of VP2 EF loop may elicits effective immune responses against EV71 infection.

  3. Protection against Lethal Enterovirus 71 Challenge in Mice by a Recombinant Vaccine Candidate Containing a Broadly Cross-Neutralizing Epitope within the VP2 EF Loop

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Longfa; He, Delei; Li, Zhiqun; Zheng, Jun; Yang, Lisheng; Yu, Miao; Yu, Hai; Chen, Yixin; Que, Yuqiong; Shih, James Wai Kuo; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2014-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and is associated with several severe neurological complications in the Asia-Pacific region. Here, we evaluated that while passive transfer of neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nMAb) against the VP2 protein protect against lethal EV71 infection in BALB/c mice. Protective nMAb were mapped to residues 141-155 of VP2 by peptide ELISA. High-resolution structural analysis showed that the epitope is part of the VP2 EF loop, which is the “puff” region that forms the “southern rim” of the canyon. Moreover, a three-dimensional structural characterization for the puff region with prior neutralizing epitopes and receptor-binding sites that can serve to inform vaccine strategies. Interestingly, using hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier, we demonstrated that the cross-neutralizing EV71 antibodies were induced, and the VP2 epitope immunized mice serum also conferred 100% in vivo passive protection. The mechanism of in vivo protection conferred by VP2 nMAb is in part attributed to the in vitro neutralizing titer and ability to bind authentic viral particles. Importantly, the anti-VP2(aa141-155) antibodies could inhibit the binding of human serum to EV71 virions showed that the VP2 epitope is immunodominant. Collectively, our results suggest that a broad-spectrum vaccine strategy targeting the high-affinity epitope of VP2 EF loop may elicits effective immune responses against EV71 infection. PMID:24669278

  4. Cross-kingdom RNA trafficking and environmental RNAi for powerful innovative pre- and post-harvest plant protection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Thomas, Nicholas; Jin, Hailing

    2017-08-01

    ​Small RNA (sRNA) induces RNA interference (RNAi) in almost all eukaryotes. While sRNAs can move within an organism, they can also move between interacting organisms to induce gene silencing, a phenomenon called 'cross-kingdom RNAi'. Some sRNAs from pathogens or pests move into host cells and suppress host immunity in both plants and animals; whereas some host sRNAs travel into pathogen/pest cells to inhibit their virulence. Moreover, uptake of exogenous RNAs from the environment was recently discovered in certain fungal pathogens, which makes it possible to suppress fungal diseases by directly applying pathogen-targeting RNAs on crops and post-harvest products. This new-generation of RNA-based fungicides is powerful, environmentally friendly, and can be easily adapted to control multiple diseases simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Human rights protections and HIV prevalence among MSM who sell sex: Cross-country comparisons from a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Catherine E; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Reisner, Sari L; Mayer, Kenneth H; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Bärnighausen, Till

    2016-03-15

    Laws and policies can affect the HIV risk of key populations through a number of direct and indirect pathways. We investigated the association between HIV prevalence among men who engage in transactional sex and language in the penal code protecting sexual minorities, including men who have sex with men (MSM), and sex workers. HIV prevalence among men who engage in transactional sex was assessed through meta-analysis of published literature and country surveillance reports. Meta-regression was used to determine the association between HIV prevalence and protective laws for sexual minorities and sex workers. Sixty-six reports representing 28 countries and 31,924 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Controlling for multiple study- and country-level variables, legal protection for sexual minorities was associated with a 10.9% (95% CI: 3.8-18.0%) and sex workers associated with a 7.0% (95% CI: 1.3-12.8%) decrease in country-level HIV prevalence among men who engage in transactional sex. Laws that seek to actively protect sex workers and MSM may be necessary to decrease HIV risk for this key population.

  6. Human rights protections and HIV prevalence among MSM who sell sex: Cross-country comparisons from a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G.; Reisner, Sari L.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Bärnighausen, Till

    2016-01-01

    Laws and policies can affect the HIV risk of key populations through a number of direct and indirect pathways. We investigated the association between HIV prevalence among men who engage in transactional sex and language in the penal code protecting sexual minorities, including men who have sex with men (MSM), and sex workers. HIV prevalence among men who engage in transactional sex was assessed through meta-analysis of published literature and country surveillance reports. Meta-regression was used to determine the association between HIV prevalence and protective laws for sexual minorities and sex workers. Sixty-six reports representing 28 countries and 31,924 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Controlling for multiple study- and country-level variables, legal protection for sexual minorities was associated with a 10.9% (95% CI: 3.8 to 18.0%) and sex workers associated with a 7.0% (95% CI: 1.3 to 12.8%) decrease in country-level HIV prevalence among men who engage in transactional sex. Laws that seek to actively protect sex workers and MSM may be necessary to decrease HIV risk for this key population. PMID:26979302

  7. Concurrent and cross-season protection of inactivated influenza vaccine against A(H1N1)pdm09 illness among young children: 2012-2013 case-control evaluation of influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanxi; Xu, Jianxiong; Lin, Jinyan; Wang, Ming; Li, Kuibiao; Ge, Jing; Thompson, Mark G

    2015-06-09

    In 2012-2013, we examined 1729 laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza cases matched 1:1 with healthy controls and estimated influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) to be 67% (95% confidence interval=58-74%) for ages 8 months to 6 years old. Among children aged 8-35 months old, VE for fully vaccinated children (73%, 60-81%) was significantly higher than VE for partially vaccinated children (55%, 33-70%). Significant cross-season protection from prior IIV3 was noted, including VE of 31% (8-48%) from IIV3 received in 2010-2011 against influenza illness in 2012--2013 without subsequent boosting doses.

  8. Protection of a Single Dose West Nile Virus Recombinant Subviral Particle Vaccine against Lineage 1 or 2 Strains and Analysis of the Cross-Reactivity with Usutu Virus

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurovirulent mosquito-borne flavivirus. High WNV virulence was mainly associated with lineage 1 strains, but recent outbreaks have unveiled circulation of highly virulent lineage 2 strains. Co-expression of flavivirus prM and E glycoproteins drives the assembly of recombinant subviral particles (RSPs) that share antigenic features with virions. Mouse immunization with lineage 1 WNV RSPs induced a potent humoral response against WNV with production of neutralizing antibodies. A single inoculation of RSPs formulated with Al(OH)3 as adjuvant protected mice against a lethal challenge with WNV strains from lineage 1 or 2. The cross-reactivity of the response elicited by these RSPs was analyzed against the related flavivirus Usutu virus (USUV), which shares multiple ecological and antigenic features with WNV. Immunization with WNV-RSPs increased specific, although low, antibody titers found upon subsequent USUV infection. PMID:25229345

  9. Identifying protective host gene expression signatures within the spleen during West Nile virus infection in the collaborative cross model.

    PubMed

    Green, Richard; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Sekine, Aimee; Ireton, Renee C; Ferris, Martin T; Hendrick, Duncan M; Voss, Kathleen; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Baric, Ralph; Heise, Mark; Gale, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Flaviviruses are hematophagous arthropod-viruses that pose global challenges to human health. Like Zika virus, West Nile Virus (WNV) is a flavivirus for which no approved vaccine exists [1]. The role host genetics play in early detection and response to WNV still remains largely unexplained. In order to capture the impact of genetic variation on innate immune responses, we studied gene expression following WNV infection using the collaborative cross (CC). The CC is a mouse genetics resource composed of hundreds of independently bred, octo-parental recombinant inbred mouse lines [2]. To accurately capture the host immune gene expression signatures of West Nile infection, we used the nanostring platform to evaluate expression in spleen tissue isolated from CC mice infected with WNV over a time course of 4, 7, and 12 days' post-infection [3]. Nanostring is a non-amplification based digital method to quantitate gene expression that uses color-coded molecular barcodes to detect hundreds of transcripts in a sample. Using this approach, we identified unique gene signatures in spleen tissue at days 4, 7, and 12 following WNV infection, which delineated distinct differences between asymptomatic and symptomatic CC lines. We also identified novel immune genes. Data was deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE86000.

  10. Financial protection of rural health insurance for patients with hypertension and diabetes: repeated cross-sectional surveys in rural China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Xiaojie; Zhao, Yang; Meng, Qingyue

    2016-09-08

    The New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) in rural China has been expanding in both population coverage and benefit package. China has also established an essential medicine policy in recent years to further reduce patients' medical expenditures and financial burden. This study aims to evaluate the impact of these policies on reducing medical expenditures and financial burden of patients diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes. This study used repeated cross-sectional surveys in 2011 and 2012 in three counties of Shandong Province. Outpatient and inpatient service expenditures and catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) were measured and analyzed. Medical expenditures for outpatient services significantly increased for hypertensive and diabetic patients within a 1 year period, while inpatient service expenditures remained unchanged. Although NCMS increased its reimbursement rate, hypertensive and diabetic patients still heavily suffered CHE from both outpatient and inpatient services. Outpatient services were more important factors than inpatient services contributing to non-communicable chronic diseases (NCD) patients' financial burden. The effects of NCMS expansion have been offset by the rapid escalation of medical expenditures. More attention should be paid to the design of NCMS benefit package to cover NCD outpatient services. There is also an urgent need to reform the current Fee for Service to other provider payment methods in order to control the escalating NCD medical expenditures.

  11. A cross-sectional study of Taenia solium in a multiple taeniid-endemic region reveals competition may be protective.

    PubMed

    Conlan, James V; Vongxay, Khamphouth; Khamlome, Boualam; Dorny, Pierre; Sripa, Banchob; Elliot, Aileen; Blacksell, Stuart D; Fenwick, Stanley; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2012-08-01

    We conducted cross-sectional surveys for taeniasis and cysticercosis in humans, pigs, and dogs in four northern provinces of Laos. Human cysticercosis and taeniasis prevalence was 2.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-3.0%) and 8.4% (95% CI = 6.9-9.9%), respectively. Eating uncooked beef, being male, province of residence, age, and ethnicity were significant risk factors for taeniasis and only province of residence was a significant risk factor for cystiercosis. Thirty-five human tapeworms were recovered during the survey and 33 (94.3%) and 2 (5.7%) were identified as Taenia saginata and T. solium, respectively. Maximum-likelihood adjusted prevalence of T. solium and T. hydatigena in pigs was 4.2% (95% CI = 0.5-7.9%) and 55.9% (95% CI = 47.5-64.3%), respectively, and T. hydatigena taeniasis in dogs was 4.8% (95% CI = 0.0-11.3%). Taenia hydatigena and T. saginata were the most prevalent taeniids in the respective pig and human populations and together may suppress T. solium transmission.

  12. A Cross-Sectional Study of Taenia solium in a Multiple Taeniid-Endemic Region Reveals Competition May be Protective

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, James V.; Vongxay, Khamphouth; Khamlome, Boualam; Dorny, Pierre; Sripa, Banchob; Elliot, Aileen; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Fenwick, Stanley; Thompson, R. C. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We conducted cross-sectional surveys for taeniasis and cysticercosis in humans, pigs, and dogs in four northern provinces of Laos. Human cysticercosis and taeniasis prevalence was 2.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–3.0%) and 8.4% (95% CI = 6.9–9.9%), respectively. Eating uncooked beef, being male, province of residence, age, and ethnicity were significant risk factors for taeniasis and only province of residence was a significant risk factor for cystiercosis. Thirty-five human tapeworms were recovered during the survey and 33 (94.3%) and 2 (5.7%) were identified as Taenia saginata and T. solium, respectively. Maximum-likelihood adjusted prevalence of T. solium and T. hydatigena in pigs was 4.2% (95% CI = 0.5–7.9%) and 55.9% (95% CI = 47.5–64.3%), respectively, and T. hydatigena taeniasis in dogs was 4.8% (95% CI = 0.0–11.3%). Taenia hydatigena and T. saginata were the most prevalent taeniids in the respective pig and human populations and together may suppress T. solium transmission. PMID:22855759

  13. Development of a vaccine of cross-linked heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxins that protects against Escherichia coli producing either enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Klipstein, F A; Engert, R F; Clements, J D

    1982-01-01

    A vaccine of cross-linked heat-stable (ST) and heat-labile (LT) toxins that protects against heterologous serotypes of strains of Escherichia coli which produce either the LT or ST enterotoxin was developed by conjugating ST to LT by the carbodiimide reaction. Three interrelated factors were found to affect the composition and properties of the final conjugate: (i) the amount of carbodiimide added to the toxins, (ii) the initial ratio of ST to LT, and (iii) the duration of the conjugation reaction. Optimal conjugation conditions were identified as a carbodiimide-to-toxin ratio of 10:1 by weight, an initial molar ratio of ST to LT of 100:1, and a conjugation reaction time of 96 h. This approach yielded a conjugate that contained 96% by moles and 36% by weight pure ST, determined with radioiodinated pure ST, and 34% by weight semi-pure ST, determined by the Lowry protein method. The retained antigenicities of the conjugated toxins, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, was greater than or equal to 82%, and their toxicities, as determined by the Y1 adrenal cell assay for LT and by the suckling mouse assay for ST, were reduced to less than or equal to 0.15%. Immunization of rats with this cross-linked ST-LT vaccine provided strong protection against challenge with either the LT or the ST toxin or with viable heterologous strains which produce these toxins, either singly or together. These observations indicate that conjugation of ST to LT results in a unique new immunogen in that ST acquires immunogenicity as a function of the reaction, LT retains most of its antigenicity, and the toxic properties of each individual toxin are greatly reduced. PMID:6749682

  14. Wounding induces resistance to pathogens with different lifestyles in tomato: role of ethylene in cross-protection.

    PubMed

    Francia, Doriana; Demaria, Daniele; Calderini, Ornella; Ferraris, Lucia; Valentino, Danila; Arcioni, Sergio; Tamietti, Giacomo; Cardinale, Francesca

    2007-11-01

    Many reports point to the existence of a network of regulatory signalling occurring in plants during the interaction with micro-organisms (biotic stress) and abiotic stresses such as wounding. However, the focus is on shared intermediates/components and/or common molecular outputs in differently triggered signalling pathways, and not on the degree and modes of effective influence between abiotic and biotic stresses nor the range of true plant-pathogen interactions open to such influence. We report on local and systemic wound-induced protection in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) to four pathogens with a range of lifestyles (Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici, Phytophthora capsici and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato). The role of ethylene (ET) in the phenomenon and in the induction by wounding of several markers of defense was investigated by using the never-ripe tomato mutant plants impaired in ET perception. We showed that PINIIb, PR1b, PR5, PR7 and peroxidase (POD) are influenced locally and/or systemically by wounding and, with the exception of POD activity, by ET perception. We also demonstrated that ET, although not essential, is positively (B. cinerea, P. capsici) or negatively (F. oxysporum, P. syringae pv. tomato) involved not only in basal but also in wound-induced resistance to each pathogen.

