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Sample records for including cultivated methanogens

  1. Diversity of Archaea in Marine Sediments from Skan Bay, Alaska, Including Cultivated Methanogens, and Description of Methanogenium boonei sp. nov.▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Melissa M.; Wardlaw, George D.; Tang, Chin F.; Bonin, Adam S.; Liu, Yitai; Valentine, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Methanogenesis in cold marine sediments is a globally important process leading to methane hydrate deposits, cold seeps, physical instability of sediment, and atmospheric methane emissions. We employed a multidisciplinary approach that combined culture-dependent and -independent analyses with geochemical measurements in the sediments of Skan Bay, Alaska (53°N, 167°W), to investigate methanogenesis there. Cultivation-independent analyses of the archaeal community revealed that uncultivated microbes of the kingdoms Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota are present at Skan Bay and that methanogens constituted a small proportion of the archaeal community. Methanogens were cultivated from depths of 0 to 60 cm in the sediments, and several strains related to the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales were isolated. Isolates were psychrotolerant marine-adapted strains and included an aceticlastic methanogen, strain AK-6, as well as three strains of CO2-reducing methanogens: AK-3, AK7, and AK-8. The phylogenetic positions and physiological characteristics of these strains are described. We propose a new species, Methanogenium boonei, with strain AK-7 as the type strain. PMID:17122405

  2. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Mancini, Enrico; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-02-11

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic activity. Overall, fed-batch cultivation was clearly the most efficient method compared to batch and CSTR. Specifically, by saving incubation time up to 150%, fed-batch reactors were acclimatised to nearly 2-fold higher FAN levels with a 37%-153% methanogenic activity improvement, compared to batch method. Meanwhile, CSTR reactors were inhibited at lower ammonia levels. Finally, specific methanogenic activity test showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active than aceticlastic methanogens in all FAN levels above 540mgNH3-NL(-1).

  3. Cultivation of methanogenic community from subseafloor sediments using a continuous-flow bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Imachi, Hiroyuki; Aoi, Ken; Tasumi, Eiji; Saito, Yumi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Saito, Yayoi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Tomaru, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Rika; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Takai, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Microbial methanogenesis in subseafloor sediments is a key process in the carbon cycle on the Earth. However, the cultivation-dependent evidences have been poorly demonstrated. Here we report the cultivation of a methanogenic microbial consortium from subseafloor sediments using a continuous-flow-type bioreactor with polyurethane sponges as microbial habitats, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. We anaerobically incubated methane-rich core sediments collected from off Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, for 826 days in the reactor at 10 °C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with glucose, yeast extract, acetate and propionate as potential energy sources was provided into the reactor. After 289 days of operation, microbiological methane production became evident. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed the presence of metabolically active microbial cells with various morphologies in the reactor. DNA- and RNA-based phylogenetic analyses targeting 16S rRNA indicated the successful growth of phylogenetically diverse microbial components during cultivation in the reactor. Most of the phylotypes in the reactor, once it made methane, were more closely related to culture sequences than to the subsurface environmental sequence. Potentially methanogenic phylotypes related to the genera Methanobacterium, Methanococcoides and Methanosarcina were predominantly detected concomitantly with methane production, while uncultured archaeal phylotypes were also detected. Using the methanogenic community enrichment as subsequent inocula, traditional batch-type cultivations led to the successful isolation of several anaerobic microbes including those methanogens. Our results substantiate that the DHS bioreactor is a useful system for the enrichment of numerous fastidious microbes from subseafloor sediments and will enable the physiological and ecological characterization of pure cultures of previously uncultivated subseafloor microbial life. PMID:21654849

  4. Cultivation of methanogenic community from subseafloor sediments using a continuous-flow bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Imachi, Hiroyuki; Aoi, Ken; Tasumi, Eiji; Saito, Yumi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Saito, Yayoi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Tomaru, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Rika; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Takai, Ken

    2011-12-01

    Microbial methanogenesis in subseafloor sediments is a key process in the carbon cycle on the Earth. However, the cultivation-dependent evidences have been poorly demonstrated. Here we report the cultivation of a methanogenic microbial consortium from subseafloor sediments using a continuous-flow-type bioreactor with polyurethane sponges as microbial habitats, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. We anaerobically incubated methane-rich core sediments collected from off Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, for 826 days in the reactor at 10 °C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with glucose, yeast extract, acetate and propionate as potential energy sources was provided into the reactor. After 289 days of operation, microbiological methane production became evident. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed the presence of metabolically active microbial cells with various morphologies in the reactor. DNA- and RNA-based phylogenetic analyses targeting 16S rRNA indicated the successful growth of phylogenetically diverse microbial components during cultivation in the reactor. Most of the phylotypes in the reactor, once it made methane, were more closely related to culture sequences than to the subsurface environmental sequence. Potentially methanogenic phylotypes related to the genera Methanobacterium, Methanococcoides and Methanosarcina were predominantly detected concomitantly with methane production, while uncultured archaeal phylotypes were also detected. Using the methanogenic community enrichment as subsequent inocula, traditional batch-type cultivations led to the successful isolation of several anaerobic microbes including those methanogens. Our results substantiate that the DHS bioreactor is a useful system for the enrichment of numerous fastidious microbes from subseafloor sediments and will enable the physiological and ecological characterization of pure cultures of previously uncultivated subseafloor microbial life.

  5. Cultivation of methanogenic community from 2-km deep subseafloor coalbeds using a continuous-flow bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imachi, H.; Tasumi, E.; Morono, Y.; Ito, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep subseafloor environments associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs have been least explored by previous scientific drilling and hence the nature of deep subseafloor life and its ecological roles in the carbon cycle remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed cultivation of subseafloor methanogenic communities using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. The sample used for the reactor cultivation was obtained from 2 km-deep coalbeds off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan, the northwestern Pacific, during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 using a riser drilling technology of the drilling vessel Chikyu. The coalbed samples were incubated anaerobically in the DHS reactor at the in-situ temperature of 40°C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with a tiny amount of yeast extract, acetate, propionate and butyrate was provided into the DHS reactor. After 34 days of the bioreactor operation, a small production of methane was observed. The methane concentration was gradually increased and the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane was consistency 13C-depleted during the bioreactor operation, indicating the occurrence of microbial methanogenesis. Microscopic observation showed that the enrichment culture contained a variety of microorganisms, including methanogen-like rod-shaped cells with F420 auto-fluorescence. Interestingly, many spore-like particles were observed in the bioreactor enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed the growth of phylogenetically diverse bacteria and archaea in the DHS reactor. Predominant archaeal components were closely related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the genus Methanobacterium. Some predominant bacteria were related to the spore-formers within the class Clostridia, which are overall in good agreement with microscopic observations. By analyzing ion images using a nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Nano

  6. Cultivation of methanogens from shallow marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Melissa M.; Boone, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the methanogenic degradation of acetate, the fate of molecular hydrogen and formate or the ability of methanogens to grow and produce methane in cold, anoxic marine sediments. The microbes that produce methane were examined in permanently cold, anoxic marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge (44°35' N, 125°10' W, depth 800 m). Sediment samples (15 to 35 cm deep) were collected from areas of active methane ebullition or areas where methane hydrates occurred. The samples were diluted into enrichment medium with formate, acetate or trimethylamine as catabolic substrate. After 2 years of incubation at 4 °C to 15 °C, enrichment cultures produced methane. PCR amplification and sequencing of the rRNA genes from the highest dilutions with growth suggested that each enrichment culture contained a single strain of methanogen. The level of sequence similarity (91 to 98%) to previously characterized prokaryotes suggested that these methanogens belonged to novel genera or species within the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries from DNA extracted directly from the sediment samples revealed phylotypes that were either distantly related to cultivated methanogens or possible anaerobic methane oxidizers related to the ANME-1 and ANME-2 groups of the Archaea. However, no methanogenic sequences were detected, suggesting that methanogens represented only a small proportion of the archaeal. PMID:16877319

  7. Cultivation of methanogens from shallow marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Melissa M; Boone, David R

    2006-08-01

    Little is known about the methanogenic degradation of acetate, the fate of molecular hydrogen and formate or the ability of methanogens to grow and produce methane in cold, anoxic marine sediments. The microbes that produce methane were examined in permanently cold, anoxic marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge (44 degrees 35' N, 125 degrees 10' W, depth 800 m). Sediment samples (15 to 35 cm deep) were collected from areas of active methane ebullition or areas where methane hydrates occurred. The samples were diluted into enrichment medium with formate, acetate or trimethylamine as catabolic substrate. After 2 years of incubation at 4 degrees C to 15 degrees C, enrichment cultures produced methane. PCR amplification and sequencing of the rRNA genes from the highest dilutions with growth suggested that each enrichment culture contained a single strain of methanogen. The level of sequence similarity (91 to 98%) to previously characterized prokaryotes suggested that these methanogens belonged to novel genera or species within the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries from DNA extracted directly from the sediment samples revealed phylotypes that were either distantly related to cultivated methanogens or possible anaerobic methane oxidizers related to the ANME-1 and ANME-2 groups of the Archaea. However, no methanogenic sequences were detected, suggesting that methanogens represented only a small proportion of the archaeal community.

  8. In vitro detection and primary cultivation of bacteria producing materials inhibitory to ruminal methanogens.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Rosalind A; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Zhang, Li Hua; Klieve, Athol V

    2010-02-01

    A novel method for screening bacterial isolates for their potential to inhibit the growth of ruminal methanogenic Archaea was developed using a modification of the soft agar overlay technique, formally used for the isolation of lytic bacteriophages. This method may be used in the specific, hydrogen-rich conditions required for the growth of ruminal methanogenic Archaea.

  9. Cell proliferation at 122 degrees C and isotopically heavy CH4 production by a hyperthermophilic methanogen under high-pressure cultivation.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Nakamura, Kentaro; Toki, Tomohiro; Tsunogai, Urumu; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Nunoura, Takuro; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-08-05

    We have developed a technique for cultivation of chemolithoautotrophs under high hydrostatic pressures that is successfully applicable to various types of deep-sea chemolithoautotrophs, including methanogens. It is based on a glass-syringe-sealing liquid medium and gas mixture used in conjunction with a butyl rubber piston and a metallic needle stuck into butyl rubber. By using this technique, growth, survival, and methane production of a newly isolated, hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanopyrus kandleri strain 116 are characterized under high temperatures and hydrostatic pressures. Elevated hydrostatic pressures extend the temperature maximum for possible cell proliferation from 116 degrees C at 0.4 MPa to 122 degrees C at 20 MPa, providing the potential for growth even at 122 degrees C under an in situ high pressure. In addition, piezophilic growth significantly affected stable carbon isotope fractionation of methanogenesis from CO(2). Under conventional growth conditions, the isotope fractionation of methanogenesis by M. kandleri strain 116 was similar to values (-34 per thousand to -27 per thousand) previously reported for other hydrogenotrophic methanogens. However, under high hydrostatic pressures, the isotope fractionation effect became much smaller (< -12 per thousand), and the kinetic isotope effect at 122 degrees C and 40 MPa was -9.4 per thousand, which is one of the smallest effects ever reported. This observation will shed light on the sources and production mechanisms of deep-sea methane.

  10. Diversity and Structure of the Methanogenic Community in Anoxic Rice Paddy Soil Microcosms as Examined by Cultivation and Direct 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Großkopf, Regine; Janssen, Peter H.; Liesack, Werner

    1998-01-01

    A dual approach consisting of cultivation and molecular retrieval of partial archaeal 16S rRNA genes was carried out to characterize the diversity and structure of the methanogenic community inhabiting the anoxic bulk soil of flooded rice microcosms. The molecular approach identified four groups of known methanogens. Three environmental sequences clustered with Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanobacterium formicicum, six were closely related but not identical to those of strains of Methanosaeta concilii, two grouped with members of the genus Methanosarcina, and two were related to the methanogenic endosymbiont of Plagiopyla nasuta. The cultivation approach via most-probable-number counts with a subsample of the same soil as an inoculum yielded cell numbers of up to 107 per g of dry soil for the H2-CO2-utilizing methanogens and of up to 106 for the acetate-utilizing methanogens. Strain VeH52, isolated from the terminal positive dilution on H2-CO2, grouped within the phylogenetic radiation characterized by M. bryantii and M. formicicum and the environmental sequences of the Methanobacterium-like group. A consortium of two distinct methanogens grew in the terminal positive culture on acetate. These two organisms showed absolute 16S rRNA gene identities with environmental sequences of the novel Methanosaeta-like group and the Methanobacterium-like group. Methanosarcina spp. were identified only in the less-dilute levels of the same dilution series on acetate. These data correlate well with acetate concentrations of about 11 μM in the pore water of this rice paddy soil. These concentrations are too low for the growth of known Methanosarcina spp. but are at the acetate utilization threshold of Methanosaeta spp. Thus, our data indicated Methanosaeta spp. and Methanobacterium spp. to be the dominant methanogenic groups in the anoxic rice soil, whereas Methanosarcina spp. appeared to be less abundant. PMID:9501436

  11. Novel molecular markers for the detection of methanogens and phylogenetic analyses of methanogenic communities

    PubMed Central

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Pyzik, Adam; Romaniuk, Krzysztof; Sobczak, Adam; Szczesny, Pawel; Lipinski, Leszek; Bartosik, Dariusz; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic Archaea produce approximately one billion tons of methane annually, but their biology remains largely unknown. This is partially due to the large phylogenetic and phenotypic diversity of this group of organisms, which inhabit various anoxic environments including peatlands, freshwater sediments, landfills, anaerobic digesters and the intestinal tracts of ruminants. Research is also hampered by the inability to cultivate methanogenic Archaea. Therefore, biodiversity studies have relied on the use of 16S rRNA and mcrA [encoding the α subunit of the methyl coenzyme M (methyl-CoM) reductase] genes as molecular markers for the detection and phylogenetic analysis of methanogens. Here, we describe four novel molecular markers that should prove useful in the detailed analysis of methanogenic consortia, with a special focus on methylotrophic methanogens. We have developed and validated sets of degenerate PCR primers for the amplification of genes encoding key enzymes involved in methanogenesis: mcrB and mcrG (encoding β and γ subunits of the methyl-CoM reductase, involved in the conversion of methyl-CoM to methane), mtaB (encoding methanol-5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide Co-methyltransferase, catalyzing the conversion of methanol to methyl-CoM) and mtbA (encoding methylated [methylamine-specific corrinoid protein]:coenzyme M methyltransferase, involved in the conversion of mono-, di- and trimethylamine into methyl-CoM). The sensitivity of these primers was verified by high-throughput sequencing of PCR products amplified from DNA isolated from microorganisms present in anaerobic digesters. The selectivity of the markers was analyzed using phylogenetic methods. Our results indicate that the selected markers and the PCR primer sets can be used as specific tools for in-depth diversity analyses of methanogenic consortia. PMID:26217325

  12. 29 CFR 780.110 - Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operations included in âcultivation and tillage of the soil... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Cultivation and Tillage of the Soil § 780.110 Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.” “Cultivation and tillage of the soil”...

  13. 29 CFR 780.110 - Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operations included in âcultivation and tillage of the soil... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Cultivation and Tillage of the Soil § 780.110 Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.” “Cultivation and tillage of the soil”...

  14. 29 CFR 780.110 - Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operations included in âcultivation and tillage of the soil... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Cultivation and Tillage of the Soil § 780.110 Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.” “Cultivation and tillage of the soil”...

  15. 29 CFR 780.110 - Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operations included in âcultivation and tillage of the soil... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Cultivation and Tillage of the Soil § 780.110 Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.” “Cultivation and tillage of the soil”...

  16. 29 CFR 780.110 - Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations included in âcultivation and tillage of the soil... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Cultivation and Tillage of the Soil § 780.110 Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.” “Cultivation and tillage of the soil”...

  17. Higher Temperature and Hydrogen Availability Stimulated the Methanogenic Activity in East Antarctic Subglacial Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial ecosystem has been recognized as an environment with considerable methanogenic activity, and therefore is of significant impact on global methane budget and climate change. Although the methanogens have been discovered at a few subglacial environments, the methanogenic activity there is yet insufficiently studied, especially on the effects of environmental parameters, due to technical difficulties on sampling and cultivation. Here, in this study, we attempt to access the methanogenic activity and community structure in response to temperature and substrate availability. An integrated approach including in vitro cultivation and molecular techniques were employed. A subglacial sediment from Larsemann Hills, East Antarctica was incubated at different temperatures (1, 4, 12 oC) supplied with H2+CO2 or sodium acetate to estimate the methanogenic activity. The McrA gene which is a specific marker for methanogens was amplified with primer ME and ML to construct phylogenetic trees. This functional gene was also quantified by Q-PCR before and after the incubation to estimate the increase of methanogens. After 8 months a highest methanogenesis rate of 226 pmol/ day/ gram sediment was observed at 12 oC with H2 supplying, which was 2 times higher than that with acetate supplying, clearly suggesting that H2 is a preferable substrate than acetate. The methanogenesis rate without supplying extra substrate showed positive temperature dependence with rate of 23.3, 24.8, 131 pmol/day/gram sediment at 1 oC, 4 oC, and 12 oC, respectively. The McrA copy number was increased more than 300 times and 50 times with H2 and acetate supplying respectively after the incubation. 94% and 67% of the mcrA gene sequences were classed into methanomicrobiales which were hydrogen-trophic methanogens in the two clone libraries with primer ML and ME respectively. This finding suggests the potential effect of methanogenesis under glacier on the climate change.

  18. New approach to the cultivation of methanogenic bacteria: 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (HS-CoM)-dependent growth of Methanobacterium ruminantium in a pressureized atmosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Balch, W E; Wolfe, R S

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivity of the requirement of Methanobacterium ruminantium strain M1 to a new coenzyme, 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (HS-CoM) was examined by use of new techniques that were developed for rapid and efficient handling of large numbers of cultures of methanogenic bacteria. The system uses sealed tubes that contain a gas mixture of 80% hydrogen and 20% carbon dioxide under a pressure of 2 to 3 atm. This modification of the Hungate technique reduces variability among replicate cultures and simplifies the dispensing, sterilization, and storage of liquid media as well as the transfer and maintenance of methanogenic bacteria. Results indicate a limit of sensitivity of the assay at 5 nM HS-CoM, with half-maximal growth at 25 nM HS-CoM. Coenzyme activity could be replaced by 2,2'-dithiodiethanesulfonic acid at a half-molar equivalent of the HS-CoM concentration, or by 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid on an equimolar basis. These data reveal a very sensitive and precise requirement for HS-CoM in the nutrition of this fastidious anaerobe. Images PMID:827241

  19. The Geobiochemistry of Methanogen Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    A principle of geobiochemistry is that adaptation over evolutionary time includes a thermodynamic drive to minimize costs of making biomolecules like proteins and lipids. If so, then biomolecule abundances will reflect, at least in part, their relative stabilities at the conditions imposed by external environments. We tested this hypothesis by comparing relative stabilities of 138 orthologous proteins between a representative lake-sediment methanogen (Methanoculleus marisnigri) and a representative rumen methanogen (Methanospirillum hungatei) at the compositional constraints of their respective environments. Chemical affinities of the proteins were calculated based on pH, temperature, and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen, bicarbonate, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide, together with standard Gibbs energies of formation of proteins from the elements predicted with a group additivity algorithm for unfolded proteins [1]. Methanogens were chosen as they are chemoautotrophs and their metabolism proceeds at relatively small affinities. Also, they are found in a variety of compositionally varying habitats like rumen, sediments, hydrothermal systems and sewage. The methanogens selected belong to the same order of taxonomy and are closely related. Preliminary results show that a majority of the proteins belonging to the rumen methanogen (66%) are more stable in the rumen environment, while a majority of the proteins belonging to the lake-sediment methanogen (58%) are more stable at sediment conditions. In a separate observation, it was noted that while the complete protein ';proteasome subunit alpha' of another rumen methanogen (Methanobrevibacter smithii) was less stable in its more reducing habitat as compared to a sewage methanogen (Methanothermobacter thermoautotophicus), its first 26 amino acid residues (N terminal) were in fact more stable in its own environment. These 26 residues are reported to be unique as compared to other proteasome proteins and are suggested to

  20. Methanogens in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G.; Rittmann, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The last decade of space science revealed that potential habitats in the Solar System may not be limited to the classical habitable zone supporting life as we know it. These microorganisms were shown to thrive under extremophilic growth conditions. Here, we outline the main eco-physiological characteristics of methanogens like their response on temperature, pressure, or pH changes or their resistance against radiation or desiccation. They can withstand extreme environmental conditions which makes them intriguing organisms for astrobiological studies. On Earth, they are found for example in wetlands, in arctic and antarctic subglacial environments, in ruminants, and even in the environment surrounding the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. These obligate anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs or chemolithoheterotrophs are able to use e.g. hydrogen and C1 compounds like CO2, formate, or methanol as energy source and carbon source, respectively. We point out their capability to be able to habitat potential extraterrestrial biospheres all over the planetary system. We will give an overview about these possible environments on Mars, icy moons like Europa or Enceladus, and minor planets. We present an overview about studies of methanogens with an astrobiological relevance and we show our conclusions about the role of methanogens for the search for extraterrestrial life in the Solar System. We will present first results of our study about the possibility to cultivate methanogens under Enceladus-like conditions. For that, based on the observations obtained by the Cassini spacecraft concerning the plume compounds, we produce a medium with a composition similar to the ocean composition of this icy moon which is far more Enceladus-like than in any (published) experiment before. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies with these microbes. We point out the importance of future in-situ or even sample and return missions to

  1. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens dominate in biogas reactors fed with defined substrates.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, K; Ratering, S; Baumann, R; Schmidt, M; Zerr, W; Schnell, S

    2012-09-01

    Methanogenic communities in 200L biogas reactors containing liquid manure were investigated for 33 d. The reactors were consecutively fed with casein, starch and cream. Real-time PCR with primers targeting the gene for methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) resulted in copy numbers of up to 2.1×10(9) g dry mass(-1). Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed a stable community consisting of few hydrogenotrophic methanogens. One of the two most abundant species was closely related to Methanospirillum hungatei, whereas the other one was only distantly related to other methanogens, with Methanopyrus kandleri being the closest cultivated relative. Most probable number (MPN) cultivations were accomplished with a sample from a 600 m(3) reactor from which all manures used in the experiments originated, and equal cell counts of ca. 10(9) g dry mass(-1) were found for cultivations with acetate, H(2) and methanol. SSCP analysis of these samples and sequencing of the DNA bands identified different hydrogenotrophic methanogens in all samples, and acetoclastic methanogens closely related to Methanosarcina mazei in the samples cultivated with acetate and methanol. As the acetoclastic species were not found in any other SSCP sample, it was supposed that the ammonia values in the manure of the laboratory biogas reactor, which ranged from 2.48 to 3.61 g NH(4)-NL(-1), inhibited the growth of the acetoclastic methanogens.

  2. Osmoregulation in methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Our major goal of our work has been to develop and use NMR techniques to study how methanogenic archaebacteria deal with osmotic stress with the hope of providing insights into increasing the salt tolerance of other cells. The project has three main sections: (i) in vivo studies of methanogens; (ii) use of [sup l3]C- and [sup l5]N- labeled potential precursors and in vitro analyses of specific label uptake for elucidation of osmolyte dynamics and biosynthetic pathways of osmolytes in these organisms, and isolation of key biosynthetic enzymes; and (iii) collaborative studies on identification of organic solutes in other methanogens.

  3. Microbial dark matter ecogenomics reveals complex synergistic networks in a methanogenic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nobu, Masaru K; Narihiro, Takashi; Rinke, Christian; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-08-01

    Ecogenomic investigation of a methanogenic bioreactor degrading terephthalate (TA) allowed elucidation of complex synergistic networks of uncultivated microorganisms, including those from candidate phyla with no cultivated representatives. Our previous metagenomic investigation proposed that Pelotomaculum and methanogens may interact with uncultivated organisms to degrade TA; however, many members of the community remained unaddressed because of past technological limitations. In further pursuit, this study employed state-of-the-art omics tools to generate draft genomes and transcriptomes for uncultivated organisms spanning 15 phyla and reports the first genomic insight into candidate phyla Atribacteria, Hydrogenedentes and Marinimicrobia in methanogenic environments. Metabolic reconstruction revealed that these organisms perform fermentative, syntrophic and acetogenic catabolism facilitated by energy conservation revolving around H2 metabolism. Several of these organisms could degrade TA catabolism by-products (acetate, butyrate and H2) and syntrophically support Pelotomaculum. Other taxa could scavenge anabolic products (protein and lipids) presumably derived from detrital biomass produced by the TA-degrading community. The protein scavengers expressed complementary metabolic pathways indicating syntrophic and fermentative step-wise protein degradation through amino acids, branched-chain fatty acids and propionate. Thus, the uncultivated organisms may interact to form an intricate syntrophy-supported food web with Pelotomaculum and methanogens to metabolize catabolic by-products and detritus, whereby facilitating holistic TA mineralization to CO2 and CH4.

  4. Microbial dark matter ecogenomics reveals complex synergistic networks in a methanogenic bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Nobu, Masaru K; Narihiro, Takashi; Rinke, Christian; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-01-01

    Ecogenomic investigation of a methanogenic bioreactor degrading terephthalate (TA) allowed elucidation of complex synergistic networks of uncultivated microorganisms, including those from candidate phyla with no cultivated representatives. Our previous metagenomic investigation proposed that Pelotomaculum and methanogens may interact with uncultivated organisms to degrade TA; however, many members of the community remained unaddressed because of past technological limitations. In further pursuit, this study employed state-of-the-art omics tools to generate draft genomes and transcriptomes for uncultivated organisms spanning 15 phyla and reports the first genomic insight into candidate phyla Atribacteria, Hydrogenedentes and Marinimicrobia in methanogenic environments. Metabolic reconstruction revealed that these organisms perform fermentative, syntrophic and acetogenic catabolism facilitated by energy conservation revolving around H2 metabolism. Several of these organisms could degrade TA catabolism by-products (acetate, butyrate and H2) and syntrophically support Pelotomaculum. Other taxa could scavenge anabolic products (protein and lipids) presumably derived from detrital biomass produced by the TA-degrading community. The protein scavengers expressed complementary metabolic pathways indicating syntrophic and fermentative step-wise protein degradation through amino acids, branched-chain fatty acids and propionate. Thus, the uncultivated organisms may interact to form an intricate syntrophy-supported food web with Pelotomaculum and methanogens to metabolize catabolic by-products and detritus, whereby facilitating holistic TA mineralization to CO2 and CH4. PMID:25615435

  5. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-11-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process. Syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens are important for the ammonia inhibitory mechanism on anaerobic digestion. The roles and interactions of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens to ammonia inhibition effect are still unclear. The aim of the current study was to determine the ammonia toxicity levels of various pure strains of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Moreover, ammonia toxicity on the syntrophic-cultivated strains of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens was tested. Thus, four hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis, Methanobacterium congolense, Methanoculleu thermophilus and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus), two SAOB (i.e. Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) and their syntrophic cultivation were assessed under 0.26, 3, 5 and 7 g NH4 (+)-N L(-1). The results showed that some hydrogenotrophic methanogens were equally, or in some cases, more tolerant to high ammonia levels compared to SAOB. Furthermore, a mesophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogen was more sensitive to ammonia toxicity compared to thermophilic methanogens tested in the study, which is contradicting to the general belief that thermophilic methanogens are more vulnerable to high ammonia loads compared to mesophilic. This unexpected finding underlines the fact that the complete knowledge of ammonia inhibition effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens is still absent.

  6. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  7. Methanogenic Diversity in Marine Sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, M. M.; Boone, D. R.

    2004-12-01

    Little is known about the mechanism of methanogenic degradation of acetate or the fate of hydrogen and formate in cold marine sediments, or the ability of methanogens to grow and produce methane there. We used cultivation and molecular techniques to examine the microbes that produce methane from these substrates in permanently cold, anoxic marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon (44° 35'N, 125° 10'W, depth 800 m). Sediment samples (15 to 35 cm deep) were collected from areas of active methane ebullition or areas where methane hydrates occurred. The samples were anoxically diluted and inoculated into enrichment media with formate, acetate, or trimethylamine as catabolic substrate. After 2 years incubation at 4° C to 15° C, enrichment cultures grew and produced methane. DNA was extracted from the highest dilutions that grew. The sequence data suggested that each enrichment culture contained a single strain of methanogen, and many of these sequences were dissimilar to known sequences of methanogens. This level of similarity (89 to 91% similar) suggests that these methanogens belong to novel genera. A clone library of 16S rRNA genes was also created from DNA extracted from the sediment samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries also revealed phylotypes that were only distantly related to cultivated organisms. The sequences of the clone library and of the enrichment cultures indicate a high degree of phylogenetic diversity among the Hydrate Ridge Archaea.

  8. Modeling the significance of including C redistribution when determining changes in net carbon storage along a cultivated toposequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirinda, Ngonidzashe; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Heckrath, Goswin; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo

    2016-04-01

    Globally, soil carbon (C) reserves are second only to those in the ocean, and accounts for a significant C reservoir. In the case of arable soils, the quantity of stored C is influenced by various factors (e.g. management practices). Currently, the topography related influences on in-field soil C dynamics remain largely unknown. However, topography is known to influence a multiplicity of factors that regulate C input, storage and redistribution. To understand the patterns and untangle the complexity of soil C dynamics in arable landscapes, our study was conducted with soils from shoulderslope and footslope positions on a 7.1 ha winter wheat field in western Denmark. We first collected soil samples from shoulderslope and footslope positions with various depth intervals down to 100 cm and analyzed them for physical and chemical properties including texture and soil organic C contents. In-situ carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured at different soil profile depths at both positions for a year. Soil moisture content and temperature at 5 and 40 cm depth was measured continuously. Additionally, surface soil CO2 fluxes at shoulderslope and footslope positions were measured. We then used measurement data collected from the two landscape positions to calibrate the one-dimensional mechanistic model SOILCO2 module of the HYDRUS-1D software package and obtained soil CO2 fluxes from soil profile at two landscape positions. Furthermore, we tested whether the inclusion of vertical and lateral soil C movement improved the modeling of C dynamics in cultivated landscapes. For that, soil profile CO2 fluxes were compared with those obtained using a simple process-based soil whole profile C model, C-TOOL, which was modified to include vertical and lateral movement of C on landscape. Our results highlight the need to consider vertical and lateral soil C movement in the modeling of C dynamics in cultivated landscapes, for better qualification of net carbon storage.

  9. Method for Indirect Quantification of CH4 Production via H2O Production Using Hydrogenotrophic Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Rittmann, Simon K.-M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens are an intriguing group of microorganisms from the domain Archaea. Methanogens exhibit extraordinary ecological, biochemical, and physiological characteristics and possess a huge biotechnological potential. Yet, the only possibility to assess the methane (CH4) production potential of hydrogenotrophic methanogens is to apply gas chromatographic quantification of CH4. In order to be able to effectively screen pure cultures of hydrogenotrophic methanogens regarding their CH4 production potential we developed a novel method for indirect quantification of the volumetric CH4 production rate by measuring the volumetric water production rate. This method was established in serum bottles for cultivation of methanogens in closed batch cultivation mode. Water production was estimated by determining the difference in mass increase in a quasi-isobaric setting. This novel CH4 quantification method is an accurate and precise analytical technique, which can be used to rapidly screen pure cultures of methanogens regarding their volumetric CH4 evolution rate. It is a cost effective alternative determining CH4 production of methanogens over CH4 quantification by using gas chromatography, especially if applied as a high throughput quantification method. Eventually, the method can be universally applied for quantification of CH4 production from psychrophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogens. PMID:27199898

  10. Populations of Methanogenic Bacteria in a Georgia Salt Marsh

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Michael J.; Wiebe, William J.; Whitman, William B.

    1988-01-01

    Methanogens represented about 0.5% of the total bacteria in sediments from a Georgia salt marsh in which Spartina alterniflora is the predominant vegetation. The population of methanogens was composed of at least two groups of nearly equal size. One group was represented by cocci which were able to utilize trimethylamine and were unable to use H2 or acetate. The second group was composed of two subgroups which were able to utilize H2 but were unable to use trimethylamine or acetate. The more common subgroup included rod- or plate-shaped methanogens which could utilize isopropanol in addition to H2 and formate. The second subgroup included Methanococcus maripaludis, which utilized only H2 and formate. Other groups of methanogens were also present, including Methanosarcina sp. which utilized acetate, H2, and methylamines. In addition to the overall variability in the types of methanogens, the numbers of methanogens in sediments also exhibited significant spatial variability both within and between tall- and short-Spartina zones. Images PMID:16347628

  11. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Global Warming Potential of Traditional and Diversified Tropical Rice Rotation Systems including Impacts of Upland Crop Management Practices i.e. Mulching and Inter-crop Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, Baldur; Weller, Sebastian; Kraus, David; Wassmann, Reiner; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Paddy rice cultivation is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, while at the same time changes in demand (e.g. changes in diets or increasing demand for biofuels) will feed back on agricultural practices. These factors are changing traditional cropping patterns from flooded double-rice systems to the introduction of well-aerated upland crop systems in the dry season. Emissions of methane (CH4) are expected to decrease, while emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) will increase and soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks will most likely be volatilized in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). We measured greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines to provide a comparative assessment of the global warming potentials (GWP) as well as yield scaled GWPs of different crop rotations and to evaluate mitigation potentials or risks of new management practices i.e. mulching and inter-crop cultivation. New management practices of mulching and intercrop cultivation will also have the potential to change SOC dynamics, thus can play the key role in contributing to the GWP of upland cropping systems. To present, more than three years of continuous measurement data of CH4 and N2O emissions in double-rice cropping (R-R) and paddy rice rotations diversified with either maize (R-M) or aerobic rice (R-A) in upland cultivation have been collected. Introduction of upland crops in the dry season reduced irrigation water use and CH4 emissions by 66-81% and 95-99%, respectively. Moreover, for practices including upland crops, CH4 emissions in the subsequent wet season with paddy rice were reduced by 54-60%. Although annual N2O emissions increased twice- to threefold in the diversified systems, the strong reduction of CH4 led to a significantly lower (p<0.05) annual GWP (CH4+ N2O) as compared to the traditional double-rice cropping system. Measurements of soil organic carbon contents before and three years after introduction of upland

  12. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids, including monoesters with an unusual esterifying acid, from cultivated Crotalaria juncea (Sunn Hemp cv. 'Tropic Sun')

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivation of Crotalaria juncea L. (Sunn Hemp cv. ‘Tropic Sun’) is recommended as a green manure crop in a rotation cycle to improve soil condition, help control erosion, suppress weeds, and reduce soil nematodes. Because C. juncea belongs to a genus that is known for the production of toxic dehydr...

  13. Light sensitivity of methanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.D.; McMahon, C.W.; Wolfe, R.S. )

    1991-09-01

    Representatives of four families of methanogenic archaebacteria (archaea), Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum {Delta}H, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg, Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanococcus voltae, and Methanomicrobium mobile, were found to be light sensitive. The facultative anaerobic eubacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, however, were tolerant of light when grown anaerobically under identical light conditions. Interference filters were used to show that the growth of the methanogens is inhibited by light in the blue end of the visible spectrum (370 to 430 nm).

  14. Accelerated glycerol fermentation in Escherichia coli using methanogenic formate consumption.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli can ferment glycerol anaerobically only under very defined restrictive conditions. Hence, it was the aim of this study to overcome this limitation via a co-cultivation approach. Anaerobic glycerol fermentation by a pure E. coli culture was compared to a co-culture that also contained the formate-oxidizing methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Co-cultivation of the two strains led to a more than 11-fold increased glycerol consumption. Furthermore, it supported a constantly neutral pH and a shift from ethanol to succinate production. Moreover, M. formicicum was analyzed for its ability to grow on different standard media and a surprising versatility could be demonstrated.

  15. Characterization of methanogenic Archaea in the leachate of a closed municipal solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Nan; Chen, Yue-Qin; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Shuo; Lan, Chong-Yu; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2003-11-01

    Cultivation-independent molecular approaches were used to investigate the phylogenetic composition of Archaea and the relative abundance of phylogenetically defined groups of methanogens in the leachate of a closed municipal solid waste landfill. Cloning and phylogenetic analysis of archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences (16S rDNA) revealed that the landfill leachate harbored a diverse Archaea community, with sequence types distributed within the two archaeal kingdoms of the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota. Of the 80 clones examined, 51 were phylogenetically associated with well-defined methanogen lineages covering two major methanogenic phenotypes; 20 were related to Thermoplasma and were grouped with some novel archaeal rRNA gene sequences recently recovered from various anaerobic habitats; finally, five belonged to Crenarchaeota and were not closely related to any hitherto cultivated species. Most of the methanogen-like clones were affiliated with the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales and the methylotrophic and acetoclastic Methanosarcinales. Quantitative oligonucleotide hybridization experiments showed that methanogens in the leachate accounted for only a very small fraction of the total community (approximately 2%) and that Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales constituted the majority of the total methanogenic population.

  16. Role for acetotrophic methanogens in methanogenic biodegradation of vinyl chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Under methanogenic conditions, stream-bed sediment microorganisms rapidly degraded [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride to 14CH4 and 14CO2. Amendment with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid eliminated 14CH4 production and decreased 14CO2 recovery by an equal molar amount. Results obtained with [14C]ethene, [14C]acetate, or 14CO2 as substrates indicated that acetotrophic methanogens were responsible for the production of 14CH4 during biodegradation of [1,2-14C]VC.Under methanogenic conditions, stream-bed sediment microorganisms rapidly degraded [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride to 14CH4 and 14CO2. Amendment with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid eliminated 14CH4 production and decreased 14CO2 recovery by an equal molar amount. Results obtained with [14C]-ethene, [14C]acetate, or 14CO2 as substrates indicated that acetotrophic methanogens were responsible for the production of 14CH4, during biodegradation of [1,2-14C]VC.

  17. Mature fine tailings from oil sands processing harbour diverse methanogenic communities.

    PubMed

    Penner, Tara J; Foght, Julia M

    2010-06-01

    Processing oil sands to extract bitumen produces large volumes of a tailings slurry comprising water, silt, clays, unrecovered bitumen, and residual solvent used in the extraction process. Tailings are deposited into large settling basins, where the solids settle by gravity to become denser mature fine tailings (MFT). A substantial flux of methane, currently estimated at ~40 million L/day, is being emitted from the Mildred Lake Settling Basin. To better understand the biogenesis of this greenhouse gas, the methanogenic consortia in MFT samples from depth profiles in 2 tailings deposits (Mildred Lake Settling Basin and West In-Pit) were analyzed by constructing clone libraries of amplified archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The archaeal sequences, whose closest matches were almost exclusively cultivated methanogens, were comparable within and between basins and were predominantly (87% of clones) affiliated with acetoclastic Methanosaeta spp. In contrast, bacterial clone libraries were unexpectedly diverse, with the majority (~55%) of sequences related to Proteobacteria, including some presumptive nitrate-, iron-, or sulfate-reducing, hydrocarbon-degrading genera (e.g., Thauera, Rhodoferax, and Desulfatibacillum). Thus, MFT harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes presumptively responsible for producing methane from substrates indigenous to the MFT. These findings contribute to our understanding of biogenic methane production and densification of MFT in oil sands tailings deposits.

  18. Distribution of methanogenic potential in fractions of turf grass used as inoculum for the start-up of thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Suwannoppadol, Suwat; Ho, Goen; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to investigate thermophilic methanogens in turf used as an inoculum. Results showed that Methanoculleus sp. regarded as hydrogenotrophic and Methanosarcina sp. regarded as acetoclastic methanogens were present in turf tested. However, active acetoclastic methanogens were present in turf soil only. The current study showed that thermophilic methanogens were present in various turf grass species: Stenotaphrum secundatum, Cynodon dactylon, and Zoysia japonica. Severe treatments of grass leaves under oxic conditions, including blending, drying and pulverizing did not affect the thermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity of the grass. A dried and pulverized grass extract could be generated that can serve as a readily storable methanogenic inoculum for thermophilic anaerobic digestion. The methanogens could also be physically extracted into an aqueous suspension, suitable as an inoculum. The possible contribution of the presence of methanogens on grass plants to global greenhouse emissions is briefly discussed.

  19. Phage diversity in a methanogenic digester.

    PubMed

    Park, M-O; Ikenaga, H; Watanabe, K

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that phages are present in natural and engineered ecosystems and influence the structure and performance of prokaryotic communities. However, little has been known about phages occurring in anaerobic ecosystems, including those in methanogenic digesters for waste treatment. This study investigated phages produced in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket methanogenic digester treating brewery wastes. Phage-like particles (PLPs) in the influent and effluent of the digester were concentrated and purified by sequential filtration and quantified and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence assay, and field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). Results indicate that numbers of PLPs in the effluent of the digester exceeded 1 x 10(9) L-1 and at least 10 times greater than those in the influent, suggesting that substantial amounts of PLPs were produced in the digester. A production rate of the PLPs was estimated at least 5.2 x 10(7) PLPs day-1 L-1. TEM and FIGE showed that a variety of phages were produced in the digester, including those affiliated with Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Cystoviridae.

  20. Hydrophobicity of imidazole derivatives correlates with improved activity against human methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Khelaifia, Saber; Brunel, Jean Michel; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-06-01

    Methanogenic archaea are involved in periodontitis in humans. They have also been implicated in digestive tract pathologies and obesity. These microorganisms are broadly resistant to antibiotics, except for metronidazole and ornidazole. In this study, eight imidazole derivatives were synthesised and their in vitro cytotoxicity and activity against six species of methanogenic archaea, including Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanobrevibacter oralis, Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanobacterium beijingense, Methanosaeta concilii and Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, were tested. Whilst the effective half-maximum cytotoxic concentrations (EC50 values) of all compounds were ≤50 mg/L, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were 0.05-0.8 mg/L for most methanogenic archaea and 0.1-1mg/L for M. stadtmanae. These results indicated a >20-400 therapeutic index (EC50/MIC) for these compounds, which compared with metronidazole exhibited 1-log increased activity against methanogenic archaea cultured from the human microbiota. These compounds are therefore promising molecules for the treatment of methanogenic archaea-related infections.

  1. Methanogenic Hydrocarbon Degradation: Evidence from Field and Laboratory Studies.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Núria; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten; Treude, Tina; Krüger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformation of hydrocarbons to methane is an environmentally relevant process taking place in a wide variety of electron acceptor-depleted habitats, from oil reservoirs and coal deposits to contaminated groundwater and deep sediments. Methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is considered to be a major process in reservoir degradation and one of the main processes responsible for the formation of heavy oil deposits and oil sands. In the absence of external electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate, sulfate or Fe(III), fermentation and methanogenesis become the dominant microbial metabolisms. The major end product under these conditions is methane, and the only electron acceptor necessary to sustain the intermediate steps in this process is CO2, which is itself a net product of the overall reaction. We are summarizing the state of the art and recent advances in methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation research. Both the key microbial groups involved as well as metabolic pathways are described, and we discuss the novel insights into methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading populations studied in laboratory as well as environmental systems enabled by novel cultivation-based and molecular approaches. Their possible implications on energy resources, bioremediation of contaminated sites, deep-biosphere research, and consequences for atmospheric composition and ultimately climate change are also addressed.

  2. Adaptation of a methanogenic consortium to arsenite inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E.; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous metalloid known for its adverse effects to human health. Microorganisms are also impacted by As toxicity, including methanogenic archaea, which can affect the performance of process in which biological activity is required (i.e. stabilization of activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants). The novel ability of a mixed methanogenic granular sludge consortium to adapt to the inhibitory effect of arsenic (As) was investigated by exposing the culture to approximately 0.92 mM of AsIII for 160 d in an arsenate (AsV) reducing bioreactor using ethanol as the electron donor. The results of shaken batch bioassays indicated that the original, unexposed sludge was severely inhibited by arsenite (AsIII) as evidenced by the low 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined, i.e., 19 and 90 μM for acetoclastic- and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, respectively. The tolerance of the acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the sludge to AsIII increased 47-fold (IC50 = 910 μM) and 12-fold (IC50= 1100 μM), respectively, upon long-term exposure to As. In conclusion, the methanogenic community in the granular sludge demonstrated a considerable ability to adapt to the severe inhibitory effects of As after a prolonged exposure period. PMID:26823637

  3. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g) compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA. PMID:23401664

  4. Relating methanogen community structure and anaerobic digester function.

    PubMed

    Bocher, B T W; Cherukuri, K; Maki, J S; Johnson, M; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown about the relationships between microbial community structure and anaerobic digester function. However, knowledge of links between community structure and function, such as specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and COD removal rate, are valuable to improve anaerobic bioprocesses. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) to predict SMA using methanogen community structure descriptors for 49 cultures. Community descriptors were DGGE demeaned standardized band intensities for amplicons of a methanogen functional gene (mcrA). First, predictive accuracy of MLR QSARs was assessed using cross validation with training (n = 30) and test sets (n = 19) for glucose and propionate SMA data. MLR equations correlating band intensities and SMA demonstrated good predictability for glucose (q(2) = 0.54) and propionate (q(2) = 0.53). Subsequently, data from all 49 cultures were used to develop QSARs to predict SMA values. Higher intensities of two bands were correlated with higher SMA values; high abundance of methanogens associated with these two bands should be encouraged to attain high SMA values. QSARs are helpful tools to identify key microorganisms or to study and improve many bioprocesses. Development of new, more robust QSARs is encouraged for anaerobic digestion or other bioprocesses, including nitrification, nitritation, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

  5. Dynamics of the methanogenic archaea in tropical estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (10(6)-10(7) cells/g) compared with the dry season (10(4)-10(6) cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA.

  6. Impact of dewatering technologies on specific methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Batstone, Damien J; Lu, Yang; Jensen, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    Dewatering methods for recuperative thickening and final dewatering can potentially impact methanogenic activity and microbial community. This influences both the feasibility of recuperative thickening to increase solids residence time within a digester, and the utilisation of dewatered digestate as inoculum for new digesters. Thickening technology can reduce methanogenic activity through either air contact (rotary drum, DAF, or belt filter press), or by lysing cells through shear (centrifuge). To assess this, two plants with recuperative thickening (rotary drum) in their anaerobic digester, and five without recuperative thickening, had specific methanogenic activity tested in all related streams, including dewatering feed, thickened return, final cake, and centrate. All plants had high speed centrifuges for final dewatering. The digester microbial community was also assessed through 16s pyrotag sequencing and subsequent principal component analysis (PCA). The specific methanogenic activity of all samples was in the expected range of 0.2-0.4 gCOD gVS(-1)d(-1). Plants with recuperative thickening did not have lower digester activity. Centrifuge based dewatering had a significant and variable impact on methanogenic activity in all samples, ranging between 20% and 90% decrease but averaging 54%. Rotary drum based recuperative thickening had a far smaller impact on activity, with a 0% per-pass drop in activity in one plant, and a 20% drop in another. However, the presence of recuperative thickening was a major predictor of overall microbial community (PC1, p = 0.0024). Microbial community PC3 (mainly driven by a shift in methanogens) was a strong predictor for sensitivity in activity to shear (p = 0.0005, p = 0.00001 without outlier). The one outlier was related to a plant producing the wettest cake (17% solids). This indicates that high solids is a potential driver of sensitivity to shear, but that a resilient microbial community can also bestow resilience

  7. An integrated study reveals diverse methanogens, Thaumarchaeota, and yet-uncultivated archaeal lineages in Armenian hot springs.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Brian P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Cole, Jessica K; Panosyan, Hovik H

    2013-07-01

    Culture-independent and enrichment techniques, with an emphasis on members of the Archaea, were used to determine the composition and structure of microbial communities inhabiting microbial mats in the source pools of two geothermal springs near the towns of Arzakan and Jermuk in Armenia. Amplification of small-subunit rRNA genes using "universal" primers followed by pyrosequencing (pyrotags) revealed highly diverse microbial communities in both springs, with >99 % of pyrosequences corresponding to members of the domain Bacteria. The spring in Arzakan was colonized by a photosynthetic mat dominated by Cyanobacteria, in addition to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Spirochaeta and a diversity of other Bacteria. The spring in Jermuk was colonized by phylotypes related to sulfur, iron, and hydrogen chemolithotrophs in the Betaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, along with a diversity of other Bacteria. Analysis of near full-length small subunit rRNA genes amplified using Archaea-specific primers showed that both springs are inhabited by a diversity of methanogens, including Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales and relatives of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, close relatives of the ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (AOA) "Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis", and the yet-uncultivated Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group and Deep Hydrothermal Vent Crenarchaeota group 1. Methanogenic enrichments confirmed the predicted physiological diversity, revealing methylotrophic, acetoclastic, and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at 45 and 55 °C, but not 65 °C. This is one of only a few studies combining cultivation-independent and -dependent approaches to study archaea in moderate-temperature (37-73 °C) terrestrial geothermal environments and suggests important roles for methanogenic archaea and AOA in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycles in these environments.

  8. Effect of Nickel Levels on Hydrogen Partial Pressure and Methane Production in Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) consumption and methane (CH4) production in pure cultures of three different methanogens were investigated during cultivation with 0, 0.2 and 4.21 μM added nickel (Ni). The results showed that the level of dissolved Ni in the anaerobic growth medium did not notably affect CH4 production in the cytochrome-free methanogenic species Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanoculleus bourgensis MAB1, but affected CH4 formation rate in the cytochrome-containing Methanosarcina barkeri grown on H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina barkeri also had the highest amounts of Ni in its cells, indicating that more Ni is needed by cytochrome-containing than by cytochrome-free methanogenic species. The concentration of Ni affected threshold values of H2 partial pressure (pH2) for all three methanogen species studied, with M. bourgensis MAB1 reaching pH2 values as low as 0.1 Pa when Ni was available in amounts used in normal anaerobic growth medium. To our knowledge, this is the lowest pH2 threshold recorded to date in pure methanogen culture, which suggests that M.bourgensis MAB1 have a competitive advantage over other species through its ability to grow at low H2 concentrations. Our study has implications for research on the H2-driven deep subsurface biosphere and biogas reactor performance. PMID:27992585

  9. Effect of Nickel Levels on Hydrogen Partial Pressure and Methane Production in Methanogens.

    PubMed

    Neubeck, Anna; Sjöberg, Susanne; Price, Alex; Callac, Nolwenn; Schnürer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) consumption and methane (CH4) production in pure cultures of three different methanogens were investigated during cultivation with 0, 0.2 and 4.21 μM added nickel (Ni). The results showed that the level of dissolved Ni in the anaerobic growth medium did not notably affect CH4 production in the cytochrome-free methanogenic species Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanoculleus bourgensis MAB1, but affected CH4 formation rate in the cytochrome-containing Methanosarcina barkeri grown on H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina barkeri also had the highest amounts of Ni in its cells, indicating that more Ni is needed by cytochrome-containing than by cytochrome-free methanogenic species. The concentration of Ni affected threshold values of H2 partial pressure (pH2) for all three methanogen species studied, with M. bourgensis MAB1 reaching pH2 values as low as 0.1 Pa when Ni was available in amounts used in normal anaerobic growth medium. To our knowledge, this is the lowest pH2 threshold recorded to date in pure methanogen culture, which suggests that M.bourgensis MAB1 have a competitive advantage over other species through its ability to grow at low H2 concentrations. Our study has implications for research on the H2-driven deep subsurface biosphere and biogas reactor performance.

  10. Community Structure in Methanogenic Enrichments Provides Insight into Syntrophic Interactions in Hydrocarbon-Impacted Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, S. Jane; Toth, Courtney R. A.; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil involves the conversion of hydrocarbons to methanogenic substrates by syntrophic bacteria and subsequent methane production by methanogens. Assessing the metabolic roles played by various microbial species in syntrophic communities remains a challenge, but such information has important implications for bioremediation and microbial enhanced energy recovery technologies. Many factors such as changing environmental conditions or substrate variations can influence the composition and biodegradation capabilities of syntrophic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. In this study, a methanogenic crude oil-degrading enrichment culture was successively transferred onto the single long chain fatty acids palmitate or stearate followed by their parent alkanes, hexadecane or octadecane, respectively, in order to assess the impact of different substrates on microbial community composition and retention of hydrocarbon biodegradation genes. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that a reduction in substrate diversity resulted in a corresponding loss of microbial diversity, but that hydrocarbon biodegradation genes (such as assA/masD encoding alkylsuccinate synthase) could be retained within a community even in the absence of hydrocarbon substrates. Despite substrate-related diversity changes, all communities were dominated by hydrogenotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens along with bacteria including Clostridium sp., members of the Deltaproteobacteria, and a number of other phyla. Microbial co-occurrence network analysis revealed a dense network of interactions amongst syntrophic bacteria and methanogens that were maintained despite changes in the substrates for methanogenesis. Our results reveal the effect of substrate diversity loss on microbial community diversity, indicate that many syntrophic interactions are stable over time despite changes in substrate pressure, and show that syntrophic interactions amongst

  11. Methanogenic food web in the gut contents of methane-emitting earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Kristin; Hunger, Sindy; Brown, George G; Tsai, Siu M; Cerri, Carlos C; Conrad, Ralf; Drake, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    The anoxic saccharide-rich conditions of the earthworm gut provide an ideal transient habitat for ingested microbes capable of anaerobiosis. It was recently discovered that the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil can emit methane (CH4) and that ingested methanogens might be associated with this emission. The objective of this study was to resolve trophic interactions of bacteria and methanogens in the methanogenic food web in the gut contents of E. eugeniae. RNA-based stable isotope probing of bacterial 16S rRNA as well as mcrA and mrtA (the alpha subunit of methyl-CoM reductase and its isoenzyme, respectively) of methanogens was performed with [13C]-glucose as a model saccharide in the gut contents. Concomitant fermentations were augmented by the rapid consumption of glucose, yielding numerous products, including molecular hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), formate, acetate, ethanol, lactate, succinate and propionate. Aeromonadaceae-affiliated facultative aerobes, and obligate anaerobes affiliated to Lachnospiraceae, Veillonellaceae and Ruminococcaceae were associated with the diverse fermentations. Methanogenesis was ongoing during incubations, and 13C-labeling of CH4 verified that supplemental [13C]-glucose derived carbon was dissimilated to CH4. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens affiliated with Methanobacteriaceae and Methanoregulaceae were linked to methanogenesis, and acetogens related to Peptostreptoccocaceae were likewise found to be participants in the methanogenic food web. H2 rather than acetate stimulated methanogenesis in the methanogenic gut content enrichments, and acetogens appeared to dissimilate supplemental H2 to acetate in methanogenic enrichments. These findings provide insight on the processes and associated taxa potentially linked to methanogenesis and the turnover of organic carbon in the alimentary canal of methane-emitting E. eugeniae. PMID:25615437

  12. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  13. Methanogenic food web in the gut contents of methane-emitting earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Kristin; Hunger, Sindy; Brown, George G; Tsai, Siu M; Cerri, Carlos C; Conrad, Ralf; Drake, Harold L

    2015-08-01

    The anoxic saccharide-rich conditions of the earthworm gut provide an ideal transient habitat for ingested microbes capable of anaerobiosis. It was recently discovered that the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil can emit methane (CH4) and that ingested methanogens might be associated with this emission. The objective of this study was to resolve trophic interactions of bacteria and methanogens in the methanogenic food web in the gut contents of E. eugeniae. RNA-based stable isotope probing of bacterial 16S rRNA as well as mcrA and mrtA (the alpha subunit of methyl-CoM reductase and its isoenzyme, respectively) of methanogens was performed with [(13)C]-glucose as a model saccharide in the gut contents. Concomitant fermentations were augmented by the rapid consumption of glucose, yielding numerous products, including molecular hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), formate, acetate, ethanol, lactate, succinate and propionate. Aeromonadaceae-affiliated facultative aerobes, and obligate anaerobes affiliated to Lachnospiraceae, Veillonellaceae and Ruminococcaceae were associated with the diverse fermentations. Methanogenesis was ongoing during incubations, and (13)C-labeling of CH4 verified that supplemental [(13)C]-glucose derived carbon was dissimilated to CH4. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens affiliated with Methanobacteriaceae and Methanoregulaceae were linked to methanogenesis, and acetogens related to Peptostreptoccocaceae were likewise found to be participants in the methanogenic food web. H2 rather than acetate stimulated methanogenesis in the methanogenic gut content enrichments, and acetogens appeared to dissimilate supplemental H2 to acetate in methanogenic enrichments. These findings provide insight on the processes and associated taxa potentially linked to methanogenesis and the turnover of organic carbon in the alimentary canal of methane-emitting E. eugeniae.

  14. Methanogenic archaea are globally ubiquitous in aerated soils and become active under wet anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Claus, Peter; Conrad, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The prototypical representatives of the Euryarchaeota—the methanogens—are oxygen sensitive and are thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. However, we found methanogens of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella to be present in many types of upland soils (including dryland soils) sampled globally. These methanogens could be readily activated by incubating the soils as slurry under anoxic conditions, as seen by rapid methane production within a few weeks, without any additional carbon source. Analysis of the archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene community profile in the incubated samples through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantification through quantitative PCR indicated dominance of Methanosarcina, whose gene copy numbers also correlated with methane production rates. Analysis of the δ13C of the methane further supported this, as the dominant methanogenic pathway was in most cases aceticlastic, which Methanocella cannot perform. Sequences of the key methanogenic enzyme methyl coenzyme M reductase retrieved from the soil samples before incubation confirmed that Methanosarcina and Methanocella are the dominant methanogens, though some sequences of Methanobrevibacter and Methanobacterium were also detected. The global occurrence of only two active methanogenic archaea supports the hypothesis that these are autochthonous members of the upland soil biome and are well adapted to their environment. PMID:22071343

  15. Stereochemical studies of acyclic isoprenoids-XII. Lipids of methanogenic bacteria and possible contributions to sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risatti, J.B.; Rowland, S.J.; Yon, D.A.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Abundant volatile lipids of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanosarcina barkeri include isoprenoid hydrocarbons (??? C30), and C15, C20 and C25 isoprenoid alcohols. M. barkeri contains 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosane, whose relative stereochemistry is the same as found in marine sediments, indicating that it is a marker of methanogenic activity. The C20, C30 and C25 alkenes in M. thermoautotrophicum also have a preferred sterochemistry; the latter have the 2,6,10,14,18-pentamethyleicosanyl skeleton, suggesting that the alkane in marine sediments may derive from methanogens. The stereochemistry of squalane in a marine sediment is also compatible with an origin in methanogens; in contrast, the stereochemistry of pristane in M. thermoautotrophicum indicates a fossil fuel contaminant origin, suggesting that this and certain other alkanes reported in archaebacteria might also be of contaminant origin. There is, therefore, little evidence at present that the pristane in immature marine sediments originates in methanogens. The C15 and C20 saturated alcohols in M. thermoautotrophicum have mainly the all-R configuration. If this is generally true for methanogens, the C20 alcohol in the Messel shale may originate mainly from methanogens, whereas that in the Green River shale may originate mainly from photosynthetic organisms. ?? 1984.

  16. Stress response of methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost compared with methanogens from nonpermafrost habitats.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Daria; Wagner, Dirk

    2007-07-01

    We examined the survival potential of methanogenic archaea exposed to different environmental stress conditions such as low temperature (down to -78.5 degrees C), high salinity (up to 6 M NaCl), starvation (up to 3 months), long-term freezing (up to 2 years), desiccation (up to 25 days) and oxygen exposure (up to 72 h). The experiments were conducted with methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost and were complemented by experiments on well-studied methanogens from nonpermafrost habitats. Our results indicate a high survival potential of a methanogenic archaeon from Siberian permafrost when exposed to the extreme conditions tested. In contrast, these stress conditions were lethal for methanogenic archaea isolated from nonpermafrost habitats. A better adaptation to stress was observed at a low temperature (4 degrees C) compared with a higher one (28 degrees C). Given the unique metabolism of methanogenic archaea in general and the long-term survival and high tolerance to extreme conditions of the methanogens investigated in this study, methanogenic archaea from permafrost should be considered as primary candidates for possible subsurface Martian life.

