Science.gov

Sample records for including non-zero obliquity

  1. A Mercury orientation model including non-zero obliquity and librations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    Planetary orientation models describe the orientation of the spin axis and prime meridian of planets in inertial space as a function of time. The models are required for the planning and execution of Earth-based or space-based observational work, e.g. to compute viewing geometries and to tie observations to planetary coordinate systems. The current orientation model for Mercury is inadequate because it uses an obsolete spin orientation, neglects oscillations in the spin rate called longitude librations, and relies on a prime meridian that no longer reflects its intended dynamical significance. These effects result in positional errors on the surface of ~1.5 km in latitude and up to several km in longitude, about two orders of magnitude larger than the finest image resolution currently attainable. Here we present an updated orientation model which incorporates modern values of the spin orientation, includes a formulation for longitude librations, and restores the dynamical significance to the prime meridian. We also use modern values of the orbit normal, spin axis orientation, and precession rates to quantify an important relationship between the obliquity and moment of inertia differences.

  2. Tidal Heating at Pluto and Charon as a Result of Non-Zero Obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M.; Bills, B. G.; Mitchell, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pluto-Charon system represents a unique opportunity to examine tidal heating in a zero eccentricity system. As a result, any tidal heating in these bodies will occur as a result of finite obliquity. While Pluto and Charon's obliquities have yet to be measured, theoretical models assuming the spin poles of the bodies are in Cassini states predict observable obliquity values. We present a new tidal heating model for synchronously rotating bodies. As a major result of this formulation, we show how tidal heating is quadratically dependent on the h and l Love numbers, in contrast with classic models which assume homogeneous interior structure and find a linear dependence on the k Love number. Furthermore, we show how the spatial patterns of tidal heating depend on obliquity as well as eccentricity. By applying theoretical predictions of Pluto and Charon's spin pole orientations we examine the radially integrated spatial pattern of tidal heating at these bodies. At degree two, these patterns on Pluto predict equal heating at the sub- and anti-Charon points. Recent observations, however, show a clear dichotomy at these locations. Degree three tidal heating patterns, though reduced in magnitude, break the spatial symmetry and represent a positive indicator that tidal heating is active at Pluto and may be a source of the geologic activity at Tombaugh Regio.

  3. Oblique view of east and south sides, including component landscape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of east and south sides, including component landscape elements that surround the building, camera facing northwest - Naval Training Station, Senior Officers' Quarters District, Quarters No. 3, Naval Station Treasure Island, 3 Whiting Way, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Composite graft including bone tissue: a case report of successful reattachment of multiple fingertip oblique amputation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Lim, Yun sub; Choi, Jaehoon; Kim, Nam Gyun; Kim, Jun Sik

    2013-02-01

    A composite graft for reattachment of an amputated fingertip is a very controversial and challenging procedure. An osteocutaneous composite graft is rarely conducted and has a low success rate following fingertip amputation. A 21-year-old male patient was referred to our emergency clinic with dorsal oblique amputation of the middle, ring and small fingers of the left hand through the distal interphalangeal joint and middle phalanx. The amputated parts of the middle and ring fingers were reattached with osteocutaneous composite grafts. The amputated part of the small finger was revascularised to the ulnar palmar digital artery of the small finger. The composite grafts of the middle and ring fingers and the revascularised small finger survived completely. We suggest that careful patient selection will allow an osteocutaneous composite graft to become an acceptable method for the treatment of fingertip amputation. A large-scale study of osteocutaneous graft of amputated fingertips is required to improve the survival rate.

  5. Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters in equilibrium air including attached-shock solutions for surfaces at angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Souders, S. W.

    1975-01-01

    Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters for air in thermochemical equilibrium are tabulated as a function of shock angle for altitudes ranging from 15.24 km to 91.44 km in increments of 7.62 km at selected hypersonic speeds. Post-shock parameters tabulated include flow-deflection angle, velocity, Mach number, compressibility factor, isentropic exponent, viscosity, Reynolds number, entropy difference, and static pressure, temperature, density, and enthalpy ratios across the shock. A procedure is presented for obtaining oblique-shock flow properties in equilibrium air on surfaces at various angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral by use of the two-dimensional tabulations. Plots of the flow parameters against flow-deflection angle are presented at altitudes of 30.48, 60.96, and 91.44 km for various stream velocities.

  6. Dielectric waveguide with transverse index variation that support a zero group velocity mode at a non-zero longitudinal wavevector

    DOEpatents

    Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoious, John D.; Fink, Yoel; Johnson, Steven G.; Fan, Shanhui

    2005-06-21

    Optical components including a laser based on a dielectric waveguide extending along a waveguide axis and having a refractive index cross-section perpendicular to the waveguide axis, the refractive index cross-section supporting an electromagnetic mode having a zero group velocity for a non-zero wavevector along the waveguide axis.

  7. Non-zero helicity of a cyclonic vortex over localized heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanovskii, A.; Evgrafova, A.; Popova, E.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental and numerical study of the steady-state cyclonic vortex from isolated heat source in a rotating fluid layer is described. The structure of laboratory cyclonic vortex is similar to the typical structure of tropical cyclones from observational data and numerical modelling including secondary flows in the boundary layer. Differential characteristics of the flow were studied by numerical simulation using CFD software FlowVision. It was found that helicity in a described system has non-zero value. Physical interpretation of helicity distribution is provided.

  8. Oblique discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Discord and entanglement characterize two kinds of quantum correlations, and discord captures more correlation than entanglement in the sense that even separable states may have nonzero discord. In this paper, we propose a new kind of quantum correlation that we call as oblique discord. A zero-discord state corresponds to an orthonormal basis, while a zero-oblique-discord state corresponds to a basis which is not necessarily orthogonal. Under this definition, the set of zero-discord states is properly contained inside the set of zero-oblique-discord states, and the set of zero-oblique-discord states is properly contained inside the set of separable states. We give a characterization of zero-oblique-discord states via quantum mapping, provide a geometric measure for oblique discord, and raise a conjecture, which if it holds, then we can define an information-theoretic measure for oblique discord. Also, we point out that the definition of oblique discord can be properly extended to some different versions just as the case of quantum discord.

  9. Climates of Oblique Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    A previous paper (Dobrovolskis 2007; Icarus 192, 1-23) showed that eccentricity can have profound effects on the climate, habitability, and detectability of extrasolar planets. This complementary study shows that obliquity can have comparable effects. The known exoplanets exhibit a wide range of orbital eccentricities, but those within several million km of their suns are generally in near-circular orbits. This fact is widely attributed to the dissipation of tides in the planets, which is particularly effective for solid/liquid bodies like "Super-Earths". Along with friction between a solid mantle and a liquid core, tides also are expected to despin a planet until it is captured in the synchronous resonance, so that its rotation period is identical to its orbital period. The canonical example of synchronous spin is the way that our Moon always keeps nearly the same hemisphere facing the Earth. Tides also tend to reduce the planet's obliquity (the angle between its spin and orbital angular velocities). However, orbit precession can cause the rotation to become locked in a "Cassini state", where it retains a nearly constant non-zero obliquity. For example, our Moon maintains an obliquity of about 6.7° with respect to its orbit about the Earth. For comparison, stable Cassini states can exist for practically any obliquity up to 180° for planets of binary stars, or in multi-planet systems with high mutual inclinations, such as are produced by scattering or by the Kozai mechanism. This work considers planets in synchronous rotation with circular orbits. For obliquities greater than 90°, the ground track of the sub-solar point wraps around all longitudes on the surface of such a planet. For smaller obliquities, the sub-solar track takes the figure-8 shape of an analemma. This can be visualized as the intersection of the planet's spherical surface with a right circular cylinder, parallel to the spin axis and tangent to the equator from the inside. The excursion of the

  10. Dynamic analysis of offshore structures with non-zero initial conditions in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Lu, Hongchao; Li, Huajun

    2016-03-01

    The state of non-zero conditions is typically treated as fact when considering the dynamic analysis of offshore structures. This article extends a newly proposed method [1] to manage the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures in the frequency domain, including new studies on original environmental loads reconstruction, response comparisons with the commercial software ANSYS, and a demonstration using an experimental cantilever beam. The original environmental loads, such as waves, currents, and winds, that act on a structure are decomposed into multiple complex exponential components are represented by a series of poles and corresponding residues. Counter to the traditional frequency-domain method, the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures could be solved in the frequency domain. Compared with reference [1], an improvement reported in this article is that practical issues, including the choice of model order and central-processing-unit (CPU) time consumption, are further studied when applying this new method to offshore structures. To investigate the feasibility of the representation of initial environmental loads by their poles and corresponding residues, a measured random wave force collected from a column experiment at the Lab of Ocean University of China is used, decomposed, reconstructed and then compared with the original wave force; then, a numerical offshore platform is used to study the performance of the proposed method in detail. The numerical results of this study indicate that (1) a short duration of environmental loads are required to obtain their constitutive poles and residues, which implies good computational efficiency; and (2) the proposed method has a similar computational efficiency to traditional methods due to the use of the inverse Fourier transform technique. To better understand the performance, of time consumption and accuracy of the proposed method, the commercial software ANSYS is used to determine responses

  11. Insolation on exoplanets with eccentricity and obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2013-09-01

    The pattern of insolation on an extrasolar planet has profound implications for its climate and habitability. A planet’s insolation regime depends on its orbital eccentricity, the obliquity of its spin axis, its rotation rate, and its longitude of vernal equinox. For example, although a planet receives the same time-averaged insolation at both poles, the peak insolation at its poles can differ by a factor up to 27, depending on its eccentricity and equinox. This is of particular interest for planets with polar icecaps (or lakes and seas), like Mercury, Earth, and Mars (or Titan). The nearly 600 exoplanets now with known eccentricities span a wide range of eccentricity from essentially zero up to near unity; but their obliquities are still unknown, and also may range widely. Including both non-zero eccentricity and obliquity together vastly broadens the variety of global insolation patterns on extrasolar planets. This applies especially to planets in synchronous rotation, or in other spin-orbit resonances (like Mercury), which can exhibit quite complicated and unusual insolation patterns. For example, regions of eternal daylight and endless night occur only on synchronous exoplanets, whose rotation periods equal their orbital periods; but the peak and time-averaged insolation can vary by factors of at least 32 and 88, respectively, over a planet with a rotation period of half its orbital period, an eccentricity of 0.20, and an obliquity of 60°. Patterns of both mean and peak insolation display various symmetries with respect to latitude and longitude on the planet’s surface. Most of these are relatively simple and easily understood; for example, a resonant planet whose orbital period is half of an odd multiple of its rotation period (as in Mercury’s 3/2 resonance) experiences identical insolation patterns at longitudes 180° apart. However, such half-odd resonances also exhibit a totally unexpected symmetry of the time-averaged insolation with respect to the

  12. The role of magnetic dipoles and non-zero-order Bragg waves in metamaterial perfect absorbers.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yong; Chen, Hou-Tong; Dalvit, Diego A R

    2013-02-11

    We develop a simple treatment of a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) based on grating theory. We analytically prove that the condition of MPA requires the existence of two currents, which are nearly out of phase and have almost identical amplitude, akin to a magnetic dipole. Furthermore, we show that non-zero-order Bragg modes within the MPA may consume electromagnetic energy significantly.

  13. Electrodynamics at non-zero temperature, chemical potential and Bose condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, Alexander D.; Lepidi, Angela; Piccinelli, Gabriella E-mail: lepidi@fe.infn.it

    2009-02-15

    Electrodynamics of charged scalar bosons and spin 1/2 fermions is studied at non-zero temperature, chemical potentials, and possible Bose condensate of the charged scalars. Debye screening length, plasma frequency, and the photon dispersion relation are calculated. It is found that in presence of the condensate the time-time component of the photon polarization operator in the first order in electric charge squared acquires infrared singular parts proportional to inverse powers of the spatial photon momentum k.

  14. Non-zero basal oxygen flow a hazard to anesthesia breathing circuit leak test.

    PubMed

    Tokumine, Joho; Sugahara, Kazuhiro; Gushiken, Kouji; Ohta, Minoru; Matsuyama, Tomoaki; Saikawa, Satoko

    2005-04-01

    The non-zero basal flow (BF) of oxygen in anesthesia machines has been set to supply the basal metabolic requirement of oxygen. However, there is no scientific evidence of its necessity. In this study we sought to clarify whether non-zero BF affects leak detection during preanesthetic inspections. Twenty-five participants performed leak tests on anesthesia machines to detect breathing circuit leaks. Artificial leak-producing devices were used to create leaks from 0 to 1.0 L/min. The investigator randomly chose the leak device and connected it into the breathing circuit. Participants, blinded as to the presence or the type of leak producing device, then tested the breathing circuit for leaks. The conventional breathing system leak test was performed with and without BF. The results of leak detection in each leak procedure were analyzed statistically. The leak detection rate of leak test with BF was less than without BF (P < 0.01). We demonstrated that non-zero BF of oxygen decreases the leak detection rate and is an obstacle for leak detection, especially for small leaks. Therefore, we recommend that breathing circuit leak tests should be performed in the absence of BF of oxygen.

  15. Oblique Shock Interaction with a Laminar Cylindrical Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    We present an experimental study of a planar shock interaction with an initially cylindrical, diffuse density interface, where the angle α between the plane of the shock and the axis of the cylinder can be zero (planar normal interaction) or non-zero (oblique interaction). The interface is formed by injecting a laminar jet of a heavy gas mixture (sulfure hexafluoride, acetone, nitrogen) into quiescent air. The jet is stabilized by an annular co-flow of air to minimize diffusion. Interaction between the pressure gradient (shock front) and density gradients leads to vorticity deposition, and during the subsequent evolution, the flow undergoes mixing (injected material - air) and eventually transitions to turbulence. Several parameters affect this evolution, including the angle α, the Atwood number (density ratio), and the Mach number of the shock. For quantitative and qualitative characterization of the influence of these parameters, we use flow visualization in two planes that relies on planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in acetone, which forms a part of the injected material. This research is supported by NNSA Grant DE-NA000220.

  16. Oblique shock interaction with a laminar cylindrical jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    We present an experimental study of planar shock interaction with an initially cylindrical, diffuse density interface, where the angle α between the plane of the shock and the axis of the cylinder can be zero (planar normal interaction) or non-zero (oblique interaction). The interface is formed by injecting a laminar jet of a heavy gas mixture (sulfur hexafluoride, acetone, nitrogen) into quiescent air. The jet is stabilized by an annular co-flow of air to minimize diffusion. Interaction between the pressure gradient (shock front) and density gradient leads to vorticity deposition, and during the subsequent evolution, the flow undergoes mixing (injected material - air) and eventually transitions to turbulence. Several parameters affect this evolution, including the angle α, the Atwood number (density ratio), and the Mach number of the shock. For quantitative and qualitative characterization of the influence of these parameters, we use flow visualization in two planes that relies on planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in acetone, which forms part of the injected material.

  17. Spin zero Hawking radiation for non-zero-angular momentum mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ngampitipan, Tritos; Bonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2015-05-15

    Black hole greybody factors carry some quantum black hole information. Studying greybody factors may lead to understanding the quantum nature of black holes. However, solving for exact greybody factors in many black hole systems is impossible. One way to deal with this problem is to place some rigorous analytic bounds on the greybody factors. In this paper, we calculate rigorous bounds on the greybody factors for spin zero hawking radiation for non-zero-angular momentum mode from the Kerr-Newman black holes.

  18. The X-ray Light Curves of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables with Non-zero Shock Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Koji

    The hard X-ray emitting shocks in magnetic CVs are probably 0.01-0.1 Rwd tall. Self occultation of X-ray emitting regions under such shocks must be calculated using a full, three-dimensional geometry: The difference between the top and the bottom of the shock is substantial in this regard. In this paper, I present the results of crude simulations showing that the non-zero shock height probably is an important factor in the hard X-ray spin modulations of IPs, with applications to XY Ari and EX Hya.

  19. Insolation patterns on synchronous exoplanets with obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2009-11-01

    A previous paper [Dobrovolskis, A.R., 2007. Icarus 192, 1-23] showed that eccentricity can have profound effects on the climate, habitability, and detectability of extrasolar planets. This complementary study shows that obliquity can have comparable effects. The known exoplanets exhibit a wide range of orbital eccentricities, but those within several million kilometers of their suns are generally in near-circular orbits. This fact is widely attributed to the dissipation of tides in the planets. Tides in a planet affect its spin even more than its orbit, and such tidally evolved planets often are assumed to be in synchronous rotation, so that their rotation periods are identical to their orbital periods. The canonical example of synchronous spin is the way that our Moon always keeps nearly the same hemisphere facing the Earth. Tides also tend to reduce the planet's obliquity (the angle between its spin and orbital angular velocities). However, orbit precession can cause the rotation to become locked in a "Cassini state", where it retains a nearly constant non-zero obliquity. For example, our Moon maintains an obliquity of about 6.7° with respect to its orbit about the Earth. In comparison, stable Cassini states can exist for practically any obliquity up to ˜90° or more for planets of binary stars, or in multi-planet systems with high mutual inclinations, such as are produced by scattering or by the Kozai mechanism. This work considers planets in synchronous rotation with circular orbits, but arbitrary obliquity β; this affects the distribution of insolation over the planet's surface, particularly near its poles. For β=0, one hemisphere bakes in perpetual sunshine, while the opposite hemisphere experiences eternal darkness. As β increases, the region of permanent daylight and the antipodal realm of endless night both shrink, while a more temperate area of alternating day and night spreads in longitude, and especially in latitude. The regions of permanent day or

  20. Flow-induced instabilities of shells of revolution with non-zero Gaussian curvatures conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gary Han; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2016-02-01

    We study flow-induced instabilities of axis-symmetric shells of revolution with an arbitrary meridian and non-zero Gaussian curvatures. We consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model based on an inviscid flow model and a thin shell theory. This FSI model is solved using a method that combines the Galerkin technique with the boundary element method (BEM). The present method is capable of investigating the dynamic behavior of doubly-curved shells in contact with flow without the need for an analytical solution of the perturbed flow potential. Shells of revolution with different values of non-zero Gaussian curvatures are investigated and their behavior is compared to shells with zero Gaussian curvature. It is found that the added mass natural frequencies of shells of revolution are larger than those of conical shells with the same inlet, outlet and length. Shells of revolution, with both positive and negative Gaussian curvatures, lose their instability by buckling, however, shells with negative Gaussian curvatures buckle at modes similar to those observed in uniform and conical shells, while shells with positive Gaussian curvatures buckle with localized deformations close to the area with higher local flow velocities.