  15. A novel thiol antioxidant that crosses the blood brain barrier protects dopaminergic neurons in experimental models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bahat-Stroomza, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Offen, Daniel; Panet, Hana; Saada, Ann; Krool-Galron, Nili; Barzilai, Aari; Atlas, Daphne; Melamed, Eldad

    2005-02-01

    It is believed that oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in the loss of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) and that treatment with antioxidants might be neuroprotective. However, most currently available antioxidants cannot readily penetrate the blood brain barrier after systemic administration. We now report that AD4, the novel low molecular weight thiol antioxidant and the N-acytel cysteine (NAC) related compound, is capable of penetrating the brain and protects neurons in general and especially dopaminergic cells against various OS-generating neurotoxins in tissue cultures. Moreover, we found that treatment with AD4 markedly decreased the damage of dopaminergic neurons in three experimental models of PD. AD4 suppressed amphetamine-induced rotational behaviour in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA-induced nigral lesion. It attenuated the reduction in striatal dopamine levels in mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6,-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). It also reduced the dopaminergic neuronal loss following chronic intrajugular administration of rotenone in rats. Our findings suggest that AD4 is a novel potential new neuroprotective drug that might be effective at slowing down nigral neuronal degeneration and illness progression in patients with PD.

  16. Dirac Cone Protected by Non-Symmorphic Symmetry and highly dispersive 3D Dirac crossings in ZrSiS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoop, Leslie; Ali, Mazhar; Strasser, Carola; Duppel, Viola; Parkin, Stuart; Lotsch, Bettina; Ast, Christian

    Materials harboring exotic quasiparticles, such as Dirac and Weyl fermions have garnered much attention from the physics and material science communities. Here, we show with angle resolved photoemission studies supported by ab initio calculations that the highly stable, non-toxic and earth-abundant material, ZrSiS, has an electronic band structure that hosts several Dirac cones which form a Fermi surface with a diamond-shaped line of Dirac nodes. We also experimentally show, for the first time, that the square Si lattice in ZrSiS is an excellent template for realizing the new types of 2D Dirac cones protected by non-symmophic symmetry and image an unforseen surface state that arises close to the 2D Dirac cone. Finally, we find that the energy range of the linearly dispersed bands is as high as 2 eV above and below the Fermi level; much larger than of any known Dirac material so far. We will discuss why these characteristics make ZrSiS very promising for future applications.

  17. HIPAA Newborns' and Mothers' Health Protection Act--IRS. Notice of proposed rulemaking by cross-reference to temporary regulations.

    PubMed

    1998-10-27

    Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, the IRS is issuing temporary regulations relating to minimum hospital length-of-stay requirements imposed on group health plans with respect to mothers and newborns. The hospital length-of-stay requirements were added to the Internal Revenue Code by section 1531 of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. The IRS is issuing the temporary regulations at the same time that the Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor and the Health Care Financing Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are issuing substantially similar interim final regulations relating to hospital length-of-stay requirements added by the Newborns' and Mothers' Health Protection Act of 1996 to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and the Public Health Service Act. The temporary regulations provide guidance to employers and group health plans relating to the new hospital length-of-stay requirements. The text of those temporary regulations also serves as the text of these proposed regulations.

  18. Cross-Protective Potential of a Novel Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Antigenic Site B of the Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Reiko; Igarashi, Manabu; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Kishida, Noriko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroshi; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2009-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A viruses has been classified into sixteen distinct subtypes (H1–H16) to date. The HA subtypes of influenza A viruses are principally defined as serotypes determined by neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition tests using polyclonal antisera to the respective HA subtypes, which have little cross-reactivity to the other HA subtypes. Thus, it is generally believed that the neutralizing antibodies are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. In this study, we generated a novel monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to HA, designated MAb S139/1, which showed heterosubtypic cross-reactive neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition of influenza A viruses. This MAb was found to have broad reactivity to many other viruses (H1, H2, H3, H5, H9, and H13 subtypes) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We further found that MAb S139/1 showed neutralization and hemagglutination-inhibition activities against particular strains of H1, H2, H3, and H13 subtypes of influenza A viruses. Mutant viruses that escaped neutralization by MAb S139/1 were selected from the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2), A/Adachi/2/57 (H2N2), and A/WSN/33 (H1N1) strains, and sequence analysis of the HA genes of these escape mutants revealed amino acid substitutions at positions 156, 158, and 193 (H3 numbering). A molecular modeling study showed that these amino acids were located on the globular head of the HA and formed a novel conformational epitope adjacent to the receptor-binding domain of HA. Furthermore, passive immunization of mice with MAb S139/1 provided heterosubtypic protection. These results demonstrate that MAb S139/1 binds to a common antigenic site shared among a variety of HA subtypes and neutralizes viral infectivity in vitro and in vivo by affecting viral attachment to cells. The present study supports the notion that cross-reactive antibodies play some roles in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus infection, and underscores the potential

  19. Cross-protective potential of a novel monoclonal antibody directed against antigenic site B of the hemagglutinin of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Reiko; Igarashi, Manabu; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Kishida, Noriko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroshi; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2009-03-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A viruses has been classified into sixteen distinct subtypes (H1-H16) to date. The HA subtypes of influenza A viruses are principally defined as serotypes determined by neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition tests using polyclonal antisera to the respective HA subtypes, which have little cross-reactivity to the other HA subtypes. Thus, it is generally believed that the neutralizing antibodies are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. In this study, we generated a novel monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to HA, designated MAb S139/1, which showed heterosubtypic cross-reactive neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition of influenza A viruses. This MAb was found to have broad reactivity to many other viruses (H1, H2, H3, H5, H9, and H13 subtypes) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We further found that MAb S139/1 showed neutralization and hemagglutination-inhibition activities against particular strains of H1, H2, H3, and H13 subtypes of influenza A viruses. Mutant viruses that escaped neutralization by MAb S139/1 were selected from the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2), A/Adachi/2/57 (H2N2), and A/WSN/33 (H1N1) strains, and sequence analysis of the HA genes of these escape mutants revealed amino acid substitutions at positions 156, 158, and 193 (H3 numbering). A molecular modeling study showed that these amino acids were located on the globular head of the HA and formed a novel conformational epitope adjacent to the receptor-binding domain of HA. Furthermore, passive immunization of mice with MAb S139/1 provided heterosubtypic protection. These results demonstrate that MAb S139/1 binds to a common antigenic site shared among a variety of HA subtypes and neutralizes viral infectivity in vitro and in vivo by affecting viral attachment to cells. The present study supports the notion that cross-reactive antibodies play some roles in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus infection, and underscores the potential

  20. Adverse life events and delinquent behavior among Kenyan adolescents: a cross-sectional study on the protective role of parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Past research provides strong evidence that adverse life events heighten the risk of delinquent behavior among adolescents. Urban informal (slum) settlements in sub-Saharan Africa are marked by extreme adversity. However, the prevalence and consequences of adverse life events as well as protective factors that can mitigate the effects of exposure to these events in slum settlements is largely understudied. We examine two research questions. First, are adverse life events experienced at the individual and household level associated with a higher likelihood of delinquent behavior among adolescents living in two slums in Nairobi, Kenya? Second, are parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem protective against delinquency in a context of high adversity? Methods We used cross-sectional data from 3,064 males and females aged 12–19 years who participated in the Transitions to Adulthood Study. We examined the extent to which a composite index of adverse life events was associated with delinquent behavior (measured using a composite index derived from nine items). We also examined the direct and moderating effects of three protective factors: parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem. Results Fifty-four percent of adolescents reported at least one adverse life event, while 18% reported three or more adverse events. For both males and females, adversity was positively and significantly associated with delinquency in bivariate and multivariate models. Negative associations were observed between the protective factors and delinquency. Significant adverse events × protective factor interaction terms were observed for parental monitoring (females and males), religiosity (males), and self-esteem (females). Conclusions Similar to research in high income countries, adverse life events are associated with an increased likelihood of delinquent behavior among adolescents living in urban slums in Kenya, a low-income country. However, parental monitoring

  1. Cross-species coherence in effects and modes of action in support of causality determinations in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Science Assessment for Lead.

    PubMed

    Lassiter, Meredith Gooding; Owens, Elizabeth Oesterling; Patel, Molini M; Kirrane, Ellen; Madden, Meagan; Richmond-Bryant, Jennifer; Hines, Erin Pias; Davis, J Allen; Vinikoor-Imler, Lisa; Dubois, Jean-Jacques

    2015-04-01

    The peer-reviewed literature on the health and ecological effects of lead (Pb) indicates common effects and underlying modes of action across multiple organisms for several endpoints. Based on such observations, the United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) applied a cross-species approach in the 2013 Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead for evaluating the causality of relationships between Pb exposure and specific endpoints that are shared by humans, laboratory animals, and ecological receptors (i.e., hematological effects, reproductive and developmental effects, and nervous system effects). Other effects of Pb (i.e., cardiovascular, renal, and inflammatory responses) are less commonly assessed in aquatic and terrestrial wildlife limiting the application of cross-species comparisons. Determinations of causality in ISAs are guided by a framework for classifying the weight of evidence across scientific disciplines and across related effects by considering aspects such as biological plausibility and coherence. As illustrated for effects of Pb where evidence across species exists, the integration of coherent effects and common underlying modes of action can serve as a means to substantiate conclusions regarding the causal nature of the health and ecological effects of environmental toxicants.

  2. Recombinant trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase of Brugia malayi cross-reacts with human Wuchereria bancrofti immune sera and engenders a robust protective outcome in mice.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Susheela; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Jyoti; Soni, Vishal Kumar; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2012-11-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase of Brugia malayi (Bm-TPP) represents an attractive vaccine candidate because it is present in all the major life stages of parasite, but is absent in mammals. We have previously cloned, purified and biochemically characterized Bm-TPP. In the present study, we investigated the cross-reactivity of recombinant Bm-TPP (r-Bm-TPP) with the sera of human bancroftian patients belonging to different disease categories. In silico study using bioinformatics tool demonstrated that Bm-TPP is highly immunogenic in nature. BALB/c mice administered with r-Bm-TPP alone or in combination with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) generated a strong IgG response. Further investigations on the antibody isotypes showed generation of a mixed T helper cell response which was marginally biased towards Th1 phenotype. r-Bm-TPP with or without adjuvant lead to significantly increased accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen of infected mice and increased the activation of peritoneal macrophages. Additionally, r-Bm-TPP enhanced the production of both proinflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines and mice immunized with r-Bm-TPP alone or in combination with FCA showed 54.5% and 67% protection respectively against B. malayi infective larvae challenge. Taken together, our findings suggest that Bm-TPP is protective in nature and might be a potential candidate for development of vaccine against lymphatic filarial infections.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of hemoglobin conjugates with antioxidant enzymes via poly(ethylene glycol) cross-linker (Hb-SOD-CAT) for protection from free radical stress

    PubMed Central

    Nadithe, Venkatareddy; Bae, You Han

    2010-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) conjugated with the antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT), by employing dicarboxymethylated poly(ethylene glycol), was designed for protection of hemoglobin against free radicals. In this study, the conjugation process was confirmed by employing SDS-PAGE and SEC techniques. The average molecular weight of the conjugates was estimated to be around 1000 kDa. The enzymatic activities of the SOD and CAT in the conjugates (Hb-SOD-CAT) after conjugation were found to retain greater than 70% and 90% of the original bioactivity. Results show that antioxidant enzymes helped minimize methemoglobin (non-carrier of oxygen) formation during the conjugation process and also during storage at 4°C over a period of one month. In summary, the optimized (1:10 Hb/PEG) cross-linked conjugates with antioxidant enzymes showed protective properties from severe free radical stresses when incubated with hydrogen peroxide (0.1 and 1mM) and xanthine (1mM)/xanthine oxidase (10 and 20mUnits/mL) system. PMID:20723561

  4. Geranylgeranylacetone protects against diclofenac-induced gastric and small intestinal mucosal injuries in healthy subjects: a prospective randomized placebo-controlled double-blind cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Yasumasa; Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji; Ohmiya, Naoki; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Kawashima, Hiroki; Itoh, Akihiro; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi

    2009-01-01

    Little information is available regarding the prevention and treatment of small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We planned a pilot study to investigate the protective effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) against NSAID-induced small intestinal injuries using video capsule endoscopy (VCE). Ten healthy male volunteers took oral GGA 300 mg/day (regimen A) or placebo (regimen B) in addition to diclofenac 75 mg/day + rabeprazole 20 mg/day for 7 days. We conducted a cross-over trial of regimens A and B with a 2-week washout period. All subjects underwent VCE before and after each administration period, and were evaluated for NSAID-induced gastric and small intestinal mucosal lesions. The number of mucosal lesions (erosions, ulcers and a red spot with possible bleeding) detected in both stomach and small bowel changed between prior to and immediately after administration period, with significantly fewer lesions for regimen A after administration period (mean +/- SD A:B = 2.6 +/- 3.2:9.5 +/- 8.5; p = 0.027). Combination therapy with GGA and rabeprazole reduced the incidence of gastroenteropathy induced by 1-week administration of diclofenac. Our findings suggest this therapy as a candidate for protecting patients on long-term NSAID therapy. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Cross-species microarray analysis with the OSCAR system suggests an INSR->Pax6->NQO1 neuro-protective pathway in aging and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue; He, Xin; Zhong, Sheng

    2007-01-01

    OSCAR is a web platform for cluster and cross-species analysis of microarray data. It provides a comprehensive but friendly environment to both users and algorithm developers. For users, OSCAR provides cluster tools for both single and multiple species data, together with interactive analysis features. For single species data, OSCAR currently provides Hierarchical Clustering, K-means, partition around medoids (PAM), Self-Organizing Map (SOM), Tight Clustering and a novel algorithm called ‘Consensus Tight-clustering’. The new Consensus Tight-clustering algorithm delivers robust gene clusters and its result is more resistant to false positives than other state-of-the-art algorithms. For cross-species data analysis, OSCAR provides two novel computational tools: ‘coherentCluster’, ‘coherentSubset’ and a novel visualization tool: ‘comparative heatmap’. Applying the coherentCluster algorithm to human and fly aging data, we identified several coherent clusters of genes, which share co-regulation patterns that are highly correlated with the aging process in both of the two species. One coherent cluster suggests insulin receptor (INSR) may regulate Pax6 in both species and across different tissues. Further analysis with human brain expression and pathological data suggests an INSR->Pax6->quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)->detoxification neuro-protective pathway might be present in aging or diseased brain. For algorithm developers, OSCAR is a plug-and-play platform. With little effort, developers can plug their own algorithms into the OSCAR server without revealing the source codes, which will equip their command line executables with user-friendly interface and interactive analysis capability. In summary, OSCAR initiates an open platform for development and application of clustering and cross-species analysis programs. OSCAR stands for an open system for cluster analysis of microarray data. It is available at: http://biocomp.bioen.uiuc.edu/oscar PMID:17545194