  17. Effects of Methanogenic Inhibitors on Methane Production and Abundances of Methanogens and Cellulolytic Bacteria in In Vitro Ruminal Cultures ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenming; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of select antimethanogen compounds on methane production, feed digestion and fermentation, and populations of ruminal bacteria and methanogens using in vitro cultures. Seven compounds, including 2-bromoethanesulphonate (BES), propynoic acid (PA), nitroethane (NE), ethyl trans-2-butenoate (ETB), 2-nitroethanol (2NEOH), sodium nitrate (SN), and ethyl-2-butynote (EB), were tested at a final concentration of 12 mM. Ground alfalfa hay was included as the only substrate to simulate daily forage intake. Compared to no-inhibitor controls, PA, 2NEOH, and SN greatly reduced the production of methane (70 to 99%), volatile fatty acids (VFAs; 46 to 66%), acetate (30 to 60%), and propionate (79 to 82%), with 2NEOH reducing the most. EB reduced methane production by 23% without a significant effect on total VFAs, acetate, or propionate. BES significantly reduced the propionate concentration but not the production of methane, total VFAs, or acetate. ETB or NE had no significant effect on any of the above-mentioned measurements. Specific quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays showed that none of the inhibitors significantly affected total bacterial populations but that they did reduce the Fibrobacter succinogenes population. SN reduced the Ruminococcus albus population, while PA and 2NEOH increased the populations of both R. albus and Ruminococcus flavefaciens. Archaeon-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that all the inhibitors affected the methanogen population structure, while archaeon-specific qPCR revealed a significant decrease in methanogen population in all treatments. These results showed that EB, ETB, NE, and BES can effectively reduce the total population of methanogens but that they reduce methane production to a lesser extent. The results may guide future in vivo studies to develop effective mitigation of methane emission from ruminants. PMID:21357427

  18. Molecular analysis of methanogens involved in methanogenic degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide in full-scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Hu, Tai-Ho; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Chang, Shao-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated methanogenic communities involved in degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in three full-scale bioreactors treating TMAH-containing wastewater. Based on the results of terminal-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative PCR analyses targeting the methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes retrieved from three bioreactors, Methanomethylovorans and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens involved in the methanogenic degradation of TMAH in the bioreactors. Furthermore, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate mcrA messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during methanogenic TMAH degradation, and the results indicated that a higher level of TMAH favored mcrA mRNA expression by Methansarcina, while Methanomethylovorans could only express considerable amount of mcrA mRNA at a lower level of TMAH. These results suggest that Methansarcina is responsible for methanogenic TMAH degradation at higher TMAH concentrations, while Methanomethylovorans may be important at a lower TMAH condition.

  19. Modularized Evolution in Archaeal Methanogens Phylogenetic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Wong, Chi-Fat; Wong, Mabel Ting; Huang, He; Leung, Frederick C.

    2014-01-01

    Methanogens are methane-producing archaea that plays a key role in the global carbon cycle. To date, the evolutionary history of methanogens and closely related nonmethanogen species remains unresolved among studies conducted upon different genetic markers, attributing to horizontal gene transfers (HGTs). With an effort to decipher both congruent and conflicting evolutionary events, reconstruction of coevolved gene clusters and hierarchical structure in the archaeal methanogen phylogenetic forest, comprehensive evolution, and network analyses were performed upon 3,694 gene families from 41 methanogens and 33 closely related archaea. Our results show that 1) greater than 50% of genes are in topological dissonance with others; 2) the prevalent interorder HGTs, even for core genes, in methanogen genomes led to their scrambled phylogenetic relationships; 3) most methanogenesis-related genes have experienced at least one HGT; 4) greater than 20% of the genes in methanogen genomes were transferred horizontally from other archaea, with genes involved in cell-wall synthesis and defense system having been transferred most frequently; 5) the coevolution network contains seven statistically robust modules, wherein the central module has the highest average node strength and comprises a majority of the core genes; 6) different coevolutionary module genes boomed in different time and evolutionary lineage, constructing diversified pan-genome structures; 7) the modularized evolution is also closely related to the vertical evolution signals and the HGT rate of the genes. Overall, this study presented a modularized phylogenetic forest that describes a combination of complicated vertical and nonvertical evolutionary processes for methanogenic archaeal species. PMID:25502908

  20. Pulp mill wastewater sediment reveals novel methanogenic and cellulolytic populations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyu; Wang, Wei; Du, Miaofen; Li, Chunfang; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2013-02-01

    Pulp mill wastewater generated from wheat straw is characterized as high alkalinity and very high COD pollution load. A naturally developed microbial community in a pulp mill wastewater storage pool that had been disused were investigated in this study. Owing to natural evaporation and a huge amount of lignocellulose's deposition, the wastewater sediment contains high concentrations of organic matters and sodium ions, but low concentrations of chloride and carbonate. The microbiota inhabiting especially anaerobic community, including methanogenic arhcaea and cellulolytic species, was studied. All archaeal sequences fall into 2 clusters of family Halobacteriaceae and methanogenic archaeon in the phylum Euryarchaeota. In the methanogenic community, phylogenetic analysis of methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA) genes targeted to novel species in genus Methanoculleus or novel genus of order Methanomicrobiales. The predominance of Methanomicrobiales suggests that methanogenesis in this system might be driven by the hydrogenotrophic pathway. As the important primary fermenter for methane production, the cellulolytic community of enzyme GHF48 was found to be dominated by narrower breadth of novel clostridial cellulase genes. Novel anoxic functional members in such extreme sediment provide the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of anoxic treatment of saline and alkaline wastewaters, as well as benefiting to the biomass transformation and biofuel production processes.

  1. Genetics and molecular biology of methanogen genes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Konisky, J.

    1997-10-07

    Adenylate kinase has been isolated from four related methanogenic members of the Archaea. For each the optimum temperature for enzyme activity was similar to the temperature for optimal microbial growth and was approximately 30 C for Methanococcus voltage, 70 C for Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, 80 C for Methanococcus igneus and 80--90 C for Methanococcus jannaschii. The enzymes were sensitive to the adenylate kinase inhibitor, Ap{sub 5}A [P{sup 1}, P{sup 5}-di(adenosine-5{prime}) pentaphosphate], a property that was exploited to purify the enzymes by CIBACRON Blue affinity chromatography. The enzymes had an estimated molecular weight (approximately 23--25 kDa) in the range common for adenylate kinases. Each of the enzymes had a region of amino acid sequence close to its N-terminus that was similar to the canonical P-loop sequence reported for all adenylate kinases. However, the methanogen sequences lacked a lysine residue that has previously been found to be invariant in adenylate kinases including an enzyme isolated from the Archeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. If verified as a nucleotide binding domain, the methanogen sequence would represent a novel nucleotide binding motif. There was no correlation between amino acid abundance and the optimal temperature for enzyme activity.

  2. Methane Production by Methanogens in Perchlorate-supplemented Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, K. L.; Gavin, P.; Goodhart, T.; Kral, T. A.

    2009-03-01

    Perchlorates, found on the martian surface, create a harsh environment. Methanogens are familiar with harsh environments and their growth was tested in perchlorate salt media. All four species of methanogens produced methane at all concentrations of each salt tested.

  3. Ether polar lipids of methanogenic bacteria: structures, comparative aspects, and biosyntheses.

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Y; Nishihara, M; Morii, H; Akagawa-Matsushita, M

    1993-01-01

    Complete structures of nearly 40 ether polar lipids from seven species of methanogens have been elucidated during the past 10 years. Three kinds of variations of core lipids, macrocyclic archaeol and two hydroxyarchaeols, were identified, in addition to the usual archaeol and caldarchaeol (for the nomenclature of archaeal [archaebacterial] ether lipids, see the text). Polar head groups of methanogen phospholipids include ethanolamine, serine, inositol, N-acetylglucosamine, dimethyl- and trimethylaminopentanetetrol, and glucosaminylinositol. Glucose is the sole hexose moiety of glycolipids in most methanogens, and galactose and mannose have been found in a few species. Methanogen lipids are characterized by their diversity in phosphate-containing polar head groups and core lipids, which in turn can be used for chemotaxonomy of methanogens. This was shown by preliminary simplified analyses of lipid component residues. Core lipid analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography provides a method of determining the methanogenic biomass in natural samples. There has been significant progress in the biosynthetic studies of methanogen lipids in recent years. In vivo incorporation experiments have led to delineation of the outline of the synthetic route of the diphytanylglycerol ether core. The mechanisms of biosynthesis of tetraether lipids and various polar lipids, and cell-free systems of either lipid synthesis, however, remain to be elucidated. The significance and the origin of archaeal ether lipids is discussed in terms of the lipid composition of bacteria living in a wide variety of environments, the oxygen requirement for biosynthesis of hydrocarbon chains, and the physicochemical properties and functions of lipids as membrane constituents. PMID:8464404

  4. Co-occurence of Crenarchaeota, Thermoplasmata and methanogens in anaerobic sludge digesters.

    PubMed

    Chouari, Rakia; Guermazi, Sonda; Sghir, Abdelghani

    2015-05-01

    16S rRNA Crenarchaeota and Thermoplasmata sequences retrieved from 22 anaerobic digesters were analysed. 4.8 and 0.53 % of archaeal sequences were simultaneously affiliated to these lineages. A core of 2 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing 0.6 to -33.6 % of all archaeal sequences were defined for the Crenarchaeotes and identified to already known but not yet cultivable organisms in almost half of the digesters sampled. For the Thermoplasmata, apparently less abundant with 0.7 to -4.7 % of the archaeal sequences, 3 OTUs were identified. We showed here that Crenarchaeotes coexist with methanogens and are particularly abundant when Arch I lineage (also called WSA2 by Hugenholtz) is dominant in digesters. Moreover, Thermoplasmata were detected when Crenarchaeota were present. Interactions between methanogens, Crenarchaeotea and Thermoplamata were thus discussed.

  5. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbach, Katrin; Conrad, Ralf; Řeháková, Klára; Doležal, Jiří; Janatková, Kateřina; Angel, Roey

    2013-01-01

    Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high-altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India) produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival) were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust) were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, ~103 gdw−1 soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonizers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts. PMID:24348469

  6. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Aschenbach, Katrin; Conrad, Ralf; Reháková, Klára; Doležal, Jiří; Janatková, Kateřina; Angel, Roey

    2013-01-01

    Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high-altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India) produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival) were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust) were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, ~10(3) gdw(-1) soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonizers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts.

  7. Cattle Manure Enhances Methanogens Diversity and Methane Emissions Compared to Swine Manure under Rice Paddy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Pramanik, Prabhat; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-01-01

    Livestock manures are broadly used in agriculture to improve soil quality. However, manure application can increase the availability of organic carbon, thereby facilitating methane (CH4) production. Cattle and swine manures are expected to have different CH4 emission characteristics in rice paddy soil due to the inherent differences in composition as a result of contrasting diets and digestive physiology between the two livestock types. To compare the effect of ruminant and non-ruminant animal manure applications on CH4 emissions and methanogenic archaeal diversity during rice cultivation (June to September, 2009), fresh cattle and swine manures were applied into experimental pots at 0, 20 and 40 Mg fresh weight (FW) ha−1 in a greenhouse. Applications of manures significantly enhanced total CH4 emissions as compared to chemical fertilization, with cattle manure leading to higher emissions than swine manure. Total organic C contents in cattle (466 g kg−1) and swine (460 g kg−1) manures were of comparable results. Soil organic C (SOC) contents were also similar between the two manure treatments, but dissolved organic C (DOC) was significantly higher in cattle than swine manure. The mcrA gene copy numbers were significantly higher in cattle than swine manure. Diverse groups of methanogens which belong to Methanomicrobiaceae were detected only in cattle-manured but not in swine-manured soil. Methanogens were transferred from cattle manure to rice paddy soils through fresh excrement. In conclusion, cattle manure application can significantly increase CH4 emissions in rice paddy soil during cultivation, and its pretreatment to suppress methanogenic activity without decreasing rice productivity should be considered. PMID:25494364

  8. Methanogenic archaea in subgingival sites: a review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hieu, Tung; Khelaifia, Saber; Aboudharam, Gerard; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-06-01

    Archaea are non-bacterial prokaryotes associated with oral microbiota in humans, but their roles in oral pathologies remain controversial. Several studies reported the molecular detection of methanogenic archaea from periodontitis, but the significance of this association has not been confirmed yet. An electronic search was therefore conducted in MEDLINE-Pubmed to identify all papers published in English connecting archaea and periodontal infections. Data analysis of the selected studies showed that five genera of methanogenic archaea have been detected in the subgingival microbiota, Methanobrevibacter oralis being the most frequently detected species in 41% of periodontitis patients and 55% of periodontal pockets compared to 6% of healthy subjects and 5% of periodontally-healthy sites (p < 10(-5) , Chi-squared test). Based on the five determination-criteria proposed by Socransky (association with disease, elimination of the organism, host response, animal pathogenicity and mechanisms of pathogenicity), M. oralis is a periodontal pathogen. The methanogenic archaea load correlating with periodontitis severity further supports the pathogenic role of methanogenic archaea in periodontitis. Therefore, detection and quantification of M. oralis in periodontal pockets could help the laboratory diagnosis and follow-up of periodontitis. Determining the origin, diversity and pathogenesis of archaea in periodontal infections warrants further investigations.

  9. Methanogens: A Model for Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, T. A.; Altheide, T. S.; Lueders, A. E.; Goodhart, T. H.; Virden, B. T.; Birch, W.; Howe, K. L.; Gavin, P.

    2010-04-01

    Methanogens have been shown to produce methane at reduced pressures (400 and 50 mbar), in the presence of perchlorate salts, using carbonate as a sole carbon source, and to survive desiccation at both 1 bar and 6 mbar for extended periods of time.

  10. Methanogenic diversity and activity in municipal solid waste landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Laloui-Carpentier, Wassila; Li, Tianlun; Vigneron, Vassilia; Mazéas, Laurent; Bouchez, Théodore

    2006-01-01

    Archaeal microbial communities present in municipal solid waste landfill leachates were characterized using a 16S rDNA approach. Phylogenetic affiliations of 239 partial length 16S rDNA sequences were determined. Sequences belonging to the order Methanosarcinales were dominant in the clone library and 65% of the clones belonged to the strictly acetoclastic methanogenic family Methanosaetaceae. Sequences affiliated to the metabolically versatile family Methanosarcinaceae represented 18% of the retrieved sequences. Members of the hydrogenotrophic order Methanomicrobiales were also recovered in limited numbers, especially sequences affiliated to the genera Methanoculleus and Methanofollis. Eleven euryarchaeal and thirteen crenarchaeal sequences (i.e. 10%) were distantly related to any hitherto cultivated microorganisms, showing that archaeal diversity within the investigated samples was limited. Lab-scale incubations were performed with leachates mixed with several methanogenic precursors (acetate, hydrogen, formate, methanol, methylamine). Microbial populations were followed using group specific 16S rRNA targeted fluorescent oligonucleotidic probes. During the incubations with acetate, acetoclastic methanogenesis was rapidly induced and led to the dominance of archaea hybridizing with probe MS1414 which indicates their affiliation to the family Methanosarcinaceae. Hydrogen and formate addition induced an important acetate synthesis resulting from the onset of homoacetogenic metabolism. In these incubations, species belonging to the family Methanosarcinaceae (hybridizing with probe MS1414) and the order Methanomicrobiales (hybridizing with probe EURY496) were dominant. Homoacetogenesis was also recorded for incubations with methanol and methylamines. In the methanol experiment, acetoclastic methanogenesis took place and archaea hybridizing with probe MS821 (specific for Methanosarcina spp.) were observed to be the dominant population. These results confirm that

  11. Distinctive non-methanogen archaeal populations in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; He, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens define the archaeal communities involved in anaerobic digestion. Recently, non-methanogen archaeal populations have been unexpectedly identified in anaerobic digestion processes. To gain insight into the ecophysiology of these uncharacterized archaeal populations, for the first time, a phylogenetic analysis was performed on a collection of non-methanogen archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from anaerobic digesters of broad geographic distribution, revealing a distinct clade formed by these sequences in subgroup 6 of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group in the newly proposed archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota. This exclusive phylogenetic assemblage enabled the development of a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay specifically targeting these non-methanogen archaeal populations in anaerobic digestion. Application of the qPCR assay in continuous anaerobic digesters indicated that these archaeal populations were minor constituents of the archaeal communities, and the abundance of these populations remained relatively constant irrespective of process perturbations. Analysis of the archaeal populations in methanogenic communities further revealed the co-occurrence of these non-methanogen archaea with acetoclastic methanogens. Nevertheless, the low abundance of non-methanogen archaea as compared with acetoclastic methanogens suggests that the non-methanogen archaeal populations were not major players in animal waste-fed methanogenic processes investigated in this study and the functions of these archaeal populations remain to be identified.

  12. Gene order phylogeny and the evolution of methanogens.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiwei; Sun, Zhiyi; Arndt, William; Shi, Jian; Friedman, Robert; Tang, Jijun

    2009-06-29

    Methanogens are a phylogenetically diverse group belonging to Euryarchaeota. Previously, phylogenetic approaches using large datasets revealed that methanogens can be grouped into two classes, "Class I" and "Class II". However, some deep relationships were not resolved. For instance, the monophyly of "Class I" methanogens, which consist of Methanopyrales, Methanobacteriales and Methanococcales, is disputable due to weak statistical support. In this study, we use MSOAR to identify common orthologous genes from eight methanogen species and a Thermococcale species (outgroup), and apply GRAPPA and FastME to compute distance-based gene order phylogeny. The gene order phylogeny supports two classes of methanogens, but it differs from the original classification of methanogens by placing Methanopyrales and Methanobacteriales together with Methanosarcinales in Class II rather than with Methanococcales. This study suggests a new classification scheme for methanogens. In addition, it indicates that gene order phylogeny can complement traditional sequence-based methods in addressing taxonomic questions for deep relationships.

  13. Response of Methanogens in Arctic Sediments to Temperature and Methanogenic Substrate Availability

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Lynsay I.; Tveit, Alexander; Øvreås, Lise; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    Although cold environments are major contributors to global biogeochemical cycles, comparatively little is known about their microbial community function, structure, and limits of activity. In this study a microcosm based approach was used to investigate the effects of temperature, and methanogenic substrate amendment, (acetate, methanol and H2/CO2) on methanogen activity and methanogen community structure in high Arctic wetlands (Solvatnet and Stuphallet, Svalbard). Methane production was not detected in Stuphallet sediment microcosms (over a 150 day period) and occurred within Solvatnet sediments microcosms (within 24 hours) at temperatures from 5 to 40°C, the maximum temperature being at far higher than in situ maximum temperatures (which range from air temperatures of -1.4 to 14.1°C during summer months). Distinct responses were observed in the Solvatnet methanogen community under different short term incubation conditions. Specifically, different communities were selected at higher and lower temperatures. At lower temperatures (5°C) addition of exogenous substrates (acetate, methanol or H2/CO2) had no stimulatory effect on the rate of methanogenesis or on methanogen community structure. The community in these incubations was dominated by members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 family-level group, which were most similar to the psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanosphaerula palustris strain E1-9c. In contrast, at higher temperatures, substrate amendment enhanced methane production in H2/CO2 amended microcosms, and played a clear role in structuring methanogen communities. Specifically, at 30°C members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 predominated following incubation with H2/CO2, and Methanosarcinaceaeand Methanosaetaceae were enriched in response to acetate addition. These results may indicate that in transiently cold environments, methanogen communities can rapidly respond to moderate short term increases in temperature, but not

  14. Response of Methanogens in Arctic Sediments to Temperature and Methanogenic Substrate Availability.

    PubMed

    Blake, Lynsay I; Tveit, Alexander; Øvreås, Lise; Head, Ian M; Gray, Neil D

    2015-01-01

    Although cold environments are major contributors to global biogeochemical cycles, comparatively little is known about their microbial community function, structure, and limits of activity. In this study a microcosm based approach was used to investigate the effects of temperature, and methanogenic substrate amendment, (acetate, methanol and H2/CO2) on methanogen activity and methanogen community structure in high Arctic wetlands (Solvatnet and Stuphallet, Svalbard). Methane production was not detected in Stuphallet sediment microcosms (over a 150 day period) and occurred within Solvatnet sediments microcosms (within 24 hours) at temperatures from 5 to 40°C, the maximum temperature being at far higher than in situ maximum temperatures (which range from air temperatures of -1.4 to 14.1°C during summer months). Distinct responses were observed in the Solvatnet methanogen community under different short term incubation conditions. Specifically, different communities were selected at higher and lower temperatures. At lower temperatures (5°C) addition of exogenous substrates (acetate, methanol or H2/CO2) had no stimulatory effect on the rate of methanogenesis or on methanogen community structure. The community in these incubations was dominated by members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 family-level group, which were most similar to the psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanosphaerula palustris strain E1-9c. In contrast, at higher temperatures, substrate amendment enhanced methane production in H2/CO2 amended microcosms, and played a clear role in structuring methanogen communities. Specifically, at 30°C members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 predominated following incubation with H2/CO2, and Methanosarcinaceaeand Methanosaetaceae were enriched in response to acetate addition. These results may indicate that in transiently cold environments, methanogen communities can rapidly respond to moderate short term increases in temperature, but not

  15. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Jones, D. Martin; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5–nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12–nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12–nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers. PMID:24765087

  16. Microbiology and biochemistry of the methanogenic archaeobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbanat, Darren R.; Aceti, David J.; Baron, Stephen F.; Terlesky, Katherine C.; Ferry, James C.

    The methane producing bacteria area diverse group of organisms that function in nature with other groups of strictly anaerobic bacteria to convert complex organic matter to methane and carbon dioxide. The methanogens belong to the archaeobacteria, a third primary kingdom distinct from all other procaryotes (eubacteria) and eucaryotes. The distinction is based on the unique structures of cell wall and membrane components present in archaeobacteria, as well as differences in the highly conserved 16s rRNA sequences among the three kingdoms. In addition, the methanogens contain several novel cofactors that function as one-carbon carriers during the reduction of carbon dioxide to methane with electrons derived from the oxidation of H2 or formate. Methanogens also convert acetate to methane by a pathway distinct from that for carbon dioxide reduction. The pathway involves activation of acetate to acetyl-SCoA followed by decarbonylation and reduction of the methyl group to methane coupled to the oxidation of the carbonyl group to carbon dioxide.

  17. Expression of a bacterial catalase in a strictly anaerobic methanogen significantly increases tolerance to hydrogen peroxide but not oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew E; Schaff, Cody W; Horne, Alexandra J; Lessner, Faith H; Lessner, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Haem-dependent catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that degrades H2O2, producing H2O and O2, and is common in aerobes. Catalase is present in some strictly anaerobic methane-producing archaea (methanogens), but the importance of catalase to the antioxidant system of methanogens is poorly understood. We report here that a survey of the sequenced genomes of methanogens revealed that the majority of species lack genes encoding catalase. Moreover, Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methanogen capable of synthesizing haem and encodes haem-dependent catalase in its genome; yet, Methanosarcina acetivorans cells lack detectable catalase activity. However, inducible expression of the haem-dependent catalase from Escherichia coli (EcKatG) in the chromosome of Methanosarcina acetivorans resulted in a 100-fold increase in the endogenous catalase activity compared with uninduced cells. The increased catalase activity conferred a 10-fold increase in the resistance of EcKatG-induced cells to H2O2 compared with uninduced cells. The EcKatG-induced cells were also able to grow when exposed to levels of H2O2 that inhibited or killed uninduced cells. However, despite the significant increase in catalase activity, growth studies revealed that EcKatG-induced cells did not exhibit increased tolerance to O2 compared with uninduced cells. These results support the lack of catalase in the majority of methanogens, since methanogens are more likely to encounter O2 rather than high concentrations of H2O2 in the natural environment. Catalase appears to be a minor component of the antioxidant system in methanogens, even those that are aerotolerant, including Methanosarcina acetivorans. Importantly, the experimental approach used here demonstrated the feasibility of engineering beneficial traits, such as H2O2 tolerance, in methanogens.

  18. Methanopyrus kandleri: an archaeal methanogen unrelated to all other known methanogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Stetter, K. O.; Rouviere, P.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence shows that the newly discovered hyperthermophilic methanogen, Methanopryus kandleri, is phylogenetically unrelated to any other known methanogen. The organism represents a separate lineage originating near the root of the archaeal tree. Although the 16S rRNA sequence of Mp. kandleri resembles euryarchaeal 16S rRNAs more than it does crenarchaeal, it shows more crenarchaeal signature features than any known euryarchaeal rRNA. Attempts to place it in relation to the root of the archaeal tree show that the Mp. kandleri lineage likely arises from the euryarchaeal branch of the tree. While the existence of so deeply branching a methanogenic lineage brings into question the thesis that methanogenesis evolved from an earlier metabolism similar to that seen in Thermococcus, it at the same time reinforces the notion that the aboriginal [correction of aborginal] archaeon was a thermophile.

  19. Levels of water-soluble vitamins in methanogenic and non-methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The levels of seven water-soluble vitamins in Methanobacterium thermoautotropicum, Methanococcus voltae, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtillis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron were compared by using a vitamin-requiring Leuconostoc strain. Both methanogens contained levels of folic acid and pantothenic acid which were approximately two orders of magnitude lower than levels in the nonmethanogens. Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contained levels of thiamine, biotin, nicotinic acid, and pyridoxine which were approximately one order of magnitude lower than levels in the nonmethanogens. The thiamine level in Methanococcus voltae was approximately one order of magnitude lower than levels in the nonmethanogens. Only the levels of riboflavin (and nicotinic acid and pyridoxine in Methanococcus voltae) were approximately equal in the methanogens and nonmethanogens. Folic acid may have been present in extracts of methanogens merely as a precursor, by-product, or hydrolysis product of methanopterin.

  20. Methanogens: Methane Producers of the Rumen and Mitigation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Sarah E.; Wright, André-Denis G.; McBride, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Methanogens are the only known microorganisms capable of methane production, making them of interest when investigating methane abatement strategies. A number of experiments have been conducted to study the methanogen population in the rumen of cattle and sheep, as well as the relationship that methanogens have with other microorganisms. The rumen methanogen species differ depending on diet and geographical location of the host, as does methanogenesis, which can be reduced by modifying dietary composition, or by supplementation of monensin, lipids, organic acids, or plant compounds within the diet. Other methane abatement strategies that have been investigated are defaunation and vaccines. These mitigation methods target the methanogen population of the rumen directly or indirectly, resulting in varying degrees of efficacy. This paper describes the methanogens identified in the rumens of cattle and sheep, as well as a number of methane mitigation strategies that have been effective in vivo. PMID:21253540

  1. Glycine betaine as a direct substrate for methanogens (Methanococcoides spp.).

    PubMed

    Watkins, Andrew J; Roussel, Erwan G; Parkes, R John; Sass, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Nine marine methanogenic Methanococcoides strains, including the type strains of Methanococcoides methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense, were tested for the utilization of N-methylated glycines. Three strains (NM1, PM2, and MKM1) used glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a substrate for methanogenesis, partially demethylating it to N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas none of the strains used N,N-dimethylglycine or sarcosine (N-methylglycine). Growth rates and growth yields per mole of substrate with glycine betaine (3.96 g [dry weight] per mol) were similar to those with trimethylamine (4.11 g [dry weight] per mol). However, as glycine betaine is only partially demethylated, the yield per methyl group was significantly higher than with trimethylamine. If glycine betaine and trimethylamine are provided together, trimethylamine is demethylated to dimethyl- and methylamine with limited glycine betaine utilization. After trimethylamine is depleted, dimethylamine and glycine betaine are consumed rapidly, before methylamine. Glycine betaine extends the range of substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, allowing them to gain energy from the substrate without the need for syntrophic partners.

  2. Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland maize impacts the resident and active methanogenic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Björn; Blaser, Martin B; Klose, Melanie; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland crops is a common management scheme allowing the reduction of water consumption along with the reduction of methane emission. The introduction of an upland crop into the paddy rice ecosystem leads to dramatic changes in field conditions (oxygen availability, redox conditions). However, the impact of this practice on the archaeal and bacterial communities has scarcely been studied. Here, we provide a comprehensive study focusing on the crop rotation between flooded rice in the wet season and upland maize (RM) in the dry season in comparison with flooded rice (RR) in both seasons. The composition of the resident and active microbial communities was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA. The archaeal community composition changed dramatically in the rotational fields indicated by a decrease of anaerobic methanogenic lineages and an increase of aerobic Thaumarchaeota. Members of Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae and Methanocellaceae were equally suppressed in the rotational fields indicating influence on both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. On the contrary, members of soil crenarchaeotic group, mainly Candidatus Nitrososphaera, were higher in the rotational fields, possibly indicating increasing importance of ammonia oxidation during drainage. In contrast, minor effects on the bacterial community were observed. Acidobacteria and Anaeromyxobacter spp. were enriched in the rotational fields, whereas members of anaerobic Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing members of Deltaproteobacteria were found in higher abundance in the rice fields. Combining quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing data revealed increased ribosomal numbers per cell for methanogenic species during crop rotation. This stress response, however, did not allow the methanogenic community to recover in the rotational fields during re-flooding and rice

  3. Molecular Biology and Genetics of the Acetate-Utilizing Methanogenic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Gunsalus

    2003-07-21

    Methane biosynthesis by the Methanosarcina species, in contrast to other methanogens, occurs from the full range of methanogenic substrates that include acetate, methanol, tri-methyl, di-methyl, and methyl-amine, methyl-sulfides, and in limited instances, H2/CO2. The Methanosarcina are also versatile in their ability to adapt and grow in habitats of varying osmolarity ranging from fresh water environments, marine environments, and to hyper saline environments (ca to 1.2 M NaCl). To facilitate studies that address the biochemistry, molecular biology and physiology of these organisms, we have constructed a whole-genome microarray to identify classes of differentially expressed genes in M. mazei strain Goe1. We propose to further identify and examine how genes and their proteins involved in the synthesis and transport of osmolytes in the cell are regulated. These compounds include N-epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine, alpha-glutamate, betaine, and potassium whose levels within the cell are modulated in order to provide appropriate osmotic balance. We will identify differentially expressed genes involved in hydrogen and carbon dioxide sequestration since M. mazei strain Goe1 is currently the only practical model for such study. Finally, we will explore the essential roles of two metals, molybdate and tungstate, in methanogen regulation and metabolism of these environmentally essential organsims. The above studies will advance our general understanding of how methanogens respond to their environmental signals, and adapt by adjusting their physiology to thrive in changing anaerobic habitats whether natural or man-made.

  4. 16S ribosomal DNA-directed PCR primers for ruminal methanogens and identification of methanogens colonising young lambs.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Lucy C; Evans, Paul N; Naylor, Graham E; Morvan, Brieuc; Jarvis, Graeme N; Joblin, Keith N

    2004-10-01

    The population densities and identities of methanogens colonising new-born lambs in a grazing flock were determined from rumen samples collected at regular intervals after birth. Methanogen colonisation was found at the first sampling (1-3 days after birth) and population densities reached around 10(4) methanogens per gram at 1 week of age. Population densities increased in an exponential manner to a maximum of 10(8)-10(9) per gram at 3 weeks of age. To identify methanogens, PCR primers specific for each of the Archaea; a grouping of the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales and Methanococcales; the order Methanobacteriales; the order Methanococcales; the order Methanosarcinales; the genus Methanobacterium; and the genus Methanobrevibacter were designed. Primer-pair specificities were confirmed in tests with target and non-target micro-organisms. PCR analysis of DNA extracts revealed that all the detectable ruminal methanogens belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, with no methanogens belonging to the Methanomicrobiales, the Methanosarcinales, or the Methanococcales being detected. In 3 lambs, the initial colonising methanogens were Methanobrevibacter spp. and in 2 lambs were a mixture of Methanobrevibacter and Methanobacterium spp. In the latter case, the initial colonising Methanobacterium spp. subsequently disappeared and were not detectable 12-19 days after birth. Seven weeks after birth, lambs contained only Methanobrevibacter spp. This study, the first to provide information on the identities of methanogens colonising pre-ruminants, suggests that the predominant methanogens found in the mature rumen establish very soon after birth and well before a functioning rumen develops.

  5. Molecular identification of methanogenic archaea from surti buffaloes (bubalus bubalis), reveals more hydrogenotrophic methanogens phylotypes.

    PubMed

    Singh, K M; Pandya, P R; Parnerkar, S; Tripathi, A K; Rank, D N; Kothari, R K; Joshi, C G

    2011-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock are considered to be one of the more potent forms of greenhouses gases contributing to global warming. Many strategies to reduce emissions are targeting the methanogens that inhabit the rumen, but such an approach can only be successful if it targets all the major groups of ruminant methanogens. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the diversity of these microbes in breeds of buffaloes, as well as in response to geographical location and different diets, is required. Therefore, molecular diversity of rumen methanogens in Surti buffaloes was investigated using 16S rRNA gene libraries prepared from pooled rumen contents from three Surti buffaloes. A total of 171 clones were identified revealing 23 different sequences (phylotypes). Of these 23 sequences, twelve sequences (12 OTUs, 83 clones) and 10 sequences (10 OTUs, 83 clones) were similar to methanogens belonging to the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales, and the remaining 1 phylotype (5 clones) were similar to Methanosarcina barkeri. These unique sequences clustered within a distinct and strongly supported phylogenetic group. Further studies and effective strategies can be made to inhibit the growth of Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales phylotypes to reduce the methane emission from rumen and thus help in preventing global warming.

  6. Microbial reduction of Fe(III) in smectite minerals by thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Agrawal, Abinash

    2013-04-01

    Clay minerals and thermophilic methanogens can co-exist in hot anoxic environments, including the continental subsurface, geysers, terrestrial hot springs, and deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems. However, it is unclear whether thermophilic methanogens are able to reduce structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. In this study, the ability of a thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus to reduce structural Fe(III) in iron-rich and iron-poor smectites, (nontronite NAu-2 and Wyoming montmorillonite SWy-2) and the relationship between iron reduction and methanogenesis were investigated. M. thermautotrophicus reduced Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2 and montmorillonite SWy-2 with H2/CO2 as substrate. The extent of bioreduction was 27% for nontronite and 13-15% for montmorillonite. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) did not enhance the extent of bioreduction, but accelerated the rate. When methanogenesis was inhibited via addition of 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES), the extent of bioreduction decreased to 16% for NAu-2 and 9% for SWy-2. These data suggest that Fe(III) bioreduction and methanogenesis were mutually beneficial. The likely mechanism was that Fe(III) bioreduction lowered the reduction potential of the system so that methanogenesis became favorable, and methanogenesis in turn stimulated the growth of the methanogen, which enhanced Fe(III) bioreduction. NAu-2 was partly dissolved and high charge smectite and biogenic silica formed as a result of bioreduction.

  7. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, I.; Hooper, Sean; Lykidis, A; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Background Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  8. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  9. Energetics of syntrophic cooperation in methanogenic degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Schink, B

    1997-01-01

    Fatty acids and alcohols are key intermediates in the methanogenic degradation of organic matter, e.g., in anaerobic sewage sludge digestors or freshwater lake sediments. They are produced by classical fermenting bacteria for disposal of electrons derived in simultaneous substrate oxidations. Methanogenic bacteria can degrade primarily only one-carbon compounds. Therefore, acetate, propionate, ethanol, and their higher homologs have to be fermented further to one-carbon compounds. These fermentations are called secondary or syntrophic fermentations. They are endergonic processes under standard conditions and depend on intimate coupling with methanogenesis. The energetic situation of the prokaryotes cooperating in these processes is problematic: the free energy available in the reactions for total conversion of substrate to methane attributes to each partner amounts of energy in the range of the minimum biochemically convertible energy, i.e., 20 to 25 kJ per mol per reaction. This amount corresponds to one-third of an ATP unit and is equivalent to the energy required for a monovalent ion to cross the charged cytoplasmic membrane. Recent studies have revealed that syntrophically fermenting bacteria synthesize ATP by substrate-level phosphorylation and reinvest part of the ATP-bound energy into reversed electron transport processes, to release the electrons at a redox level accessible by the partner bacteria and to balance their energy budget. These findings allow us to understand the energy economy of these bacteria on the basis of concepts derived from the bioenergetics of other microorganisms. PMID:9184013

  10. RIM-DB: a taxonomic framework for community structure analysis of methanogenic archaea from the rumen and other intestinal environments

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, Henning; Kittelmann, Sandra; Henderson, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Methane is formed by methanogenic archaea in the rumen as one of the end products of feed fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract. To develop strategies to mitigate anthropogenic methane emissions due to ruminant farming, and to understand rumen microbial differences in animal feed conversion efficiency, it is essential that methanogens can be identified and taxonomically classified with high accuracy. Currently available taxonomic frameworks offer only limited resolution beyond the genus level for taxonomic assignments of sequence data stemming from high throughput sequencing technologies. Therefore, we have developed a QIIME-compatible database (DB) designed for species-level taxonomic assignment of 16S rRNA gene amplicon data targeting methanogenic archaea from the rumen, and from animal and human intestinal tracts. Called RIM-DB (Rumen and Intestinal Methanogen-DB), it contains a set of 2,379 almost full-length chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene sequences, including 20 previously unpublished sequences from isolates from three different orders. The taxonomy encompasses the recently-proposed seventh order of methanogens, the Methanomassiliicoccales, and allows differentiation between defined groups within this order. Sequence reads from rumen contents from a range of ruminant-diet combinations were taxonomically assigned using RIM-DB, Greengenes and SILVA. This comparison clearly showed that taxonomic assignments with RIM-DB resulted in the most detailed assignment, and only RIM-DB taxonomic assignments allowed methanogens to be distinguished taxonomically at the species level. RIM-DB complements the use of comprehensive databases such as Greengenes and SILVA for community structure analysis of methanogens from the rumen and other intestinal environments, and allows identification of target species for methane mitigation strategies. PMID:25165621

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Methanoregula formicica SMSPT, a Mesophilic Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen Isolated from a Methanogenic Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-09-04

    Methanoregula formicica SMSP(T) is a mesophilic H2/formate-utilizing methanogenic archaeon and a representative of the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales. Here, we report a 2.8-Mb complete genome sequence of this methanogenic archaeon.

  12. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Boonfei; Jane Fowler, S; Laban, Nidal Abu; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities. PMID:25734684

  13. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boonfei; Fowler, S Jane; Abu Laban, Nidal; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-09-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities.

  14. Hydrogen-limited growth of hyperthermophilic methanogens at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Ver Eecke, Helene C; Butterfield, David A; Huber, Julie A; Lilley, Marvin D; Olson, Eric J; Roe, Kevin K; Evans, Leigh J; Merkel, Alexandr Y; Cantin, Holly V; Holden, James F

    2012-08-21

    Microbial productivity at hydrothermal vents is among the highest found anywhere in the deep ocean, but constraints on microbial growth and metabolism at vents are lacking. We used a combination of cultivation, molecular, and geochemical tools to verify pure culture H(2) threshold measurements for hyperthermophilic methanogenesis in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Volcano and Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Two Methanocaldococcus strains from Axial and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii showed similar Monod growth kinetics when grown in a bioreactor at varying H(2) concentrations. Their H(2) half-saturation value was 66 μM, and growth ceased below 17-23 μM H(2), 10-fold lower than previously predicted. By comparison, measured H(2) and CH(4) concentrations in fluids suggest that there was generally sufficient H(2) for Methanocaldococcus growth at Axial but not at Endeavour. Fluids from one vent at Axial (Marker 113) had anomalously high CH(4) concentrations and contained various thermal classes of methanogens based on cultivation and mcrA/mrtA analyses. At Endeavour, methanogens were largely undetectable in fluid samples based on cultivation and molecular screens, although abundances of hyperthermophilic heterotrophs were relatively high. Where present, Methanocaldococcus genes were the predominant mcrA/mrtA sequences recovered and comprised ∼0.2-6% of the total archaeal community. Field and coculture data suggest that H(2) limitation may be partly ameliorated by H(2) syntrophy with hyperthermophilic heterotrophs. These data support our estimated H(2) threshold for hyperthermophilic methanogenesis at vents and highlight the need for coupled laboratory and field measurements to constrain microbial distribution and biogeochemical impacts in the deep sea.

  15. Hydrogen-limited growth of hyperthermophilic methanogens at deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Ver Eecke, Helene C.; Butterfield, David A.; Huber, Julie A.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Olson, Eric J.; Roe, Kevin K.; Evans, Leigh J.; Merkel, Alexandr Y.; Cantin, Holly V.; Holden, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial productivity at hydrothermal vents is among the highest found anywhere in the deep ocean, but constraints on microbial growth and metabolism at vents are lacking. We used a combination of cultivation, molecular, and geochemical tools to verify pure culture H2 threshold measurements for hyperthermophilic methanogenesis in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Volcano and Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Two Methanocaldococcus strains from Axial and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii showed similar Monod growth kinetics when grown in a bioreactor at varying H2 concentrations. Their H2 half-saturation value was 66 μM, and growth ceased below 17–23 μM H2, 10-fold lower than previously predicted. By comparison, measured H2 and CH4 concentrations in fluids suggest that there was generally sufficient H2 for Methanocaldococcus growth at Axial but not at Endeavour. Fluids from one vent at Axial (Marker 113) had anomalously high CH4 concentrations and contained various thermal classes of methanogens based on cultivation and mcrA/mrtA analyses. At Endeavour, methanogens were largely undetectable in fluid samples based on cultivation and molecular screens, although abundances of hyperthermophilic heterotrophs were relatively high. Where present, Methanocaldococcus genes were the predominant mcrA/mrtA sequences recovered and comprised ∼0.2–6% of the total archaeal community. Field and coculture data suggest that H2 limitation may be partly ameliorated by H2 syntrophy with hyperthermophilic heterotrophs. These data support our estimated H2 threshold for hyperthermophilic methanogenesis at vents and highlight the need for coupled laboratory and field measurements to constrain microbial distribution and biogeochemical impacts in the deep sea. PMID:22869718

  16. Physico-chemical characteristics and methanogen communities in swine and dairy manure storage tanks: spatio-temporal variations and impact on methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Barret, Maialen; Gagnon, Nathalie; Topp, Edward; Masse, Lucie; Massé, Daniel I; Talbot, Guylaine

    2013-02-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions represent a major environmental problem associated with the management of manure from the livestock industry. Methane is the primary GHG emitted during manure outdoor storage. In this paper, the variability of two swine and two dairy manure storage tanks was surveyed, in terms of physico-chemical and microbiological parameters. The impact of the inter-tank and spatio-temporal variations of these parameters on the methanogenic activity of manure was ascertained. A Partial Least Square regression was carried out, which demonstrated that physico-chemical as well as microbiological parameters had a major influence on the methanogenic activity. Among the 19 parameters included in the regression, the concentrations of VFAs had the strongest negative influence on the methane emission rate of manure, resulting from their well-known inhibitory effect. The relative abundance of two amplicons in archaeal fingerprints was found to positively influence the methanogenic activity, suggesting that Methanoculleus spp. and possibly Methanosarcina spp. are major contributors to methanogenesis in storage tanks. This work gave insights into the mechanisms, which drive methanogenesis in swine and dairy manure storage tanks.

  17. Effects of soil structure destruction on methane production andcarbon partitioning between methanogenic pathways in tropical rain forestsoils

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Yit Arn; Silver, Whendee L.

    2005-01-25

    Controls on methanogenesis are often determined fromlaboratory incubations of soils converted to slurries. Destruction ofsoil structure during slurry conversion may disrupt syntrophicassociations, kill methanogens, and/or alter the microsite distributionof methanogenic activity, suppressing CH4 production. The effects ofslurry conversion on methanogenesis were investigated to determine ifdisruption of aggregate structure impacted methanogenesis, substrateutilization, and C partitioning between methanogenic pathways. Soils werecollected from the tropical rain forest life zone of the LuquilloExperimental Forest, Puerto Rico, and exposed to different physicaldisturbances, including flooding and physical homogenization. Slurryconversion negatively impacted methanogenesis. Rates of CH4 productiondeclined by a factor of 17 after well-aggregated soils were converted toslurries. Significantly more 13C-acetate was recovered in CO2 compared toCH4 after slurry conversion, suggesting that methanogens consumed lessacetate after slurry conversion and may have competed less effectivelywith other anaerobes for acetate. Isotopic data indicate that therelative partitioning of C between aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophicpathways wasunchanged after slurry conversion. These data suggest thatexperiments which destroy soil structure may significantly underestimatemethanogenesis and overestimate the potential for other microorganisms tocompete with methanogens for organic substrates. Current knowledge of thefactors that regulate methanogenesis in soil may be biased by thefindings of slurry-based experiments, that do not accurately representthe complex, spatially heterogeneous conditions found in well-aggregatedsoils.

  18. Microbial precipitation of dolomite in methanogenic groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Jennifer A.; Bennett, Philip C.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Macpherson, G.L.; Milliken, Kitty L.

    2004-01-01

    We report low-temperature microbial precipitation of dolomite in dilute natural waters from both field and laboratory experiments. In a freshwater aquifer, microorganisms colonize basalt and nucleate nonstoichiometric dolomite on cell walls. In the laboratory, ordered dolomite formed at near-equilibrium conditions from groundwater with molar Mg:Ca ratios of <1; dolomite was absent in sterile experiments. Geochemical and microbiological data suggest that methanogens are the dominant metabolic guild in this system and are integral to dolomite precipitation. We hypothesize that the attached microbial consortium reacts with the basalt surface, releasing Mg and Ca into solution, which drives dolomite precipitation via nucleation on the cell wall. These findings provide insight into the long-standing dolomite problem and suggest a fundamental role for microbial processes in the formation of dolomite across a wide range of environmental conditions.

  19. Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

    2012-05-06

    This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

  20. The role of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in an acidogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhai; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory-scale acidogenic anaerobic sequencing batch reactor was set up to test the effect of pH change on microbial community structure of the reactor biomass and process performance. No immediate performance change on acidogenesis was observed after the pH change. However, as the hydrogenotrophic methanogen population decreased, hydrogen content in biogas increased followed by a sharp decrease in volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with acetic acid (HAc) in particular. Recovery of reactor performance following pH correction was only apparent after recovery of hydrogenotrophic methanogen population. These suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogens played a very important role in performance of the acidogenic process.

  1. Diversity of methanogens in the hindgut of captive white rhinoceroses, Ceratotherium simum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The white rhinoceros is on the verge of extinction with less than 20,200 animals remaining in the wild. In order to better protect these endangered animals, it is necessary to better understand their digestive physiology and nutritional requirements. The gut microbiota is nutritionally important for herbivorous animals. However, little is known about the microbial diversity in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of the white rhinoceros. Methanogen diversity in the GIT may be host species-specific and, or, function-dependent. To assess methanogen diversity in the hindgut of white rhinoceroses, an archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed from pooled PCR products obtained from the feces of seven adult animals. Results Sequence analysis of 153 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences revealed 47 unique phylotypes, which were assigned to seven operational taxonomic units (OTUs 1 to 7). Sequences assigned to OTU-7 (64 out of 153 total sequencs – 42%) and OTU-5 (18%, 27/153) had 96.2% and 95.5% identity to Methanocorpusculum labreanum, respectively, making Methanocorpusculum labreanum the predominant phylotype in these white rhynoceroses. Sequences belonging to OTU-6 (27%, 42/153) were related (97.6%) to Methanobrevibacter smithii. Only 4% of the total sequences (6/153) were assigned to Methanosphaera stadtmanae (OTU-1). Sequences belonging to OTU-2 (4%, 6/153), OTU-3 (3%, 5/153) and OTU-4 (2%, 3/153) were distantly related (87.5 to 88,4%) to Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and were considered to be novel species or strains that have yet-to-be cultivated and characterized. Conclusion Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the methanogen species in the hindgut of white rhinoceroses were more similar to those in the hindgut of horses. Our findings may help develop studies on improving the digestibility of forage for sustainable management and better health of these endangered animals. PMID:24228793

  2. A hydrogen-based subsurface microbial community dominated by methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; O'Neill, Kathleen; Bradley, Paul M.; Methé, Barbara A.; Ciufo, Stacy A.; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life may be facilitated if ecosystems can be found on Earth that exist under conditions analogous to those present on other planets or moons. It has been proposed, on the basis of geochemical and thermodynamic considerations, that geologically derived hydrogen might support subsurface microbial communities on Mars and Europa in which methanogens form the base of the ecosystem. Here we describe a unique subsurface microbial community in which hydrogen-consuming, methane-producing Archaea far outnumber the Bacteria. More than 90% of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequences recovered from hydrothermal waters circulating through deeply buried igneous rocks in Idaho are related to hydrogen-using methanogenic microorganisms. Geochemical characterization indicates that geothermal hydrogen, not organic carbon, is the primary energy source for this methanogen-dominated microbial community. These results demonstrate that hydrogen-based methanogenic communities do occur in Earth's subsurface, providing an analogue for possible subsurface microbial ecosystems on other planets.

  3. A hydrogen-based subsurface microbial community dominated by methanogens.

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Francis H; O'Neill, Kathleen; Bradley, Paul M; Methé, Barbara A; Ciufo, Stacy A; Knobel, LeRoy L; Lovley, Derek R

    2002-01-17

    The search for extraterrestrial life may be facilitated if ecosystems can be found on Earth that exist under conditions analogous to those present on other planets or moons. It has been proposed, on the basis of geochemical and thermodynamic considerations, that geologically derived hydrogen might support subsurface microbial communities on Mars and Europa in which methanogens form the base of the ecosystem. Here we describe a unique subsurface microbial community in which hydrogen-consuming, methane-producing Archaea far outnumber the Bacteria. More than 90% of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequences recovered from hydrothermal waters circulating through deeply buried igneous rocks in Idaho are related to hydrogen-using methanogenic microorganisms. Geochemical characterization indicates that geothermal hydrogen, not organic carbon, is the primary energy source for this methanogen-dominated microbial community. These results demonstrate that hydrogen-based methanogenic communities do occur in Earth's subsurface, providing an analogue for possible subsurface microbial ecosystems on other planets.

  4. A hydrogen-based subsurface microbial community dominated by methanogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; O'Neil, Kyle; Bradley, P.M.; Methe, B.A.; Ciufo, S.A.; Knobel, L.L.; Lovley, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life may be facilitated if ecosystems can be found on Earth that exist under conditions analogous to those present on other planets or moons. It has been proposed, on the basis of geochemical and thermodynamic considerations, that geologically derived hydrogen might support subsurface microbial communities on Mars and Europa in which methanogens form the base of the ecosystem1-5. Here we describe a unique subsurface microbial community in which hydrogen-consuming, methane-producing Archaea far outnumber the Bacteria. More than 90% of the 16s ribosomal DNA sequences recovered from hydrothermal waters circulating through deeply buried igneous rocks in Idaho are related to hydrogen-using methanogenic microorganisms. Geochemical characterization indicates that geothermal hydrogen, not organic carbon, is the primary energy source for this methanogen-dominated microbial community. These results demonstrate that hydrogen-based methanogenic communities do occur in Earth's subsurface, providing an analogue for possible subsurface microbial ecosystems on other planets.

  5. The Effects of Perchlorate on Methane Production of Methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodhart, T.; Kral, T. A.

    2010-04-01

    In May 2008, the Phoenix space craft analyzed the martian soil, detecting perchlorate, which is a highly oxidizing compound and potentially harmful to organic matter. This presentation discusses the effects that perchlorate has on methanogen growth.

  6. Diversity of functional genes of methanogens, methanotrophs and sulfate reducers in deep-sea hydrothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Nercessian, Olivier; Bienvenu, Nadège; Moreira, David; Prieur, Daniel; Jeanthon, Christian

    2005-01-01

    To contribute to the identification of methanogens, methanotrophs and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in microbial communities from the 13 degrees N (East Pacific Rise) and Rainbow (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) hydrothermal vent fields, we investigated the diversity of mcrA, pmoA and dsrAB genes sequences. Clone libraries were obtained using DNA isolated from fragments of diffuse vents, sediment and in situ samplers. The clones were categorized by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and representatives of each group were sequenced. Sequences were related to that of hyperthermophilic (order Methanopyrales and family Methanocaldococcaceae), thermophilic and mesophilic (family Methanococcaceae) methanogens, thermophilic (proposed genus 'Methylothermus') and mesophilic type I methanotrophs, and hyperthermophilic (order Archaeoglobales), thermophilic (order Thermodesulfobacteriales) and mesophilic (family Desulfobulbaceae) SRB. Several of the obtained sequences were distantly related to the genes of cultivated organisms, providing evidence of the existence of novel lineages in the three functional groups. This study provides for the first time an insight into the diversity of several functional genes of deep-sea hydrothermal system microorganisms.

  7. A comment on methanogenic bacteria and the primitive ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    As the phenotype of methanogenic bacteria is suggested to have been one of the major factors creating a dynamic balance between CO2 and CH4 in the primitive atmosphere, these organisms are thought to be very ancient. Their antiquity may be further postulated by comparative characterization of their ribosomal RNA. Accepting this antiquity, it is concluded that a carbon-dioxide-methane cycle, driven by photosynthesis, was the major carbon cycle in primitive ecology, and that photosynthesis and methanogens were thus contemporaneous.

  8. Evidence for para dechlorination of polychlorobiphenyls by methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, D.; Quensen, J.F.; Tiedje, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    When microorganisms eluted from upper Hudson River sediment were cultured without any substrate except polychlorobiphenyl (PCB)-free Hudson River sediment, methane formation was the terminal step of the anaerobic food chain. In sediments containing Aroclor 1242, addition of eubacterium-inhibiting antibiotics, which should have directly inhibited fermentative bacteria and thereby should have indirectly inhibited methanogens, resulted in no dechlorination activity or methane production. However, when substrates for methanogenic bacteria were provided along with the antibiotics (to free the methanogens from dependence on eubacteria), concomitant methane production and dechlorination of PCBs were observed. The dechlorination of Aroclor 1242 was from the para positions, a pattern distinctly different from, and more limited than, the pattern observed with untreated or pasteurized inocula. Both methane production and dechlorination in cultures amended with antibiotics plus methanogenic substrates were inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. These results suggest that the methanogenic bacteria are among the physiological groups capable of anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs, but that the dechlorination observed with methanogenic bacteria is less extensive than the dechlorination observed with more complex anaerobic consortia. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. [Acetyl-CoA cleavage and synthesis in methanogens]. Progress report, September 1994--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The acetyl-CoA decarbonylase synthase (ACDS) complex has been detected in a variety of methanogens including species of Methanosarcina, Methanothrix (i.e., Methanosaeta), and Methanococcus. The multienzyme complex from Methanosarcina barkeri is composed of five different subunits, possibly arranged in an {alpha}{sub 6}{beta}{sub 6}{gamma}{sub 6}{delta}{sub 6}{var_epsilon}{sub 6} structure with the individual subunits of molecular masses (kDa) of 89, 60, 50, 48, and 20, respectively. This progress report summarizes the work from the past 21 months on studies directed toward understanding how the ACDS complex functions in the physiology of acetate-cleaving, and acetate-synthesizing methanogens.

  10. Contribution of Transcriptomics to Systems-Level Understanding of Methanogenic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Patrick D.; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby

    2013-01-01

    Methane-producing Archaea are of interest due to their contribution to atmospheric change and for their roles in technological applications including waste treatment and biofuel production. Although restricted to anaerobic environments, methanogens are found in a wide variety of habitats, where they commonly live in syntrophic relationships with bacterial partners. Owing to tight thermodynamic constraints of methanogenesis alone or in syntrophic metabolism, methanogens must carefully regulate their catabolic pathways including the regulation of RNA transcripts. The transcriptome is a dynamic and important control point in microbial systems. This paper assesses the impact of mRNA (transcriptome) studies on the understanding of methanogenesis with special consideration given to how methanogenesis is regulated to cope with nutrient limitation, environmental variability, and interactions with syntrophic partners. In comparison with traditional microarray-based transcriptome analyses, next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing is greatly advantageous in assessing transcription start sites, the extent of 5′ untranslated regions, operonic structure, and the presence of small RNAs. We are still in the early stages of understanding RNA regulation but it is already clear that determinants beyond transcript abundance are highly relevant to the lifestyles of methanogens, requiring further study. PMID:23533330

  11. Contribution of transcriptomics to systems-level understanding of methanogenic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Browne, Patrick D; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby

    2013-01-01

    Methane-producing Archaea are of interest due to their contribution to atmospheric change and for their roles in technological applications including waste treatment and biofuel production. Although restricted to anaerobic environments, methanogens are found in a wide variety of habitats, where they commonly live in syntrophic relationships with bacterial partners. Owing to tight thermodynamic constraints of methanogenesis alone or in syntrophic metabolism, methanogens must carefully regulate their catabolic pathways including the regulation of RNA transcripts. The transcriptome is a dynamic and important control point in microbial systems. This paper assesses the impact of mRNA (transcriptome) studies on the understanding of methanogenesis with special consideration given to how methanogenesis is regulated to cope with nutrient limitation, environmental variability, and interactions with syntrophic partners. In comparison with traditional microarray-based transcriptome analyses, next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing is greatly advantageous in assessing transcription start sites, the extent of 5' untranslated regions, operonic structure, and the presence of small RNAs. We are still in the early stages of understanding RNA regulation but it is already clear that determinants beyond transcript abundance are highly relevant to the lifestyles of methanogens, requiring further study.

  12. Evaluation of methanogenic treatment of TMAH (tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide) in a full-scale TFT-LCD wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Hu, T H; Whang, L M; Lei, C N; Chen, C F; Chiang, T Y; Lin, L B; Chen, H W; Liu, P W G; Cheng, S S

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated TMAH biodegradation under methanogenic conditions. Under methanogenic conditions, a sludge from a full-scale UASB treating TFT-LCD wastewater was able to degrade 2,000 mg/L of TMAH within 10 h and attained a specific degradation rate of 19.2 mgTMAH/gVSS-h. Furthermore, several chemicals including some surfactants, DMSO, and sulfate were examined for their potential inhibitory effects on TMAH biodegradation under methanogenic conditions. The results indicated that surfactant S1 (up to 2%) and DMSO (up to 1,000 mg/L) presented negligible inhibitory effects on TMAH degradation, while surfactant S2 (0.2-1%) might inhibit methanogenic reaction without any TMAH degradation for 3-5 h. At sulfate concentrations higher than 300 mg/L, a complete inhibition of methanogenic reaction and TMAH biodegradation was observed. Results from cloning and sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina mazei were the dominant methanogens in the UASB treating TMAH-containing TFT-LCD wastewater.

  13. Methanogenic Archaea and human periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Lepp, Paul W.; Brinig, Mary M.; Ouverney, Cleber C.; Palm, Katherine; Armitage, Gary C.; Relman, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Archaea have been isolated from the human colon, vagina, and oral cavity, but have not been established as causes of human disease. In this study, we reveal a relationship between the severity of periodontal disease and the relative abundance of archaeal small subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA) in the subgingival crevice by using quantitative PCR. Furthermore, the relative abundance of archaeal small subunit rDNA decreased at treated sites in association with clinical improvement. Archaea were harbored by 36% of periodontitis patients and were restricted to subgingival sites with periodontal disease. The presence of archaeal cells at these sites was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. The archaeal community at diseased sites was dominated by a Methanobrevibacter oralis-like phylotype and a distinct Methanobrevibacter subpopulation related to archaea that inhabit the gut of numerous animals. We hypothesize that methanogens participate in syntrophic relationships in the subgingival crevice that promote colonization by secondary fermenters during periodontitis. Because they are potential alternative syntrophic partners, our finding of larger Treponema populations sites without archaea provides further support for this hypothesis. PMID:15067114

  14. Vinyl acetate degradation by Brevibacillus agri isolated from a slightly aerated methanogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Lara-Mayorga, I; Durán-Hinojosa, U; Arana-Cuenca, A; Monroy-Hermosillo, O; Ramírez-Vives, F

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, the authors showed that a slight aeration of a methanogenic reactor treating wastewater from the manufacture of polymeric resins could improve its performance, by increasing or allowing the removal of some of its contaminants, including vinyl acetate (VA). This paper reports the isolation under aerobic conditions of a VA-biodegrading axenic culture (strain C1) retrieved from the sludge of a slightly aerated methanogenic reactor at 1 mg L(-1) d(-1) of dissolved oxygen (DO). The axenic culture obtained was phenotypically (morphology, biochemical properties, VA consumption kinetics) and phylogenetically characterized. It formed white colonies with a branched and flat morphology on solid medium. The cell morphology of the isolate was bacillus with round endings and flagellate. The cells could form chains and were stained Gram-negative. The isolate required simple nutritional elements and had a growth rate of 0.024 h(-1). The phylogenetical analysis showed that the aerobic bacterium was identified as Brevibacillus agri, with 99.3% similarity. The VA consumption kinetics in the methanogenic sludge were: volumetric consumption rate (rVA) of 1.74 +/- 0.2 mg L(-1) h(-1), maximum specific consumption rate (qVAmax) of 3.98 mg g(-1) volatile suspended solids (VSS) h(-1) and affinity constant (Ks) of 457.1 mg L(-1). The same parameters in the axenic culture were 1.69 +/- 0.04 mg L(-1) (h-1), 4.09 mg g(-1) dry weight h(-1) and 421.9 mg L(-1), respectively. These results show evidence that the aerobic isolated bacterium, identified as Brevibacillus agri, carried out the VA hydrolysis in the slightly aerated methanogenic sludge, which is the limiting step in the degradation of this compound.