  1. Effect of non-zero divergence wind fields on atmospheric transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitada, Toshihiro

    The use of wind fields that do not satisfy the equation of continuity exactly can introduce significant errors in the calculation of the atmospheric transport of chemical species. Results are presented showing that non-zero divergence winds, used as inputs to a transport equation of conservation form, can introduce local fictitious production or destruction rates into the numerical calculations. A divergence-corrected form of the equation, which is mathematically equivalent but not numerically equivalent to an advection form of the equation, can eliminate these undesirable effects as well as the advection form equation can. The divergence-corrected form of the equation leads exactly to the conservation form when massconsistent winds are used. Also, it has the desirable property that the numerical form can preserve, to a large extent, integral conservation relations of the original mass balance equation even when Δ · V ≠ 0. The effects of using non-zero divergence winds appear as first-order chemical reactions. These terms are compared quantitatively with the rates of several tropospheric chemical reactions.

  2. Quantum Quench Dynamics in the Transverse Field Ising Model at Non-zero Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeling, Nils; Kehrein, Stefan

    The recently discovered Dynamical Phase Transition denotes non-analytic behavior in the real time evolution of quantum systems in the thermodynamic limit and has been shown to occur in different systems at zero temperature [Heyl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 135704 (2013)]. In this talk we present the extension of the analysis to non-zero temperature by studying a generalized form of the Loschmidt echo, the work distribution function, of a quantum quench in the transverse field Ising model. Although the quantitative behavior at non-zero temperatures still displays features derived from the zero temperature non-analyticities, it is shown that in this model dynamical phase transitions do not exist if T > 0 . This is a consequence of the system being initialized in a thermal state. Moreover, we elucidate how the Tasaki-Crooks-Jarzynski relation can be exploited as a symmetry relation for a global quench or to obtain the change of the equilibrium free energy density. This work was supported through CRC SFB 1073 (Project B03) of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  3. Vector tomography for reconstructing electric fields with non-zero divergence in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouri, Alexandra; Brookes, Mike; Rimpiläinen, Ville

    2017-01-01

    In vector tomography (VT), the aim is to reconstruct an unknown multi-dimensional vector field using line integral data. In the case of a 2-dimensional VT, two types of line integral data are usually required. These data correspond to integration of the parallel and perpendicular projection of the vector field along the integration lines and are called the longitudinal and transverse measurements, respectively. In most cases, however, the transverse measurements cannot be physically acquired. Therefore, the VT methods are typically used to reconstruct divergence-free (or source-free) velocity and flow fields that can be reconstructed solely from the longitudinal measurements. In this paper, we show how vector fields with non-zero divergence in a bounded domain can also be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements without the need of explicitly evaluating the transverse measurements. To the best of our knowledge, VT has not previously been used for this purpose. In particular, we study low-frequency, time-harmonic electric fields generated by dipole sources in convex bounded domains which arise, for example, in electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging. We explain in detail the theoretical background, the derivation of the electric field inverse problem and the numerical approximation of the line integrals. We show that fields with non-zero divergence can be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements with the help of two sparsity constraints that are constructed from the transverse measurements and the vector Laplace operator. As a comparison to EEG source imaging, we note that VT does not require mathematical modeling of the sources. By numerical simulations, we show that the pattern of the electric field can be correctly estimated using VT and the location of the source activity can be determined accurately from the reconstructed magnitudes of the field.

  4. Effects of Obliquity on the Habitability of Exoplanets around M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Yonggang; Tian, Feng; Yang, Jun; Ding, Feng; Zhou, Linjiong; Hu, Yongyun

    2016-05-01

    Most previous studies on how obliquity affects planetary habitability focused on planets around Sun-like stars. Their conclusions may not be applicable to habitable planets around M dwarfs due to the tidal-locking feature and associated insolation pattern of these planets. Here we use a comprehensive three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model to investigate this issue. We find that the climates of planets with higher obliquities are generally warmer, consistent with previous studies. The mechanism of warming is, however, completely different. Significant reduction of low clouds, instead of sea-ice cover, within the substeller region (which moves if the obliquity is non-zero) is the key in warming M-dwarf planets with high obliquities. For a total insolation of 1237 W m-2, the climate warms by 21 K when the obliquity increases from 0° to 90°. Correspondingly, the runaway greenhouse inner edge of the habitable zone shifts outward from 2500 to 2100 W m-2. The moist greenhouse inner edge, based on our crude estimation, shifts less, from 2180 to 2075 W m-2. Near the outer edge, in contrast, the climates of planets with higher obliquities are colder due to their reduced ability to maintain a hotspot at the surface. Therefore, the outer edge moves inward when obliquity is increased, opposite to the finding of previous studies on planets around Sun-like stars. Our results thus indicate that the habitable zone for M dwarfs narrows if the obliquity of their planets increases.

  5. Finite-time fuzzy stabilisation and control for nonlinear descriptor systems with non-zero initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhan; Zhang, Qingling; Ai, Jun; Sun, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For nonlinear descriptor systems, this paper presents an approach to obtain a fuzzy controller with guaranteed finite-time stability and finite-time boundedness with non-zero initial state, which outperforms some recent work and additionally provides a precision estimation of model approximation. We prove necessary and sufficient conditions of finite-time stability and finite-time boundedness with non-zero initial state for nonlinear descriptor systems. Using Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy dynamic models and proposed sufficient conditions, we define fuzzy sets and use linear matrix inequalities to satisfy differential linear matrix inequalities. A simulation confirms efficiency and precision of the given method.

  6. Coherent information of one-mode Gaussian channels—the general case of non-zero added classical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brádler, Kamil

    2015-03-01

    We prove that whenever the coherent information of a one-mode Gaussian (OMG) channel is non-zero its supremum is achieved for the infinite input power. This is a well established fact for zero added classical noise, whereas the non-zero case has not been studied in detail. The presented analysis fills the gap for three canonical classes of OMG channels: the lossy, amplifying and additive classical noise channel class. For the remaining OMG channel classes the coherent information is known to vanish.

  7. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  8. Evolution of Mercury's Obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yseboodt, M.; Margot, J. L.

    2005-05-01

    Mercury has a near-zero obliquity, i.e. its spin axis is nearly perpendicular to its orbital plane. In order to constrain the size of the planet's core with the framework suggested by Peale (1976), the obliquity must be known precisely. Rambaux and Bois (2004) have suggested that Mercury's obliquity varies on thousand-year timescales due to planetary perturbations, potentially ruining the feasibility of Peale's experiment. We use a Hamiltonian approach (free of energy dissipation) to study the spin-orbit evolution of Mercury subject to planetary perturbations. We can reproduce an obliquity evolution similar to that of Rambaux and Bois (2004) if we introduce the planetary perturbations abruptly, i.e. by a step function. But if we introduce the planetary effects smoothly starting from an equilibrium position corresponding to the Cassini state (where the spin axis, the normal to the invariable plane and the normal to the orbital plane are aligned), the thousand-year oscillations in the obliquity do not appear. We find an equilibrium value for the obliquity of ˜1.6 arcmin for (B-A)/C = 1.2 10-4 and (C-A)/C = 2.4 10-4, which are combinations of the moments of inertia corresponding to the Mariner 10 gravity data. Our results indicate that planetary perturbations do not force short-period oscillations in Mercury's obliquity, even though such oscillations may appear in numerical integrations involving artificial departures from the Cassini state or the sudden onset of perturbations. Peale (2004) has shown that the periods of damping of the free motions (free precession or free libration) are short compared to the age of the solar system, such that oscillations in obliquity are expected to decay. In the absence of excitation processes, Mercury's obliquity will remain constant, suggesting that one of the important conditions for the success of Peale's experiment is realized.

  9. Two-dimensional quantum percolation with binary non-zero hopping integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon Thomas, Brianna; Nakanishi, Hisao

    In a previous work [Dillon and Nakanishi, Eur.Phys.J B 87, 286 (2014)], we calculated the transmission coefficient of the two-dimensional quantum percolation problem and mapped out in detail the three regimes of localization, i.e., exponentially localized, power-law localized, and delocalized which had been proposed earlier [Islam and Nakanishi, Phys.Rev. E 77, 061109 (2008)]. We now consider a variation on quantum percolation in which the hopping integral (Vdiluted) associated with bonds that connect to at least one diluted site is non-zero but a fraction of the hopping integral (Vfull=1) between non-diluted sites. We study the latter model by calculating quantities such as the transmission coefficient and the inverse participation ratio and find the original quantum percolation results to be stable over a wide range of energy. In particular, except in the immediate neighborhood of the band center (where increasing Vdiluted to just 0.02*Vfull appears to eliminate localization effects), increasing Vdiluted only shifts the boundaries between the 3 regimes but does not eliminate them until the Vdiluted reaches 20

  10. Robust quantum oscillations with non-zero Berry phase in Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Sourabh; Rajeev, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    We performed angle dependent magnetoresistance study of a metallic single crystal sample of Bi2Te3. We find that the magnetoresistance is highly asymmetric in positive and negative magnetic fields for small angles between the magnetic field and the direction perpendicular to the plane of the sample. The magnetoresistance becomes symmetric as the angle approaches 90°. The quantum Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations are symmetric and show signatures of topological surface states with Dirac dispersion in the form of non-zero Berry phase. However, the angular dependence of these oscillations suggests a complex three dimensional Fermi surface as the source of these oscillations, which does not exactly conform with the six ellipsoidal model of the Fermi surface of Bi2Te3. We attribute the asymmetry in the magnetoresistance to a mixing of the Hall voltage in the longitudinal resistance due to the comparable magnitude of the Hall and longitudinal resistance in our samples. This provides a clue to understanding the asymmetric magnetoresistance often seen in this and similar materials. Moreover, the asymmetric nature evolves with exposure to atmosphere and thermal cycling, which we believe is either due to exposure to atmosphere or thermal cycling, or both affecting the carrier concentration and hence the Hall signal in these samples. However, the quantum oscillations seem to be robust against these factors which suggests that the two have different origins.

  11. Flow-induced buckling of flexible shells with non-zero Gaussian curvatures and thin spots.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gary Han; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2017-03-29

    We study the influence of one or multiple thin spots on the flow-induced instabilities of flexible shells of revolution with non-zero Gaussian curvatures. The shell's equation of motion is described by a thin doubly-curved shell theory and is coupled with perturbed flow pressure, calculated based on an inviscid flow model. We show that for shells with positive Gaussian curvatures conveying fluid, the existence of a thin spot results in a localized flow-induced buckling response of the shell in the neighborhood of the thin spot, and significantly reduces the critical flow velocity for buckling instability. For shells with negative Gaussian curvatures, the buckling response is extended along the shell's characteristic lines and the critical flow velocity is only slightly reduced. We also show that the length scale of the localized deformation generated by a thin spot is proportional to the shell's global thickness when the stiffness of the thin spot is negligible compared with the stiffness of the rest of the shell. When two thin spots exist at a distance, their influences are independent from each other for shells with positive Gaussian curvatures, but large-scale deformations can be created due to multiple thin spots on shells with negative curvatures, depending on the thin spots' relative position.

  12. Phase dependent excitation of Rydberg atoms in non-zero average fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Eric; Carrat, Vincent; Gallagher, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The final energy of an electron excited to a high lying Rydberg state in the presence of a microwave (MW) field shows a dependence on the phase of the field at which the excitation occurs. This phase dependence is comparable to that seen in strong field experiments using attosecond pulses to probe systems perturbed by intense infrared (IR) fields. In zero average field, final energies exhibit a phase dependence at twice the frequency of the MW field. We show a phase dependence at the same frequency as the MW field emerges in the presence of a non-zero average field, parallel to the MW polarization. To isolate phase dependence at the MW frequency, we amplitude modulate the IR excitation laser and phase lock this modulation to the MW field. Li atoms are excited to states near the ionization limit in the presence of a MW field, and bound Rydberg states (n>150) are detected. In an applied average field, we observe modulation of the Rydberg signal at the MW frequency. This modulation vanishes as the average field is zeroed, but persists even in fields large enough to ionize most of the population. We compare these results to symmetry arguments and a model of classical Rydberg orbits. An experiment to determine the absolute phase of the modulation relative the MW field is discussed. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy.

  13. Two-dimensional aligned-field magnetofluiddynamic flow. I Steady incompressible flow with non-zero charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.-L.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown that, in the case of non-zero charge density, the class of steady, plane, incompressible, aligned-fluid magnetofluiddynamic flows contains no rotational motions. Therefore, this class of flows is exhausted by the irrotational solutions of Kingston and Power.

  14. Towards Efficiency of Oblique Images Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, W.; Bakuła, K.

    2016-03-01

    Many papers on both theoretical aspects of bundle adjustment of oblique images and new operators for detecting tie points on oblique images have been written. However, only a few achievements presented in the literature were practically implemented in commercial software. In consequence often aerial triangulation is performed either for nadir images obtained simultaneously with oblique photos or bundle adjustment for separate images captured in different directions. The aim of this study was to investigate how the orientation of oblique images can be carried out effectively in commercial software based on the structure from motion technology. The main objective of the research was to evaluate the impact of the orientation strategy on both duration of the process and accuracy of photogrammetric 3D products. Two, very popular software: Pix4D and Agisoft Photoscan were tested and two approaches for image blocks were considered. The first approach based only on oblique images collected in four directions and the second approach included nadir images. In this study, blocks for three test areas were analysed. Oblique images were collected with medium-format cameras in maltan cross configuration with registration of GNSS and INS data. As a reference both check points and digital surface models from airborne laser scanning were used.

  15. The oblique electron lens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hallam, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    An oblique electron lens is described that is especially applicable to image converters and camera tubes employing flat opaque photocathodes. The use of optical lenses, corrector plates, and/or mirrors (often employed in other electron lenses designed for use with opaque photocathodes) are eliminated. The oblique electron lens is well suited to ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet image converters, and to image converters employing opaque negative electron affinity photocathodes. It is also possible to use this oblique electron lens for electronography. Measurements on an experimental tube show that a limiting resolution of 50 line pairs/mm is possible, but the intrinsic lens quality is believed to approach that of a conventional electromagnetic lens having uniform and colinear electric and magnetic fields.

  16. Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of Supersonic Through-Flow Fan with Vibrating Blades Under Non-Zero Mean Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, T.; Namba, M.

    1996-08-01

    The double linearization concept is applied to a rotating annular cascade model operating at supersonic axial velocity. It is assumed that each blade vibrates with infinitesimal displacement amplitude under small but non-zero mean loading. Vibration modes normal and parallel to the blade chord are considered. Numerical results indicate that the mean loading effects play a crucial role on the aerodynamic instability of the blade motion. The bending motion can be unstable due to the presence of mean loading. Both the steady performance and the flutter boundary are highly sensitive to the blade camber. The bending motion instability is substantially influenced also by the chordwise component of the blade motion. Some numerical results compared with strip theory prediction demonstrate significant three-dimensional effects on the unsteady aerodynamic force under non-zero mean loading.

  17. Mars Obliquity Cycle Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The tilt of Mars' spin axis (obliquity) varies cyclically over hundreds of thousands of years, and affects the sunlight falling on the poles. Because the landing site of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is so near the north pole, higher sun and warmer temperatures during high obliquity lead to warmer, more humid surface environments, and perhaps thicker, more liquid-like films of water in soil.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Influence of geophysical factors on oblique-sounder ionospheric characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Baranets, A.N.; Blagoveshchenskaya, N.F.; Borisova, T.D.; Bubnov, V.A.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of geophysical factors, including magnetoionospheric disturbances, on decameter wave propagation over extended paths using oblique sounding (OS) data, and also to compare experimental and calculated OS ionograms for various conditions of radio waver propagation (season, time of day). Variations of oblique-sounder ionospheric characteristics along a 9000 km long subauroral path for various geophysical conditions are considered. A comparison is made of experimental and calculated ionograms of oblique sounding.

  19. The obliquity of Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Harris, A. W.

    1983-01-01

    Pluto's obliquity (the angle between its spin axis and orbit normal) varies between 102 and 126 deg over a period of about 3 million years. These oscillations are nearly sinusoidal and quite stable, leading to only modest changes in the insolation regime. Thus, Pluto's rotation has been slightly retrograde ever since its current orbit and rotation rate were established.

  20. Multi-input, multi-output regulator design for constant disturbances and non-zero set points with application to automatic landing in a crosswind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, W. E.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Undesirable steady offsets result when a stationary, linear regulator using state feedback is subjected to constant disturbances and/or non-zero setspoints. To eliminate these offsets, the disturbances and non-zero setpoints can be fed forward to the control. Only when the number of outputs is less than or equal to the number of control inputs can the outputs be maintained at arbitrary non-zero setpoints. The state and the disturbance may be estimated using a constant gain Kalman filter or by modeling the constant disturbances as exponentially correlated processes with long correlation times.

  1. Does a possible laboratory observation of a frequency anisotropy of light result from a non-zero photon mass m?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, J. V.; Pecker, J. C.; Vigier, J. P.

    1991-04-01

    Assuming a priori the existence of a non-zero photon rest-mass mγ>0 and justifying this assumption, we can predict the existence of an anisotropy in velocity and frequency of light in the direction of the apex of the 3 K background cosmic radiation field. Since this frequency shift can now be tested in the laboratory, it is important to improve the precision of these measurements in order to check our predictions. Its possible confirmation implies indeed the definition of an absolute evolution parameter in the rest frame Σ0 of this 3 K background microwave radiation.