  6. Cross-Protection of Chicken Immunoglobulin Y Antibodies against H5N1 and H1N1 Viruses Passively Administered in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Wallach, Michael G.; Webby, Richard J.; Islam, Fakhrul; Walkden-Brown, Stephen; Emmoth, Eva; Feinstein, Ricardo; Gronvik, Kjell-Olov

    2011-01-01

    Influenza viruses remain a major threat to global health due to their ability to undergo change through antigenic drift and antigenic shift. We postulated that avian IgY antibodies represent a low-cost, effective, and well-tolerated approach that can easily be scaled up to produce enormous quantities of protective antibodies. These IgY antibodies can be administered passively in humans (orally and intranasally) and can be used quickly and safely to help in the fight against an influenza pandemic. In this study, we raised IgY antibodies against H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 influenza viruses. We demonstrated that, using whole inactivated viruses alone and in combination to immunize hens, we were able to induce a high level of anti-influenza virus IgY in the sera and eggs, which lasted for at least 2 months after two immunizations. Furthermore, we found that by use of in vitro assays to test for the ability of IgY to inhibit hemagglutination (HI test) and virus infectivity (serum neutralization test), IgYs inhibited the homologous as well as in some cases heterologous clades and strains of viruses. Using an in vivo mouse model system, we found that, when administered intranasally 1 h prior to infection, IgY to H5N1 protected 100% of the mice against lethal challenge with H5N1. Of particular interest was the finding that IgY to H5N1 cross-protected against A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) both in vitro and in vivo. Based on our results, we conclude that anti-influenza virus IgY can be used to help prevent influenza virus infection. PMID:21613458

  7. Cross-protection of chicken immunoglobulin Y antibodies against H5N1 and H1N1 viruses passively administered in mice.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Michael G; Webby, Richard J; Islam, Fakhrul; Walkden-Brown, Stephen; Emmoth, Eva; Feinstein, Ricardo; Gronvik, Kjell-Olov

    2011-07-01

    Influenza viruses remain a major threat to global health due to their ability to undergo change through antigenic drift and antigenic shift. We postulated that avian IgY antibodies represent a low-cost, effective, and well-tolerated approach that can easily be scaled up to produce enormous quantities of protective antibodies. These IgY antibodies can be administered passively in humans (orally and intranasally) and can be used quickly and safely to help in the fight against an influenza pandemic. In this study, we raised IgY antibodies against H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 influenza viruses. We demonstrated that, using whole inactivated viruses alone and in combination to immunize hens, we were able to induce a high level of anti-influenza virus IgY in the sera and eggs, which lasted for at least 2 months after two immunizations. Furthermore, we found that by use of in vitro assays to test for the ability of IgY to inhibit hemagglutination (HI test) and virus infectivity (serum neutralization test), IgYs inhibited the homologous as well as in some cases heterologous clades and strains of viruses. Using an in vivo mouse model system, we found that, when administered intranasally 1 h prior to infection, IgY to H5N1 protected 100% of the mice against lethal challenge with H5N1. Of particular interest was the finding that IgY to H5N1 cross-protected against A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) both in vitro and in vivo. Based on our results, we conclude that anti-influenza virus IgY can be used to help prevent influenza virus infection.

  8. Cost-consequences evaluation between bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines in Italy: the potential impact of different cross-protection profiles.

    PubMed

    Capri, S; Gasparini, R; Panatto, D; Demarteau, N

    2011-06-01

    Two human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are currently available: a bivalent HPV-16/18 and a quadrivalent HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. The vaccines may have different sustained- and cross-protection levels against non-vaccine oncogenic HPV-types. This study investigated the potential difference in clinical and economic impacts provided by two HPV vaccines in Italy. A prevalence-based model estimated the potential net difference in HPV-related lesions (abnormal pap smear, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), cervical cancer (CC) and genital warts (GW)) and associated costs generated by the two vaccines. Incidence and treatment costs were obtained from Italian and European sources. Vaccine efficacy rates were based on published data for each vaccine. Lifetime vaccine efficacy was assumed. Results are reported over one year after reaching a steady state. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the lesion incidence, vaccine effectiveness, treatment costs and sustained protection. The bivalent vaccine would prevent an additional reduction of 7976 abnormal pap smears; 601 CIN1; 1826 CIN2/3 and 295 CC cases compared to the quadrivalent vaccine while 25,848 genital wart cases would be prevented by the quadrivalent vaccine. The additional cost averted with the bivalent vaccine was estimated at €2,385,354 per year compared to the quadrivalent vaccine. The most influential parameters were CC- and GW-related costs and the difference in sustained protection. Our model suggests that, in the Italian setting, the bivalent vaccine would prevent more precancerous and CC lesions than the quadrivalent vaccine. This translates into a greater cost averted for the bivalent vaccine, which could completely offset savings in GW-related costs associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunogenicity of an inactivated Chinese bovine viral diarrhea virus 1a (BVDV 1a) vaccine cross protects from BVDV 1b infection in young calves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Xinchuan; Wu, Yongwang; Li, Xiaoxin; Ji, Ye; Meng, Qingsen; Zhang, Shucheng; Wu, Hua

    2014-08-15

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 1a and 1b strains are the predominant subgenotypes in China. Because of the genetic and antigenic variability among different BVDV strains, a vaccine effective in one region may fail to protect against infections caused by different virus strains in another region. No BVDV vaccine developed with the predominant strains in China are available. In this study, the immunogenicity of an inactivated Chinese BVDV 1a NM01 vaccine strain was evaluated by challenging with a Chinese BVDV 1b JL strain. Ten 2-4-month-old calves were intramuscularly vaccinated with a single dose of the vaccine strain and boosted with same dose three weeks after the first vaccination, with five mock immunized calves serving as a control group. The average titer of neutralization antibody to BVDV 1a and BVDV 1b of immunized calves reached 1:410 and 1:96, respectively, at 21 days post the second vaccination. Twenty-one days post the second vaccination, all calves were challenged with strain JL. The clinical signs, such as the temperature and leukopenia of the immunized calves and viral shedding, were significantly less than the mock immunized calves after challenging with the virulent BVDV 1b strain, indicating that the BVDV 1a vaccine strain elicited efficacious protection against the endemic BVDV 1b strain in China. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an inactivated BVDV vaccine which demonstrated effective cross-protection against BVDV type 1b infection in China.

  10. Cross-Protective Immunity to Leishmania amazonensis is Mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ Epitopes of Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nico, Dirlei; Gomes, Daniele Crespo; Alves-Silva, Marcus Vinícius; Freitas, Elisangela Oliveira; Morrot, Alexandre; Bahia, Diana; Palatnik, Marcos; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleoside hydrolase (NH) of Leishmania donovani (NH36) is a phylogenetic marker of high homology among Leishmania parasites. In mice and dog vaccination, NH36 induces a CD4+ T cell-driven protective response against Leishmania chagasi infection directed against its C-terminal domain (F3). The C-terminal and N-terminal domain vaccines also decreased the footpad lesion caused by Leishmania amazonensis. We studied the basis of the crossed immune response using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin for mice prophylaxis against L. amazonensis. The F1 (amino acids 1–103) and F3 peptide (amino acids 199–314) vaccines enhanced the IgG and IgG2a anti-NH36 antibodies to similar levels. The F3 vaccine induced the strongest DTH response, the highest proportions of NH36-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after challenge and the highest expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α. The F1 vaccine, on the other hand, induced a weaker but significant DTH response and a mild enhancement of IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. The in vivo depletion with anti-CD4 or CD8 monoclonal antibodies disclosed that cross-protection against L. amazonensis infection was mediated by a CD4+ T cell response directed against the C-terminal domain (75% of reduction of the size of footpad lesion) followed by a CD8+ T cell response against the N-terminal domain of NH36 (57% of reduction of footpad lesions). Both vaccines were capable of inducing long-term cross-immunity. The amino acid sequence of NH36 showed 93% identity to the sequence of the NH A34480 of L. amazonensis, which also showed the presence of completely conserved predicted epitopes for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in F1 domain, and of CD4+ epitopes differing by a single amino acid, in F1 and F3 domains. The identification of the C-terminal and N-terminal domains as the targets of the immune response to NH36 in the model of L. amazonensis infection represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against

  11. Cross-Protective Immunity to Leishmania amazonensis is Mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ Epitopes of Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase Terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Nico, Dirlei; Gomes, Daniele Crespo; Alves-Silva, Marcus Vinícius; Freitas, Elisangela Oliveira; Morrot, Alexandre; Bahia, Diana; Palatnik, Marcos; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2014-01-01

    The nucleoside hydrolase (NH) of Leishmania donovani (NH36) is a phylogenetic marker of high homology among Leishmania parasites. In mice and dog vaccination, NH36 induces a CD4+ T cell-driven protective response against Leishmania chagasi infection directed against its C-terminal domain (F3). The C-terminal and N-terminal domain vaccines also decreased the footpad lesion caused by Leishmania amazonensis. We studied the basis of the crossed immune response using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin for mice prophylaxis against L. amazonensis. The F1 (amino acids 1-103) and F3 peptide (amino acids 199-314) vaccines enhanced the IgG and IgG2a anti-NH36 antibodies to similar levels. The F3 vaccine induced the strongest DTH response, the highest proportions of NH36-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after challenge and the highest expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α. The F1 vaccine, on the other hand, induced a weaker but significant DTH response and a mild enhancement of IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. The in vivo depletion with anti-CD4 or CD8 monoclonal antibodies disclosed that cross-protection against L. amazonensis infection was mediated by a CD4+ T cell response directed against the C-terminal domain (75% of reduction of the size of footpad lesion) followed by a CD8+ T cell response against the N-terminal domain of NH36 (57% of reduction of footpad lesions). Both vaccines were capable of inducing long-term cross-immunity. The amino acid sequence of NH36 showed 93% identity to the sequence of the NH A34480 of L. amazonensis, which also showed the presence of completely conserved predicted epitopes for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in F1 domain, and of CD4+ epitopes differing by a single amino acid, in F1 and F3 domains. The identification of the C-terminal and N-terminal domains as the targets of the immune response to NH36 in the model of L. amazonensis infection represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against

  12. Determinants and protective behaviours regarding tick bites among school children in the Netherlands: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, Desiree J M A; Gassner, Fedor; Wong, Albert; Steenbergen van, Jim E; Crutzen, Rik; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2013-12-09

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The incidence is 13.4 per 100,000 inhabitants in the United States and more than 300 per 100,000 inhabitants in Europe. Children are at highest risk of LB. In the Netherlands in 2007, the incidence of tick bites in children between 10-14 years varied from 7,000 -11,000 per 100,000, depending on age. This study among Dutch school children aimed to examine the knowledge, perceived threat, and perceived importance of protective behaviour in relation to tick bites and their potential consequences. In April 2012, the municipal health services (MHS) contacted primary schools to recruit children 9-13 years by telephone, e-mail, or advertisement in MHS newsletters. In total, 1,447 children from 40 schools participated in this study by completing a specifically developed and pretested compact paper questionnaire. Regression models were used to determine which covariates (e.g. forest cover, previous education, knowledge) are associated with our response variables. 70% (n = 1,015) of the children answered at least six out of seven knowledge questions correctly. The vast majority (93%; n = 1345) regarded body checks as very or somewhat important, 18% (n = 260) was routinely checked by their parents. More frequent body checks were associated with good knowledge about ticks and tick-borne diseases and knowing persons who got ill after tick bite. Children in areas with a higher forest cover were more likely to be checked frequently. Most children have a good knowledge of ticks and the potential consequences of tick bites. Knowing persons who personally got ill after tick-bite is associated with a good knowledge score and leads to higher susceptibility and better appreciation of the need for body checks. Perceived severity is associated with a good knowledge score and with knowing persons who got ill after tick-bite. Is seems to be useful to additionally address children in health

  13. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Michele; Lawrence, Donna; Haig, Jennifer; Anonychuk, Andrea; Demarteau, Nadia

    2012-10-13

    In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types -16 and -18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW) while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. A Markov model of the natural history of HPV infection among women, cervical cancer (CC) and GW was used to estimate the impact of vaccinating a cohort of 100,000 12-year-old females on lifetime outcomes and healthcare system costs (no indirect benefit in males included). A budget impact model was used to estimate the impact of each vaccine by province. In the base case, vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 48 additional CC cases, and 16 additional CC deaths, while vaccination with the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 6,933 additional GW cases. Vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was estimated to save 1 additional discounted quality adjusted life year (QALY) at an overall lower lifetime cost to the healthcare system compared to the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (assuming vaccine price parity). In sensitivity analyses, the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was associated with greater QALYs saved when the cross-protection efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine was reduced, or the burden of GW due to HPV-6/11 was increased. In most scenarios with price parity, the lifetime healthcare cost of the strategy with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to be lower than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. In the probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the HPV-16/18 vaccine provided more QALY benefit than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in 49.2% of scenarios, with lower relative lifetime costs in 83.5% of scenarios. Overall, the predicted lifetime healthcare costs and QALYs saved by implementing each of the vaccines are similar. Vaccination

  14. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types −16 and −18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW) while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. Methods A Markov model of the natural history of HPV infection among women, cervical cancer (CC) and GW was used to estimate the impact of vaccinating a cohort of 100,000 12-year-old females on lifetime outcomes and healthcare system costs (no indirect benefit in males included). A budget impact model was used to estimate the impact of each vaccine by province. Results In the base case, vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 48 additional CC cases, and 16 additional CC deaths, while vaccination with the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 6,933 additional GW cases. Vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was estimated to save 1 additional discounted quality adjusted life year (QALY) at an overall lower lifetime cost to the healthcare system compared to the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (assuming vaccine price parity). In sensitivity analyses, the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was associated with greater QALYs saved when the cross-protection efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine was reduced, or the burden of GW due to HPV-6/11 was increased. In most scenarios with price parity, the lifetime healthcare cost of the strategy with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to be lower than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. In the probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the HPV-16/18 vaccine provided more QALY benefit than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in 49.2% of scenarios, with lower relative lifetime costs in 83.5% of scenarios. Conclusions Overall, the predicted lifetime healthcare costs and QALYs saved by implementing each

  15. Gas sensor protection device and method

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, David; Magera, Craig

    2016-11-08

    A gas sensor includes a sensor housing and a sensing element located within the sensor housing. The sensing element has a distal end and defines an axis. The gas sensor also includes a sensor protection device coupled to the sensor housing and at least partially surrounding the distal end of the sensing element. The sensor protection device includes a first member coupled to the housing, the first member having a generally rectangular cross-sectional shape in a plane perpendicular to the axis. The first member includes a gas inlet and a gas outlet. The sensor protection device also includes a second member coupled to the housing.