  15. Field Evidence for Magnetite Formation by a Methanogenic Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, S.; Beaver, C. L.; Williams, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lund, A.

    2015-12-01

    The aged, subsurface petroleum spill in Bemidji, Minnesota, has been surveyed with magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements. High MS values were found in the free-product phase around the fluctuating water table. Although we had hypothesized that high MS values are related to the occurrence of the mineral magnetite resulting from the activity of iron-reducing bacteria, our microbial analysis pointed to the presence of a methanogenic microbial community at the locations and depths of the highest MS values. Here, we report on a more detailed microbial analysis based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of sediment samples from four consecutive years. In addition, we provide geochemical data (FeII/FeIII concentrations) to refine our conceptual model of methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation at aged petroleum spills and demonstrate that the microbial induced changes of sediment properties can be monitored with MS. The methanogenic microbial community at the Bemidji site consisted mainly of the syntrophic, hydrocarbon-degrading Smithella and the hydrogenotrophic, methane-generating Methanoregula. There is growing evidence in the literature that not only Bacteria, but also some methanogenic Archaea are able to reduce iron. In fact, a recent study reported that the methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila produced magnetite during the reduction of ferrihydrite in a laboratory experiment when hydrogen was present. Therefore, our finding of high MS values and the presence of magnetite in the methanogenic zone of an aged, subsurface petroleum spill could very well be the first field evidence for magnetite formation during methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation.

  16. Terrestrial models for extraterrestrial life: methanogens and halophiles at Martian temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. N.; Sparks, W. B.; Lubow, S.; McGrath, M.; Livio, M.; Valenti, J.; Sowers, K. R.; Shukla, H. D.; MacAuley, S.; Miller, T.; Suvanasuthi, R.; Belas, R.; Colman, A.; Robb, F. T.; Dassarma, P.; Müller, J. A.; Coker, J. A.; Cavicchioli, R.; Chen, F.; Dassarma, S.

    2006-08-01

    Cold environments are common throughout the Galaxy. We are conducting a series of experiments designed to probe the low-temperature limits for growth in selected methanogenic and halophilic Archaea. This paper presents initial results for two mesophiles, a methanogen, Methanosarcina acetivorans, and a halophile, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and for two Antarctic cold-adapted Archaea, a methanogen, Methanococcoides burtonii, and a halophile, Halorubrum lacusprofundi. Neither mesophile is active at temperatures below 5 °C, but both cold-adapted microorganisms show significant growth at sub-zero temperatures (-2 °C and -1 °C, respectively), extending previous low-temperature limits for both species by 4 5 °C. At low temperatures, both H. lacusprofundi and M. burtonii form multicellular aggregates, which appear to be embedded in extracellular polymeric substances. This is the first detection of this phenomenon in Antarctic species of Archaea at cold temperatures. The low-temperature limits for both psychrophilic species fall within the temperature range experienced on present-day Mars and could permit survival and growth, particularly in sub-surface environments. We also discuss the results of our experiments in the context of known exoplanet systems, several of which include planets that intersect the Habitable Zone. In most cases, those planets follow orbits with significant eccentricity, leading to substantial temperature excursions. However, a handful of the known gas giant exoplanets could potentially harbour habitable terrestrial moons.

  17. Methanogenic archaea isolated from Taiwan's Chelungpu fault.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sue-Yao; Lai, Mei-Chin

    2011-02-01

    Terrestrial rocks, petroleum reservoirs, faults, coal seams, and subseafloor gas hydrates contain an abundance of diverse methanoarchaea. However, reports on the isolation, purification, and characterization of methanoarchaea in the subsurface environment are rare. Currently, no studies investigating methanoarchaea within fault environments exist. In this report, we succeeded in obtaining two new methanogen isolates, St545Mb(T) of newly proposed species Methanolobus chelungpuianus and Methanobacterium palustre FG694aF, from the Chelungpu fault, which is the fault that caused a devastating earthquake in central Taiwan in 1999. Strain FG694aF was isolated from a fault gouge sample obtained at 694 m below land surface (mbls) and is an autotrophic, mesophilic, nonmotile, thin, filamentous-rod-shaped organism capable of using H(2)-CO(2) and formate as substrates for methanogenesis. The morphological, biochemical, and physiological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that this isolate belongs to Methanobacterium palustre. The mesophilic strain St545Mb(T), isolated from a sandstone sample at 545 mbls, is a nonmotile, irregular, coccoid organism that uses methanol and trimethylamine as substrates for methanogenesis. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain St545Mb(T) was 99.0% similar to that of Methanolobus psychrophilus strain R15 and was 96 to 97.5% similar to the those of other Methanolobus species. However, the optimal growth temperature and total cell protein profile of strain St545Mb(T) were different from those of M. psychrophilus strain R15, and whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization revealed less than 20% relatedness between these two strains. On the basis of these observations, we propose that strain St545Mb(T) (DSM 19953(T); BCRC AR10030; JCM 15159) be named Methanolobus chelungpuianus sp. nov. Moreover, the environmental DNA database survey indicates that both Methanolobus chelungpuianus and Methanobacterium palustre are widespread in the

  18. Hydrogen transfer between methanogens and fermentative heterotrophs in hyperthermophilic cocultures

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, V.; Hirsh, I.S.; Bouwer, E.J.; Rinker, K.D.; Kelly, R.M.

    1997-11-05

    Interactions involving hydrogen transfer were studied in a coculture of two hyperthermophilic microorganisms: Thermotoga maritima, an anaerobic heterotroph, and Methanococcus jannaschii, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen. Cell densities of T. maritima increased 10-fold when cocultured with M. jannaschii at 85 C, and the methanogen was able to grow in the absence of externally supplied H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The coculture could not be established if the two organisms were physically separated by a dialysis membrane, suggesting the importance of spatial proximity. The significance of spatial proximity was also supported by cell cytometry, where the methanogen was only found in cell sorts at or above 4.5 {micro}m in samples of the coculture in exponential phase. An unstructured mathematical model was used to compare the influence of hydrogen transport and metabolic properties on mesophilic and hyperthermophilic cocultures. Calculations suggest the increases in methanogenesis rates with temperature result from greater interactions between the methanogenic and fermentative organisms, as evidenced by the sharp decline in H{sub 2} concentration in the proximity of a hyperthermophilic methanogen. The experimental and modeling results presented here illustrate the need to consider the interactions within hyperthermophilic consortia when choosing isolation strategies and evaluating biotransformations at elevated temperatures.

  19. Anaerobic Degradation of Phthalate Isomers by Methanogenic Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Kleerebezem, Robbert; Pol, Look W. Hulshoff; Lettinga, Gatze

    1999-01-01

    Three methanogenic enrichment cultures, grown on ortho-phthalate, iso-phthalate, or terephthalate were obtained from digested sewage sludge or methanogenic granular sludge. Cultures grown on one of the phthalate isomers were not capable of degrading the other phthalate isomers. All three cultures had the ability to degrade benzoate. Maximum specific growth rates (μSmax) and biomass yields (YXtotS) of the mixed cultures were determined by using both the phthalate isomers and benzoate as substrates. Comparable values for these parameters were found for all three cultures. Values for μSmax and YXtotS were higher for growth on benzoate compared to the phthalate isomers. Based on measured and estimated values for the microbial yield of the methanogens in the mixed culture, specific yields for the phthalate and benzoate fermenting organisms were calculated. A kinetic model, involving three microbial species, was developed to predict intermediate acetate and hydrogen accumulation and the final production of methane. Values for the ratio of the concentrations of methanogenic organisms, versus the phthalate isomer and benzoate fermenting organisms, and apparent half-saturation constants (KS) for the methanogens were calculated. By using this combination of measured and estimated parameter values, a reasonable description of intermediate accumulation and methane formation was obtained, with the initial concentration of phthalate fermenting organisms being the only variable. The energetic efficiency for growth of the fermenting organisms on the phthalate isomers was calculated to be significantly smaller than for growth on benzoate. PMID:10049876

  20. Distribution of compatible solutes in the halophilic methanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Meichin Lai; Sowers, K.R.; Gunsalus, R.P. ); Robertson, D.E.; Roberts, M.F. )

    1991-09-01

    Accumulation of compatible solutes, by uptake or de novo synthesis, enables bacteria to reduce the difference between osmotic potentials of the cell cytoplasm and the extracellular environment. To examine this process in the halophilic and halotolerant methanogenic archaebacteria, 14 strains were tested for the accumulation of compatible solutes in response to growth in various extracellular concentrations of NaCl. In external NaCl concentrations of 0.7 to 3.4 M, the halophilic methanogens accumulated K{sup +} ion and low-molecular-weight organic compounds. {beta}-Glutamate was detected in two halotolerant strains that grew below 1.5 M NaCl. Two unusual {beta}-amino acids, N{sub {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine and {beta}-glutamine (3-aminoglutaramic acid), as well as L-{alpha}-glutamate were compatible solutes among all of these strains. De novo synthesis of glycine betaine was also detected in several strains of moderately and extremely halophilic methanogens. The zwitterionic compounds ({beta}-glutamine, N{sub {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine,a nd glycine betaine) and potassium were the predominant compatible solutes among the moderately and extremely halophilic methanogens. This is the first report of {beta}-glutamine as a compatible solute and de novo biosynthesis of glycine betaine in the methanogenic archaebacteria.

  1. Thermodynamics and H2 Transfer in a Methanogenic, Syntrophic Community.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Joshua J; Calixto Contreras, Montserrat; Reed, Jennifer L

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms in nature do not exist in isolation but rather interact with other species in their environment. Some microbes interact via syntrophic associations, in which the metabolic by-products of one species serve as nutrients for another. These associations sustain a variety of natural communities, including those involved in methanogenesis. In anaerobic syntrophic communities, energy is transferred from one species to another, either through direct contact and exchange of electrons, or through small molecule diffusion. Thermodynamics plays an important role in governing these interactions, as the oxidation reactions carried out by the first community member are only possible because degradation products are consumed by the second community member. This work presents the development and analysis of genome-scale network reconstructions of the bacterium Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans and the methanogenic archaeon Methanospirillum hungatei. The models were used to verify proposed mechanisms of ATP production within each species. We then identified additional constraints and the cellular objective function required to match experimental observations. The thermodynamic S. fumaroxidans model could not explain why S. fumaroxidans does not produce H2 in monoculture, indicating that current methods might not adequately estimate the thermodynamics, or that other cellular processes (e.g., regulation) play a role. We also developed a thermodynamic coculture model of the association between the organisms. The coculture model correctly predicted the exchange of both H2 and formate between the two species and suggested conditions under which H2 and formate produced by S. fumaroxidans would be fully consumed by M. hungatei.

  2. The Cultivated Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilder, Rosalind

    1983-01-01

    Teachers who follow this monthly schedule for starting and cultivating plants in their classrooms can look forward to blooms and greenery throughout the year. Advice on choosing plants, making cuttings, forcing bulbs, rooting sweet potatoes and pineapples, and holding a Mother's Day plant sale is included. (PP)

  3. Growth of Methanogens on a Mars Soil Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Bekkum, Curtis R.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2004-12-01

    Currently, the surface of Mars is probably too cold, too dry, and too oxidizing for life, as we know it, to exist. But the subsurface is another matter. Life forms that might exist below the surface could not obtain their energy from photosynthesis, but rather they would have to utilize chemical energy. Methanogens are one type of microorganism that might be able to survive below the surface of Mars. A potential habitat for existence of methanogens on Mars might be a geothermal source of hydrogen, possibly due to volcanic or hydrothermal activity, or the reaction of basalt and anaerobic water, carbon dioxide, which is abundant in the martian atmosphere, and of course, subsurface liquid water. We report here that certain methanogens can grow on a Mars soil simulant when supplied with carbon dioxide, molecular hydrogen, and varying amounts of water.

  4. Growth of methanogens on a Mars soil simulant.

    PubMed

    Kral, Timothy A; Bekkum, Curtis R; McKay, Christopher P

    2004-12-01

    Currently, the surface of Mars is probably too cold, too dry, and too oxidizing for life, as we know it, to exist. But the subsurface is another matter. Life forms that might exist below the surface could not obtain their energy from photosynthesis, but rather they would have to utilize chemical energy. Methanogens are one type of microorganism that might be able to survive below the surface of Mars. A potential habitat for existence of methanogens on Mars might be a geothermal source of hydrogen, possibly due to volcanic or hydrothermal activity, or the reaction of basalt and anaerobic water, carbon dioxide, which is abundant in the martian atmosphere, and of course, subsurface liquid water. We report here that certain methanogens can grow on a Mars soil simulant when supplied with carbon dioxide, molecular hydrogen, and varying amounts of water.

  5. Phylogenomic Data Support a Seventh Order of Methylotrophic Methanogens and Provide Insights into the Evolution of Methanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Borrel, Guillaume; O’Toole, Paul W.; Harris, Hugh M.B.; Peyret, Pierre; Brugère, Jean-François; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence from sequence data from various environments, including the human gut, suggests the existence of a previously unknown putative seventh order of methanogens. The first genomic data from members of this lineage, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus alvus,” provide insights into its evolutionary history and metabolic features. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal proteins robustly indicates a monophyletic group independent of any previously known methanogenic order, which shares ancestry with the Marine Benthic Group D, the Marine Group II, the DHVE2 group, and the Thermoplasmatales. This phylogenetic position, along with the analysis of enzymes involved in core methanogenesis, strengthens a single ancient origin of methanogenesis in the Euryarchaeota and indicates further multiple independent losses of this metabolism in nonmethanogenic lineages than previously suggested. Genomic analysis revealed an unprecedented loss of the genes coding for the first six steps of methanogenesis from H2/CO2 and the oxidative part of methylotrophic methanogenesis, consistent with the fact that M. luminyensis and “Ca. M. alvus” are obligate H2-dependent methylotrophic methanogens. Genomic data also suggest that these methanogens may use a large panel of methylated compounds. Phylogenetic analysis including homologs retrieved from environmental samples indicates that methylotrophic methanogenesis (regardless of dependency on H2) is not restricted to gut representatives but may be an ancestral characteristic of the whole order, and possibly also of ancient origin in the Euryarchaeota. 16S rRNA and McrA trees show that this new order of methanogens is very diverse and occupies environments highly relevant for methane production, therefore representing a key lineage to fully understand the diversity and evolution of methanogenesis. PMID:23985970

  6. METHANOGENS WITH PSEUDOMUREIN USE DIAMINOPIMELATE AMINOTRANSFERASE IN LYSINE BIOSYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David E.; Huse, Holly K.

    2008-01-01

    Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus uses lysine for both protein synthesis and cross-linking pseudomurein in its cell wall. A diaminopimelate aminotransferase enzyme from this methanogen (MTH0052) converts tetrahydrodipicolinate to L,L-diaminopimelate, a lysine precursor. This gene complemented an Escherichia coli diaminopimelate auxotrophy, and the purified protein catalyzed the transamination of diaminopimelate to tetrahydrodipicolinate. Phylogenetic analysis indicated this gene was recruited from anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria. These results expand the family of diaminopimelate aminotransferases to a diverse set of plant, bacterial and archaeal homologs. In contrast marine methanogens from the Methanococcales, which lack pseudomurein, appear to use a different diaminopimelate pathway for lysine biosynthesis. PMID:18371309

  7. Molecular Signatures of Methanogens in Cultures and Environmental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, R. E.; Embaye, T.; Jahnke, L. L.; Baumgartner, M.

    2002-12-01

    The core lipids of methanogens comprise C20 and C40 isoprenoid chains, linked through ether bonds to glycerol. Additional structural diversity is encoded into the polar head groups that are attached to the glycerol ether cores. These compounds are potentially very useful as taxonomic markers in microbial mats and other environmental samples while the nature of the hydrocarbon chains provide a means to identify methanogenic inputs to ancient sediments. The structural diversity of methanogen polar lipids is most valuable when it can be directly correlated to 16S rRNA phylogeny. On the other hand, this diversity can also leads to analytical challenges because there is no single approach that works for all structural types. While some intact methanogen lipids have been identified using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, the most common means of analysing the lipid cores involves cleavage of the ether bonds using HI and subsequent reduction of the alkyl iodides to hydrocarbons with LiAlH4. One class of methanogenic lipids, the 3?-hydroxyarchaeols, escaped detection for some years because strong acid treatments in the analysis protocols destroyed hydroxyl-containing isoprenoid chains. We have been systematically re-examining the lipids of methanogens, using milder procedures involving weak acid hydrolysis of polar head groups, derivatisation to form trimethylsilyl ethers and analysis by GC-MS. As well as archaeol, sn-2- and sn-3-hydroxyarchaeol, we have tentatively identified a dihydroxyarchaeol in several Methanococcus sp. For Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus an analysis of the total lipid extracts using BBr3 as an ether cleavage reagent followed by LiBEt3H, reduction revealed a very complex mixture consisting of phytane, phytenes, biphytane, biphytenes and a suite of related alcohols. The latter compounds were analysed by GC-MS as their trimethylsilyl ethers and found to comprise a mixture tentatively identified as phytan-N-ol and biphytan-N-ol where N= 3 or 7

  8. An ancient divergence among the bacteria. [methanogenic phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, W. E.; Magrum, L. J.; Fox, G. E.; Wolfe, R. S.; Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNZs from two species of met methanogenic bacteria, the mesophile Methanobacterium ruminantium and the thermophile Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, have been characterized in terms of the oligonucleotides produced by digestion with T1 ribonuclease. These two organisms are found to be sufficiently related that they can be considered members of the same genus or family. However, they bear only slight resemblance to 'typical' Procaryotic genera; such as Escherichia, Bacillus and Anacystis. The divergence of the methanogenic bacteria from other bacteria may be the most ancient phylogenetic event yet detected - antedating considerably the divergence of the blue green algal line for example, from the main bacterial line.

  9. Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic Co-cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Birte; Stahl, David

    2010-05-17

    In environments where the amount of the inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, sulfur oroxidized metal ions (Fe3+;Mn4+) is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic associations of fermenting, acetogenic bacteria (e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as"secondary fermenters") and methanogenic archaea. In these consortia, the conversion of lactate to acetate, CO2 and methane depends on the cooperating activities of both metabolically distinct microbial groups that are tightly linked by the need to maintain the exchanged metabolites (hydrogenandformate) at very low concentrations.

  10. Naphthenic acids and surrogate naphthenic acids in methanogenic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Holowenko, F M; Mackinnon, M D; Fedorak, P M

    2001-08-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex mixture of naturally occurring acyclic and cyclic aliphatic carboxylic acids in petroleum. In the Athabasca oil sands. NAs have been identified as the largest component of dissolved organic matter in the tailings waters from oils sands extraction processes. They are the major contributor to the acute toxicity of the fine tailings wastewaters at the oil sands extraction plants in northeastern Alberta, Canada. In this study, three sources of NAs were studied, including commercially available NAs, those extracted from oil sands process-affected waters, and individual naphthenic-like surrogate compounds. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated differences between the commercial and extracted NAs. The NAs derived from the process-affected waters showed a short-term inhibition of methanogenesis from H2 or acetate, but with time the populations resumed methane production. It has been postulated that microbial metabolism of the carboxylated side chains of NAs would lead to methane production. The two NA mixtures failed to stimulate methanogenesis in microcosms that contained either oil sands fine tailings or domestic sewage sludge. However, in microcosms with sewage sludge, methanogenesis was stimulated by some surrogate NAs including 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid at 400-800 mg/L, 5-cyclohexylpentanoic acid at 200 mg/L or 6-phenylhexanoic acid at 200 and 400 mg/L. When added at 200 mg/L to methanogenic microcosms containing fine tailings, 3-cyclohexylpropanoic and 4-cyclohexylbutanoic acids produced methane yields that suggested mineralization of the side chain and the ring.

  11. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  12. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation by Methylotrophic Methanogenic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Penger, Jörn; Conrad, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    In natural environments methane is usually produced by aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea. However, some methanogens can use C1 compounds such as methanol as the substrate. To determine the contributions of individual substrates to methane production, the stable-isotope values of the substrates and the released methane are often used. Additional information can be obtained by using selective inhibitors (e.g., methyl fluoride, a selective inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis). We studied stable carbon isotope fractionation during the conversion of methanol to methane in Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanolobus zinderi and generally found large fractionation factors (−83‰ to −72‰). We further tested whether methyl fluoride impairs methylotrophic methanogenesis. Our experiments showed that even though a slight inhibition occurred, the carbon isotope fractionation was not affected. Therefore, the production of isotopically light methane observed in the presence of methyl fluoride may be due to the strong fractionation by methylotrophic methanogens and not only by hydrogenotrophic methanogens as previously assumed. PMID:22904062

  13. Methanogen Sensitivity to Ultraviolet Radiation: Implications for Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, N.; Kral, T. A.

    2013-09-01

    If an organism is to exist near the surface of Mars, it must be able to deal with UV radiation. The sensitivity of four species of methanogens to UV radiation was determined. They survived from 1 to 12 hours, depending on the organism tested.

  14. Survival of Methanogens During Desiccation: Implications for Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Michael G.; Kral, Timothy A.

    2006-08-01

    The relatively recent discoveries that liquid water likely existed on the surface of past Mars and that methane currently exists in the martian atmosphere have fueled the possibility of extant or extinct life on Mars. One possible explanation for the existence of the methane would be the presence of methanogens in the subsurface. Methanogens are microorganisms in the domain Archaea that can metabolize molecular hydrogen as an energy source and carbon dioxide as a carbon source and produce methane. One factor of importance is the arid nature of Mars, at least at the surface. If one is to assume that life exists below the surface, then based on the only example of life that we know, liquid water must be present. Realistically, however, that liquid water may be seasonal just as it is at some locations on our home planet. Here we report on research designed to determine how long certain species of methanogens can survive desiccation on a Mars soil simulant, JSC Mars-1. Methanogenic cells were grown on JSC Mars-1, transferred to a desiccator within a Coy anaerobic environmental chamber, and maintained there for varying time periods. Following removal from the desiccator and rehydration, gas chromatographic measurements of methane indicated survival for varying time periods. Methanosarcina barkeri survived desiccation for 10 days, while Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanothermobacter wolfeii were able to survive for 25 days.

  15. Methane as a product of chloroethene biodegradation under methanogenic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Radiometric detection headspace analyses of microcosms containing bed sediments from two geographically distinct sites indicated that 10-39% of the radiolabeled carbon transformed during anaerobic biodegradation of [1,2- 14C]trichloroethene (TCE) or [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) under methanogenic conditions was ultimately incorporated into 14CH4. The results demonstrate that, in addition to ethene, ethane, and CO2, CH4 can be a significant product of chloroethene biodegradation in some methanogenic sediments.Radiometric detection headspace analyses of microcosms containing bed sediments from two geographically distinct sites indicated that 10-39% of the radiolabeled carbon transformed during anaerobic biodegradation of [1,2-14C]trichloroethene (TCE) or [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) under methanogenic conditions was ultimately incorporated into 14CH4. The results demonstrate that, in addition to ethene, ethane, and CO2, CH4 can be a significant product of chloroethene biodegradation in some methanogenic sediments.

  16. Survival of methanogens during desiccation: implications for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Michael G; Kral, Timothy A

    2006-08-01

    The relatively recent discoveries that liquid water likely existed on the surface of past Mars and that methane currently exists in the martian atmosphere have fueled the possibility of extant or extinct life on Mars. One possible explanation for the existence of the methane would be the presence of methanogens in the subsurface. Methanogens are microorganisms in the domain Archaea that can metabolize molecular hydrogen as an energy source and carbon dioxide as a carbon source and produce methane. One factor of importance is the arid nature of Mars, at least at the surface. If one is to assume that life exists below the surface, then based on the only example of life that we know, liquid water must be present. Realistically, however, that liquid water may be seasonal just as it is at some locations on our home planet. Here we report on research designed to determine how long certain species of methanogens can survive desiccation on a Mars soil simulant, JSC Mars-1. Methanogenic cells were grown on JSC Mars-1, transferred to a desiccator within a Coy anaerobic environmental chamber, and maintained there for varying time periods. Following removal from the desiccator and rehydration, gas chromatographic measurements of methane indicated survival for varying time periods. Methanosarcina barkeri survived desiccation for 10 days, while Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanothermobacter wolfeii were able to survive for 25 days.

  17. Metabolic reconstruction of the archaeon methanogen Methanosarcina Acetivorans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methanogens are ancient organisms that are key players in the carbon cycle accounting for about one billion tones of biological methane produced annually. Methanosarcina acetivorans, with a genome size of ~5.7 mb, is the largest sequenced archaeon methanogen and unique amongst the methanogens in its biochemical characteristics. By following a systematic workflow we reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for M. acetivorans. This process relies on previously developed computational tools developed in our group to correct growth prediction inconsistencies with in vivo data sets and rectify topological inconsistencies in the model. Results The generated model iVS941 accounts for 941 genes, 705 reactions and 708 metabolites. The model achieves 93.3% prediction agreement with in vivo growth data across different substrates and multiple gene deletions. The model also correctly recapitulates metabolic pathway usage patterns of M. acetivorans such as the indispensability of flux through methanogenesis for growth on acetate and methanol and the unique biochemical characteristics under growth on carbon monoxide. Conclusions Based on the size of the genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and extent of validated predictions this model represents the most comprehensive up-to-date effort to catalogue methanogenic metabolism. The reconstructed model is available in spreadsheet and SBML formats to enable dissemination. PMID:21324125

  18. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF MTBE IN THE SUBSURFACE UNDER METHANOGENIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This case study was conducted at the former Fuel Farm Site at the U.S.Coast Guard Support Center at Elizabeth City, North Carolina. The study is intended to answer the following questions. Can MTBE be biodegraded under methanogenic conditions in ground water that was contaminated...

  19. Isolation and characterization of Methanomethylovorans hollandica gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from freshwater sediment, a methylotrophic methanogen able to grow on dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; Maas, R; Luderer, R; Op den Camp, H J; Pol, A; van der Drift, C; Vogels, G D

    1999-08-01

    A newly isolated methanogen, strain DMS1(T), is the first obligately anaerobic archaeon which was directly enriched and isolated from a freshwater sediment in defined minimal medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as the sole carbon and energy source. The use of a chemostat with a continuous DMS-containing gas stream as a method of enrichment, followed by cultivation in deep agar tubes, resulted in a pure culture. Since the only substrates utilized by strain DMS1(T) are methanol, methylamines, methanethiol (MT), and DMS, this organism is considered an obligately methylotrophic methanogen like most other DMS-degrading methanogens. Strain DMS1(T) differs from all other DMS-degrading methanogens, since it was isolated from a freshwater pond and requires NaCl concentrations (0 to 0.04 M) typical of the NaCl concentrations required by freshwater microorganisms for growth. DMS was degraded effectively only in a chemostat culture in the presence of low hydrogen sulfide and MT concentrations. Addition of MT or sulfide to the chemostat significantly decreased degradation of DMS. Transient accumulation of DMS in MT-amended cultures indicated that transfer of the first methyl group during DMS degradation is a reversible process. On the basis of its low level of homology with the most closely related methanogen, Methanococcoides burtonii (94.5%), its position on the phylogenetic tree, its morphology (which is different from that of members of the genera Methanolobus, Methanococcoides, and Methanohalophilus), and its salt tolerance and optimum (which are characteristic of freshwater bacteria), we propose that strain DMS1(T) is a representative of a novel genus. This isolate was named Methanomethylovorans hollandica. Analysis of DMS-amended sediment slurries with a fluorescence microscope revealed the presence of methanogens which were morphologically identical to M. hollandica, as described in this study. Considering its physiological properties, M. hollandica DMS1(T) is

  20. Ruminal Methanogen Community in Dairy Cows Fed Agricultural Residues of Corn Stover, Rapeseed, and Cottonseed Meals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengpeng; Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Xingwen; Zhang, Yangdong; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-07-13

    The purpose was to reveal changes in the methanogen community in the rumen of dairy cows fed agricultural residues of corn stover, rapeseed, and cottonseed meals, compared with alfalfa hay or soybean meal. Analysis was based on cloning and sequencing the methyl coenzyme M reductase α-subunit gene of ruminal methanogens. Results revealed that predicted methane production was increased while population of ruminal methanogens was not significantly affected when cows were fed diets containing various amounts of agricultural residues. Richness and diversity of methanogen community were markedly increased by addition of agricultural residues. The dominant ruminal methanogens shared by all experimental groups belonged to rumen cluster C, accounting for 71% of total, followed by the order Methanobacteriales (29%). Alterations of ruminal methanogen community and prevalence of particular species occurred in response to fed agricultural residue rations, suggesting the possibility of regulating target methanogens to control methane production by dairy cows fed agricultural residues.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from methanogenic digester sludge

    DOE PAGES

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; ...

    2014-09-04

    In this study, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen Isolated from Methanogenic Digester Sludge.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-09-04

    Here, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1(T), a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  3. A vaccine against rumen methanogens can alter the composition of archaeal populations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Yvette J; Popovski, Sam; Rea, Suzanne M; Skillman, Lucy C; Toovey, Andrew F; Northwood, Korinne S; Wright, André-Denis G

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to formulate a vaccine based upon the different species/strains of methanogens present in sheep intended to be immunized and to determine if a targeted vaccine could be used to decrease the methane output of the sheep. Two 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to survey the methanogenic archaea in sheep prior to vaccination, and methanogens representing five phylotypes were found to account for >52% of the different species/strains of methanogens detected. A vaccine based on a mixture of these five methanogens was then formulated, and 32 sheep were vaccinated on days 0, 28, and 103 with either a control or the anti-methanogen vaccine. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that each vaccination with the anti-methanogen formulation resulted in higher specific immunoglobulin G titers in plasma, saliva, and rumen fluid. Methane output levels corrected for dry-matter intake for the control and treatment groups were not significantly different, and real-time PCR data also indicated that methanogen numbers were not significantly different for the two groups after the second vaccination. However, clone library data indicated that methanogen diversity was significantly greater in sheep receiving the anti-methanogen vaccine and that the vaccine may have altered the composition of the methanogen population. A correlation between 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness and cross-reactivity for the methanogens (R(2) = 0.90) also exists, which suggests that a highly specific vaccine can be made to target specific strains of methanogens and that a more broad-spectrum approach is needed for success in the rumen. Our data also suggest that methanogens take longer than 4 weeks to adapt to dietary changes and call into question the validity of experimental results based upon a 2- to 4-week acclimatization period normally observed for bacteria.

  4. A Vaccine against Rumen Methanogens Can Alter the Composition of Archaeal Populations▿

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Yvette J.; Popovski, Sam; Rea, Suzanne M.; Skillman, Lucy C.; Toovey, Andrew F.; Northwood, Korinne S.; Wright, André-Denis G.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to formulate a vaccine based upon the different species/strains of methanogens present in sheep intended to be immunized and to determine if a targeted vaccine could be used to decrease the methane output of the sheep. Two 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to survey the methanogenic archaea in sheep prior to vaccination, and methanogens representing five phylotypes were found to account for >52% of the different species/strains of methanogens detected. A vaccine based on a mixture of these five methanogens was then formulated, and 32 sheep were vaccinated on days 0, 28, and 103 with either a control or the anti-methanogen vaccine. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that each vaccination with the anti-methanogen formulation resulted in higher specific immunoglobulin G titers in plasma, saliva, and rumen fluid. Methane output levels corrected for dry-matter intake for the control and treatment groups were not significantly different, and real-time PCR data also indicated that methanogen numbers were not significantly different for the two groups after the second vaccination. However, clone library data indicated that methanogen diversity was significantly greater in sheep receiving the anti-methanogen vaccine and that the vaccine may have altered the composition of the methanogen population. A correlation between 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness and cross-reactivity for the methanogens (R2 = 0.90) also exists, which suggests that a highly specific vaccine can be made to target specific strains of methanogens and that a more broad-spectrum approach is needed for success in the rumen. Our data also suggest that methanogens take longer than 4 weeks to adapt to dietary changes and call into question the validity of experimental results based upon a 2- to 4-week acclimatization period normally observed for bacteria. PMID:19201957

  5. Cultivating strategic thinking skills.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author presents an overview of strategic leadership and offers approaches for cultivating strategic thinking skills.

  6. Electrolytic methanogenic-methanotrophic coupling for tetrachloroethylene bioremediation: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Guiot, Serge R; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Kuhn, Ramona; Alaplantive, Aude

    2008-04-15

    Coupling of methanogenic and methanotrophic catabolisms was performed in a single-stage technology equipped with a water electrolysis cell placed in the effluent recirculation loop. The electrolysis-generated hydrogen served as an electron donor for both bicarbonate reduction into CH4 and reductive dechlorination, while the O2 and CH4, supported the cometabolic oxidation of chlorinated intermediates left over by the tetrachloroethylene (PCE) transformation. The electrolytical methanogenic/methanotrophic coupled (eMaMoC) process was tested in a laboratory-scale setup at PCE loads ranging from 5 to 50 micromol/L(rx) x d (inlet concentrations from 4 to 11 mg/L), and at various hydraulic residence times (HRT). Degradation followed essentially a reductive dechlorination pathway from PCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), and an oxidative pathway from DCE to CO2. PCE reductive dechlorination to DCE was consistently over 98% while a maximum oxidative DCE mineralization of 89% was obtained at a load of 4.3 micromol PCE/ L(rx) x d and an HRT of 6 days. Controlling dissolved oxygen concentrations within a relatively low range (2-3 mg/L) seemed instrumental to sustain the overall degradation capacity. Degradation kinetics were further evaluated: the apparent half-saturation constant (K(s)) had to be set relatively high (29 microM) for the simulated data to best fit the experimental ones. In spite of such kinetic limitations, the eMaMoC system, while fueled by water electrolysis, was effective in building and sustaining a functional methanogenic/methanotrophic consortium capable of significant PCE mineralization in a single-stage process. Hence, degradation standards are within reach so long as the methanotrophic DCE-oxidizing potential, including substrate affinity, are optimized and HRT accordingly adjusted.

  7. Methanocella arvoryzae sp. nov., a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Sanae; Conrad, Ralf; Liesack, Werner; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    A novel hydrogenotrophic methanogen, designated strain MRE50(T), was isolated from a methanogenic consortium, which was originally established from an Italian rice field soil. Cells were non-motile rods, 1.3-2.8 μm long and 0.4-0.7 μm wide. Coccoid cells were also observed in cultures at the late-exponential phase of growth. Strain MRE50(T) grew at 37-55 °C (optimally at 45 °C), at pH 6-7.8 (optimally at pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-20 g NaCl l(-1). The isolate utilized H(2)/CO(2) and formate for growth and methane production. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and the methanogen-specific marker gene mcrA showed that strain MRE50(T) is affiliated with the order Methanocellales, previously known as uncultured archaeal group Rice Cluster I. Based on both 16S rRNA gene and mcrA gene sequences, strain MRE50(T) was related most closely to Methanocella paludicola SANAE(T). Levels of sequence similarity were 92.5 and 86.1 %, respectively, indicating that strains MRE50(T) and Methanocella paludicola SANAE(T) represent different species within the genus Methanocella. In addition, although these strains shared phenotypic properties including cell morphology and substrate utilization, they differed with respect to susceptibility to antibiotics, and temperature and NaCl ranges for growth. Given the phenotypic differences and the distinct phylogenetic placement of the new isolate relative to the type species of the genus Methanocella, strain MRE50(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Methanocella, for which the name Methanocella arvoryzae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MRE50(T) (=NBRC 105507(T) =DSM 22066(T)).

  8. Methanogen prevalence throughout the gastrointestinal tract of pre-weaned dairy calves

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Chen, Yanhong; Griebel, Philip J; Guan, Le Luo

    2014-01-01

    The methanogenic community throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of pre-weaned calves has not been well studied. The current study firstly investigated the distribution and composition of the methanogenic community in the rumen, ileum, and colon of 3–4 week-old milk-fed dairy calves (n = 4) using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The occurrence of methanogens in the GIT of pre-weaned calves was further validated by using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was applied to quantify the methanogenic community in the rumen, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum of 8 3–4 week old animals. Both cloning libraries and PCR-DGGE revealed that phylotypes close to Methanobrevibacter were the main taxon along the GIT in pre-weaned sucking calves. The composition and abundance of methanogens varied significantly among individual animals, suggesting that host conditions may influence the composition of the symbiotic microbiota. Segregation of methanogenic communities throughout the GIT was also observed within individual animals, suggesting possible functional differences among methanogens residing in different GIT regions. This is the first study to analyze methanogenic communities throughout the GIT of milk-fed newborn dairy calves and reveal both their diversity and abundance. The identification of methanogens in the lower GIT of pre-weaned dairy calves warrants further investigation to better define methanogen roles in GIT function and their impact on host metabolism and health. PMID:25483332

  9. Establishment and Development of Ruminal Hydrogenotrophs in Methanogen-Free Lambs▿

    PubMed Central

    Fonty, Gérard; Joblin, Keith; Chavarot, Michel; Roux, Remy; Naylor, Graham; Michallon, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether reductive acetogenesis can provide an alternative to methanogenesis in the rumen. Gnotobiotic lambs were inoculated with a functional rumen microbiota lacking methanogens and reared to maturity on a fibrous diet. Lambs with a methanogen-free rumen grew well, and the feed intake and ruminal volatile fatty acid concentrations for lambs lacking ruminal methanogens were lower but not markedly dissimilar from those for conventional lambs reared on the same diet. A high population density (107 to 108 cells g−1) of ruminal acetogens slowly developed in methanogen-free lambs. Sulfate- and fumarate-reducing bacteria were present, but their population densities were highly variable. In methanogen-free lambs, the hydrogen capture from fermentation was low (28 to 46%) in comparison with that in lambs containing ruminal methanogens (>90%). Reductive acetogenesis was not a significant part of ruminal fermentation in conventional lambs but contributed 21 to 25% to the fermentation in methanogen-free meroxenic animals. Ruminal H2 utilization was lower in lambs lacking ruminal methanogens, but when a methanogen-free lamb was inoculated with a methanogen, the ruminal H2 utilization was similar to that in conventional lambs. H2 utilization in lambs containing a normal ruminal microflora was age dependent and increased with the animal age. The animal age effect was less marked in lambs lacking ruminal methanogens. Addition of fumarate to rumen contents from methanogen-free lambs increased H2 utilization. These findings provide the first evidence from animal studies that reductive acetogens can sustain a functional rumen and replace methanogens as a sink for H2 in the rumen. PMID:17675444

  10. Vaccination of Sheep with a Methanogen Protein Provides Insight into Levels of Antibody in Saliva Needed to Target Ruminal Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Subharat, Supatsak; Shu, Dairu; Zheng, Tao; Buddle, Bryce M.; Kaneko, Kan; Hook, Sarah; Janssen, Peter H.; Wedlock, D. Neil

    2016-01-01

    Methane is produced in the rumen of ruminant livestock by methanogens and is a major contributor to agricultural greenhouse gases. Vaccination against ruminal methanogens could reduce methane emissions by inducing antibodies in saliva which enter the rumen and impair ability of methanogens to produce methane. Presently, it is not known if vaccination can induce sufficient amounts of antibody in the saliva to target methanogen populations in the rumen and little is known about how long antibody in the rumen remains active. In the current study, sheep were vaccinated twice at a 3-week interval with a model methanogen antigen, recombinant glycosyl transferase protein (rGT2) formulated with one of four adjuvants: saponin, Montanide ISA61, a chitosan thermogel, or a lipid nanoparticle/cationic liposome adjuvant (n = 6/formulation). A control group of sheep (n = 6) was not vaccinated. The highest antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in both saliva and serum were observed with Montanide ISA61, which promoted levels of salivary antibodies that were five-fold higher than the second most potent adjuvant, saponin. A rGT2-specific IgG standard was used to determine the level of rGT2-specific IgG in serum and saliva. Vaccination with GT2/Montanide ISA61 produced a peak antibody concentration of 7 × 1016 molecules of antigen-specific IgG per litre of saliva, and it was estimated that in the rumen there would be more than 104 molecules of antigen-specific IgG for each methanogen cell. Both IgG and IgA in saliva were shown to be relatively stable in the rumen. Salivary antibody exposed for 1–2 hours to an in vitro simulated rumen environment retained approximately 50% of antigen-binding activity. Collectively, the results from measuring antibody levels and stablility suggest a vaccination-based mitigation strategy for livestock generated methane is in theory feasible. PMID:27472482

  11. Methanohalophilus zhilinae sp. nov., an alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathrani, I. M.; Boone, D. R.; Mah, R. A.; Fox, G. E.; Lau, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    Methanohalophilus zhilinae, a new alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic species of methanogenic bacteria, is described. Strain WeN5T (T = type strain) from Bosa Lake of the Wadi el Natrun in Egypt was designated the type strain and was further characterized. This strain was nonmotile, able to catabolize dimethylsulfide, and able to grow in medium with a methyl group-containing substrate (such as methanol or trimethylamine) as the sole organic compound added. Sulfide (21 mM) inhibited cultures growing on trimethylamine. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of strain WeN5T was typical of the pattern for archaeobacteria, and the guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid was 38 mol%. Characterization of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequence indicated that strain WeN5T is phylogenetically distinct from members of previously described genera other than Methanohalophilus and supported the partition of halophilic methanogens into their own genus.

  12. Inhibitory effects of nitrogen oxides on a mixed methanogenic culture.

    PubMed

    Tugtas, A Evren; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2007-02-15

    The effect of nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide on a mixed, mesophilic (35 degrees C) methanogenic culture was investigated. Short-term inhibition assays were conducted at a concentration range of 10-350 mg N/L nitrate, 17-500 mg N/L nitrite, 0.02-0.8 mg N/L aqueous NO, and 19-191 mg N/L aqueous nitrous oxide. Simultaneous methane production and N-oxide reduction was observed in 10 and 30 mg N/L nitrate and 0.02 mg N/L aqueous NO-amended cultures. However, addition of N-oxide resulted in immediate cessation of methanogenesis in all other cultures. Methanogenesis completely recovered subsequent to the complete reduction of N-oxides to nitrogen gas in all N-oxide-amended cultures, with the exception of the 500 mg N/L nitrite- and 0.8 mg N/L aqueous NO-amended cultures. Partial recovery of methanogenesis was observed in the 500 mg N/L nitrite-amended culture in contrast to complete inhibition of methanogenesis in the 0.8 mg N/L aqueous NO-amended culture. Accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed in both cultures at the end of the incubation period. Among all N-oxides, NO exerted the most and nitrate exerted the least inhibitory effect on the fermentative/methanogenic consortia. The effect of multiple additions of nitrate (300 mg N/L) on the same methanogenic culture was also investigated. Long-term exposure of the methanogenic culture to nitrate resulted in an increase of N-oxide reduction rates and decrease of methane production rates, which was attributed to changes in the microbial community structure due to nitrate addition.

  13. Methanogenic Archaea as Potential Candidates for Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.

    Within our solar system, Mars has been considered as a prime candidate for extraterrestrial life beyond Earth. Various paleo-climate models of the early Mars showed that prior 3.8 Ga ago Mars was characterised by moderate temperatures, the presence of liquid water and an anoxic atmosphere comparable to those on early Earth, where the evolution of microorganisms had already started. Assuming that early life developed on Mars as well, Martian life must have adapted to drastically changing environmental conditions or became extinct. Within the scope of a project in the DFG (German Research Foundation) Priority Program "Mars and the Terrestrial Planets" the tolerances of methanogenic archaea under unfavourable life conditions of terrestrial or extraterrestrial permafrost (Mars simulation) were studied. The borders of growth influenced by desiccation, temperature extremes, radiation and high salt concentration were analyzed for the organisms in pure cultures obtained from permafrost soils as well as in their natural environment of Siberian permafrost. The presented results show the high survival capability of methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost under unfavourable environmental conditions exhibiting metabolic activity even below the freezing point. Furthermore, Methanosarcina SMA21 is also extremely resistant against UV radiation and high salinity. It survives three weeks of simulated Martian diurnal changes in temperature and humidity nearly completely. Our studies demonstrate for the first time the possible survival of methanogenic archaea under present Martian conditions. These results in connection with the finding of methane in the Martian atmosphere by the ESA mission "Mars Express" supported the hypothesis that methanogens are the most likely candidates for life on Mars.

  14. Effective Suppression of Methane Emission by 2-Bromoethanesulfonate during Rice Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Waghmode, Tatoba R.; Haque, Md. Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2015-01-01

    2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) is a structural analogue of coenzyme M (Co-M) and potent inhibitor of methanogenesis. Several studies confirmed, BES can inhibit CH4 prodcution in rice soil, but the suppressing effectiveness of BES application on CH4 emission under rice cultivation has not been studied. In this pot experiment, different levels of BES (0, 20, 40 and 80 mg kg-1) were applied to study its effect on CH4 emission and plant growth during rice cultivation. Application of BES effectively suppressed CH4 emission when compared with control soil during rice cultivation. The CH4 emission rates were significantly (P<0.001) decreased by BES application possibly due to significant (P<0.001) reduction of methnaogenic biomarkers like Co-M concentration and mcrA gene copy number (i.e. methanogenic abunadance). BES significantly (P<0.001) reduced methanogen activity, while it did not affect soil dehydrogenase activity during rice cultivation. A rice plant growth and yield parameters were not affected by BES application. The maximum CH4 reduction (49% reduction over control) was found at 80 mg kg-1 BES application during rice cultivation. It is, therefore, concluded that BES could be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH4 emission without affecting rice plant growth and productivity during rice cultivation. PMID:26562416

  15. Application of a real-time qPCR method to measure the methanogen concentration during anaerobic digestion as an indicator of biogas production capacity.

    PubMed

    Traversi, Deborah; Villa, Silvia; Lorenzi, Eugenio; Degan, Raffaella; Gilli, Giorgio

    2012-11-30

    Biogas is an energy source that is produced via the anaerobic digestion of various organic materials, including waste-water sludge and organic urban wastes. Among the microorganisms involved in digestion, methanogens are the major microbiological group responsible for methane production. To study the microbiological equilibrium in an anaerobic reactor, we detected the methanogen concentration during wet digestion processes fed with pre-treated urban organic waste and waste-water sludge. Two different pre-treatments were used in successive experimental digestions: pressure-extrusion and turbo-mixing. Chemical parameters were collected to describe the process and its production. The method used is based on real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) with the functional gene mcrA as target. First, we evaluated the validity of the analyses. Next, we applied this method to 50 digestate samples and then we performed a statistical analysis. A positive and significant correlation between the biogas production rate and methanogen abundance was observed (r = 0.579, p < 0.001). This correlation holds both when considering all of the collected data and when the two data sets are separated. The pressure-extrusion pre-treatment allowed to obtain the higher methane amount and also the higher methanogen presence (F = 41.190, p < 0.01). Moreover a higher mean methanogen concentration was observed for production rate above than of 0.6 m(3) biogas/kg TVS (F = 7.053; p < 0.05). The applied method is suitable to describe microbiome into the anaerobic reactor, moreover methanogen concentration may have potential for use as a digestion optimisation tool.

  16. Metabolic Pathways in Methanococcus jannaschii and Other Methanogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sprott, G D; Ekiel, I; Patel, G B

    1993-04-01

    Eleven strains of methanogenic bacteria were divided into two groups on the basis of the directionality (oxidative or reductive) of their citric acid pathways. These pathways were readily identified for most methanogens from the patterns of carbon atom labeling in glutamate, following growth in the presence of [2-C]acetate. All used noncyclic pathways, but members of the family Methanosarcinaceae were the only methanogens found to use the oxidative direction. Methanococcus jannaschii failed to incorporate carbon from acetate despite transmembrane equilibration comparable to other weak acids. This organism was devoid of detectable activities of the acetate-incorporating enzymes acetyl coenzyme A synthetase, acetate kinase, and phosphotransacetylase. However, incorporation of [1-C]-, [2-C]-, or [3-C]pyruvate during the growth of M. jannaschii was possible and resulted in labeling patterns indicative of a noncyclic citric acid pathway operating in the reductive direction to synthesize amino acids. Carbohydrates were labeled consistent with glucogenesis from pyruvate. Leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, lysine, formate, glycerol, and mevalonate were incorporated when supplied to the growth medium. Lysine was preferentially incorporated into the lipid fraction, suggesting a role as a phytanyl chain precursor.

  17. Hydrogen consumption by methanogens on the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kral, T. A.; Brink, K. M.; Miller, S. L.; McKay, C. P.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It is possible that the first autotroph used chemical energy rather than light. This could have been the main source of primary production after the initial inventory of abiotic organic material had been depleted. The electron acceptor most readily available for use by this first chemoautotroph would have been CO2. The most abundant electron donor may have been H2 that would have been outgassing from volcanoes at a rate estimated to be as large as 10(12) moles yr-1, as well as from photo-oxidation of Fe+2. We report here that certain methanogens will consume H2 down to partial pressures as low as 4 Pa (4 x 10(-5) atm) with CO2 as the sole carbon source at a rate of 0.7 ng H2 min-1 microgram-1 cell protein. The lower limit of pH2 for growth of methanogens can be understood on the basis that the pH2 needs to be high enough for one ATP to be synthesized per CO2 reduced. The pH2 values needed for growth measured here are consistent with those measured by Stevens and McKinley for growth of methanogens in deep basalt aquifers. H2-consuming autotrophs are likely to have had a profound effect on the chemistry of the early atmosphere and to have been a dominant sink for H2 on the early Earth after life began rather than escape from the Earth's atmosphere to space.

  18. Environmental selection of planktonic methanogens in permafrost thaw ponds.

    PubMed

    Crevecoeur, Sophie; Vincent, Warwick F; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-08-09

    The warming and thermal erosion of ice-containing permafrost results in thaw ponds that are strong emitters of methane to the atmosphere. Here we examined methanogens and other Archaea, in two types of thaw ponds that are formed by the collapse of either permafrost peat mounds (palsas) or mineral soil mounds (lithalsas) in subarctic Quebec, Canada. Using high-throughput sequencing of a hypervariable region of 16S rRNA, we determined the taxonomic structure and diversity of archaeal communities in near-bottom water samples, and analyzed the mcrA gene transcripts from two sites. The ponds at all sites were well stratified, with hypoxic or anoxic bottom waters. Their archaeal communities were dominated by Euryarchaeota, specifically taxa in the methanogenic orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales, indicating a potentially active community of planktonic methanogens. The order Methanomicrobiales accounted for most of the mcrA transcripts in the two ponds. The Archaeal communities differed significantly between the lithalsa and palsa ponds, with higher alpha diversity in the organic-rich palsa ponds, and pronounced differences in community structure. These results indicate the widespread occurrence of planktonic, methane-producing Archaea in thaw ponds, with environmental selection of taxa according to permafrost landscape type.

  19. Environmental selection of planktonic methanogens in permafrost thaw ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevecoeur, Sophie; Vincent, Warwick F.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-08-01

    The warming and thermal erosion of ice-containing permafrost results in thaw ponds that are strong emitters of methane to the atmosphere. Here we examined methanogens and other Archaea, in two types of thaw ponds that are formed by the collapse of either permafrost peat mounds (palsas) or mineral soil mounds (lithalsas) in subarctic Quebec, Canada. Using high-throughput sequencing of a hypervariable region of 16S rRNA, we determined the taxonomic structure and diversity of archaeal communities in near-bottom water samples, and analyzed the mcrA gene transcripts from two sites. The ponds at all sites were well stratified, with hypoxic or anoxic bottom waters. Their archaeal communities were dominated by Euryarchaeota, specifically taxa in the methanogenic orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales, indicating a potentially active community of planktonic methanogens. The order Methanomicrobiales accounted for most of the mcrA transcripts in the two ponds. The Archaeal communities differed significantly between the lithalsa and palsa ponds, with higher alpha diversity in the organic-rich palsa ponds, and pronounced differences in community structure. These results indicate the widespread occurrence of planktonic, methane-producing Archaea in thaw ponds, with environmental selection of taxa according to permafrost landscape type.

  20. Cometabolic Enzymatic Transformation of Organic Micropollutants under Methanogenic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Lorena; Carballa, Marta; Lema, Juan M

    2017-02-23

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been shown to have the biological potential to decrease concentrations of several organic micropollutants (OMPs) in sewage sludge. However, the mechanisms and factors behind these biotransformations, which are essential for elucidating the possible transformation products and to foster the complete removal of OMPs via operational strategies, remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the transformation mechanisms of 20 OMPs during the methanogenic step of AD with a focus on the role of acetate kinase (AK), which is a key enzyme in methane production. The results from lab-scale methanogenic reactors showed that this step accounts for much of the reported OMP biotransformation in AD. Furthermore, enzymatic assays confirmed that AK transforms galaxolide, naproxen, nonylphenol, octylphenol, ibuprofen, diclofenac, bisphenol A, and triclosan. Except for galaxolide, for which further studies are required to refine conclusions, the OMP's chemical structure was a determinant for AK action because only compounds that contain a carboxyl or hydroxyl group and have moderate steric hindrance were enzymatically transformed, likely by phosphorylation. For these seven compounds, this enzymatic mechanism accounts for 10-90% of the measured methanogenic biotransformation, suggesting that other active enzymes of the AD process are also involved in OMP biotransformation.

  1. Environmental selection of planktonic methanogens in permafrost thaw ponds

    PubMed Central

    Crevecoeur, Sophie; Vincent, Warwick F.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-01-01

    The warming and thermal erosion of ice-containing permafrost results in thaw ponds that are strong emitters of methane to the atmosphere. Here we examined methanogens and other Archaea, in two types of thaw ponds that are formed by the collapse of either permafrost peat mounds (palsas) or mineral soil mounds (lithalsas) in subarctic Quebec, Canada. Using high-throughput sequencing of a hypervariable region of 16S rRNA, we determined the taxonomic structure and diversity of archaeal communities in near-bottom water samples, and analyzed the mcrA gene transcripts from two sites. The ponds at all sites were well stratified, with hypoxic or anoxic bottom waters. Their archaeal communities were dominated by Euryarchaeota, specifically taxa in the methanogenic orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales, indicating a potentially active community of planktonic methanogens. The order Methanomicrobiales accounted for most of the mcrA transcripts in the two ponds. The Archaeal communities differed significantly between the lithalsa and palsa ponds, with higher alpha diversity in the organic-rich palsa ponds, and pronounced differences in community structure. These results indicate the widespread occurrence of planktonic, methane-producing Archaea in thaw ponds, with environmental selection of taxa according to permafrost landscape type. PMID:27501855

  2. Methanogenic biodegradation of two-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Berdugo-Clavijo, Carolina; Dong, Xiaoli; Soh, Jung; Sensen, Christoph W; Gieg, Lisa M

    2012-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are widespread in methane-rich subsurface environments, such as oil reservoirs and fuel-contaminated aquifers; however, little is known about the biodegradation of these compounds under methanogenic conditions. To assess the metabolism of PAH in the absence of electron acceptors, a crude oil-degrading methanogenic enrichment culture was tested for the ability to biodegrade naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN), 2-methylnaphthalene (2-MN), and 2, 6-dimethylnaphthalene (2, 6-diMN). When methane was measured as an indicator of metabolism, nearly 400 μmol of methane was produced in the 2-MN- and 2, 6-diMN-amended cultures relative to substrate-unamended controls, which is close to the amount of methane stoichiometrically predicted based on the amount of substrate added (51-56 μmol). In contrast, no substantial methane was produced in the naphthalene- and 1-MN-amended enrichments. In time course experiments, metabolite analysis of enrichments containing 2-MN and 2, 6-diMN revealed the formation of 2-naphthoic acid and 6-methyl-2-naphthoic acid, respectively. Microbial community analysis by 454 pyrosequencing revealed that these PAH-utilizing enrichments were dominated by archaeal members most closely affiliated with Methanosaeta and Methanoculleus species and bacterial members most closely related to the Clostridiaceae, suggesting that these organisms play an important role in the methanogenic metabolism of the substituted naphthalenes in these cultures.

  3. Acetoclastic methanogenic activity measurement by a titration bioassay.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, Alberto; Castellazzi, Luca; Speece, Richard E

    2002-01-05

    A titration bioassay, designed to accurately determine the activity of acetoclastic methanogens, is described that also allows evaluation of inhibition due to potential toxicants on the active biomass. The instrument is made of a pH-stat connected to an anaerobic batch reactor. Acetate is blended and mixed with anaerobic sludge in the reactor where a 1:1 N2 and CO2 mixture is sparged at the beginning of each test. As the acetoclastic methanogens consume acetate, the pH increase, and the titration unit adds acetic acid and keeps the pH constant. The rate of titrant addition is directly proportional to the methanogenic activity. A very useful feature of the system is its potential to operate for long periods (days) at constant pH and substrate (acetate) concentration. The theoretical background and principle of operation are described as well as some of the practical problems encountered with the use of the instrument. Estimation of kinetic constants for an anaerobic culture according to the Michaelis-Menten model is presented. Examples of inhibition by inorganics (NaCl) and chlorinated solvents (chloroform) are also given.

  4. Genome sequencing of methanogenic Archaea Methanosarcina mazei TUC01 strain isolated from an Amazonian Flooded Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraúna, R. A.; Graças, D. A.; Ramos, R. T.; Carneiro, A. R.; Lopes, T. S.; Lima, A. R.; Zahlouth, R. L.; Pellizari, V. H.; Silva, A.

    2013-05-01

    Methanosarcina mazei is a strictly anaerobic methanogen from the Methanosarcinales order. This species is known for its broad catabolic range among methanogens and is widespread throughout diverse environments. The draft genome of a strain cultivated from the sediment of the Tucuruí hydroelectric power station, the fourth largest hydroelectric dam in the world, is described here. Approximately 80% of methane is produced by biogenic sources, such as methanogenic archaea from M. mazei species. Although the methanogenesis pathway is well known, some aspects of the core genome, genome evolution and shared genes are still unclear. A sediment sample from the Tucuruí hydropower station reservoir was inoculated in mineral media supplemented with acetate and methanol. This media was maintained in an H2:CO2 (80:20) atmosphere to enrich and cultivate M. mazei. The enrichment was conducted at 30°C under standard anaerobic conditions. After several molecular and cellular analyses, total DNA was extracted from a non-pure culture of M. mazei, amplified using phi29 DNA polymerase (BioLabs) and finally used as a source template for genome sequencing. The draft genome was obtained after two rounds of sequencing. First, the genome was sequenced using a SOLiD System V3 with a mate-paired library, which yielded 24,405,103 and 24,399,268 reads (50 bp) for the R3 and F3 tags, respectively. The second round of sequencing was performed using the SOLiD 5500 XL platform with a mate-paired library, resulting in a total of 113,588,848 reads (60 bp) for each tag (F3 and R3). All reads obtained by this procedure were filtered using Quality Assessment software, whereby reads with an average quality score below Phred 20 were removed. Velvet and Edena were used to assemble the reads, and Simplifier was used to remove the redundant sequences. After this, a total of 16,811 contigs were obtained. M. mazei GO1 (AE008384) genome was used to map the contigs and generate the scaffolds. We used the

  5. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B.; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P.; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool. PMID:26052322

  6. Identification of Methanogenic archaea in the Hyporheic Sediment of Sitka Stream

    PubMed Central

    Buriánková, Iva; Brablcová, Lenka; Mach, Václav; Dvořák, Petr; Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Rulík, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea produce methane as a metabolic product under anoxic conditions and they play a crucial role in the global methane cycle. In this study molecular diversity of methanogenic archaea in the hyporheic sediment of the lowland stream Sitka (Olomouc, Czech Republic) was analyzed by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing analysis of the methyl coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) gene. Sequencing analysis of 60 clones revealed 24 different mcrA phylotypes from hyporheic sedimentary layers to a depth of 50 cm. Phylotypes were affiliated with Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales orders. Only one phylotype remains unclassified. The majority of the phylotypes showed higher affiliation with uncultured methanogens than with known methanogenic species. The presence of relatively rich assemblage of methanogenic archaea confirmed that methanogens may be an important component of hyporheic microbial communities and may affect CH4 cycling in rivers. PMID:24278322

  7. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses of the thermophilic, aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta thermophila responding to ammonia stress.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro; Sasaki, Konomi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of ammonia on two different degradation pathways of methanogenic acetate were evaluated using a pure culture (Methanosaeta thermophila strain PT) and defined co-culture (Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain TM and Thermacetogenium phaeum strain PB), which represented aceticlastic and syntrophic methanogenesis, respectively. Growth experiments with high concentrations of ammonia clearly demonstrated that sensitivity to ammonia stress was markedly higher in M. thermophila PT than in the syntrophic co-culture. M. thermophila PT also exhibited higher sensitivity to high pH stress, which indicated that an inability to maintain pH homeostasis is an underlying cause of ammonia inhibition. Methanogenesis was inhibited in the resting cells of M. thermophila PT with moderate concentrations of ammonia, suggesting that the inhibition of enzymes involved in methanogenesis may be one of the major factors responsible for ammonia toxicity. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a broad range of disturbances in M. thermophila PT cells under ammonia stress conditions, including protein denaturation, oxidative stress, and intracellular cation imbalances. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated that syntrophic acetate degradation dominated over aceticlastic methanogenesis under ammonia stress conditions, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on complex microbial community systems. Our results also imply that the co-existence of multiple metabolic pathways and their different sensitivities to stress factors confer resiliency on methanogenic processes.