  2. Forced Obliquity and Moments of Inertia of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, B. G.; Nimmo, F.

    2006-12-01

    The obliquity of Titan, which is the angular separation between its spin and orbit poles, is small but certainly non-zero. An accurate measurement of this angle will provide constraints on the moments of inertia of the body and thereby yield valuable information about the composition and state of the interior. Cassini radar measurements should allow determination of this quantity. For a perfectly rigid body, the obliquity varies in response to gravitational torques and has a current value which depends upon both rate of change and initial conditions. In that case, the moments of inertia are determined from two sources: the harmonic degree two gravity field, and observations of the rate of spin pole precession. If Titan were in that category, the prospects for determination of the moments of inertia would be rather bleak, as the precession rate is likely to be small enough to avoid detection during the Cassini mission. However, an alternative approach is likely applicable. For bodies, like the Moon, in which tidal dissipation has been sufficiently vigorous, the spin pole will be driven into a generalized Cassini state. In such a state, the spin pole and orbit pole remain coplanar with the invariable pole, about which the orbit pole precesses. In that case, the obliquity is very nearly constant, and the dynamical information is encoded in the obliquity value itself, rather than the spin pole precession rate. We suggest that Titan is sufficiently dissipative that is has likely attained such a state. The relevant invariable pole is close to the spin pole of Saturn. A plausible range of polar moment values for Titan is (0.3≤ C/M R2≤ 0.4), where M and R are the mass and mean radius of the body. The upper bound corresponds to a homogeneous body, while the lower bound is more centrally condensed than the Earth. The corresponding range of tidally damped obliquity values is (0.07° ≤ ǎrepsilon ≤ 0.13° ) It is anticipated that the Cassini radar measurements will

  3. Assessing Uncertainties in Boundary Layer Transition Predictions for HIFiRE-1 at Non-zero Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, Lindsay C.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer stability was analyzed for the HIFiRE-1 flight vehicle geometry for ground tests conducted at the CUBRC LENS I hypersonic shock test facility and the Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20- inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Boundary layer stability results were compared to transition onset location obtained from discrete heat transfer measurements from thin film gauges during the CUBRC test and spatially continuous heat transfer measurements from thermal phosphor paint data during the LaRC test. The focus of this analysis was on conditions at non-zero angles of attack as stability analysis has already been performed at zero degrees angle of attack. Also, the transition onset data obtained during flight testing was at nonzero angles of attack, so this analysis could be expanded in the future to include the results of the flight test data. Stability analysis was performed using the 2D parabolized stability software suite STABL (Stability and Transition Analysis for Hypersonic Boundary Layers) developed at the University of Minnesota and the mean flow solutions were computed using the DPLR finite volume Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. A center line slice of the 3D mean flow solution was used for the stability analysis to incorporate the angle of attack effects while still taking advantage of the 2D STABL software suite. The N-factors at transition onset and the value of Re(sub theta)/M(sub e), commonly used to predict boundary layer transition onset, were compared for all conditions analyzed. Ground test data was analyzed at Mach 7.2 and Mach 6.0 and angles of attack of 1deg, 3deg and 5deg. At these conditions, the flow was found to be second mode dominant for the HIFiRE-1 slender cone geometry. On the leeward side of the vehicle, a strong trend of transition onset location with angle of attack was observed as the boundary layer on the leeward side of the vehicle developed inflection points at streamwise positions on the vehicle that correlated to

  4. Melt Production in Oblique Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Melosh, H. J.

    2000-05-01

    Hydrocode modeling is a fundamental tool for the study of melt production in planetary impact events. Until recently, however, numerical modeling of impacts for melt production studies has been limited to vertical impacts. We present the first results of the investigation of melt production in oblique impacts. Simulations were carried out using Sandia's three-dimensional hydrocode CTH, coupled to the SESAME equation of state. While keeping other impact parameters constant, the calculations span impact angles (measured from the surface) from 90° (vertical impact) to 15°. The results show that impact angle affects the strength and distribution of the shock wave generated in the impact. As a result, both the isobaric core and the regions of melting in the target appear asymmetric and concentrated in the downrange, shallower portion of the target. The use of a pressure-decay power law (which describes pressure as function of linear distance from the impact point) to reconstruct the region of melting and vaporization is therefore complicated by the asymmetry of the shock wave. As an analog to the pressure decay versus distance from the impact point, we used a "volumetric pressure decay," where the pressure decay is modeled as a function of volume of target material shocked at or above the given shock pressure. We find that the volumetric pressure decay exponent is almost constant for impact angles from 90° to 30°, dropping by about a factor of two for a 15° impact. In the range of shock pressures at which most materials of geologic interest melt or begin to vaporize, we find that the volume of impact melt decreases by at most 20% for impacts from 90° down to 45°. Below 45°, however, the amount of melt in the target decreases rapidly with impact angle. Compared to the vertical case, the reduction in volume of melt is about 50% for impacts at 30° and more than 90% for a 15° impact. These estimates do not include possible melting due to shear heating, which can

  5. Obliquity Modulation of the Incoming Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a basic principle of orbital resonance, we have identified a huge deficit of solar radiation induced by the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity as possibly the causal mechanism for ice age glaciation. Including this modulation effect on solar radiation, we have performed model simulations of climate change for the past 2 million years. Simulation results show that: (1) For the past 1 million years, temperature fluctuation cycles were dominated by a 100-Kyr period due to amplitude-frequency resonance effect of the obliquity; (2) From 2 to 1 million years ago, the amplitude-frequency interactions. of the obliquity were so weak that they were not able to stimulate a resonance effect on solar radiation; (3) Amplitude and frequency modulation analysis on solar radiation provides a series of resonance in the incoming solar radiation which may shift the glaciation cycles from 41-Kyr to 100-Kyr about 0.9 million years ago. These results are in good agreement with the marine and continental paleoclimate records. Thus, the proposed climate response to the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity may be the key to understanding the glaciation puzzles in paleoclimatology.

  6. CMB anisotropies generated by a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-zero helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ballardini, Mario

    2015-10-01

    We consider the impact of a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-vanishing helicity on CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization. We compute the exact expressions for the scalar, vector and tensor part of the energy-momentum tensor including the helical contribution, by assuming a power-law dependence for the spectra and a comoving cutoff which mimics the damping due to viscosity. We also compute the parity-odd correlator between the helical and non-helical contribution which generate the TB and EB cross-correlation in the CMB pattern. We finally show the impact of including the helical term on the power spectra of CMB anisotropies up to multipoles with ℓ ∼ O(10{sup 3})

  7. Simulation of Low-density Nozzle Plumes in Non-zero Ambient Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Stubbs, Robert M.; Penko, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method was applied to the analysis of low-density nitrogen plumes exhausting from a small converging-diverging nozzle into finite ambient pressures. Two cases were considered that simulated actual test conditions in a vacuum facility. The numerical simulations readily captured the complicated flow structure of the overexpanded plumes adjusting to the finite ambient pressures, including Mach disks and barrel shaped shocks. The numerical simulations compared well to experimental data of Rothe.

  8. Persistently Auxetic Materials: Engineering the Poisson Ratio of 2D Self-Avoiding Membranes under Conditions of Non-Zero Anisotropic Strain.

    PubMed

    Ulissi, Zachary W; Govind Rajan, Ananth; Strano, Michael S

    2016-08-23

    Entropic surfaces represented by fluctuating two-dimensional (2D) membranes are predicted to have desirable mechanical properties when unstressed, including a negative Poisson's ratio ("auxetic" behavior). Herein, we present calculations of the strain-dependent Poisson ratio of self-avoiding 2D membranes demonstrating desirable auxetic properties over a range of mechanical strain. Finite-size membranes with unclamped boundary conditions have positive Poisson's ratio due to spontaneous non-zero mean curvature, which can be suppressed with an explicit bending rigidity in agreement with prior findings. Applying longitudinal strain along a singular axis to this system suppresses this mean curvature and the entropic out-of-plane fluctuations, resulting in a molecular-scale mechanism for realizing a negative Poisson's ratio above a critical strain, with values significantly more negative than the previously observed zero-strain limit for infinite sheets. We find that auxetic behavior persists over surprisingly high strains of more than 20% for the smallest surfaces, with desirable finite-size scaling producing surfaces with negative Poisson's ratio over a wide range of strains. These results promise the design of surfaces and composite materials with tunable Poisson's ratio by prestressing platelet inclusions or controlling the surface rigidity of a matrix of 2D materials.

  9. Resolution of superior oblique myokymia with memantine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Farooq, Shegufta J; Gottlob, Irene

    2008-02-01

    We describe a novel treatment of superior oblique myokymia. A 40-year-old woman was treated with gabapentin for this disorder with partial success and reported significant side effects including loss of libido and weight gain. After a drug holiday, memantine therapy was initiated resulting in a substantial improvement in her symptoms with far fewer side effects and stability on long-term maintenance therapy.

  10. Oblique dust density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  11. Obliquity Tides in Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    Tidal dissipation in HD209458b while it has a very high obliquity has been proposed as a means of inflating the planet to its observed oversize (Winn and Holman, 2005). The high obliquity is maintained by the planet's being trapped into Cassini state 2 at an obliquity near 90° while the planet maintains a rotation rate synchronous with its orbital mean motion. In a Cassini state the spin axis and orbit normal remain coplanar with the normal to the Laplace plane as they precess around the latter, where the orbit has a significant inclination to the Laplace plane. The orbit of HD209458b is inclined to equatorial plane of the star by about 4°. If the stellar equator plane is coincident with the plane of the initially massive nebula, that plane is the Laplace plane on which the orbit is precessing. A planet can evolve to Cassini state 2 by tidal dissipation on a time scale comparable with that of the retardation of the spin rate. The latter time scale can become relatively short as the planet migrates toward the star. While the nebula is there, the orbital precession rate is rapid, Cassini state 2 has a small obliquity, and tidal friction will drive the planet to that state. That evolution may not occur for cases where the obliquity of state 2 is relatively large. As the nebula is dispersed, the orbital precession slows with the result that the Cassini state obliquity increases. The spin follows the Cassini state to high obliquity because the solid angle traced by the spin as it precesses about the Cassini state position is an adiabatic invariant. With no nebula, only the quadrupole moment of the star is left to cause the orbit to precess. At the slow precession rate thus induced, the obliquity of the Cassini state is nearly 90°, which if maintained while the spin remains synchronous with the orbital motion, causes the dissipation inferred by Winn and Holman. Implicit in this scenario is the assumption that the synchronous rotation is somehow maintained. Authors of

  12. A non-zero variance of Tajima's estimator for two sequences even for infinitely many unlinked loci.

    PubMed

    King, Léandra; Wakeley, John; Carmi, Shai

    2017-03-21

    The population-scaled mutation rate, θ, is informative on the effective population size and is thus widely used in population genetics. We show that for two sequences and n unlinked loci, the variance of Tajima's estimator (θˆ), which is the average number of pairwise differences, does not vanish even as n→∞. The non-zero variance of θˆ results from a (weak) correlation between coalescence times even at unlinked loci, which, in turn, is due to the underlying fixed pedigree shared by gene genealogies at all loci. We derive the correlation coefficient under a diploid, discrete-time, Wright-Fisher model, and we also derive a simple, closed-form lower bound. We also obtain empirical estimates of the correlation of coalescence times under demographic models inspired by large-scale human genealogies. While the effect we describe is small (Varθˆ∕θ(2)≈ONe(-1)), it is important to recognize this feature of statistical population genetics, which runs counter to commonly held notions about unlinked loci.

  13. Designing a graded index depressed clad non-zero dispersion shifted optical fiber for wide band transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Ghosh, Debashri; Basu, Mousumi

    2008-02-01

    Non-zero dispersion shifted fibers (NZ-DSFs) find extensive use in wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) system as it reduces the non-linear effects like four-wave mixing (FWM) generation. A depressed clad graded index fiber with a central dip in the refractive index profile, as well as without dip, has been modeled to perform as an NZ-DSF using the spot size optimization technique. The performance characteristics of the proposed NZ-DSF have been studied by changing different fiber parameters; such as inner core radius (a), relative refractive index differences ([Delta]+), normalized end position of depressed clad (C), depression parameter ([rho]), etc. for a given value of Petermann-2 spot size . By suitably adjusting the fiber parameters, the effective core areas (Aeff) as simulated here are very large (~80 [mu]m2) so that the effect of non-linearities upon them can be minimized. These NZ-DSFs have also been optimized for WDM transmission system. The dispersion slopes of the proposed fibers with and without dip have been estimated which are comparable with the reported results.

  14. Flows of Viscoelastic Fluids in Curved Pipes: the Effect of Non-Zero Second Normal Stress Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Anne M.; Jitchote, Witasanachai; Chanchawichak, Supalerk

    1998-11-01

    Perturbation methods have been used to obtain solutions for steady, fully developed flows of viscoelastic fluids in curved pipes of circular cross-section. The perturbation parameter is the ratio of the pipe cross-sectional radius to the pipe centerline radius. In previous studies of viscoelastic fluids with zero second normal stress coefficient, the secondary motion for both creeping and non-creeping flows has been shown to be qualitatively similar to that arising from centrifugal effects in Newtonian fluids. Namely, in addition to the primary flow, there is a secondary motion consisting of a pair of counter-rotating vortices (see, e.g. Bowen, Davies, Walters, JNNFM, 38, 1991 and Robertson and Muller, Int. J. Non-Linear Mechanics, 31, 1996). In this work, we have obtained perturbation solutions for two fluids with non-zero second normal stress coefficient: the classical second order fluid and the modified Oldroyd-B fluid introduced by Shaqfeh, Muller and Larson (JFM, 235). We find ranges of material parameters for which the secondary motion of these fluids is qualitatively different from that seen for fluids with zero second normal stress difference.

  15. Proton beam generation of oblique whistler waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that ion beams are capable of generating whistler waves that propagate parallel to the mean magnetic field. Such waves may have been observed both upstream of the earth's bow shock and in the vicinity of comets. Previous analyses are extended to include propagation oblique to the mean magnetic field. The instability is generated by the perpendicular component of free energy in the ions, which can arise either via a temperature anisotropy or via a gyrating distribution. In the former case, the generation of whistler waves is confined to a fairly narrow cone of propagation directions centered about parallel propagation; in the latter case, the maximum growth of the instability can occur at fairly large obliquities (theta equal to about 50 deg).

  16. Drawing with oblique coordinates: on a single case.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Dario; Santangelo, Gabriella; Carbone, Giuseppe; Giordano, Flavia; Angelillo, Valentina Gerarda; Trojano, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    We describe a patient with right hemisphere damage affected by mild left visuo-spatial neglect and constructional apraxia. During the rehabilitation, he failed to draw a draught-board using horizontal and vertical trajectories, but he performed it successfully using oblique trajectories. These observations suggested an impairment of vertical/horizontal spatial coordinates system. In copying tasks including figure elements in different orientations he drew more accurately components in oblique orientation, whereas failed to reproduce components in horizontal orientation. The patient performed visuospatial perceptual and perceptual-imaginative tasks successfully. From these findings, it is possible to suggest that the oblique coordinate system of reference operates independently of vertical and horizontal coordinate systems in building a complex figure and that, therefore, cardinal orientation do not constitute a reference norm to define oblique orientation, as previously suggested.

  17. Habitable planets with high obliquities.

    PubMed

    Williams, D M; Kasting, J F

    1997-01-01

    Earth's obliquity would vary chaotically from 0 degrees to 85 degrees were it not for the presence of the Moon (J. Laskar, F. Joutel, and P. Robutel, 1993, Nature 361, 615-617). The Moon itself is thought to be an accident of accretion, formed by a glancing blow from a Mars-sized planetesimal. Hence, planets with similar moons and stable obliquities may be extremely rare. This has lead Laskar and colleagues to suggest that the number of Earth-like planets with high obliquities and temperate, life-supporting climates may be small. To test this proposition, we have used an energy-balance climate model to simulate Earth's climate at obliquities up to 90 degrees. We show that Earth's climate would become regionally severe in such circumstances, with large seasonal cycles and accompanying temperature extremes on middle- and high-latitude continents which might be damaging to many forms of life. The response of other, hypothetical, Earth-like planets to large obliquity fluctuations depends on their land-sea distribution and on their position within the habitable zone (HZ) around their star. Planets with several modest-sized continents or equatorial supercontinents are more climatically stable than those with polar supercontinents. Planets farther out in the HZ are less affected by high obliquities because their atmospheres should accumulate CO2 in response to the carbonate-silicate cycle. Dense, CO2-rich atmospheres transport heat very effectively and therefore limit the magnitude of both seasonal cycles and latitudinal temperature gradients. We conclude that a significant fraction of extrasolar Earth-like planets may still be habitable, even if they are subject to large obliquity fluctuations.

  18. Habitable planets with high obliquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. M.; Kasting, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    Earth's obliquity would vary chaotically from 0 degrees to 85 degrees were it not for the presence of the Moon (J. Laskar, F. Joutel, and P. Robutel, 1993, Nature 361, 615-617). The Moon itself is thought to be an accident of accretion, formed by a glancing blow from a Mars-sized planetesimal. Hence, planets with similar moons and stable obliquities may be extremely rare. This has lead Laskar and colleagues to suggest that the number of Earth-like planets with high obliquities and temperate, life-supporting climates may be small. To test this proposition, we have used an energy-balance climate model to simulate Earth's climate at obliquities up to 90 degrees. We show that Earth's climate would become regionally severe in such circumstances, with large seasonal cycles and accompanying temperature extremes on middle- and high-latitude continents which might be damaging to many forms of life. The response of other, hypothetical, Earth-like planets to large obliquity fluctuations depends on their land-sea distribution and on their position within the habitable zone (HZ) around their star. Planets with several modest-sized continents or equatorial supercontinents are more climatically stable than those with polar supercontinents. Planets farther out in the HZ are less affected by high obliquities because their atmospheres should accumulate CO2 in response to the carbonate-silicate cycle. Dense, CO2-rich atmospheres transport heat very effectively and therefore limit the magnitude of both seasonal cycles and latitudinal temperature gradients. We conclude that a significant fraction of extrasolar Earth-like planets may still be habitable, even if they are subject to large obliquity fluctuations.