  16. Regulated delayed synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen of Salmonella Typhimurium enhances immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy against heterologous Salmonella challenge

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun; Liu, Qing; Luo, Yali; Li, Pei; Liu, Qiong; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) are two major polysaccharide structures on the surface of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Previous studies have demonstrated that regulated truncation of LPS enhances the cross-reaction against conserved outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from enteric bacteria. We speculate that the regulation of both O-antigen and ECA may enhance the induction of immune responses against conserved OMPs from enteric bacteria. In this work we targeted rfbB and rffG genes which encode dTDP-glucose 4,6-dehydratases and share the same function in regulating O-antigen and ECA synthesis. We constructed a mutant, S496 (ΔrfbB6 ΔrffG7 ΔpagL73::TT araC PBAD rfbB-3), in which rfbB gene expression was dependent on exogenously supplied arabinose during in vitro growth and achieved the simultaneous tight regulation of both LPS and ECA synthesis, as demonstrated by the LPS profile and Western blotting using antisera against LPS and ECA. When administered orally, S. Typhimurium S496 was completely attenuated for virulence but still retained the capacity to colonize and disseminate in mice. In addition, we found that oral immunization with S496 resulted in increased immune responses against OMPs from enteric bacteria and enhanced survival compared with immunization with S492 possessing ΔrfbB6 ΔrffG8 mutations when challenged with lethal doses of Salmonella Choleraesuis or Salmonella Enteritidis. These results indicate that S. Typhimurium arabinose-regulated rfbB strain S496 is a good vaccine candidate, conferring cross-protection against lethal challenge with heterologous Salmonella. PMID:27423383

  17. A recombinant chimeric La Crosse virus expressing the surface glycoproteins of Jamestown Canyon virus is immunogenic and protective against challenge with either parental virus in mice or monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R S; Gresko, A K; Nelson, J T; Murphy, B R; Whitehead, S S

    2012-01-01

    La Crosse virus (LACV) and Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), family Bunyaviridae, are mosquito-borne viruses that are endemic in North America and recognized as etiologic agents of encephalitis in humans. Both viruses belong to the California encephalitis virus serogroup, which causes 70 to 100 cases of encephalitis a year. As a first step in creating live attenuated viral vaccine candidates for this serogroup, we have generated a recombinant LACV expressing the attachment/fusion glycoproteins of JCV. The JCV/LACV chimeric virus contains full-length S and L segments derived from LACV. For the M segment, the open reading frame (ORF) of LACV is replaced with that derived from JCV and is flanked by the untranslated regions of LACV. The resulting chimeric virus retained the same robust growth kinetics in tissue culture as observed for either parent virus, and the virus remains highly infectious and immunogenic in mice. Although both LACV and JCV are highly neurovirulent in 21 day-old mice, with 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) values of 0.1 and 0.5 log₁₀ PFU, respectively, chimeric JCV/LACV is highly attenuated and does not cause disease even after intracerebral inoculation of 10³ PFU. Parenteral vaccination of mice with 10¹ or 10³ PFU of JCV/LACV protected against lethal challenge with LACV, JCV, and Tahyna virus (TAHV). The chimeric virus was infectious and immunogenic in rhesus monkeys and induced neutralizing antibodies to JCV, LACV, and TAHV. When vaccinated monkeys were challenged with JCV, they were protected against the development of viremia. Generation of highly attenuated yet immunogenic chimeric bunyaviruses could be an efficient general method for development of vaccines effective against these pathogenic viruses.

  18. Inactivated Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Produced by 200-L Scale Serum-Free Microcarrier Bioreactor System Provides Cross-Protective Efficacy in Human SCARB2 Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chia-Ho; Liu, Wan-Hsin; Tai, Hsiu-Fen; Pan, Chien-Hung; Chen, Yung-Tsung; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chan, Chi-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chen, Juine-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics and outbreaks caused by infections of several subgenotypes of EV71 and other serotypes of coxsackie A viruses have raised serious public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. These concerns highlight the urgent need to develop a scalable manufacturing platform for producing an effective and sufficient quantity of vaccines against deadly enteroviruses. In this report, we present a platform for the large-scale production of a vaccine based on the inactivated EV71(E59-B4) virus. The viruses were produced in Vero cells in a 200 L bioreactor with serum-free medium, and the viral titer reached 107 TCID50/mL 10 days after infection when using an MOI of 10−4. The EV71 virus particles were harvested and purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Fractions containing viral particles were pooled based on ELISA and SDS-PAGE. TEM was used to characterize the morphologies of the viral particles. To evaluate the cross-protective efficacy of the EV71 vaccine, the pooled antigens were combined with squalene-based adjuvant (AddaVAX) or aluminum phosphate (AlPO4) and tested in human SCARB2 transgenic (Tg) mice. The Tg mice immunized with either the AddaVAX- or AlPO4-adjuvanted EV71 vaccine were fully protected from challenges by the subgenotype C2 and C4 viruses, and surviving animals did not show any degree of neurological paralysis symptoms or muscle damage. Vaccine treatments significantly reduced virus antigen presented in the central nervous system of Tg mice and alleviated the virus-associated inflammatory response. These results strongly suggest that this preparation results in an efficacious vaccine and that the microcarrier/bioreactor platform offers a superior alternative to the previously described roller-bottle system. PMID:26287531

  19. Inactivated Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Produced by 200-L Scale Serum-Free Microcarrier Bioreactor System Provides Cross-Protective Efficacy in Human SCARB2 Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chia-Ho; Liu, Wan-Hsin; Tai, Hsiu-Fen; Pan, Chien-Hung; Chen, Yung-Tsung; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chan, Chi-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chen, Juine-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics and outbreaks caused by infections of several subgenotypes of EV71 and other serotypes of coxsackie A viruses have raised serious public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. These concerns highlight the urgent need to develop a scalable manufacturing platform for producing an effective and sufficient quantity of vaccines against deadly enteroviruses. In this report, we present a platform for the large-scale production of a vaccine based on the inactivated EV71(E59-B4) virus. The viruses were produced in Vero cells in a 200 L bioreactor with serum-free medium, and the viral titer reached 10(7) TCID50/mL 10 days after infection when using an MOI of 10(-4). The EV71 virus particles were harvested and purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Fractions containing viral particles were pooled based on ELISA and SDS-PAGE. TEM was used to characterize the morphologies of the viral particles. To evaluate the cross-protective efficacy of the EV71 vaccine, the pooled antigens were combined with squalene-based adjuvant (AddaVAX) or aluminum phosphate (AlPO4) and tested in human SCARB2 transgenic (Tg) mice. The Tg mice immunized with either the AddaVAX- or AlPO4-adjuvanted EV71 vaccine were fully protected from challenges by the subgenotype C2 and C4 viruses, and surviving animals did not show any degree of neurological paralysis symptoms or muscle damage. Vaccine treatments significantly reduced virus antigen presented in the central nervous system of Tg mice and alleviated the virus-associated inflammatory response. These results strongly suggest that this preparation results in an efficacious vaccine and that the microcarrier/bioreactor platform offers a superior alternative to the previously described roller-bottle system.

  20. Sterilizing Immunity Elicited by Neisseria meningitidis Carriage Shows Broader Protection than Predicted by Serum Antibody Cross-Reactivity in CEACAM1-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, Shannon E.; Strobel, Lea; Frosch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis asymptomatically colonizes the human upper respiratory tract but is also the cause of meningitis and severe septicemia. Carriage or disease evokes an immune response against the infecting strain. Hitherto, we have known little about the breadth of immunity induced by natural carriage of a single strain or its implications for subsequent infectious challenge. In this study, we establish that transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM1 support nasal colonization by a variety of strains of different capsular types. Next, we nasally challenged these mice with either of the N. meningitidis strains H44/76 (serogroup B, ST-32) and 90/18311 (serogroup C, ST-11), while following the induction of strain-specific immunoglobulin. When these antisera were tested for reactivity with a diverse panel of N. meningitidis strains, very low levels of antibody were detected against all meningococcal strains, yet a mutually exclusive “fingerprint” of high-level cross-reactivity toward certain strains became apparent. To test the efficacy of these responses for protection against subsequent challenge, CEACAM1-humanized mice exposed to strain 90/18311 were then rechallenged with different N. meningitidis strains. As expected, the mice were immune to challenge with the same strain and with a closely related ST-11 strain, 38VI, while H44/76 (ST-32) could still colonize these animals. Notably, however, despite the paucity of detectable humoral response against strain 196/87 (ST-32), this strain was unable to colonize the 90/18311-exposed mice. Combined, our data suggest that current approaches may underestimate the actual breadth of mucosal protection gained through natural exposure to N. meningitidis strains. PMID:25368118

  1. An innovative approach to induce cross-protective immunity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in the lungs of pigs through adjuvanted nanotechnology-based vaccination.

    PubMed

    Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Ouyang, Kang; Torrelles, Jordi B; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2014-01-01

    cytokines) in the lungs were observed. In conclusion, combination of NP-KAg and soluble M. tb WCL elicits broadly cross-protective anti-PRRSV immunity in the pig respiratory system.

  2. Immunization with a DNA adenine methylase over-producing Yersinia pseudotuberculosis vaccine confers robust cross-protection against heterologous pathogenic serotypes.

    PubMed

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z; Heithoff, Douglas M; Ersoy, Selvi C; Shimp, William R; Mahan, Michael J

    2014-03-14

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a foodborne pathogen that can cause serious human illness. Although the source and route of transmission often remain obscure, livestock have been implicated in some cases. The diversity of yersiniae present on farms and their widespread distribution in animal and environmental reservoirs necessitates the use of broad prophylactic strategies that are efficacious against many serotypes simultaneously. Herein, immunization of mice with a modified, live attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis vaccine that overproduces the DNA adenine methylase (Dam(OP)) conferred robust protection against virulent challenge (150-fold LD50) with homologous and heterologous serotypes that have been associated with human disease (O:1, O:1a, O:3). Further, the dam gene was shown to be essential for cell viability in all (7 of 7) Y. pseudotuberculosis strains tested. Direct selection for the inheritance of dam mutant alleles in Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in dam strain variants that contained compensatory (second-site suppressor) mutations in genes encoding methyl-directed mismatch repair proteins (mutHLS) that are involved in suppression of the non-viable cell phenotype in all (19/19) strains tested. Such dam mutH variants exhibited a significant increase in virulence and spontaneous mutation frequency relative to that of a Dam(OP) vaccine strain. These studies indicate that Y. pseudotuberculosis Dam(OP) strains conferred potent cross-protective efficacy as well as decreased virulence and spontaneous mutation frequency relative to those that lack Dam, which have compensatory mutations in mutHLS loci. These data suggest that development of yersiniae livestock vaccines based on Dam overproduction is a viable mitigation strategy to reduce these potential foodborne contaminants.

  3. Exposure to low UVA doses increases KatA and KatB catalase activities, and confers cross-protection against subsequent oxidative injuries in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Tribelli, Paula M; Pizarro, Ramón A; López, Nancy I; Costa, Cristina S

    2016-05-01

    Solar UVA radiation is one of the main environmental stress factors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Exposure to high UVA doses produces lethal effects by the action of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) it generates. P. aeruginosa has several enzymes, including KatA and KatB catalases, which provide detoxification of ROS. We have previously demonstrated that KatA is essential in defending P. aeruginosa against high UVA doses. In order to analyse the mechanisms involved in the adaptation of this micro-organism to UVA, we investigated the effect of exposure to low UVA doses on KatA and KatB activities, and the physiological consequences. Exposure to UVA induced total catalase activity; assays with non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels showed that both KatA and KatB activities were increased by radiation. This regulation occurred at the transcriptional level and depended, at least partly, on the increase in H2O2 levels. We demonstrated that exposure to low UVA produced a protective effect against subsequent lethal doses of UVA, sodium hypochlorite and H2O2. Protection against lethal UVA depends on katA, whilst protection against sodium hypochlorite depends on katB, demonstrating that different mechanisms are involved in the defence against these oxidative agents, although both genes can be involved in the global cellular response. Conversely, protection against lethal doses of H2O2 could depend on induction of both genes and/or (an)other defensive factor(s). A better understanding of the adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to UVA is relevant from an ecological standpoint and for improving disinfection strategies that employ UVA or solar irradiation.

  4. Small and medium sized HDL particles are protectively associated with coronary calcification in a cross-sectional population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Ditah, Chobufo; Otvos, James; Nassar, Hisham; Shaham, Dorith; Sinnreich, Ronit; Kark, Jeremy D

    2016-08-01

    Failure of trials to observe benefits by elevating plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has raised serious doubts about HDL-C's atheroprotective properties. We aimed to identify protective HDL biomarkers by examining the association of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measures of total HDL-particle (HDL-P), large HDL-particle, and small and medium-sized HDL-particle (MS-HDL-P) concentrations and average HDL-particle size with coronary artery calcification (CAC), which reflects the burden of coronary atherosclerosis, and compare with that of HDL-C. Using a cross-sectional design, 504 Jerusalem residents (274 Arabs and 230 Jews), recruited by population-based probability sampling, had HDL measured by NMR spectroscopy. CAC was determined by multidetector helical CT-scanning using Agatston scoring. Independent associations between the NMR measures and CAC (comparing scores ≥100 vs. <100) were assessed with multivariable binary logistic models. Comparing tertile 3 vs. tertile 1, we observed protective associations of HDL-P (multivariable-adjusted OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.22-0.79, plinear trend = 0.002) and MS-HDL-P (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.19-0.69), plinear trend = 0.006 with CAC, which persisted after further adjustment for HDL-C. HDL-C was not significantly associated with CAC (multivariable-adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.27-1.29 for tertiles 3 vs. 1, plinear trend = 0.49). Large HDL-P and average particle size (which are highly correlated; r = 0.83) were not associated with CAC: large HDL-P (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.33-1.83, plinear trend = 0.29) and average HDL-P size (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.35-1.48, plinear trend = 0.58). MS-HDL-P represents a protective subpopulation of HDL particles. HDL-P and MS-HDL-P were more strongly associated with CAC than HDL-C. Based on the accumulating evidence, incorporation of MS-HDL-P or HDL-P into the routine prediction of CHD risk should be evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Vaccination with NS1-truncated H3N2 swine influenza virus primes T cells and confers cross-protection against an H1N1 heterosubtypic challenge in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The diversity of contemporary swine influenza virus (SIV) strains impedes effective immunization of swine herds. Mucosally delivered, attenuated virus vaccines are one approach with potential to provide broad cross-protection. Reverse genetics-derived H3N2 SIV virus with truncated NS1 (NS1delta126 T...