  8. Physiological and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Thermophilic, Aceticlastic Methanogen Methanosaeta thermophila Responding to Ammonia Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro; Sasaki, Konomi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of ammonia on two different degradation pathways of methanogenic acetate were evaluated using a pure culture (Methanosaeta thermophila strain PT) and defined co-culture (Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain TM and Thermacetogenium phaeum strain PB), which represented aceticlastic and syntrophic methanogenesis, respectively. Growth experiments with high concentrations of ammonia clearly demonstrated that sensitivity to ammonia stress was markedly higher in M. thermophila PT than in the syntrophic co-culture. M. thermophila PT also exhibited higher sensitivity to high pH stress, which indicated that an inability to maintain pH homeostasis is an underlying cause of ammonia inhibition. Methanogenesis was inhibited in the resting cells of M. thermophila PT with moderate concentrations of ammonia, suggesting that the inhibition of enzymes involved in methanogenesis may be one of the major factors responsible for ammonia toxicity. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a broad range of disturbances in M. thermophila PT cells under ammonia stress conditions, including protein denaturation, oxidative stress, and intracellular cation imbalances. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated that syntrophic acetate degradation dominated over aceticlastic methanogenesis under ammonia stress conditions, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on complex microbial community systems. Our results also imply that the co-existence of multiple metabolic pathways and their different sensitivities to stress factors confer resiliency on methanogenic processes. PMID:24920170

  9. Estimation of methanogen biomass via quantitation of coenzyme M

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Determination of the role of methanogenic bacteria in an anaerobic ecosystem often requires quantitation of the organisms. Because of the extreme oxygen sensitivity of these organisms and the inherent limitations of cultural techniques, an accurate biomass value is very difficult to obtain. We standardized a simple method for estimating methanogen biomass in a variety of environmental matrices. In this procedure we used the thiol biomarker coenzyme M (CoM) (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid), which is known to be present in all methanogenic bacteria. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based method for detecting thiols in pore water (A. Vairavamurthy and M. Mopper, Anal. Chim. Acta 78:363–370, 1990) was modified in order to quantify CoM in pure cultures, sediments, and sewage water samples. The identity of the CoM derivative was verified by using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The assay was linear for CoM amounts ranging from 2 to 2,000 pmol, and the detection limit was 2 pmol of CoM/ml of sample. CoM was not adsorbed to sediments. The methanogens tested contained an average of 19.5 nmol of CoM/mg of protein and 0.39 ± 0.07 fmol of CoM/cell. Environmental samples contained an average of 0.41 ± 0.17 fmol/cell based on most-probable-number estimates. CoM was extracted by using 1% tri-(N)-butylphosphine in isopropanol. More than 90% of the CoM was recovered from pure cultures and environmental samples. We observed no interference from sediments in the CoM recovery process, and the method could be completed aerobically within 3 h. Freezing sediment samples resulted in 46 to 83% decreases in the amounts of detectable CoM, whereas freezing had no effect on the amounts of CoM determined in pure cultures. The method described here provides a quick and relatively simple way to estimate methanogenic biomass.

  10. Energetic and hydrogen limitations of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, L. C.; Holden, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are a unique ecosystem, based ultimately not on photosynthesis but chemosynthetic primary production. This makes them an excellent analog environment for the early Earth, and for potential extraterrestrial habitable environments, such as those on Mars and Europa. The habitability of given vent systems for chemoautotrophic prokaryotes can be modeled energetically by estimating the available Gibbs energy for specific modes of chemoautotrophy, using geochemical data and mixing models for hydrothermal fluids and seawater (McCollom and Shock, 1997). However, modeling to date has largely not taken into account variation in organisms' energy demands in these environments. Controls on maintenance energies are widely assumed to be temperature-dependent, rising with increasing temperature optima (Tijhuis et al., 1993), and species-independent. The impacts of other environmental stressors and particular energy-gathering strategies on maintenance energies have not been investigated. We have undertaken culture-based studies of growth and maintenance energies in thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogenic (hydrogenotrophic) archaea from deep-sea hydrothermal vents to investigate potential controls on energy demands in hydrothermal vent microbes, and to quantify their growth and maintenance energies for future bioenergetic modeling. We have investigated trends in their growth energies over their full temperature range and a range of nitrogen concentrations, and in their maintenance energies at different hydrogen concentrations. Growth energies in these organisms appear to rise with temperature, but do not vary between hyperthermophilic and thermophilic methanogens. Nitrogen availability at tested levels (40μM - 9.4 mM) does not appear to affect growth energies in all but one tested organism. In continuous chemostat culture, specific methane production varied with hydrogen availability but was similar between a thermophilic and a hyperthermophilic

  11. Biological Hydrogen Production Using Chloroform-treated Methanogenic Granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Shulin

    In fermentative hydrogen production, the low-hydrogen-producing bacteria retention rate limits the suspended growth reactor productivity because of the long hydraulic retention time (HRT) required to maintain adequate bacteria population. Traditional bacteria immobilization methods such as calcium alginate entrapment have many application limitations in hydrogen fermentation, including limited duration time, bacteria leakage, cost, and so on. The use of chloroform-treated anaerobic granular sludge as immobilized hydrogen-producing bacteria in an immobilized hydrogen culture may be able to overcome the limitations of traditional immobilization methods. This paper reports the findings on the performance of fed-batch cultures and continuous cultures inoculated with chloroform-treated granules. The chloroform-treated granules were able to be reused over four fed-batch cultures, with pH adjustment. The upflow reactor packed with chloroform-treated granules was studied, and the HRT of the upflow reactor was found to be as low as 4 h without any decrease in hydrogen production yield. Initial pH and glucose concentration of the culture medium significantly influenced the performance of the reactor. The optimum initial pH of the culture medium was neutral, and the optimum glucose concentration of the culture medium was below 20 g chemical oxygen demand/L at HRT 4 h. This study also investigated the possibility of integrating immobilized hydrogen fermentation using chloroform-treated granules with immobilized methane production using untreated granular sludge. The results showed that the integrated batch cultures produced 1.01 mol hydrogen and 2 mol methane per mol glucose. Treating the methanogenic granules with chloroform and then using the treated granules as immobilized hydrogen-producing sludge demonstrated advantages over other immobilization methods because the treated granules provide hydrogen-producing bacteria with a protective niche, a long duration of an active

  12. Differences in the Rumen Methanogen Populations of Lactating Jersey and Holstein Dairy Cows under the Same Diet Regimen▿†

    PubMed Central

    King, Erin E.; Smith, Rachel P.; St-Pierre, Benoit; Wright, André-Denis G.

    2011-01-01

    In the dairy cattle industry, Holstein and Jersey are the breeds most commonly used for production. They differ in performance by various traits, such as body size, milk production, and milk composition. With increased concerns about the impact of agriculture on climate change, potential differences in other traits, such as methane emission, also need to be characterized further. Since methane is produced in the rumen by methanogenic archaea, we investigated whether the population structure of methanogen communities would differ between Holsteins and Jerseys. Breed-specific rumen methanogen 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from pooled PCR products obtained from lactating Holstein and Jersey cows, generating 180 and 185 clones, respectively. The combined 365 sequences were assigned to 55 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Twenty OTUs, representing 85% of the combined library sequences, were common to both breeds, while 23 OTUs (36 sequences) were found only in the Holstein library and 12 OTUs (18 sequences) were found only in the Jersey library, highlighting increased diversity in the Holstein library. Other differences included the observation that sequences with species-like sequence identity to Methanobrevibacter millerae were represented more highly in the Jersey breed, while Methanosphaera-related sequences and novel uncultured methanogen clones were more frequent in the Holstein library. In contrast, OTU sequences with species-level sequence identity to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium were represented similarly in both libraries. Since the sampled animals were from a single herd consisting of two breeds which were fed the same diet and maintained under the same environmental conditions, the differences we observed may be due to differences in host breed genetics. PMID:21705541

  13. Shifts in methanogenic community composition and methane fluxes along the degradation of discontinuous permafrost

    PubMed Central

    Liebner, Susanne; Ganzert, Lars; Kiss, Andrea; Yang, Sizhong; Wagner, Dirk; Svenning, Mette M.

    2015-01-01

    The response of methanogens to thawing permafrost is an important factor for the global greenhouse gas budget. We tracked methanogenic community structure, activity, and abundance along the degradation of sub-Arctic palsa peatland permafrost. We observed the development of pronounced methane production, release, and abundance of functional (mcrA) methanogenic gene numbers following the transitions from permafrost (palsa) to thaw pond structures. This was associated with the establishment of a methanogenic community consisting both of hydrogenotrophic (Methanobacterium, Methanocellales), and potential acetoclastic (Methanosarcina) members and their activity. While peat bog development was not reflected in significant changes of mcrA copy numbers, potential methane production, and rates of methane release decreased. This was primarily linked to a decline of potential acetoclastic in favor of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Although palsa peatland succession offers similarities with typical transitions from fen to bog ecosystems, the observed dynamics in methane fluxes and methanogenic communities are primarily attributed to changes within the dominant Bryophyta and Cyperaceae taxa rather than to changes in peat moss and sedge coverage, pH and nutrient regime. Overall, the palsa peatland methanogenic community was characterized by a few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs). These OTUs seem to be indicative for methanogenic species that thrive in terrestrial organic rich environments. In summary, our study shows that after an initial stage of high methane emissions following permafrost thaw, methane fluxes, and methanogenic communities establish that are typical for northern peat bogs. PMID:26029170

  14. Shifts in methanogenic community composition and methane fluxes along the degradation of discontinuous permafrost.

    PubMed

    Liebner, Susanne; Ganzert, Lars; Kiss, Andrea; Yang, Sizhong; Wagner, Dirk; Svenning, Mette M

    2015-01-01

    The response of methanogens to thawing permafrost is an important factor for the global greenhouse gas budget. We tracked methanogenic community structure, activity, and abundance along the degradation of sub-Arctic palsa peatland permafrost. We observed the development of pronounced methane production, release, and abundance of functional (mcrA) methanogenic gene numbers following the transitions from permafrost (palsa) to thaw pond structures. This was associated with the establishment of a methanogenic community consisting both of hydrogenotrophic (Methanobacterium, Methanocellales), and potential acetoclastic (Methanosarcina) members and their activity. While peat bog development was not reflected in significant changes of mcrA copy numbers, potential methane production, and rates of methane release decreased. This was primarily linked to a decline of potential acetoclastic in favor of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Although palsa peatland succession offers similarities with typical transitions from fen to bog ecosystems, the observed dynamics in methane fluxes and methanogenic communities are primarily attributed to changes within the dominant Bryophyta and Cyperaceae taxa rather than to changes in peat moss and sedge coverage, pH and nutrient regime. Overall, the palsa peatland methanogenic community was characterized by a few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs). These OTUs seem to be indicative for methanogenic species that thrive in terrestrial organic rich environments. In summary, our study shows that after an initial stage of high methane emissions following permafrost thaw, methane fluxes, and methanogenic communities establish that are typical for northern peat bogs.

  15. Methanogenic potential of tailings samples from oil sands extraction plants.

    PubMed

    Fedorak, Phillip M; Coy, Debora L; Salloum, Myrna J; Dudas, Marvin J

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 20% of Canada's oil supply now comes from the extraction of bitumen from the oil sands deposits in northeastern Alberta. The oil sands are strip-mined, and the bitumen is typically separated from sand and clays by an alkaline hot water extraction process. The rapidly expanding oil sands industry has millions of cubic metres of tailings for disposal and large areas of land to reclaim. There are estimates that the consolidation of the mature fine tails (MFT) in the settling ponds will take about 150 years. Some of the settling ponds are now evolving microbially produced methane, a greenhouse gas. To hasten consolidation, gypsum (CaSO4 x 2H2O) is added to MFT, yielding materials called consolidated or composite tailings (CT). Sulfate from the gypsum has the potential to stimulate sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to out-compete methanogens, thereby stopping methanogenesis. This investigation examined three MFT and four CT samples from three oil sands extractions companies. Each was found to contain methanogens and SRB. Serum bottle microcosm studies showed sulfate in the CT samples stopped methane production. However, if the microcosms were amended with readily utilizable electron donors, the sulfate was consumed, and when it reached approximately 20 mg/L, methane production began. Some unamended microcosms were incubated for 372 days, with no methane production detected. This work showed that each MFT and CT sample has the potential to become methanogenic, but in the absence of exogenous electron donors, the added sulfate can inhibit methanogenesis for a long time.

  16. Magnetic resonance microscopy of iron transport in methanogenic granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartacek, Jan; Vergeldt, Frank J.; Gerkema, Edo; Jenicek, Pavel; Lens, Piet N. L.; Van As, Henk

    2009-10-01

    Interactions between anaerobic biofilms and heavy metals such as iron, cobalt or nickel are largely unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive method that allows in situ studies of metal transport within biofilm matrixes. The present study investigates quantitatively the penetration of iron (1.75 mM) bound to ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) into the methanogenic granules (spherical biofilm). A spatial resolution of 109 × 109 × 218 μm 3 and a temporal resolution of 11 min are achieved with 3D Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) measurements. The longitudinal relaxivity, i.e. the slope the dependence of the relaxation rate (1/ T1) on the concentration of paramagnetic metal ions, was used to measure temporal changes in iron concentration in the methanogenic granules. It took up to 300 min for the iron-EDTA complex ([FeEDTA] 2-) to penetrate into the methanogenic granules (3-4 mm in diameter). The diffusion was equally fast in all directions with irregularities such as diffusion-facilitating channels and diffusion-resistant zones. Despite these irregularities, the overall process could be modeled using Fick's equations for diffusion in a sphere, because immobilization of [FeEDTA] 2- in the granular matrix (or the presence of a reactive barrier) was not observed. The effective diffusion coefficient ( D ejf) of [FeEDTA] 2- was found to be 2.8 × 10 -11 m 2 s -1, i.e. approximately 4% of D ejf of [FeEDTA] 2- in water. The Fickian model did not correspond to the processes taking place in the core of the granule (3-5% of the total volume of the granule), where up to 25% over-saturation by iron (compare to the concentration in the bulk solution) occurred.

  17. Degradation of hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in different geosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straaten, Nontje; Jiménez García, Núria; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krueger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    With increasing energy demand the search for new resources is becoming increasingly important for the future energy supply. Therefore the knowledge about fossil fuels like oil or natural gas and their extraction should be expanded. Biodegraded oil is found in many reservoirs worldwide. Consequently, it is very important to get insight in the microbial communities and metabolic processes involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Due to the lack of alternative electron acceptors in hydrocarbon-rich geosystems, degradation often takes place under methanogenic conditions. The aim of the present study is to identify the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the degradation of complex hydrocarbons, like BTEX and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, using culture dependent and independent techniques. For this purpose enrichment cultures from marine sediments, shales, coal and oil reservoirs are monitored for their capability to degrade alkanes and aromatic compounds. Moreover the environmental samples of these different geosystems analysed for evidence for the in situ occurrence of methanogenic oil degradation. The gas geochemical data provided in several cases hints for a recent biological origin of the methane present. First results of the microbial community analysis showed in environmental samples and enrichment cultures the existence of Bacteria known to degrade hydrocarbons. Also a diverse community of methanogenic Archaea could be found in the clone libraries. Additionally, in oil and coal reservoir samples the degradation of model hydrocarbons, e.g. methylnaphthalene, hexadecane and BTEX, to CH4 was confirmed by 13C-labeling. To explore the mechanisms involved in biodegradation, the enrichments as well as the original environmental samples are further analysed for the presence of respective functional genes.

  18. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low.

  19. Trace Elements Induce Predominance among Methanogenic Activity in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Wintsche, Babett; Glaser, Karin; Sträuber, Heike; Centler, Florian; Liebetrau, Jan; Harms, Hauke; Kleinsteuber, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements (TE) play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control, and supplementation of TEs lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while TE deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by TE deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller's grains and supplemented with TEs (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten) and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting TE supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, TE concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH) and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the TE-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on TE supplementation explainable by different TE requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under TE deprivation, Methanoculleus and thus hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was favored although Methanosarcina was not overgrown by

  20. Effect of temperature on perchloroethylene dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the kinetics of growth, substrate metabolism, and perchloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium is reported. In all cases, a simple kinetic model accurately reflected experimental data. Values for the substrate and methane yield coefficients, and the maximum specific growth rate are fairly consistent at each temperature. Also, the substrate and methane yield coefficients show little temperature sensitivity. In contrast, both the maximum specific growth rate and the PCE dechlorination yield coefficient (Y{sub PCE}) are temperature dependent.

  1. Trace Elements Induce Predominance among Methanogenic Activity in Anaerobic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Wintsche, Babett; Glaser, Karin; Sträuber, Heike; Centler, Florian; Liebetrau, Jan; Harms, Hauke; Kleinsteuber, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements (TE) play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control, and supplementation of TEs lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while TE deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by TE deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller’s grains and supplemented with TEs (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten) and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting TE supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, TE concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH) and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the TE-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on TE supplementation explainable by different TE requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under TE deprivation, Methanoculleus and thus hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was favored although Methanosarcina was not overgrown

  2. Relationship between methanogenic archaea and subgingival microbial complexes in human periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Horz, H P; Robertz, N; Vianna, M E; Henne, K; Conrads, G

    2015-10-01

    We compared the amounts of methanogenic archaea with ten of the most important periodontal pathogens in 125 clinical samples. Correlation analysis suggests that the support of the periodontitis-associated bacterial consortium by methanogenic archaea may be driven through direct or indirect interactions with Prevotella intermedia.

  3. Spatial Variations of the Methanogenic Communities in the Sediments of Tropical Mangroves

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Hongmei; Cheung, Shunyan; Zhou, Zhi; Wu, Chen; Nagarajan, Sanjay; Liu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Methane production by methanogens in mangrove sediments is known to contribute significantly to global warming, but studies on the shift of methanogenic community in response to anthropogenic contaminations were still limited. In this study, the effect of anthropogenic activities in the mangrove sediments along the north and south coastlines of Singapore were investigated by pyrosequencing of the mcrA gene. Our results showed that hydrogenotrophic, acetoclastic and methylotrophic methanogens coexist in the sediments. The predominance of the methylotrophic Methanosarcinales reflects the potential for high methane production as well as the possible availability of low acetate and high methylated C-1 compounds as substrates. A decline in the number of acetoclastic/methylotrophic methanogens in favor of hydrogenotrophic methanogens was observed along a vertical profile in Sungei Changi, which was contaminated by heavy metals. The diversity of methanogens in the various contaminated stations was significantly different from that in a pristine St. John’s Island. The spatial variation in the methanogenic communities among the different stations was more distinct than those along the vertical profiles at each station. We suggest that the overall heterogeneity of the methanogenic communities residing in the tropical mangrove sediments might be due to the accumulated effects of temperature and concentrations of nitrate, cobalt, and nickel. PMID:27684479

  4. Methane Production and Methanogenic Archaea in the Digestive Tracts of Millipedes (Diplopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens’ diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia. PMID:25028969

  5. Molecular Diversity and Activity of Methanogens in the Subseafloor at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents of the Pacific Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Merkel, A.; Holden, J. F.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    , including mesophiles and hyper/thermophiles, but that some methanogens recovered from Marker 113 are surviving at low or sub-optimal hydrogen levels. Vent 9m had a community composition similar to Marker 113, dominated by Methanococcales, and Zen Gardens, also at Axial, had a population of methanogens very different from either site. The community there was composed of members of the order Methanomicrobiales, including mesophilic methanogens previously only found in terrestrial environments. Along the Mariana Arc, Shrimp City vent at NW Rota-1 had some of the highest levels of methane detected on the entire arc, and mcrA analysis indicates members of the Methanococcales were present, as well as Methanosarcinales and anaerobic methane oxidizers. An integrated comparison of organismal and geochemical diversity will be presented to link energy transfer in these diverse hydrothermal systems from mantle to microbes.

  6. Geographic information system-based identification of suitable cultivation sites for wood-cultivated ginseng.

    PubMed

    Beon, Mu Sup; Park, Jun Ho; Kang, Hag Mo; Cho, Sung Jong; Kim, Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Wood-cultivated ginseng, including roots in its dried form, is produced in forest land without using artificial facilities such as light barriers. To identify suitable sites for the propagation of wood-cultivated ginseng, factor combination technique (FCT) and linear combination technique (LCT) were used with geographic information system and the results were superimposed onto an actual wood-cultivated ginseng plantation. The LCT more extensively searched for suitable sites of cultivation than that by the FCT; further, the LCT probed wide areas considering the predominance of precipitous mountains in Korea. In addition, the LCT showed the much higher degree of overlap with the actual cultivation sites; therefore, the LCT more comprehensively reflects the cultivator's intention for site selection. On the other hand, the inclusion of additional factors for the selection of suitable cultivation sites and experts' opinions may enhance the effectiveness and accuracy of the LCT for site application.

  7. Survival of methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost under simulated Martian thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Daria; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Wagner, Dirk

    2007-04-01

    Methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost complementary to the already well-studied methanogens from non-permafrost habitats were exposed to simulated Martian conditions. After 22 days of exposure to thermo-physical conditions at Martian low- and mid-latitudes up to 90% of methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost survived in pure cultures as well as in environmental samples. In contrast, only 0.3%-5.8% of reference organisms from non-permafrost habitats survived at these conditions. This suggests that methanogens from terrestrial permafrost seem to be remarkably resistant to Martian conditions. Our data also suggest that in scenario of subsurface lithoautotrophic life on Mars, methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost could be used as appropriate candidates for the microbial life on Mars.

  8. Methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in subsurface environments remediation, heavy oil formation, and energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Hubert, C; Dolfing, J; Head, I M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are common constituents of surface, shallow, and deep-subsurface environments. Under anaerobic conditions, hydrocarbons can be degraded to methane by methanogenic microbial consortia. This degradation process is widespread in the geosphere. In comparison with other anaerobic processes, methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is more sustainable over geological time scales because replenishment of an exogenous electron acceptor is not required. As a consequence, this process has been responsible for the formation of the world's vast deposits of heavy oil, which far exceed conventional oil assets such as those found in the Middle East. Methanogenic degradation is also a potentially important component of attenuation in hydrocarbon contamination plumes. Studies of the organisms, syntrophic partnerships, mechanisms, and geochemical signatures associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation have identified common themes and diagnostic markers for this process in the subsurface. These studies have also identified the potential to engineer methanogenic processes to enhance the recovery of energy assets as biogenic methane from residual oils stranded in petroleum systems.

  9. Oligonucleotide primers, probes and molecular methods for the environmental monitoring of methanogenic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Summary For the identification and quantification of methanogenic archaea (methanogens) in environmental samples, various oligonucleotide probes/primers targeting phylogenetic markers of methanogens, such as 16S rRNA, 16S rRNA gene and the gene for the α‐subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), have been extensively developed and characterized experimentally. These oligonucleotides were designed to resolve different groups of methanogens at different taxonomic levels, and have been widely used as hybridization probes or polymerase chain reaction primers for membrane hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization, rRNA cleavage method, gene cloning, DNA microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for studies in environmental and determinative microbiology. In this review, we present a comprehensive list of such oligonucleotide probes/primers, which enable us to determine methanogen populations in an environment quantitatively and hierarchically, with examples of the practical applications of the probes and primers. PMID:21375721

  10. Hydrogen or formate: Alternative key players in methanogenic degradation.

    PubMed

    Schink, Bernhard; Montag, Dominik; Keller, Anja; Müller, Nicolai

    2017-02-15

    Hydrogen and formate are important electron carriers in methanogenic degradation in anoxic environments such as sediments, sewage sludge digestors and biogas reactors. Especially in the terminal steps of methanogenesis, they determine the energy budgets of secondary (syntrophically) fermenting bacteria and their methanogenic partners. The literature provides considerable data on hydrogen pool sizes in such habitats, but little data exist for formate concentrations due to technical difficulties in formate determination at low concentration. Recent evidence from biochemical and molecular biological studies indicates that several secondary fermenters can use both hydrogen and formate for electron release, and may do so even simultaneously. Numerous strictly anaerobic bacteria contain enzymes which equilibrate hydrogen and formate pools to energetically equal values, and recent measurements in sewage digestors and biogas reactors indicate that - beyond occasional fluctuations - the pool sizes of hydrogen and formate are indeed energetically nearly equivalent. Nonetheless, a thermophilic archaeon from a submarine hydrothermal vent, Thermococcus onnurineus, can obtain ATP from the conversion of formate to hydrogen plus bicarbonate at 80°C, indicating that at least in this extreme environment the pools of formate and hydrogen are likely to be sufficiently different to support such an unusual type of energy conservation.

  11. Presence of an unusual methanogenic bacterium in coal gasification waste.

    PubMed

    Tomei, F A; Rouse, D; Maki, J S; Mitchell, R

    1988-12-01

    Methanogenic bacteria growing on a pilot-scale, anaerobic filter processing coal gasification waste were enriched in a mineral salts medium containing hydrogen and acetate as potential energy sources. Transfer of the enrichments to methanol medium resulted in the initial growth of a strain of Methanosarcina barkeri, but eventually small cocci became dominant. The cocci growing on methanol produced methane and exhibited the typical fluorescence of methanogenic bacteria. They grew in the presence of the cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics d-cycloserine, fosfomycin, penicillin G, and vancomycin as well as in the presence of kanamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in eubacteria. The optimal growth temperature was 37 degrees C, and the doubling time was 7.5 h. The strain lysed after reaching stationary phase. The bacterium grew poorly with hydrogen as the energy source and failed to grow on acetate. Morphologically, the coccus shared similarities with Methanosarcina sp. Cells were 1 mum wide, exhibited the typical thick cell wall and cross-wall formation, and formed tetrads. Packets and cysts were not formed.

  12. Recovery of palladium(II) by methanogenic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Field, James A; Otero-Gonzalez, Lila; Razo-Flores, Elías; Cervantes, Francisco J; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-02-01

    This is the first report that demonstrates the ability of anaerobic methanogenic granular sludge to reduce Pd(II) to Pd(0). Different electron donors were evaluated for their effectiveness in promoting Pd reduction. Formate and H2 fostered both chemically and biologically mediated Pd reduction. Ethanol only promoted the reduction of Pd(II) under biotic conditions and the reduction was likely mediated by H2 released from ethanol fermentation. No reduction was observed in biotic or abiotic assays with all other substrates tested (acetate, lactate and pyruvate) although a large fraction of the total Pd was removed from the liquid medium likely due to biosorption. Pd(II) displayed severe inhibition towards acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, as indicated by 50% inhibiting concentrations as low as 0.96 and 2.7 mg/L, respectively. The results obtained indicate the potential of utilizing anaerobic granular sludge bioreactor technology as a practical and promising option for Pd(II) reduction and recovery offering advantages over pure cultures.

  13. Restricted diversity of dental calculus methanogens over five centuries, France

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Hong T. T.; Nkamga, Vanessa D.; Signoli, Michel; Tzortzis, Stéfan; Pinguet, Romuald; Audoly, Gilles; Aboudharam, Gérard; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens are acknowledged archaeal members of modern dental calculus microbiota and dental pathogen complexes. Their repertoire in ancient dental calculus is poorly known. We therefore investigated archaea in one hundred dental calculus specimens collected from individuals recovered from six archaeological sites in France dated from the 14th to 19th centuries AD. Dental calculus was demonstrated by macroscopic and cone-beam observations. In 56 calculus specimens free of PCR inhibition, PCR sequencing identified Candidatus Methanobrevibacter sp. N13 in 44.6%, Methanobrevibacter oralis in 19.6%, a new Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis-like methanogen in 12.5%, a Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis-like in one and Methanoculleus bourgensis in one specimen, respectively. One Candidatus Methanobrevibacter sp. N13 dental calculus was further documented by fluorescent in situ hybridization. The prevalence of dental calculus M. oralis was significantly lower in past populations than in modern populations (P = 0.03, Chi-square test). This investigation revealed a previously unknown repertoire of archaea found in the oral cavity of past French populations as reflected in preserved dental calculus. PMID:27166431

  14. Methane formation and methane oxidation by methanogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, A J; Brock, T D

    1979-01-01

    Methanogenic bacteria were found to form and oxidize methane at the same time. As compared to the quantity of methane formed, the amount of methane simultaneously oxidized varied between 0.3 and 0.001%, depending on the strain used. All the nine tested strains of methane producers (Methanobacterium ruminantium, Methanobacterium strain M.o.H., M. formicicum, M. thermoautotrophicum, M. arbophilicum, Methanobacterium strain AZ, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanospirillum hungatii, and the "acetate organism") reoxidized methane to carbon dioxide. In addition, they assimilated a small part of the methane supplied into cell material. Methanol and acetate also occurred as oxidation products in M. barkeri cultures. Acetate was also formed by the "acetate organism," a methane bacterium unable to use methanogenic substrates other than acetate. Methane was the precursor of the methyl group of the acetate synthesized in the course of methane oxidation. Methane formation and its oxidation were inhibited equally by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Short-term labeling experiments with M. thermoautotrophicum and M. hungatii clearly suggest that the pathway of methane oxidation is not identical with a simple back reaction of the methane formation process. Images PMID:762019

  15. Methanogens rapidly transition from methane production to iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Sivan, O; Shusta, S S; Valentine, D L

    2016-03-01

    Methanogenesis, the microbial methane (CH4 ) production, is traditionally thought to anchor the mineralization of organic matter as the ultimate respiratory process in deep sediments, despite the presence of oxidized mineral phases, such as iron oxides. This process is carried out by archaea that have also been shown to be capable of reducing iron in high levels of electron donors such as hydrogen. The current pure culture study demonstrates that methanogenic archaea (Methanosarcina barkeri) rapidly switch from methanogenesis to iron-oxide reduction close to natural conditions, with nitrogen atmosphere, even when faced with substrate limitations. Intensive, biotic iron reduction was observed following the addition of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite and complex organic matter and was accompanied by inhibition of methane production. The reaction rate of this process was of the first order and was dependent only on the initial iron concentrations. Ferrous iron production did not accelerate significantly with the addition of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) but increased by 11-28% with the addition of phenazine-1-carboxylate (PCA), suggesting the possible role of methanophenazines in the electron transport. The coupling between ferrous iron and methane production has important global implications. The rapid transition from methanogenesis to reduction of iron-oxides close to the natural conditions in sediments may help to explain the globally-distributed phenomena of increasing ferrous concentrations below the traditional iron reduction zone in the deep 'methanogenic' sediment horizon, with implications for metabolic networking in these subsurface ecosystems and in past geological settings.

  16. Modeling steady-state methanogenic degradation of phenols in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, Barbara A.; Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Field and microcosm observations of methanogenic phenolic compound degradation indicate that Monod kinetics governs the substrate disappearance but overestimates the observed biomass. In this paper we present modeling results from an ongoing multidisciplinary study of methanogenic biodegradation of phenolic compounds in a sand and gravel aquifer contaminated by chemicals and wastes used in wood treatment. Field disappearance rates of four phenols match those determined in batch microcosm studies previously performed by E.M. Godsy and coworkers. The degradation process appears to be at steady-state because even after a sustained influx over several decades, the contaminants still are disappearing in transport downgradient. The existence of a steady-state degradation profile of each substrate together with a low biomass density in the aquifer indicate that the bacteria population is exhibiting no net growth. This may be due to the oligotrophic nature of the biomass population in which utilization and growth are approximately independent of concentration for most of the concentration range. Thus a constant growth rate should exist over much of the contaminated area which may in turn be balanced by an unusually high decay or maintenance rate due to hostile conditions or predation.

  17. Conserved gene structures and expression signals in methanogenic archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Allmansberger, R; Bokranz, M; Kröckel, L; Schallenberg, J; Klein, A

    1989-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cotranscribed gene clusters comprising the structural genes mcrA, mcrB, mcrC, mcrD, and mcrG was carried out in three species of methanogens. mcrA, mcrB, and mcrG are the structural genes for the three subunits of methyl coenzyme M reductase, while the two other genes encode polypeptides of unknown functions. The degree of conservation of the mcr gene products among different species of methanogens varies. No correlation was found between the conservation of the G+C contents of the homologous genes and of the amino acid sequences of their products among the different bacteria. The comparison of RNA polymerase core subunit genes of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum as evolutionary markers with their equivalents in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster showed that homologous polypeptide domains are encoded by different numbers of genes suggesting gene fusion of adjacent genes in the course of evolution. The archaebacterial subunits exhibit much stronger homology with their eukaryotic than with their eubacterial equivalents on the polypeptide sequence level. All the analyzed genes are preceded by ribosome binding sites of eubacterial type. In addition to known putative promoter sequences, conserved structural elements of the DNA were detected surrounding the transcription initiation sites of the mcr genes.

  18. Environmental Drivers of Differences in Microbial Community Structure in Crude Oil Reservoirs across a Methanogenic Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Jenna L.; Akob, Denise M.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Fierer, Noah; Spear, John R.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total Archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil) geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow, up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells. Also, the 17 down-dip wells

  19. Environmental drivers of differences in microbial community structure in crude oil reservoirs across a methanogenic gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; Akob, Denise M.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Fierer, Noah; Spear, John R.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total Archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil) geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow, up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells. Also, the 17 down-dip wells

  20. Environmental Drivers of Differences in Microbial Community Structure in Crude Oil Reservoirs across a Methanogenic Gradient.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jenna L; Akob, Denise M; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Fierer, Noah; Spear, John R; Warwick, Peter D; McCray, John E

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total Archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil) geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow, up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells. Also, the 17 down-dip wells

  1. Impact of Reed Canary Grass Cultivation and Mineral Fertilisation on the Microbial Abundance and Genetic Potential for Methane Production in Residual Peat of an Abandoned Peat Extraction Area.

    PubMed

    Espenberg, Mikk; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Maddison, Martin; Nõlvak, Hiie; Järveoja, Järvi; Mander, Ülo

    This study examined physiochemical conditions and prokaryotic community structure (the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA gene abundances and proportions), and evaluated the effect of reed canary grass cultivation and mineral fertilisation on these factors, in the 60 cm thick residual peat layer of experimental plots located on an abandoned peat extraction area. The archaeal proportion was 0.67-39.56% in the prokaryotic community and the methanogens proportion was 0.01-1.77% in the archaeal community. When bacterial abundance was higher in the top 20 cm of peat, the archaea were more abundant in the 20-60 cm layer and methanogens in the 40-60 cm layer of the residual peat. The bacterial abundance was significantly increased, but archaeal abundance was not affected by cultivation. The fertiliser application had a slight effect on peat properties and on archaeal and methanogen abundances in the deeper layer of cultivated peat. The CH4 emission was positively related to mcrA abundance in the 20-60 cm of the bare peat, while in case of reed canary grass cultivation these two parameters were not correlated. Reed canary grass cultivation mitigated CH4 emission, although methanogen abundance remained approximately the same or even increased in different layers of residual peat under cultivated sites over time. This study supports the outlook of using abandoned peat extraction areas to produce reed canary grass for energy purposes as an advisable land-use practice from the perspective of atmospheric impact in peatland-rich Northern Europe.

  2. Impact of Reed Canary Grass Cultivation and Mineral Fertilisation on the Microbial Abundance and Genetic Potential for Methane Production in Residual Peat of an Abandoned Peat Extraction Area

    PubMed Central

    Espenberg, Mikk; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Maddison, Martin; Nõlvak, Hiie; Järveoja, Järvi; Mander, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined physiochemical conditions and prokaryotic community structure (the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA gene abundances and proportions), and evaluated the effect of reed canary grass cultivation and mineral fertilisation on these factors, in the 60 cm thick residual peat layer of experimental plots located on an abandoned peat extraction area. The archaeal proportion was 0.67–39.56% in the prokaryotic community and the methanogens proportion was 0.01–1.77% in the archaeal community. When bacterial abundance was higher in the top 20 cm of peat, the archaea were more abundant in the 20–60 cm layer and methanogens in the 40–60 cm layer of the residual peat. The bacterial abundance was significantly increased, but archaeal abundance was not affected by cultivation. The fertiliser application had a slight effect on peat properties and on archaeal and methanogen abundances in the deeper layer of cultivated peat. The CH4 emission was positively related to mcrA abundance in the 20–60 cm of the bare peat, while in case of reed canary grass cultivation these two parameters were not correlated. Reed canary grass cultivation mitigated CH4 emission, although methanogen abundance remained approximately the same or even increased in different layers of residual peat under cultivated sites over time. This study supports the outlook of using abandoned peat extraction areas to produce reed canary grass for energy purposes as an advisable land-use practice from the perspective of atmospheric impact in peatland-rich Northern Europe. PMID:27684377

  3. Seasonal dynamics of bacterial and archaeal methanogenic communities in flooded rice fields and effect of drainage

    PubMed Central

    Breidenbach, Björn; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We studied the resident (16S rDNA) and the active (16S rRNA) members of soil archaeal and bacterial communities during rice plant development by sampling three growth stages (vegetative, reproductive and maturity) under field conditions. Additionally, the microbial community was investigated in two non-flooded fields (unplanted, cultivated with upland maize) in order to monitor the reaction of the microbial communities to non-flooded, dry conditions. The abundance of Bacteria and Archaea was monitored by quantitative PCR showing an increase in 16S rDNA during reproductive stage and stable 16S rRNA copies throughout the growth season. Community profiling by T-RFLP indicated a relatively stable composition during rice plant growth whereas pyrosequencing revealed minor changes in relative abundance of a few bacterial groups. Comparison of the two non-flooded fields with flooded rice fields showed that the community composition of the Bacteria was slightly different, while that of the Archaea was almost the same. Only the relative abundance of Methanosarcinaceae and Soil Crenarchaeotic Group increased in non-flooded vs. flooded soil. The abundance of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA copies was highest in flooded rice fields, followed by non-flooded maize and unplanted fields. However, the abundance of ribosomal RNA (active microbes) was similar indicating maintenance of a high level of ribosomal RNA under the non-flooded conditions, which were unfavorable for anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. This maintenance possibly serves as preparedness for activity when conditions improve. In summary, the analyses showed that the bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting Philippine rice field soil were relatively stable over the season but reacted upon change in field management. PMID:25620960

  4. Methanogenic burst in the end-Permian carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Daniel H; Fournier, Gregory P; French, Katherine L; Alm, Eric J; Boyle, Edward A; Cao, Changqun; Summons, Roger E

    2014-04-15

    The end-Permian extinction is associated with a mysterious disruption to Earth's carbon cycle. Here we identify causal mechanisms via three observations. First, we show that geochemical signals indicate superexponential growth of the marine inorganic carbon reservoir, coincident with the extinction and consistent with the expansion of a new microbial metabolic pathway. Second, we show that the efficient acetoclastic pathway in Methanosarcina emerged at a time statistically indistinguishable from the extinction. Finally, we show that nickel concentrations in South China sediments increased sharply at the extinction, probably as a consequence of massive Siberian volcanism, enabling a methanogenic expansion by removal of nickel limitation. Collectively, these results are consistent with the instigation of Earth's greatest mass extinction by a specific microbial innovation.

  5. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Mochimaru, Hanako; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    Coal-bed methane is one of the largest unconventional natural gas resources. Although microbial activity may greatly contribute to coal-bed methane formation, it is unclear whether the complex aromatic organic compounds present in coal can be used for methanogenesis. We show that deep subsurface-derived Methermicoccus methanogens can produce methane from more than 30 types of methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) as well as from coals containing MACs. In contrast to known methanogenesis pathways involving one- and two-carbon compounds, this “methoxydotrophic” mode of methanogenesis couples O-demethylation, CO2 reduction, and possibly acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Because MACs derived from lignin may occur widely in subsurface sediments, methoxydotrophic methanogenesis would play an important role in the formation of natural gas not limited to coal-bed methane and in the global carbon cycle.

  6. Methanogenic burst in the end-Permian carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Daniel H.; Fournier, Gregory P.; French, Katherine L.; Alm, Eric J.; Boyle, Edward A.; Cao, Changqun; Summons, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    The end-Permian extinction is associated with a mysterious disruption to Earth’s carbon cycle. Here we identify causal mechanisms via three observations. First, we show that geochemical signals indicate superexponential growth of the marine inorganic carbon reservoir, coincident with the extinction and consistent with the expansion of a new microbial metabolic pathway. Second, we show that the efficient acetoclastic pathway in Methanosarcina emerged at a time statistically indistinguishable from the extinction. Finally, we show that nickel concentrations in South China sediments increased sharply at the extinction, probably as a consequence of massive Siberian volcanism, enabling a methanogenic expansion by removal of nickel limitation. Collectively, these results are consistent with the instigation of Earth’s greatest mass extinction by a specific microbial innovation. PMID:24706773

  7. Microbial community signature of high-solid content methanogenic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Abbassi-Guendouz, Amel; Trably, Eric; Hamelin, Jérôme; Dumas, Claire; Steyer, Jean Philippe; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    In this study, changes in bacterial and archaeal communities involved in anaerobic digestion processes operated with high solid contents were investigated. Batch tests were performed within a range of total solids (TS) of 10-35%. Between 10% and 25% TS, high methanogenic activity was observed and no overall specific structure of active bacterial communities was found. At 30% and 35%, methanogenesis was inhibited as a consequence of volatile fatty acids accumulation. Here, a specific bacterial signature was observed with three main dominant bacteria related to Clostridium sp., known for their ability to grow at low pH. Additionally, archaeal community was gradually impacted by TS content. Three archaeal community structures were observed with a gradual shift from Methanobacterium sp. to Methanosarcina sp., according to the TS content. Overall, several species were identified as biomarkers of methanogenesis inhibition, since bacterial and archaeal communities were highly specific at high TS contents.

  8. Methanogenic burst in the end-Permian carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Daniel H.; Fournier, Gregory P.; French, Katherine L.; Alm, Eric J.; Boyle, Edward A.; Cao, Changqun; Summons, Roger E.

    2014-04-01

    The end-Permian extinction is associated with a mysterious disruption to Earth's carbon cycle. Here we identify causal mechanisms via three observations. First, we show that geochemical signals indicate superexponential growth of the marine inorganic carbon reservoir, coincident with the extinction and consistent with the expansion of a new microbial metabolic pathway. Second, we show that the efficient acetoclastic pathway in Methanosarcina emerged at a time statistically indistinguishable from the extinction. Finally, we show that nickel concentrations in South China sediments increased sharply at the extinction, probably as a consequence of massive Siberian volcanism, enabling a methanogenic expansion by removal of nickel limitation. Collectively, these results are consistent with the instigation of Earth's greatest mass extinction by a specific microbial innovation.

  9. Effect of acclimation on methanogenic degradation of chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.T.; Muthukrishnan, S.

    1996-11-01

    Chlorophenols are highly toxic and persistent in the environment. Several millions of pounds of chlorinated phenols and chlorophenol based compounds are manufactured and used every year. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) and tetrachlorophenols (TCP) are widely used in the paper pulp industry and also as wood preservatives. Chlorophenols are also formed during the disinfection of wastewater containing phenols and in chlorine bleaching processes of cellulose. Anaerobic biodegradation of chlorophenols by anaerobic microbial consortia has been extensively studied by many researchers. Anaerobic biodegradation of chlorophenols occurs through a series of reductive dechlorination, in which the chlorine is replaced by hydrogen at each step. This reductive dehalogenation is of environmental importance because the less chlorinated metabolic products are generally less toxic and more easily degraded by aerobic bacteria. The main objective of this study is to examine the degradation of chlorophenols in both unacclimated and acclimated methanogenic cultures.

  10. Selenocysteine, Pyrrolysine, and the Unique Energy Metabolism of Methanogenic Archaea

    DOE PAGES

    Rother, Michael; Krzycki, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are a group of strictly anaerobic microorganisms characterized by their strict dependence on the process of methanogenesis for energy conservation. Among the archaea, they are also the only known group synthesizing proteins containing selenocysteine or pyrrolysine. All but one of the known archaeal pyrrolysine-containing and all but two of the confirmed archaeal selenocysteine-containing protein are involved in methanogenesis. Synthesis of these proteins proceeds through suppression of translational stop codons but otherwise the two systems are fundamentally different. This paper highlights these differences and summarizes the recent developments in selenocysteine- and pyrrolysine-related research on archaea and aims to putmore » this knowledge into the context of their unique energy metabolism.« less

  11. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Mochimaru, Hanako; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-10-14

    Coal-bed methane is one of the largest unconventional natural gas resources. Although microbial activity may greatly contribute to coal-bed methane formation, it is unclear whether the complex aromatic organic compounds present in coal can be used for methanogenesis. We show that deep subsurface-derived Methermicoccus methanogens can produce methane from more than 30 types of methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) as well as from coals containing MACs. In contrast to known methanogenesis pathways involving one- and two-carbon compounds, this "methoxydotrophic" mode of methanogenesis couples O-demethylation, CO2 reduction, and possibly acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Because MACs derived from lignin may occur widely in subsurface sediments, methoxydotrophic methanogenesis would play an important role in the formation of natural gas not limited to coal-bed methane and in the global carbon cycle.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of methanogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a driving force in the evolution of metabolic pathways, allowing novel enzymatic functions that provide a selective advantage to be rapidly incorporated into an organism's physiology. Here, the role of two HGT events in the evolution of methanogenesis is described. First, the acetoclastic sub-pathway of methanogenesis is shown to have evolved via a transfer of the ackA and pta genes from a cellulolytic clostridia to a family of methanogenic archaea. Second, the system for encoding the amino acid pyrrolysine, used for the synthesis of enzymes for methanogenesis from methylamines, is shown to likely have evolved via transfer from an ancient, unknown, deeply branching organismal lineage.

  13. "Methanoplasmatales," Thermoplasmatales-related archaea in termite guts and other environments, are the seventh order of methanogens.

    PubMed

    Paul, Kristina; Nonoh, James O; Mikulski, Lena; Brune, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    The Euryarchaeota comprise both methanogenic and nonmethanogenic orders and many lineages of uncultivated archaea with unknown properties. One of these deep-branching lineages, distantly related to the Thermoplasmatales, has been discovered in various environments, including marine habitats, soil, and also the intestinal tracts of termites and mammals. By comparative phylogenetic analysis, we connected this lineage of 16S rRNA genes to a large clade of unknown mcrA gene sequences, a functional marker for methanogenesis, obtained from the same habitats. The identical topologies of 16S rRNA and mcrA gene trees and the perfect congruence of all branches, including several novel groups that we obtained from the guts of termites and cockroaches, strongly suggested that they stem from the same microorganisms. This was further corroborated by two highly enriched cultures of closely related methanogens from the guts of a higher termite (Cubitermes ugandensis) and a millipede (Anadenobolus sp.), which represented one of the arthropod-specific clusters in the respective trees. Numerous other pairs of habitat-specific sequence clusters were obtained from the guts of other termites and cockroaches but were also found in previously published data sets from the intestinal tracts of mammals (e.g., rumen cluster C) and other environments. Together with the recently described Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis isolated from human feces, which falls into rice cluster III, the results of our study strongly support the idea that the entire clade of "uncultured Thermoplasmatales" in fact represents the seventh order of methanogenic archaea, for which the provisional name "Methanoplasmatales" is proposed.

  14. “Methanoplasmatales,” Thermoplasmatales-Related Archaea in Termite Guts and Other Environments, Are the Seventh Order of Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Kristina; Nonoh, James O.; Mikulski, Lena

    2012-01-01

    The Euryarchaeota comprise both methanogenic and nonmethanogenic orders and many lineages of uncultivated archaea with unknown properties. One of these deep-branching lineages, distantly related to the Thermoplasmatales, has been discovered in various environments, including marine habitats, soil, and also the intestinal tracts of termites and mammals. By comparative phylogenetic analysis, we connected this lineage of 16S rRNA genes to a large clade of unknown mcrA gene sequences, a functional marker for methanogenesis, obtained from the same habitats. The identical topologies of 16S rRNA and mcrA gene trees and the perfect congruence of all branches, including several novel groups that we obtained from the guts of termites and cockroaches, strongly suggested that they stem from the same microorganisms. This was further corroborated by two highly enriched cultures of closely related methanogens from the guts of a higher termite (Cubitermes ugandensis) and a millipede (Anadenobolus sp.), which represented one of the arthropod-specific clusters in the respective trees. Numerous other pairs of habitat-specific sequence clusters were obtained from the guts of other termites and cockroaches but were also found in previously published data sets from the intestinal tracts of mammals (e.g., rumen cluster C) and other environments. Together with the recently described Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis isolated from human feces, which falls into rice cluster III, the results of our study strongly support the idea that the entire clade of “uncultured Thermoplasmatales” in fact represents the seventh order of methanogenic archaea, for which the provisional name “Methanoplasmatales” is proposed. PMID:23001661

  15. Progression of methanogenic degradation of crude oil in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Delin, G.N.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.

    2005-01-01

    Our results show that subsurface crude-oil degradation rates at a long-term research site were strongly influenced by small-scale variations in hydrologic conditions. The site is a shallow glacial outwash aquifer located near Bemidji in northern Minnesota that became contaminated when oil spilled from a broken pipeline in August 1979. In the study area, separate-phase oil forms a subsurface oil body extending from land surface to about 1 m (3.3 ft) below the 6-8-m (20-26 ft)-deep water table. Oil saturation in the sediments ranges from 10-20% in the vadose zone to 30-70% near the water table. At depths below 2 m (6.6 ft), degradation of the separate-phase crude oil occurs under methanogenic conditions. The sequence of methanogenic alkane degradation depletes the longer chain n-alkanes before the shorter chain n-alkanes, which is opposite to the better known aerobic sequence. The rates of degradation vary significantly with location in the subsurface. Oil-coated soils within 1.5 m (5 ft) of land surface have experienced little degradation where soil water saturation is less than 20%. Oil located 2-8 m (6.6-26 ft) below land surface in areas of higher recharge has been substantially degraded. The best explanation for the association between recharge and enhanced degradation seems to be increased downward transport of microbial growth nutrients to the oil body. This is supported by observations of greater microbial numbers at higher elevations in the oil body and significant decreases with depth in nutrient concentrations, especially phosphorus. Our results suggest that environmental effects may cause widely diverging degradation rates in the same spill, calling into question dating methods based on degradation state. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth of methylaminotrophic, acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic bacteria on artificial supports.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, H; Vidal, R; Baeza, M; Reyes, J E; Aspe, E

    1997-06-01

    The efficiency of organic matter degradation in attached biomass reactors depends on the suitable selection of artificial support for the retention of bacterial communities. We have studied the growth on glass and clay beads of methylaminotrophic, acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic bacterial communities isolated from anaerobic reactors. Bacterial counts were performed by the standard MPN technique. Experiments were performed in 50 ml vials for 12 days at 35 degrees C. Increase in the counts of methylaminotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens occurred on both glass and clay beads. The latter support material also stimulated the growth rate of methylaminotrophic methanogens.

  17. Osmoregulation in methanogens. Progress report, May 15, 1991--January 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Our major goal of our work has been to develop and use NMR techniques to study how methanogenic archaebacteria deal with osmotic stress with the hope of providing insights into increasing the salt tolerance of other cells. The project has three main sections: (i) in vivo studies of methanogens; (ii) use of {sup l3}C- and {sup l5}N- labeled potential precursors and in vitro analyses of specific label uptake for elucidation of osmolyte dynamics and biosynthetic pathways of osmolytes in these organisms, and isolation of key biosynthetic enzymes; and (iii) collaborative studies on identification of organic solutes in other methanogens.

  18. Spirulina cultivation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo-Tang, Wu; Wen-Zhou, Xiang; Cheng-Kui, Zeng

    1998-03-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the development and many problems of Spirulina cultivation in China, points out the advantages and disadvantages of open photobioreactor system, and predicts that seawater Spirulina cultivation will be a new trend to be strengthened and emphasized due to its special physiological characteristics, easier management, lower fertilizer cost, and higher resistance to contaminants and rare pollution of chemicals.

  19. Assessing the Ecophysiology of Methanogens in the Context of Recent Astrobiological and Planetological Studies.

    PubMed

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G; Rittmann, Simon K-M R

    2015-12-03

    Among all known microbes capable of thriving under extreme and, therefore, potentially extraterrestrial environmental conditions, methanogens from the domain Archaea are intriguing organisms. This is due to their broad metabolic versatility, enormous diversity, and ability to grow under extreme environmental conditions. Several studies revealed that growth conditions of methanogens are compatible with environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System. Hence, life in the Solar System might not be limited to the classical habitable zone. In this contribution we assess the main ecophysiological characteristics of methanogens and compare these to the environmental conditions of putative habitats in the Solar System, in particular Mars and icy moons. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies concerning methanogens.

  20. Assessing the Ecophysiology of Methanogens in the Context of Recent Astrobiological and Planetological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G.; Rittman, Simon K.-M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Among all known microbes capable of thriving under extreme and, therefore, potentially extraterrestrial environmental conditions, methanogens from the domain Archaea are intriguing organisms. This is due to their broad metabolic versatility, enormous diversity, and ability to grow under extreme environmental conditions. Several studies revealed that growth conditions of methanogens are compatible with environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System. Hence, life in the Solar System might not be limited to the classical habitable zone. In this contribution we assess the main ecophysiological characteristics of methanogens and compare these to the environmental conditions of putative habitats in the Solar System, in particular Mars and icy moons. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies concerning methanogens.

  1. Assessing the Ecophysiology of Methanogens in the Context of Recent Astrobiological and Planetological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G.; Rittmann, Simon K.-M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Among all known microbes capable of thriving under extreme and, therefore, potentially extraterrestrial environmental conditions, methanogens from the domain Archaea are intriguing organisms. This is due to their broad metabolic versatility, enormous diversity, and ability to grow under extreme environmental conditions. Several studies revealed that growth conditions of methanogens are compatible with environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System. Hence, life in the Solar System might not be limited to the classical habitable zone. In this contribution we assess the main ecophysiological characteristics of methanogens and compare these to the environmental conditions of putative habitats in the Solar System, in particular Mars and icy moons. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies concerning methanogens. PMID:26703739

  2. SEQUENTIAL REDUCTIVE DEHALOGATION OF CHLOROANILINES BY MICROORGANISMS FROM A METHANOGENIC AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloroaniline-based compounds are widely used chem- icals and important contaminants of aquatic and terrestrial environments. We have found that chloroanilines can be biologically dehalogenated in polluted aquifers when methanogenic, but not sulfate-reducing conditions prevail. T...

  3. Analysis of methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor: use of fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Montero, B; García-Morales, J L; Sales, D; Solera, R

    2009-03-01

    Methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor was determined by comparing the amount of methane generated for each of the organic loading rates with the size of the total and specific methanogenic population, as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. A high correlation was evident between the total methanogenic activity and retention time [-0.6988Ln(x)+2.667] (R(2) 0.8866). The total methanogenic activity increased from 0.04x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) to 0.38x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) while the retention time decreased, augmenting the organic loading rates. The specific methanogenic activities of H(2)-utilizing methanogens and acetate-utilizing methanogens increased until they stabilised at 0.64x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) and 0.33x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1), respectively. The methanogenic activity of H(2)-utilizing methanogens was higher than acetate-utilizing methanogens, indicating that maintaining a low partial pressure of hydrogen does not inhibit the acetoclastic methanogenesis or the anaerobic process.

  4. Pathways for methanogenesis and diversity of methanogenic archaea in three boreal peatland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Galand, P E; Fritze, H; Conrad, R; Yrjälä, K

    2005-04-01

    The main objectives of this study were to uncover the pathways used for methanogenesis in three different boreal peatland ecosystems and to describe the methanogenic populations involved. The mesotrophic fen had the lowest proportion of CH4 produced from H2-CO2. The oligotrophic fen was the most hydrogenotrophic, followed by the ombrotrophic bog. Each site was characterized by a specific group of methanogenic sequences belonging to Methanosaeta spp. (mesotrophic fen), rice cluster-I (oligotrophic fen), and fen cluster (ombrotrophic bog).

  5. Vertical profiles of sediment methanogenic potential and communities in two plateau freshwater lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuyin; Li, Ningning; Wang, Wei; Li, Bingxin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Microbial methanogenesis in sediment plays a crucial role in CH4 emission from freshwater lake ecosystems. However, knowledge of the layer-depth-related changes of methanogen community structure and activities in freshwater lake sediment is still limited. The present study was conducted to characterize the methanogenesis potential in different sediment-layer depths and the vertical distribution of microbial communities in two freshwater lakes of different trophic status on the Yunnan Plateau (China). Incubation experiments and inhibitor studies were carried out to determine the methanogenesis potential and pathways. 16S rRNA and mcrA genes were used to investigate the abundance and structure of methanogen and archaeal communities, respectively. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was mainly responsible for methane production in sediments of both freshwater lakes. The layer-depth-related changes of methanogenesis potential and the abundance and community structure of methanogens were observed in both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. Archaeal 16S rRNA and mcrA genes displayed a similar abundance change pattern in both lakes, and the relative abundance of methanogens decreased with increasing sediment-layer depth. Archaeal communities differed considerably in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, but methanogen communities showed a slight difference between these two lakes. However, methanogen communities illustrated a remarkable layer-depth-related change. Order Methanomicrobiales was the dominant methanogen group in all sediments, while Methanobacteriales showed a high proportion only in upper layer sediments. The trophic status of the lake might have a notable influence on the depth-related change pattern of methanogenesis activity, while the methanogen community structure was mainly influenced by sediment depth.

  6. Methanogens and Martian natural resources: Investigations regarding the possibility of biogenic methane on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastain, Brendon Kelly

    Archaeal methanogens were suggested as terrestrial models of possible subsurface martian microbial life prior to the actual detection of methane in Mars' atmosphere. This idea gained even more interest after the methane on Mars was observed. However, the amount of methane detected was very small, and release of methane was localized and episodic. This led some scientists to doubt that an active or ancient biosphere could be the source of the methane. Moreover, even extremophilic methanogens have not been shown to metabolize in conditions exactly analogous to those known to be available on Mars. The following chapters present a realistic and viable mechanism that allows a large or ancient biosphere to be the original source of the observed methane, and they detail experimental work that was done in order to systematically investigate nutritional and conditional variables related to those that might be available in the martian subsurface. The results of the experimental work indicate that some components of Mars' regolith can support methanogenic metabolism without being detrimental to the organisms, and that certain known components of Mars' regolith can promote periods of methanogenic dormancy without being lethal to the methanogens. The results of the experimental studies also show that material known to exist at and near Mars' surface has the potential to supply electrons for biological methanogenesis and that methanogenic metabolism can occur even when artificial media, buffers, and reductants are omitted in order to create more Mars-relevant conditions. These findings may have implications regarding the viability of methanogenic organisms as a source of the observed methane and should assist future efforts to study methanogenic metabolism in conditions exactly analogous to those available in niches on Mars.