  19. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  20. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-20

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  1. Trap filled limit and high current voltage characteristics of organic diodes with non-zero Schottky barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Jain, S. C.; Kumar, Vikram; Chand, Suresh; Tandon, R. P.

    2008-08-01

    The analytical expressions for trap filled limit voltage ( V'_TFL ) and current-voltage characteristics for non-zero organic Schottky barrier are derived theoretically. The theoretical results are validated experimentally. In this case, the injected free charge carrier density at the contact is not infinitely large but a finite number p(0). For an exponential distribution of traps the maximum possible number of traps that can be filled in a sample is H'_b=H_b((p(0)/N_v))^{1/l} , where l = Tc/T, Tc is the characteristic temperature of trap distribution. The use of Fermi-Dirac statistics causes a maximum error of only 6.9% in H'_{b} . The analytical expression for V'_TFL is shown to be V'_TFL =0.5qH'_bd^2/\\varepsilon \\varepsilon _0 , where d is the sample thickness. As the applied voltage increases and if p(0)>H'_{b} , V2 law is obtained over a considerable range of applied voltage. However, the curves change to Ohm's law as the voltage increases beyond this range. If p(0), V2 law is not obtained and the curves directly go to Ohm's law. Experimental results of ITO/PEDOT : PSS/poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyhexyloxy)1,4-phenylenevinylene)(MEH-PPV)/Au and ITO/PEDOT : PSS/poly(3-hexyl thiophene)(P3HT)/Au Schottky diodes are reported. The experimental results show excellent agreement with the theory.

  2. Comparison of Chevron and Distal Oblique Osteotomy for Bunion Correction.

    PubMed

    Scharer, Brandon M; DeVries, J George

    2016-01-01

    The chevron osteotomy is a standard procedure by which bunions are corrected. One of us routinely performs a distal oblique osteotomy, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been described for the correction of bunion deformities. The purpose of the present study was to compare the short- and medium-term results of the distal oblique and chevron osteotomies for bunion correction. We performed a retrospective clinical and radiographic comparison of patients who had undergone a distal oblique or chevron osteotomy for the correction of bunion deformity. In addition, a prospective patient satisfaction survey was undertaken. A total of 55 patients were included in the present study and were treated from January 2012 to November 2014. Of the 55 patients, 27 (49.2%) were in the chevron group and 28 (50.8%) in the distal oblique group. Radiographically, no statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups with respect to postoperative first intermetatarsal angle (p < .0001) and hallux valgus angle (p < .0001), but a greater change was found in the intermetatarsal angle in the distal oblique group (p = .467). Prospective patient satisfaction scores were available for 33 patients (60%), 16 (29%) in the chevron group and 17 (31%) in the distal oblique group. When converting the satisfaction score to a numerical score, the chevron group scored 3.3 ± 1.1 and the distal oblique group scored 3.2 ± 0.8 (p = .812). We found that the distal oblique osteotomy used in the present study is simple and reliable and showed radiographic correction and patient satisfaction equivalent to those in the chevron osteotomy.

  3. Effects of oblique wave propagation on the nonlinear plasma resonance in the two-dimensional channel of the Dyakonov-Shur detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupper, Greg; Rudin, Sergey; Crowne, Frank J.

    2012-12-01

    In the Dyakonov-Shur terahertz detector the conduction channel of a heterostructure High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) is used as a plasma wave resonator for density oscillations in electron gas. Nonlinearities in the plasma wave propagation lead to a constant source-to-drain voltage, providing the detector output. In this paper, we start with the quasi-classical Boltzmann equation and derive the hydrodynamic model with temperature dependent transport coefficients for a two-dimensional viscous flow. This derivation allows us to obtain the parameters for the hydrodynamic model from the band-structure of the HEMT channel. The treatment here also includes the energy balance equation into the analysis. By numerical solution of the hydrodynamic equations with a non-zero boundary current we evaluate the detector response function and obtain the temperature dependence of the plasma resonance. The present treatment extends the theory of Dyakonov-Shur plasma resonator and detector to account for the temperature dependence of viscosity, the effects of oblique wave propagation on detector response, and effects of boundary current in two-dimensional flow on quality of the plasma resonance. The numerical results are given for a GaN channel. We also investigated a stability of source to drain flow and formation of shock waves.

  4. Secular obliquity variations for Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Bruce; Scott, Bryan R.; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-10-01

    We have constructed secular variation models for the orbit and spin poles of the asteroid (1) Ceres, and used them to examine how the obliquity, or angular separation between spin and orbit poles, varies over a time span of several million years. The current obliquity is 4.3 degrees, which means that there are some regions near the poles which do not receive any direct Sunlight. The Dawn mission has provided an improved estimate of the spin pole orientation, and of the low degree gravity field. That allows us to estimate the rate at which the spin pole precesses about the instantaneous orbit pole.The orbit of Ceres is secularly perturbed by the planets, with Jupiter's influence dominating. The current inclination of the orbit plane, relative to the ecliptic, is 10.6 degrees. However, it varies between 7.27 and 11.78 degrees, with dominant periods of 22.1 and 39.6 kyr. The spin pole precession rate parameter has a period of 205 kyr, with current uncertainty of 3%, dominated by uncertainty in the mean moment of inertia of Ceres.The obliquity varies, with a dominant period of 24.5 kyr, with maximum values near 26 degrees, and minimum values somewhat less than the present value. Ceres is currently near to a minimum of its secular obliquity variations.The near-surface thermal environment thus has at least 3 important time scales: diurnal (9.07 hours), annual (4.60 years), and obliquity cycle (24.5 kyr). The annual thermal wave likely only penetrates a few meters, but the much long thermal wave associated with the obliquity cycle has a skin depth larger by a factor of 70 or so, depending upon thermal properties in the subsurface.

  5. Asymmetric kinetic equilibria: Generalization of the BAS model for rotating magnetic profile and non-zero electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorville, Nicolas; Belmont, Gérard; Aunai, Nicolas; Dargent, Jérémy; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    , 110702 (2013)], and more recently in a fully kinetic simulation as well [J. Dargent and N. Aunai, Phys. Plasmas (submitted)]. Nevertheless, in most asymmetric layers like the terrestrial magnetopause, one would indeed expect a magnetic field rotation from one direction to another without going through zero [J. Berchem and C. T. Russell, J. Geophys. Res. 87, 8139-8148 (1982)], and a non-zero normal electric field. In this paper, we propose the corresponding generalization: in the model presented, the profiles can be freely imposed for the magnetic field rotation (although restricted to a 180 rotation hitherto) and for the normal electric field. As it was done previously, the equilibrium is tested with a hybrid simulation.

  6. Asymmetric kinetic equilibria: Generalization of the BAS model for rotating magnetic profile and non-zero electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Dorville, Nicolas Belmont, Gérard; Aunai, Nicolas; Dargent, Jérémy; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-09-15

    ) 20, 110702 (2013)], and more recently in a fully kinetic simulation as well [J. Dargent and N. Aunai, Phys. Plasmas (submitted)]. Nevertheless, in most asymmetric layers like the terrestrial magnetopause, one would indeed expect a magnetic field rotation from one direction to another without going through zero [J. Berchem and C. T. Russell, J. Geophys. Res. 87, 8139–8148 (1982)], and a non-zero normal electric field. In this paper, we propose the corresponding generalization: in the model presented, the profiles can be freely imposed for the magnetic field rotation (although restricted to a 180 rotation hitherto) and for the normal electric field. As it was done previously, the equilibrium is tested with a hybrid simulation.

  7. Oblique lumbar spine radiographs: importance in young patients

    SciTech Connect

    Libson, E.; Bloom, R.A.; Dinari, G.; Robin, G.C.

    1984-04-01

    Spondylolysis is a direct precursor of spondylolisthesis and can lead to crippling back pain. Of 1,743 patients surveyed, including 936 who were asymptomatic and 807 with back pain, 165 (including 91 who were asymptomatic and 74 with back pain) had spondylolysis, which was seen only on oblique lumbar views in 20% of cases. Because of the high false-negative rate of AP and lateral views, oblique views are essential in children and young adults. As spondylolysis is rare above L3, radiographs can be limited to L3-S1. Significantly less spondylolysis was seen in persons older than 30 with back pain usually caused by disk degeneration.

  8. Oblique Photogrammetry and Usage on Land Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisa, A.; Ozmus, L.; Erkek, B.; Ates, H. B.; Bakici, S.

    2013-08-01

    Projects based on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have started within the body of the General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre (GDLRC) by the Land Registry and Cadastre Information System (LRCIS) in the beginning of 2000s. LRCIS was followed by other projects which are Turkish National Geographic Information System (TNGIS), Continuously Operating GPS Reference Stations (CORS-TR), Geo Metadata Portal (GMP), Orthophoto Web Services, Completion of Initial Cadastre, Cadastre Renovation Project (CRP), 2B and Land Registry Achieve Information System (LRAIS). When examining the projects generated by GDLRC, it is realized that they include basic functions of land administration required for sustainable development. Sustainable development is obtained through effective land administration as is known. Nowadays, land use becomes more intense as a result of rapid population increase. The importance of land ownership has increased accordingly. At this point, the necessity of cadastre appears. In Turkey, cadastral registration is carried out by the detection of parcels. In other words, it is obtained through the division of land surface into 2D boundaries and mapping of them. However, existing land administration systems have begun to lose their efficiency while coping with rights, restrictions and responsibilities (RRRs) belonging to land which become more complicated day by day. Overlapping and interlocking constructions appear particularly in urban areas with dense housing and consequently, the problem of how to project these structures onto the surface in 2D cadastral systems has arisen. Herein, the necessity of 3D cadastre concept and 3D property data is confronted. In recent years, oblique photogrammetry, whose applications are gradually spreading, is used as an effective method for producing 3D data. In this study, applications of oblique photogrammetry and usability of oblique images as base for 3D Cadastre and Land Administration projects are examined.

  9. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (p<0.01). Eighteen (60%) patients had ptosis, six (20%) of whom had bilateral ptosis. Diagnosing myasthenia gravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected.

  10. Calcium Uptake and Release through Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in the Inferior Oblique Muscles of Patients with Inferior Oblique Overaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Seon; Chang, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Do Han; Park, So Ra; Han, Sueng-Han

    2006-01-01

    We characterized and compared the characteristics of Ca2+ movements through the sarcoplasmic reticulum of inferior oblique muscles in the various conditions including primary inferior oblique overaction (IOOA), secondary IOOA, and controls, so as to further understand the pathogenesis of primary IOOA. Of 15 specimens obtained through inferior oblique myectomy, six were from primary IOOA, 6 from secondary IOOA, and the remaining 3 were controls from enucleated eyes. Ryanodine binding assays were performed, and Ca2+ uptake rates, calsequestrins and SERCA levels were determined. Ryanodine bindings and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake rates were significantly decreased in primary IOOA (p<0.05). Western blot analysis conducted to quantify calsequestrins and SERCA, found no significant difference between primary IOOA, secondary IOOA, and the controls. Increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration due to reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake may play a role in primary IOOA. PMID:16642550

  11. Phase transitions in the hard-core Bose-Fermi-Hubbard model at non-zero temperatures in the heavy-fermion limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasyuk, I. V.; Krasnov, V. O.

    2017-04-01

    Phase transitions at non-zero temperatures in ultracold Bose- and Fermi-particles mixture in optical lattices using the Bose-Fermi-Hubbard model in the mean field and hard-core boson approximations are investigated. The case of infinitely small fermion transfer and the repulsive on-site boson-fermion interaction is considered. The possibility of change of order (from the 2nd to the 1st one) of the phase transition to the superfluid phase in the regime of fixed values of the chemical potentials of Bose- and Fermi-particles is established. The relevant phase diagrams determining the conditions at which such a change takes place, are built.

  12. 9. OBLIQUE VIEW, PARTIAL WEST SPAN, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. OBLIQUE VIEW, PARTIAL WEST SPAN, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING TRUSS PANELS AND SOLID CONFIGURATION OF TRUSS MEMBERS, INCLUDING POLYGONAL TOP CHORD, VERTICAL AND DIAGONAL MEMBERS, AND CROSS-STRUTS - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  13. Strike-Slip Fault Patterns on Europa: Obliquity or Polar Wander?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Variations in diurnal tidal stress due to Europa's eccentric orbit have been considered as the driver of strike-slip motion along pre-existing faults, but obliquity and physical libration have not been taken into account. The first objective of this work is to examine the effects of obliquity on the predicted global pattern of fault slip directions based on a tidal-tectonic formation model. Our second objective is to test the hypothesis that incorporating obliquity can reconcile theory and observations without requiring polar wander, which was previously invoked to explain the mismatch found between the slip directions of 192 faults on Europa and the global pattern predicted using the eccentricity-only model. We compute predictions for individual, observed faults at their current latitude, longitude, and azimuth with four different tidal models: eccentricity only, eccentricity plus obliquity, eccentricity plus physical libration, and a combination of all three effects. We then determine whether longitude migration, presumably due to non-synchronous rotation, is indicated in observed faults by repeating the comparisons with and without obliquity, this time also allowing longitude translation. We find that a tidal model including an obliquity of 1.2?, along with longitude migration, can predict the slip directions of all observed features in the survey. However, all but four faults can be fit with only 1? of obliquity so the value we find may represent the maximum departure from a lower time-averaged obliquity value. Adding physical libration to the obliquity model improves the accuracy of predictions at the current locations of the faults, but fails to predict the slip directions of six faults and requires additional degrees of freedom. The obliquity model with longitude migration is therefore our preferred model. Although the polar wander interpretation cannot be ruled out from these results alone, the obliquity model accounts for all observations with a value

  14. An investigation of oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multi-sheet aluminum structures. A model to be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations relating crater and perforation damage of a multi-sheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multi-sheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the hazardous meteoroid and space debris environment.

  15. Analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to a meteoroid or space debris environement.

  16. Hellas basin, Mars: Formation by oblique impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Gregory J.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    Hellas, a 2,000-km-diameter, roughly circular multiring impact basin in the southern highlands of Mars, has a pronounced southeastern lobe of rim material that extends for some 1,500 km. This lobe and a system of ridges concentric to the southern part of the basin (including part of the lobe) were interpreted to be formed by an oblique impact that was inclined in the direction of the lobe. Our preliminary geologic mapping of the Hellas region (lat -20 to -65 deg, long 250 to 320 deg) at 1:5,000,000 scale gives this hypothesis additional supporting evidence, including a symmetric distribution of basin ejecta and volcanic centers across the inferred trend of the impact. Furthermore, measurements of relief indicate that the downrange ejecta may be about twice as thick as they are elsewhere around the rim.

  17. Obliquity Variations of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A planet's obliquity, which is the angle between its orbital angular momentum and its rotational angular momentum, is an important factor in determining its climate and habitability. For small obliquities, as well as obliquities close to 180 degrees, the planet receives more radiant energy from its star at equatorial latitudes than near its poles, whereas the poles are heated the most for obliquities near 90 degrees. Jacques Laskar has analyzed possible obliquity variations of the planets in our Solar System. His study also considers the same planets with different rotational periods, and the Earth without the Moon. He finds, using frequency map analysis, that the obliquity of the Earth is stabilized by the Moon, and can vary by at most a few degrees. In contrast, the obliquity of Mars can range from 0 to 60 degrees, and a hypothetical moonless Earth's axial tilt could be close to 0 degrees or as large as 85 degrees. Numerical integrations by Laskar and others have shown that Mars' obliquity indeed varies over most of its permitted range on time scales of tens of millions of years. In contrast, our analysis shows that the obliquity of a moonless Earth appears to be confined to the range of approximately 12 - 38 degrees over time scales of 100 million years. Results of ongoing longer integrations will be presented, and their implications discussed.

  18. Document segmentation via oblique cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, Jeremy; Branzan-Albu, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel solution for the layout segmentation of graphical elements in Business Intelligence documents. We propose a generalization of the recursive X-Y cut algorithm, which allows for cutting along arbitrary oblique directions. An intermediate processing step consisting of line and solid region removal is also necessary due to presence of decorative elements. The output of the proposed segmentation is a hierarchical structure which allows for the identification of primitives in pie and bar charts. The algorithm was tested on a database composed of charts from business documents. Results are very promising.

  19. The chaotic obliquity of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touma, Jihad; Wisdom, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The discovery (by Laskar, 1989, 1990) that the evolution of the solar system is chaotic, made in a numerical integration of the averaged secular approximation of the equations of motions for the planets, was confirmed by Sussman and Wisdom (1992) by direct numerical integration of the whole solar system. This paper presents results of direct integrations of the rotation of Mars in the chaotically evolved planetary system, made using the same model as that used by Sussman and Wisdom. The numerical integration shows that the obliquity of Mars undergoes large chaotic variations, which occur as the system evolves in the chaotic zone associated with a secular spin-orbit resonance.