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of a Cross-Protective Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK-1 dam Mutant Identifies a Set of Genes More Transcriptionally Active Compared to Wild-Type, and Stably Transcribed across Biologically Relevant Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Claire B.; Pierlé, Sebastian Aguilar; Brayton, Kelly A.; Ochoa, Jennine N.; Shah, Devendra H.; Lahmers, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking DNA adenine methyltransferase confers cross-protective immunity against multiple Salmonella serotypes. The mechanistic basis is thought to be associated with the de-repression of genes that are tightly regulated when transiting from one microenvironment to another. This de-repression provides a potential means for the production of a more highly expressed and stable antigenic repertoire capable of inducing cross-protective immune responses. To identify genes encoding proteins that may contribute to cross-protective immunity, we used a Salmonella Typhimurium DNA adenine methyltransferase mutant strain (UK-1 dam mutant) derived from the parental UK-1 strain, and assessed the transcriptional profile of the UK-1 dam mutant and UK-1 strain grown under conditions that simulate the intestinal or endosomal microenvironments encountered during the infective process. As expected, the transcriptional profile of the UK-1 dam mutant identified a set of genes more transcriptionally active when compared directly to UK-1, and stably transcribed in biologically relevant culture conditions. Further, 22% of these genes were more highly transcribed in comparison to two other clinically-relevant Salmonella serovars. The strategy employed here helps to identify potentially conserved proteins produced by the UK-1 dam mutant that stimulate and/or modulate the development of cross-protective immune responses toward multiple Salmonella serotypes. PMID:25364573

  7. TaHsfA6f is a transcriptional activator that regulates a suite of heat stress protection genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) including previously unknown Hsf targets

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Gang-Ping; Drenth, Janneke; McIntyre, C. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress is a significant environmental factor adversely affecting crop yield. Crop adaptation to high-temperature environments requires transcriptional reprogramming of a suite of genes involved in heat stress protection. This study investigated the role of TaHsfA6f, a member of the A6 subclass of heat shock transcription factors, in the regulation of heat stress protection genes in Triticum aestivum (bread wheat), a poorly understood phenomenon in this crop species. Expression analysis showed that TaHsfA6f was expressed constitutively in green organs but was markedly up-regulated during heat stress. Overexpression of TaHsfA6f in transgenic wheat using a drought-inducible promoter resulted in up-regulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and a number of other heat stress protection genes that included some previously unknown Hsf target genes such as Golgi anti-apoptotic protein (GAAP) and the large isoform of Rubisco activase. Transgenic wheat plants overexpressing TaHsfA6f showed improved thermotolerance. Transactivation assays showed that TaHsfA6f activated the expression of reporter genes driven by the promoters of several HSP genes (TaHSP16.8, TaHSP17, TaHSP17.3, and TaHSP90.1-A1) as well as TaGAAP and TaRof1 (a co-chaperone) under non-stress conditions. DNA binding analysis revealed the presence of high-affinity TaHsfA6f-binding heat shock element-like motifs in the promoters of these six genes. Promoter truncation and mutagenesis analyses identified TaHsfA6f-binding elements that were responsible for transactivation of TaHSP90.1-A1 and TaGAAP by TaHsfA6f. These data suggest that TaHsfA6f is a transcriptional activator that directly regulates TaHSP, TaGAAP, and TaRof1 genes in wheat and its gene regulatory network has a positive impact on thermotolerance. PMID:25428996

  8. TaHsfA6f is a transcriptional activator that regulates a suite of heat stress protection genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) including previously unknown Hsf targets.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang-Ping; Drenth, Janneke; McIntyre, C Lynne

    2015-02-01

    Heat stress is a significant environmental factor adversely affecting crop yield. Crop adaptation to high-temperature environments requires transcriptional reprogramming of a suite of genes involved in heat stress protection. This study investigated the role of TaHsfA6f, a member of the A6 subclass of heat shock transcription factors, in the regulation of heat stress protection genes in Triticum aestivum (bread wheat), a poorly understood phenomenon in this crop species. Expression analysis showed that TaHsfA6f was expressed constitutively in green organs but was markedly up-regulated during heat stress. Overexpression of TaHsfA6f in transgenic wheat using a drought-inducible promoter resulted in up-regulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and a number of other heat stress protection genes that included some previously unknown Hsf target genes such as Golgi anti-apoptotic protein (GAAP) and the large isoform of Rubisco activase. Transgenic wheat plants overexpressing TaHsfA6f showed improved thermotolerance. Transactivation assays showed that TaHsfA6f activated the expression of reporter genes driven by the promoters of several HSP genes (TaHSP16.8, TaHSP17, TaHSP17.3, and TaHSP90.1-A1) as well as TaGAAP and TaRof1 (a co-chaperone) under non-stress conditions. DNA binding analysis revealed the presence of high-affinity TaHsfA6f-binding heat shock element-like motifs in the promoters of these six genes. Promoter truncation and mutagenesis analyses identified TaHsfA6f-binding elements that were responsible for transactivation of TaHSP90.1-A1 and TaGAAP by TaHsfA6f. These data suggest that TaHsfA6f is a transcriptional activator that directly regulates TaHSP, TaGAAP, and TaRof1 genes in wheat and its gene regulatory network has a positive impact on thermotolerance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Beneficial cross-protection of allergen-specific immunotherapy on airway eosinophilia using unrelated or a partial repertoire of allergen(s) implicated in experimental feline asthma.

    PubMed

    Reinero, Carol; Lee-Fowler, Tekla; Chang, Chee-Hoon; Cohn, Leah; Declue, Amy

    2012-06-01

    The study hypothesis was that in experimentally asthmatic cats rush immunotherapy (RIT) using allergens not completely matched with sensitizing allergen(s) would at least partially attenuate the asthmatic phenotype and modulate the aberrant immune response. In phase I, cats sensitized to Bermuda grass allergen (BGA), house dust mite allergen (HDMA) or placebo received BGA RIT. In phase II, cats dually sensitized to BGA and HDMA received RIT using BGA, HDMA or placebo. Efficacy of RIT was assessed using percentage bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) eosinophils. Additionally, a variety of immunologic assays were performed. Eosinophilic airway inflammation significantly decreased over time in asthmatic cats given RIT using sensitizing allergen or unrelated allergen (P<0.001). In dually sensitized cats, single allergen RIT but not placebo reduced airway eosinophilia (P=0.038). Differences in allergen-specific lymphocyte proliferation, in the number of IL-10 producing cells and in the percentage T regulatory cells were detected between asthmatic cats getting RIT and controls. Cross-protection manifested by reduced airway eosinophilia was noted in cats treated with RIT allergens which did not completely match allergen used in asthma induction. However, the mechanism of immunologic tolerance may differ when improperly matched allergens to the sensitizing allergens are used in RIT.

  10. Prediction of Protection against Asian Enterovirus 71 Outbreak Strains by Cross-neutralizing Capacity of Serum from Dutch Donors, The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koen, Gerrit; van Eijk, Hetty; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; de Jong, Menno D.; Wolthers, Katja C.

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) in Asia are related to high illness and death rates among children. To gain insight into the potential threat for the population of Europe, we determined the neutralizing activity in intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) batches and individual serum samples from donors in the Netherlands against EV-71 strains isolated in Europe and in Asia. All IVIg batches and 41%, 79%, and 65% of serum samples from children ≤5 years of age, women of childbearing age, and HIV-positive men, respectively, showed high neutralizing activity against a Dutch C1 strain, confirming widespread circulation of EV-71 in the Netherlands. Asian B3–4 and C4 strains were efficiently cross-neutralized, predicting possible protection against extensive circulation and associated outbreaks of those types in Europe. However, C2 and C5 strains that had few mutations in the capsid region consistently escaped neutralization, emphasizing the importance of monitoring antigenic diversity among circulating EV-71 strains. PMID:27533024

  11. A vegetarian diet does not protect against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A cross-sectional study between Buddhist priests and the general population.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Hun; Oh, Dong Jun; Kwon, Ki Hwan; Lee, Jun Kyu; Koh, Moon Soo; Lee, Jin Ho; Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2015-07-01

    There is limited data that supports a role for a vegetarian diet in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between vegetarian diets and NAFLD, considering metabolic syndrome and obesity. This is a cross-sectional, retrospective study comparing the prevalence of NAFLD of 615 Buddhist priests and age-, sex-, Body mass index (BMI)-and presence/absence of metabolic syndrome-matched controls who underwent routine health checkups in a health promotion center. Diagnosis and severity of NAFLD was determined based on ultrasonographic findings. The prevalence of NAFLD was not statistically significantly different between the Buddhist priests and the general population (29.9% vs. 25.05%, p=0.055). The Buddhist priest group had higher serum albumin, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and serum triglyceride levels and lower serum total bilirubin, serum fasting glucose, and serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels than the general population group. In univariate analysis and multivariate analysis, NAFLD was associated with old age, male gender, increased BMI, increased waist circumference, metabolic syndrome, high albumin, high glucose, high AST, high ALT, high gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), high triglycerides, low HDL, high low density lipoprotein (LDL), and high total cholesterol. The vegetarian diet does not protect against NAFLD.

  12. A Cross-Lagged Panel Model Examining Protective Behavioral Strategies: Are Types of Strategies Differentially Related to Alcohol Use and Consequences?

    PubMed Central

    Napper, Lucy E.; Kenney, Shannon R.; Lac, Andrew; Lewis, Leslie J.; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Protective behavioral strategies (PBS) are skills that can be used to reduce the of risk alcohol-related negative consequences. Studies have shown that, in general, PBS are related to less alcohol consumption and fewer negative consequences; however, other studies have suggested that not all types of PBS (e.g., stopping/limiting drinking [SLD], manner of drinking [MOD] and serious harm reduction [SHR]) are equally effective at reducing alcohol risk. In addition, few studies have explored the longitudinal relationships among PBS, alcohol use and consequences. Using a sample of heavy drinking college students (N = 338), the current study examined PBS use, alcohol consumption and consequences across two time points three months apart. Cross-lagged panel models revealed that MOD predicted a reduction in alcohol use and negative consequences. SHR was longitudinally related to fewer negative consequences, but unrelated to alcohol use. SLD was not associated with drinking or consequences at follow-up. These results highlight the need for future research to examine the effects of different types of PBS and have implications for alcohol intervention programs that incorporate PBS skills training. PMID:24229842

  13. Cross-protection against European swine influenza viruses in the context of infection immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus: studies in the pig model of influenza.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; De Hert, Karl; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-09-24

    Pigs are natural hosts for the same influenza virus subtypes as humans and are a valuable model for cross-protection studies with influenza. In this study, we have used the pig model to examine the extent of virological protection between a) the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus and three different European H1 swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages, and b) these H1 viruses and a European H3N2 SIV. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with representative strains of each virus lineage with 6- and 17-week intervals between H1 inoculations and between H1 and H3 inoculations, respectively. Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation. There was substantial though differing cross-protection between pH1N1 and other H1 viruses, which was directly correlated with the relatedness in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins. Cross-protection against H3N2 was almost complete in pigs with immunity against H1N2, but was weak in H1N1/pH1N1-immune pigs. In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype. True heterosubtypic protection, in contrast, appears to be minimal in natural influenza virus hosts. We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

  14. A Chimera Containing CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of the Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase (NH36) Optimizes Cross-Protection against Leishmania amazonesis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Silva, Marcus Vinícius; Nico, Dirlei; Morrot, Alexandre; Palatnik, Marcos; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2017-01-01

    , the YPPEFKTKL epitope shows high amino acid identity with a multipotent PADRE sequence and stimulates simultaneously the CD4+, CD8+ T cell, and a probable T regulatory response. With this approach, we advanced in the design of a NH36 polytope vaccine capable of inducing cross-protection to cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:28280494

  15. A Chimera Containing CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of the Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase (NH36) Optimizes Cross-Protection against Leishmania amazonesis Infection.

    PubMed

    Alves-Silva, Marcus Vinícius; Nico, Dirlei; Morrot, Alexandre; Palatnik, Marcos; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2017-01-01

    , the YPPEFKTKL epitope shows high amino acid identity with a multipotent PADRE sequence and stimulates simultaneously the CD4+, CD8+ T cell, and a probable T regulatory response. With this approach, we advanced in the design of a NH36 polytope vaccine capable of inducing cross-protection to cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  16. Physical activity as a protective factor against depressive symptoms in older Chinese veterans in the community: result from a national cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wen-Jin; Tan, Ji-Ping; Yi, Fang; Zou, Yong-Ming; Gao, Ya; Zhao, Yi-Ming; Wang, Lu-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity is generally considered to be effective in reducing the prevalence of depression and promoting remission of its symptoms. However, large-scale epidemiological research on this issue is lacking in older Chinese adults. We performed a nationwide epidemiological survey to determine the relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in older Chinese veterans in the community, with adjustment for potential confounders. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a representative sample of 9,676 community-dwelling older Chinese veterans. Depressive symptoms were identified using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Physical activity was self-reported using a one-year physical activity questionnaire. Information about covariates was obtained by questionnaire-based interview. Relationships between study variables and symptoms of depression were estimated using unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Results The median age was 82.29 (interquartile range 80.25–84.60) years. In total, 81.84% of the study participants engaged in physical activity that was predominantly light in intensity. In unadjusted analyses, physical activity was associated with a significantly decreased likelihood of depressive symptoms (5.43% versus 18.83%, P<0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression with adjustment and controlling for confounders, physical activity was still inversely associated with depressive symptoms and was the only independent protective factor (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.44–0.72, P<0.0001) among the associated factors in this study. In a univariate general linear model, there was a significant difference in Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score between subjects participating in active physical activity and those who did not (F=59.07, P<0.0001). Conclusion This study found an inverse relationship between physical activity and symptoms of depression in older Chinese veterans in

  17. Interferon regulatory factor 3 and Type I interferons are protective in alcoholic liver injury in mice via cross-talk of parenchymal and myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrasek, Jan; Dolganiuc, Angela; Csak, Timea; Nath, Bharath; Hritz, Istvan; Kodys, Karen; Catalano, Donna; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Mandrekar, Pranoti; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) features increased hepatic exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) recognizes LPS and activates signaling pathways depending on MyD88 or TRIF adaptors. We previously showed that MyD88 is dispensable in ALD. TLR4 induces Type-I interferons (IFN) in MyD88-independent manner that involves interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3). We fed alcohol or control diets to wild-type (WT) and IRF3 knock-out (KO) mice, and to mice with selective IRF3 deficiency in liver parenchymal and bone marrow-derived cells. Whole-body IRF3-KO mice were protected from alcohol-induced liver injury, steatosis and inflammation. In contrast to WT or bone-marrow specific IRF3-KO mice, deficiency of IRF3 only in parenchymal cells aggravated alcohol-induced liver injury, associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, lower anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and lower Type-I IFNs compared to WT mice. Co-culture of WT primary murine hepatocytes with liver mononuclear cells (LMNC) resulted in higher LPS-induced IL-10 and IFN-β, and lower TNF-α levels compared to LMNC alone. Type-I IFN was important since co-cultures of hepatocytes with LMNC from Type-I IFN receptor KO mice showed attenuated IL-10 levels compared to control co-cultures from WT mice. We further identified that Type-I IFNs potentiated LPS-induced IL-10 and inhibited inflammatory cytokine production in both murine macrophages and human leukocytes, indicating preserved cross-species effects. These findings suggest that liver parenchymal cells are the dominant source of Type-I IFN in TLR4/IRF3-dependent manner. Further, parenchymal cell-derived Type-I IFNs increase anti-inflammatory and suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines production by LMNC in paracrine manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that IRF3 activation in parenchymal cells and resulting type I IFNs have protective effects in ALD via modulation of inflammatory functions in macrophages. These results suggest