  7. Comparative study of fermentation and methanogen community structure in the digestive tract of goats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abecia, L; Fondevila, M; Rodríguez-Romero, N; Martínez, G; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R

    2013-05-01

    Methane is the most important anthropogenic contribution to climate change after carbon dioxide and represents a loss of feed energy for the animal, mainly for herbivorous species. However, our knowledge about the ecology of Archaea, the microbial group responsible for methane synthesis in the gut, is very poor. Moreover, it is well known that hindgut fermentation differs from rumen fermentation. The composition of archaeal communities in fermentation compartments of goats and rabbits were investigated using DGGE to generate fingerprints of archaeal 16S rRNA gene. Ruminal contents and faeces from five Murciano-Granadina goats and caecal contents of five commercial White New Zealand rabbits were compared. Diversity profile of methanogenic archaea was carried out by PCR-DGGE. Quantification of methanogenic archaea and the abundance relative to bacteria was determined by real-time PCR. Methanogenic archaeal species were relatively constant across species. Dendrogram from DGGE of the methanogen community showed one cluster for goat samples with two sub-clusters by type of sample (ruminal and faeces). In a second cluster, samples from rabbit were grouped. No differences were found either in richness or Shannon index as diversity indexes. Although the primer sets used was developed to investigate rumen methanogenic archaeal community, primers specificity did not affect the assessment of rabbit methanogen community structure. Rumen content showed the highest number or methanogenic archaea (log₁₀ 9.36), followed by faeces (log₁₀ 8.52) and showing rabbit caecum the lower values (log₁₀ 5.52). DGGE profile showed that pre-gastric and hindgut fermenters hold a very different methanogen community. Rabbits hold a microbial community of similar complexity than that in ruminants but less abundant, which agrees with the type of fermentation profile.

  8. Colonization of rice roots with methanogenic archaea controls photosynthesis-derived methane emission.

    PubMed

    Pump, Judith; Pratscher, Jennifer; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The methane emitted from rice fields originates to a large part (up to 60%) from plant photosynthesis and is formed on the rice roots by methanogenic archaea. To investigate to which extent root colonization controls methane (CH4 ) emission, we pulse-labeled rice microcosms with (13) CO2 to determine the rates of (13) CH4 emission exclusively derived from photosynthates. We also measured emission of total CH4 ((12+13) CH4 ), which was largely produced in the soil. The total abundances of archaea and methanogens on the roots and in the soil were analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene and the mcrA gene coding for a subunit of the methyl coenzyme M reductase respectively. The composition of archaeal and methanogenic communities was determined with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). During the vegetative growth stages, emission rates of (13) CH4 linearly increased with the abundance of methanogenic archaea on the roots and then decreased during the last plant growth stage. Rates of (13) CH4 emission and the abundance of methanogenic archaea were lower when the rice was grown in quartz-vermiculite with only 10% rice soil. Rates of total CH4 emission were not systematically related to the abundance of methanogenic archaea in soil plus roots. The composition of the archaeal communities was similar under all conditions; however, the analysis of mcrA genes indicated that the methanogens differed between the soil and root. Our results support the hypothesis that rates of photosynthesis-driven CH4 emission are limited by the abundance of methanogens on the roots.

  9. Assessment of active methanogenic archaea in a methanol-fed upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Cerrillo, Míriam; Morey, Lluís; Viñas, Marc; Bonmatí, August

    2016-12-01

    Methanogenic archaea enrichment of a granular sludge was undertaken in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor fed with methanol in order to enrich methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic populations. A microbial community assessment, in terms of microbial composition and activity-throughout the different stages of the feeding process with methanol and acetate-was performed using specific methanogenic activity (SMA) assays, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and high-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from DNA and complementary DNA (cDNA). Distinct methanogenic enrichment was revealed by qPCR of mcrA gene in the methanol-fed community, being two orders of magnitude higher with respect to the initial inoculum, achieving a final mcrA/16S rRNA ratio of 0.25. High-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that the resulting methanogenic population was mainly composed by methylotrophic archaea (Methanomethylovorans and Methanolobus genus), being also highly active according to the RNA-based assessment. SMA confirmed that the methylotrophic pathway, with a direct conversion of methanol to CH4, was the main step of methanol degradation in the UASB. The biomass from the UASB, enriched in methanogenic archaea, may bear great potential as additional inoculum for bioreactors to carry out biogas production and other related processes.

  10. Methanogenic archaea in marcellus shale: a possible mechanism for enhanced gas recovery in unconventional shale resources.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Yael Tarlovsky; Kotcon, James; Mroz, Thomas

    2015-06-02

    Marcellus Shale occurs at depths of 1.5-2.5 km (5000 to 8000 feet) where most geologists generally assume that thermogenic processes are the only source of natural gas. However, methanogens in produced fluids and isotopic signatures of biogenic methane in this deep shale have recently been discovered. This study explores whether those methanogens are indigenous to the shale or are introduced during drilling and hydraulic fracturing. DNA was extracted from Marcellus Shale core samples, preinjected fluids, and produced fluids and was analyzed using Miseq sequencing of 16s rRNA genes. Methanogens present in shale cores were similar to methanogens in produced fluids. No methanogens were detected in injected fluids, suggesting that this is an unlikely source and that they may be native to the shale itself. Bench-top methane production tests of shale core and produced fluids suggest that these organisms are alive and active under simulated reservoir conditions. Growth conditions designed to simulate the hydrofracture processes indicated somewhat increased methane production; however, fluids alone produced relatively little methane. Together, these results suggest that some biogenic methane may be produced in these wells and that hydrofracture fluids currently used to stimulate gas recovery could stimulate methanogens and their rate of producing methane.

  11. Methanogen communities and Bacteria along an ecohydrological gradient in a northern raised bog complex.

    PubMed

    Juottonen, Heli; Galand, Pierre E; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Laine, Jukka; Fritze, Hannu; Yrjälä, Kim

    2005-10-01

    Mires forming an ecohydrological gradient from nutrient-rich, groundwater-fed mesotrophic and oligotrophic fens to a nutrient-poor ombrotrophic bog were studied by comparing potential methane (CH(4)) production and methanogenic microbial communities. Methane production was measured from different depths of anoxic peat and methanogen communities were detected by detailed restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of clone libraries, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Potential CH(4) production changed along the ecohydrological gradient with the fens displaying much higher production than the ombrotrophic bog. Methanogen diversity also decreased along the gradient. The two fens had very similar diversity of methanogenic methyl-coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA), but in the upper layer of the bog the methanogen diversity was strikingly lower, and only one type of mcrA sequence was retrieved. It was related to the Fen cluster, a group of novel methanogenic sequences found earlier in Finnish mires. Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences from the fens fell into at least nine phyla, but only four phyla were retrieved from the bog. The most common bacterial groups were Deltaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Acidobacteria.

  12. Methanogenic Oil Degradation in the Dagang Oil Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Núria; Cai, Minmin; Straaten, Nontje; Yao, Jun; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation is one of the main in situ oil transformation processes in subsurface oil reservoirs. Recent studies have provided evidence of biodegradation of residual oil constituents under methanogenic conditions. Methane, like other biogenic gases, may contribute to reduce the viscosity of oil and enhance its flow characteristics (making it more available) but it can also be used as a energy source. So the aim of the present study was to provide reliable information on in situ biotransformation of oil under methanogenic conditions, and to assess the feasibility of implementing a MEOR strategy at this site. For this reason, chemical and isotopic analyses of injection and production fluids of the Dagang oil field (Hebei province, China) were performed. Microbial abundances were assessed by qPCR, and clone libraries were performed to study the diversity. In addition, microcosms with either oil or 13C-labelled hydrocarbons were inoculated with injection or production waters to characterize microbial processes in vitro. Geochemical and isotopic data were consistent with in situ biogenic methane production linked to aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation: GC-MS profiles of petroleum samples were nearly devoid of n-alkanes, linear alkylbenzenes, and alkyltoluenes, and light PAH, confirming that Dagang oil is mostly highly weathered. In addition, carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane (δ13CCH4 and δDCH4, respectively), and the bulk isotopic discrimination (Δδ13C) between methane and CO2 (between 32 and 65 ) were in accordance with previously reported values for methane formation during hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, methane-producing Archaea and hydrocarbon-degrading Bacteria were abundant in produced oil-water samples. On the other hand, our laboratory degradation experiments revealed that autochthonous microbiota are capable of significantly degrade oil within several months, with biodegradation patterns resembling those

  13. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L; Almquist, Catherine B; Briggs, Brandon R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70°C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr(6+) concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr(6+) concentrations with the 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr(6+) solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr(6+) concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr(6+) to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr(6+) concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr(6+) bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr(6+) from 13.3 to1.9 µM h(-1). X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr(6+) to insoluble Cr(3+) precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr(3+). Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr(6+) exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr(6+) to less toxic Cr(3+) and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially

  14. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70°C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations with the 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to1.9 µM h−1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature

  15. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70 °C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to 1.9 μM h-1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature subsurface radioactive waste disposal

  16. Novel Syntrophic Populations Dominate an Ammonia-Tolerant Methanogenic Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Frank, J. A.; Arntzen, M. Ø.; Sun, L.; Hagen, L. H.; McHardy, A. C.; Horn, S. J.; Eijsink, V. G. H.; Schnürer, A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biogas reactors operating with protein-rich substrates have high methane potential and industrial value; however, they are highly susceptible to process failure because of the accumulation of ammonia. High ammonia levels cause a decline in acetate-utilizing methanogens and instead promote the conversion of acetate via a two-step mechanism involving syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) to H2 and CO2, followed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Despite the key role of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB), only a few culturable representatives have been characterized. Here we show that the microbiome of a commercial, ammonia-tolerant biogas reactor harbors a deeply branched, uncultured phylotype (unFirm_1) accounting for approximately 5% of the 16S rRNA gene inventory and sharing 88% 16S rRNA gene identity with its closest characterized relative. Reconstructed genome and quantitative metaproteomic analyses imply unFirm_1’s metabolic dominance and SAO capabilities, whereby the key enzymes required for acetate oxidation are among the most highly detected in the reactor microbiome. While culturable SAOB were identified in genomic analyses of the reactor, their limited proteomic representation suggests that unFirm_1 plays an important role in channeling acetate toward methane. Notably, unFirm_1-like populations were found in other high-ammonia biogas installations, conjecturing a broader importance for this novel clade of SAOB in anaerobic fermentations. IMPORTANCE The microbial production of methane or “biogas” is an attractive renewable energy technology that can recycle organic waste into biofuel. Biogas reactors operating with protein-rich substrates such as household municipal or agricultural wastes have significant industrial and societal value; however, they are highly unstable and frequently collapse due to the accumulation of ammonia. We report the discovery of a novel uncultured phylotype (unFirm_1) that is highly detectable in

  17. Relationship between Trophic Status and Methanogenic Pathways in Alaskan Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, X.; Sidelinger, W.; Wang, Y.; Hines, M. E.; Langford, L.; Chanton, J.

    2015-12-01

    To improve predictions of naturally emitted CH4 from northern wetlands, it is necessary to further examine the methanogenic pathways in these wetlands. Stable isotope C ratios (δ13C) have been used as a robust tool to distinguish different pathways, but different sources of parent compounds (acetate and CO2) with unique δ13C may add complexity to previously established criteria. Large portions of peatlands accommodate a mixture of different sphagna and sedges. Plant species may look very similar and belong to the same genus but are different morphologically and physiologically. To better understand the relationships between surface vegetation patterns and methanogenic pathways, 26 peatland sites were studied in Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska in summers of 2014 and 2015. These sites were ordinated using multiple factor analysis into 3 clusters based on pH, temp, CH4 and volatile fatty acids production rates, δ13C values, and surface vegetation species/pattern. In the low-pH trophic cluster (pH~3.5), non-vascular/vascular plant ratios (NV/V) were ~ 0.87 and dominated by diverse Sphagnum species and specific sedges (Eriophorum vaginatum), and fermentation was the dominant end-point in decomposition with no CH4 detected. Although NV/V is about the same in the intermediate cluster (0.74) (pH~4.5), and Sphagnum squarrosum was largely present, both hydrogenotrophic (HM) and acetoclastic methanogenesis (AM) were very active. Syntrophy was present at certain sites, which may provide CO2 with unique δ13C for CH4 production. At the highest pH trophic cluster examined in this study (pH~5), non-vascular plants were almost not existent and Carex aquatilis dominated. CH4 production rates (mainly HM) were slower than those in the intermediate cluster and the apparent fractionation factor a was lower than in the sites with syntrophy, which warrants further investigation of the position and compound specific δ13C analysis of volatile fatty acids.

  18. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2014-10-22

    Despite the significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70°C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations with the 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to1.9 μM h₋1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of

  19. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; ...

    2014-10-22

    Despite the significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70°C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations with the 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions bymore » this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to1.9 μM h₋1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature

  20. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  1. A Methanogenic Origin for Molybdenum-Nitrogenase (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, E.; Miller, S.; Hamilton, T.; Lavin, M.; Peters, J.

    2009-12-01

    The taxonomic distribution and phylogenetic relationships of proteins required for molybdenum (Mo)-nitrogenase that arose by gene fusion and duplication reveals that Mo-nitrogenase was not associated with LUCA, but rather emerged in the strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea and was acquired in bacteria via lateral gene transfer in an anoxic environment. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Mo-nitrogenase emerged early during the evolution of life, perhaps prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis. To test this hypothesis, we examined the evolutionary relationships of paralogous proteins required for the biosynthesis of the nitrogenase active site cofactor and bacteriochlorophyll (Bch), which indicated that Mo-nitrogenase predates the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis. Importantly, the age of nodes delineating the major diversification of Mo-dependent nitrogenase is similar to the maximum age for the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, suggesting that the diversification of Mo-nitrogenase may have been promoted by the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, most likely through the widespread oxidation of Mo-sulfides and subsequent increases in Mo bioavailability. These findings imply that Mo-dependent biological nitrogen fixation emerged prior to the transition from the Archean to the Proterozoic and the widespread oxidation of the atmosphere and ocean. Further, the results imply that the emergence and evolution of biological nitrogen fixation is closely tied to the evolution of the redox of the global biosphere.

  2. Conversion and toxicity characteristics of formaldehyde in acetoclastic methanogenic sludge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, G; Kleerebezem, R; Lettinga, G

    2002-08-05

    An unadapted mixed methanogenic sludge transformed formaldehyde into methanol and formate. The methanol to formate ratio obtained was 1:1. Formaldehyde conversion proceeded without any lag phase, suggesting the constitutive character of the formaldehyde conversion enzymes involved. Because the rate of formaldehyde conversion declined at increased formaldehyde additions, we hypothesized that some enzymes and/or cofactors might become denatured as a result of the excess of formaldehyde. Furthermore, formaldehyde was found to be toxic to acetoclastic methanogenesis in a dual character. Formaldehyde toxicity was partly reversible because once the formaldehyde concentration was extremely low or virtually removed from the system, the methane production rate was partially recovered. Because the degree of this recovery was not complete, we conclude that formaldehyde toxicity was partly irreversible as well. The irreversible toxicity likely can be attributed to biomass formaldehyde-related decay. Independent of the mode of formaldehyde addition (i.e., slug or continuous), the irreversible toxicity was dependent on the total amount of formaldehyde added to the system. This finding suggests that to treat formaldehyde-containing waste streams, a balance between formaldehyde-related decay and biomass growth should be attained.

  3. Reactor performance of a 750 m(3) anaerobic digestion plant: varied substrate input conditions impacting methanogenic community.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas Otto; Malin, Cornelia; Lins, Philipp; Gstraunthaler, Gudrun; Illmer, Paul

    2014-10-01

    A 750 m(3) anaerobic digester was studied over a half year period including a shift from good reactor performance to a reduced one. Various abiotic parameters like volatile fatty acids (VFA) (formic-, acetic-, propionic-, (iso-)butyric-, (iso-)valeric-, lactic acid), total C, total N, NH4 -N, and total proteins, as well as the organic matter content and dry mass were determined. In addition several process parameters such as temperature, pH, retention time and input of substrate and the concentrations of CH4, H2, CO2 and H2S within the reactor were monitored continuously. The present study aimed at the investigation of the abundance of acetogens and total cell numbers and the microbial methanogenic community as derived from PCR-dHPLC analysis in order to put it into context with the determined abiotic parameters. An influence of substrate quantity on the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process was found as well as a shift from a hydrogenotrophic in times of good reactor performance towards an acetoclastic dominated methanogenic community in times of reduced reactor performance. After the change in substrate conditions it took the methano-archaeal community about 5-6 weeks to be affected but then changes occurred quickly.

  4. Cultivation of parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Parasite cultivation techniques constitute a substantial segment of present-day study of parasites, especially of protozoa. Success in establishing in vitro and in vivo culture of parasites not only allows their physiology, behavior and metabolism to be studied dynamically, but also allows the nature of the antigenic molecules in the excretory and secretory products to be vigorously pursued and analyzed. The complex life-cycles of various parasites having different stages and host species requirements, particularly in the case of parasitic helminths, often make parasite cultivation an uphill assignment. Culturing of parasites depends on the combined expertise of all types of microbiological cultures. Different parasites require different cultivation conditions such as nutrients, temperature and even incubation conditions. Cultivation is an important method for diagnosis of many clinically important parasites, for example, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, Leishmania spp., Strongyloides stercoralis and free-living amoebae. Many commercial systems like InPouch TV for T. vaginalis, microaerophilous stationary phase culture for Babesia bovis and Harada-Mori culture technique for larval-stage nematodes have been developed for the rapid diagnosis of the parasitic infections. Cultivation also has immense utility in the production of vaccines, testing vaccine efficacy, and antigen - production for obtaining serological reagents, detection of drug-resistance, screening of potential therapeutic agents and conducting epidemiological studies. Though in vitro cultivation techniques are used more often compared with in vivo techniques, the in vivo techniques are sometimes used for diagnosing some parasitic infections such as trypanosomiasis and toxoplasmosis. Parasite cultivation continues to be a challenging diagnostic option. This review provides an overview of intricacies of parasitic culture and update on popular methods used for cultivating parasites. PMID

  5. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes.

    PubMed

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-11-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella.

  6. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars. PMID:27682103

  7. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-09-09

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2(T) M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth's subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  8. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-01-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella. PMID:21914097

  9. Substrate sources regulate spatial variation of metabolically active methanogens from two contrasting freshwater wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongxin; Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Kang, Hojeong; Freeman, Chris; Yuan, Junji; Xiang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    There is ample evidence that methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetlands exhibit large spatial variations at a field scale. However, little is known about the metabolically active methanogens mediating these differences. We explored the spatial patterns in active methanogens of summer inundated Calamagrostis angustifolia marsh with low CH4 emissions and permanently inundated Carex lasiocarpa marsh with high CH4 emissions in Sanjiang Plain, China. In C. angustifolia marsh, the addition of (13)C-acetate significantly increased the CH4 production rate, and Methanosarcinaceae methanogens were found to participate in the consumption of acetate. In C. lasiocarpa marsh, there was no apparent increase in the CH4 production rate and no methanogen species were labeled with (13)C. When (13)CO2-H2 was added, however, CH4 production was found to be due to Fen Cluster (Methanomicrobiales) in C. angustifolia marsh and Methanobacterium Cluster B (Methanobacteriaceae) together with Fen Cluster in C. lasiocarpa marsh. These results suggested that CH4 was produced primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogens using substrates mainly derived from plant litter in C. lasiocarpa marsh and by both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens using substrates mainly derived from root exudate in C. angustifolia marsh. The significantly lower CH4 emissions measured in situ in C. angustifolia marsh was primarily due to a deficiency of substrates compared to C. lasiocarpa marsh. Therefore, we speculate that the substrate source regulates both the type of active methanogens and the CH4 production pathway and consequently contributes to the spatial variations in CH4 productions observed in these freshwater marshes.

  10. [Phylogenetic analysis of methanogenic corn stalk degrading microbial communities].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jiang-Tao; Guo, Rong-Bo; Yuan, Xian-Zheng; Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Qiu, Yan-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Methanogenic corn stalk degrading enrichment cultures were constructed using corn stalk as the sole carbon source and eight types of environmental samples as inocula. All the cultures could degrade corn stalk within 30-50 days and the total solids (TS) removal rates were in the range of 30%-40%. In six out of eight cultures, the cumulative methane yields per gram TS were 62.1-118.4 mL x g(-1), with acetate, propionate and butyrate as the major volatile fatty acids (100-500 mg x L(-1)), and the final pH were 6.5-6.7. In the other two cultures, the cumulative methane yields per gram TS were 8.5-9.7 mL xg(-1), while the concentrations of acetate were high (1200 mg x L(-1)), and the final pH were low (5.6-5.9). The bacterial and archaeal structures in eight enrichments were investigated with a 16S rRNA genes-based clone library method. Clones belonging to the bacterial phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Synergistetes and Thermotogae were observed in abundance within the bacterial clone libraries, which accounted for 37.8%, 34.3%, 11.6% and 6.4% of the total number of bacterial clones, respectively. Within the domain Archaea, clones affiliated with the classes Methanomicrobia and Methanobacteria were found to be abundant in the archaeal clone libraries, which accounted for 61.1% and 38.9% of the total number of archaeal clones, respectively.

  11. Transduction-Like Gene Transfer in the Methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 × 10−5 (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10−3 (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae. PMID:10321998

  12. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  13. Methanogenic degradation of lignin-derived monoaromatic compounds by microbial enrichments from rice paddy field soil.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro; Chino, Kanako; Kamimura, Naofumi; Masai, Eiji; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-09-24

    Anaerobic degradation of lignin-derived aromatics is an important metabolism for carbon and nutrient cycles in soil environments. Although there are some studies on degradation of lignin-derived aromatics by nitrate- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, knowledge on their degradation under methanogenic conditions are quite limited. In this study, methanogenic microbial communities were enriched from rice paddy field soil with lignin-derived methoxylated monoaromatics (vanillate and syringate) and their degradation intermediates (protocatechuate, catechol, and gallate) as the sole carbon and energy sources. Archaeal community analysis disclosed that both aceticlastic (Methanosarcina sp.) and hydrogenotrophic (Methanoculleus sp. and Methanocella sp.) methanogens dominated in all of the enrichments. Bacterial community analysis revealed the dominance of acetogenic bacteria (Sporomusa spp.) only in the enrichments on the methoxylated aromatics, suggesting that Sporomusa spp. initially convert vanillate and syringate into protocatechuate and gallate, respectively, with acetogenesis via O-demethylation. As the putative ring-cleavage microbes, bacteria within the phylum Firmicutes were dominantly detected from all of the enrichments, while the dominant phylotypes were not identical between enrichments on vanillate/protocatechuate/catechol (family Peptococcaceae bacteria) and on syringate/gallate (family Ruminococcaceae bacteria). This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation among acetogens, ring-cleaving fermenters/syntrophs and aceticlastic/hydrogenotrophic methanogens for degradation of lignin-derived aromatics under methanogenic conditions.

  14. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  15. Rumen microbial diversity in Svalbard reindeer, with particular emphasis on methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Monica A; Edwards, Joan E; Cheng, Yan Fen; Senosiain, Roberto S; Fraile, Maria N; Northwood, Korinne S; Praesteng, Kirsti E; Glad, Trine; Mathiesen, Svein D; Wright, André-Denis G

    2009-12-01

    Ruminal methanogens, bacteria and ciliate protozoa of Svalbard reindeer grazing natural pastures in October (late fall) and April (late winter) were investigated using molecular-based approaches. The appetite of the Svalbard reindeer peaks in August (summer) and is at its lowest in March (winter). Microbial numbers, quantified by real-time PCR, did not change significantly between October and April, when food intakes are at similar levels, although the numbers of methanogens tended to be higher in October (P=0.074), and ciliate numbers tended to be higher in April (P=0.055). Similarly, no change was detected in the bacterial and protozoal population composition by rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. Dominant methanogens were identified using a 16S rRNA gene library (97 clones) prepared from pooled PCR products from reindeer on October pasture (n=5). Eleven of the 22 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) generated exhibited a high degree of sequence similarity to methanogens affiliated with Methanobacteriales (eight OTUs), Methanomicrobiales (one OTU) and Methanosarcinales (two OTUs). The remaining 11 OTUs (53% of the clones) were associated with a cluster of uncultivated ruminal archaea. This study has provided important insights into the rumen microbiome of a high-arctic herbivorous animal living under harsh nutritional conditions, and evidence suggesting that host type affects the population size of ruminal methanogens.

  16. Methanogenic degradation of lignin-derived monoaromatic compounds by microbial enrichments from rice paddy field soil

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro; Chino, Kanako; Kamimura, Naofumi; Masai, Eiji; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of lignin-derived aromatics is an important metabolism for carbon and nutrient cycles in soil environments. Although there are some studies on degradation of lignin-derived aromatics by nitrate- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, knowledge on their degradation under methanogenic conditions are quite limited. In this study, methanogenic microbial communities were enriched from rice paddy field soil with lignin-derived methoxylated monoaromatics (vanillate and syringate) and their degradation intermediates (protocatechuate, catechol, and gallate) as the sole carbon and energy sources. Archaeal community analysis disclosed that both aceticlastic (Methanosarcina sp.) and hydrogenotrophic (Methanoculleus sp. and Methanocella sp.) methanogens dominated in all of the enrichments. Bacterial community analysis revealed the dominance of acetogenic bacteria (Sporomusa spp.) only in the enrichments on the methoxylated aromatics, suggesting that Sporomusa spp. initially convert vanillate and syringate into protocatechuate and gallate, respectively, with acetogenesis via O-demethylation. As the putative ring-cleavage microbes, bacteria within the phylum Firmicutes were dominantly detected from all of the enrichments, while the dominant phylotypes were not identical between enrichments on vanillate/protocatechuate/catechol (family Peptococcaceae bacteria) and on syringate/gallate (family Ruminococcaceae bacteria). This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation among acetogens, ring-cleaving fermenters/syntrophs and aceticlastic/hydrogenotrophic methanogens for degradation of lignin-derived aromatics under methanogenic conditions. PMID:26399549

  17. Methanogenic activity and diversity in the centre of the Amsterdam Mud Volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; John Parkes, R; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stephane; Toffin, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    Marine mud volcanoes are geological structures emitting large amounts of methane from their active centres. The Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV), located in the Anaximander Mountains south of Turkey, is characterized by intense active methane seepage produced in part by methanogens. To date, information about the diversity or the metabolic pathways used by the methanogens in active centres of marine mud volcanoes is limited. (14)C-radiotracer measurements showed that methylamines/methanol, H(2)/CO(2) and acetate were used for methanogenesis in the AMV. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was measured all along the sediment core, Methanosarcinales affiliated sequences were detected using archaeal 16S PCR-DGGE and mcrA gene libraries, and enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of Methanococcoides in the shallow sediment layers. Overall acetoclastic methanogenesis was higher than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which is unusual for cold seep sediments. Interestingly, acetate porewater concentrations were extremely high in the AMV sediments. This might be the result of organic matter cracking in deeper hotter sediment layers. Methane was also produced from hexadecanes. For the most part, the methanogenic community diversity was in accordance with the depth distribution of the H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis. These results demonstrate the importance of methanogenic communities in the centres of marine mud volcanoes.

  18. Geographical Distribution of Methanogenic Archaea in Nine Representative Paddy Soils in China

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Qianhui; Zhong, Linghao; Deng, Ye; Shi, Yu; Wang, Baozhan; Jia, Zhongjun; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi

    2016-01-01

    Paddy field methanogenic archaea are responsible for methane (CH4) production and contribute significantly to climate change. The information regarding the spatial variations in the abundance, the diversity and the composition of such ecologically important microbes, however, is quite limited at large scale. In this investigation, we studied the abundance, alpha diversity and geographical distribution of methanogenic archaeal communities in nine representative paddy sites, along a large latitudinal gradient in China, using pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR. It is found that all paddy soils harbor constant methanogenic archaeal constituents, which is dominated by family Methanocellaceae (37.3%), Methanobacteriaceae (22.1%), Methanosaetaceae (17.2%), and Methanosarcinaceae (9.8%). Methanogenic archaeal abundance is primarily influenced by soil C (R = 0.612, P = 0.001) and N (R = 0.673, P = 0.001) contents, as well as alpha diversity by soil pH (PD: R = -0.552, P = 0.006; Chao1: R = -0.615, P = 0.002). Further exploration revealed that both spatial distance (R = 0.3469, P = 0.001, partial mental test) and soil chemical variables mainly about soil C and N (R = 0.2847, P = 0.001) are the two major factors affecting methanogenic archaeal community composition distribution in paddy soils. This finding will allow us to develop a better picture of the biogeographic ranges of these ecologically important microbes and get deeper insights into their ecology. PMID:27679621

  19. Spatial structure and persistence of methanogen populations in humic bog lakes.

    PubMed

    Milferstedt, Kim; Youngblut, Nicholas D; Whitaker, Rachel J

    2010-06-01

    Patterns of diversity within methanogenic archaea in humic bog lakes are quantified over time and space to determine the roles that spatial isolation and seasonal mixing play in structuring microbial populations. The protein encoding gene mcrA is used as a molecular marker for the detection of fine-scale differences between methanogens in four dimictic bog lakes in which the water column is mixed twice a year and one meromictic lake that is permanently stratified. Although similar sequences are observed in each bog lake, each lake has its own characteristic set of persisting sequence types, indicating that methanogen populations are delimited either by low migration between the anaerobic hypolimnia or by lake-specific selection. The meromictic lake is differentiated from all other lakes and contains sequences with a higher degree of microdiversity than the dimictic lakes. By relating the structure of diversity to the depth of each bog lake, we propose the hypothesis that the deeper parts of the water column favor microdiversification of methanogens, whereas the periodically disturbed water column of shallower dimictic lakes promote genetically more diverse methanogen communities.

  20. Distinguishing activity decay and cell death from bacterial decay for two types of methanogens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Cai, Zhengqing; Fu, Kunming; Zhao, Dongye

    2012-03-15

    As bacterial decay consists of cell death and activity decay, and the corresponding information about AOB/NOB, OHO, PAOs and GAOs has been experimentally acquired, another functional type of bacteria in biological wastewater treatment, methanogens, remains to be investigated, to gather the same information, which is extremely important for such bacteria with low growth rates. With successfully selection and enrichment of both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and by means of measuring specific methane activity (SMA) and hydrogen consumption rate (HCR), a series of decay experiments and molecular techniques such as FISH verification and LIVE/DEAD staining revealed, identified and calculated the decay and death rates of both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens respectively. The results indicated that the decay rates of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were 0.070 and 0.034 d(-1) respectively, and the death rates were thus calculated at 0.022 and 0.016 d(-1) respectively. For this reason, cell deaths were only responsible for 31% and 47% of the total bacterial decay of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and activity decays actually contributed significantly to the total bacterial decay, respectively at 69% and 53%.

  1. Precipitation of low-temperature dolomite from an anaerobic microbial consortium: the role of methanogenic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Kenward, P A; Goldstein, R H; González, L A; Roberts, J A

    2009-12-01

    Here we report precipitation of dolomite at low temperature (30 degrees C) mediated by a mixed anaerobic microbial consortium composed of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB), fermenters, and methanogens. Initial solution geochemistry is controlled by DIRB, but after 90 days shifts to a system dominated by methanogens. In live experiments conditions are initially saturated with respect to dolomite (Omega(dol) = 19.40) and increase by two orders of magnitude (Omega(dol) = 2 330.77) only after the onset of methanogenesis, as judged by the increasing [CH(4)] and the detection of methanogenic micro-organisms. We identify ordered dolomite in live microcosms after 90 days via powder X-ray diffraction, while sterile controls precipitate only calcite. Scanning electron microscopy and transmitted electron microscopy demonstrate that the precipitated dolomite is closely associated with cell walls and putative extra-cellular polysaccharides. Headspace gas measurements and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis confirm the presence of both autotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens and exclude the presence of DIRB and sulfate-reducing bacteria after dolomite begins forming. Furthermore, the absence of dolomite in the controls and prior to methanogenesis confirm that methanogenic Archaea are necessary for the low-temperature precipitation of dolomite under the experimental conditions tested.

  2. Reduction of humic substances by halorespiring, sulphate-reducing and methanogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco J; de Bok, Frank A M; Duong-Dac, Tuan; Stams, Alfons J M; Lettinga, Gatze; Field, Jim A

    2002-01-01

    Physiologically distinct anaerobic microorganisms were explored for their ability to oxidize different substrates with humic acids or the humic analogue, anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate (AQDS), as a terminal electron acceptor. Most of the microorganisms evaluated including, for example, the halorespiring bacterium, Desulfitobacterium PCE1, the sulphate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio G11 and the methanogenic archaeon, Methanospirillum hungatei JF1, could oxidize hydrogen linked to the reduction of humic acids or AQDS. Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans and Desulfitobacterium PCE1 could also convert lactate to acetate linked to the reduction of humic substances. Humus served as a terminal electron acceptor supporting growth of Desulfitobacterium species, which may explain the recovery of these microorganisms from organic rich environments in which the presence of chlorinated pollutants or sulphite is not expected. The results suggest that the ubiquity of humus reduction found in many different environments may be as a result of the increasing number of anaerobic microorganisms, which are known to be able to reduce humic substances.

  3. Analysis of dsDNA and RNA viromes in methanogenic digesters reveals novel viral genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Calusinska, Magdalena; Marynowska, Martyna; Goux, Xavier; Lentzen, Esther; Delfosse, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Although viruses are not the key players of the anaerobic digestion process, they may affect the dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations involved in biogas production. Until now viruses have received very little attention in this specific habitat; therefore, as a first step towards their characterization, we optimized a virus filtration protocol from anaerobic sludge. Afterwards, to assess dsDNA and RNA viral diversity in sludge samples from nine different reactors fed either with waste water, agricultural residues or solid municipal waste plus agro-food residues, we performed metagenomic analyses. As a result we showed that, while the dsDNA viromes (21 assigned families in total) were dominated by dsDNA phages of the order Caudovirales, RNA viruses (14 assigned families in total) were less diverse and were for the main part plant-infecting viruses. Interestingly, less than 2% of annotated contigs were assigned as putative human and animal pathogens. Our study greatly extends the existing view of viral genetic diversity in methanogenic reactors and shows that these viral assemblages are distinct not only among the reactor types but also from nearly 30 other environments already studied, including the human gut, fermented food, deep sea sediments and other aquatic habitats.

  4. Methanosarcina baltica, sp. nov., a novel methanogen isolated from the Gotland Deep of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    von Klein, Dominique; Arab, Hocine; Völker, Horst; Thomm, Michael

    2002-04-01

    A novel methanogen, Methanosarcina baltica GS1-AT, DSM 14042, JCM 11281, was isolated from sediment at a depth of 241 m in the Gotland Deep of the Baltic Sea. Cells were irregular, monopolar monotrichous flagellated cocci 1.5-3 microm in diameter often occurring in pairs or tetrads. The catabolic substrates used included methanol, methylated amines, and acetate, but not formate or H2/CO2. Growth was observed in a temperature range between 4 degrees and 27 degrees C with an optimum at 25 degrees C. The doubling time with methanol as substrate was 84 h at 25 degrees C, 120 h at 9 degrees C, and 167 h at 4 degrees C. The doubling time with acetate as substrate was 252 h at 25 degrees C and 425 h at 20 degrees C. After the transfer of methanol-grown cultures, long lag phases were observed that lasted 15-20 days at 25 degrees C and 25 days at 4 degrees -9 degrees C. The NaCl optimum for growth was 2%-4%, and the fastest growth occurred within a pH range of 6.5-7.5. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed that the strain was phylogenetically related to Methanosarcina. The sequence similarity to described species of <95.7% and its physiological properties distinguished strain GS1-A(T) from all described species of the genus Methanosarcina.

  5. Methanofollis aquaemaris sp. nov., a methanogen isolated from an aquaculture fish pond.

    PubMed

    Lai, M C; Chen, S C

    2001-09-01

    A novel methanogen, designated strain N2F9704T, was isolated from an aquaculture fish pond near Wang-gong, Taiwan. The cells were irregular cocci, non-motile, 1.2-2.0 microm in diameter and stained gram-negative. Cells of strain N2F9704T lysed easily by SDS treatment (0.1 g l(-1)) and the S-layer protein had an Mr of 137000. The catabolic substrates used included formate and H2+CO2, but not acetate, methanol, trimethylamine or secondary alcohols. The optimal growth parameters for strain N2F9704T were pH 6.5, 37 degrees C with 0.5% NaCl. Trace amounts of tungstate not only promoted growth but also extended the range of growth conditions. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a phylogenetic relationship to Methanofollis species and the name Methanofollis aquaemaris sp. nov. is therefore proposed for strain N2F9704T (= OCM 746T = CCRC 16166T). Additionally, the strain was infected with a novel coccus-shaped, enveloped virus with a diameter of 200 nm.

  6. Distribution of Sulfate-Reducing and Methanogenic Bacteria in Anaerobic Aggregates Determined by Microsensor and Molecular Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Santegoeds, Cecilia M.; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Hesselink, Gijs; Zopfi, Jakob; Lens, Piet; Muyzer, Gerard; de Beer, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    Using molecular techniques and microsensors for H2S and CH4, we studied the population structure of and the activity distribution in anaerobic aggregates. The aggregates originated from three different types of reactors: a methanogenic reactor, a methanogenic-sulfidogenic reactor, and a sulfidogenic reactor. Microsensor measurements in methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates revealed that the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (2 to 3 mmol of S2− m−3 s−1 or 2 × 10−9 mmol s−1 per aggregate) was located in a surface layer of 50 to 100 μm thick. The sulfidogenic aggregates contained a wider sulfate-reducing zone (the first 200 to 300 μm from the aggregate surface) with a higher activity (1 to 6 mmol of S2− m−3 s−1 or 7 × 10−9 mol s−1 per aggregate). The methanogenic aggregates did not show significant sulfate-reducing activity. Methanogenic activity in the methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates (1 to 2 mmol of CH4 m−3 s−1 or 10−9 mmol s−1 per aggregate) and the methanogenic aggregates (2 to 4 mmol of CH4 m−3 s−1 or 5 × 10−9 mmol s−1 per aggregate) was located more inward, starting at ca. 100 μm from the aggregate surface. The methanogenic activity was not affected by 10 mM sulfate during a 1-day incubation. The sulfidogenic and methanogenic activities were independent of the type of electron donor (acetate, propionate, ethanol, or H2), but the substrates were metabolized in different zones. The localization of the populations corresponded to the microsensor data. A distinct layered structure was found in the methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates, with sulfate-reducing bacteria in the outer 50 to 100 μm, methanogens in the inner part, and Eubacteria spp. (partly syntrophic bacteria) filling the gap between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria. In methanogenic aggregates, few sulfate-reducing bacteria were detected, while methanogens were found in the core. In the sulfidogenic aggregates, sulfate-reducing bacteria were

  7. Fundamentals of methanogenic pathways that are key to the biomethanation of complex biomass

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, James G

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to CH4 (biomethanation) involves an anaerobic microbial food chain composed of at least three metabolic groups of which the first two decompose the complex biomass primarily to acetate, formate, and H2. The thermodynamics of these conversions are unfavorable requiring a symbiosis with the CH4-producing group (methanogens) that metabolize the decomposition products to favorable concentrations. The methanogens produce CH4 by two major pathways, conversion of the methyl group of acetate and reduction of CO2 coupled to the oxidation of formate or H2. This review covers recent advances in the fundamental understanding of both methanogenic pathways with the view of stimulating research towards improving the rate and reliability of the overall biomethanation process. PMID:21555213

  8. Factors influencing the degradation of garbage in methanogenic bioreactors and impacts on biogas formation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masahiko; Sasaki, Kengo

    2012-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of garbage is attracting much attention because of its application in waste volume reduction and the recovery of biogas for use as an energy source. In this review, various factors influencing the degradation of garbage and the production of biogas are discussed. The surface hydrophobicity and porosity of supporting materials are important factors in retaining microorganisms such as aceticlastic methanogens and in attaining a higher degradation of garbage and a higher production of biogas. Ammonia concentration, changes in environmental parameters such as temperature and pH, and adaptation of microbial community to ammonia have been related to ammonia inhibition. The effects of drawing electrons from the methanogenic community and donating electrons into the methanogenic community on methane production have been shown in microbial fuel cells and bioelectrochemical reactors. The influences of trace elements, phase separation, and co-digestion are also summarized in this review.

  9. Fermentation Enhancement of Methanogenic Archaea Consortia from an Illinois Basin Coalbed via DOL Emulsion Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Peng, Su-Ping; Wang, En-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Microbially enhanced coalbed methane technology must be used to increase the methane content in mining and generate secondary biogenic gas. In this technology, the metabolic processes of methanogenic consortia are the basis for the production of biomethane from some of the organic compounds in coal. Thus, culture nutrition plays an important role in remediating the nutritional deficiency of a coal seam. To enhance the methane production rates for microorganism consortia, different types of nutrition solutions were examined in this study. Emulsion nutrition solutions containing a novel nutritional supplement, called dystrophy optional modification latex, increased the methane yield for methanogenic consortia. This new nutritional supplement can help methanogenic consortia form an enhanced anaerobic environment, optimize the microbial balance in the consortia, and improve the methane biosynthesis rate. PMID:25884952

  10. Fermentation enhancement of methanogenic archaea consortia from an Illinois basin coalbed via DOL emulsion nutrition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Peng, Su-Ping; Wang, En-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Microbially enhanced coalbed methane technology must be used to increase the methane content in mining and generate secondary biogenic gas. In this technology, the metabolic processes of methanogenic consortia are the basis for the production of biomethane from some of the organic compounds in coal. Thus, culture nutrition plays an important role in remediating the nutritional deficiency of a coal seam. To enhance the methane production rates for microorganism consortia, different types of nutrition solutions were examined in this study. Emulsion nutrition solutions containing a novel nutritional supplement, called dystrophy optional modification latex, increased the methane yield for methanogenic consortia. This new nutritional supplement can help methanogenic consortia form an enhanced anaerobic environment, optimize the microbial balance in the consortia, and improve the methane biosynthesis rate.

  11. Distribution, Activities, and Interactions of Methanogens and Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Holmes, M. Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling methanogenic pathways in the Florida Everglades, the distribution and functional activities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) were investigated in soils (0 to 2 or 0 to 4 cm depth) across the well-documented nutrient gradient in the water conservation areas (WCAs) caused by runoff from the adjacent Everglades Agricultural Area. The methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) sequences that were retrieved from WCA-2A, an area with relatively high concentrations of SO42− (≥39 μM), indicated that methanogens inhabiting this area were broadly distributed within the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomassiliicoccales. In more than 3 years of monitoring, quantitative PCR (qPCR) using newly designed group-specific primers revealed that the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were more numerous than the Methanosaetaceae obligatory acetotrophs in SO42−-rich areas of WCA-2A, while the Methanosaetaceae were dominant over the Methanomicrobiales in WCA-3A (with relatively low SO42− concentrations; ≤4 μM). qPCR of dsrB sequences also indicated that SRPs are present at greater numbers than methanogens in the WCAs. In an incubation study with WCA-2A soils, addition of MoO42− (a specific inhibitor of SRP activity) resulted in increased methane production rates, lower apparent fractionation factors [αapp; defined as (amount of δ13CO2 + 1,000)/(amount of δ13CH4 + 1,000)], and higher Methanosaetaceae mcrA transcript levels compared to those for the controls without MoO42−. These results indicate that SRPs play crucial roles in controlling methanogenic pathways and in shaping the structures of methanogen assemblages as a function of position along the nutrient gradient. PMID:26276115

  12. Distribution, activities, and interactions of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Holmes, M Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Reddy, K Ramesh; Ogram, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling methanogenic pathways in the Florida Everglades, the distribution and functional activities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) were investigated in soils (0 to 2 or 0 to 4 cm depth) across the well-documented nutrient gradient in the water conservation areas (WCAs) caused by runoff from the adjacent Everglades Agricultural Area. The methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) sequences that were retrieved from WCA-2A, an area with relatively high concentrations of SO4 (2-) (≥39 μM), indicated that methanogens inhabiting this area were broadly distributed within the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomassiliicoccales. In more than 3 years of monitoring, quantitative PCR (qPCR) using newly designed group-specific primers revealed that the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were more numerous than the Methanosaetaceae obligatory acetotrophs in SO4 (2-)-rich areas of WCA-2A, while the Methanosaetaceae were dominant over the Methanomicrobiales in WCA-3A (with relatively low SO4 (2-) concentrations; ≤4 μM). qPCR of dsrB sequences also indicated that SRPs are present at greater numbers than methanogens in the WCAs. In an incubation study with WCA-2A soils, addition of MoO4 (2-) (a specific inhibitor of SRP activity) resulted in increased methane production rates, lower apparent fractionation factors [αapp; defined as (amount of δ(13)CO2 + 1,000)/(amount of δ(13)CH4 + 1,000)], and higher Methanosaetaceae mcrA transcript levels compared to those for the controls without MoO4 (2-). These results indicate that SRPs play crucial roles in controlling methanogenic pathways and in shaping the structures of methanogen assemblages as a function of position along the nutrient gradient.

  13. Investigation into the effect of high concentrations of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion on methanogenic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H.; Walter, Andreas; Ebner, Christian; Insam, Heribert

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Different methanogenic communities in mesophilic and thermophilic reactors. • High VFA levels do not cause major changes in archaeal communities. • Real-time PCR indicated greater diversity than ANAEROCHIP microarray. - Abstract: A study was conducted to determine whether differences in the levels of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in anaerobic digester plants could result in variations in the indigenous methanogenic communities. Two digesters (one operated under mesophilic conditions, the other under thermophilic conditions) were monitored, and sampled at points where VFA levels were high, as well as when VFA levels were low. Physical and chemical parameters were measured, and the methanogenic diversity was screened using the phylogenetic microarray ANAEROCHIP. In addition, real-time PCR was used to quantify the presence of the different methanogenic genera in the sludge samples. Array results indicated that the archaeal communities in the different reactors were stable, and that changes in the VFA levels of the anaerobic digesters did not greatly alter the dominating methanogenic organisms. In contrast, the two digesters were found to harbour different dominating methanogenic communities, which appeared to remain stable over time. Real-time PCR results were inline with those of microarray analysis indicating only minimal changes in methanogen numbers during periods of high VFAs, however, revealed a greater diversity in methanogens than found with the array.

  14. Quantitative analysis of ruminal methanogenic microbial populations in beef cattle divergent in phenotypic residual feed intake (RFI) offered contrasting diets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methane (CH4) emissions in cattle are an undesirable end product of rumen methanogenic fermentative activity as they are associated not only with negative environmental impacts but also with reduced host feed efficiency. The aim of this study was to quantify total and specific rumen microbial methanogenic populations in beef cattle divergently selected for residual feed intake (RFI) while offered (i) a low energy high forage (HF) diet followed by (ii) a high energy low forage (LF) diet. Ruminal fluid was collected from 14 high (H) and 14 low (L) RFI animals across both dietary periods. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was conducted to quantify the abundance of total and specific rumen methanogenic microbes. Spearman correlation analysis was used to investigate the association between the relative abundance of methanogens and animal performance, rumen fermentation variables and diet digestibility. Results Abundance of methanogens, did not differ between RFI phenotypes. However, relative abundance of total and specific methanogen species was affected (P < 0.05) by diet type, with greater abundance observed while animals were offered the LF compared to the HF diet. Conclusions These findings suggest that differences in abundance of specific rumen methanogen species may not contribute to variation in CH4 emissions between efficient and inefficient animals, however dietary manipulation can influence the abundance of total and specific methanogen species. PMID:25276350

  15. Hydrobiogeochemical controls on a low-carbon emitting energy extraction mechanism: exploring methanogenic crude oil biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Jenna; McIntosh, Jennifer; Akob, Denise; Spear, John; Warwick, Peter; McCray, John

    2016-04-01

    Exploiting naturally-occurring microbial communities in the deep subsurface could help mitigate the effects of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. These microbial communities, a combination of methanogens and syntrophic bacteria, can perform methanogenic crude oil biodegradation, namely the conversion of crude oil to natural gas, and have also been detected in biodegraded, methanogenic reservoirs. These microbes could target residual crude oil, a high-carbon, hard-to-obtain fossil fuel source, and convert it to natural gas, effectively "producing" a lower CO2 per BTU fuel source. Yet, little is known about what geochemical parameters are driving microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs, and how the presence of specific microbial communities may impact methanogenic crude oil biodegradation. To investigate methanogenic crude oil biodegradation, 22 wells along a subsurface hydrogeochemical gradient in the southeastern USA were sampled for DNA analysis of the microbial community, and geochemical analysis of produced water and crude oil. A statistical comparison of microbial community structure to formation fluid geochemical parameters, amount of crude oil biodegradation, and relative extent of methanogenesis revealed that relative degree of biodegradation (high, medium, or low), chloride concentration (550 mM to 2100 mM), well depth (393 m to 1588 m), and spatial location within the reservoir (i.e., oil field location) are the major drivers of microbial diversity. There was no statistical evidence for correlation between extent of methanogenesis and the subsurface community composition. Despite the dominance of methanogens in these sampled wells, methanogenic activity was not predicted solely based on the microbial community composition. Crude oil biodegradation, however, correlates with both community composition and produced water geochemistry, suggesting a co-linear system and implying that microbial communities associated with degree

  16. Effect of dietary fiber on the methanogen community in the hindgut of Lantang gilts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Liang, J B; Liao, X D; Wright, A D G; Wu, Y B; Yu, B

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary fiber on methanogenic diversity and community composition in the hindgut of indigenous Chinese Lantang gilts to explain the unexpected findings reported earlier that Lantang gilts fed low-fiber diet (LFD) produced more methane than those fed high-fiber diet (HFD). In total, 12 Lantang gilts (58.7±0.37 kg) were randomly divided into two dietary groups (six replicates (pigs) per group) and fed either LFD (NDF=201.46 g/kg) or HFD (NDF=329.70 g/kg). Wheat bran was the main source of fiber for the LFD, whereas ground rice hull (mixture of rice hull and rice bran) was used for the HFD. Results showed that the methanogens in the hindgut of Lantang gilts belonged to four known species (Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, Methanobrevibacter wolinii, Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii), with about 89% of the methanogens belonging to the genus Methanobrevibacter. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies of Methanobrevibacter were more than three times higher (P0.05) was observed in 16S rRNA gene copies of Fibrobacter succinogenes between the two dietary groups, and 18S rRNA gene copies of anaerobic fungi in gilts fed LFD were lower than (P<0.05) those fed HFD. To better explain the effect of different fiber source on the methanogen community, a follow-up in vitro fermentation using a factorial design comprised of two inocula (prepared from hindgut content of gilts fed two diets differing in their dietary fiber)×four substrates (LFD, HFD, wheat bran, ground rice hull) was conducted. Results of the in vitro fermentation confirmed that the predominant methanogens belonged to the genus of Methanobrevibacter, and about 23% methanogens was found to be distantly related (90%) to Thermogymnomonas acidicola. In vitro fermentation also seems to suggest that fiber source did change the methanogens community. Although the density of Methanobrevibacter species was positively correlated with CH

  17. Development of methanogenic consortia in fluidized-bed batches using sepiolite of different particle size.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J M; Rodríguez, F; Valle, L; Muñoz, M A; Moriñigo, M A; Borrego, J J

    1996-09-01

    The addition of support materials, such as sepiolite, to fluidized-bed anaerobic digesters enhances the methane production by increasing the colonization by syntrophic microbiota. However, the efficiency in the methanogenesis depends on the particle size of the support material, the highest level of methane production being obtained by the smaller particle size sepiolite. Because of the porosity and physico-chemical characteristics of these support materials, the anaerobic microbial consortia formed quickly (after one week of incubation). The predominant methanogenic bacteria present in the active granules, detected both by immunofluorescence using specific antibodies and by scanning electron microscopy, were acetoclastic methanogens, mainly Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta.

  18. Seaweed cultivation for renewable resources

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, K.T.; Benson, P.H.

    1987-01-01

    In the 1970's and 80's, major research and development programs were launched to explore the possibility of using marine biomass as a source of energy. This volume, not only reviews the accomplishments of the aforementioned programs, but also describes how this research relates to seaweed cultivation for other products, such as food, feed, and high value chemicals. Topics covered include the features of marine biomass production, biotechnological manipulations of marine algae, and marine biomass conversion to energy, as well as economics. The chapters synthesize a large number of technical reports, journal articles, symposia and conference proceedings and technology transfer meetings.

  19. Tailoring partially reduced graphene oxide as redox mediator for enhanced biotransformation of iopromide under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Toral-Sánchez, Eduardo; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Ascacio Valdés, Juan A; Aguilar, Cristóbal N; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-10-22

    This work reports the first successful application of graphene oxide (GO) and partially reduced GO (rGO) as redox mediator (RM) to increase the biotransformation of the recalcitrant iodinated contrast medium, iopromide (IOP). Results showed that GO-based materials promoted up to 5.5 and 2.8-fold faster biotransformation of IOP by anaerobic sludge under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions, respectively. Correlation between the extent of reduction of GO and its redox-mediating capacity was demonstrated, which was reflected in faster removal and greater extent of biotransformation of IOP. Further analysis indicated that the biotransformation pathway of IOP involved multiple reactions including deiodination, decarboxylation, demethylation, dehydration and N-dealkylation. GO-based materials could be strategically tailored and integrated in biological treatment systems to effectively enhance the redox conversion of recalcitrant pollutants commonly found in wastewater treatment systems and industrial effluents.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from methanogenic digester sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen -Tso

    2014-09-04

    In this study, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  1. Changes in methanogenic substrate utilization and communities with depth in a salt-marsh, creek sediment in southern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John Parkes, R.; Brock, Fiona; Banning, Natasha; Hornibrook, Edward R. C.; Roussel, Erwan G.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Fry, John C.

    2012-01-01

    A combined biogeochemical and molecular genetic study of creek sediments (down to 65 cm depth) from Arne Peninsula salt-marsh (Dorset, UK) determined the substrates used for methanogenesis and the distribution of the common methanogens, Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales capable of metabolising these substrates. Methane concentrations increased by 11 cm, despite pore water sulphate not being removed until 45 cm. Neither upward methane diffusion or anaerobic oxidation of methane seemed to be important in this zone. In the near-surface sulphate-reduction zone (5-25 cm) turnover time to methane for the non-competitive methanogenic substrate trimethylamine was most rapid (80 days), and were much longer for acetate (7900 days), methanol (40,500 days) and bicarbonate (361,600 days). Methylamine-utilizing Methanosarcinales were the dominant (60-95%) methanogens in this zone. In deeper sediments rates of methanogenesis from competitive substrates increased substantially, with acetate methanogenic rates becoming ˜100 times greater than H 2/CO 2 methanogenesis below 50 cm. In addition, there was a dramatic change in methanogen diversity with obligate acetate-utilizing, Methanosaeta related sequences being dominant. At a similar depth methanol turnover to methane increased to its most rapid (1700 days). This activity pattern is consistent with deeper methanogen populations (55 cm) being dominated by acetate-utilizing Methanosaeta with H 2/CO 2 and alcohol-utilizing Methanomicrobiales also present. Hence, there is close relationship between the depth distribution of methanogenic substrate utilization and specific methanogens that can utilize these compounds. It is unusual for acetate to be the dominant methanogenic substrate in coastal sediments and δ13C-CH 4 values (-74 to -71‰) were atypical for acetate methanogenesis, suggesting that common stable isotope proxy models may not apply well in this type of dynamic anoxic sediment, with multiple methanogenic substrates.

  2. Cultivating Moral Resilience.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton

    2017-02-01

    : Decades of research have documented the frequency, sources, and consequences of moral distress. However, few studies have focused on interventions designed to diminish its negative effects. The cultivation of moral resilience-the ability to respond positively to the distress and adversity caused by an ethically complex situation-is proposed as a method to transform moral distress.

  3. Cultivating Leaders from Within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Maggie; Schertzer, Kristen

    2005-01-01

    A major problem faced by school districts in the US is the paucity of applicants for the posts of school principals. A solution adopted by The Capistrano Unified School District (CUSD) in Orange County California was the cultivation of good leaders from within the district through the Teaching Assistant Principal (TAP) program.

  4. Can abundance of methanogen be a good indicator for CH4 flux in soil ecosystems?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Jang, Inyoung; Jeong, Sangseom; Kang, Hojeong

    2015-12-01

    Methane, which is produced by methanogenic archaea, is the second most abundant carbon compound in the atmosphere. Due to its strong radiative forcing, many studies have been conducted to determine its sources, budget, and dynamics. However, a mechanistic model of methane flux has not been developed thus far. In this study, we attempt to examine the relevance of the abundance of methanogen as a biological indicator of methane flux in three different types of soil ecosystems: permafrost, rice paddy, and mountainous wetland. We measured the annual average methane flux and abundance of methanogen in the soil ecosystems in situ. The correlation between methane flux and the abundance of methanogen exists only under a specific biogeochemical conditions such as SOM of higher than 60%, pH of 5.6-6.4, and water-saturated. Except for these conditions, significant correlations were absent. Therefore, microbial abundance information can be applied to a methane flux model selectively depending on the biogeochemical properties of the soil ecosystem.

  5. Combined molecular ecological and confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis of peat bog methanogen populations.

    PubMed

    Upton, M; Hill, B; Edwards, C; Saunders, J R; Ritchie, D A; Lloyd, D

    2000-12-15

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy, using fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of different physiological groups of methanogens, was used to identify which methanogenic genera were present and to describe their in situ spatial locations in samples taken at different depths from blanket peat bog cores. Total bacterial DNA was also extracted and purified from the samples and used as template for amplification of 16S rRNA and regions of methyl CoM reductase-encoding genes using the polymerase chain reaction, as well as for oligonucleotide hybridisation experiments. These techniques, used in concert, demonstrated that methanogens of several physiological groups were present in highest numbers in the mid regions of 25 cm deep peat cores. Some discrepancies were apparent in the findings of the microscopic and molecular methods, though these may be partially accounted for by the different sensitivities of the techniques employed. The combined approaches used in this study gave an insight into the diversity and distribution of methanogens in peat environments not possible using molecular ecological methods alone.

  6. Methanogenic archaea diversity in hyporheic sediments of a small lowland stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brablcova, Lenka; Buriánková, Iva; Rulík, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Abundance and diversity of methanogenic archaea were studied at five localities along a longitudinal profile of a Sitka stream (Czech Republic). Samples of hyporheic sediments were collected from two sediment depths (0-25 cm and 25-50 cm) by freeze-core method. Methanogen community was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing method. The proportion of methanogens to the DAPI-stained cells varied among all localities and depths with an average value 2.08 × 105 per g of dry sediment. A total of 73 bands were detected at 19 different positions on the DGGE gel and the highest methanogen diversity was found at the downstream located sites. Cluster analysis of DGGE image showed three main clusters consisting of localities that differed in the number and similarity of the DGGE bands. Sequencing analysis of representative DGGE bands revealed phylotypes affiliated with members belonging to the orders Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales. The authors are thankful to the European Social Fund and state budget of the Czech Republic for providing the financial support during this study. This work is a part of the POSTUP II project CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0041, which is mutually financed by the previously stated funding agencies.

  7. Ruminal fermentation of anti-methanogenic nitrate- and nitro-containing forages in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA), and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if fed at high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied li...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Methanogen Methanoculleus bourgensis BA1 Isolated from a Biogas Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Irena; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Pühler, Alfred; Schnürer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Methanoculleus bourgensis BA1, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, was isolated from a laboratory-scale biogas reactor operating under an elevated ammonium concentration. Here, the complete genome sequence of M. bourgensis BA1 is reported. The availability of the BA1 genome sequence enables detailed comparative analyses involving other Methanoculleus spp. representing important members of microbial biogas communities. PMID:27340059

  9. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities.

    PubMed

    Junicke, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2016-01-01

    Many anaerobic conversions proceed close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the microbial groups involved need to share their low energy budget to survive at the thermodynamic boundary of life. This study aimed to investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic control mechanisms of the electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities. Despite the rather low energy content of butyrate, results demonstrate unequal energy sharing between the butyrate-utilizing species (17 %), the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (9-10 %), and the acetoclastic methanogens (73-74 %). As a key finding, the energy disproportion resulted in different growth strategies of the syntrophic partners. Compared to the butyrate-utilizing partner, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens compensated their lower biomass yield per mole of electrons transferred with a 2-fold higher biomass-specific electron transfer rate. Apart from these thermodynamic control mechanisms, experiments revealed a ten times lower hydrogen inhibition constant on butyrate conversion than proposed by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, suggesting a much stronger inhibitory effect of hydrogen on anaerobic butyrate conversion. At hydrogen partial pressures exceeding 40 Pa and at bicarbonate limited conditions, a shift from methanogenesis to reduced product formation was observed which indicates an important role of the hydrogen partial pressure in redirecting electron fluxes towards reduced products such as butanol. The findings of this study demonstrate that a careful consideration of thermodynamics and kinetics is required to advance our current understanding of flux regulation in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Antarctic Methanogen Enriched from Dry Valley Permafrost

    PubMed Central

    Buongiorno, Joy; Bird, Jordan T.; Krivushin, Kirill; Oshurkova, Victoria; Shcherbakova, Victoria; Rivkina, Elizaveta M.