  20. Accuracy of Measurements in Oblique Aerial Images for Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, W.

    2016-10-01

    Oblique aerial images have been a source of data for urban areas for several years. However, the accuracy of measurements in oblique images during this time has been limited to a single meter due to the use of direct -georeferencing technology and the underlying digital elevation model. Therefore, oblique images have been used mostly for visualization purposes. This situation changed in recent years as new methods, which allowed for a higher accuracy of exterior orientation, were developed. Current developments include the process of determining exterior orientation and the previous but still crucial process of tie point extraction. Progress in this area was shown in the ISPRS/EUROSDR Benchmark on Multi-Platform Photogrammetry and is also noticeable in the growing interest in the use of this kind of imagery. The higher level of accuracy in the orientation of oblique aerial images that has become possible in the last few years should result in a higher level of accuracy in the measurements of these types of images. The main goal of this research was to set and empirically verify the accuracy of measurements in oblique aerial images. The research focused on photogrammetric measurements composed of many images, which use a high overlap within an oblique dataset and different view angles. During the experiments, two series of images of urban areas were used. Both were captured using five DigiCam cameras in a Maltese cross configuration. The tilt angles of the oblique cameras were 45 degrees, and the position of the cameras during flight used a high grade GPS/INS navigation system. The orientation of the images was set using the Pix4D Mapper Pro software with both measurements of the in-flight camera position and the ground control points (measured with GPS RTK technology). To control the accuracy, check points were used (which were also measured with GPS RTK technology). As reference data for the whole study, an area of the city-based map was used. The archived results

  1. A numerical study on the oblique focus in MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Alec; Huang, Yuexi; Pulkkinen, Aki; Schwartz, Michael L.; Lozano, Andres M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-11-01

    Recent clinical data showing thermal lesions from treatments of essential tremor using MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound shows that in many cases the focus is oblique to the main axis of the phased array. The potential for this obliquity to extend the focus into lateral regions of the brain has led to speculation as to the cause of the oblique focus, and whether it is possible to realign the focus. Numerical simulations were performed on clinical export data to analyze the causes of the oblique focus and determine methods for its correction. It was found that the focal obliquity could be replicated with the numerical simulations to within 23.2+/- {{13.6}\\circ} of the clinical cases. It was then found that a major cause of the focal obliquity was the presence of sidelobes, caused by an unequal deposition of power from the different transducer elements in the array at the focus. In addition, it was found that a 65% reduction in focal obliquity was possible using phase and amplitude corrections. Potential drawbacks include the higher levels of skull heating required when modifying the distribution of power among the transducer elements, and the difficulty at present in obtaining ideal phase corrections from CT information alone. These techniques for the reduction of focal obliquity can be applied to other applications of transcranial focused ultrasound involving lower total energy deposition, such as blood-brain barrier opening, where the issue of skull heating is minimal.

  2. Magnetic and mechanical properties of a finite-thickness superconducting strip with a cavity in oblique magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mechanical response of a finite-thickness superconducting strip containing an elliptical cavity in oblique magnetic fields. After the Bean critical state model and the minimum magnetic energy variation procedure are employed, the dependency of the magnetic and mechanical properties on the aspect ratio of the strip and the tilt angles of the applied field and elliptical cavity is discussed. The results show that for a strip in an oblique magnetic field, the current front penetrates non-monotonically from the surface inwards in the initial stage. The magnetization of the strip and the applied field are not collinear, and the angle between them becomes smaller with increasing field. Simultaneously, the strip suffers from a torque produced by the electromagnetic force and then has a tendency to rotate. Compared with the defect-free case, the appearance of the elliptical cavity affects the magnetic property of the strip and further causes significant stress concentration. If the tilt angle of the elliptical cavity is small, a position of stable mechanical equilibrium will exist for the strip. It is interesting that due to the elliptical cavity effect, an oblique magnetization and a non-zero torque are generated even if the applied field is perpendicular or parallel to the strip.

  3. Evaluation of the oblique detonation wave ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    The potential performance of oblique detonation wave ramjets is analyzed in terms of multishock diffusion, oblique detonation waves, and heat release. Results are presented in terms of thrust coefficients and specific impulses for a range of flight Mach numbers of 6 to 16.

  4. The obliquity of Mars and 'climate friction'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David P.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical theory is presented which explains the increase of the mean obliquity of Mars over geologic time due to the so called 'climate friction' (i.e., the climatic changes associated with obliquity oscillations of Mars). The theory is compared with a 10 m.y. numerical integration of the equations performed for a hypothetically large amount of climate friction for two cases of the obliquity oscillations: (1) a single sinusoid and (2) a sum of three sinusoids. The theory and numerics agree for both cases within about 12 percent on the size of the secular increase in obliquity. One possible mechanism of climate friction investigated is 'postglacial rebound' on Mars. According to this theory, giant polar caps form when the obliquity is low, and slowly squeeze out an equatorial bulge. When the obliquity is high, the caps disappear, but the bulge takes some time to collapse, due to mantle viscosity, causing it to oscillate out of phase with the obliquity oscillations. This causes a secular increase in the average obliquity.

  5. Microwave Imaging under Oblique Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingyang; Xu, Kuiwen; Shen, Fazhong; Zhang, Bin; Ye, Dexin; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Li, Changzhi; Ran, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Microwave imaging based on inverse scattering problem has been attracting many interests in the microwave society. Among some major technical challenges, the ill-posed, multi-dimensional inversion algorithm and the complicated measurement setup are critical ones that prevent it from practical applications. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the performance of the subspace-based optimization method (SOM) for two-dimensional objects when it was applied to a setup designed for oblique incidence. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results show that, for 2D objects, neglecting the cross-polarization scattering will not cause a notable loss of information. Our method can be potentially used in practical imaging applications for 2D-like objects, such as human limbs. PMID:27399706

  6. Compressible gas properties of UF/sub 6/ for isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Harloff, G.J.

    1984-11-01

    Isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock tables are given for the real gas UF/sub 6/ for Mach numbers up to 22. An evaluation of the real gas effects is given. A computer program listing is included.

  7. Effects of the dark energy and flat rotation curve on the gravitational time delay of particle with non-zero mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Tamal; Ghosh, Shubhrangshu; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-07-01

    The effects of several dark energy models on gravitational time delay of particles with non-zero mass are investigated and analytical expressions for the same are obtained at the first order accuracy. Also the expression for gravitational time delay under the influence of conformal gravity potential that well describes the flat rotation curve of spiral galaxies is derived. The findings suggest that (i) the conformal gravity description of dark matter reduces the net time delay in contrast to the effect of normal dark matter, and therefore in principle the models can be discriminated using gravitational time delay observations, and (ii) the effect of dark energy/flat rotation curve may be revealed from high-precision measurements of gravitational time delay of particles involving the megaparsec and beyond distance scale.

  8. On the problem of non-zero word error rates for fixed-rate error correction codes in continuous variable quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sarah J.; Lance, Andrew M.; Ong, Lawrence; Shirvanimoghaddam, Mahyar; Ralph, T. C.; Symul, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The maximum operational range of continuous variable quantum key distribution protocols has shown to be improved by employing high-efficiency forward error correction codes. Typically, the secret key rate model for such protocols is modified to account for the non-zero word error rate of such codes. In this paper, we demonstrate that this model is incorrect: firstly, we show by example that fixed-rate error correction codes, as currently defined, can exhibit efficiencies greater than unity. Secondly, we show that using this secret key model combined with greater than unity efficiency codes, implies that it is possible to achieve a positive secret key over an entanglement breaking channel—an impossible scenario. We then consider the secret key model from a post-selection perspective, and examine the implications for key rate if we constrain the forward error correction codes to operate at low word error rates.

  9. A Core-Offset Mach Zehnder Interferometer Based on A Non-Zero Dispersion-Shifted Fiber and Its Torsion Sensing Application

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Mascotte, Eduardo; Sierra-Hernandez, Juan M.; Mata-Chavez, Ruth I.; Jauregui-Vazquez, Daniel; Castillo-Guzman, Arturo; Estudillo-Ayala, Julian M.; Guzman-Chavez, Ana D.; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an all-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) based on a non-zero dispersion-shifted fiber (NZ-DSF) is presented. The MZI was implemented by core-offset fusion splicing one section of a NZ-DSF fiber between two pieces of single mode fibers (SMFs). Here, the NZ-DSF core and cladding were used as the arms of the MZI, while the core-offset sections acted as optical fiber couplers. Thus, a MZI interference spectrum with a fringe contrast (FC) of about 20 dB was observed. Moreover, its response spectrum was experimentally characterized to the torsion parameter and a sensitivity of 0.070 nm/° was achieved. Finally, these MZIs can be implemented in a compact size and low cost. PMID:27294930

  10. A Core-Offset Mach Zehnder Interferometer Based on A Non-Zero Dispersion-Shifted Fiber and Its Torsion Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Mascotte, Eduardo; Sierra-Hernandez, Juan M; Mata-Chavez, Ruth I; Jauregui-Vazquez, Daniel; Castillo-Guzman, Arturo; Estudillo-Ayala, Julian M; Guzman-Chavez, Ana D; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto

    2016-06-10

    In this paper, an all-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) based on a non-zero dispersion-shifted fiber (NZ-DSF) is presented. The MZI was implemented by core-offset fusion splicing one section of a NZ-DSF fiber between two pieces of single mode fibers (SMFs). Here, the NZ-DSF core and cladding were used as the arms of the MZI, while the core-offset sections acted as optical fiber couplers. Thus, a MZI interference spectrum with a fringe contrast (FC) of about 20 dB was observed. Moreover, its response spectrum was experimentally characterized to the torsion parameter and a sensitivity of 0.070 nm/° was achieved. Finally, these MZIs can be implemented in a compact size and low cost.

  11. Evaluation of Surgical Strategy Based on the Intraoperative Superior Oblique Tendon Traction Test

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Miwa; Suzuki, Hiroko; Hikoya, Akiko; Sawada, Mayu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Sato, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To clarify the efficacy of a surgical strategy based on the superior oblique tendon traction test. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed between January 2002 and June 2015. During that period, a single inferior oblique muscle (IO) myectomy and a combined IO myectomy and superior oblique muscle (SO) tuck procedure were performed based on SO tendon looseness as revealed by a traction test. The surgical effects of both procedures and the number of operations were analyzed. Results Sixty-five cases were retrieved. Seventy-four surgeries were required. The IO myectomy and simultaneous groups included 48 and 17 cases, respectively. Pre-operative vertical deviation was significantly lower in the IO myectomy (11.8 prism diopters) than in the simultaneous (27.2 prism diopters; Mann–Whitney U-test, P < 0.001) group. The mean induced changes were 9.4 prism diopters and 21.6 prism diopters in the IO myectomy and simultaneous groups, respectively, and the postoperative vertical deviation was not significantly different. On average, 1.13 and 1.18 surgeries per patient were performed in the IO myectomy and simultaneous groups, respectively. Conclusion The simultaneous surgery of inferior oblique myectomy and superior oblique tuck is safe and effective for treating large angle of congenital/idiopathic superior oblique palsy with a lax superior oblique tendon, as determined by the traction test. PMID:27992486

  12. The Charged Lepton Mass Matrix and Non-zero θ13 with TeV Scale New Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Ahmed; Datta, Alakabha

    2012-03-01

    We provide an explicit structure of the charged lepton mass matrix which is 2-3 symmetric except for a single breaking of this symmetry by the muon mass. We identify a flavor symmetric limit for the mass matrices where the first generation is decoupled from the other two in the charged lepton sector while in the neutrino sector the third generation is decoupled from the first two generations. The leptonic mixing in the symmetric limit can be, among other structures, the bi-maximal (BM) or the tri-bimaximal (TBM) mixing. Symmetry breaking effects are included both in the charged lepton and the neutrino sector to produce corrections to the leptonic mixing and explain the recent θ13 measurements. A model that extends the SM by three right handed neutrinos, an extra Higgs doublet, and two singlet scalars is introduced to generate the leptonic mixing.[4pt] This work was supported in part by the US-Egypt Joint Board on Scientific and Technological Co-operation award (Project ID: 1855) administered by the US Department of Agriculture, summer grant from the College of Liberal Arts, University of Mississippi and in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1068052 and 1066293 and the hospitality of the Aspen Center for Physics.

  13. Ionospheric profile inversion using oblique-incidence ionograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, D. L.; Watt, T. M.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the elementary methods used in deriving true-height profiles from oblique-incidence ionograms are reviewed. The two principal methods presented are oblique-to-vertical transformation and direct inversion of the oblique-incidence ionogram. Limitations in oblique-incidence inversion due to magnetic-field effects, horizontal gradients, and absolute time delay are discussed.

  14. Graduated recession of the superior oblique muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, J A

    1975-01-01

    Recession of the superior oblique was performed bilaterally in 12 patients with the A phenomenon and unilaterally in four patients with vertical imbalance. The results are discussed. Images PMID:1191613

  15. Oblique shear fractures of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Alan E; Ahmad, Nawaiz

    2003-08-01

    Traumatic fractures of the lunate are rare. This article presents two patients who had displaced oblique lunate fractures and distal radius fractures. Both fractures achieved union; however, transient avascular necrosis occurred in the proximal healing of one patient.

  16. Oblique Wing Research Aircraft on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This 1976 photograph of the Oblique Wing Research Aircraft was taken in front of the NASA Flight Research Center hangar, located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. In the photograph the noseboom, pitot-static probe, and angles-of-attack and sideslip flow vanes(covered-up) are attached to the front of the vehicle. The clear nose dome for the television camera, and the shrouded propellor for the 90 horsepower engine are clearly seen. The Oblique Wing Research Aircraft was a small, remotely piloted, research craft designed and flight tested to look at the aerodynamic characteristics of an oblique wing and the control laws necessary to achieve acceptable handling qualities. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and the NASA Ames Research Center conducted research with this aircraft in the mid-1970s to investigate the feasibility of flying an oblique wing aircraft.

  17. Oblique orthographic projections and contour plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Oblique orthographic projections allow model to be viewed in any selected orientation specified by Euler-angle transformation. This transformation resolves coordinate system of model to principal plane on which display is to be plotted.

  18. Obliquity Variations of a Rapidly Rotating Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy L.; Barnes, Jason W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John E.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    Venus clearly differs from Earth in terms of its spin and atmospheric composition, where the former is controlled by solid-body and atmospheric thermal tides. However, this may have been different during earlier stages of planetary evolution, when the Sun was fainter and the Venusian atmosphere was less massive. We investigate how the axial tilt, or obliquity, would have varied during this epoch considering a rapidly rotating Venus. Through numerical simulation of an ensemble of hypothetical Early Venuses, we find the obliquity variation to be simpler than a Moonless Earth (Lissauer et al., 2012). Most low-obliquity Venuses show very low total obliquity variability comparable to that of the real Moon-influenced Earth.

  19. Red Shifts with Obliquely Approaching Light Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, C. E.; Moore-Head, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Refutes the Doppler effect as the explanation of large red shifts in the spectra of distant galaxies and explains the relativistic effects in which the light sources approach the observer obliquely. Provides several diagrams and graphs. (YP)

  20. Oblique interactions of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Wang Zhehui; Hou Lujing; Jiang Ke; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.; Wu Dejin

    2010-06-16

    Self-excited dust density waves (DDWs) are studied in a striped electrode device. In addition to the usual perpendicularly (with respect to the electrode) propagating DDWs, which have been frequently observed in dusty plasma experiments on the ground, a low-frequency oblique mode is also observed. This low-frequency oblique DDW has a frequency much lower than the dust plasma frequency and its spontaneous excitation is observed even with a very low dust density. It is found that the low-frequency oblique mode can exist either separately or together with the usual perpendicular mode. In the latter case, a new mode arises as a result of the interactions between the perpendicular and the oblique modes. The experiments show that these three modes satisfy the wave coupling conditions in both the frequencies and the wave-vectors.

  1. Oblique interactions of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhelchui; Li, Yang - Fang; Hou, Lujing; Jiang, Ke; Wu, De - Jin; Thomas, Hubertus M; Morfill, Gregor E

    2010-01-01

    Self-excited dust density waves (DDWs) are studied in a striped electrode device. In addition to the usual perpendicularly (with respect to the electrode) propagating DDWs, which have been frequently observed in dusty plasma experiments on the ground, a low-frequency oblique mode is also observed. This low-frequency oblique DDW has a frequency much lower than the dust plasma frequency and its spontaneous excitation is observed even with a very low dust density. It is found that the low-frequency oblique mode can exist either separately or together with the usual perpendicular mode. In the latter case, a new mode arises as a result of the interactions between the perpendicular and the oblique modes. The experiments show that these three modes satisfy the wave coupling conditions in both the frequencies and the wave-vectors.

  2. Modal control of an oblique wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, James D.

    1989-01-01

    A linear modal control algorithm is applied to the NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft (OWRA). The control law is evaluated using a detailed nonlinear flight simulation. It is shown that the modal control law attenuates the coupling and nonlinear aerodynamics of the oblique wing and remains stable during control saturation caused by large command inputs or large external disturbances. The technique controls each natural mode independently allowing single-input/single-output techniques to be applied to multiple-input/multiple-output systems.

  3. The effect of polar caps on obliquity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    Rubincam has shown that the Martian obliquity is dependent on the seasonal polar caps. In particular, Rubincam analytically derived this dependence and showed that the change in obliquity is directly proportional to the seasonal polar cap mass. Rubincam concludes that seasonal friction does not appear to have changed Mars' climate significantly. Using a computer model for the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, Haberle et al. have made a convincing case for the possibility of huge polar caps, about 10 times the mass of the current polar caps, that exist for a significant fraction of the planet's history. Since Rubincam showed that the effect of seasonal friction on obliquity is directly proportional to polar cap mass, a scenario with a ten-fold increase in polar cap mass over a significant fraction of the planet's history would result in a secular increase in Mars' obliquity of perhaps 10 degrees. Hence, the Rubincam conclusion of an insignificant contribution to Mars' climate by seasonal friction may be incorrect. Furthermore, if seasonal friction is an important consideration in the obliquity of Mars, this would significantly alter the predictions of past obliquity.

  4. Tectonics of oblique plate boundary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Brune, Sascha; Leever, Karen A.; Fernández, Carlos; Czeck, Dyanna M.