  18. An innovative approach to induce cross-protective immunity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in the lungs of pigs through adjuvanted nanotechnology-based vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Ouyang, Kang; Torrelles, Jordi B; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2014-01-01

    cytokines) in the lungs were observed. In conclusion, combination of NP-KAg and soluble M. tb WCL elicits broadly cross-protective anti-PRRSV immunity in the pig respiratory system. PMID:24711701

  19. VirR-Mediated Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes against Food Antimicrobials and Cross-Protection Induced by Exposure to Organic Acid Salts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jihun; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J; Bergholz, Teresa M

    2015-07-01

    Formulations of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods with antimicrobial compounds constitute an important safety measure against foodborne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. While the efficacy of many commercially available antimicrobial compounds has been demonstrated in a variety of foods, the current understanding of the resistance mechanisms employed by L. monocytogenes to counteract these stresses is limited. In this study, we screened in-frame deletion mutants of two-component system response regulators associated with the cell envelope stress response for increased sensitivity to commercially available antimicrobial compounds (nisin, lauric arginate, ε-polylysine, and chitosan). A virR deletion mutant showed increased sensitivity to all antimicrobials and significantly greater loss of membrane integrity when exposed to nisin, lauric arginate, or ε-polylysine (P < 0.05). The VirR-regulated operon, dltABCD, was shown to be the key contributor to resistance against these antimicrobial compounds, whereas another VirR-regulated gene, mprF, displayed an antimicrobial-specific contribution to resistance. An experiment with a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusion with the dlt promoter indicated that nisin does not specifically induce VirR-dependent upregulation of dltABCD. Lastly, prior exposure of L. monocytogenes parent strain H7858 and the ΔvirR mutant to 2% potassium lactate enhanced subsequent resistance against nisin and ε-polylysine (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that VirRS-mediated regulation of dltABCD is the major resistance mechanism used by L. monocytogenes against cell envelope-damaging food antimicrobials. Further, the potential for cross-protection induced by other food-related stresses (e.g., organic acids) needs to be considered when applying these novel food antimicrobials as a hurdle strategy for RTE foods. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. VirR-Mediated Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes against Food Antimicrobials and Cross-Protection Induced by Exposure to Organic Acid Salts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jihun; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Formulations of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods with antimicrobial compounds constitute an important safety measure against foodborne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. While the efficacy of many commercially available antimicrobial compounds has been demonstrated in a variety of foods, the current understanding of the resistance mechanisms employed by L. monocytogenes to counteract these stresses is limited. In this study, we screened in-frame deletion mutants of two-component system response regulators associated with the cell envelope stress response for increased sensitivity to commercially available antimicrobial compounds (nisin, lauric arginate, ε-polylysine, and chitosan). A virR deletion mutant showed increased sensitivity to all antimicrobials and significantly greater loss of membrane integrity when exposed to nisin, lauric arginate, or ε-polylysine (P < 0.05). The VirR-regulated operon, dltABCD, was shown to be the key contributor to resistance against these antimicrobial compounds, whereas another VirR-regulated gene, mprF, displayed an antimicrobial-specific contribution to resistance. An experiment with a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusion with the dlt promoter indicated that nisin does not specifically induce VirR-dependent upregulation of dltABCD. Lastly, prior exposure of L. monocytogenes parent strain H7858 and the ΔvirR mutant to 2% potassium lactate enhanced subsequent resistance against nisin and ε-polylysine (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that VirRS-mediated regulation of dltABCD is the major resistance mechanism used by L. monocytogenes against cell envelope-damaging food antimicrobials. Further, the potential for cross-protection induced by other food-related stresses (e.g., organic acids) needs to be considered when applying these novel food antimicrobials as a hurdle strategy for RTE foods. PMID:25911485

  1. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian 'avian-like' H1N1 swine viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian "avian-like" (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. © 2013 The Authors Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Revisiting the 1976 "swine flu" vaccine clinical trials: cross-reactive hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antibodies and their role in protection against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hang; Li, Xing; Gao, Jin; Lin, Zhengshi; Jing, Xianghong; Plant, Ewan; Zoueva, Olga; Eichelberger, Maryna C; Ye, Zhiping

    2011-12-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses are genetically similar to A/New Jersey/76 H1N1 virus (NJ/76), the strain selected for the 1976 "swine flu" vaccines. Approximately 45 million people in the United States were vaccinated against NJ/76 30 years ago, but the impact of this nationwide immunization on the current pandemic is largely unknown. Archived human serum samples collected during the 1976 swine flu vaccine trials were assessed for cross-reactive antibody responses to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses. Administration of an NJ/76 monovalent vaccine or the combination of a bivalent vaccine (NJ/76 H1N1 and A/Victoria/75 H3N2) plus a B/Hong Kong/72 monovalent vaccine increased hemagglutinin inhibition (HAI) and neuraminidase inhibition (NAI) antibodies cross-reacting with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses. We showed that cross-reactive human HAI antibodies elicited by the 1976 swine flu vaccination played a dominant role in protecting recipient mice against the wild-type A/California/04/2009. Cross-reactive human NAI antibodies were also protective in recipient mice after a lethal challenge with a hemagglutinin mismatched virus bearing the A/California/04/2009 neuraminidase gene. Transfer of human serum samples with an original HAI titer of 43 or an original NAI titer of 472 was estimated to protect 50% of recipient mice from a lethal infection under the experimental conditions described. The 1976 swine flu vaccination induced cross-reactive HAI and NAI antibodies that were functionally protective in mice, suggesting that this vaccination campaign might have had a positive impact on older adults (≥50 years) in the United States during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

  3. Assessment of the cross-protective capability of recombinant capsid proteins derived from pig, rat, and avian hepatitis E viruses (HEV) against challenge with a genotype 3 HEV in pigs.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Brenton J; Opriessnig, Tanja; Kenney, Scott P; Dryman, Barbara A; Córdoba, Laura; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2012-09-28

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, is primarily transmitted via the fecal-oral route through contaminated water supplies, although many sporadic cases of hepatitis E are transmitted zoonotically via direct contact with infected animals or consumption of contaminated animal meats. Genotypes 3 and 4 HEV are zoonotic and infect humans and other animal species, whereas genotypes 1 and 2 HEV are restricted to humans. There exists a single serotype of HEV, although the cross-protective ability among the animal HEV strains is unknown. Thus, in this study we expressed and characterized N-terminal truncated ORF2 capsid antigens derived from swine, rat, and avian HEV strains and evaluated their cross-protective ability in a pig challenge model. Thirty, specific-pathogen-free, pigs were divided into 5 groups of 6 pigs each, and each group of pigs were vaccinated with 200 μg of swine HEV, rat HEV, or avian HEV ORF2 antigen or PBS buffer (2 groups) as positive and negative control groups. After a booster dose immunization at 2 weeks post-vaccination, the vaccinated animals all seroconverted to IgG anti-HEV. At 4 weeks post-vaccination, the animals were intravenously challenged with a genotype 3 mammalian HEV, and necropsied at 4 weeks post-challenge. Viremia, fecal virus shedding, and liver histological lesions were compared to assess the protective and cross-protective abilities of these antigens against HEV challenge in pigs. The results indicated that pigs vaccinated with truncated recombinant capsid antigens derived from three animal strains of HEV induced a strong IgG anti-HEV response in vaccinated pigs, but these antigens confer only partial cross-protection against a genotype 3 mammalian HEV. The results have important implications for the efficacy of current vaccines and for future vaccine development, especially against the novel zoonotic animal strains of HEV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Infection of HLA-DR1 Transgenic Mice with a Human Isolate of Influenza A Virus (H1N1) Primes a Diverse CD4 T-Cell Repertoire That Includes CD4 T Cells with Heterosubtypic Cross-Reactivity to Avian (H5N1) Influenza Virus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Katherine A.; Chaves, Francisco A.; Sant, Andrea J.

    2009-01-01

    The specificity of the CD4 T-cell immune response to influenza virus is influenced by the genetic complexity of the virus and periodic encounters with variant subtypes and strains. In order to understand what controls CD4 T-cell reactivity to influenza virus proteins and how the influenza virus-specific memory compartment is shaped over time, it is first necessary to understand the diversity of the primary CD4 T-cell response. In the study reported here, we have used an unbiased approach to evaluate the peptide specificity of CD4 T cells elicited after live influenza virus infection. We have focused on four viral proteins that have distinct intracellular distributions in infected cells, hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), nucleoprotein, and the NS1 protein, which is expressed in infected cells but excluded from virion particles. Our studies revealed an extensive diversity of influenza virus-specific CD4 T cells that includes T cells for each viral protein and for the unexpected immunogenicity of the NS1 protein. Due to the recent concern about pandemic avian influenza virus and because CD4 T cells specific for HA and NA may be particularly useful for promoting the production of neutralizing antibody to influenza virus, we have also evaluated the ability of HA- and NA-specific CD4 T cells elicited by a circulating H1N1 strain to cross-react with related sequences found in an avian H5N1 virus and find substantial cross-reactivity, suggesting that seasonal vaccines may help promote protection against avian influenza virus. PMID:19386707

  5. Broad Cross-Protection Is Induced in Preclinical Models by a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Composed of L1/L2 Chimeric Virus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Boxus, Mathieu; Fochesato, Michel; Miseur, Agnès; Mertens, Emmanuel; Dendouga, Najoua; Brendle, Sarah; Balogh, Karla K; Christensen, Neil D; Giannini, Sandra L

    2016-07-15

    At least 15 high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are linked to anogenital preneoplastic lesions and cancer. Currently, there are three licensed prophylactic HPV vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) of the L1 major capsid protein from HPV-2, -4, or -9, including the AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 L1 vaccine. The L2 minor capsid protein contains HPV-neutralizing epitopes that are well conserved across numerous high-risk HPVs. Therefore, the objective of our study was to assess the capacity to broaden vaccine-mediated protection using AS04-adjuvanted vaccines based on VLP chimeras of L1 with one or two L2 epitopes. Several chimeric VLPs were constructed by inserting L2 epitopes within the DE loop and/or C terminus of L1. Based on the shape, yield, size, and immunogenicity, one of seven chimeras was selected for further evaluation in mouse and rabbit challenge models. The chimeric VLP consisted of HPV-18 L1 with insertions of HPV-33 L2 (amino acid residues 17 to 36; L1 DE loop) and HPV-58 L2 (amino acid residues 56 to 75; L1 C terminus). This chimeric L1/L2 VLP vaccine induced persistent immune responses and protected against all of the different HPVs evaluated (HPV-6, -11, -16, -31, -35, -39, -45, -58, and -59 as pseudovirions or quasivirions) in both mouse and rabbit challenge models. The degree and breadth of protection in the rabbit were further enhanced when the chimeric L1/L2 VLP was formulated with the L1 VLPs from the HPV-16/18 L1 vaccine. Therefore, the novel HPV-18 L1/L2 chimeric VLP (alone or in combination with HPV-16 and HPV-18 L1 VLPs) formulated with AS04 has the potential to provide broad protective efficacy in human subjects. From evaluations in human papillomavirus (HPV) protection models in rabbits and mice, our study has identified a prophylactic vaccine with the potential to target a wide range of HPVs linked to anogenital cancer. The three currently licensed vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLPs) of the L1 major capsid protein from

  6. Broad Cross-Protection Is Induced in Preclinical Models by a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Composed of L1/L2 Chimeric Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Boxus, Mathieu; Fochesato, Michel; Miseur, Agnès; Mertens, Emmanuel; Dendouga, Najoua; Brendle, Sarah; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least 15 high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are linked to anogenital preneoplastic lesions and cancer. Currently, there are three licensed prophylactic HPV vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) of the L1 major capsid protein from HPV-2, -4, or -9, including the AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 L1 vaccine. The L2 minor capsid protein contains HPV-neutralizing epitopes that are well conserved across numerous high-risk HPVs. Therefore, the objective of our study was to assess the capacity to broaden vaccine-mediated protection using AS04-adjuvanted vaccines based on VLP chimeras of L1 with one or two L2 epitopes. Several chimeric VLPs were constructed by inserting L2 epitopes within the DE loop and/or C terminus of L1. Based on the shape, yield, size, and immunogenicity, one of seven chimeras was selected for further evaluation in mouse and rabbit challenge models. The chimeric VLP consisted of HPV-18 L1 with insertions of HPV-33 L2 (amino acid residues 17 to 36; L1 DE loop) and HPV-58 L2 (amino acid residues 56 to 75; L1 C terminus). This chimeric L1/L2 VLP vaccine induced persistent immune responses and protected against all of the different HPVs evaluated (HPV-6, -11, -16, -31, -35, -39, -45, -58, and -59 as pseudovirions or quasivirions) in both mouse and rabbit challenge models. The degree and breadth of protection in the rabbit were further enhanced when the chimeric L1/L2 VLP was formulated with the L1 VLPs from the HPV-16/18 L1 vaccine. Therefore, the novel HPV-18 L1/L2 chimeric VLP (alone or in combination with HPV-16 and HPV-18 L1 VLPs) formulated with AS04 has the potential to provide broad protective efficacy in human subjects. IMPORTANCE From evaluations in human papillomavirus (HPV) protection models in rabbits and mice, our study has identified a prophylactic vaccine with the potential to target a wide range of HPVs linked to anogenital cancer. The three currently licensed vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLPs) of the L1 major

  7. 40 CFR 750.8 - Cross-examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT PROCEDURES... legislative hearing becomes available and shall specify: (1) The disputed issue(s) of material fact as to which cross-examination is requested. This shall include an explanation of why the questions at issue...

  8. 40 CFR 750.40 - Cross-examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT... informal hearing becomes available and must specify: (1) The disputed issue(s) of material fact as to which cross-examination is requested. This must include an explanation of why the questions at issue are...

  9. Extension of the Method for Predicting Six-Degree-of-Freedom Store Separation Trajectories at Speeds up to the Critical Speed to Include a Fuselage with Noncircular Cross Section. Volume I - Theoretical Methods and Comparisons with Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    use, or sell any patented invention that may in any way be related theareto. L Coies ofWhittWs rpr hudntb eunduls euni requ ired y e u i y co s d r to...perturbation velocity vector r radial distance in crossflow plane .iv semispan of a wing image vortex S local body cross-sectional area S ’(x) rate of change...outer limit becomes [Ux(x)/21TV] S ’(x).n r . The total velocity in the axial direction x of the body is Ux(X) and S ’(x) is the rate of change of the cross

  10. Factors associated with sun protection compliance: results from a nationwide cross-sectional evaluation of 2215 patients from a dermatological consultation.