    2016-01-01

    A genomic reconstruction belonging to the genus Methanosarcina was assembled from metagenomic data from a methane-producing enrichment of Antarctic permafrost. This is the first methanogen genome reported from permafrost of the Dry Valleys and can help shed light on future climate-affected methane dynamics. PMID:27932654

  11. Peptidolytic Microbial Community of Methanogenic Reactors from two Modified Uasbs of Brewery Industries.

    PubMed

    Díaz, C; Baena, S; Patel, B K C; Fardeau, M L

    2010-07-01

    We studied the peptide-degrading anaerobic communities of methanogenic reactors from two mesophilic full-scale modified upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors treating brewery wastewater in Colombia. Most probable number (MPN) counts varied between 7.1 x 10(8) and 6.6 × 10(9) bacteria/g volatile suspended solids VSS (Methanogenic Reactor 1) and 7.2 × 10(6) and 6.4 × 10(7) bacteria/g (VSS) (Methanogenic Reactor 2). Metabolites detected in the highest positive MPN dilutions in both reactors were mostly acetate, propionate, isovalerate and, in some cases, negligible concentrations of butyrate. Using the highest positive dilutions of MPN counts, 50 dominant strains were isolated from both reactors, and 12 strains were selected for sequencing their 16S rRNA gene based on their phenotypic characteristics. The small-subunit rRNA gene sequences indicated that these strains were affiliated to the families Propionibacteriaceae, Clostridiaceae and Syntrophomonadaceae in the low G + C gram-positive group and Desulfovibrio spp. in the class δ-Proteobacteria. The main metabolites detected in the highest positive dilutions of MPN and the presence of Syntrophomonadaceae indicate the effect of the syntrophic associations on the bioconversion of these substrates in methanogenic reactors. Additionally, the potential utilization of external electron acceptors for the complete degradation of amino acids by Clostridium strains confirms the relevance of these acceptors in the transformation of peptides and amino acids in these systems.

  12. Different behaviour of methanogenic archaea and Thaumarchaeota in rice field microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xiubin; Lu, Yahai; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Archaea in rice fields play an important role in carbon and nitrogen cycling. They comprise methane-producing Euryarchaeota as well as ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota, but their community structures and population dynamics have not yet been studied in the same system. Different soil compartments (surface, bulk, rhizospheric soil) and ages of roots (young and old roots) at two N fertilization levels and at three time points (the panicle initiation, heading and maturity periods) of the season were assayed by determining the abundance (using qPCR) and composition (using T-RFLP and cloning/sequencing) of archaeal genes (mcrA, amoA, 16S rRNA gene). The community of total Archaea in soil and root samples mainly consisted of the methanogens and the Thaumarchaeota and their abundance increased over the season. Methanogens proliferated everywhere, but Thaumarchaeota proliferated only on the roots and in response to nitrogen fertilization. The community structures of Archaea, methanogens and Thaumarchaeota were different in soil and root samples indicating niche differentiation. While Methanobacteriales were generally present, Methanosarcinaceae and Methanocellales were the dominant methanogens in soil and root samples, respectively. The results emphasize the specific colonization of roots by two ecophysiologically different groups of archaea which may belong to the core root biome.

  13. Analysis of rumen methanogen diversity in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) under three different diets.

    PubMed

    Franzolin, Raul; St-Pierre, Benoit; Northwood, Korinne; Wright, André-Denis G

    2012-07-01

    The water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is a prominent livestock species for the production of milk and meat in many countries. We investigated the diversity of rumen methanogens in Mediterranean water buffaloes maintained in Brazil under different diets: corn silage, grazing pasture, or sugar cane. A total of 467 clones were isolated from three methanogen 16S rRNA gene clone libraries that each represented a distinct feed type. The 467 clones were assigned to 19 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Four OTUs were represented in all three libraries, eight OTUs were library-specific, six OTUs were found in only the corn silage and pasture grazing libraries, and one OTU was shared only between pasture grazing and sugar cane libraries. We found that Methanobrevibacter-related sequences were the most abundant in the water buffaloes sampled for our analysis, in contrast to previously reported studies showing that Methanomicrobium mobile-like methanogens were the most abundant methanogens in water buffaloes of Murrah and Surti breeds sampled in India. Considering the worldwide distribution of water buffaloes and the likely wide variety of diets provided, our results combined with studies from other groups support that larger scope analyses of microbiomes for this livestock species would provide great insight into the contribution of geographical location, breed, and diet in determining the population structure of rumen microorganisms.

  14. Reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite by methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, D.; Dong, Hailiang H.; Bishop, M.E.; Wang, Hongfang; Agrawal, A.; Tritschler, S.; Eberl, D.D.; Xie, S.

    2011-01-01

    Clay minerals and methanogens are ubiquitous and co-exist in anoxic environments, yet it is unclear whether methanogens are able to reduce structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. In this study, the ability of methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri to reduce structural Fe(III) in iron-rich smectite (nontronite NAu-2) and the relationship between iron reduction and methanogenesis were investigated. Bioreduction experiments were conducted in growth medium using three types of substrate: H2/CO2, methanol, and acetate. Time course methane production and hydrogen consumption were measured by gas chromatography. M. barkeri was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 with H2/CO2 and methanol as substrate, but not with acetate. The extent of bioreduction, as measured by the 1,10-phenanthroline method, was 7-13% with H2/CO2 as substrate, depending on nontronite concentration (5-10g/L). The extent was higher when methanol was used as a substrate, reaching 25-33%. Methanogenesis was inhibited by Fe(III) reduction in the H2/CO2 culture, but enhanced when methanol was used. High charge smectite and biogenic silica formed as a result of bioreduction. Our results suggest that methanogens may play an important role in biogeochemical cycling of iron in clay minerals and may have important implications for the global methane budget. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Formation of methane and carbon dioxide from dimethylselenide in anoxic sediments and by a methanogenic bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Zehr, Jon P.

    1986-01-01

    Anaerobic San Francisco Bay salt marsh sediments rapidly metabolized [14C]dimethylselenide (DMSe) to 14CH4 and 14CO2. Addition of selective inhibitors (2-bromoethanesulfonic acid or molybdate) to these sediments indicated that both methanogenic and sulfate-respiring bacteria could degrade DMSe to gaseous products. However, sediments taken from the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Wildlife Refuge produced only 14CO2 from [14C]DMSe, implying that methanogens were not important in the Kesterson samples. A pure culture of a dimethylsulfide (DMS)-grown methylotrophic methanogen converted [14C]DMSe to 14CH4 and14CO2. However, the organism could not grow on DMSe. Addition of DMS to either sediments or the pure culture retarded the metabolism of DMSe. This effect appeared to be caused by competitive inhibition, thereby indicating a common enzyme system for DMS and DMSe metabolism. DMSe appears to be degraded as part of the DMS pool present in anoxic environments. These results suggest that methylotrophic methanogens may demethylate methylated forms of other metals and metalloids found in nature.

  16. High Concentrations of Methyl Fluoride Affect the Bacterial Community in a Thermophilic Methanogenic Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Liping; Lü, Fan; Wu, Qing; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2014-01-01

    To precisely control the application of methyl fluoride (CH3F) for analysis of methanogenic pathways, the influence of 0–10% CH3F on bacterial and archaeal communities in a thermophilic methanogenic sludge was investigated. The results suggested that CH3F acts specifically on acetoclastic methanogenesis. The inhibitory effect stabilized at an initial concentration of 3–5%, with around 90% of the total methanogenic activity being suppressed, and a characteristic of hydrogenotrophic pathway in isotope fractionation was demonstrated under this condition. However, extended exposure (12 days) to high concentrations of CH3F (>3%) altered the bacterial community structure significantly, resulting in increased diversity and decreased evenness, which can be related to acetate oxidation and CH3F degradation. Bacterial clone library analysis showed that syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria Thermacetogenium phaeum were highly enriched under the suppression of 10% CH3F. However, the methanogenic community did not change obviously. Thus, excessive usage of CH3F over the long term can change the composition of the bacterial community. Therefore, data from studies involving the use of CH3F as an acetoclast inhibitor should be interpreted with care. Conversely, CH3F has been suggested as a factor to stimulate the enrichment of syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria. PMID:24658656

  17. Degradation of methanethiol in anaerobic sewers and its correlation with methanogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Hu, Shihu; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-02-01

    Methanethiol (MT) is considered one of the predominant odorants in sewer systems. Therefore, understanding MT transformation in sewers is essential to sewer odor assessment and abatement. In this study, we investigated the degradation of MT in laboratory anaerobic sewers. Experiments were carried out in seven anaerobic sewer reactors with biofilms at different stages of development. MT degradation was found to be strongly dependent on the methanogenic activity of sewer biofilms. The MT degradation rate accelerated with the increase of methanogenic activity of sewer biofilms, resulting in MT accumulation (i.e. net production) in sewer reactors with relatively low methanogenic activities, and MT removal in reactors with higher methanogenic activities. A Monod-type kinetic expression was developed to describe MT degradation kinetics in anaerobic sewers, in which the maximum degradation rate was modeled as a function of the maximum methane production rate through a power function. It was also found that MT concentration had a linear relationship with acetate concentration, which may be used for preliminary assessment of MT presence in anaerobic sewers.

  18. Hydrocarbon activation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions proceeds by different mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Ian; Gray, Neil; Aitken, Caroline; Sherry, Angela; Jones, Martin; Larter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Microbial degradation of alkanes typically involves their conversion to fatty acids which are then catabolised by beta-oxidation. The critical step in this process is activation of the hydrocarbon. Under oxic conditions this is catalyzed by monooxygenase enzymes with the formation of long chain alcohols. In the absence of oxygen alternative alkane activation mechanisms have been observed or proposed. Fumarate addition to alkanes to form alkyl succinates is considered a central process in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. Comparative studies of crude oil degradation under sulphate-reducing and methanogenic conditions revealed distinctive patterns of compound class removal and metabolite formation. Alkyl succinates derived from C7 to C26 n-alkanes and branched chain alkanes were found in abundance in sulfate-reducing systems but these were not detected during methanogenic crude oil degradation. Only one other mechanism of alkane activation has been elucidated to date. This involves addition of carbon derived from bicarbonate/CO2 to C-3 of an alkane chain to form a 2-ethylalkane with subsequent removal of the ethyl group leading to the formation of a fatty acid 1 carbon shorter than the original alkane. 2-ethylalkanes have never been detected as metabolites of anaerobic alkane degradation and were not detected in crude oil-degrading methanogenic systems. Due to the range of alkanes present in crude oil it was not possible to infer the generation of C-odd acids from C-even alkanes which is characteristic of the C-3 carboxylation mechanism. Furthermore genes homologous to alkysuccinate synthetases were not detected in the methanogenic hydrocarbon degrading community by pyrosequencing of total DNA extracted from methanogenic enrichments cultures. beta-oxidation genes were detected and intriguingly, alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase genes were present. This offers the possibility that alkane activation in the methanogenic system does not proceed via acid metabolites

  19. Assessment of fertilizer potential of the struvite produced from the treatment of methanogenic landfill leachate using low-cost reagents.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Leachates generated in methanogenic landfills contain high strength of ammonium nitrogen which removal is hard to be accomplished by means of conventional techniques. The chemical precipitation of struvite, which is a mineral that could be reused as a slow-release fertilizer, is an effective process in the removal and recovery of NH4 amount of high-concentrated wastewaters. In this paper, a struvite precipitation process using unconventional reagents is proposed for a sustainable recovery of nitrogen content. In particular, seawater bittern, a by-product of marine salt manufacturing, and bone meal, a by-product of the thermal treatment of meat waste, have been used as low-cost sources of magnesium and phosphorus, respectively. The process enables the removal of more than 98 % ammonia load, the recovery about 99 and 95 % of phosphorus and magnesium, respectively, and the production of a precipitate containing struvite crystals. Heavy metals concentrations of produced precipitate were below the threshold values specified by the EC Directive for use of sewage sludges as fertilizers. Specific agronomic tests were conducted to investigate the fertilizing value of precipitate recovered from landfill leachate. The fertilizing effect of struvite deposit in cultivating Spinacia oleracea was compared with that of vegetable soil and commercial fertilizer. The growth of selected vegetable in the pots with struvite precipitate resulted significantly greater in both than those in the control pots and in the pots with the complex fertilizer. Furthermore, the struvite application as fertilizer did not result in more heavy metals in the vegetables respect those from soil and model fertilizer.

  20. Shifts in methanogen community structure and function across a coastal marsh transect: effects of exotic Spartina alterniflora invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junji; Ding, Weixin; Liu, Deyan; Kang, Hojeong; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin

    2016-01-01

    Invasion of Spartina alterniflora in coastal areas of China increased methane (CH4) emissions. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we measured CH4 production potential, methanogen community structure and biogeochemical factors along a coastal wetland transect comprised of five habitat regions: open water, bare tidal flat, invasive S. alterniflora marsh and native Suaeda salsa and Phragmites australis marshes. CH4 production potential in S. alterniflora marsh was 10 times higher than that in other regions, and it was significantly correlated with soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and trimethylamine concentrations, but was not correlated with acetate or formate concentrations. Although the diversity of methanogens was lowest in S. alterniflora marsh, invasion increased methanogen abundance by 3.48-fold, compared with native S. salsa and P. australis marshes due to increase of facultative Methanosarcinaceae rather than acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Ordination analyses suggested that trimethylamine was the primary factor regulating shift in methanogen community structure. Addition of trimethylamine increased CH4 production rates by 1255-fold but only by 5.61- and 11.4-fold for acetate and H2/CO2, respectively. S. alterniflora invasion elevated concentration of non-competitive trimethylamine, and shifted methanogen community from acetotrophic to facultative methanogens, which together facilitated increased CH4 production potential. PMID:26728134

  1. Shifts in methanogen community structure and function across a coastal marsh transect: effects of exotic Spartina alterniflora invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junji; Ding, Weixin; Liu, Deyan; Kang, Hojeong; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin

    2016-01-01

    Invasion of Spartina alterniflora in coastal areas of China increased methane (CH4) emissions. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we measured CH4 production potential, methanogen community structure and biogeochemical factors along a coastal wetland transect comprised of five habitat regions: open water, bare tidal flat, invasive S. alterniflora marsh and native Suaeda salsa and Phragmites australis marshes. CH4 production potential in S. alterniflora marsh was 10 times higher than that in other regions, and it was significantly correlated with soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and trimethylamine concentrations, but was not correlated with acetate or formate concentrations. Although the diversity of methanogens was lowest in S. alterniflora marsh, invasion increased methanogen abundance by 3.48-fold, compared with native S. salsa and P. australis marshes due to increase of facultative Methanosarcinaceae rather than acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Ordination analyses suggested that trimethylamine was the primary factor regulating shift in methanogen community structure. Addition of trimethylamine increased CH4 production rates by 1255-fold but only by 5.61- and 11.4-fold for acetate and H2/CO2, respectively. S. alterniflora invasion elevated concentration of non-competitive trimethylamine, and shifted methanogen community from acetotrophic to facultative methanogens, which together facilitated increased CH4 production potential.

  2. Investigation into the effect of high concentrations of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion on methanogenic communities

    PubMed Central

    Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H.; Walter, Andreas; Ebner, Christian; Insam, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether differences in the levels of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in anaerobic digester plants could result in variations in the indigenous methanogenic communities. Two digesters (one operated under mesophilic conditions, the other under thermophilic conditions) were monitored, and sampled at points where VFA levels were high, as well as when VFA levels were low. Physical and chemical parameters were measured, and the methanogenic diversity was screened using the phylogenetic microarray ANAEROCHIP. In addition, real-time PCR was used to quantify the presence of the different methanogenic genera in the sludge samples. Array results indicated that the archaeal communities in the different reactors were stable, and that changes in the VFA levels of the anaerobic digesters did not greatly alter the dominating methanogenic organisms. In contrast, the two digesters were found to harbour different dominating methanogenic communities, which appeared to remain stable over time. Real-time PCR results were inline with those of microarray analysis indicating only minimal changes in methanogen numbers during periods of high VFAs, however, revealed a greater diversity in methanogens than found with the array. PMID:25164858

  3. Trace elements affect methanogenic activity and diversity in enrichments from subsurface coal bed produced water.

    PubMed

    Unal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R(2) = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community.

  4. Trace Elements Affect Methanogenic Activity and Diversity in Enrichments from Subsurface Coal Bed Produced Water

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R2 = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community. PMID

  5. Roles of thermophilic thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Renxing; Grizzle, Robert S.; Duncan, Kathleen E.; McInerney, Michael J.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Thermophilic sulfide-producing microorganisms from an oil pipeline network were enumerated with different sulfur oxyanions as electron acceptors at 55°C. Most-probable number (MPN) analysis showed that thiosulfate-reducing bacteria were the most numerous sulfidogenic microorganisms in pipeline inspection gauge (PIG) scrapings. Thiosulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments were obtained from the MPN cultures that were able to use yeast extract as the electron donor. Molecular analysis revealed that both enrichments harbored the same dominant bacterium, which belonged to the genus Anaerobaculum. The dominant archaeon in the methanogenic enrichment was affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter. With yeast extract as the electron donor, the general corrosion rate by the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment (8.43 ± 1.40 milli-inch per year, abbreviated as mpy) was about 5.5 times greater than the abiotic control (1.49 ± 0.15 mpy), while the comparable measures for the methanogenic culture were 2.03 ± 0.49 mpy and 0.62 ± 0.07 mpy, respectively. Total iron analysis in the cultures largely accounted for the mass loss of iron measured in the weight loss determinations. Profilometry analysis of polished steel coupons incubated in the presence of the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment revealed 59 pits over an area of 71.16 mm2, while only 6 pits were evident in the corresponding methanogenic incubations. The results show the importance of thiosulfate-utilizing, sulfide-producing fermentative bacteria such as Anaerobaculum sp. in the corrosion of carbon steel, but also suggest that Anaerobaculum sp. are of far less concern when growing syntrophically with methanogens. PMID:24639674

  6. Kinetics of DCE and VC mineralization under methanogenic and Fe(III)- reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of anaerobic mineralization of DCE and VC under mathanogenic and Fe(III)-reducing conditions as a function of dissolved contaminant concentration were evaluated. Microorganisms indigenous to creek bed sediments, where groundwater contaminated with chlorinated ethenes continuously discharges, demonstrated significant mineralization of DCE and VC under methanogenic and Fe(III)- reducing conditions. Over 37 days, the recovery of [1,214C]VC radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 5% to 44% and from 8% to 100% under methanogenic and Fe(III)-reducing conditions, respectively. The recovery of [1,2-14C]DCE radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 4% to 14% and did not vary significantly between methanogenic and Fe(III)reducing conditions. VC mineralization was described by Michaelis- Menten kinetics. Under methanogenic conditions, V(max) was 0.19 ?? 0.01 ??mol L-1 d-1 and the half-saturation constant, k(m), was 7.6 ?? 1.7 ??M. Under Fe(III)-reducing conditions, V(max) was 0.76 ?? 0.07 ??mol L-1 d-1 and k(m) was 1.3 ?? 0.5 ??M. In contrast, DCE mineralization could be described by first-order kinetics. The first-order degradation rate constant for DCE mineralization was 0.6 ?? 0.2% d-1 under methanogenic and Fe(III)-reducing conditions. The results indicate that the kinetics of chlorinated ethane mineralization can vary significantly with the specific contaminant and the predominant redox conditions under which mineralization occurs.

  7. Laser spectroscopic real time measurements of methanogenic activity under simulated Martian subsurface analog conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmack, Janosch; Böhm, Michael; Brauer, Chris; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Wagner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    On Earth, chemolithoautothrophic and anaerobic microorganisms such as methanogenic archaea are regarded as model organisms for possible subsurface life on Mars. For this reason, the methanogenic strain Methanosarcina soligelidi (formerly called Methanosarcina spec. SMA-21), isolated from permafrost-affected soil in northeast Siberia, has been tested under Martian thermo-physical conditions. In previous studies under simulated Martian conditions, high survival rates of these microorganisms were observed. In our study we present a method to measure methane production as a first attempt to study metabolic activity of methanogenic archaea during simulated conditions approaching conditions of Mars-like environments. To determine methanogenic activity, a measurement technique which is capable to measure the produced methane concentration with high precision and with high temporal resolution is needed. Although there are several methods to detect methane, only a few fulfill all the needed requirements to work within simulated extraterrestrial environments. We have chosen laser spectroscopy, which is a non-destructive technique that measures the methane concentration without sample taking and also can be run continuously. In our simulation, we detected methane production at temperatures down to -5 °C, which would be found on Mars either temporarily in the shallow subsurface or continually in the deep subsurface. The pressure of 50 kPa which we used in our experiments, corresponds to the expected pressure in the Martian near subsurface. Our new device proved to be fully functional and the results indicate that the possible existence of methanogenic archaea in Martian subsurface habitats cannot be ruled out.

  8. Methanogen community composition and rates of methane consumption in Canadian High Arctic permafrost soils.

    PubMed

    Allan, J; Ronholm, J; Mykytczuk, N C S; Greer, C W; Onstott, T C; Whyte, L G

    2014-04-01

    Increasing permafrost thaw, driven by climate change, has the potential to result in organic carbon stores being mineralized into carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) through microbial activity. This study examines the effect of increasing temperature on community structure and metabolic activity of methanogens from the Canadian High Arctic, in an attempt to predict how warming will affect microbially controlled CH4 soil flux. In situ CO2 and CH4 flux, measured in 2010 and 2011 from ice-wedge polygons, indicate that these soil formations are a net source of CO2 emissions, but a CH4 sink. Permafrost and active layer soil samples were collected at the same sites and incubated under anaerobic conditions at warmer temperatures, with and without substrate amendment. Gas flux was measured regularly and indicated an increase in CH4 flux after extended incubation. Pyrosequencing was used to examine the effects of an extended thaw cycle on methanogen diversity and the results indicate that in situ methanogen diversity, based on the relative abundance of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene associated with known methanogens, is higher in the permafrost than in the active layer. Methanogen diversity was also shown to increase in both the active layer and permafrost soil after an extended thaw. This study provides evidence that although High Arctic ice-wedge polygons are currently a sink for CH4, higher arctic temperatures and anaerobic conditions, a possible result of climate change, could result in this soil becoming a source for CH4 gas flux.

  9. The role of methanogens in acetic acid production under different salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Keke; Guo, Chenghong; Maspolim, Yogananda; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a fed-batch acidogenic reactor was operated at a 3 d hydraulic retention time (HRT) and fed with alkaline pre-treated sludge to investigate salinity effects on methanogens' abundance, activities and their consumption of produced acetic acid (HAc) and total volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The salinity concentration was increased step-wise by adding sodium chloride. At 3‰ (parts per thousand) salinity, the average produced volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration was 2410.16 ± 637.62 mg COD L(-1) and 2.70 ± 0.36 L methane was produced daily in the acidogenic reactor. Further batch tests indicated methanogens showed a HAc degradation rate of 3.81 mg COD g(-1) VSS h(-1) at initial HAc concentration of 1150 mg COD L(-1), and showed tolerance up to 16‰ salinity (3.76 g Na(+) L(-1)) as indicated by a constant HAc degradation rate. The microbiological study indicated this can be related to the predominance of acetate-utilizing Methanosarcinaceae and Methanomicrobiales in the reactor. However, with salinity increased to 20‰ and 40‰, increases in VFAs and HAc production and decreases in methane production, methanogens population, acidogenic bacteria population and acidification extent were observed. This study demonstrated presence of acetate-utilizing methanogens in an acidogenic reactor and their high tolerance to salinity, as well as their negative impacts on net VFAs production. The results would suggest the presence of methanogens in the acidogenic reactor should not be ignored and the recovery of methane from the acidogenic reactor needs to be considered to avoid carbon loss.

  10. Cultivation of Marine Sponges.

    PubMed

    Osinga; Tramper; Wijffels

    1999-11-01

    There is increasing interest in biotechnological production of marine sponge biomass owing to the discovery of many commercially important secondary metabolites in this group of animals. In this article, different approaches to producing sponge biomass are reviewed, and several factors that possibly influence culture success are evaluated. In situ sponge aquacultures, based on old methods for producing commercial bath sponges, are still the easiest and least expensive way to obtain sponge biomass in bulk. However, success of cultivation with this method strongly depends on the unpredictable and often suboptimal natural environment. Hence, a better-defined production system would be desirable. Some progress has been made with culturing sponges in semicontrolled systems, but these still use unfiltered natural seawater. Cultivation of sponges under completely controlled conditions has remained a problem. When designing an in vitro cultivation method, it is important to determine both qualitatively and quantitatively the nutritional demands of the species that is to be cultured. An adequate supply of food seems to be the key to successful sponge culture. Recently, some progress has been made with sponge cell cultures. The advantage of cell cultures is that they are completely controlled and can easily be manipulated for optimal production of the target metabolites. However, this technique is still in its infancy: a continuous cell line has yet to be established. Axenic cultures of sponge aggregates (primmorphs) may provide an alternative to cell culture. Some sponge metabolites are, in fact, produced by endosymbiotic bacteria or algae that live in the sponge tissue. Only a few of these endosymbionts have been cultivated so far. The biotechnology for the production of sponge metabolites needs further development. Research efforts should be continued to enable commercial exploitation of this valuable natural resource in the near future.

  11. On the Cultivation of Innovative Talents in Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Changli; Jia, Hongchun

    2009-01-01

    It is the sure pursuit for the Colleges and Universities to cultivate the innovative talents for the society. The cultivation of innovative talents in Colleges and Universities plays a crucial role not only in economic and social development, but also in schools' and personal development. The internal quality of innovative talents includes the…

  12. Outsiders on the Inside: Cultivating Productive Relationships with Vendors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sheila E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how administrators with responsibility for managing projects involving vendors outside the organization can cultivate a productive working relationship. Highlights include how to select and work with outside vendors; cultivating vendor skills; the role of the corporate client; the former employee as vendor; and a profile of a successful…

  13. Cultivating Discontinuity: Pentecostal Pedagogies of Yielding and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahinsky, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Exploring missionary study at an Assemblies of God Bible college through ethnography and training manuals demonstrates systematic pedagogies that cultivate sensory capabilities encouraging yielding, opening to rupture, and constraint. Ritual theory and the Anthropology of Christianity shift analytic scales to include "cultivation," a…

  14. Study on two methylotrophic and halophilic methanogens, Methanosarcina siciliae HI350 and Methanolobus taylorii GS-16

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, S.

    1994-01-01

    Strain HI350, similar to Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] (T = type strain) morphologically and physiologically, was isolated from an oil well in the Gulf of Mexico. Catabolic substrates included methanol, trimethylamine, dimethyl sulfide, and methane thiol, but not H[sub 2]-CO[sub 2], formate, or acetate. Growth was fastest in the presence of 0.4 to 0.6 M Na[sup +], in the presence of 60 to 200 mM Mg[sup 2+], at pH 6.5 to 6.8, and at 40[degrees]C. Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] was closely related to Methanosarcina. Transfer of Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] to the genus Methanosarcina as Methanosarcina siciliae is proposed with strain HI350 as its reference strain. Degradation of dimethyl sulfide or methane thiol by strain HI350 was complete, and stoichiometric quantities of methane and hydrogen sulfide were formed. Studies of cell-free extracts suggested that enzymes for degradation of dimethyl sulfide and methane thiol were inducible, whereas those for the degradation of methanol or trimethylamine were constitutive. Methanolobus taylorii GS-16, a moderately halophilic and alkcaliphilic methanogen, grows over a wide pH range. The key observation indicative of the involvement of K[sup +] transport in cytosolic acidification was that valinomycin (0.8 [mu]M), a K[sup +] uniporter, inhibited the growth of strain GS-16 only at alkaline pH. Experiments with resting cells indicated that, at alkaline pH, valinomycin uncoupled catabolic reactions from ATP synthesis. Thus, a K[sup +]/H[sup +] antiporter was proposed to account for the K[sup +] extrusion and the uncoupling effect of valinomycin at alkaline pH.

  15. Cas9-mediated genome editing in the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Dipti D; Metcalf, William W

    2017-03-14

    Although Cas9-mediated genome editing has proven to be a powerful genetic tool in eukaryotes, its application in Bacteria has been limited because of inefficient targeting or repair; and its application to Archaea has yet to be reported. Here we describe the development of a Cas9-mediated genome-editing tool that allows facile genetic manipulation of the slow-growing methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans Introduction of both insertions and deletions by homology-directed repair was remarkably efficient and precise, occurring at a frequency of approximately 20% relative to the transformation efficiency, with the desired mutation being found in essentially all transformants examined. Off-target activity was not observed. We also observed that multiple single-guide RNAs could be expressed in the same transcript, reducing the size of mutagenic plasmids and simultaneously simplifying their design. Cas9-mediated genome editing reduces the time needed to construct mutants by more than half (3 vs. 8 wk) and allows simultaneous construction of double mutants with high efficiency, exponentially decreasing the time needed for complex strain constructions. Furthermore, coexpression the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) machinery from the closely related archaeon, Methanocella paludicola, allowed efficient Cas9-mediated genome editing without the need for a repair template. The NHEJ-dependent mutations included deletions ranging from 75 to 2.7 kb in length, most of which appear to have occurred at regions of naturally occurring microhomology. The combination of homology-directed repair-dependent and NHEJ-dependent genome-editing tools comprises a powerful genetic system that enables facile insertion and deletion of genes, rational modification of gene expression, and testing of gene essentiality.

  16. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote-derived contaminants in natural and simulated ground water ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Godsy, E.M.

    1993-12-31

    Wastes from an abandoned wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. The contaminated ground water is enriched in organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, indole, oxindole, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, 2(1H)-isoquinolinone, benzothiophene, benzofuran, naphthalene, and indene. Evidence is presented that the methanogenic degradation of the compounds listed above and concomitant microbial growth in batch microcosms derived from contaminated aquifer material can be described using Monod kinetics. The K{sub s} values obtained for the biodegradation of the phenolic compounds in this study are much lower than published values, indicating that the aquifer microorganisms may have developed enzyme systems and transport mechanisms that are adapted to low nutrient conditions. The values for k{sub d} are much less than {mu}{sub max}, and can be neglected in the microcosm studies. The low Y values, approximately an order of magnitude lower than theoretical values, and the low numbers of microorganisms in the aquifer derived microcosms suggest that these organisms may use some unique strategies to survive in the subsurface environment. Studies of the degradation pathways of the homocyclic and heterocyclic aromatic compounds on the basis of intermediate compounds have revealed that the process consists of both a major and a minor pathway. The first transformation step of the major pathway consists of oxidation and cleavage of the heterocyclic ring. After cleavage of this ring, the substituent side chains and the remaining homocyclic ring are subjected to various reactions including oxidation, decarboxylation, desulfurylation or ammonification, and O-methylation. These reactions are followed by the reduction of the homocyclic ring, cleavage of this ring, {beta}-oxidation, and mineralization.

  17. The methanogenic redox cofactor F420 is widely synthesized by aerobic soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ney, Blair; Ahmed, F Hafna; Carere, Carlo R; Biswas, Ambarish; Warden, Andrew C; Morales, Sergio E; Pandey, Gunjan; Watt, Stephen J; Oakeshott, John G; Taylor, Matthew C; Stott, Matthew B; Jackson, Colin J; Greening, Chris

    2017-01-01

    F420 is a low-potential redox cofactor that mediates the transformations of a wide range of complex organic compounds. Considered one of the rarest cofactors in biology, F420 is best known for its role in methanogenesis and has only been chemically identified in two phyla to date, the Euryarchaeota and Actinobacteria. In this work, we show that this cofactor is more widely distributed than previously reported. We detected the genes encoding all five known F420 biosynthesis enzymes (cofC, cofD, cofE, cofG and cofH) in at least 653 bacterial and 173 archaeal species, including members of the dominant soil phyla Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Firmicutes. Metagenome datamining validated that these genes were disproportionately abundant in aerated soils compared with other ecosystems. We confirmed through high-performance liquid chromatography analysis that aerobically grown stationary-phase cultures of three bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans, Oligotropha carboxidovorans and Thermomicrobium roseum, synthesized F420, with oligoglutamate sidechains of different lengths. To understand the evolution of F420 biosynthesis, we also analyzed the distribution, phylogeny and genetic organization of the cof genes. Our data suggest that although the Fo precursor to F420 originated in methanogens, F420 itself was first synthesized in an ancestral actinobacterium. F420 biosynthesis genes were then disseminated horizontally to archaea and other bacteria. Together, our findings suggest that the cofactor is more significant in aerobic bacterial metabolism and soil ecosystem composition than previously thought. The cofactor may confer several competitive advantages for aerobic soil bacteria by mediating their central metabolic processes and broadening the range of organic compounds they can synthesize, detoxify and mineralize.

  18. Use of a Hierarchical Oligonucleotide Primer Extension Approach for Multiplexed Relative Abundance Analysis of Methanogens in Anaerobic Digestion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Hui-Ping; Hsu, Mao-Hsuan; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we established a rapid multiplex method to detect the relative abundances of amplified 16S rRNA genes from known cultivatable methanogens at hierarchical specificities in anaerobic digestion systems treating industrial wastewater and sewage sludge. The method was based on the hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension (HOPE) technique and combined with a set of 27 primers designed to target the total archaeal populations and methanogens from 22 genera within 4 taxonomic orders. After optimization for their specificities and detection sensitivity under the conditions of multiple single-nucleotide primer extension reactions, the HOPE approach was applied to analyze the methanogens in 19 consortium samples from 7 anaerobic treatment systems (i.e., 513 reactions). Among the samples, the methanogen populations detected with order-level primers accounted for >77.2% of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes detected using an Archaea-specific primer. The archaeal communities typically consisted of 2 to 7 known methanogen genera within the Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales and displayed population dynamic and spatial distributions in anaerobic reactor operations. Principal component analysis of the HOPE data further showed that the methanogen communities could be clustered into 3 distinctive groups, in accordance with the distribution of the Methanosaeta, Methanolinea, and Methanomethylovorans, respectively. This finding suggested that in addition to acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, the methylotrophic methanogens might play a key role in the anaerobic treatment of industrial wastewater. Overall, the results demonstrated that the HOPE approach is a specific, rapid, and multiplexing platform to determine the relative abundances of targeted methanogens in PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene products. PMID:24077716

  19. Community Composition and Density of Methanogens in the Foregut of the Tammar Wallaby (Macropus eugenii)▿

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Paul N.; Hinds, Lyn A.; Sly, Lindsay I.; McSweeney, Christopher S.; Morrison, Mark; Wright, André-Denis G.

    2009-01-01

    The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the foregut contents of Tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) was studied using 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme reductase subunit A (mcrA) gene clone libraries. Methanogens belonging to the Methanobacteriales and a well-supported cluster of uncultivated archaeon sequences previously observed in the ovine and bovine rumens were found. Methanogen densities ranged from 7.0 × 105 and 3.9 × 106 cells per gram of wet weight. PMID:19218421

  20. Domestication of a Mesoamerican cultivated fruit tree, Spondias purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Allison; Schaal, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Contemporary patterns of genetic variation in crops reflect historical processes associated with domestication, such as the geographic origin(s) of cultivated populations. Although significant progress has been made in identifying several global centers of domestication, few studies have addressed the issue of multiple origins of cultivated plant populations from different geographic regions within a domestication center. This study investigates the domestication history of jocote (Spondias purpurea), a Mesoamerican cultivated fruit tree. Sequences of the chloroplast spacer trnG–trnS were obtained for cultivated and wild S. purpurea trees, two sympatric taxa (Spondias mombin var. mombin and Spondias radlkoferi), and two outgroups (S. mombin var. globosa and Spondias testudinus). A phylogeographic approach was used and statistically significant associations of clades and geographical location were tested with a nested clade analysis. The sequences confirm that wild populations of S. purpurea are the likely progenitors of cultivated jocote trees. This study provides phylogeographic evidence of multiple domestications of this Mesoamerican cultivated fruit tree. Haplotypes detected in S. purpurea trees form two clusters, each of which includes alleles recovered in both cultivated and wild populations from distinct geographic regions. Cultivated S. purpurea populations have fewer unique trnG–trnS alleles than wild populations; however, five haplotypes were absent in the wild. The presence of unique alleles in cultivation may reflect contemporary extinction of the tropical dry forests of Mesoamerica. These data indicate that some agricultural habitats may be functioning as reservoirs of genetic variation in S. purpurea. PMID:16126899

  1. Domestication of a Mesoamerican cultivated fruit tree, Spondias purpurea.

    PubMed

    Miller, Allison; Schaal, Barbara

    2005-09-06

    Contemporary patterns of genetic variation in crops reflect historical processes associated with domestication, such as the geographic origin(s) of cultivated populations. Although significant progress has been made in identifying several global centers of domestication, few studies have addressed the issue of multiple origins of cultivated plant populations from different geographic regions within a domestication center. This study investigates the domestication history of jocote (Spondias purpurea), a Mesoamerican cultivated fruit tree. Sequences of the chloroplast spacer trnG-trnS were obtained for cultivated and wild S. purpurea trees, two sympatric taxa (Spondias mombin var. mombin and Spondias radlkoferi), and two outgroups (S. mombin var. globosa and Spondias testudinus). A phylogeographic approach was used and statistically significant associations of clades and geographical location were tested with a nested clade analysis. The sequences confirm that wild populations of S. purpurea are the likely progenitors of cultivated jocote trees. This study provides phylogeographic evidence of multiple domestications of this Mesoamerican cultivated fruit tree. Haplotypes detected in S. purpurea trees form two clusters, each of which includes alleles recovered in both cultivated and wild populations from distinct geographic regions. Cultivated S. purpurea populations have fewer unique trnG-trnS alleles than wild populations; however, five haplotypes were absent in the wild. The presence of unique alleles in cultivation may reflect contemporary extinction of the tropical dry forests of Mesoamerica. These data indicate that some agricultural habitats may be functioning as reservoirs of genetic variation in S. purpurea.

  2. Process diagnosis using methanogenic Archaea in maize-fed, trace element depleted fermenters.

    PubMed

    Munk, Bernhard; Lebuhn, Michael

    2014-10-01

    A mesophilic maize-fed pilot-scale fermenter was severely acidified due to trace element (TE) deficiency. Mainly cobalt (0.07 mg * kg(-1) fresh mass (FM)), selenium (0.007 mg * kg(-1) FM) and sodium (13 mg * kg(-1) FM) were depleted. From this inoculum, three lab-scale flow-through fermenters were operated to analyse micronutrient deficiencies and population dynamics in more detail. One fermenter was supplemented with selenium, one with cobalt, and one served as control. After starvation and recovery of the fermenters, the organic loading rate (OLR) was increased. In parallel, the concentration (Real-Time PCR) of methanogens and their population composition (amplicon sequencing) was determined at the DNA and mRNA level. The parameters Metabolic Quotient (MQ) and cDNA/DNA were calculated to assess the activity of the methanogens. The control without TE supplementation acidified first at an OLR of 4.0 kg volatile solids (VS) * m(-3) * d(-1) while the singular addition of selenium and of cobalt positively influenced the fermenter stability up to an OLR of 4.5 or 5.0 kg VS * m(-3) * d(-1), respectively. In the stable process, the methanogenic populations were dominated by probably residual hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus sp. (DNA-level), but representatives of versatile Methanosarcina sp. were most active (cDNA-level). When the TE supplemented fermenters began to acidify, Methanosarcina spp. were dominant in the whole (DNA-level) and the active (cDNA-level) community. The acidified control fermenter was dominated by Methanobacteriaceae genus IV. Until acidification, the concentration of methanogens increased with higher OLRs. The MQ indicated stress metabolism approximately one month before the TVA/TIC ratio reached a critical level of 0.7, demonstrating its suitability as early warning parameter of process acidification. The development of the cDNA/DNA ratio also reflected the increasing methanogenic activity with higher OLRs. Highest cDNA/DNA values (ca. 2) were

  3. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm.

    PubMed

    Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7%) were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers) were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest) and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area). More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  4. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm

    PubMed Central

    Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7%) were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers) were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest) and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area). More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied. PMID:27006640

  5. Methanogenic activity in plankton samples and fish intestines A mechanism for in situ methanogenesis in oceanic surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.

    1979-01-01

    When plankton samples were incubated anaerobically with a cysteine-sulfide reducing agent, pronounced methane evolution occurred. This activity was inhibited by air, CHCl3, C2H2, and 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Adding [14C]CO32− resulted in accumulation of [14C]CH4. Portions of the digestive tracts of three fishes were incubated in methanogenic media, and two of the samples showed the presence of methanogenic bacteria.

  6. The Genome Sequence of the Rumen Methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium Reveals New Possibilities for Controlling Ruminant Methane Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, Sinead C.; Kelly, William J.; Altermann, Eric; Ronimus, Ron S.; Yeoman, Carl J.; Pacheco, Diana M.; Li, Dong; Kong, Zhanhao; McTavish, Sharla; Sang, Carrie; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Janssen, Peter H.; Dey, Debjit; Attwood, Graeme T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG), having a global warming potential 21 times that of carbon dioxide (CO2). Methane emissions from agriculture represent around 40% of the emissions produced by human-related activities, the single largest source being enteric fermentation, mainly in ruminant livestock. Technologies to reduce these emissions are lacking. Ruminant methane is formed by the action of methanogenic archaea typified by Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, which is present in ruminants fed a wide variety of diets worldwide. To gain more insight into the lifestyle of a rumen methanogen, and to identify genes and proteins that can be targeted to reduce methane production, we have sequenced the 2.93 Mb genome of M. ruminantium M1, the first rumen methanogen genome to be completed. Methodology/Principal Findings The M1 genome was sequenced, annotated and subjected to comparative genomic and metabolic pathway analyses. Conserved and methanogen-specific gene sets suitable as targets for vaccine development or chemogenomic-based inhibition of rumen methanogens were identified. The feasibility of using a synthetic peptide-directed vaccinology approach to target epitopes of methanogen surface proteins was demonstrated. A prophage genome was described and its lytic enzyme, endoisopeptidase PeiR, was shown to lyse M1 cells in pure culture. A predicted stimulation of M1 growth by alcohols was demonstrated and microarray analyses indicated up-regulation of methanogenesis genes during co-culture with a hydrogen (H2) producing rumen bacterium. We also report the discovery of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases in M. ruminantium M1, the first reported in archaeal species. Conclusions/Significance The M1 genome sequence provides new insights into the lifestyle and cellular processes of this important rumen methanogen. It also defines vaccine and chemogenomic targets for broad inhibition of rumen methanogens and represents a significant contribution to

  7. Cultivation-independent analysis of archaeal and bacterial communities of the formation water in an Indian coal bed to enhance biotransformation of coal into methane.

    PubMed

    Singh, Durgesh Narain; Kumar, Ashok; Sarbhai, Munish Prasad; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Biogenic origin of the significant proportion of coal bed methane has indicated the role of microbial communities in methanogenesis. By using cultivation-independent approach, we have analysed the archaeal and bacterial community present in the formation water of an Indian coal bed at 600-700 m depth to understand their role in methanogenesis. Presence of methanogens in the formation water was inferred by epifluorescence microscopy and PCR amplification of mcrA gene. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone library from the formation water metagenome was dominated by methanogens showing similarity to Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter and Methanolinea whereas the clones of bacterial 16S rRNA gene library were closely related to Azonexus, Azospira, Dechloromonas and Thauera. Thus, microbial community of the formation water consisted of predominantly hydrogenotrophic methanogens and the proteobacteria capable of nitrogen fixation, nitrate reduction and polyaromatic compound degradation. Methanogenic potential of the microbial community present in the formation water was elucidated by the production of methane in the enrichment culture, which contained 16S rRNA gene sequences showing close relatedness to the genus Methanobacterium. Microcosm using formation water as medium as well as a source of inoculum and coal as carbon source produced significant amount of methane which increased considerably by the addition of nitrite. The dominance of Diaphorobacter sp. in nitrite amended microcosm indicated their important role in supporting methanogenesis in the coal bed. This is the first study indicating existence of methanogenic and bacterial community in an Indian coal bed that is capable of in situ biotransformation of coal into methane.

  8. Evidence of Active Methanogen Communities in Shallow Sediments of the Sonora Margin Cold Seeps

    PubMed Central

    L'Haridon, Stéphane; Godfroy, Anne; Roussel, Erwan G.; Cragg, Barry A.; Parkes, R. John; Toffin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the Sonora Margin cold seep ecosystems (Gulf of California), sediments underlying microbial mats harbor high biogenic methane concentrations, fueling various microbial communities, such as abundant lineages of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME). However, the biodiversity, distribution, and metabolism of the microorganisms producing this methane remain poorly understood. In this study, measurements of methanogenesis using radiolabeled dimethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate showed that biogenic methane production in these sediments was mainly dominated by methylotrophic methanogenesis, while the proportion of autotrophic methanogenesis increased with depth. Congruently, methane production and methanogenic Archaea were detected in culture enrichments amended with trimethylamine and bicarbonate. Analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and reverse-transcribed PCR-amplified 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from these enrichments revealed the presence of active methylotrophic Methanococcoides burtonii relatives and several new autotrophic Methanogenium lineages, confirming the cooccurrence of Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales methanogens with abundant ANME populations in the sediments of the Sonora Margin cold seeps. PMID:25769831

  9. Biological reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene to ethylene under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, D L; Gossett, J M

    1989-01-01

    A biological process for remediation of groundwater contaminated with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) can only be applied if the transformation products are environmentally acceptable. Studies with enrichment cultures of PCE- and TCE-degrading microorganisms provide evidence that, under methanogenic conditions, mixed cultures are able to completely dechlorinate PCE and TCE to ethylene, a product which is environmentally acceptable. Radiotracer studies with [14C]PCE indicated that [14C]ethylene was the terminal product; significant conversion to 14CO2 or 14CH4 was not observed. The rate-limiting step in the pathway appeared to be conversion of vinyl chloride to ethylene. To sustain reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE, it was necessary to supply an electron donor; methanol was the most effective, although hydrogen, formate, acetate, and glucose also served. Studies with the inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate suggested that methanogens played a key role in the observed biotransformations of PCE and TCE. PMID:2552919

  10. Molecular biology and physiology of methanogenic archaebacteria. Annual report, July 1988-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, D.P.; McCarthy, D.; Tanner, R.S.

    1989-06-27

    Methane-producing archaebacteria are worthy of their novel biology and potential in anaerobic bioprocessing. This work continues to study the biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology of the thermophilic autotroph Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. DNA from antimetabolite-resistant mutant strains was used to transform sensitive recipient cells to resistance, and DNA was cloned into Escherichia coli plasmids. This DNA will be mutated with transposons in the E. coli host, then isolated and used to transform methanogen cells to selectable mutant phenotypes. Mutant strains resistant to purine analogs were used to determine that wild type cells of M. thermoautotrophicum possess an almost complete set of enzymes for uptake, activation, and interconversion of purine bases and nucleosides. These mutants and the information about the pathways will be the basis for generating a genetic map. Metabolic studies of a unique formate auxotroph revealed a new role for this one carbon compound in the anabolic metabolism of this methanogen.

  11. Metagenomic identification of active methanogens and methanotrophs in serpentinite springs of the Voltri Massif, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Christopher N.; Hyer, Alex; Twing, Katrina I.; Longino, August A.; Lang, Susan Q.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2017-01-01

    The production of hydrogen and methane by geochemical reactions associated with the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks can potentially support subsurface microbial ecosystems independent of the photosynthetic biosphere. Methanogenic and methanotrophic microorganisms are abundant in marine hydrothermal systems heavily influenced by serpentinization, but evidence for methane-cycling archaea and bacteria in continental serpentinite springs has been limited. This report provides metagenomic and experimental evidence for active methanogenesis and methanotrophy by microbial communities in serpentinite springs of the Voltri Massif, Italy. Methanogens belonging to family Methanobacteriaceae and methanotrophic bacteria belonging to family Methylococcaceae were heavily enriched in three ultrabasic springs (pH 12). Metagenomic data also suggest the potential for hydrogen oxidation, hydrogen production, carbon fixation, fermentation, and organic acid metabolism in the ultrabasic springs. The predicted metabolic capabilities are consistent with an active subsurface ecosystem supported by energy and carbon liberated by geochemical reactions within the serpentinite rocks of the Voltri Massif. PMID:28149702

  12. Evidence of active methanogen communities in shallow sediments of the sonora margin cold seeps.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Adrien; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Godfroy, Anne; Roussel, Erwan G; Cragg, Barry A; Parkes, R John; Toffin, Laurent

    2015-05-15

    In the Sonora Margin cold seep ecosystems (Gulf of California), sediments underlying microbial mats harbor high biogenic methane concentrations, fueling various microbial communities, such as abundant lineages of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME). However, the biodiversity, distribution, and metabolism of the microorganisms producing this methane remain poorly understood. In this study, measurements of methanogenesis using radiolabeled dimethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate showed that biogenic methane production in these sediments was mainly dominated by methylotrophic methanogenesis, while the proportion of autotrophic methanogenesis increased with depth. Congruently, methane production and methanogenic Archaea were detected in culture enrichments amended with trimethylamine and bicarbonate. Analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and reverse-transcribed PCR-amplified 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from these enrichments revealed the presence of active methylotrophic Methanococcoides burtonii relatives and several new autotrophic Methanogenium lineages, confirming the cooccurrence of Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales methanogens with abundant ANME populations in the sediments of the Sonora Margin cold seeps.

  13. A coupled, pore-scale model for methanogenic microbial activity in underground hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebigbo, Anozie; Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Underground hydrogen storage (UHS) as a means of energy storage is an efficient way of compensating for seasonal fluctuations in the availability of energy. One important factor which influences this technology is the activity of methanogenic microorganisms capable of utilising hydrogen and carbon dioxide for metabolism and leading to a change in the stored gas composition. A coupled, pore-scale model is presented which aids in the investigation of the mechanisms that govern the conversion of hydrogen to methane, i.e. advective hydrogen flow, its diffusion into microbial biofilms of multiple species, and its consumption within these biofilms. The model assumes that spherical grains are coated by a film of residual water and treats the biofilm development within each film in a quasi one-dimensional manner. A sample simulation using the presented model illustrates the biofilm growth process in these films as well as the competition between three different microbial species: methanogens, acetogens, and acetotrophs.

  14. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity.

  15. Abundance and potential metabolic activity of methanogens in well-aerated forest and grassland soils of an alpine region.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Katrin; Praeg, Nadine; Mutschlechner, Mira; Wagner, Andreas O; Illmer, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Although methanogens were recently discovered to occur in aerated soils, alpine regions have not been extensively studied for their presence so far. Here, the abundance of archaea and the methanogenic guilds Methanosarcinales, Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocella spp. was studied at 16 coniferous forest and 14 grassland sites located at the montane and subalpine belts of the Northern Limestone Alps (calcareous) and the Austrian Central Alps (siliceous) using quantitative real-time PCR. Abundance of archaea, methanogens and the methanogenic potentials were significantly higher in grasslands than in forests. Furthermore, methanogenic potentials of calcareous soils were higher due to pH. Methanococcales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocella spp. were detected in all collected samples, which indicates that they are autochthonous, while Methanobacteriales were absent from 4 out of 16 forest soils. Methanosarcinales were absent from 10 out of 16 forest soils and 2 out of 14 grassland soils. Nevertheless, together with Methanococcales they represented the majority of the 16S rRNA gene copies quantified from the grassland soils. Contrarily, forest soils were clearly dominated by Methanococcales. Our results indicate a higher diversity of methanogens in well-aerated soils than previously believed and that pH mainly influences their abundances and activities.

  16. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy reveals a convergence of the chemical composition in methanogenic archaea from a Siberian permafrost-affected soil.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Paloma; Hermelink, Antje; Lasch, Peter; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; König, Nicole; Burckhardt, Oliver; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Methanogenic archaea are widespread anaerobic microorganisms responsible for the production of biogenic methane. Several new species of psychrotolerant methanogenic archaea were recently isolated from a permafrost-affected soil in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia), showing an exceptional resistance against desiccation, osmotic stress, low temperatures, starvation, UV and ionizing radiation when compared to methanogens from non-permafrost environments. To gain a deeper insight into the differences observed in their resistance, we described the chemical composition of methanogenic strains from permafrost and non-permafrost environments using confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM). CRM is a powerful tool for microbial identification and provides fingerprint-like information about the chemical composition of the cells. Our results show that the chemical composition of methanogens from permafrost-affected soils presents a high homology and is remarkably different from strains inhabiting non-permafrost environments. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the studied strains based on the functional gene mcrA to prove the different evolutionary relationship of the permafrost strains. We conclude that the permafrost methanogenic strains show a convergent chemical composition regardless of their genotype. This fact is likely to be the consequence of a complex adaptive process to the Siberian permafrost environment and might be the reason underlying their resistant nature.

  17. Microbial diversity and methanogenic activity of Antrim Shale formation waters from recently fractured wells

    PubMed Central

    Wuchter, Cornelia; Banning, Erin; Mincer, Tracy J.; Drenzek, Nicholas J.; Coolen, Marco J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin is one of the most productive shale gas formations in the U.S., but optimal resource recovery strategies must rely on a thorough understanding of the complex biogeochemical, microbial, and physical interdependencies in this and similar systems. We used Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the diversity and relative abundance of prokaryotic communities present in Antrim shale formation water of three closely spaced recently fractured gas-producing wells. In addition, the well waters were incubated with a suite of fermentative and methanogenic substrates in an effort to stimulate microbial methane generation. The three wells exhibited substantial differences in their community structure that may arise from their different drilling and fracturing histories. Bacterial sequences greatly outnumbered those of archaea and shared highest similarity to previously described cultures of mesophiles and moderate halophiles within the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and δ- and ε-Proteobacteria. The majority of archaeal sequences shared highest sequence similarity to uncultured euryarchaeotal environmental clones. Some sequences closely related to cultured methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also present in the initial well water. Incubation with methanol and trimethylamine stimulated methylotrophic methanogens and resulted in the largest increase in methane production in the formation waters, while fermentation triggered by the addition of yeast extract and formate indirectly stimulated hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The addition of sterile powdered shale as a complex natural substrate stimulated the rate of methane production without affecting total methane yields. Depletion of methane indicative of anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was observed over the course of incubation with some substrates. This process could constitute a substantial loss of methane in the shale formation. PMID:24367357

  18. Zero-valent iron on Mars: An alternative energy source for methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastain, Brendon K.; Kral, Timothy A.

    2010-07-01

    Zero-valent iron, montmorillonite-like smectites, and CO 2 gas are known to exist on Mars, and work was performed to investigate the ability of methanogens to subsist on these materials. After 71 days of incubation at 55 °C, mean methane concentration as percent of headspace volume was 19.80 ± 1.76% (mean ± SE) for replicates containing elemental iron and 0.50 ± 0.15% for those lacking elemental iron.

  19. Diversity and variability of methanogens during the shift from mesophilic to thermohilic conditions while biogas production.

    PubMed

    Ziembińska-Buczyńska, A; Banach, A; Bacza, T; Pieczykolan, M

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is the most popular path of organic waste disposal. It is often used in wastewater treatment plants for excessive sludge removal. Methanogenic fermentation had usually been performed under mesophilic conditions, but in the past few years the thermophilic processes have become more popular due to economics and sludge sanitation. Methanogens, the group of microorganisms responsible for methane production, are thought to be sensitive to temperature change and it has already been proven that the communities performing methanogenesis under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions differ. But in most cases the research performed on methanogen diversity and changeability was undertaken in two separate anaerobic chambers for meso- and thermophilic conditions. It is also known that there is a group of microorganisms performing AD which are insensitive to temperature. Also the linkage between digester performance and its microbial content and community changeability is still not fully understood. That is why in this experiment we analyzed the bacterial community performing methanogenesis in a pilot scale anaerobic chamber during the shift from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions to point at the group of temperature tolerant microorganisms and their performance. The research was performed with PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). It occurred that the community biodiversity decreased together with a temperature increase. The changes were coherent for both the total bacteria community and methanogens. These bacterial shifts were also convergent with biogas production-it decreased in the beginning of the thermophilic phase with the bacterial biodiversity decrease and increased when the community seemed to be restored. DGGE results suggest that among a wide variety of microorganisms involved in AD there is a GC-rich group relatively insensitive towards temperature change, able to adapt quickly to shifts in

  20. Protein complexing in a methanogen suggests electron bifurcation and electron delivery from formate to heterodisulfide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Kyle C.; Wong, Phoebe M.; Wang, Tiansong; Lie, Thomas J.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Swanson, Ingrid; Burn, June A.; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In methanogenic Archaea, the final step of methanogenesis generates methane and a heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoM-S-S-CoB). Reduction of this heterodisulfide by heterodisulfide reductase to regenerate HS-CoM and HS-CoB is an exergonic process. Thauer et al. [Thauer, et al. 2008 Nat Rev Microbiol 6:579–591] recently suggested that in hydrogenotrophic methanogens the energy of heterodisulfide reduction powers the most endergonic reaction in the pathway, catalyzed by the formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, via flavin-based electron bifurcation. Here we present evidence that these two steps in methanogenesis are physically linked. We identify a protein complex from the hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis, that contains heterodisulfide reductase, formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, F420-nonreducing hydrogenase, and formate dehydrogenase. In addition to establishing a physical basis for the electron-bifurcation model of energy conservation, the composition of the complex also suggests that either H2 or formate (two alternative electron donors for methanogenesis) can donate electrons to the heterodisulfide-H2 via F420-nonreducing hydrogenase or formate via formate dehydrogenase. Electron flow from formate to the heterodisulfide rather than the use of H2 as an intermediate represents a previously unknown path of electron flow in methanogenesis. We further tested whether this path occurs by constructing a mutant lacking F420-nonreducing hydrogenase. The mutant displayed growth equal to wild-type with formate but markedly slower growth with hydrogen. The results support the model of electron bifurcation and suggest that formate, like H2, is closely integrated into the methanogenic pathway. PMID:20534465

  1. Land-atmosphere exchange of CH4 in Barrow, Alaska: Contributions of Methanogens and Methanotrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Graham, D. E.; Elias, D. A.; Phelps, T. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate prediction of climate-biogeochemistry requires a good understanding and explicit microbial mechanisms being incorporated. A microbial functional group-based module has been developed to simulate the production and consumption of the methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas along soil profile. The developed module in stand-along version has been tested and validated against our previous incubation results. The module was then incorporated into the Community Land Model 4.5 (CLM4.5), the land component of the Community Earth system model. After parameterization with literature-derived data, we use the CLM4.5 model with multiple soil layers version to simulate CH4 processes at Barrow, Alaska and compare with the field observational data from the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE Arctic). The relative contributions of four microbial functional groups, acetotrophic methanogens, hydrogenotrophic methanogens, aerobic methanotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs, to the CH4 flux were quantified and evaluated. The tested model was used for regional estimation of CH4 fluxes. The sensitivity analysis identifies that acetate acid production has a substantial effect on CH4 production. The simulation results confirmed that microbial mechanisms are critically important for simulating CH4 fluxes. The acetotrophic methanogens play a dominant contribution while hydrogenotrophic methanogens have minor contribution to CH4 production; aerobic methanotrophs have predominated contribution to methane consumption. The anaerobic methanotrophs are important for CH4 consumption in the northern permafrost region due to long-term anaerobic condition in the Arctic region that normally induces large population of anaerobic methanotrophs. The vertical distribution of microbial contribution to the CH4 process is largely different across microbial functional groups and environmental condition. This microbial functional group-based biogeochemistry module is among the first attempts to

  2. Microbial diversity and methanogenic activity of Antrim Shale formation waters from recently fractured wells.

    PubMed

    Wuchter, Cornelia; Banning, Erin; Mincer, Tracy J; Drenzek, Nicholas J; Coolen, Marco J L

    2013-01-01

    The Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin is one of the most productive shale gas formations in the U.S., but optimal resource recovery strategies must rely on a thorough understanding of the complex biogeochemical, microbial, and physical interdependencies in this and similar systems. We used Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the diversity and relative abundance of prokaryotic communities present in Antrim shale formation water of three closely spaced recently fractured gas-producing wells. In addition, the well waters were incubated with a suite of fermentative and methanogenic substrates in an effort to stimulate microbial methane generation. The three wells exhibited substantial differences in their community structure that may arise from their different drilling and fracturing histories. Bacterial sequences greatly outnumbered those of archaea and shared highest similarity to previously described cultures of mesophiles and moderate halophiles within the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and δ- and ε-Proteobacteria. The majority of archaeal sequences shared highest sequence similarity to uncultured euryarchaeotal environmental clones. Some sequences closely related to cultured methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also present in the initial well water. Incubation with methanol and trimethylamine stimulated methylotrophic methanogens and resulted in the largest increase in methane production in the formation waters, while fermentation triggered by the addition of yeast extract and formate indirectly stimulated hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The addition of sterile powdered shale as a complex natural substrate stimulated the rate of methane production without affecting total methane yields. Depletion of methane indicative of anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was observed over the course of incubation with some substrates. This process could constitute a substantial loss of methane in the shale formation.