    2016-12-01

    The relative displacement between lithospheric plates normally results in obliquely deforming plate boundaries. This is simply caused by the fact that, on plate tectonics basis, irregularly shaped plate boundaries are rarely perpendicular or parallel to small-circle rotation paths, which describe plate motion on a sphere (Fig. 1a). Global current relative plate motions estimated from geological data (DeMets et al., 2010; Argus et al., 2011) and GPS measurements (e.g., Kreemer et al., 2003; Argus et al., 2010) provide insight to the prevalent degrees of obliquity on Earth's surface. Based on these global data sets, Philippon and Corti (2016), statistically show that current orthogonal boundaries (obliquity angle smaller than 10°) represent around 8% of the total boundary length whereas strike-slip boundaries (obliquity angle larger than 80°) are encountered in < 10% of the total boundary length. Therefore, around 80% of active plate boundaries present oblique relative motions. Furthermore, changes in plate kinematics leading to migration or jumps in the rotation poles necessarily cause obliquity along former pure strike-slip or convergent/divergent boundaries (Fig. 1b).

  5. Segmentation and Reconstruction of Buildings with Aerial Oblique Photography Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Li, Y. C.; Hu, W.; Ding, X. B.

    2015-06-01

    Oblique photography technology as an excellent method for 3-D city model construction has brought itself to large-scale recognition and undeniable high social status. Tilt and vertical images with the high overlaps and different visual angles can produce a large number of dense matching point clouds data with spectral information. This paper presents a method of buildings reconstruction with stereo matching dense point clouds from aerial oblique images, which includes segmentation of buildings and reconstruction of building roofs. We summarize the characteristics of stereo matching point clouds from aerial oblique images and outline the problems with existing methods. Then we present the method for segmentation of building roofs, which based on colors and geometrical derivatives such as normal and curvature. Finally, a building reconstruction approach is developed based on the geometrical relationship. The experiment and analysis show that the methods are effective on building reconstruction with stereo matching point clouds from aerial oblique images.

  6. Viscosity Solutions for the One-Body Liouville Equation in Yang-Mills Charged Bianchi Models with Non-Zero Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayissi, Raoul Domingo; Noutchegueme, Norbert; Etoua, Remy Magloire; Tchagna, Hugues Paulin Mbeutcha

    2015-09-01

    Recently in 2005, Briani and Rampazzo (Nonlinear Differ Equ Appl 12:71-91, 2005) gave, using results of Crandall and Lions (Ill J Math 31:665-688, 1987), Ishii (Indiana Univ Math J 33: 721-748, 1984, Bull Fac Sci Eng 28: 33-77, 1985) and Ley (Adv Diff Equ 6:547-576, 2001) a density approach to Hamilton-Jacobi equations with t-measurable Hamiltonians. In this paper we show, using an important result of Briani and Rampazzo (Nonlinear Differ Equ Appl 12:71-91, 2005) the existence and uniqueness of viscosity solutions to the one-body Liouville relativistic equation in Yang-Mills charged Bianchi space times with non-zero mass. To our knowledge, the method used here is original and thus, totally different from those used in Alves (C R Acad Sci Paris Sér A 278:1151-1154, 1975), Choquet-Bruhat and Noutchegueme (C R Acad Sci Paris Sér I 311, 1973), Choquet-Bruhat and Noutchegueme (Ann Inst Henri Poincaré 55:759-787, 1991), Choquet-Bruhat and Noutchegueme (Pitman Res Notes Math Ser 253:52-71, 1992), Noutchegueme and Noundjeu (Ann Inst Henri Poincaré 1:385-404, 2000), Wollman (J Math Anal Appl 127:103-121, 1987) and Choquet-Bruhat (Existence and uniqueness for the Einstein-Maxwell-Liouville system. Volume dedicated to Petrov, Moscow, 1971) who have studied the same equation.

  7. SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN vSHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN - Snake River Bridge at Lyons' Ferry, State Route 261 spanning Snake River, Starbuck, Columbia County, WA

  8. Effects of shadowing and steering in oblique incidence epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yunsic

    2009-03-01

    Recently the fabrication of novel nanostructures by oblique deposition has drawn much attention due to their potential application in electronic and mechanical devices as well as the interesting morphologies observed in various experiments, such as nanorods, nanocolumns, and nanohelicoids. Unlike self-organization by misfit strain in heteroepitaxial growth, oblique deposition provides a relatively direct way of controlling surface structures of growing films. Recent experiments indicate that oblique incidence deposition can significantly alter materials properties such as surface roughness, magnetic anisotropy, optical transmittance, and porosity. After a review of these experimental results, we first show that a series of morphological transitions observed in oblique incidence Cu/Cu(100) growth near room temperature can be explained primarily by geometrical shadowing effects [1]. We then discuss the modifying effects of steering due to short-range and long-range attraction [2] as well as of substrate rotation on the surface morphology. Finally, we present the results of recent multiscale simulations of Cu/Cu(100) growth at lower temperature (T = 160 - 200 K) [3] as well as parallel accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations at very low temperature [4]. Based on these simulations we have been able to explain a number of recent intriguing but previously unexplained experimental results including the strong dependence of the surface morphology and roughening behavior on temperature as well as the development of compressive strain in metal thin film growth. [4pt] [1] Y. Shim and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 046103 (2007).[0pt] [2] Y. Shim, V. Borovikov and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 77, 235423 (2008).[0pt] [3] V. Borovikov, Y. Shim and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 76, 241401(R) (2007).[0pt] [4] Y. Shim, V. Borovikov, B. P. Uberuaga, A. F. Voter, and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 116101 (2008).

  9. Titan's interior constrained from its obliquity and tidal Love number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baland, Rose-Marie; Coyette, Alexis; Yseboodt, Marie; Beuthe, Mikael; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, the Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturn system has measured the shape, the obliquity, the static gravity field, and the tidally induced gravity field of Titan. The large values of the obliquity and of the k2 Love number both point to the existence of a global internal ocean below the icy crust. In order to constrain interior models of Titan, we combine the above-mentioned data as follows: (1) we build four-layer density profiles consistent with Titan's bulk properties; (2) we determine the corresponding internal flattening compatible with the observed gravity and topography; (3) we compute the obliquity and tidal Love number for each interior model; (4) we compare these predictions with the observations. Previously, we found that Titan is more differentiated than expected (assuming hydrostatic equilibrium), and that its ocean is dense and less than 100 km thick. Here, we revisit these conclusions using a more complete Cassini state model, including: (1) gravitational and pressure torques due to internal tidal deformations; (2) atmosphere/lakes-surface exchange of angular momentum; (3) inertial torque due to Poincaré flow. We also adopt faster methods to evaluate Love numbers (i.e. the membrane approach) in order to explore a larger parameter space.

  10. Oblique low-altitude image matching using robust perspective invariant features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiqing; Du, Jing; Chen, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yuqian

    2017-01-01

    Compared with vertical photogrammtry, oblique photogrammetry is radically different for images acquired from sensor with big yaw, pitch, and roll angles. Image matching is a vital step and core problem of oblique low-altitude photogrammetric process. Among the most popular oblique images matching methods are currently SIFT/ASIFT and many affine invariant feature-based approaches, which are mainly used in computer vision, while these methods are unsuitable for requiring evenly distributed corresponding points and high efficiency simultaneously in oblique photogrammetry. In this paper, we present an oblique low-altitude images matching approach using robust perspective invariant features. Firstly, the homography matrix is estimated by a few corresponding points obtained from top pyramid images matching in several projective simulation. Then images matching are implemented by sub-pixel Harris corners and descriptors after shape perspective transforming on the basis of homography matrix. Finally, the error or gross error matched points are excluded by epipolar geometry, RANSAC algorithm and back projection constraint. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can achieve more excellent performances in oblique low-altitude images matching than the common methods, including SIFT and SURF. And the proposed approach can significantly improve the computational efficiency compared with ASIFT and Affine-SURF.

  11. Solar Obliquity Induced by Planet Nine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-10-01

    The six-degree obliquity of the sun suggests that either an asymmetry was present in the solar system's formation environment, or an external torque has misaligned the angular momentum vectors of the sun and the planets. However, the exact origin of this obliquity remains an open question. Batygin and Brown (2016) have recently shown that the physical alignment of distant Kuiper Belt orbits can be explained by a m9 = 10-20 mEarth planet on a distant, eccentric, and inclined orbit, with an approximate perihelion distance of q9 ˜ 250 AU. Using an analytic model for secular interactions between Planet Nine and the remaining giant planets, here we show that a planet with similar parameters can naturally generate the observed obliquity as well as the specific pole position of the sun's spin axis. Thus, Planet Nine offers a testable explanation for the otherwise mysterious spin-orbit misalignment of the solar system.

  12. Solar Obliquity Induced by Planet Nine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-11-01

    The six-degree obliquity of the Sun suggests that either an asymmetry was present in the solar system’s formation environment, or an external torque has misaligned the angular momentum vectors of the Sun and the planets. However, the exact origin of this obliquity remains an open question. Batygin & Brown have recently shown that the physical alignment of distant Kuiper Belt orbits can be explained by a 5{--}20 {m}\\oplus planet on a distant, eccentric, and inclined orbit, with an approximate perihelion distance of ˜250 au. Using an analytic model for secular interactions between Planet Nine and the remaining giant planets, here, we show that a planet with similar parameters can naturally generate the observed obliquity as well as the specific pole position of the Sun’s spin axis, from a nearly aligned initial state. Thus, Planet Nine offers a testable explanation for the otherwise mysterious spin-orbit misalignment of the solar system.

  13. Obliquity Evolution of an Early Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy L.; Barnes, Jason; Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John

    2014-11-01

    Stark differences in both atmospheric mass and rotation are apparent between the present-day Earth and neighboring Venus. These planets may have been more similar 4 Gyr ago when most of the carbon within Venus may have been in solid form, implying a low-mass atmosphere. As a result, Venus's rotation rate could have been much faster than at present due to the smaller cumulative effects of solid-body and atmospheric tides. We investigate how the obliquity of a hypothetical rapidly-rotating Early Venus would have evolved as compared to a Moonless Earth. As with our previous investigation [Lissauer, Barnes, & Chambers 2012], slow prograde rotation of our hypothesized Early Venus generally leads to larger variations in obliquity than does retrograde rotation. However, the variability of obliquity for retrograde rotations differs from the Moonless Earth and can change with the initial spin period. The implications for early habitability of extrasolar Venus analogs will also be discussed.

  14. F-8 oblique wing structural feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koltko, E.; Katz, A.; Bell, M. A.; Smith, W. D.; Lauridia, R.; Overstreet, C. T.; Klapprott, C.; Orr, T. F.; Jobe, C. L.; Wyatt, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of fitting a rotating oblique wing on an F-8 aircraft to produce a full scale manned prototype capable of operating in the transonic and supersonic speed range was investigated. The strength, aeroelasticity, and fatigue life of such a prototype are analyzed. Concepts are developed for a new wing, a pivot, a skewing mechanism, control systems that operate through the pivot, and a wing support assembly that attaches in the F-8 wing cavity. The modification of the two-place NTF-8A aircraft to the oblique wing configuration is discussed.

  15. Aeroelastic tailoring for oblique wing lateral trim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Jonathan D.; Weisshaar, Terrence A.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1988-01-01

    Composite material aeroelastic tailoring is presently explored as a means for the correction of the roll trim imbalance of oblique-wing aircraft configurations. The concept is demonstrated through the analysis of a realistic oblique wing by a static aeroelastic computational procedure encompassing the full potential transonic aerodynamic code FLO22 and a Ritz structural plate program that models the stiffness due to symmetrical-but-unbalanced composite wing skins. Results indicate that asymetric composite tailoring reduces the aileron deflection needed for roll equilibrium, and reduces control surface hinge moment and drag. Wing skin stresses are, however, very high.

  16. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Henry, M. David; Resnick, Paul J.; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.

    2016-04-05

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicontopography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  17. Orientation Strategies for Aerial Oblique Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, A.; Moré, J.

    2012-07-01

    Oblique aerial images become more and more distributed to fill the gap between vertical aerial images and mobile mapping systems. Different systems are on the market. For some applications, like texture mapping, precise orientation data are required. One point is the stable interior orientation, which can be achieved by stable camera systems, the other a precise exterior orientation. A sufficient exterior orientation can be achieved by a large effort in direct sensor orientation, whereas minor errors in the angles have a larger effect than in vertical imagery. The more appropriate approach is by determine the precise orientation parameters by photogrammetric methods using an adapted aerial triangulation. Due to the different points of view towards the object the traditional aerotriangulation matching tools fail, as they produce a bunch of blunders and require a lot of manual work to achieve a sufficient solution. In this paper some approaches are discussed and results are presented for the most promising approaches. We describe a single step approach with an aerotriangulation using all available images; a two step approach with an aerotriangulation only of the vertical images plus a mathematical transformation of the oblique images using the oblique cameras excentricity; and finally the extended functional model for a bundle block adjustment considering the mechanical connection between vertical and oblique images. Beside accuracy also other aspects like efficiency and required manual work have to be considered.

  18. Oblique and Head-On Elastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2008-01-01

    When a moving ball collides elastically with an identical, initially stationary ball, the incident ball will either come to rest (head-on collision; see Fig. 1) or will acquire a velocity that is perpendicular to that acquired by the target ball (oblique collision; see Fig. 2). These two possible outcomes are related in an interesting way, which…

  19. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce Burckel, D.; Finnegan, Patrick S.; David Henry, M.; Resnick, Paul J.; Jarecki, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicon topography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  20. The Chicxulub Impact Crater and Oblique Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Gulick, S.; Melosh, H.; Christeson, G.

    2007-05-01

    Determining whether or not the Chicxulub impact was oblique (<45 degrees) will aid in our understanding of the environmental consequences 65 Ma. Planetary impact events, and impact simulations in the laboratory, show that oblique impacts have clear asymmetric ejecta distributions. However, the subsurface structures of the resultant craters are not well understood. In 2005, we acquired 1822 km of seismic reflection data onboard the R/V Maurice Ewing imaging the massive (200+ km) Chicxulub impact crater. The seismic profiles show that pre- crater stratigraphy outside the central basin of the Chicxulub impact crater is offset downward into the crater marking the post-impact slumping and formation of the terrace zone. The inward collapse of the Chicxulub terrace zone coincides with the outward collapse of the central uplift to form the peak ring. Chicxulub's peak ring is offset to the southeast, away from the deepest terrace zone mapped in the seismic data, suggesting that its peak ring was offset toward a more gradual wall of the transient cavity. Peak ring offsets, relative to crater center, of Venusian craters from radar images in the Magellan data set allow us to determine whether there are systematic variations in peak ring offset due to oblique impact. Ten pristine Venusian peak ring craters formed by oblique impact show that peak rings are offset both uprange and downrange, suggesting that peak ring position, and related subsurface asymmetries in the terrace zone, do not provide information about impact obliquity. This analysis supports the idea that Chicxulub's peak ring offset is a consequence of target properties and pre-impact structure and independent of impact trajectory.

  1. LOW STELLAR OBLIQUITIES IN COMPACT MULTIPLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.

    2013-07-01

    We measure the sky-projected stellar obliquities ({lambda}) in the multiple-transiting planetary systems KOI-94 and Kepler-25, using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. In both cases, the host stars are well aligned with the orbital planes of the planets. For KOI-94 we find {lambda} = -11 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign , confirming a recent result by Hirano and coworkers. Kepler-25 was a more challenging case, because the transit depth is unusually small (0.13%). To obtain the obliquity, it was necessary to use prior knowledge of the star's projected rotation rate and apply two different analysis methods to independent wavelength regions of the spectra. The two methods gave consistent results, {lambda} = 7 Degree-Sign {+-} 8 Degree-Sign and -0. Degree-Sign 5 {+-} 5. Degree-Sign 7. There are now a total of five obliquity measurements for host stars of systems of multiple-transiting planets, all of which are consistent with spin-orbit alignment. This alignment is unlikely to be the result of tidal interactions because of the relatively large orbital distances and low planetary masses in the systems. In this respect, the multiplanet host stars differ from hot-Jupiter host stars, which commonly have large spin-orbit misalignments whenever tidal interactions are weak. In particular, the weak-tide subset of hot-Jupiter hosts has obliquities consistent with an isotropic distribution (p = 0.6), but the multiplanet hosts are incompatible with such a distribution (p {approx} 10{sup -6}). This suggests that high obliquities are confined to hot-Jupiter systems, and provides further evidence that hot-Jupiter formation involves processes that tilt the planetary orbit.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Jump Conditions for Oblique Relativistic Shocks with Gyrotropic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Double, Glen P.; Baring, Matthew G.; Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    2003-01-01

    Shock jump conditions, i.e., the specification of the downstream parameters of the gas in terms of the upstream parameters, are obtained for steady-state, plane shocks with oblique magnetic fields and arbitrary flow speeds. This is done by combining the continuity of particle number flux and the electromagnetic boundary conditions at the shock with the magnetohydrodynamic conservation laws derived from the stress-energy tensor. For ultrarelativistic and nonrelativistic shocks, the jump conditions may be solved analytically. For mildly relativistic shocks, analytic solutions are obtained for isotropic pressure using an approximation for the adiabatic index that is valid in high sonic Mach number cases. Examples assuming isotropic pressure illustrate how the shock compression ratio depends on the shock speed and obliquity. In the more general case of gyrotropic pressure, the jump conditions cannot be solved analytically with- out additional assumptions, and the effects of gyrotropic pressure are investigated by parameterizing the distribution of pressure parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. Our numerical solutions reveal that relatively small departures from isotropy (e.g., approximately 20%) produce significant changes in the shock compression ratio, r , at all shock Lorentz factors, including ultrarelativistic ones, where an analytic solution with gyrotropic pressure is obtained. In particular, either dynamically important fields or significant pressure anisotropies can incur marked departures from the canonical gas dynamic value of r = 3 for a shocked ultrarelativistic flow and this may impact models of particle acceleration in gamma-ray bursts and other environments where relativistic shocks are inferred. The jump conditions presented apply directly to test-particle acceleration, and will facilitate future self-consistent numerical modeling of particle acceleration at oblique, relativistic shocks; such models include the modification of the fluid

  3. The effects of external electric field: creating non-zero first hyperpolarizability for centrosymmetric benzene and strongly enhancing first hyperpolarizability for non-centrosymmetric edge-modified graphene ribbon H2N-(3,3)ZGNR-NO2.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Jia-Jun; Li, Ying; Wu, Di; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhi-Ru; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-09-01

    How to generate a non-zero first hyperpolarizability for a centrosymmetric molecule is a challenging question. In this paper, an external (pump) electric field is used to make a centrosymmetric benzene molecule generate a non-zero value of the electric field induced first hyperpolarizability (β (F) ). This comes from the centrosymmetry breaking of electron cloud. Two interesting rules are exhibited. (1) β (F) is anisotropic for different directional fields (F i, i = X, Y, Z). (2) The field dependence of β (F) is a non-monotonic function, and an optimum external electric field causes the maximum value of β (F) . The largest first hyperpolarizability β (F) reaches the considerable level of 3.9 × 10(5) a.u. under F Y = 330 × 10(-4) a.u. for benzene. The external electric field effects on non-centrosymmetric edge-modified graphene ribbon H2N-(3,3)ZGNR-NO2 was also studied in this work. The first hyperpolarizability reaches as much as 2.1 × 10(7) a.u. under F X = 600 × 10(-4) a.u. for H2N-(3,3)ZGNR-NO2. We show that the external electric field can not only create a non-zero first hyperpolarizability for centrosymmetric molecule, but also remarkably enhance the first hyperpolarizability for a non-centrosymmetric molecule.