    PubMed

    Sattler, U; Thellier, S; Sibaud, V; Taïeb, C; Mery, S; Paul, C; Meyer, N

    2014-06-01

    Campaigns designed to promote sun protection often fail to induce long-term changes in behaviour. There is limited information on patients with low compliance to sun protection recommendations from dermatologists. To characterize dermatology patients at higher risk of low compliance to sun protection measures, and to investigate the relationship between sun protection behaviour, knowledge about accurate sun protection recommendations, ultraviolet (UV)-associated risks and level of UV exposure. An anonymous self-administered multiple-choice questionnaire was distributed by dermatologists to patients receiving a sunscreen prescription. Four domains were explored: sun protection behaviour, sun protection knowledge, level of UV exposure and knowledge about UV-associated risks. We modelled sun protection behaviour and determined factors associated with low compliance to sun protection measures. In total 2215 questionnaires were analysed. Patients stratified by risk who better complied with sun protection measures had a better knowledge of UV-associated risks (mean score 14·45 ± 3·20 vs. 12·75 ± 3·29 and 11·20 ± 3·80, P < 0·0001) and sun protection measures (mean score 12·08 ± 2·79 vs. 10·68 ± 3·11 and 9·00 ± 3·63, P < 0·0001). Patients who better complied with sun protection measures also reported higher levels of sun exposure (mean score 4·24 ± 2·26 vs. 4·02 ± 2·05 and 3·34 ± 2·14, P < 0·0001). Factors associated with low adherence to sun protection behaviour were age below 20 or over 64 years, male sex, lower knowledge about accurate sun protection recommendations and UV-associated risks, and low UV exposure. This study shows the complex relationship between UV exposure, knowledge about UV-associated risks, and knowledge about sun protection recommendations and behaviour. Future skin cancer prevention programmes should focus on specific populations with low sun protection behaviour and high UV exposure. © 2014

  11. A live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine provides cross-protection against Salmonella serovars to reduce disease severity and pathogen transmission

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine was developed to confer broad protection against multiple Salmonella serovars to prevent disease and reduce pathogen colonization and shedding. Two vaccine trials were performed in swine to determine the protection afforded by the vac...

  12. Quebec Serve and Protect Low Back Pain Study: A Web-based Cross-sectional Investigation of Prevalence and Functional Impact Among Police Officers.

    PubMed

    Benyamina Douma, Nabiha; Côté, Charles; Lacasse, Anaïs

    2017-10-01

    Web-based cross-sectional study. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and the burden of low back pain (LBP) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) among Quebec police officers. Police officers have work-related factors associated with LBP, but chronicity and impacts of this condition have been little explored among this population. Between May and October 2014, a web-based cross-sectional study was conducted among police officers working in the province of Quebec (Canada). Nine police organizations accepted to disseminate the email invitation to their members. The survey included the French-Canadian version of the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and other items regarding functional impact of LBP and associated treatments. A total of 3589 police officers completed the questionnaire. Mean age was 38.5 ± 8.7 years, 32.0% were women, and 67.4% reported being car-patrol officers. A majority reported LBP symptoms in the past 12 months (67.7%) and 96.5% of them perceived that presence of LBP was totally/partially linked to their work in the police force. Prevalence of CLBP among all responders was 28.7%. Police officers reporting CLBP, as compared to those reporting acute or subacute LBP symptoms in the past 12 months, were more likely to report LBP-related reduction of work activities (64.4% vs. 45.7%; P < 0.001) and more working days lost in the past 12 months (average of 11.9 ± 43.5 vs. 1.5 ± 9.8; P < 0.001). A greater proportion also reported LBP-related health care visits in the past 12 months (86.2% vs. 64.2%; P < 0.001) and current use of pain medications/complementary alternative medicines (90.1% vs. 69.7%; P < 0.001). CLBP is a frequent and burdensome condition among Quebec police officers. Our results underline the importance for police organizations to promote CLBP prevention and to implement workplace management programs. 3.

  13. Characterization of a type O foot-and-mouth disease virus re-emerging in the year 2011 in free areas of the Southern Cone of South America and cross-protection studies with the vaccine strain in use in the region.

    PubMed

    Maradei, Eduardo; Malirat, Viviana; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Benitez, Elizabeth Oviedo; Pedemonte, Andrea; Seki, Cristina; Novo, Sabrina Galdo; Balette, Cristina I; D'Aloia, Ricardo; La Torre, José L; Mattion, Nora; Toledo, Jorge Rodríguez; Bergmann, Ingrid E

    2013-03-23

    Molecular, antigenic and vaccine matching studies, including protective response in vivo, were conducted with a foot-and-mouth disease type O virus isolated during the outbreak in September 2011 in San Pedro, Paraguay, country internationally recognized as free with vaccination in 1997. The phylogenetic tree derived from complete VP(1) sequences as well as monoclonal antibody profiling indicated that this isolate was related to viruses responsible for previous emergencies in free areas of the Southern Cone of South America occurring sporadically between the years 2000 and 2006. Marked differences with the vaccine strain O(1)/Campos, including the loss of reactivity with neutralizing MAbs, were recognized. Levels of protective antibodies induced by the vaccine containing the O(1)/Campos strain against the San Pedro virus and the virus responsible for the previous emergency in 2006 in the Southern Cone assessed by in vitro vaccine matching studies pointed to an insufficient protective response 30 days after vaccination (DPV), which was properly attained at 79 DPV or after revaccination. In agreement with the in vitro assessment, the in vivo challenge in the Protection against Podal Generalization test in cattle indicated appropriate protection for the San Pedro strain at 79 DPV or after revaccination. The complementary conclusions that can be derived from vaccine matching tests designed differently to fit the various objectives intended: prophylaxis, emergency vaccination or incorporation of new field strains into antigen banks, is evaluated. This is the first report of the antigenic and immunogenic characterization of the variants responsible for emergencies in the Southern Cone of South America and the putative impact of the changes on the cross protection conferred by the vaccine strain.

  14. Time dependent quantum dynamics study of the Ne + H2(+)(v0 = 0-4, j0 = 1) → NeH(+) + H proton transfer reaction, including the Coriolis coupling. A system with oscillatory cross sections.

    PubMed

    Gamallo, Pablo; Defazio, Paolo; González, Miguel

    2011-10-27

    The Ne + H(2)(+)(v(0) = 0-4, j(0) = 1) proton transfer reaction has been studied in a wide collision energy (E(col)) interval, using the time dependent real wave packet method and taking into account the Coriolis coupling (CC-RWP method) and employing a recent ab initio potential energy surface, widely extending the reaction conditions previously explored at the CC level. The reaction probability shows a strong oscillatory behavior vs E(col) and the presence of sharp resonances, arising from metastable NeH(2)(+) states. The behavior of the reaction cross section σ vs E(col) depends on the vibrational level and can in general be interpreted in terms of the late barrier character of the potential energy surface and the existence (or not) of threshold energy. The situation is particularly complex for v(0) = 2, as σ(v0=2, j0=1) presents significant oscillations with E(col) up to ≈0.33 eV, which probably reflect the resonances found in the reaction probability. Hence, it would be particularly interesting to investigate the Ne + H(2)(+)(v(0) = 2, j(0) = 1) reaction experimentally, as some resonances survive the partial wave summation. The state selected cross sections compare well with previous CC quantum and experimental results, and although the previous centrifugal sudden RWP cross sections are reasonable, the inclusion of the Coriolis coupling is important to achieve a quantitative description of this and similar systems.

  15. Immunoglobulin with High-Titer In Vitro Cross-Neutralizing Hepatitis C Virus Antibodies Passively Protects Chimpanzees from Homologous, but Not Heterologous, Challenge.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Jens; Engle, Ronald E; Faulk, Kristina; Wang, Richard Y; Farci, Patrizia; Alter, Harvey J; Purcell, Robert H

    2015-09-01

    The importance of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) in protection against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains controversial. We infused a chimpanzee with H06 immunoglobulin from a genotype 1a HCV-infected patient and challenged with genotype strains efficiently neutralized by H06 in vitro. Genotype 1a NAbs afforded no protection against genotype 4a or 5a. Protection against homologous 1a lasted 18 weeks, but infection emerged when NAb titers waned. However, 6a infection was prevented. The differential in vivo neutralization patterns have implications for HCV vaccine development. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Occupant Protection Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Genie; Somers, Jeff; Granderson, Brad; Gernhardt, Mike; Currie, Nancy; Lawrence, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    Topics include occupant protection overview with a focus on crew protection during dynamic phases of flight; occupant protection collaboration; modeling occupant protection; occupant protection considerations; project approach encompassing analysis tools, injury criteria, and testing program development; injury criteria update methodology, unique effects of pressure suits and other factors; and a summary.

  17. Comparative assessment of a DNA and protein Leishmania donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase vaccine to cross-protect against murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major or L. mexicana infection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S A; Alawa, J; Doro, B; Henriquez, F L; Roberts, C W; Nok, A; Alawa, C B I; Alsaadi, M; Mullen, A B; Carter, K C

    2012-02-08

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem and it is estimated that 12 million people are currently infected. A vaccine which could cross-protect people against different Leishmania spp. would facilitate control of this disease as more than one species of Leishmania may be present. In this study the ability of a DNA vaccine, using the full gene sequence for L. donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γGCS) incorporated in the pVAX vector (pVAXγGCS), and a protein vaccine, using the corresponding recombinant L. donovani γGCS protein (LdγGCS), to protect against L. major or L. mexicana infection was evaluated. DNA vaccination gave transient protection against L. major and no protection against L. mexicana despite significantly enhancing specific antibody titres in vaccinated infected mice compared to infected controls. Vaccination with the LdγGCS protected against both species but only if the protein was incorporated into non-ionic surfactant vesicles for L. mexicana. The results of this study indicate that a L. donovani γGCS vaccine could be used to vaccinate against more than one Leishmania species but only if the recombinant protein is used.

  18. 40 CFR 35.3575 - Application of Federal cross-cutting authorities (cross-cutters).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Application of Federal cross-cutting authorities (cross-cutters). 35.3575 Section 35.3575 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....3575 Application of Federal cross-cutting authorities (cross-cutters). (a) General. A number of...

  19. Evaluation of cross-protection against three topotypes of serotype O foot-and-mouth disease virus in pigs vaccinated with multi-epitope protein vaccine incorporated with poly(I:C).

    PubMed

    Cao, Yimei; Lu, Zengjun; Li, Dong; Fan, Pengju; Sun, Pu; Bao, Huifang; Fu, Yuanfang; Li, Pinghua; Bai, Xingwen; Chen, Yingli; Xie, Baoxia; Liu, Zaixin

    2014-01-31

    Epitope-based vaccines are always questioned for their cross-protection against the antigenically variable foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). In this study, we proved the cross-protection effect of a multi-epitope vaccine incorporated with poly(I:C) against three topotypes of O type FMDV. A total of 45 naïve pigs were vaccinated with different doses of multi-epitope protein vaccine incorporated with poly(I:C). At 28 days post-vaccination, 45 vaccinated and 6 unvaccinated control pigs (two pigs for each group) were challenged with three topotypes of virulent O type FMDV, namely, O/Mya/98 (Southeast Asia topotype), O/HN/CHA/93 (Cathay topotype) and O/Tibet/CHA/99 (PanAsia topotype) strains. All unvaccinated pigs developed generalised FMD clinical signs. Results showed that all pigs (n=15) conferred complete protection against the O/Mya/98 and O/HN/CHA/93 FMDV strains, 11 of which were protected against the O/Tibet/CHA/99 FMDV strain. The 50% protective dose values of the vaccine against the O/Mya/98, O/HN/CHA/93 and O/Tibet/CHA/99 FMDV strains were 15.59, 15.59 and 7.05, respectively. Contact challenge experiment showed that transmission occurred from the donors to the unvaccinated but not to vaccinated pigs. These results showed that vaccination with multi-epitope protein vaccine incorporated with poly(I:C) can efficiently prevent FMD in pigs.

  20. Poly(ethylene glycol) cross-linked hemoglobin with antioxidant enzymes protects pancreatic islets from hypoxic and free radical stress and extends islet functionality

    PubMed Central

    Nadithe, Venkatareddy; Mishra, Deepa; Bae, You Han

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of multifunctional PEG-based hemoglobin conjugates crosslinked with antioxidant enzymes for their ability to protect an oxygen carrier (hemoglobin) and insulin secreting islets from the combination of hypoxic and free radical stress under simulated transplantation conditions. In this study, RINm5F cells and isolated pancreatic islets were challenged with oxidants (H2O2 or xanthine and xanthine oxidase) and incubated with conjugates (Hb-Hb or Hb-SOD-CAT) in normoxia (21% oxygen) or hypoxia (6% or 1% oxygen). Hemoglobin protection, intracellular free radical activity and cell viability in RINm5F cells measured by methemoglobin, DCF-DA and MTT assay respectively showed that cells were better protected by conjugates containing antioxidant enzymes. Insulin secretion from islets and qualitative confocal evaluation of viability showed beta cells were protected by conjugates containing antioxidant enzymes when exposed to induced stress. Our study suggested that antioxidant enzymes play a significant role in hemoglobin protection and thus extended cell protection. PMID:22447333

  1. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  2. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  3. A Vaccine of L2 Epitope Repeats Fused with a Modified IgG1 Fc Induced Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies and Protective Immunity against Divergent Human Papillomavirus Types

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yanchun; Xie, Xixiu; Wang, Zhirong; Xu, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    Current human papillomavirus (HPV) major capsid protein L1 virus-like particles (VLPs)-based vaccines in clinic induce strong HPV type-specific neutralizing antibody responses. To develop pan-HPV vaccines, here, we show that the fusion protein E3R4 consisting of three repeats of HPV16 L2 aa 17–36 epitope (E3) and a modified human IgG1 Fc scaffold (R4) induces cross-neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity against divergent HPV types. E3R4 was expressed as a secreted protein in baculovirus expression system and could be simply purified by one step Protein A affinity chromatography with the purity above 90%. Vaccination of E3R4 formulated with Freunds adjuvant not only induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against HPV pseudovirus types 16, 18, 45, 52, 58, 6, 11 and 5 in mice, but also protected mice against vaginal challenges with HPV pseudovirus types 16, 45, 52, 58, 11 and 5 for at least eleven months after the first immunization. Moreover, vaccination of E3R4 formulated with FDA approved adjuvant alum plus monophosphoryl lipid A also induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against HPV types 16, 18 and 6 in rabbits. Thus, our results demonstrate that delivery of L2 antigen as a modified Fc-fusion protein may facilitate pan-HPV vaccine development. PMID:24802101

  4. Cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of a pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Libo; Liu, Feng; Fairman, Jeffery; Hong, David K; Lewis, David B; Monath, Thomas; Warner, John F; Belser, Jessica A; Patel, Jenish; Hancock, Kathy; Katz, Jacqueline M; Lu, Xiuhua

    2012-01-05

    The development of pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 vaccines that confer both antigen-sparing and cross-clade protection are a high priority given the limited worldwide capacity for influenza vaccine production, and the antigenic and genetic heterogeneity of circulating H5N1 viruses. The inclusion of potent adjuvants in vaccine formulations may achieve both of these aims. Here we show that the addition of JVRS-100, an adjuvant consisting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) to a clade 1-derived H5N1 split vaccine induced significantly higher virus-specific antibody than unadjuvanted formulations, with a >30-fold dose-sparing effect and induction of increased antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in mice. All mice that received one dose of adjuvanted vaccine and subsequent H5N1 viral challenges exhibited mild illness, lower lung viral titers, undetectable spleen and brain viral titers, and 100% survival after either homologous clade 1 or heterologous clade 2 H5N1 viral challenges, whereas unadjuvanted vaccine recipients showed significantly increased weight loss, viral titers, and mortality. The protective immunity induced by JVRS-100 adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine was shown to last for over one year without significant waning. Thus, JVRS-100 adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine elicited enhanced humoral and T-cell responses, dose-sparing, and cross-clade protection in mice. CLDC holds promise as an adjuvant for human pre-pandemic inactivated H5N1 vaccines.