  3. Methyl fluoride affects methanogenesis rather than community composition of methanogenic archaea in a rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Daebeler, Anne; Gansen, Martina; Frenzel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of methane formation vary with environmental conditions, but whether this can also be linked to changes in the active archaeal community structure remains uncertain. Here, we show that the suppression of aceticlastic methanogenesis by methyl fluoride (CH(3)F) caused surprisingly little differences in community composition of active methanogenic archaea from a rice field soil. By measuring the natural abundances of carbon isotopes we found that the effective dose for a 90% inhibition of aceticlastic methanogenesis in anoxic paddy soil incubations was <0.75% CH(3)F (v/v). The construction of clone libraries as well as t-RFLP analysis revealed that the active community, as indicated by mcrA transcripts (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, a key enzyme for methanogenesis), remained stable over a wide range of CH(3)F concentrations and represented only a subset of the methanogenic community. More precisely, Methanocellaceae were of minor importance, but Methanosarcinaceae dominated the active population, even when CH(3)F inhibition only allowed for aceticlastic methanogenesis. In addition, we detected mcrA gene fragments of a so far unrecognised phylogenetic cluster. Transcription of this phylotype at methyl fluoride concentrations suppressing aceticlastic methanogenesis suggests that the respective organisms perform hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Hence, the application of CH(3)F combined with transcript analysis is not only a useful tool to measure and assign in situ acetate usage, but also to explore substrate usage by as yet uncultivated methanogens.

  4. Conductive iron oxide minerals accelerate syntrophic cooperation in methanogenic benzoate degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Li; Tang, Jia; Wang, Yueqiang; Hu, Min; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-08-15

    Recent studies have suggested that conductive iron oxide minerals can facilitate syntrophic metabolism of the methanogenic degradation of organic matter, such as ethanol, propionate and butyrate, in natural and engineered microbial ecosystems. This enhanced syntrophy involves direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) powered by microorganisms exchanging metabolic electrons through electrically conductive minerals. Here, we evaluated the possibility that conductive iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) can stimulate the methanogenic degradation of benzoate, which is a common intermediate in the anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds. The results showed that 89-94% of the electrons released from benzoate oxidation were recovered in CH4 production, and acetate was identified as the only carbon-bearing intermediate during benzoate degradation. Compared with the iron-free controls, the rates of methanogenic benzoate degradation were enhanced by 25% and 53% in the presence of hematite and magnetite, respectively. This stimulatory effect probably resulted from DIET-mediated methanogenesis in which electrons transfer between syntrophic partners via conductive iron minerals. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved in the functioning of syntrophic DIET. Considering the ubiquitous presence of iron minerals within soils and sediments, the findings of this study will increase the current understanding of the natural biological attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic environments.

  5. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao Dan; Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Long, Ruijun; Denman, Stuart E.; McSweeney, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep) and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep) species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences. PMID:27274707

  6. Propionate-degrading bacterium, Syntrophobacter wolinii sp. nov. gen. nov. , from methanogenic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, D.R.; Bryant, M.P.

    1980-09-01

    A new genus and species of a nonmotile gram-negative rod, Syntrophobacter wolinii, is the first bacterium described which degrades propionate only in coculture with an H/sub 2/-using organism and in the absence of light or exogenous electron acceptors such as O/sub 2/, sulfate, or nitrate. It was isolated from methanogenic enrichments from an anaerobic municipal sewage digestor, using anaerobic roll tubes containing a medium with propionate as the energy source in association with an H/sub 2/-using, sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio sp. which cannot utilize fatty acids other than formate. S. wolinii produced acetate and, presumably, CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/ (or formate) from propionate. In media without sulfate and with Methanospirillum hungatei, a methanogen that uses only H/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/ or formate as an energy source, acetate, methane, and, presumably, CO/sub 2/ were produced from propionate and only small amounts of Desulfovibrio sp. were present. Isolation in coculture with the methanogen was not successful. S. wolinii does not use other saturated fatty acids as energy sources. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis as a tool for monitoring methanogenic Archaea changes in an anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Bułkowska, Katarzyna; Dabrowska, Dorota; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Możejko, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    The applicability of a newly-designed PCR primer pair in examination of methanogenic Archaea in a digester treating plant biomass was evaluated by Ribosmal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA). To find a suitable approach, three variants of RISA were tested: (1) standard, polyacrylamide gel-based, (2) automated, utilized capillary electrophoresis (GA-ARISA), and (3) automated microfluidics-based (MF-ARISA). All three techniques yielded a consistent picture of archaeal community structure changes during anaerobic digestion monitored for more than 6 weeks. While automated variants were more practical for handling and rapid analysis of methanogenic Archaea, the gel-based technique was advantageous when micro-organism identification was required. A DNA-sequence analysis of dominant bands extracted from the gel revealed that the main role in methane synthesis was played by micro-organisms affiliated with Methanosarcina barkeri. The obtained results revealed that RISA is a robust method allowing for detailed analysis of archaeal community structure during organic biomass conversion into biogas. In addition, our results showed that GA-ARISA has a higher resolution and reproducibility than other variants of RISA and could be used as a technique for tracking changes in methanogenic Archaea in an anaerobic digester.

  8. Biodegradation of C7 and C8 iso-alkanes under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Abu Laban, Nidal; Dao, Anh; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Iso-alkanes comprise a substantial proportion of petroleum and refined products that impact the environment, but their fate is cryptic under methanogenic conditions. We investigated methanogenic biodegradation of C7 and C8 iso-alkanes found in naphtha, specifically 2-methylhexane, 3-methylhexane, 2-methylheptane, 4-methylheptane and 3-ethylhexane. These were incubated as a mixture or individually with enrichment cultures derived from oil sands tailings ponds that generate methane from naphtha components; substrate depletion and methane production were monitored for up to 663 days. 3-Methylhexane and 4-methylheptane were degraded both singly and in the mixture, whereas 2-methylhexane and 2-methylheptane resisted degradation as single substrates but were depleted in the iso-alkane mixture, suggesting co-metabolism. 3-Ethylhexane was degraded neither singly nor with co-substrates. Putative metabolites consistent with succinylated C7 and C8 were detected, suggesting activation by addition of iso-alkanes to fumarate and corresponding to detection of alkylsuccinate synthase-like genes. 454 pyrotag sequencing, cloning and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA genes revealed predominance of a novel member of the family Peptococcaceae (order Clostridiales) and Archaea affiliated with Methanoregula and Methanosaeta. We report here isomer-specific metabolism of C7 -C8 iso-alkanes under methanogenic conditions and propose their activation by a novel Peptococcaceae via addition to fumarate.

  9. The effect of organic loading rate and retention time on hydrogen production from a methanogenic CSTR.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, O; Kaparaju, P; Rintala, J

    2011-10-01

    The possibility of shifting a methanogenic process for hydrogen production by changing the process parameters viz., organic loading rate (OLR) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) was evaluated. At first, two parallel semi-continuously fed continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated as methanogenic reactors (M1 and M2) for 78 days. Results showed that a methane yield of 198-218 L/kg volatile solids fed (VS(fed)) was obtained when fed with grass silage at an OLR of 2 kgVS/m³/d and HRT of 30 days. After 78 days of operation, hydrogen production was induced in M2 by increasing the OLR from 2 to 10 kgVS/m³/d and shortening the HRT from 30 to 6 days. The highest H₂ yield of 42 L/kgVS(fed) was obtained with a maximum H₂ content of 24%. The present results thus demonstrate that methanogenic process can be shifted towards hydrogen production by increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT.

  10. Influence of Environmental Conditions on Methanogenic Compositions in Anaerobic Biogas Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Karakashev, Dimitar; Batstone, Damien J.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2005-01-01

    The influence of environmental parameters on the diversity of methanogenic communities in 15 full-scale biogas plants operating under different conditions with either manure or sludge as feedstock was studied. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to identify dominant methanogenic members of the Archaea in the reactor samples; enriched and pure cultures were used to support the in situ identification. Dominance could be identified by a positive response by more than 90% of the total members of the Archaea to a specific group- or order-level probe. There was a clear dichotomy between the manure digesters and the sludge digesters. The manure digesters contained high levels of ammonia and of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and were dominated by members of the Methanosarcinaceae, while the sludge digesters contained low levels of ammonia and of VFA and were dominated by members of the Methanosaetaceae. The methanogenic diversity was greater in reactors operating under mesophilic temperatures. The impact of the original inoculum used for the reactor start-up was also investigated by assessment of the present population in the reactor. The inoculum population appeared to have no influence on the eventual population. PMID:15640206

  11. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  12. Anaerobic Digestion of Renewable Biomass: Thermophilic Temperature Governs Methanogen Population Dynamics ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Krakat, Niclas; Westphal, A.; Schmidt, S.; Scherer, P.

    2010-01-01

    Beet silage and beet juice were digested continuously as representative energy crops in a thermophilic biogas fermentor for more than 7 years. Fluorescence microscopy of 15 samples covering a period of 650 days revealed that a decrease in temperature from 60°C to 55°C converted a morphologically uniform archaeal population (rods) into a population of methanogens exhibiting different cellular morphologies (rods and coccoid cells). A subsequent temperature increase back to 60°C reestablished the uniform morphology of methanogens observed in the previous 60°C period. In order to verify these observations, representative samples were investigated by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Both methods confirmed the temperature-dependent population shift observed by fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, all samples investigated demonstrated that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales dominated in the fermentor, as 29 of 34 identified operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assigned to this order. This apparent discrimination of acetoclastic methanogens contradicts common models for anaerobic digestion processes, such as anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1), which describes the acetotrophic Euryarchaeota as predominant organisms. PMID:20097828

  13. Biogas process parameters--energetics and kinetics of secondary fermentations in methanogenic biomass degradation.

    PubMed

    Montag, Dominik; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Pool sizes of short-chain fatty acids (formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate), hydrogen, and carbon monoxide were assayed in digesting sludge from four different methanogenic reactors degrading either sewage sludge or agricultural products and wastes at pH 8.0 and 40 or 47 °C. Free reaction energies were calculated for the respective degradation reactions involved, indicating that acetate, propionate, and butyrate degradation all supplied sufficient energy (-10 to -30 kJ per mol reaction) to sustain the microbial communities involved in the respective processes. Pools of formate and hydrogen were energetically equivalent as electron carriers. In the sewage sludge reactor, homoacetogenic acetate formation from H2 and CO2 was energetically feasible whereas syntrophic acetate oxidation appeared to be possible in two biogas reactors, one operating at enhanced ammonia content (4.5 g NH4 (+)-N per l) and the other one at enhanced temperature (47 °C). Maximum capacities for production of methanogenic substrates did not exceed the consumption capacities by hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogens. Nonetheless, the capacity for acetate degradation appeared to be a limiting factor especially in the reactor operating at enhanced ammonia concentration.

  14. Limited aeration of methanogenic systems for treatment of sulfate-containing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Zitomer, D.H.; Shrout, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    Wastewaters with high sulfate concentrations are often not readily amenable to methanogenic treatment due to production of potentially inhibitory hydrogen sulfide. Some reports indicate that treatment has been enhanced by air sparging of recycle flows to air-strip hydrogen sulfide and create a selective environment for reduction of sulfate to elemental sulfur, rather than sulfides and thiosulfate. In this report, direct aeration of methanogenic expanded beds was employed for treatment of high-sulfate wastewater and compared to a strictly anaerobic control. An influent wastewater COD:SO{sup {minus}2}{sub 4} ratio as low as 4,4:1 did not discernibly inhibit methane production in the anaerobic control. At a relatively high OLR of 30g COD/L{sub A}-d and a relatively short HRT of 4.2 hours, the COD removal of the control was 97%. Methanogenesis was also sustained in the aerated reactors which had oxygen transfer rates of between 2 to 5% of the OLR. These aerated reactors converted approximately 70% of the COD to methane. Future research will involve higher sulfate loadings and aeration rates to determine possible benefits of direct aeration of methanogenic expanded beds.

  15. Direct Characterization of Methanogens in Two High-Rate Anaerobic Biological Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hester A.; de Macario, Everly Conway; Williams, Regan S.; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The methanogenic flora from two types of turbulent, high-rate reactors was studied by immunologic methods as well as by phase-contrast, fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy. The reactors were a fluidized sand-bed biofilm ANITRON reactor and an ultrafiltration membrane-associated suspended growth MARS reactor (both trademarks of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, Pa.). Conventional microscopic methods revealed complex mixtures of microbes of a range of sizes and shapes, among which morphotypes resembling Methanothrix spp. and Methanosarcina spp. were noticed. Precise identification of these and other methanogens was accomplished by antigenic fingerprinting with a comprehensive panel of calibrated antibody probes of predefined specificity spectra. The methanogens identified showed morphotypes and antigenic fingerprints indicating their close similarity with the following reference organisms: Methanobacterium formicicum MF and Methanosarcina barkeri W in the ANITRON reactor only; Methanosarcina barkeri R1M3, M. mazei S6, Methanogenium cariaci JR1, and Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus AZ in the MARS reactor only; and Methanobrevibacter smithii ALI and Methanothrix soehngenii Opfikon in both reactors. Species diversity and distribution appeared to be, at least in part, dependent on the degree of turbulence inside the reactor. Images PMID:16347581

  16. Comparative Analysis of Methanogenic Communities in Different Laboratory-Scale Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M.; Ziganshina, Elvira E.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative analysis of methanogenic archaea compositions and dynamics in 11 laboratory-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with different agricultural materials (chicken manure, cattle manure, maize straw, maize silage, distillers grains, and Jatropha press cake) was carried out by analysis of the methyl coenzyme-M reductase α-subunit (mcrA) gene. Various taxa within Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriaceae, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae, and Methanomassiliicoccales were detected in the biogas reactors but in different proportions depending on the substrate type utilized as well as various process parameters. Improved coverage and higher taxonomic resolution of methanogens were obtained compared to a previous 16S rRNA gene based study of the same reactors. Some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the relative methane content, whereas opposite correlations were found for Methanobacterium. Specific biogas production was found to be significantly correlating with Methanosarcinaceae. Statistical analysis also disclosed that some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the ammonia level, whereas the prevalence of Methanocorpusculum, Methanobacterium, and Methanosaeta was negatively correlated with this parameter. These results suggest that the application of methanogenic archaea adapted to specific feedstock might enhance the anaerobic digestion of such waste materials in full-scale biogas reactors. PMID:28074084

  17. How to cultivate Ectocarpus.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Susana M; Scornet, Delphine; Rousvoal, Sylvie; Peters, Nick T; Dartevelle, Laurence; Peters, Akira F; Cock, J Mark

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the standard procedure for growing Ectocarpus in the laboratory. The culture is started with partheno-sporophyte (or sporophyte) filaments because this is the stage that is usually maintained in strain collections. The standard medium is Provasoli-enriched natural seawater (PES), but Ectocarpus can also be grown in artificial seawater, which allows more precise control over the culture conditions. The algae can be cultivated either in plastic Petri dishes or in 10-L bottles with bubbling, if large amounts of biomass are required. Standard growth conditions are 13°C with a 12h/12h d/night cycle and 20 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) irradiance using daylight-type fluorescent tubes. All manipulations of Ectocarpus cultures should be performed in a clean environment (if possible, under a laminar flow hood). Forceps should be dipped in ethanol and allowed to dry under the hood.

  18. Starting from grape cultivation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A

    1992-06-01

    Rapid population growth can only be stopped by lowering the fertility rate. The UNFPA recommends improving the employment opportunities for women as the single best way of achieving this reduction. An example of this phenomenon is the grape cultivation in the Nordeste (Northeastern) region of Brazil. This area is the poorest part of Brazil and has the highest proportion of indigent people. These people have been deforesting the Amazon in search of a better life. What they have done is sterilize the land and turned a tropical rain forest into a desert. In an effort to reverse this trend, grape cultivation has been introduced in an area called Petrolina. The area is very dry with less than 500 mm of precipitation annually. They do have access to a 5000 square kilometer artificial lake (the largest in the world) and the 3rd largest river in Brazil (the Sao Francisco). In an effort to avoid using agricultural medicines, the vines are fertilized with organic matter created on the farm and little or no pesticides are used since pests do not live in such an arid region. It has taken 20 years of trial and error, but the quality of the grapes is now very high and is competitive on the world market. Because of climate and location, harvesting is done year round which increases the productivity of the land. The farm managers have found that married women make the best workers and have the highest level of productivity. Age at 1st marriage averages 24-25, compared with 15-16 for unemployed women in the same area. The fertility rate averages 50% of that for unemployed women in the same area. Agricultural development offers the best opportunity for the women of developing countries. It can pay a high wage, reduce fertility, and replant desert areas.

  19. CULTIVATION OF LEPTOSPIRAE I.

    PubMed Central

    Stalheim, O. H. V.; Wilson, J. B.

    1964-01-01

    Stalheim, O. H. V. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and J. B. Wilson. Cultivation of leptospirae. I. Nutrition of Leptospira canicola. J. Bacteriol. 88:48–54. 1964.—The nutrition of Leptospira canicola was investigated by use of synthetic media of suitable ionic strength. At an incubation temperature of 30 C, the minimal components were calcium, iron, magnesium, and ammonium ions, thiamine, and a fatty acid source; barium and strontium replaced calcium. Aspartic acid, glutamic acid, or methionine stimulated the rate and amount of growth; the best growth occurred in medium containing additional amino acids. Additions of cyanocobalamin or biotin permitted growth at 37 C. The stimulatory effects of added cyanocobalamin, biotin, pyridoxine, pantothenate, lipoic acid, or nicotinic acid were additive at 37 C, but not at 30 C. Fatty acids containing 14, 16, 17, or 18 carbon atoms supported growth; linoleic and linolenic acids were toxic. Glyceryl monooleate or trioleate, or Tween 40, 60, or 80 supported moderate to good growth; a mixture of monoolein and Tween 60, or Tweens 60 and 80 supported the best growth. Ten strains of L. canicola cultivated in a synthetic medium containing Tweens 60 and 80 attained cellular densities per ml of 107 to 4.0 × 107 organisms. L. canicola cells, resuspended in medium containing oleic-1-C14 acid, incorporated label primarily into cellular lipids; a lesser amount was located in the protein fraction, and only trace amounts were found in the nucleic acid fraction. The rate of incorporation was not affected by added sodium acetate. L. canicola was found to have fatty acid decarboxylase activity. PMID:14197904

  20. Hybrid origins of cultivated potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild and cultivated potatoes, Solanum section Petota, is taxonomically difficult, partly because of interspecific hybridization at both the diploid and polyploid levels. The taxonomy of cultivated potatoes is particularly controversial. With DNA sequence data of the GBSSI (waxy) gene we here infer r...

  1. DNA stable-isotope probing of oil sands tailings pond enrichment cultures reveals different key players for toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laban, Nidal Abu; Dao, Anh; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    Oil sands tailings ponds are anaerobic repositories of fluid wastes produced by extraction of bitumen from oil sands ores. Diverse indigenous microbiota biodegrade hydrocarbons (including toluene) in situ, producing methane, carbon dioxide and/or hydrogen sulfide, depending on electron acceptor availability. Stable-isotope probing of cultures enriched from tailings associated specific taxa and functional genes to (13)C6- and (12)C7-toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions. Total DNA was subjected to isopycnic ultracentrifugation followed by gradient fraction analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and construction of 16S rRNA, benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) gene clone libraries. T-RFLP analysis plus sequencing and in silico digestion of cloned taxonomic and functional genes revealed that Clostridiales, particularly Desulfosporosinus (136 bp T-RF) contained bssA genes and were key toluene degraders during methanogenesis dominated by Methanosaeta. Deltaproteobacterial Desulfobulbaceae (157 bp T-RF) became dominant under sulfidogenic conditions, likely because the Desulfosporosinus T-RF 136 apparently lacks dsrB and therefore, unlike its close relatives, is presumed incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. We infer incomplete oxidation of toluene by Desulfosporosinus in syntrophic association with Methanosaeta under methanogenic conditions, and complete toluene oxidation by Desulfobulbaceae during sulfate reduction.

  2. Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval Lozano, Claudia Johanna Vergara Mendoza, Marisol; Carreno de Arango, Mariela; Castillo Monroy, Edgar Fernando

    2009-02-15

    This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Rio Frio Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L{sup -1} and a concentration of CO{sub 2} of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} MPN mL{sup -1}). The acetogenic population was (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and the sulphate-reducing population was (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH{sub 4} (70%) were higher than CO{sub 2} (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L{sup -1}. Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and methanogenic bacteria (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified.

  3. Gut Colonization by Methanogenic Archaea Is Associated with Organic Dairy Consumption in Children

    PubMed Central

    van de Pol, Jeroen A. A.; van Best, Niels; Mbakwa, Catherine A.; Thijs, Carel; Savelkoul, Paul H.; Arts, Ilja C. W.; Hornef, Mathias W.; Mommers, Monique; Penders, John

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota represents a complex and diverse ecosystem with a profound impact on human health, promoting immune maturation, and host metabolism as well as colonization resistance. Important members that have often been disregarded are the methanogenic archaea. Methanogenic archaea reduce hydrogen levels via the production of methane, thereby stimulating food fermentation by saccharolytic bacteria. On the other hand, colonization by archaea has been suggested to promote a number of gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases such as colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and obesity. Archaea have been shown to be absent during infancy while omnipresent in school-aged children, suggesting that colonization may result from environmental exposure during childhood. The factors that determine the acquisition of methanogenic archaea, however, have remained undefined. Therefore, we aimed to explore determinants associated with the acquisition of the two main gastrointestinal archaeal species, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Methanosphaera stadtmanae, in children. Within the context of the KOALA Birth Cohort Study, fecal samples from 472 children aged 6–10 years were analyzed for the abundance of M. smithii and M. stadtmanae using qPCR. Environmental factors such as diet, lifestyle, hygiene, child rearing, and medication were recorded by repeated questionnaires. The relationship between these determinants and the presence and abundance of archaea was analyzed by logistic and linear regression respectively. Three hundred and sixty-nine out of the 472 children (78.2%) were colonized by M. smithii, and 39 out of the 472 children (8.3%) by M. stadtmanae. The consumption of organic yogurt (odds ratio: 4.25, CI95: 1.51; 11.95) and the consumption of organic milk (odds ratio: 5.58, CI95: 1.83; 17.01) were positively associated with the presence of M. smithii. We subsequently screened raw milk, processed milk, and yogurt samples for methanogens. We identified milk

  4. Effects of dietary supplementation of active dried yeast on fecal methanogenic archaea diversity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dingxing; Kang, Kun; Wang, Hongze; Wang, Zhisheng; Xue, Bai; Wang, Lizhi; Xu, Feng; Peng, Quanhui

    2017-02-07

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of different dosages of active dried yeast (ADY) on the fecal methanogenic archaea community of dairy cattle. Twelve multiparous, healthy, mid-lactating Holstein dairy cows (body weight: 584 ± 23.2 kg, milk produced: 26.3 ± 1.22 kg/d) were randomly assigned to one of three treatments (control, ADY2, and ADY4) according to body weight with four replicates per treatment. Cows in the control group were fed conventional rations without ADY supplementation, while cows in the ADY2 and ADY4 group were fed rations supplemented with ADY at 2 or 4 g/d/head. Real-time PCR analysis showed the populations of total methanogens in the feces were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the ADY4 group compared with control. High-throughput sequencing technology was applied to examine the differences in methanogenic archaea diversity in the feces of the three treatment groups. A total of 155,609 sequences were recovered (a mean of 12,967 sequences per sample) from the twelve fecal samples, which consisted of a number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) ranging from 1451 to 1,733, were assigned to two phyla, four classes, five orders, five families and six genera. Bioinformatic analyses illustrated that the natural fecal archaeal community of the control group was predominated by Methanobrevibacter (86.9% of the total sequence reads) and Methanocorpusculum (10.4%), while the relative abundance of the remaining four genera were below 1% with Methanosphaera comprising 0.8%, Thermoplasma composing 0.4%, and the relative abundance of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and Halalkalicoccus being close to zero. At the genus level, the relative abundances of Methanocorpusculum and Thermoplasma were increased (P < 0.05) with increasing dosage of ADY. Conversely, the predominant methanogen genus Methanobrevibacter was decreased with ADY dosage (P < 0.05). Dietary supplementation of ADY had no significant effect (P

  5. The Repertoire of Archaea Cultivated from Severe Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Hong T. T.; Pignoly, Marion; Nkamga, Vanessa D.; Drancourt, Michel; Aboudharam, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, the abundance and diversity of methanogenic archaea in the dental microbiota have been analysed by the detection of specific DNA sequences by PCR-based investigations and metagenomic studies. Few data issued regarding methanogens actually living in dental plaque. We collected dental plaque specimens in 15 control individuals and 65 periodontitis patients. Dental plaque specimens were cultured in an anoxic liquid medium for methanogens in the presence of negative control tubes. Dental plaque methanogens were cultured from 1/15 (6.67%) control and 36/65 (55.38%) periodontitis patient samples (p<0.001). The cultures yielded Methanobrevibacter oralis in one control and thirty-one patients, Methanobrevibacter smithii in two patients and a potential new species named Methanobrevibacter sp. strain N13 in three patients with severe periodontitis. Our observations of living methanogens, strengthen previous observations made on DNA-based studies regarding the role of methanogens, in periodontitis. PMID:25830311

  6. Family acholeplasmataceae (including phytoplasmas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Acholeplasmataceae was originally established to accommodate the genus Acholeplasma, comprising the mollicutes that could be cultivated without the supplement of cholesterol and that use UGA as a stop codon instead of coding for tryptophan. It was later shown that the phytoplasmas, a larg...

  7. The impact of dissolved organic carbon on the spatial variability of methanogenic archaea communities in natural wetland ecosystems across China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Jia, Zhongjun; Cai, Zucong

    2012-10-01

    Significant spatial variation in CH(4) emissions is a well-established feature of natural wetland ecosystems. To understand the key factors affecting CH(4) production, the variation in community structure of methanogenic archaea, in relation to substrate and external environmental influences, was investigated in selected wetlands across China, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Case study areas were the subtropical Poyang wetland, the warm-temperate Hongze wetland, the cold-temperate Sanjiang marshes, and the alpine Ruoergai peatland on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The topsoil layer in the Hongze wetland exhibited the highest population of methanogens; the lowest was found in the Poyang wetland. Maximum CH(4) production occurred in the topsoil layer of the Sanjiang Carex lasiocarpa marsh, the minimum was observed in the Ruoergai peatland. CH(4) production potential was significantly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration but not with the abundance or diversity indices of methanogenic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis and DOC concentration indicated a shift in the dominant methanogen from the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales in DOC-rich wetlands to Methanosarcinaceae with a low affinity in wetlands with relatively high DOC and then to the acetotrophic methanogen Methanosaetaceae with a high affinity in wetlands with low DOC, or with high DOC but rich sulfate-reducing bacteria. Therefore, it is proposed that the dominant methanogen type in wetlands is primarily influenced by available DOC concentration. In turn, the variation in CH(4) production potential in the wetlands of eastern China is attributable to differences in the DOC content and the dominant type of methanogen present.

  8. Investigation of Methanogen Diversity in Stored Swine Manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consolidated storage of swine manure is associated with the microbial production of a variety of odors and emissions, including ammonia, organic acids, alcohols, and hydrogen sulfide. Large quantities of methane are also produced from such facilities. In the United States, methane emissions from l...

  9. KINETICS OF ETHANOL BIODEGRADATION UNDER METHANOGENIC CONDITIONS IN GASOLINE SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate. A concern has been raised that biodegradation of ethanol from a spill of gasoline may inhibit the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzene. Ethanol is miscible in water, and ethanol is readily metabolized by mi...

  10. Survivability and growth kinetics of methanogenic archaea at various pHs and pressures: Implications for deep subsurface life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Navita; Nepal, Sudip; Kral, Timothy; Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-02-01

    Life as we know it requires liquid water and sufficient liquid water is highly unlikely on the surface of present-day Mars. However, according to thermal models there is a possibility of liquid water in the deep subsurface of Mars. Thus, the martian subsurface, where the pressure and temperature is higher, could potentially provide a hospitable environment for a biosphere. Also, methane has been detected in the Mars' atmosphere. Analogous to Earth's atmospheric methane, martian methane could also be biological in origin. The carbon and energy sources for methanogenesis in the subsurface of Mars could be available by downwelling of atmospheric CO2 into the regolith and water-rock reactions such as serpentinization, respectively. Corresponding analogs of the martian subsurface on Earth might be the active sites of serpentinization at depths where methanogenic thermophilic archaea are the dominant species. Methanogens residing in Earth's hydrothermal environments are usually exposed to a variety of physiological stresses including a wide range of pressures, temperatures, and pHs. Martian geochemical models imply that the pH of probable groundwater varies from 4.96 to 9.13. In this work, we used the thermophilic methanogen, Methanothermobacter wolfeii, which grows optimally at 55oC. Therefore, a temperature of 55oC was chosen for these experiments, possibly simulating Mars' subsurface temperature. A martian geophysical model suggests depth and pressure corresponding to a temperature of 55 °C would be between 1-30 km and 100-3,000 atm respectively. Here, we have simulated Mars deep subsurface pH, pressure, and temperature conditions and have investigated the survivability, growth rate, and morphology of M. wolfeii after exposure to a wide range of pH 5-9) and pressure (1-1200 atm) at a temperature of 55 °C. Interestingly, in this study we have found that M. wolfeii was able to survive at all the pressures and pHs tested at 55 °C. In order to understand the effect of

  11. Role of methanogens and other bacteria in degradation of dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol in anoxic freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lomans, B.P.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; Pol, A.; Drift, C. van der; Vogels, G.D.

    1999-05-01

    The roles of several trophic groups of organisms (methanogens and sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria) in the microbial degradation of methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were studied in freshwater sediments. The incubation of DMS- and MT-amended slurries revealed that methanogens are the dominant DMS and MT utilizers in sulfate-poor freshwater systems. In sediment slurries, which were depleted of sulfate, 75 {micro}mol of DMS was stoichiometrically converted into 112 {micro}mol of methane. The addition of methanol or MT to DMS-degrading slurries at concentrations similar to that of DMS reduced DMS degradation rates. This indicates that the methanogens in freshwater sediments, which degrade DMS, are also consumers of methanol and MT. To verify whether a competition between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria for DMS or MT takes place in sulfate-rich freshwater systems, the effects of sulfate and inhibitors, like bromoethanesulfonic acid, molybdate, and tungstate, on the degradation of MT and DMS were studied. The results for these sulfate-rich and sulfate-amended slurry incubations clearly demonstrated that besides methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria take part in MT and DMS degradation in freshwater sediments, provided that sulfate is available. The possible involvement of an interspecies hydrogen transfer in these processes is discussed. In general, the study provides evidence for methanogenesis as a major sink for MT and DMS in freshwater sediments.

  12. Changes in methane emission, rumen fermentation, and methanogenic community in response to silage and dry cornstalk diets.

    PubMed

    Chong, Liu; Zhuping, Zhu; Tongjun, Guo; Yongming, Luo; Hongmin, Dong

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of silage or dry cornstalk diets on methane emission, rumen fermentation, and methanogenic community, and reveal whether the change of methanogenic compositions was related to the methane production. A total of 39 sheep were divided into four groups, fed diets of different concentrate level based on silage or dry cornstalk roughage for 40 days. It was found that, at 20% concentrate level, the sheep fed silage could suppress methanogenesis significantly in contrast with the silage diet (p < 0.05). The ruminal acetate:propionate ratio was 3.17 in the silage-fed sheep significantly lower than 3.78 in the dry cornstalk-fed sheep (p < 0.05), reflecting the effect of fermentation on methane output was related to roughage types. Furthermore, the methanogens was found to be significantly lower abundance (p < 0.05), and showed a different pattern using multivariate statistical analysis in silage-fed sheep. Compared with dry cornstalk diet, silage diet of 20% concentrate reduced methane production, decreased methanogenic abundance, and induced change of Methanobrevibacter composition at strain levels. This study showed variation of methanogenic compositions at strain level and its probable relationship with methane production, and provided microbial information to explain the low methane output when the animals were fed silage.

  13. Zero-valent iron enhanced methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge after heat and alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Quan, Xie

    2015-04-01

    Heat or alkali pretreatment is the effective method to improve hydrolysis of waste sludge and then enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. However the pretreatment may inactivate the methanogens in the sludge. In the present work, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to enhance the methanogenic activity in anaerobic sludge digester under two methanogens-suppressing conditions, i.e. heat-pretreatment and alkali condition respectively. With the addition of ZVI, the lag time of methane production was shortened, and the methane yield increased by 91.5% compared to the control group. The consumption of VFA was accelerated by ZVI, especially for acetate, indicating that the acetoclastic methanogenesis was enhanced. In the alkali-condition experiment, the hydrogen produced decreased from 27.6 to 18.8 mL when increasing the ZVI dosage from 0 to 10 g/L. Correspondingly, the methane yield increased from 1.9 to 32.2 mL, which meant that the H2-utilizing methanogenes was enriched. These results suggested that the addition of ZVI into anaerobic digestion of sludge after pretreated by the heat or alkali process could efficiently recover the methanogenic activity and increase the methane production and sludge reduction.

  14. Role of methanogens and other bacteria in degradation of dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol in anoxic freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; Op den Camp, H J; Pol, A; van der Drift, C; Vogels, G D

    1999-05-01

    The roles of several trophic groups of organisms (methanogens and sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria) in the microbial degradation of methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were studied in freshwater sediments. The incubation of DMS- and MT-amended slurries revealed that methanogens are the dominant DMS and MT utilizers in sulfate-poor freshwater systems. In sediment slurries, which were depleted of sulfate, 75 micromol of DMS was stoichiometrically converted into 112 micromol of methane. The addition of methanol or MT to DMS-degrading slurries at concentrations similar to that of DMS reduced DMS degradation rates. This indicates that the methanogens in freshwater sediments, which degrade DMS, are also consumers of methanol and MT. To verify whether a competition between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria for DMS or MT takes place in sulfate-rich freshwater systems, the effects of sulfate and inhibitors, like bromoethanesulfonic acid, molybdate, and tungstate, on the degradation of MT and DMS were studied. The results for these sulfate-rich and sulfate-amended slurry incubations clearly demonstrated that besides methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria take part in MT and DMS degradation in freshwater sediments, provided that sulfate is available. The possible involvement of an interspecies hydrogen transfer in these processes is discussed. In general, our study provides evidence for methanogenesis as a major sink for MT and DMS in freshwater sediments.

  15. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities.

    PubMed

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix.

  16. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

    PubMed Central

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M.

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix. PMID:26136731

  17. Methane production and methanogen levels in steers that differ in residual gain.

    PubMed

    Freetly, H C; Lindholm-Perry, A K; Hales, K E; Brown-Brandl, T M; Kim, M; Myer, P R; Wells, J E

    2015-05-01

    Methane (CH4) gas released by cattle isa product of fermentation in the digestive tract. The 2 primary sites of CH4 production in ruminants are the reticulum-rumen complex and the cecum. Methane release from cattle represents a 2% to 12% loss of the energy intake. Reducing the proportion of feed energy lost as CH4 has the potential of improving feed efficiency as well as decreasing the contribution of cattle to greenhouse gas production. Feed intake and growth were measured on 132 fall-born steers for 70 d. Seven steers with extreme positive residual gain (RG) and 7 steers with extreme negative RG whose DMI was within 0.32 SD of the mean intake were selected for subsequent measurements. Enteric CH4 production was measured via indirect calorimetry. Rumen, cecum, and rectal contents were obtained from steers at slaughter for measurement of in vitro CH4 production and methanogen 16S rRNA levels. Enteric CH4 production did not differ (P = 0.11) between the positive RG (112 ± 13 L/d)and the negative RG (74 ± 13 L/d) steers. In vitro rumen methane production did not differ between positive RG(64.26 × 10(-5) ± 10.85 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1) DM∙min(-1)) and negative RG (61.49 × 10(-5) ± 10.85 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1)DM∙min(-1); P = 0.86). In vitro cecum methane production did not differ between positive RG (4.24 ×10(-5) ± 1.90 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1) DM∙min(-1)) and negative RG (4.35 × 10(-5) ± 1.90 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1) DM∙min(-1); P = 0.97). Methanogen 16S rRNA as a percentage of the total bacteria16S rRNA did not differ between RG groups (P = 0.18). The methanogen 16S rRNA as a percentage of rumen fluid total bacteria 16S rRNA (5.3% ±3.1%) did not differ from the methanogen 16S rRNA asa percentage of cecum content total bacteria 16S rRNA(11.8% ± 3.1%; P = 0.14). The methanogen 16S rRNA as a percentage of the rectum content total bacteria 16SrRNA (0.7% ± 3.1%) was not different from the rumen content (P = 0.29) but was less than the cecum content(P = 0

  18. Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lalonde, Stefan V; Papineau, Dominic; Nisbet, Euan G; Barley, Mark E; Arndt, Nicholas T; Zahnle, Kevin; Kamber, Balz S

    2009-04-09

    It has been suggested that a decrease in atmospheric methane levels triggered the progressive rise of atmospheric oxygen, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, about 2.4 Gyr ago. Oxidative weathering of terrestrial sulphides, increased oceanic sulphate, and the ecological success of sulphate-reducing microorganisms over methanogens has been proposed as a possible cause for the methane collapse, but this explanation is difficult to reconcile with the rock record. Banded iron formations preserve a history of Precambrian oceanic elemental abundance and can provide insights into our understanding of early microbial life and its influence on the evolution of the Earth system. Here we report a decline in the molar nickel to iron ratio recorded in banded iron formations about 2.7 Gyr ago, which we attribute to a reduced flux of nickel to the oceans, a consequence of cooling upper-mantle temperatures and decreased eruption of nickel-rich ultramafic rocks at the time. We measured nickel partition coefficients between simulated Precambrian sea water and diverse iron hydroxides, and subsequently determined that dissolved nickel concentrations may have reached approximately 400 nM throughout much of the Archaean eon, but dropped below approximately 200 nM by 2.5 Gyr ago and to modern day values ( approximately 9 nM) by approximately 550 Myr ago. Nickel is a key metal cofactor in several enzymes of methanogens and we propose that its decline would have stifled their activity in the ancient oceans and disrupted the supply of biogenic methane. A decline in biogenic methane production therefore could have occurred before increasing environmental oxygenation and not necessarily be related to it. The enzymatic reliance of methanogens on a diminishing supply of volcanic nickel links mantle evolution to the redox state of the atmosphere.

  19. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production.

  20. Methanotrophic and Methanogenic Communities in Swiss Alpine Fens Dominated by Carex rostrata and Eriophorum angustifolium.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Simrita; Zeyer, Josef; Henneberger, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    Vascular plants play a key role in controlling CH4 emissions from natural wetlands, because they influence CH4 production, oxidation, and transport to the atmosphere. Here we investigated differences in the abundance and composition of methanotrophic and methanogenic communities in three Swiss alpine fens dominated by different vascular plant species under natural conditions. The sampling locations either were situated at geographically distinct sites with different physicochemical properties but the same dominant plant species (Carex rostrata) or were located within the same site, showing comparable physicochemical pore water properties, but had different plant species (C. rostrata or Eriophorum angustifolium). All three locations were permanently submerged and showed high levels of CH4 emissions (80.3 to 184.4 mg CH4 m(-2) day(-1)). Soil samples were collected from three different depths with different pore water CH4 and O2 concentrations and were analyzed for pmoA and mcrA gene and transcript abundance and community composition, as well as soil structure. The dominant plant species appeared to have a significant influence on the composition of the active methanotrophic communities (transcript level), while the methanogenic communities differed significantly only at the gene level. Yet no plant species-specific microbial taxa were discerned. Moreover, for all communities, differences in composition were more pronounced with the site (i.e., with different physicochemical properties) than with the plant species. Moreover, depth significantly influenced the composition of the active methanotrophic communities. Differences in abundance were generally low, and active methanotrophs and methanogens coexisted at all three locations and depths independently of CH4 and O2 concentrations or plant species.

  1. Identification of Methanoculleus spp. as Active Methanogens during Anoxic Incubations of Swine Manure Storage Tank Samples

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maialen; Gagnon, Nathalie; Kalmokoff, Martin L.; Topp, Edward; Verastegui, Yris; Brooks, Stephen P. J.; Matias, Fernando; Neufeld, Josh D.

    2013-01-01

    Methane emissions represent a major environmental concern associated with manure management in the livestock industry. A more thorough understanding of how microbial communities function in manure storage tanks is a prerequisite for mitigating methane emissions. Identifying the microorganisms that are metabolically active is an important first step. Methanogenic archaea are major contributors to methanogenesis in stored swine manure, and we investigated active methanogenic populations by DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP). Following a preincubation of manure samples under anoxic conditions to induce substrate starvation, [U-13C]acetate was added as a labeled substrate. Fingerprint analysis of density-fractionated DNA, using length-heterogeneity analysis of PCR-amplified mcrA genes (encoding the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase), showed that the incorporation of 13C into DNA was detectable at in situ acetate concentrations (∼7 g/liter). Fingerprints of DNA retrieved from heavy fractions of the 13C treatment were primarily enriched in a 483-bp amplicon and, to a lesser extent, in a 481-bp amplicon. Analyses based on clone libraries of the mcrA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that both of these heavy DNA amplicons corresponded to Methanoculleus spp. Our results demonstrate that uncultivated methanogenic archaea related to Methanoculleus spp. were major contributors to acetate-C assimilation during the anoxic incubation of swine manure storage tank samples. Carbon assimilation and dissimilation rate estimations suggested that Methanoculleus spp. were also major contributors to methane emissions and that the hydrogenotrophic pathway predominated during methanogenesis. PMID:23104405

  2. A comparison of nanosilver and silver ion effects on bioreactor landfill operations and methanogenic population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Gajaraj, Shashikanth; Wall, Judy D; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-06-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, nanosilver) and silver ions released from industry and various consumer products are eventually disposed in sanitary landfills. To compare the effects of these two forms of silver on landfill bioreactor operations with leachate recirculation, municipal solid waste (MSW) in six identical 9-L bioreactors was exposed to AgNPs (stabilized with 0.06% polyvinyl alcohol) or Ag(+) at a silver concentration of 10 mg/kg solids. The landfill anaerobic digestion was operated and monitored for more than 200 days. There was no significant difference in cumulative methane volume or methane production rate between the groups of control and 10 mg/kg Ag(+). However, MSW treated with 10 mg/kg AgNPs resulted in a reduced methane production (by up to 80%) and accumulation of volatile fatty acids in the leachates. This was accompanied by higher leachate Ag concentrations (an average of 3.7 ± 0.3 mg/L) after day 132 as compared to those in the groups of control and 10 mg/kg Ag(+) at 0.7 ± 0.4 and 1.1 ± 0.3 mg/L, respectively. Quantitative PCR targeting 16S rRNA genes of methanogens indicated reduced methanogenic growth in the bioreactors exposed to nanosilver. The peak values of total methanogens in leachates were (1.18 ± 0.09) × 10(10), (4.57 ± 2.67) × 10(10) and (7.72 ± 0.78) × 10(8) (cells/mL) for the groups of control, Ag(+) and AgNPs, respectively. The results suggest that silver ions have minimal impact on landfill methane production at the concentration of 10 mg/kg. However, nanosilver inhibits methanogenesis and is more toxic than its counterpart, likely due to slow and long-term Ag(+) release from nanosilver dissolution yielding more bioavailability in landfill leachates.

  3. Differences in the methanogen population exist in sika deer (Cervus nippon) fed different diets in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Peng; Liu, Han Lu; Jin, Chun Ai; Cui, Xue Zhe; Jing, Yi; Yang, Fu He; Li, Guang Yu; Wright, André-Denis G

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the methanogen structure from sika deer (Cervus nippon) in China may be beneficial to methane mitigation. In the present preliminary study, we investigated the methanogen community in the rumen of domesticated sika deer fed either tannin-rich plants (oak leaf, OL group) or corn stalk (CS group) using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Overall, we obtained 197 clone sequences, revealing 146 unique phylotypes, which were assigned to 36 operational taxonomic units at the species level (98 % identity). Methanogens related to the genus Methanobrevibacter were the predominant phylotypes representing 83.9 % (OL library) and 85.9 % (CS library) of the clones. Methanobrevibacter millerae was the most abundant species in both libraries, but the proportion of M. millerae-related clones in the CS library was higher than in the OL library (69.5 and 51.4 %, respectively). Moreover, Methanobrevibacter wolinii-related clones (32.5 %) were predominant in the OL library. Methanobrevibacter smithii-related clones and Methanobrevibacter ruminantium-related clones accounted for 6.5 and 6.6 % in the CS library, respectively. However, these clones were absent from the OL library. The concentrations of butyrate and total short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were significantly higher in the OL group, but the concentrations of acetate, propionate, and valerate and the acetate to propionate ratio in the OL group were not significantly different between the two groups. Tannin-rich plants may have affected the distribution of genus Methanobrevibacter phylotypes at the species level and the concentration and composition of SCFAs.

  4. Potential for Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer in Methanogenic Wastewater Digester Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Franks, Ashley E.; Summers, Zarath M.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Rotaru, Amelia E.; Rotaru, Camelia; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive, with conductivities 3-fold higher than the conductivities previously reported for dual-species aggregates of Geobacter species in which the two species appeared to exchange electrons via interspecies electron transfer. The temperature dependence response of the aggregate conductance was characteristic of the organic metallic-like conductance previously described for the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and was inconsistent with electron conduction through minerals. Studies in which aggregates were incubated with high concentrations of potential electron donors demonstrated that the aggregates had no significant capacity for conversion of hydrogen to methane. The aggregates converted formate to methane but at rates too low to account for the rates at which that the aggregates syntrophically metabolized ethanol, an important component of the reactor influent. Geobacter species comprised 25% of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from the aggregates, suggesting that Geobacter species may have contributed to some but probably not all of the aggregate conductivity. Microorganisms most closely related to the acetate-utilizing Methanosaeta concilii accounted for more than 90% of the sequences that could be assigned to methane producers, consistent with the poor capacity for hydrogen and formate utilization. These results demonstrate for the first time that methanogenic wastewater aggregates can be electrically conductive and suggest that direct interspecies electron transfer could be an important mechanism for electron exchange in some methanogenic systems. PMID:21862629

  5. Methanotrophic and Methanogenic Communities in Swiss Alpine Fens Dominated by Carex rostrata and Eriophorum angustifolium

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Simrita; Henneberger, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Vascular plants play a key role in controlling CH4 emissions from natural wetlands, because they influence CH4 production, oxidation, and transport to the atmosphere. Here we investigated differences in the abundance and composition of methanotrophic and methanogenic communities in three Swiss alpine fens dominated by different vascular plant species under natural conditions. The sampling locations either were situated at geographically distinct sites with different physicochemical properties but the same dominant plant species (Carex rostrata) or were located within the same site, showing comparable physicochemical pore water properties, but had different plant species (C. rostrata or Eriophorum angustifolium). All three locations were permanently submerged and showed high levels of CH4 emissions (80.3 to 184.4 mg CH4 m−2 day−1). Soil samples were collected from three different depths with different pore water CH4 and O2 concentrations and were analyzed for pmoA and mcrA gene and transcript abundance and community composition, as well as soil structure. The dominant plant species appeared to have a significant influence on the composition of the active methanotrophic communities (transcript level), while the methanogenic communities differed significantly only at the gene level. Yet no plant species-specific microbial taxa were discerned. Moreover, for all communities, differences in composition were more pronounced with the site (i.e., with different physicochemical properties) than with the plant species. Moreover, depth significantly influenced the composition of the active methanotrophic communities. Differences in abundance were generally low, and active methanotrophs and methanogens coexisted at all three locations and depths independently of CH4 and O2 concentrations or plant species. PMID:26092454

  6. NMR studies of osmoregulation in methanogenic archaebacteria. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Methanogens are strict anaerobic archaebacteria whose metabolism centers around the reduction of CO[sub 2] to CH[sub 4]. Their environments are often extreme (high temperatures, high salt, few nutrients, etc.) and they may have evolved unique ways to handle these stresses. It is proposed that methanogenic archaebacteria respond to osmotic stress by accumulating a series of organic solutes. In two strains of marine methanogens, Methanogenium cariaci and Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, four key organic solutes are observed: L-[alpha]-glutamate, [beta]-glutamate, N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine, and glycine betaine. The first three of these are synthesized de novo; glycine betaine is transported into the Mg. cariaci cells from the medium. In the absence of betaine, Mg. cariaci synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine as the dominant osmolyte. Mc. thermolithotrophicus also synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine but only at salt concentrations greater than 1 M. In Mc. thermolithotrophicus intracellular potassium ion concentrations, determined by [sup 39]K NMR spectroscopy, are balanced by the total concentration of anionic amino acid species, [alpha]-glutamate and [beta]-glutamate. Turnover of the organic solutes has been monitored using [sup 13]C-pulse/[sup 12]C-chase, and [sup 15]N-pulse/[sup 14]N-chase experiments. The [beta]-amino acids exhibit slower turnover rates compared to L-[alpha]-glutamate or aspartate, consistent with their role as compatible solutes. Biosynthetic information for the [beta]-amino acids was provided by [sup 13]C-label incorporation and steady state labeling experiments. [beta]-glutamate shows a lag in [sup 13]C uptake from [sup 13]CO[sub 2], indicative of its biosynthesis from a precursor not in equilibrium with the soluble L-[alpha]-glutamate pool, probably a macromolecule. A novel biosynthetic pathway is proposed for N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine from the diaminopimelate pathway.

  7. Detection of methanogenic archaea in the pitchers of the Northern pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea ).

    PubMed

    Krieger, Joseph R; Kourtev, Peter S

    2012-02-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Sarracenia rely on microorganisms in their pitchers to decompose drowned insects. The environment inside pitchers is considered to be aerobic; however, there might be zones, such as at the bottom of the pitcher, where anaerobic conditions develop. Samples of the sediment at the bottom of Sarracenia purpurea pitchers were analyzed for the presence of archaea, using PCR and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Archaeal DNA was detected in 20% of sampled pitchers. All sequences were closely related to Methanobrevibacter . Therefore, pitchers may contain anoxic zones inhabited by methanogens.

  8. Rupture of the cell envelope by decompression of the deep-sea methanogen Methanococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Beum; Clark, Douglas S

    2002-03-01

    The effect of decompression on the structure of Methanococcus jannaschii, an extremely thermophilic deep-sea methanogen, was studied in a novel high-pressure, high-temperature bioreactor. The cell envelope of M. jannaschii appeared to rupture upon rapid decompression (ca. 1 s) from 260 atm of hyperbaric pressure. When decompression from 260 atm was performed over 5 min, the proportion of ruptured cells decreased significantly. In contrast to the effect produced by decompression from hyperbaric pressure, decompression from a hydrostatic pressure of 260 atm did not induce cell lysis.

  9. Response of the methanogenic microbial communities in Amazonian oxbow lake sediments to desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Ralf; Ji, Yang; Noll, Matthias; Klose, Melanie; Claus, Peter; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Methanogenic microbial communities in soil and sediment function only when the environment is inundated and anoxic. In contrast to submerged soils, desiccation of lake sediments happens only rarely. However, some predictions suggest that extreme events of drying will become more common in the Amazon region, and this will promote an increase in sediments drying and exposure. We asked whether and how such methanogenic communities can withstand desiccation stress. Therefore, we determined the rates and pathways of CH(4) production (analysis of CH(4) and δ(13) C of CH(4), CO(2) and acetate), the copy numbers of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA genes (quantitative PCR), and the community composition of Archaea and Bacteria (T-RFLP and pyrosequencing) in oxbow lake sediments of rivers in the Brazilian Amazon region. The rivers were of white water, black water and clear water type. The measurements were done with sediment in fresh state and after drying and rewetting. After desiccation and rewetting the composition of both, the archaeal and bacterial community changed. Since lake sediments from white water rivers exhibited only negligible methanogenic activity, probably because of relatively high iron and low organic matter content, they were not further analysed. The other sediments produced CH(4), with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis usually accounting for > 50% of total activity. After desiccation and rewetting, archaeal and bacterial gene copy numbers decreased. The bacterial community showed a remarkable increase of Clostridiales from about 10% to > 30% of all Bacteria, partially caused by proliferation of specific taxa as the numbers of OTU shared with fresh sediment decreased from about 9% to 3%. Among the Archaea, desiccation specifically enhanced the relative abundance of either Methanocellales (black water) and/or Methanosarcinaceae (clear water). Despite the changes in gene copy numbers and composition of the microbial community, rates of CH

  10. Methanol induces low temperature resilient methanogens and improves methane generation from domestic wastewater at low to moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shaswati; Badhe, Neha; De Vrieze, Jo; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature (<20 °C) limits bio-methanation of sewage. Literature shows that hydrogenotrophic methanogens can adapt themselves to low temperature and methanol is a preferred substrate by methanogens in cold habitats. The study hypothesizes that methanol can induce the growth of low-temperature resilient, methanol utilizing, hydrogenotrophs in UASB reactor. The hypothesis was tested in field conditions to evaluate the impact of seasonal temperature variations on methane yield in the presence and absence of methanol. Results show that 0.04% (v/v) methanol increased methane up to 15 times and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The qPCR analysis showed the presence of Methanobacteriales along with Methanosetaceae in large numbers. This indicates methanol induced the growth of both the hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic groups through direct and indirect routes, respectively. This study thus demonstrated that methanol can impart resistance in methanogenic biomass to low temperature and can improve performance of UASB reactor.

  11. Impact of temperature, microwave radiation and organic loading rate on methanogenic community and biogas production during fermentation of dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zieliński, Marcin; Dębowski, Marcin

    2013-02-01

    This study analyzed dairy wastewater fermentation in convection- and microwave-heated hybrid reactors at loadings of 1 and 2 kg COD/(m3 d) and temperatures of 35 and 55 °C. The biomass was investigated at a molecular level to determine the links between the operational parameters of anaerobic digestion and methanogenic Archaea structure. The highest production of biogas with methane content of ca. 67% was noted in the mesophilic microwave-heated reactors. The production of methane-rich biogas and the overall diversity of Archaea was determined by Methanosarcinaceae presence. The temperature and the application of microwaves were the main factors explaining the variations in the methanogen community. At 35 °C, the microwave heating stimulated the growth of highly diverse methanogen assemblages, promoting Methanosarcina barkeri presence and excluding Methanosarcina harudinacea from the biomass. A temperature increase to 55 °C lowered Methanosarcinaceae abundance and induced a replacement of Methanoculleus palmolei by Methanosarcina thermophila.

  12. Investigation of methanogenic community structures in rural biogas digesters from different climatic regions in Yunnan, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Minghua; Wu, Yan; Li, Qiumin; Tian, Guangliang; Yang, Bin; Li, Yingjuan; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Yongxia; Xiao, Wei; Yin, Fang; Zhao, Xingling; Zhang, Wudi; Cui, Xiaolong

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of the microbial community structures of the biogas digesters in different climatic regions can help improve the methane production in the fermentation process. The methanogenic archaeal diversity in four rural biogas digesters (BNA, JSA, LJA, and XGA) was investigated by a culture-independent rRNA approach in different climatic regions in Yunnan. Community structure composed of 711 clones in the all libraries. A total of 33 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected, and major groups of methanogens were the orders Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales. 63.2 % of all archaeal OTUs belong to the order Methanosarcinales which mostly contain acetotrophic methanogens. Methanomicrobiales (19.5 % in all OTUs) were detected in considerable number. Additionally, there were minor rates of uncultured archaea. The principal component analysis indicated that the genus Methanosaeta was mainly affected by the fermentation temperatures.

  13. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents

    PubMed Central

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D.; Stewart, Lucy C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Butterfield, David A.; Huber, Julie A.; Holden, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7–40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4+ generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments. PMID:27547206

  14. Responses of Methanogenic and Methanotrophic Communities to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Temperature in a Paddy Field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Kun; Li, Lianqing; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Zheng, Jinwei; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Although climate change is predicted to affect methane (CH4) emissions in paddy soil, the dynamics of methanogens and methanotrophs in paddy fields under climate change have not yet been fully investigated. To address this issue, a multifactor climate change experiment was conducted in a Chinese paddy field using the following experimental treatments: (1) enrichment of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (500 ppm, CE), (2) canopy air warming (2°C above the ambient, WA), (3) combined CO2 enrichment and warming (CW), and (4) ambient conditions (CK). We analyzed the abundance of methanogens and methanotrophs, community structures, CH4 production and oxidation potentials, in situ CH4 emissions using real-time PCR, T-RFLP, and clone library techniques, as well as biochemical assays. Compared to the control under CE and CW treatments, CH4 production potential, methanogenic gene abundance and soil microbial biomass carbon significantly increased; the methanogenic community, however, remained stable. The canopy air warming treatment only had an effect on CH4 oxidation potential at the ripening stage. Phylogenic analysis indicated that methanogens in the rhizosphere were dominated by Methanosarcina, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomicrobiales, while methanotrophic sequences were classified as Methylococcus, Methylocaldum, Methylomonas, Methylosarcina (Type I) and Methylocystis (Type II). However, the relative abundance of Methylococcus (Type I) decreased under CE and CW treatments and the relative abundance of Methylocystis (Type II) increased. The in situ CH4 fluxes indicated similar seasonal patterns between treatments; both CE and CW increased CH4 emissions. In conclusion results suggest that methanogens and methanotrophs respond differently to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming, thus adding insights into the effects of simulated global climate change on CH4 emissions in paddy fields.

  15. Bioreactor performance and quantitative analysis of methanogenic and bacterial community dynamics in microbial electrolysis cells during large temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2012-06-19

    The use of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for H(2) production generally finds H(2) sink by undesirable methanogenesis at mesophilic temperatures. Previously reported approaches failed to effectively inhibit methanogenesis without the addition of nongreen chemical inhibitors. Here, we demonstrated that the CH(4) production and the number of methanogens in single-chamber MECs could be restricted steadily to a negligible level by continuously operating reactors at the relatively low temperature of 15 °C. This resulted in a H(2) yield and production rate comparable to those obtained at 30 °C with less CH(4) production (CH(4)% < 1%). However, this operation at 15 °C should be taken from the initial stage of anodic biofilm formation, when the methanogenic community has not yet been established sufficiently. Maintaining MECs operating at 20 °C was not effective for controlling methanogenesis. The varying degrees of methanogenesis observed in MECs at 30 °C could be completely inhibited at 4 and 9 °C, and the total number of methanogens (mainly hydrogenotrophic methanogens) could be reduced by 68-91% during 32-55 days of operation at the low temperatures. However, methanogens cannot be eliminated completely at these temperatures. After the temperature is returned to 30 °C, the CH(4) production and the number of total methanogens can rapidly rise to the prior levels. Analysis of bacterial communities using 454 pyrosequencing showed that changes in temperature had no a substantial impact on composition of dominant electricity-producing bacteria ( Geobacter ). The results of our study provide more information toward understanding the temperature-dependent control of methanogenesis in MECs.

  16. Reactive transport model of growth and methane production by high-temperature methanogens in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, L. C.; Algar, C. K.; Topçuoğlu, B. D.; Fortunato, C. S.; Larson, B. I.; Proskurowski, G. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Vallino, J. J.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens are keystone high-temperature autotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and tracers of habitability and biogeochemical activity in the hydrothermally active subseafloor. At Axial Seamount, nearly all thermophilic methanogens are Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus species, making this site amenable to modeling through pure culture laboratory experiments coupled with field studies. Based on field microcosm incubations with 1.2 mM, 20 μM, or no hydrogen, the growth of methanogens at 55°C and 80°C is limited primarily by temperature and hydrogen availability, with ammonium amendment showing no consistent effect on total methane output. The Arrhenius constants for methane production by Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (optimum 82°C) and Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus (optimum 65°C) were determined in pure culture bottle experiments. The Monod constants for hydrogen concentration were measured by growing both organisms in a 2-liter chemostat at two dilution rates; 55°C, 65°C and 82°C; and variable hydrogen concentrations. M. jannaschii showed higher ks and Vmax constants than M. thermolithotrophicus. In the field, hydrogen and methane concentrations in hydrothermal end-member and low-temperature diffuse fluids were measured, and the concentrations of methanogens that grow at 55°C and 80°C in diffuse fluids were determined using most-probable-number estimates. Methane concentration anomalies in diffuse fluids relative to end-member hydrothermal concentrations and methanogen cell concentrations are being used to constrain a 1-D reactive transport model using the laboratory-determined Arrhenius and Monod constants for methane production by these organisms. By varying flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations in the model, our goal is to determine solutions for the potential depth of the subseafloor biosphere coupled with the amount of methanogenic biomass it contains.