  4. The Obliquities of the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Ward, Wm. R.

    2002-09-01

    Jupiter has by far the smallest obliquity ( ~ 3o) of the planets (not counting tidally de-spun Mercury and Venus) which may be reflective of its formation by hydrodynamic gas flow rather than stochastic impacts. Saturn's obliquity ( ~ 26o), however, seems to belie this simple formation picture. But since the spin angular momentum of any planet is much smaller than its orbital angular momentum, post-formation obliquity can be strongly modified by passing through secular spin-orbit resonances, i.e., when the spin axis precession rate of the planet matches one of the frequencies describing the precession of the orbit plane. Spin axis precession is due to the solar torque on both the oblate figure of the planet and any orbiting satellites. In the case of Jupiter, the torque on the Galilean satellites is the principal cause of its 4.5*105 year precession; Saturn's precession of 1.8*106 years is dominated by Titan. In the past, the planetary spin axis precession rates should have been much faster due to the massive circumplanetary disks from which the current satellites condensed. The regression of the orbital node of a planet is due to the gravitational perturbations of the other planets. Nodal regression is not uniform, but is instead a composite of the planetary system's normal modes. For Jupiter and Saturn, the principal frequency is the nu16, with a period of ~ 49,000 years; the amplitude of this term is I ~ 0o.36 for Jupiter and I ~ 0o.90 for Saturn. In spite of the small amplitudes, slow adiabatic passages through this resonance (due to circumplanetary disk dispersal) could increase planetary obliquities from near zero to ~ [tan1/3 I] ~ 10o. We will discuss scenarios in which giant planet obliquities are affected by this and other resonances, and will use Jupiter's low obliquity to constrain the mass and duration of a satellite precursor disk. DPH acknowledges support from NSF Career Grant AST 9733789 and WRW is grateful to the NASA OSS and PGG programs.

  5. Oblique wing transonic transport configuration development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Studies of transport aircraft designed for boom-free supersonic flight show the variable sweep oblique wing to be the most efficient configuration for flight at low supersonic speeds. Use of this concept leads to a configuration that is lighter, quieter, and more fuel efficient than symmetric aircraft designed for the same mission. Aerodynamic structural, weight, aeroelastic and flight control studies show the oblique wing concept to be technically feasible. Investigations are reported for wing planform and thickness, pivot design and weight estimation, engine cycle (bypass ratio), and climb, descent and reserve fuel. Results are incorporated into a final configuration. Performance, weight, and balance characteristics are evaluated. Flight control requirements are reviewed, and areas in which further research is needed are identified.

  6. Ionospheric true height profiles from oblique ionograms

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.H.

    1985-06-01

    An improved direct technique in which HF oblique ionograms are reduced to ionospheric true height profiles is introduced. The benefits of this method result principally from the use of a more accurate Breit-Tuve relation to curved earth and ionosphere geometries. By comparing the results of calculations on known cases, the extent of improvement with this technique relative to the techniques by Gething and Maliphant (1967), George (1970), and Smith (1970), is demonstrated. 14 references.

  7. Oblique-wing supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An aircraft including a single fuselage having a main wing and a horizontal stabilizer airfoil pivotally attached at their centers to the fuselage is described. The pivotal attachments allow the airfoils to be yawed relative to the fuselage for high speed flight, and to be positioned at right angles with respect to the fuselage during takeoff, landing, and low speed flight. The main wing and the horizontal stabilizer are upwardly curved from their center pivotal connections towards their ends to form curvilinear dihedrals.

  8. Truncation correction for oblique filtering lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Stefan; Hornegger, Joachim; Lauritsch, Guenter; Dennerlein, Frank; Noo, Frederic

    2008-12-15

    State-of-the-art filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms often define the filtering operation to be performed along oblique filtering lines in the detector. A limited scan field of view leads to the truncation of those filtering lines, which causes artifacts in the final reconstructed volume. In contrast to the case where filtering is performed solely along the detector rows, no methods are available for the case of oblique filtering lines. In this work, the authors present two novel truncation correction methods which effectively handle data truncation in this case. Method 1 (basic approach) handles data truncation in two successive preprocessing steps by applying a hybrid data extrapolation method, which is a combination of a water cylinder extrapolation and a Gaussian extrapolation. It is independent of any specific reconstruction algorithm. Method 2 (kink approach) uses similar concepts for data extrapolation as the basic approach but needs to be integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. Experiments are presented from simulated data of the FORBILD head phantom, acquired along a partial-circle-plus-arc trajectory. The theoretically exact M-line algorithm is used for reconstruction. Although the discussion is focused on theoretically exact algorithms, the proposed truncation correction methods can be applied to any FBP algorithm that exposes oblique filtering lines.

  9. Truncation correction for oblique filtering lines.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Stefan; Hornegger, Joachim; Lauritsch, Günter; Dennerlein, Frank; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-12-01

    State-of-the-art filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms often define the filtering operation to be performed along oblique filtering lines in the detector. A limited scan field of view leads to the truncation of those filtering lines, which causes artifacts in the final reconstructed volume. In contrast to the case where filtering is performed solely along the detector rows, no methods are available for the case of oblique filtering lines. In this work, the authors present two novel truncation correction methods which effectively handle data truncation in this case. Method 1 (basic approach) handles data truncation in two successive preprocessing steps by applying a hybrid data extrapolation method, which is a combination of a water cylinder extrapolation and a Gaussian extrapolation. It is independent of any specific reconstruction algorithm. Method 2 (kink approach) uses similar concepts for data extrapolation as the basic approach but needs to be integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. Experiments are presented from simulated data of the FORBILD head phantom, acquired along a partial-circle-plus-arc trajectory. The theoretically exact M-line algorithm is used for reconstruction. Although the discussion is focused on theoretically exact algorithms, the proposed truncation correction methods can be applied to any FBP algorithm that exposes oblique filtering lines.

  10. Jet ejecta mass upon oblique impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, W.; Ahrens, T. J.; Miller, G. H.; Petach, M. B.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical models in the jetting regime for symmetric and asymmetric impact of thin plates predict the mass and velocity of jetted material upon oblique impact. However, experimental constraints on the amount of material which form jets upon oblique impact are not known. A series of preliminary experiments were conducted in which tungsten (W) flyer plates at speeds of 1.5 to 2.0 km/s were obliquely impacted into carbon targets at 30 deg in the regime of jetting, yielding radiation temperatures in the about 3200 K range. Both framing-camera and flash X-ray imaging were conducted. Broad cm-sized craters induced by jet ejecta on 2024 Al witness plates were used to infer jet mass. We infer, from measured witness plate crater volumes, that jet masses in the range of 0.01 to 0.06 g are produced by a 32 mm diameter, 6 mm thick W impactor. This is about one to two orders of magnitude less than those calculated from present theoretical models. In contrast, in refractory material experiments, the mass of gabbro ejecta trapped in styrofoam is 0.52 g, which is similar to that calculated.

  11. Oblique Impact and Its Ejecta: Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, N.; Pierazzo, E.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that impact events strike planetary surfaces at an angle from the surface. Assuming an isotropic flux of projectiles, probability theory indicates that the most likely angle of impact is 45 regardless of the body's gravitational field. While crater rims appear circular down to low impact angles, the distribution of ejecta around the crater is sensitive to the angle of impact and currently serves as the best guide to obliquity of impacts. A fair amount of numerical modeling of vertical impacts has been carried out from the early 60-s to the present time and references herein]. In vertical impacts, the axial symmetry of the process allows the simplification of the model to two dimensions (2D). Oblique impact modeling requires 3D hydro-codes and, hence, much more powerful computers. The first documented detailed oblique impact studies were carried out at Sandia National Labs' supercomputers less than 10 years ago to describe the 1994 collision of comet SL9 with Jupiter. Since then, substantial progress in computer science has made 3D modeling a reachable objective for the scientific community.

  12. DYNAMICAL INSTABILITIES IN HIGH-OBLIQUITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamayo, D.; Nicholson, P. D.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2013-03-01

    High-inclination circumplanetary orbits that are gravitationally perturbed by the central star can undergo Kozai oscillations-large-amplitude, coupled variations in the orbital eccentricity and inclination. We first study how this effect is modified by incorporating perturbations from the planetary oblateness. Tremaine et al. found that, for planets with obliquities >68. Degree-Sign 875, orbits in the equilibrium local Laplace plane are unstable to eccentricity perturbations over a finite radial range and execute large-amplitude chaotic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination. In the hope of making that treatment more easily understandable, we analyze the problem using orbital elements, confirming this threshold obliquity. Furthermore, we find that orbits inclined to the Laplace plane will be unstable over a broader radial range, and that such orbits can go unstable for obliquities less than 68. Degree-Sign 875. Finally, we analyze the added effects of radiation pressure, which are important for dust grains and provide a natural mechanism for particle semimajor axes to sweep via Poynting-Robertson drag through any unstable range. For low-eccentricity orbits in the equilibrium Laplace plane, we find that generally the effect persists; however, the unstable radial range is shifted and small retrograde particles can avoid the instability altogether. We argue that this occurs because radiation pressure modifies the equilibrium Laplace plane.

  13. Analytical and experimental validation of the Oblique Detonation Wave Engine concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Henry G.; Cambier, Jean-Luc; Menees, Gene P.; Balboni, John A.

    1988-01-01

    The Oblique Detonation Wave Engine (ODWE) for hypersonic flight has been analytically studied by NASA using the CFD codes which fully couple finite rate chemistry with fluid dynamics. Fuel injector designs investigated included wall and strut injectors, and the in-stream strut injectors were chosen to provide good mixing with minimal stagnation pressure losses. Plans for experimentally validating the ODWE concept in an arc-jet hypersonic wind tunnel are discussed. Measurements of the flow field properties behind the oblique wave will be compared to analytical predictions.

  14. Penetration and ricochet phenomena in oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile on multisheet aluminum structures is described. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  15. Integrated aerodynamic and control system design of oblique wing aircraft. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Stephen James

    1990-01-01

    An efficient high speed aircraft design must achieve a high lift to drag ratio at transonic and supersonic speeds. In 1952 Dr. R. T. Jones proved that for any flight Mach number minimum drag at a fixed lift is achieved by an elliptic wing planform with an appropriate oblique sweep angle. Since then, wind tunnel tests and numerical flow models have confirmed that the compressibility drag of oblique wing aircraft is lower than similar symmetrical sweep designs. At oblique sweep angles above thirty degrees the highly asymmetric planform gives rise to aerodynamic and inertia couplings which affect stability and degrade the aircraft's handling qualities. In the case of the NASA-Rockwell Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, attempts to improve the handling qualities by implementing a stability augmentation system have produced unsatisfactory results because of an inherent lack of controllability in the proposed design. The present work focuses on improving the handling qualities of oblique wing aircraft by including aerodynamic configuration parameters as variables in the control system synthesis to provide additional degrees of freedom with which to further decouple the aircraft's response. Handling qualities are measured using a quadratic cost function identical to that considered in optimal control problems, but the controller architecture is not restricted to full state feedback. An optimization procedure is used to simultaneously solve for the aircraft configuration and control gains which maximize a handling qualities measure, while meeting imposed constraints on trim. In some designs wing flexibility is also modeled and reduced order controllers are implemented. Oblique wing aircraft synthesized by this integrated design method show significant improvement in handling qualities when compared to the originally proposed closed loop aircraft. The integrated design synthesis method is then extended to show how handling qualities may be traded for other types of mission

  16. Variation of axial and oblique astigmatism with accommodation across the visual field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Thibos, Larry N.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we investigated the impact of accommodation on axial and oblique astigmatism along 12 meridians of the central 30° of visual field and explored the compensation of corneal first-surface astigmatism by the remainder of the eye's optical system. Our experimental evidence revealed no systematic effect of accommodation on either axial or oblique astigmatism for two adult populations (myopic and emmetropic eyes). Although a few subjects exhibited systematic changes in axial astigmatism during accommodation, the dioptric value of these changes was much smaller than the amount of accommodation. For most subjects, axial and oblique astigmatism of the whole eye are both less than for the cornea alone, which indicates a compensatory role for internal optics at all accommodative states in both central and peripheral vision. A new method for determining the eye's optical axis based on visual field maps of oblique astigmatism revealed that, on average, the optical axis is 4.8° temporal and 0.39° superior to the foveal line-of-sight in object space, which agrees with previous results obtained by different methodologies and implies that foveal astigmatism includes a small amount of oblique astigmatism (0.06 D on average). Customized optical models of each eye revealed that oblique astigmatism of the corneal first surface is negligible along the pupillary axis for emmetropic and myopic eyes. Individual variation in the eye's optical axis is due in part to misalignment of the corneal and internal components that is consistent with tilting of the crystalline lens relative to the pupillary axis. PMID:28362902

  17. Oblique view of southeast corner; camera facing northwest. Mare ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast corner; camera facing northwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Defense Electronics Equipment Operating Center, I Street, terminus west of Cedar Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. Mathematical model for the contribution of individual organs to non-zero y-intercepts in single and multi-compartment linear models of whole-body energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Kaiyala, Karl J

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models for the dependence of energy expenditure (EE) on body mass and composition are essential tools in metabolic phenotyping. EE scales over broad ranges of body mass as a non-linear allometric function. When considered within restricted ranges of body mass, however, allometric EE curves exhibit 'local linearity.' Indeed, modern EE analysis makes extensive use of linear models. Such models typically involve one or two body mass compartments (e.g., fat free mass and fat mass). Importantly, linear EE models typically involve a non-zero (usually positive) y-intercept term of uncertain origin, a recurring theme in discussions of EE analysis and a source of confounding in traditional ratio-based EE normalization. Emerging linear model approaches quantify whole-body resting EE (REE) in terms of individual organ masses (e.g., liver, kidneys, heart, brain). Proponents of individual organ REE modeling hypothesize that multi-organ linear models may eliminate non-zero y-intercepts. This could have advantages in adjusting REE for body mass and composition. Studies reveal that individual organ REE is an allometric function of total body mass. I exploit first-order Taylor linearization of individual organ REEs to model the manner in which individual organs contribute to whole-body REE and to the non-zero y-intercept in linear REE models. The model predicts that REE analysis at the individual organ-tissue level will not eliminate intercept terms. I demonstrate that the parameters of a linear EE equation can be transformed into the parameters of the underlying 'latent' allometric equation. This permits estimates of the allometric scaling of EE in a diverse variety of physiological states that are not represented in the allometric EE literature but are well represented by published linear EE analyses.

  19. Distal oblique osteotomy for tailor's bunion.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, J E; Janecki, C J; Freeling, R M

    1991-12-01

    Thirty-six patients with a total of 50 symptomatic tailor's bunions were evaluated clinically, radiographically, and subjectively, both before and after a distal oblique osteotomy procedure was performed. Thirty-four of 36 patients were satisfied with pain relief. Radiographic measurements derived from this study were consistent with those of other studies. Avascular necrosis, nonunions, or neuroma formation were not encountered in this study. The significant advantages of this procedure are its simplicity, safety, and predictability. The procedure does not require internal fixation or postoperative immobilization.

  20. Side oblique real-time orthophotography with the 9Kx9K digital framing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, Brian A.

    2003-08-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has reported on a new framing camera incorporating an ultra high resolution CCD detector array comprised of 9,216 x 9,216 pixels fabricated on one silicon wafer. The detector array features a 1:2 frame-per-second readout capable of stereo imagery with Nyquist resolution of 57 lp/mm from high velocity, low altitude (V/H) airborne platforms. Flight tests demonstrated the capability of the focal plane electronics for differential image motion compensation (IMC) with Nyquist performance utilizing a focal plane shutter (FPS) to enable both nadir and significant side and forward oblique imaging angles. The impact of FPS for differential image motion compensation is evaluated with the exterior orientation calibration parameters, which include the existing shutter velocity and flight dynamics from sample mapping applications. System requirements for GPS/INS are included with the effect of vertical error and side oblique angle impact of the digital elevation map (DEM) required to create the orthophoto. Results from the differentiated "collinearity equations" which relate the image coordinates to elements of interior and exterior orientation are combined with the DEM impact to provide useful guidelines for side oblique applications. The application of real-time orthophotography is described with the implications for system requirements for side oblique orthophoto capability.