  5. A cationic liposome-DNA complexes adjuvant (JVRS-100) enhances the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of pre-pandemic influenza A (H5N1) vaccine in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Xiangjie; Fairman, Jeffery; Lewis, David B; Katz, Jacqueline M; Levine, Min; Tumpey, Terrence M; Lu, Xiuhua

    2016-05-01

    Influenza A (H5N1) viruses continue to pose a public health threat. As inactivated H5N1 vaccines are poorly immunogenic, adjuvants are needed to improve the immunogenicity of H5N1 vaccine in humans. Here, we investigated the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy in ferrets of a clade 2.2-derived vaccine with addition of JVRS-100, an adjuvant consisting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC). After the first vaccination, significantly higher levels of hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) and neutralizing antibody titers were detected in ferrets immunized with adjuvanted vaccine compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. Following a second dose of adjuvanted vaccine, HAI antibody titers of ≥ 40 were detected against viruses from multiple H5N1 clades. HAI antibodies against newly isolated H5N2 and H5N8 viruses were also augmented by JVRS-100. Ferrets were challenged with a heterologous H5N1 virus. All ferrets that received two doses of adjuvanted vaccine exhibited mild illness, significantly reduced nasal wash virus titers and protection from lethal challenge. In contrast, ferrets that received unadjuvanted vaccine showed greater weight loss, high viral titers and 3 of 6 animals succumbed to the lethal challenge. Our results indicate that the addition of JVRS-100 to H5N1 vaccine enhanced immunogenicity and cross-protection against lethal H5N1 virus disease in ferrets. JVRS-100 warrants further investigation as a potential adjuvant for influenza vaccines.

  6. Protecting Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Karen

    2001-01-01

    Discusses privacy issues related to use of the Internet. Topics include data gathering functions that are built into applications of the World Wide Web; cookies that identify Web site visitors; personal identity information; libraries and privacy, including the need for privacy policies; protecting your privacy; and developing privacy literacy.…

  7. Relational Factors of Vulnerability and Protection for Adolescent Pregnancy: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study of Portuguese Pregnant and Nonpregnant Adolescents of Low Socioeconomic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Ana I. F.; Canavarro, Maria C.; Cardoso, Margarida F.; Mendonca, Denisa

    2005-01-01

    This study explores multiple relational contexts that promote vulnerability and protection against early pregnancy in a potential risk group of Portuguese adolescents. A comparative analysis was made between two groups of female adolescents of low socioeconomic status: pregnant adolescents (n = 57) and adolescents without a history of pregnancy (n…

  8. A vaccine composed of a hypothetical protein and the eukaryotic initiation factor 5a from Leishmania braziliensis cross-protection against Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Mariana Costa; Lage, Daniela Pagliara; Martins, Vívian Tamietti; Costa, Lourena Emanuele; Carvalho, Ana Maria Ravena Severino; Ludolf, Fernanda; Santos, Thaís Teodoro de Oliveira; Vale, Danniele Luciana; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, two proteins cloned from Leishmania braziliensis species, a hypothetical protein (LbHyp) and the eukaryotic initiation factor 5a (EiF5a), were evaluated to protect BALB/c mice against L. amazonensis infection. The animals were immunized with the antigens, either separately or in combination, using saponin as an immune adjuvant in both cases. Spleen cells from vaccinated and later infected mice produced significantly higher levels of protein and parasite-specific IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF, in addition to low levels of IL-4 and IL-10. Evaluating the parasite load by means of a limiting dilution technique and quantitative Real-Time PCR, vaccinated animals presented significant reductions in the parasite load in both infected tissues and organs, as well as lower footpad swelling, when compared to the control (saline and saponin) groups. The best results regarding the protection of the animals were achieved when the combined vaccine was administered into the animals. Protection was associated with an IFN-γ production against parasite antigens, which was mediated by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and correlated with antileishmanial nitrite production. In conclusion, data from the present study show that this polyprotein vaccine, which combines two L. braziliensis proteins, can induce protection against L. amazonensis infection.

  9. Memory protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  10. Does vaccination ensure protection? Assessing diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels in a population of healthy children: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek; Kałużna, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2016-12-01

    Vaccination effectiveness is proven when the disease does not develop after a patient is exposed to the pathogen. In the case of rare diseases, vaccination effectiveness is assessed by monitoring specific antibody levels in the population. Such recurrent analyses allow the evaluation of vaccination programs. The primary schedule of diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations is similar in various countries, with differences mainly in the number and timing of booster doses. The aim of the study was to assess diphtheria and tetanus antibody concentrations in a population of healthy children.Diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels were analyzed in a group of 324 children aged 18 to 180 months. All children were vaccinated in accordance with the Polish vaccination schedule.Specific antibody concentrations greater than 0.1 IU/mL were considered protective against tetanus or diphtheria. Levels above 1.0 were considered to ensure long-term protection.Protective levels of diphtheria antibodies were found in 229 patients (70.46%), and of tetanus in 306 patients (94.15%). Statistically significant differences were found in tetanus antibody levels in different age groups. Mean concentrations and the percentage of children with high tetanus antibody titers increased with age. No similar correlation was found for diphtheria antibodies. High diphtheria antibody levels co-occurred in 72% of the children with high tetanus antibody levels; 95% of the children with low tetanus antibody levels had low levels of diphtheria antibodies.The percentage of children with protective diphtheria antibody levels is lower than that in the case of tetanus antibodies, both in Poland and abroad, but the high proportion of children without diphtheria protection in Poland is an exception. This is all the more puzzling when taking into account that Polish children are administered a total of 5 doses containing a high concentration of diphtheria toxoid, at intervals shorter than 5 years. The decrease in

  11. Recombinant baculovirus vaccine containing multiple M2e and adjuvant LTB induces T cell dependent, cross-clade protection against H5N1 influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Fan, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Jiao; Huang, Jian-Ni; Ye, Yu; Liao, Ming

    2016-01-27

    H5N1, highly pathogenic avian influenza poses, a threat to animal and human health. Rapid changes in H5N1 viruses require periodic reformulation of the conventional strain-matched vaccines, thus emphasizing the need for a broadly protective influenza vaccine. Here, we constructed BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB, a recombinant baculovirus based on baculovirus display and BacMam technology. BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB harbors a gene cassette expressing three tandem copies of the highly conserved extracellular domain of influenza M2 protein (M2e) and the mucosal adjuvant, LTB. We showed that BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB displayed the target protein (M2e/LTB) on the baculoviral surface and expressed it in transduced mammalian cells. BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB, when delivered nasally in mice, was highly immunogenic and induced superior levels of anti-M2e IgA than the non-adjuvanted baculovirus (BV-Dual-3M2e). Importantly, after challenge with different H5N1 clades (clade 0, 2.3.2.1, 2.3.4 and 4), mice inoculated with BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB displayed improved survival and decreased lung virus shedding compared with mice inoculated with BV-Dual-3M2e. The enhanced protection from BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB is mediated by T cell immunity and is primarily based on CD8(+) T cells, while mucosal antibodies alone were insufficient for protection from lethal H5N1 challenge. These results suggest that BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB has potential to protect against a broad range of H5N1 strains thereby providing a novel direction for developing broadly protective vaccines based on cellular immunity.

  12. Protective efficacy of a broadly cross-reactive swine influenza DNA vaccine encoding M2e, cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope and consensus H3 hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pigs have been implicated as mixing reservoir for the generation of new pandemic influenza strains, control of swine influenza has both veterinary and public health significance. Unlike human influenza vaccines, strains used for commercially available swine influenza vaccines are not regularly replaced, making the vaccines provide limited protection against antigenically diverse viruses. It is therefore necessary to develop broadly protective swine influenza vaccines that are efficacious to both homologous and heterologous virus infections. In this study, two forms of DNA vaccines were constructed, one was made by fusing M2e to consensus H3HA (MHa), which represents the majority of the HA sequences of H3N2 swine influenza viruses. Another was made by fusing M2e and a conserved CTL epitope (NP147-155) to consensus H3HA (MNHa). Their protective efficacies against homologous and heterologous challenges were tested. Results BALB/c mice were immunized twice by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with the two DNA vaccines. It was shown that the two vaccines elicited substantial antibody responses, and MNHa induced more significant T cell-mediated immune response than MHa did. Then two H3N2 strains representative of different evolutional and antigenic clusters were used to challenge the vaccine-immunized mice (homosubtypic challenge). Results indicated that both of the DNA vaccines prevented homosubtypic virus infections completely. The vaccines’ heterologous protective efficacies were further tested by challenging with a H1N1 swine influenza virus and a reassortant 2009 pandemic strain. It was found that MNHa reduced the lung viral titers significantly in both challenge groups, histopathological observation showed obvious reduction of lung pathogenesis as compared to MHa and control groups. Conclusions The combined utility of the consensus HA and the conserved M2e and CTL epitope can confer complete and partial protection against homologous and

  13. Ambient Temperature Synthesis of High Enantiopurity N-Protected Peptidyl Ketones by Peptidyl Thiol Ester–Boronic Acid Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Li, Hao; Wittenberg, Rüdiger; Egi, Masahiro; Huang, Wenwei; Liebeskind, Lanny S.

    2009-01-01

    α-Amino acid thiol esters derived from N-protected mono-, di-, and tripeptides couple with aryl, π-electron-rich heteroaryl, or alkenyl boronic acids in the presence of stoichiometric Cu(I) thiophene-2-carboxylate (CuTC) and catalytic Pd2(dba)3/triethylphosphite to generate the corresponding N-protected peptidyl ketones in good to excellent yields and in high enantiopurity. Triethylphosphite plays a key role as a supporting ligand by mitigating an undesired palladium-catalyzed decarbonylation-β-elimination of the α-amino thiol esters. The peptidyl ketone synthesis proceeds at room temperature under non-basic conditions and demonstrates a high tolerance to functionality. PMID:17263394

  14. Antigenic and cross-protection studies of biotype 1 and biotype 2 isolates of Yersinia ruckeri in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Tinsley, J W; Lyndon, A R; Austin, B

    2011-07-01

    The study investigated antigen characteristics of biotype (bt) 1 and bt 2 isolates of Yersinia ruckeri. The cell surface characteristics of Y. ruckeri were compared for their antigenic characteristics using polyclonal antibodies that revealed that both biotypes had a homogenous whole-cell protein antigenic profile. Notable differences in the antigenic properties were observed in the lipopolysaccharide profile of both biotypes. Two iron-regulated outer membrane proteins (IROMP) of c.90 and 100 kDa were shown to be major specific antigens. The results demonstrate for the first time differences in antigens between bt 1 and bt 2 isolates of serotype O1 isolates of Y. ruckeri. The protection induced in rainbow trout by a commercial monovalent, and bivalent inactivated vaccine was tested with the outcome that the ability of isolates to cause mortality in vaccinated fish varied with geographical location. In this context, vaccination studies suggested that the O antigen was the dominant immunogenic molecule involved in protection against the disease. The O antigen of Y. ruckeri was the dominant immunogenic molecule involved in the protection of rainbow trout against enteric redmouth disease. There are distinct phenotypic and antigenic differences in Y. ruckeri bt 1 and bt 2 with O antigen recognized as the dominant immunogenic molecule. The data have significance in explaining the lack of success of the earlier monovalent vaccine and demonstrate the effectiveness of the newer bivalent vaccine. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; annual eligibility redeterminations for exchange participation and insurance affordability programs; health insurance issuer standards under the Affordable Care Act, including standards related to exchanges. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-09-05

    This final rule specifies additional options for annual eligibility redeterminations and renewal and re-enrollment notice requirements for qualified health plans offered through the Exchange, beginning with annual redeterminations for coverage for benefit year 2015. This final rule provides additional flexibility for Exchanges, including the ability to propose unique approaches that meet the specific needs of their state, while streamlining the consumer experience.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers, covered in protective clothing and breathing apparatus, continue sandblasting on the Mobile Launcher Platform on Launch Pad 39A to remove corrosion before repainting. Routine maintenance includes sandblasting and repainting as preventive means to minimize corrosion.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers, covered in protective clothing and breathing apparatus, continue sandblasting on the Mobile Launcher Platform on Launch Pad 39A to remove corrosion before repainting. Routine maintenance includes sandblasting and repainting as preventive means to minimize corrosion.

  17. Relational factors of vulnerability and protection for adolescent pregnancy: a cross-sectional comparative study of Portuguese pregnant and nonpregnant adolescents of low socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana I F; Canavarro, Maria C; Cardoso, Margarida F; Mendonça, Denisa

    2005-01-01

    This study explores multiple relational contexts that promote vulnerability and protection against early pregnancy in a potential risk group of Portuguese adolescents. A comparative analysis was made between two groups of female adolescents of low socioeconomic status: pregnant adolescents (n=57) and adolescents without a history of pregnancy (n=81). Results suggest that several variables belonging to different contexts-family and school and peer relations--are important in the characterization of the two groups. Lower levels of mother's overprotection and father's emotional support, presence of early pregnancy in adolescent's mother, lower level of emotional proximity to peer relations, and higher number of school failures are significantly associated with adolescent pregnancy.

  18. Development of (trimethylsilyl)ethyl ester protected enolates and applications in palladium-catalyzed enantioselective allylic alkylation: intermolecular cross-coupling of functionalized electrophiles.