  17. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D; Stewart, Lucy C; Morrison, Hilary G; Butterfield, David A; Huber, Julie A; Holden, James F

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7-40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4 (+) generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  18. Responses of Methanogenic and Methanotrophic Communities to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Temperature in a Paddy Field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Kun; Li, Lianqing; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Zheng, Jinwei; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Although climate change is predicted to affect methane (CH4) emissions in paddy soil, the dynamics of methanogens and methanotrophs in paddy fields under climate change have not yet been fully investigated. To address this issue, a multifactor climate change experiment was conducted in a Chinese paddy field using the following experimental treatments: (1) enrichment of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (500 ppm, CE), (2) canopy air warming (2°C above the ambient, WA), (3) combined CO2 enrichment and warming (CW), and (4) ambient conditions (CK). We analyzed the abundance of methanogens and methanotrophs, community structures, CH4 production and oxidation potentials, in situ CH4 emissions using real-time PCR, T-RFLP, and clone library techniques, as well as biochemical assays. Compared to the control under CE and CW treatments, CH4 production potential, methanogenic gene abundance and soil microbial biomass carbon significantly increased; the methanogenic community, however, remained stable. The canopy air warming treatment only had an effect on CH4 oxidation potential at the ripening stage. Phylogenic analysis indicated that methanogens in the rhizosphere were dominated by Methanosarcina, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomicrobiales, while methanotrophic sequences were classified as Methylococcus, Methylocaldum, Methylomonas, Methylosarcina (Type I) and Methylocystis (Type II). However, the relative abundance of Methylococcus (Type I) decreased under CE and CW treatments and the relative abundance of Methylocystis (Type II) increased. The in situ CH4 fluxes indicated similar seasonal patterns between treatments; both CE and CW increased CH4 emissions. In conclusion results suggest that methanogens and methanotrophs respond differently to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming, thus adding insights into the effects of simulated global climate change on CH4 emissions in paddy fields. PMID:27933055

  19. Comparison of methanogen diversity of yak (Bos grunniens) and cattle (Bos taurus) from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methane emissions by methanogen from livestock ruminants have significantly contributed to the agricultural greenhouse gas effect. It is worthwhile to compare methanogen from “energy-saving” animal (yak) and normal animal (cattle) in order to investigate the link between methanogen structure and low methane production. Results Diversity of methanogens from the yak and cattle rumen was investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from rumen digesta samples from four yaks (209 clones) and four cattle (205 clones) from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area (QTP). Overall, a total of 414 clones (i.e. sequences) were examined and assigned to 95 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) using MOTHUR, based upon a 98% species-level identity criterion. Forty-six OTUs were unique to the yak clone library and 34 OTUs were unique to the cattle clone library, while 15 OTUs were found in both libraries. Of the 95 OTUs, 93 putative new species were identified. Sequences belonging to the Thermoplasmatales-affiliated Linage C (TALC) were found to dominate in both libraries, accounting for 80.9% and 62.9% of the sequences from the yak and cattle clone libraries, respectively. Sequences belonging to the Methanobacteriales represented the second largest clade in both libraries. However, Methanobrevibacter wolinii (QTPC 110) was only found in the cattle library. The number of clones from the order Methanomicrobiales was greater in cattle than in the yak clone library. Although the Shannon index value indicated similar diversity between the two libraries, the Libshuff analysis indicated that the methanogen community structure of the yak was significantly different than those from cattle. Conclusion This study revealed for the first time the molecular diversity of methanogen community in yaks and cattle in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area in China. From the analysis, we conclude that yaks have a unique rumen microbial ecosystem that is significantly different from that of cattle

  20. Slash and Burn Agriculture: A Dynamic Spatio-temporal Model of Shifting Cultivation Locations and Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagge, C. E.; Frolking, S.; Chini, L. P.; Hurtt, G.

    2008-12-01

    Shifting cultivation is a form of agriculture, also known as slash-and-burn or swidden agriculture, in which a plot of forest is cleared and then cultivated continuously for several years, after which it is abandoned to revert to natural vegetation, and then is subsequently re-cleared after a longer fallow period. Shifting cultivation is an important form of agriculture because it affects soil erosion rates, canopy cover in tropical forests, nutrient deficiency in soils, and also has an impact on the global carbon cycle. Because it is generally outside of the larger economy, shifting cultivation is not well-represented in large-scale earth system analyses. We investigated a new way to model shifting cultivation which will be included in a global land-use transitions model to better quantify this type of land use, both historically and into the future. Ultimately this study will improve simulations of changes in the Earth system and will aid in the study of the carbon cycle and thus climate change. Our model calculates the area of shifting cultivation in square kilometers per half-degree grid cell, using gridded population data, the fraction of that population that is rural, the fraction of global population that practices shifting cultivation, the crop area needed per person, and the length of cultivation plus the fallow. Locations of shifting cultivation were further constrained by variables such as potential vegetation biomass density, population density, fraction of land already in use, GDP per capita, and average winter temperatures. With this model, we generated global estimates for total cultivated area, total population involved in shifting cultivation, and total shifting cultivation area including fallow lands. From this model it was estimated that the total global area of shifting cultivation in 2000 was approximately 1.5 million km2 with 90,000 km2 of that actually in cultivation by 190 million people.

  1. Squalenes, phytanes and other isoprenoids as major neutral lipids of methanogenic and thermoacidophilic 'archaebacteria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, T. G.; Langworthy, T. A.; Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1979-01-01

    The neutral lipids from nine species of methanogenic bacteria (five methanobacilli, two methanococci, a methanospirillum and a methanosarcina) and two thermoacidophilic bacteria (Thermo-plasma and Sulfolobus) have been analyzed. The neutral lipids were found to comprise a wide range (C14 to C30) of polyisoprenyl hydrocarbons with varying degrees of saturation. The principal components represented the three major isoprenoid series (C20 phytanyl, C25 pentaisoprenyl, and C30 squalenyl), in contrast with the neutral lipids of extreme halophiles, which consist predominantly of C2O (phytanyl, geranylgeraniol), C30 (squalenes), C40 (carotenes) and C50 (bacterioruberins compounds), as reported by Kates (1978). These results, which indicate strong general similarities between genetically diverse organisms, support the classification of these organisms in a separate phylogenetic group. The occurrence of similar isoprenoid compounds in petroleum and ancient sediments and the fact that the methanogens, halophiles and thermoacidophiles live in conditions presumed to have prevailed in archaen times suggest that the isoprenoid compounds in petroleum compounds and sediment may have been directly synthesized by organisms of this type

  2. Molecular biology and genetics of the acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsalus, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Acetate conversion to methane and C0{sub 2} by the methanogenic archaebacteria is a primary rate limiting step in anaerobic biodegradative processes in nature. However, the genetic study of these organisms has not been experimentally tractable due to the inability to grow and plate the organisms as single cells, and to extract high molecular weight DNA and RNA without shearing. The acetate-utilizing species, Methanosarcina thermolphila TM-1, is being used for the proposed genetic and molecular studies because, unlike previously described acetotrophic methanosarcina that have a thick heteropolysaccharide cell wall, this species can be cultured in a unicellular form that has a protein cell wall lacking the heteropolysaccharide layer. These cells can be gently disrupted to obtain protoplasts or lysed to yield intact genomic DNA and RNA. Experiments are in progress to develop a gene transfer system in this bacterial species. Methods are being developed and refined for the efficient plating of M. thermophila on defined media, for chemical mutagenesis, and for the isolation of mutants defective in acetate utilization. Chromosomal DNA libraries have been constructed from M. thermophila and are being used to clone genes involved in the acetate utilization pathway (e.g. carbon monoxide dehydrogenase). Once cloned, analysis of the molecular mechanisms responsible for their regulatory control will be performed. These studies should aid our understanding of the pathway for acetate utilization in M. thermophila and serve as a model for elucidating regulatory mechanisms in the acetotrophic methanogens.

  3. Archaea and Bacteria Acclimate to High Total Ammonia in a Methanogenic Reactor Treating Swine Waste

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Prathap; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition by ammonium at concentrations above 1000 mgN/L is known to harm the methanogenesis phase of anaerobic digestion. We anaerobically digested swine waste and achieved steady state COD-removal efficiency of around 52% with no fatty-acid or H2 accumulation. As the anaerobic microbial community adapted to the gradual increase of total ammonia-N (NH3-N) from 890 ± 295 to 2040 ± 30 mg/L, the Bacterial and Archaeal communities became less diverse. Phylotypes most closely related to hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus (36.4%) and Methanobrevibacter (11.6%), along with acetoclastic Methanosaeta (29.3%), became the most abundant Archaeal sequences during acclimation. This was accompanied by a sharp increase in the relative abundances of phylotypes most closely related to acetogens and fatty-acid producers (Clostridium, Coprococcus, and Sphaerochaeta) and syntrophic fatty-acid Bacteria (Syntrophomonas, Clostridium, Clostridiaceae species, and Cloacamonaceae species) that have metabolic capabilities for butyrate and propionate fermentation, as well as for reverse acetogenesis. Our results provide evidence countering a prevailing theory that acetoclastic methanogens are selectively inhibited when the total ammonia-N concentration is greater than ~1000 mgN/L. Instead, acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens coexisted in the presence of total ammonia-N of ~2000 mgN/L by establishing syntrophic relationships with fatty-acid fermenters, as well as homoacetogens able to carry out forward and reverse acetogenesis. PMID:27725793

  4. Characterization of a Methanogenic Community within an Algal Fed Anaerobic Digester

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Joshua T.; Tramp, Cody; Sims, Ronald C.; Miller, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial diversity and metabolic potential of a methanogenic consortium residing in a 3785-liter anaerobic digester, fed with wastewater algae, was analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing technology. DNA was extracted from anaerobic sludge material and used in metagenomic analysis through PCR amplification of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase α subunit (mcrA) gene using primer sets ML, MCR, and ME. The majority of annotated mcrA sequences were assigned taxonomically to the genera Methanosaeta in the order Methanosarcinales. Methanogens from the genus Methanosaeta are obligate acetotrophs, suggesting this genus plays a dominant role in methane production from the analyzed fermentation sample. Numerous analyzed sequences within the algae fed anaerobic digester were unclassified and could not be assigned taxonomically. Relative amplicon frequencies were determined for each primer set to determine the utility of each in pyrosequencing. Primer sets ML and MCR performed better quantitatively (representing the large majority of analyzed sequences) than primer set ME. However, each of these primer sets was shown to provide a quantitatively unique community structure, and thus they are of equal importance in mcrA metagenomic analysis. PMID:23724331

  5. Response of a rice paddy soil methanogen to syntrophic growth as revealed by transcriptional analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Yanxiang; Lü, Zhe; Lu, Yahai

    2014-08-01

    Members of Methanocellales are widespread in paddy field soils and play the key role in methane production. These methanogens feature largely in these organisms’ adaptation to low H2 and syntrophic growth with anaerobic fatty acid oxidizers. The adaptive mechanisms, however, remain unknown. In the present study, we determined the transcripts of 21 genes involved in the key steps of methanogenesis and acetate assimilation of Methanocella conradii HZ254, a strain recently isolated from paddy field soil. M. conradii was grown in monoculture and syntrophically with Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum (a propionate syntroph) or Syntrophothermus lipocalidus (a butyrate syntroph). Comparison of the relative transcript abundances showed that three hydrogenase-encoding genes and all methanogenesis-related genes tested were upregulated in cocultures relative to monoculture. The genes encoding formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (Fwd), heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr), and the membrane-bound energy-converting hydrogenase (Ech) were the most upregulated among the evaluated genes. The expression of the formate dehydrogenase (Fdh)-encoding gene also was significantly upregulated. In contrast, an acetate assimilation gene was downregulated in cocultures. The genes coding for Fwd, Hdr, and the D subunit of F420-nonreducing hydrogenase (Mvh) form a large predicted transcription unit; therefore, the Mvh/Hdr/Fwd complex, capable of mediating the electron bifurcation and connecting the first and last steps of methanogenesis, was predicted to be formed in M. conradii. We propose that Methanocella methanogens cope with low H2 and syntrophic growth by (i) stabilizing the Mvh/Hdr/Fwd complex and (ii) activating formatedependent methanogenesis.

  6. Low Pressure Tolerance by Methanogens in an Aqueous Environment: Implications for Subsurface Life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Mickol, R L; Kral, T A

    2016-09-23

    The low pressure at the surface of Mars (average: 6 mbar) is one potentially biocidal factor that any extant life on the planet would need to endure. Near subsurface life, while shielded from ultraviolet radiation, would also be exposed to this low pressure environment, as the atmospheric gas-phase pressure increases very gradually with depth. Few studies have focused on low pressure as inhibitory to the growth or survival of organisms. However, recent work has uncovered a potential constraint to bacterial growth below 25 mbar. The study reported here tested the survivability of four methanogen species (Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus maripaludis) under low pressure conditions approaching average martian surface pressure (6 mbar - 143 mbar) in an aqueous environment. Each of the four species survived exposure of varying length (3 days - 21 days) at pressures down to 6 mbar. This research is an important stepping-stone to determining if methanogens can actively metabolize/grow under these low pressures. Additionally, the recently discovered recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water columns may connect the surface to deeper levels in the subsurface. If that is the case, any organism being transported in the water column would encounter the changing pressures during the transport.

  7. Sequential biodegradation of complex naphtha hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in two different oil sands tailings.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-02-01

    Methane emissions in oil sands tailings ponds are sustained by anaerobic biodegradation of unrecovered hydrocarbons. Naphtha (primarily C6-C10; n- iso- and cycloalkanes) is commonly used as a solvent during bitumen extraction process and its residue escapes to tailings ponds during tailings deposition. To investigate biodegradability of hydrocarbons in naphtha, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL tailings ponds were amended with CNRL naphtha at ∼0.2 wt% (∼2000 mg L(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ∼1600 d. Microbial communities in both MFTs started metabolizing naphtha after a lag phase of ∼100 d. Complete biodegradation/biotransformation of all n-alkanes (except partial biodegradation of n-octane in CNRL MFT) followed by major iso-alkanes (2-methylpentane, 3-methylhexane, 2- and 4-methylheptane, iso-nonanes and 2-methylnonane) and a few cycloalkanes (derivatives of cyclopentane and cyclohexane) was observed during the incubation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Peptococcaceae and Anaerolineaceae in Albian MFT and Anaerolineaceae and Syntrophaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial communities with co-domination of Methanosaetaceae and "Candidatus Methanoregula" in archaeal populations during active biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The findings extend the known range of hydrocarbons susceptible to methanogenic biodegradation in petroleum-impacted anaerobic environments and help refine existing kinetic model to predict greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds.

  8. Decolorization of a reactive copper-phthalocyanine dye under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Beydili, M I; Matthews, R D; Pavlostathis, S G

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the biological decolorization of the copper-phthalocyanine dye Reactive Blue 7 (RB7) under methanogenic conditions using a mixed, methanogenic culture in a repetitive dye addition batch assay. The initial rate of decolorization was 13.2 mg/L-d and 5.7 mg/L-d for the first and second dye addition, respectively. For an initial RB7 concentration of ca. 300 mg/L, the extent of decolorization remained constant (about 62%) for each repetitive RB7 addition and resulted in a residual color build up. Declining absorbance ratio values (A664/A620) with increasing incubation time confirmed that the observed color removal was due to transformation as opposed to adsorption on the biomass. Chemical decolorization assays using sodium dithionite as the reducing agent resulted in similar absorbance spectra to that obtained after biological decolorization. In addition, in both the chemical and biological decolorization assays, partial oxidation of the reduced dye solution upon exposure to air resulted in higher residual color, indicating that the reduction and decolorization of RB7 are partially reversible. These results also suggest that RB7 reduction and decolorization both chemically and biologically most likely followed a similar reduction mechanism.

  9. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  10. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2015-12-15

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel B100 (biodiesel only) with different petrodiesel loads was studied using biomass pre-acclimated to B100 and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). The results indicated that the biodiesel fraction of the blend could be effectively biodegraded, whereas petrodiesel was not biodegraded at all under methanogenic conditions. The presence of petrodiesel in blends with biodiesel had a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of biodegradation than the biodegradation efficiency (defined as the efficiency of methane production). Both the biodegradation rate coefficient and the methane production efficiency increased almost linearly with the increasing fraction of biodiesel. With the increasing fraction of petrodiesel, the biodegradation rate and efficiency were correlated with the concentration of soluble FAMEs in the water.

  11. A RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathway in methanogenic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Takunari; Mehrotra, Sandhya; Endo, Chikako; Kizu, Natsuko; Matusda, Mami; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yokota, Akiho; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Ashida, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Two enzymes are considered to be unique to the photosynthetic Calvin–Benson cycle: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), responsible for CO2 fixation, and phosphoribulokinase (PRK). Some archaea possess bona fide RuBisCOs, despite not being photosynthetic organisms, but are thought to lack PRK. Here we demonstrate the existence in methanogenic archaea of a carbon metabolic pathway involving RuBisCO and PRK, which we term ‘reductive hexulose-phosphate' (RHP) pathway. These archaea possess both RuBisCO and a catalytically active PRK whose crystal structure resembles that of photosynthetic bacterial PRK. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometric analysis of metabolites reveals that the RHP pathway, which differs from the Calvin–Benson cycle only in a few steps, is active in vivo. Our work highlights evolutionary and functional links between RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathways in methanogenic archaea and photosynthetic organisms. Whether the RHP pathway allows for autotrophy (that is, growth exclusively with CO2 as carbon source) remains unknown. PMID:28082747

  12. Kinetics and inhibition during the decolorization of reactive anthraquinone dyes under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, E J; Beydilli, M I; Lee, Y H; Pavlostathis, S G

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the biological decolorization of two reactive anthraquinone dyes (Reactive Blue 4, RB 4; Reactive Blue 19, RB 19) under methanogenic conditions. Using a mixed, methanogenic culture, batch assays were performed to evaluate both the rate and extent of color removal as well as any potential inhibition. The effect of initial dye, biomass, and organic feed concentration, as well as the effect of repetitive dye addition on color removal kinetics and culture inhibition were assessed. Overall, a lower rate and extent of color removal was observed in RB 4-amended cultures as opposed to the RB 19-amended cultures. For an incubation time of ca. 15 days and an initial dye concentration of 2000 mg/L, the extent of color removal was 50 and 95% for RB 4 and RB 19, respectively. Inhibition of acidogenesis and to a larger degree of methanogenesis, resulting in accumulation of volatile fatty acids, was observed in both RB 4- and RB 19-amended cultures. Although the degree of inhibition varied among the two dyes tested (RB 19 was more inhibitory than RB 4), an increase of inhibition was observed with increasing initial dye concentration. At an initial dye concentration of 500 mg/L or higher, methane production was lower than 6% of that of the control culture for both RB 4 and RB 19. However, color removal occurred despite culture inhibition.

  13. Low Pressure Tolerance by Methanogens in an Aqueous Environment: Implications for Subsurface Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickol, R. L.; Kral, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    The low pressure at the surface of Mars (average: 6 mbar) is one potentially biocidal factor that any extant life on the planet would need to endure. Near subsurface life, while shielded from ultraviolet radiation, would also be exposed to this low pressure environment, as the atmospheric gas-phase pressure increases very gradually with depth. Few studies have focused on low pressure as inhibitory to the growth or survival of organisms. However, recent work has uncovered a potential constraint to bacterial growth below 25 mbar. The study reported here tested the survivability of four methanogen species (Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus maripaludis) under low pressure conditions approaching average martian surface pressure (6 mbar - 143 mbar) in an aqueous environment. Each of the four species survived exposure of varying length (3 days - 21 days) at pressures down to 6 mbar. This research is an important stepping-stone to determining if methanogens can actively metabolize/grow under these low pressures. Additionally, the recently discovered recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water columns may connect the surface to deeper levels in the subsurface. If that is the case, any organism being transported in the water column would encounter the changing pressures during the transport.

  14. Methanoregula boonei gen. nov., sp. nov., an acidiphilic methanogen isolated from an acidic peat bog.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Suzanna L; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Ward, Rebekah J; Yavitt, Joseph B; Zinder, Stephen H

    2011-01-01

    A novel acidiphilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, designated strain 6A8(T), was isolated from an acidic (pH 4.0-4.5) and ombrotrophic (rain-fed) bog located near Ithaca, NY, USA. Cultures were dimorphic, containing thin rods (0.2-0.3 μm in diameter and 0.8-3.0 μm long) and irregular cocci (0.2-0.8 μm in diameter). The culture utilized H(2)/CO(2) to produce methane but did not utilize formate, acetate, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, butanol or trimethylamine. Optimal growth conditions were near pH 5.1 and 35 °C. The culture grew in basal medium containing as little as 0.43 mM Na(+) and growth was inhibited completely by 50 mM NaCl. To our knowledge, strain 6A8(T) is one of the most acidiphilic (lowest pH optimum) and salt-sensitive methanogens in pure culture. Acetate, coenzyme M, vitamins and yeast extract were required for growth. It is proposed that a new genus and species be established for this organism, Methanoregula boonei gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Methanoregula boonei is 6A8(T) (=DSM 21154(T) =JCM 14090(T)).

  15. Coupling of ferredoxin and heterodisulfide reduction via electron bifurcation in hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Moll, Johanna; Parey, Kristian; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    2011-01-01

    In methanogenic archaea growing on H2 and CO2 the first step in methanogenesis is the ferredoxin-dependent endergonic reduction of CO2 with H2 to formylmethanofuran and the last step is the exergonic reduction of the heterodisulfide CoM-S-S-CoB with H2 to coenzyme M (CoM-SH) and coenzyme B (CoB-SH). We recently proposed that in hydrogenotrophic methanogens the two reactions are energetically coupled via the cytoplasmic MvhADG/HdrABC complex. It is reported here that the purified complex from Methanothermobacter marburgensis catalyzes the CoM-S-S-CoB-dependent reduction of ferredoxin with H2. Per mole CoM-S-S-CoB added, 1 mol of ferredoxin (Fd) was reduced, indicating an electron bifurcation coupling mechanism: This stoichiometry of coupling is consistent with an ATP gain per mole methane from 4 H2 and CO2 of near 0.5 deduced from an H2-threshold concentration of 8 Pa and a growth yield of up to 3 g/mol methane. PMID:21262829

  16. Effect of humic acid in leachate on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengfei; Xian, Ping; Yang, Longhui; Liu, Xi; Zhan, Longhui; Bu, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out the effects of humic acid (HA) in anaerobic-treated landfill leachate on granular sludge, the anaerobic biodegradability of HA as well as the influences of HA on the total cumulative methane production, the anaerobic methanization process and the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of granular sludge are studied in this paper. Experimental results show that as a non-biodegradable organic pollutant, HA is also difficult to be decomposed by microbes in the anaerobic reaction process. Presence of HA and changes in the concentration have no significant influences on the total cumulative methane production and the anaerobic methanization process of granular sludge. Besides, the total cumulative methane production cannot reflect the inhibition of toxics on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge on the premise of sufficient reaction time. Results also show that HA plays a promoting role on SMA of granular sludge. Without buffering agent the SMA value increased by 19.2% on average due to the buffering and regulating ability of HA, while with buffering agent the SMA value increased by 5.4% on average due to the retaining effect of HA on the morphology of the sludge particles. However, in the presence of leachate the SMA value decreased by 27.6% on average, because the toxic effect of the toxics in the leachate on granular sludge is much larger than the promoting effect of HA.

  17. Logistic analysis of algae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Slegers, P M; Leduc, S; Wijffels, R H; van Straten, G; van Boxtel, A J B

    2015-03-01

    Energy requirements for resource transport of algae cultivation are unknown. This work describes the quantitative analysis of energy requirements for water and CO2 transport. Algae cultivation models were combined with the quantitative logistic decision model 'BeWhere' for the regions Benelux (Northwest Europe), southern France and Sahara. For photobioreactors, the energy consumed for transport of water and CO2 turns out to be a small percentage of the energy contained in the algae biomass (0.1-3.6%). For raceway ponds the share for transport is higher (0.7-38.5%). The energy consumption for transport is the lowest in the Benelux due to good availability of both water and CO2. Analysing transport logistics is still important, despite the low energy consumption for transport. The results demonstrate that resource requirements, resource distribution and availability and transport networks have a profound effect on the location choices for algae cultivation.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaerolineae Strain TC1, a Novel Isolate from a Methanogenic Wastewater Treatment System.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Norihisa; Tourlousse, Dieter M; Sun, Liwei; Toyonaga, Mayu; Kuroda, Kyohei; Ohashi, Akiko; Cruz, Rodrigo; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2015-10-08

    We report the draft genome sequence of Anaerolineae bacterium strain TC1, newly isolated from a methanogenic wastewater treatment system. The assembly contains 16 contigs in 3 scaffolds representing 3,510,630 bp in total with a G+C content of 41.35%. The genome is predicted to contain 2,793 protein-coding genes and 56 RNAs.

  19. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-06-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 +/- 0.06, 1.0 +/- 0.13 and 0.4 +/- 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation.

  20. DEPENDENCE OF A HIGH-RATE, PCE-DECHLORINATING ENRICHMENT CULTURE ON METHANOGENIC ACTIVITY. (R825549C053)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role served by the presence of methanogenic activity within a tetrachloroethene (PCE)-dechlorinating culture was investigated through a series of supplementation experiments. An acclimated lactate-enrichment culture (LEC 1) capable of rapidly converting PCE to ethene was s...

  1. Methane production and methanogenic archaeal communities in two types of paddy soil amended with different amounts of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qiong-Li; Xiao, Ke-Qing; Chen, Zheng; Yao, Huai-Ying; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-05-01

    Soil type and returning straw to the field are the important factors that regulate CH4 formation in paddy soil, and the variations of biogeochemical parameters and methanogens communities play important roles in the formation of CH4 . In the present study, two paddy soil types [silt loam soil (JX) and silty clay loam soil (GD)] with different amounts of rice straw additions were incubated under anaerobic conditions to investigate the relationship between CH4 production, biogeochemical variations, and methanogenic archaeal communities. Straw incorporation significantly stimulated CH4 production in two soil types. CH4 production in JX soil was higher than the GD soil with equal straw addition. Significant differences between biogeochemical parameters and methanogenic archaeal communities were observed between two soil types. Straw addition increased archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA genes copy numbers, especially in JX soil. Multiple regression analysis indicated that variations in H2 , sulfate, Fe (II) concentrations, archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA genes copy numbers, methanogens diversity index, and the relative abundance of Methanosarcinaceae and Methanobacteriaceae together influenced CH4 production in two soil types. These results indicated that methane production was influenced by the comprehensive effects of biotic and abiotic factors in paddy soils.

  2. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-06-12

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 ± 0.06, 1.0 ± 0.13 and 0.4 ± 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation.

  3. MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF HEXACHLORO-1,3-BUTADIENE IN A METHANOGENIC ENRICHMENT CULTURE. (R825513C007)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential reductive dechlorination of hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD) was achieved by a mixed, methanogenic culture enriched from a contaminated estuarine sediment. Both methanol and lactate served as carbon and electron sources. Methanol was stoichiometrically converted to m...

  4. Thioredoxin-linked redox control of metabolism in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, an evolutionarily deeply-rooted hyperthermophilic methanogenic archaeon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thioredoxin (Trx), a small redox protein, controls multiple processes in eukaryotes and bacteria by changing the thiol redox status of selected proteins. We have investigated this aspect in methanarchaea. These ancient methanogens produce methane almost exclusively from H2 plus CO2 carried approxima...

  5. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 ± 0.06, 1.0 ± 0.13 and 0.4 ± 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation. PMID:24920064

  6. Bacteria and methanogens differ along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Wright, André-Denis G; Li, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus). The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and assigned to 2,223 core operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (12 bacterial phyla and 87 genera). The phyla Firmicutes (51.2%) and Bacteroidetes (39.4%) were the dominant bacteria in the GIT of roe deer. However, the bacterial community in the rumen was significantly (P<0.01) different from the other sampled regions along the GIT. Secondly, Prevotella spp., Anaerovibrio spp., and unidentified bacteria within the families Veillonellaceae and Paraprevotellaceae were more abundant in the rumen than in the other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Enterobacteriaceae, Succinivibrio spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. were more predominant in the colon than in other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroides spp. were more prevalent in the ileum, cecum and fecal pellets. For methanogens in the rumen and cecum, a total of 375,647 high quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and assigned to 113 core OTUs. Methanobrevibacter millerae was the dominant species accounting for 77.3±7.4 (S.E) % and 68.9±4.4 (S.E) % of total sequences in the rumen and cecum of roe deer, respectively. However, the abundance of Methanobrevibacter smithii was higher in the rumen than in the cecum (P = 0.004). These results revealed that there was intra variation in the bacterial community composition across the GIT of roe deer, and also showed that the methanogen community in the rumen differed from that in the cecum.

  7. Effects of Amendment with Ferrihydrite and Gypsum on the Structure and Activity of Methanogenic Populations in Rice Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lueders, Tillmann; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    Methane emission from paddy fields may be reduced by the addition of electron acceptors to stimulate microbial populations competitive to methanogens. We have studied the effects of ferrihydrite and gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) amendment on methanogenesis and population dynamics of methanogens after flooding of Italian rice field soil slurries. Changes in methanogen community structure were followed by archaeal small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA)- and rRNA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and by quantitative SSU rRNA hybridization probing. Under ferrihydrite amendment, acetate was consumed efficiently (<60 μM) and a rapid but incomplete inhibition of methanogenesis occurred after 3 days. In contrast to unamended controls, the dynamics of Methanosarcina populations were largely suppressed as indicated by rDNA and rRNA analysis. However, the low acetate availability was still sufficient for activation of Methanosaeta spp., as indicated by a strong increase of SSU rRNA but not of relative rDNA frequencies. Unexpectedly, rRNA amounts of the novel rice cluster I (RC-I) methanogens increased significantly, while methanogenesis was low, which may be indicative of transient energy conservation coupled to Fe(III) reduction by these methanogens. Under gypsum addition, hydrogen was rapidly consumed to low levels (∼0.4 Pa), indicating the presence of a competitive population of hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This was paralleled by a suppressed activity of the hydrogenotrophic RC-I methanogens as indicated by the lowest SSU rRNA quantities detected in all experiments. Full inhibition of methanogenesis only became apparent when acetate was depleted to nonpermissive thresholds (<5 μM) after 10 days. Apparently, a competitive, acetotrophic population of SRB was not present initially, and hence, acetotrophic methanosarcinal populations were less suppressed than under ferrihydrite amendment. In conclusion, although methane

  8. High Frequency of Thermodesulfovibrio spp. and Anaerolineaceae in Association with Methanoculleus spp. in a Long-Term Incubation of n-Alkanes-Degrading Methanogenic Enrichment Culture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bo; Wang, Li-Ying; Zhou, Zhichao; Mbadinga, Serge M.; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the microbial community and functional gene composition of a long-term active alkane-degrading methanogenic culture was established after two successive enrichment culture transfers and incubated for a total period of 1750 days. Molecular analysis was conducted after the second transfer (incubated for 750 days) for both the active alkanes-degrading methanogenic enrichment cultures (T2-AE) and the background control (T2-BC). A net increase of methane as the end product was detected in the headspace of the enrichment cultures amended with long-chain n-alkanes and intermediate metabolites, including octadecanoate, hexadecanoate, isocaprylate, butyrate, isobutyrate, propionate, acetate, and formate were measured in the liquid cultures. The composition of microbial community shifted through the successive transfers over time of incubation. Sequences of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) and mcrA functional gene indicated that bacterial sequences affiliated to Thermodesulfovibrio spp. and Anaerolineaceae and archaeal sequences falling within the genus Methanoculleus were the most frequently encountered and thus represented the dominant members performing the anaerobic degradation of long-chain n-alkanes and methanogenesis. In addition, the presence of assA functional genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase α subunit indicated that fumarate addition mechanism could be considered as a possible initial activation step of n-alkanes in the present study. The succession pattern of microbial communities indicates that Thermodesulfovibrio spp. could be a generalist participating in the metabolism of intermediates, while Anaerolineaceae plays a key role in the initial activation of long-chain n-alkane biodegradation. PMID:27695441

  9. Vaccination of cattle with a methanogen protein produces specific antibodies in the saliva which are stable in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Subharat, Supatsak; Shu, Dairu; Zheng, Tao; Buddle, Bryce M; Janssen, Peter H; Luo, Dongwen; Wedlock, D Neil

    2015-04-15

    Methane is produced in the rumen of cattle by a group of archaea (single-celled organisms forming a domain distinct from bacteria and eucarya) called methanogens. Vaccination against methanogens has the potential to reduce methane emissions by inducing antibodies in saliva which are transferred to the rumen and diminish the ability of methanogens to produce methane. Since it is likely that an effective vaccination strategy will need to produce high levels of methanogen-specific antibody in the saliva; the choice of adjuvant, route of vaccination and stability of saliva-derived antibody in the rumen all need to be considered. In this study, stability of IgA and IgG in rumen fluid was determined using an in vitro assay. IgA levels in cattle saliva were reduced by only 40% after 8h exposure to rumen contents while IgG levels were reduced by 80%. These results indicated that antibody is relatively stable in the bovine rumen. A trial was conducted in cattle to investigate induction of immune responses to a methanogen protein, recombinant glycosyl transferase protein (rGT2) from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1. Groups of cattle (n=6) were vaccinated subcutaneously with rGT2, formulated with Montanide ISA61 with or without the TLR4 agonist, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). A control group (n=6) was not vaccinated. Strong antigen-specific IgG and moderate IgA responses were measured in the serum and saliva of the vaccinated animals and antibody was also detected in the rumen.

  10. Interactive Cultural Cultivating in FLT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Youwen

    2010-01-01

    Culture cultivating in foreign language teaching (FLT) is usually conducted through factual introductions in the form of articles, books, seminars, lectures or workshops. This approach regards L2 learners as passive receivers of cultural knowledge without their interaction involved. This paper aims at raising an interactive approach to develop L2…

  11. Integrating cultivation history into EBIPM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecologically based invasive plant management (EBIPM) is a systematic thinking and planning process to assist with applying the appropriate combination of tools and strategies to addrress the underlying cause of invasion rather than simply controlling invasive annual grass abundance. Cultivation his...

  12. Cultivate the Love of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews-Beck, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that the school year is like a growing season, but with planting in the fall and harvest in the spring. Discusses ways teachers can "prepare the soil" for cultivating students' love of reading. Presents a baker's dozen ideas to build the desire to read. (RS)

  13. Cultivation and uses of cucurbits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated cucurbits have spread through trade and exploration from their respective Old and New World centers of origin to the six arable continents and are important in local, regional and world trade. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), melon (Cucumis melo L.), pumpkin, squash and gourd (Cucurbita spp...

  14. Cultivating Spontaneous Self-Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shaughnessy, Molly

    1998-01-01

    Draws on contemporary sources to provide strategies for cultivating self-discipline. Advocates self-healing for the adult to be free from destructive attitudes and personal history that can keep adults from being mindful of the child's needs, perspective, and potential. Concludes with ways to facilitate a truly Montessori approach to discipline.…

  15. Cultivating Audiences: Taming, Teaching, Transforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolucci, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Satisfying and successful school concerts require an active, empathic, and cooperative partnership between performers and audience members. As music educators work to prepare artful, dignified, and confident performers, "audiences" for these performers must be cultivated just as purposefully. Concertgoers can be motivated to consume school…

  16. RamA, a protein required for reductive activation of corrinoid-dependent methylamine methyltransferase reactions in methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Tsuneo; Soares, Jitesh A; Lienard, Tanja; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Krzycki, Joseph A

    2009-01-23

    Archaeal methane formation from methylamines is initiated by distinct methyltransferases with specificity for monomethylamine, dimethylamine, or trimethylamine. Each methylamine methyltransferase methylates a cognate corrinoid protein, which is subsequently demethylated by a second methyltransferase to form methyl-coenzyme M, the direct methane precursor. Methylation of the corrinoid protein requires reduction of the central cobalt to the highly reducing and nucleophilic Co(I) state. RamA, a 60-kDa monomeric iron-sulfur protein, was isolated from Methanosarcina barkeri and is required for in vitro ATP-dependent reductive activation of methylamine:CoM methyl transfer from all three methylamines. In the absence of the methyltransferases, highly purified RamA was shown to mediate the ATP-dependent reductive activation of Co(II) corrinoid to the Co(I) state for the monomethylamine corrinoid protein, MtmC. The ramA gene is located near a cluster of genes required for monomethylamine methyltransferase activity, including MtbA, the methylamine-specific CoM methylase and the pyl operon required for co-translational insertion of pyrrolysine into the active site of methylamine methyltransferases. RamA possesses a C-terminal ferredoxin-like domain capable of binding two tetranuclear iron-sulfur proteins. Mutliple ramA homologs were identified in genomes of methanogenic Archaea, often encoded near methyltrophic methyltransferase genes. RamA homologs are also encoded in a diverse selection of bacterial genomes, often located near genes for corrinoid-dependent methyltransferases. These results suggest that RamA mediates reductive activation of corrinoid proteins and that it is the first functional archetype of COG3894, a family of redox proteins of unknown function.

  17. Factors regulating community composition of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in brackish marsh sediments in the Min River estuary, southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, C. X.; Zhang, Z. C.; Cadillo-Quiroz, H.; Tong, C.

    2016-11-01

    Assessing the diverse communities of methanogenic Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is important to understand methane (CH4) production in wetland ecosystems. However, the vertical distribution of composition and diversity, and the effects of environmental factors on the methanogen and SRB communities in the sediments of subtropical estuarine brackish marshes have been poorly characterized. To assess the effects of variable environmental conditions on methanogenic and SRB communities in marshes, we studied three brackish marsh zones dominated by Phragmites australis, Cyperus malaccensis and Spartina alterniflora, respectively, in the Min River estuary, southeastern China. Methanogens of the Methanomicrobiales order was the dominant group at sediment depths of 0-30 cm, which indicated that the main pathway of methane production was H2/CO2 in this zone. In general, methanogens of the genus Methanoregula were dominant in the three marsh zones. For SRB, Desulfobacterales was the dominant group, and Desulfobacterium and Desulfosarcina were the predominant genera at the depth of 0-30 cm. The community composition of methanogens and SRB changed with vegetation type and soil depth. Compared with SRB, vegetation type demonstrated a stronger influence on the community composition of methanogens. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis further revealed that the main factors affecting the methanogens community composition were EC (electric conductivity) and pH, and the main factors affecting SRB community composition were pH, SOC and TN, suggesting that pH is a common factor influencing the community compositions of both methanogen and SRB in the sediments of brackish marshes.

  18. Evidence for the existence of psychrophilic methanogenic communities in anoxic sediments of deep lakes.

    PubMed

    Nozhevnikova, Alla N; Zepp, Kornelia; Vazquez, Francisco; Zehnder, Alexander J B; Holliger, Christof

    2003-03-01

    In order to obtain evidence for the existence of psychrophilic methanogenic communities in sediments of deep lakes that are low-temperature environments (4 to 5 degrees C), slurries were first incubated at temperatures between 4 and 60 degrees C for several weeks, at which time they were amended, or not, with an additional substrate, such as cellulose, butyrate, propionate, acetate, or hydrogen, and further incubated at 6 degrees C. Initial methane production rates were highest in slurries preincubated at temperatures between 4 and 15 degrees C, with maximal rates in slurries kept at 6 degrees C. Hydrogen-amended cultures were the only exceptions, with the highest methane production rates at 6 degrees C after preincubation at 30 degrees C.

  19. Methanogenic Archaea and oral infections — ways to unravel the black box

    PubMed Central

    Horz, Hans-Peter; Conrads, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Archaea, organisms that make up the third domain of cellular life are members of the human oral microflora. They are strikingly less diverse than oral bacteria and appear to be relatively rare with respect to their numerical abundance. Since they have been exclusively found in association with oral infections such as periodontitis and apical periodontitis and given their unique physiology and energy metabolism, it is highly plausible that they are more than just secondary colonizers of infected areas, but instead are actively involved in the overall poly-microbial infection process. Conversely, it is a highly challenging task to clearly demonstrate their possible active participation – mostly due to the difficulty to grow them in routine microbiology laboratories. This current review points out the importance for understanding the medical impact of methanogens and aims at devising strategies for elucidating the true function of archaea in the oral ecosystem. PMID:21541092

  20. Localization of Methyl-Coenzyme M reductase as metabolic marker for diverse methanogenic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Christoph; Walbaum, Ulrike; Ducki, Andrea; Heieren, Iris; Hoppert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Methyl-Coenzyme M reductase (MCR) as key enzyme for methanogenesis as well as for anaerobic oxidation of methane represents an important metabolic marker for both processes in microbial biofilms. Here, the potential of MCR-specific polyclonal antibodies as metabolic marker in various methanogenic Archaea is shown. For standard growth conditions in laboratory culture, the cytoplasmic localization of the enzyme in Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter wolfei, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanosarcina mazei, and in anaerobically methane-oxidizing biofilms is demonstrated. Under growth limiting conditions on nickel-depleted media, at low linear growth of cultures, a fraction of 50-70% of the enzyme was localized close to the cytoplasmic membrane, which implies "facultative" membrane association of the enzyme. This feature may be also useful for assessment of growth-limiting conditions in microbial biofilms.

  1. Methanogenic population dynamics during start-up of anaerobic digesters treating municipal solid waste and biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.E.; McMahon, K.D.; Mackie, R.I.; Raskin, L.

    1998-02-05

    An aggressive start-up strategy was used to initiate codigestion in two anaerobic, continuously mixed bench-top reactors at mesophilic (37 C) and thermophilic (55 C) conditions. The digesters were inoculated with mesophilic anaerobic sewage sludge and cattle manure and were fed a mixture of simulated municipal solid waste and biosolids in proportions that reflect US production rates. The design organic loading rate was 3.1 kg volatile solids/m{sup 3}/day and the retention time was 20 days. Ribosomal RNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were used to determine the methanogenic community structure in the inocula and the digesters. Chemical analyses were performed to evaluate digester performance. The aggressive start-up strategy was successful for the thermophilic reactor, despite the use of a mesophilic inoculum.

  2. Competition between Methanogens and Acetogens in Biocathodes: A Comparison between Potentiostatic and Galvanostatic Control

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Sam D.; Saha, Pradip; Mol, Annemerel R.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; ter Heijne, Annemiek; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a useful form of technology for the renewable production of organic commodities from biologically catalyzed reduction of CO2. However, for the technology to become applicable, process selectivity, stability and efficiency need strong improvement. Here we report on the effect of different electrochemical control modes (potentiostatic/galvanostatic) on both the start-up characteristics and steady-state performance of biocathodes using a non-enriched mixed-culture inoculum. Based on our results, it seems that kinetic differences exist between the two dominant functional microbial groups (i.e., homoacetogens and methanogens) and that by applying different current densities, these differences may be exploited to steer product selectivity and reactor performance. PMID:28106846

  3. Methanogenic Activity and Structural Characteristics of the Microbial Biofilm On a Needle-Punched Polyester Support

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Martin; Forsberg, Cecil W.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Pos, Jack; Ogilvie, John R.

    1984-01-01

    In a downflow stationary fixed-film anaerobic reactor receiving a swine waste influent, few bacteria were observed to be tightly adherent to the surfaces of the needle-punched polyester support material. However, there was a morphologically complex, dense population of bacteria trapped within the matrix. Frequently large microcolonies of a uniform morphological type of bacteria were observed. These were particularly evident for methanosarcina-like bacteria which grew forming large aggregates of unseparated cells. Leafy deposits of electron-dense, calcium- and phosphorus-enriched material coated the polyester matrix and some cells. As the biofilm matured there was more extensive mineral deposition which completely entrapped cells. The entrapped cells appeared to autolyze, and many were partially degraded. Further impregnation of the matrix with minerals and apparent cell death may eventually have a deleterious effect on the methanogenic activity of the biofilm. Images PMID:16346629

  4. Review of the cultivation program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    DOE PAGES

    Lammers, Peter J.; Huesemann, Michael; Boeing, Wiebke; ...

    2016-12-12

    The cultivation efforts within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) were developed to provide four major goals for the consortium, which included biomass production for downstream experimentation, development of new assessment tools for cultivation, development of new cultivation reactor technologies, and development of methods for robust cultivation. The NAABB consortium testbeds produced over 1500 kg of biomass for downstream processing. The biomass production included a number of model production strains, but also took into production some of the more promising strains found through the prospecting efforts of the consortium. Cultivation efforts at large scale are intensive andmore » costly, therefore the consortium developed tools and models to assess the productivity of strains under various environmental conditions, at lab scale, and validated these against scaled outdoor production systems. Two new pond-based bioreactor designs were tested for their ability to minimize energy consumption while maintaining, and even exceeding, the productivity of algae cultivation compared to traditional systems. Also, molecular markers were developed for quality control and to facilitate detection of bacterial communities associated with cultivated algal species, including the Chlorella spp. pathogen, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, which was identified in at least two test site locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Finally, the consortium worked on understanding methods to utilize compromised municipal wastewater streams for cultivation. In conclusion, this review provides an overview of the cultivation methods and tools developed by the NAABB consortium to produce algae biomass, in robust low energy systems, for biofuel production.« less

  5. Review of the cultivation program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Lammers, Peter J.; Huesemann, Michael; Boeing, Wiebke; Anderson, Daniel B.; Arnold, Robert G.; Bai, Xuemei; Bhole, Manish; Brhanavan, Yalini; Brown, Louis; Brown, Jola; Brown, Judith K.; Chisholm, Stephen; Meghan Downes, C.; Fulbright, Scott; Ge, Yufeng; Holladay, Jonathan E.; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Khopkar, Avinash; Koushik, Ambica; Laur, Paul; Marrone, Babetta L.; Mott, John B.; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Parsons, Ronald L.; Polle, Juergen; Ryan, Randy D.; Samocha, Tzachi; Sayre, Richard T.; Seger, Mark; Selvaratnam, Thinesh; Sui, Ruixiu; Thomasson, Alex; Unc, Adrian; Van Voorhies, Wayne; Waller, Peter; Yao, Yao; Olivares, José A.

    2016-12-12

    The cultivation efforts within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) were developed to provide four major goals for the consortium, which included biomass production for downstream experimentation, development of new assessment tools for cultivation, development of new cultivation reactor technologies, and development of methods for robust cultivation. The NAABB consortium testbeds produced over 1500 kg of biomass for downstream processing. The biomass production included a number of model production strains, but also took into production some of the more promising strains found through the prospecting efforts of the consortium. Cultivation efforts at large scale are intensive and costly, therefore the consortium developed tools and models to assess the productivity of strains under various environmental conditions, at lab scale, and validated these against scaled outdoor production systems. Two new pond-based bioreactor designs were tested for their ability to minimize energy consumption while maintaining, and even exceeding, the productivity of algae cultivation compared to traditional systems. Also, molecular markers were developed for quality control and to facilitate detection of bacterial communities associated with cultivated algal species, including the Chlorella spp. pathogen, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, which was identified in at least two test site locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Finally, the consortium worked on understanding methods to utilize compromised municipal wastewater streams for cultivation. In conclusion, this review provides an overview of the cultivation methods and tools developed by the NAABB consortium to produce algae biomass, in robust low energy systems, for biofuel production.

  6. Hydrogen partial pressures in a thermophilic acetate-oxidizing methanogenic coculture. [THF, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.; Zinder, S.H. )

    1988-06-01

    Hydrogen partial pressures were measured in a thermophilic coculture comprised of a eubacterial rod which oxidized acetate to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} and a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanobacterium sp. strain THF. H{sub 2} partial pressures in the coculture were measured to be between 20 and 50 Pa (0.12 to 0.30 {mu}M) during acetate utilization, approximately one order of magnitude higher than originally predicted by Zinder and Koch. However, when {Delta}G{sub f} (free energy of formation) values were corrected for 60{degree}C, the predicted value was near 15 Pa, in closer agreement with the experimentally determined values. The coculture also oxidized ethanol to acetate with H{sub 2} partial pressure values as high as 200 Pa. Acetate was not used until after the ethanol was consumed and the H{sub 2} partial pressure decreased to 40 to 50 Pa. After acetate utilization, H{sub 2} partial pressures fell to approximately 10 Pa and remained there, indicating a threshold for H{sub 2} utilization by the methanogen. Axenic cultures of the acetate-oxidizing organism were combined with pure cultures of either Methanobacterium sp. strain THF or Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum {Delta}H to form reconstituted acetate-oxidizing cocultures. The H{sub 2} partial pressures measured in both of these reconstituted cocultures were similar to those measured in the original acetate-oxidizing rod coculture. Since M. thermoautotrophicum {Delta}H did not use formate as a substrate, formate is not necessarily involved in interspecies electron transfer in this coculture.

  7. Growth kinetics and energetics of a deep-sea hyperthermophilic methanogen under varying environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Ver Eecke, Helene C; Akerman, Nancy H; Huber, Julie A; Butterfield, David A; Holden, James F

    2013-10-01

    A hyperthermophilic deep-sea methanogen, Methanocaldococcus strain JH146, was isolated from 26°C hydrothermal fluid at Axial Volcano to model high temperature methanogenesis in the subseafloor. Emphasis was placed on defining growth kinetics, cell yields and growth energy demand (GE) across a range of conditions. The organism uses H2 and CO2 as its sole carbon and energy sources. At various temperatures, pHs, and chlorinities, its growth rates and cell yields co-varied while GE remained uniform at 1.69 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) ± 0.68 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) (s.d., n = 23). An exception was at superoptimal growth temperatures where GE increased to 7.25 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) presumably due to heat shock. GE also increased from 5.1 × 10(-12) J cell(-1)s(-1) to 7.61 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) as NH4 (+) concentrations decreased from 9.4 mM to 0.14 mM. JH146 did not fix N2 or assimilate NO3 (-), lacked the N2-fixing (cluster II) nifH gene, and became nitrogen limited below 0.14 mM NH4Cl. Nitrogen availability may impact growth in situ since ammonia concentrations at Axial Volcano are < 18 μM. Our approach contributes to refining bioenergetic and carbon flux models for methanogens and other organisms in hydrothermal vents and other environments.

  8. Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov., a methanogen from sediments near a submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Lai, Mei-Chin; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao; Lin, Saulwood; Yang, Tsanyao F; Chen, Po-Chun

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain S3Fa(T), was isolated from sediments collected by Ocean Researcher I cruise ORI-934 in 2010 near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located at the upper slope of south-west Taiwan. The methanogenic substrates utilized by strain S3Fa(T) were formate and H2/CO2 but not acetate, secondary alcohols, methylamines, methanol or ethanol. Cells of strain S3Fa(T) were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0.5-1.0 μm in diameter. The surface-layer protein showed an Mr of 128,000.The optimum growth conditions were 37 °C, pH 7.1 and 0.17 M NaCl. The DNA G+C content of the genome of strain S3Fa(T) was 62.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain S3Fa(T) was most closely related to Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genome relatedness between strain S3Fa(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) was computed using both genome-to-genome distance analysis (GGDA) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with values of 46.3-55.5% and 93.08%, respectively. Based on morphological, phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic relatedness data, it is evident that strain S3Fa(T) represents a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, for which the name Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S3Fa(T) ( = BCRC AR10044(T) = DSM 29354(T)).

  9. Methylmercury decomposition in sediments and bacterial cultures: Involvement of methanogens and sulfate reducers in oxidative demethylation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Winfrey, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Demethylation of monomethylmercury in freshwater and estuarine sediments and in bacterial cultures was investigated with 14CH3HgI. Under anaerobiosis, results with inhibitors indicated partial involvement of both sulfate reducers and methanogens, the former dominating estuarine sediments, while both were active in freshwaters. Aerobes were the most significant demethylators in estuarine sediments, but were unimportant in freshwater sediments. Products of anaerobic demethylation were mainly 14CO2 as well as lesser amounts of 14CH4. Acetogenic activity resulted in fixation of some 14CO2 produced from 14CH3HgI into acetate. Aerobic demethylation in estuarine sediments produced only 14CH4, while aerobic demethylation in freshwater sediments produced small amounts of both 14CH4 and 14CO2. Two species of Desulfovibrio produced only traces of 14CH4 from 14CH3HgI, while a culture of a methylotrophic methanogen formed traces of 14CO2 and 14CH4 when grown on trimethylamine in the presence of the 14CH3HgI. These results indicate that both aerobes and anaerobes demethylate mercury in sediments, but that either group may dominate in a particular sediment type. Aerobic demethylation in the estuarine sediments appeared to proceed by the previously characterized organomercurial-lyase pathway, because methane was the sole product. However, aerobic demethylation in freshwater sediments as well as anaerobic demethylation in all sediments studied produced primarily carbon dioxide. This indicates the presence of an oxidative pathway, possibly one in which methylmercury serves as an analog of one-carbon substrates.

  10. Methylmercury decomposition in sediments and bacterial cultures: Involvement of methanogens and sulfate reducers in oxidative demethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W. ); Winfrey, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of mercury has received considerable attention because of the toxicity of methylmercury, its bioaccumulation in biota, and its biomagnification in aquatic food chains. The formation of methylmercury is mediated primarily by microorganisms. Demethylation of monomethylmercury in freshwater and estuarine sediments and in bacterial cultures was investigated with {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI. Under anaerobiosis, results with inhibitors indicated partial involvement of both sulfate reducers and methanogens, the former dominated estuarine sediments, while both were active in freshwaters. Aerobes were the most significant demethylators in estuarine sediments, but were unimportant in freshwater sediments. Products of anaerobic demthylation were mainly {sup 14}CO{sub 2} as well as lesser amounts of {sup 14}CH{sub 4}. Acetogenic activity resulted in fixation of some {sup 14}CO{sub 2} produced from {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI into acetate. Aerobic demethylation in estuarine sediments produced only {sup 14}CH{sub 4}, while aerobic demethylation in freshwater sediments produced small amounts of both {sup 14}CH{sub 4} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Two species of Desulfovibrio produced only traces of {sup 14}CH{sub 4} from {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI, while a culture of a methylotrophic methanogen formed traces of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CH{sub 4} when grown on trimethylamine in the presence of the {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI. These results indicate that both aerobes and anaerobes demethylate mercury in sediments, but that either group may dominate in a particular sediment type. Aerobic demethylation in the estuarine sediments appeared to proceed by the previously characterized organomercurial-lyase pathway, because methane was the sole product. This indicates the presence of an oxidative pathway, possibly one in which methylmercury serves as an analog of one-carbon substrates.

  11. [Cobalt(III)-EDTA]- Reduction by Thermophilic Methanogen Methanothermobacter Thermautotrophicus

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Marts, Amy R.; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.

    2015-06-30

    Cobalt is a metal contaminant at high temperature radioactive waste disposal sites. In previous studies have largely focused on mesophilic microorganisms to remediate cobalt, despite the presence of thermophilic microorganisms at such sites. In this study,Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, a thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce Co(III) in the form of [Co(III)–EDTA]-. Bioreduction experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as a growth substrate at initial Co(III) concentrations of 1, 2, 4, 7, and 10 mM. At low Co(III) concentrations (< 4 mM), a complete reduction was observed within a week. Wet chemistry, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were all consistent in revealing the reduction kinetics. But, at higher concentrations (7 and 10 mM) the reduction extents only reached 69.8% and 48.5%, respectively, likely due to the toxic effect of Co(III) to the methanogen cells as evidenced by a decrease in total cellular protein at these Co(III) concentrations. Methanogenesis was inhibited by Co(III) bioreduction, possibly due to impaired cell growth and electron diversion from CO2 to Co(III). Overall, our results demonstrated the ability of M. thermautotrophicus to reduce Co(III) to Co(II) and its potential application for remediating 60Co contaminant at high temperature subsurface radioactive waste disposal sites.

  12. Ruminal Fermentation of Anti-Methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robin C.; Ripley, Laura H.; Bowman, Jan G. P.; Callaway, Todd R.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; Beier, Ross C.; Harvey, Roger B.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA-, or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35–87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during the incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA, and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH and was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 μmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 μmol added formate per milliliter to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases, higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate, and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA, and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation

  13. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  14. Draft genome sequence of Methanoculleus sp. MH98A, a novel methanogen isolated from sub-seafloor methane hydrate deposits in Krishna Godavari basin.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Ashwini; Honkalas, Varsha; Arora, Preeti; Pore, Soham; Ranade, D R; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K

    2014-10-22

    Members of the genus Methanoculleus are among the most prevalent methanogens in biomethanation processes especially in marine and brackish environments. A methanogen, identified as a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, was isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment obtained from the Krishna Godavari Basin off the eastern coast of India. This methanogen is thought to be the supplier of the methane in the submarine methane hydrate deposits. Further study of this microorganism could possibly help to revolutionize the energy industry. The draft genome of Methanoculleus sp. MH98A is presented.

  15. Membrane technology in microalgae cultivation and harvesting: a review.

    PubMed

    Bilad, M R; Arafat, Hassan A; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2014-11-15

    Membrane processes have long been applied in different stages of microalgae cultivation and processing. These processes include microfiltration, ultrafiltration, dialysis, forward osmosis, membrane contactors and membrane spargers. They are implemented in many combinations, both as a standalone and as a coupled system (in membrane biomass retention photobioreactors (BR-MPBRs) or membrane carbonation photobioreactors (C-MPBRs). To provide sufficient background on these applications, an overview of membrane materials and membrane processes of interest in microalgae cultivation and processing is provided in this work first. Afterwards, discussion about specific aspects of membrane applications in microbial cultivation and harvesting is provided, including membrane fouling. Many of the membrane processes were shown to be promising options in microalgae cultivation. Yet, significant process optimizations are still required when they are applied to enable microalgae biomass bulk production to become competitive as a raw material for biofuel production. Recent developments of the coupled systems (BR-MPBR and C-MPBR) bring significant promises to improve the volumetric productivity of a cultivation system and the efficiency of inorganic carbon capture, respectively.

  16. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  17. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  18. Application of Virtual Manufacturing in Fields Cultivate Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Yan; Li, Zhou

    The paper introduces virtual manufacturing application in the Fields Cultivate Machines and mainly discusses the model-building of rotary-cultivate part, physical model and mathematical model included. With the model, the rotary knife is optimized, the force on the bend part is decreased, and therefore, the service life is prolonged. At the same time, with dynamic analysis software Adams, the moment curve of the rotary knife is simulated, which provides a basis for the improvement of stability and farther research in future.

  19. Substrate and/or substrate-driven changes in the abundance of methanogenic archaea cause seasonal variation of methane production potential in species-specific freshwater wetlands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Yuan, Junji; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin

    2014-05-01

    There are large temporal and spatial variations of methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetlands. To understand temporal changes of CH4 production potential (MPP), soil samples were collected from a permanently inundated Carex lasiocarpa marsh and a summer inundated Calamagrostis angustifolia marsh over the period from June to October of 2011. MPP, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, abundance and community structure of methanogenic archaea were assessed. In the C. lasiocarpa marsh, DOC concentration, MPP and the methanogen population showed similar seasonal variations and maximal values in September. MPP and DOC in the C. angustifolia marsh exhibited seasonal variations and values peaked during August, while the methanogen population decreased with plant growth. Methanogen abundance correlated significantly (P = 0.02) with DOC only for the C. lasiocarpa marsh. During the sampling period, the dominant methanogens were the Methanosaetaceae and Zoige cluster I (ZC-Ι) in the C. angustifolia marsh, and Methanomicrobiales and ZC-Ι in the C. lasiocarpa marsh. MPP correlated significantly (P = 0.04) with DOC and methanogen population in the C. lasiocarpa marsh but only with DOC in the C. angustifolia marsh. Addition of C. lasiocarpa litter enhanced MPP more effectively than addition of C. angustifolia litter, indicating that temporal variation of substrates is controlled by litter deposition in the C. lasiocarpa marsh while living plant matter is more important in the C. angustifolia marsh. This study indicated that there was no apparent shift in the dominant types of methanogen during the growth season in the species-specific freshwater wetlands. Temporal variation of MPP is controlled by subs