  1. Oblique slip in Laramide foreland arches

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, E.A.; Selvig, B.; Molzer, P. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Don Wise was one of the first structural geologists to recognize the complex, four-dimensional (space and time) nature of basement-involved faulting in the Rocky Mountain foreland. His focus on both small scale kinematic indicators and regional tectonic hypotheses has provided a launching point for many Rocky Mountain geologists. The implications of the anastomosing patterns of Laramide foreland arches on models of regional stress and strain have provoked considerable debate. Hypotheses range from those invoking multiple stages of lateral compression from different directions to single-stage models necessitating a component of strike-slip motion in east-west and north-south arches. These hypotheses were tested using slickenline analysis of minor faulting in structures with different orientations. In Wyoming, structures paralleling the dominant northwest structural trend have slickenlines in the NE-SW vertical plane, consistent with shortening and compression in this direction. The east-west Owl Creek and Casper Mountain structures also have NE-SW trending slickenlines, indicating slip oblique to these arches. In Colorado, minor faults in the north-south margin of the northeastern Front Range also indicate oblique slip, with shortening in the NE-SW quadrant. The actual trend of the slickenlines is more easterly, however, suggesting a change of slip trajectory with latitude, not time, possibly in response to identation by the Colorado Plateau.

  2. Venus - Oblique View of Crater Riley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full resolution radar mosaic centered at 14 degrees north latitude, 72 degrees east longitude, shows an oblique view of the impact crater Riley, named for Margaretta Riley, a 19th Century botanist. This view was prepared from two left-looking Magellan radar images acquired with different incidence angles. Because the relief displacements of the two images are different, depths from the crater rim to the crater floor and heights of the crater rim and flanks above the surrounding plains can be measured. The crater is 25 kilometers (15.5 miles) in diameter. The floor of the crater is 580 meters (1,914 feet) below the plains surrounding the crater. The crater's rim rises 620 meters (2,046 feet) above the plains and 1,200 meters (3,960 feet) above the crater floor. The crater's central peak is 536 meters (1,769 feet) high. The crater's diameter is 40 times the depth resulting in a relatively shallow appearance. The topography is exaggerated by 22 times to emphasize the crater's features. This oblique view was produced from two left-looking radar stereo image mosaics utilizing photogrammetric software developed by the Solar System Visualization Project and the Digital Image Animation Laboratory at JPL's Multimission Image Processing Laboratory.

  3. Ionospheric heating with oblique HF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Edward C., Jr.; Bloom, Ron M.

    1990-10-01

    Calculations of ionospheric electron density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produce by intense oblique high frequency (HF) transmitters are presented. This analysis considers radio field focusing at caustics, the consequent joule-heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes: these being the effects of a powerful oblique 'modifying' wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. Then effects on a secondary 'test' wave that is propagated along the same path as the first are investigated. Calculations predict ground-level field-strength reductions of several dB in the test wave for modifying waves having ERP in the 85 to 90 dBW range. These field-strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The results are sensitive to the model ionosphere assumed, so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An effective power of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, results in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on joule-heating and subsequent defocusing of waves passing through caustic regions.

  4. Oblique and lateral impact response of the PMHS thorax.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joshua M; Herriott, Rodney G; McFadden, Joseph D; Donnelly, Bruce R; Bolte, John H

    2006-11-01

    This study characterizes the PMHS thoracic response to blunt impact in oblique and lateral directions. A significant amount of data has been collected from lateral impacts conducted on human cadavers. Substantially less data has been collected from impacts that are anterior of lateral in an oblique direction. In the past, data collected from the handful of oblique impact studies were considered to be similar enough to the data from purely lateral impacts such that the oblique data were combined with data from lateral impacts. Defining the biomechanical response of the PMHS thorax to oblique impact is of great importance in side impact vehicle crashes where the loading is often anterior-oblique in direction. Data in this study was obtained from a chestband placed on the thorax at the level of impact to measure thoracic deflection. Two low energy impacts were conducted on each of seven subjects at 2.5 m/s, with one lateral impact and one oblique impact to opposite sides of each PMHS. Data was normalized using the Mertz-Viano method for a two mass system to allow for inter-subject comparisons. Force versus deflection response corridors were generated for the two impact types using an objective mathematical approach and compared to one another. Results were also compared to existing data for oblique and lateral thoracic impacts. The oblique thoracic response in low speed pendulum impacts was found to be different than the lateral thoracic response, in terms of force and deflection. Specifically, the lateral force was greater than the oblique force, and oblique deflection greater than lateral deflection for equal energy impacts.

  5. Photogrammetric Processing of Apollo 15 Metric Camera Oblique Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmundson, K. L.; Alexandrov, O.; Archinal, B. A.; Becker, K. J.; Becker, T. L.; Kirk, R. L.; Moratto, Z. M.; Nefian, A. V.; Richie, J. O.; Robinson, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    The integrated photogrammetric mapping system flown on the last three Apollo lunar missions (15, 16, and 17) in the early 1970s incorporated a Metric (mapping) Camera, a high-resolution Panoramic Camera, and a star camera and laser altimeter to provide support data. In an ongoing collaboration, the U.S. Geological Survey's Astrogeology Science Center, the Intelligent Robotics Group of the NASA Ames Research Center, and Arizona State University are working to achieve the most complete cartographic development of Apollo mapping system data into versatile digital map products. These will enable a variety of scientific/engineering uses of the data including mission planning, geologic mapping, geophysical process modelling, slope dependent correction of spectral data, and change detection. Here we describe efforts to control the oblique images acquired from the Apollo 15 Metric Camera.

  6. Plasmas fluxes to surfaces for an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, C.S.; Stangeby, P.C.; Elder, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Kilpatrick, S.J.; Manos, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Owens, D.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Ulrickson, M.

    1992-07-01

    The poloidal and toroidal spatial distributions of D{sub {alpha}}, He I and C II emission have been obtained in the vicinity of the TFTR bumper limiter and are compared with models of ion flow to the surface. The distributions are found not to agree with a model (the ``Cosine`` model) which determines the incident flux density using only the parallel fluxes in the scrape-off layer and the projected area of the surface perpendicular to the field lines. In particular, the Cosine model is not able to explain the significant fluxes observed at locations on the surface which are oblique to the magnetic field. It is further shown that these fluxes cannot be explained by the finite Larmor radius of impinging ions. Finally, it is demonstrated, with the use of Monte Carlo codes, that the distributions can be explained by including both parallel and cross-field transport onto the limiter surface.

  7. Plasmas fluxes to surfaces for an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, C.S. ); Stangeby, P.C.; Elder, J.D. ); Bell, M.G.; Kilpatrick, S.J.; Manos, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Owens, D.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Ulrickson, M. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-07-01

    The poloidal and toroidal spatial distributions of D{sub {alpha}}, He I and C II emission have been obtained in the vicinity of the TFTR bumper limiter and are compared with models of ion flow to the surface. The distributions are found not to agree with a model (the Cosine'' model) which determines the incident flux density using only the parallel fluxes in the scrape-off layer and the projected area of the surface perpendicular to the field lines. In particular, the Cosine model is not able to explain the significant fluxes observed at locations on the surface which are oblique to the magnetic field. It is further shown that these fluxes cannot be explained by the finite Larmor radius of impinging ions. Finally, it is demonstrated, with the use of Monte Carlo codes, that the distributions can be explained by including both parallel and cross-field transport onto the limiter surface.

  8. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  9. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  10. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  11. Uses of the Inferior Oblique Muscle in Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stager, David; Dao, Lori M.; Felius, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Inferior oblique muscle weakening is typically performed for overaction of the muscle. In this article, we review inferior oblique muscle anatomy, different weakening procedures, and recent surgical techniques that take advantage of the muscle's unique anatomy for the treatment of additional indications such as excyclotorsion and hypertropia in primary gaze. PMID:26180466

  12. Measurement of Oblique Impact-generated Shear Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, J. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental strain measurements reveal that oblique impacts can generate shear waves with displacements as large as those in the P-wave. Large oblique impacts may thus be more efficient sources of surface disruption than vertical impacts. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Reduced Oblique Effect in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Sysoeva, Olga V.; Davletshina, Maria A.; Orekhova, Elena V.; Galuta, Ilia A.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2016-01-01

    People are very precise in the discrimination of a line orientation relative to the cardinal (vertical and horizontal) axes, while their orientation discrimination sensitivity along the oblique axes is less refined. This difference in discrimination sensitivity along cardinal and oblique axes is called the “oblique effect.” Given that the oblique effect is a basic feature of visual processing with an early developmental origin, its investigation in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) may shed light on the nature of visual sensory abnormalities frequently reported in this population. We examined line orientation sensitivity along oblique and vertical axes in a sample of 26 boys with ASD (IQ > 68) and 38 typically developing (TD) boys aged 7–15 years, as well as in a subsample of carefully IQ-matched ASD and TD participants. Children were asked to detect the direction of tilt of a high-contrast black-and-white grating relative to vertical (90°) or oblique (45°) templates. The oblique effect was reduced in children with ASD as compared to TD participants, irrespective of their IQ. This reduction was due to poor orientation sensitivity along the vertical axis in ASD children, while their ability to discriminate line orientation along the oblique axis was unaffected. We speculate that this deficit in sensitivity to vertical orientation may reflect disrupted mechanisms of early experience-dependent learning that takes place during the critical period for orientation selectivity. PMID:26834540

  14. Mars Secular Obliquity Decrease and the Layered Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    2000-01-01

    Mars may have substantially decreased its average axial tilt over geologic time due to the waxing and waning of water ice caps through the phenomenon of climate friction (also called obliquity-oblateness feedback). Depending upon Mars' climate and internal structure, water caps of the order of 10(exp 17) - 10(exp 18) kg cycling with the obliquity oscillations could have either increased or decreased the average obliquity by possibly tens of degrees over the age of the solar system. Gravity and topography observations by the Mars Global Surveyor indicate that the south polar cap is mostly uncompensated, so that Mars may be largely rigid on the obliquity timescale. Further, Mars may be a water-rich planet, so that there is a large phase angle between insolation forcing and the size of the obliquity-driven water caps. A stiff, water-rich planet implies an obliquity decrease over the eons. Such a decrease might account for the apparent youthfulness of the polar layered terrain. The idea is that fewer volatiles were available to be cycled into and out of the terrain at high mean obliquity, because of the eveness of insolation between equator and pole, and because of small insolation variations as the obliquity oscillated; so that the movement of volatiles and dust produced thin layers or perhaps no layers at all. As the average obliquity decreased, the insolation contrast between high and low latitudes increased, plus the insolation variations over the obliquity cycle grew somewhat bigger, so that more volatiles and dust might have shuttled into and out of the polar regions, forming the observed thick layers late in Mars' history. It may also be that the average tilt has decreased to the point where the climate friction mechanism is starving itself: more and more water has gotten locked up in the polar regions, making less available for cycling with the oscillations. And the layer-forming mechanism may be starving too: not only less water, but also at low average

  15. Obliquity Variability of a Potentially Habitable Early Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Quarles, Billy; Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-07-01

    Venus currently rotates slowly, with its spin controlled by solid-body and atmospheric thermal tides. However, conditions may have been far different 4 billion years ago, when the Sun was fainter and most of the carbon within Venus could have been in solid form, implying a low-mass atmosphere. We investigate how the obliquity would have varied for a hypothetical rapidly rotating Early Venus. The obliquity variation structure of an ensemble of hypothetical Early Venuses is simpler than that Earth would have if it lacked its large moon (Lissauer et al., 2012), having just one primary chaotic regime at high prograde obliquities. We note an unexpected long-term variability of up to ±7° for retrograde Venuses. Low-obliquity Venuses show very low total obliquity variability over billion-year timescales, comparable to that of the real Moon-influenced Earth.

  16. Bow and Oblique Shock Formation in Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas; Sane, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, soap films have been exploited primarily to approximate two-dimensional flows while their three-dimensional character is relatively unattended. An example of the three-dimensional character of the flow in a soap film is the observed Marangoni shock wave when the flow speed exceeds the wave speed. In this study, we investigated the formation of bow and oblique shocks in soap films generated by wedges with different deflection angles. When the wedge deflection angle is small and the film flows fast, oblique shocks are observed. When the oblique shock cannot exists, bow shock is formed upstream the wedge. We characterized the oblique shock angle as a function of the wedge deflection angle and the flow speed, and we also present the criteria for transition between bow and oblique Marangoni shocks in soap films.

  17. The Role of Rift Obliquity During Pangea Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.; Butterworth, N. P.; Williams, S.; Müller, D.

    2014-12-01

    Does supercontinent break-up follow specific laws? What parameters control the success and the failure of rift systems? Recent analytical and geodynamic modeling suggests that oblique rifting is energetically preferred over orthogonal rifting. This implies that during rift competition, highly oblique branches proceed to break-up while less oblique ones become inactive. These models predict that the relative motion of Earth's continents during supercontinent break-up is affected by the orientation and shape of individual rift systems. Here, we test this hypothesis based on latest plate tectonic reconstructions. Using PyGPlates, a recently developed Python library that allows script-based access to the plate reconstruction software GPlates, we quantify rift obliquity, extension velocity and their temporal evolution for continent-scale rift systems of the past 200 Myr. Indeed we find that many rift systems contributing to Pangea fragmentation involved strong rift obliquity. East and West Gondwana for instance split along the East African coast with a mean obliquity of 55° (measured as the angle between local rift trend normal and extension direction). While formation of the central and southern South Atlantic segment involved a low obliquity of 10°, the Equatorial Atlantic opened under a high angle of 60°. Rifting between Australia and Antarctica involved two stages with 25° prior to 100 Ma followed by 50° obliquity and distinct increase of extension velocity. Analyzing the entire passive margin system that formed during Pangea breakup, we find a mean obliquity of 40°, with a standard deviation of 20°. Hence 50% of these margins formed with an angle of 40° or more. Considering that many conceptual models of rifting and passive margin formation assume 2D deformation, our study quantifies the degree to which such 2D models are globally applicable, and highlights the importance of 3D models where oblique rifting is the dominant mode of deformation.

  18. Calibration Procedures on Oblique Camera Setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, G.; Melykuti, B.; Yu, C.

    2016-06-01

    Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager) is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna -IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first step with the help of

  19. MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

    2011-07-22

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

  20. Thin oblique airfoils at supersonic speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jone, Robert T

    1946-01-01

    The well-known methods of thin-airfoil theory have been extended to oblique or sweptback airfoils of finite aspect ratio moving at supersonic speeds. The cases considered thus far are symmetrical airfoils at zero lift having plan forms bounded by straight lines. Because of the conical form of the elementary flow fields, the results are comparable in simplicity to the results of the two-dimensional thin-airfoil theory for subsonic speeds. In the case of untapered airfoils swept back behind the Mach cone the pressure distribution at the center section is similar to that given by the Ackeret theory for a straight airfoil. With increasing distance from the center section the distribution approaches the form given by the subsonic-flow theory. The pressure drag is concentrated chiefly at the center section and for long wings a slight negative drag may appear on outboard sections. (author)

  1. Extraocular Muscle Compartments in Superior Oblique Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Soh Youn; Clark, Robert A.; Le, Alan; Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate changes in volumes of extraocular muscle (EOM) compartments in unilateral superior oblique (SO) palsy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods High-resolution, surface-coil MRI was obtained in 19 patients with unilateral SO palsy and 19 age-matched orthotropic control subjects. Rectus EOMs and the SO were divided into two anatomic compartments for volume analysis in patients with unilateral SO palsy, allowing comparison of total compartmental volumes versus controls. Medial and lateral compartmental volumes of the SO muscle were compared in patients with isotropic (round shape) versus anisotropic (elongated shape) SO atrophy. Results The medial and lateral compartments of the ipsilesional SO muscles were equally atrophic in isotropic SO palsy, whereas the lateral compartment was significantly smaller than the medial in anisotropic SO palsy (P = 0.01). In contrast to the SO, there were no differential compartmental volume changes in rectus EOMs; however, there was significant total muscle hypertrophy in the ipsilesional inferior rectus (IR) and lateral rectus (LR) muscles and contralesional superior rectus (SR) muscles. Medial rectus (MR) volume was normal both ipsi- and contralesionally. Conclusions A subset of patients with SO palsy exhibit selective atrophy of the lateral, predominantly vertically acting SO compartment. Superior oblique atrophy is associated with whole-muscle volume changes in the ipsilesional IR, ipsilesional LR, and contralesional SR; however, SO muscle atrophy is not associated with compartmentally selective volume changes in the rectus EOMs. Selective compartmental SO pathology may provide an anatomic mechanism that explains some of the variability in clinical presentations of SO palsy. PMID:27768791

  2. Oblique impacts: Catastrophic vs. protracted effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed impacts as the cause of biologic catastrophes at the end of the Cretaceous and Eocene face several enigmas: protracted extinctions, even prior to the stratigraphic cosmogenic signature; widespread but non-uniform dispersal of the meteoritic component; absence of a crater of sufficient size; and evidence for massive intensive fires. Various hypotheses provide reasonable mechanisms for mass mortalities: global cooling by continental impact sites; global warming by oceanic impact sites; contrasting effects of asteroidal, cometary, and even multiple impacts; and stress on an already fragile global environment. Yet not every known large impact is associated with a major biologic catastrophe. An alternative is expanded: the consequences of an oblique impact. The most probable angle of impact is 45 deg with the probability for an impact at smaller angles decreasing: A vertical impact is as rare as a tangential impact with a 5 deg impact angle or less occurring only 8 percent of the time. Consequently a low-angle impact is a rare but probable event. Laboratory experiments at the NASA-Ames Vertical Gun Range reveal important information about cratering efficiency, impact vaporization, projectile dispersal, and phenomenology, thereby providing perspective for possible consequences of such an impact on both the Earth and Moon. Oblique impacts are rare but certain events through geologic time: A 5 deg impact by a 2 km-diameter impactor on the Earth would occur only once in about 18 my with a 10 km-diameter once in about 450 my. Major life extinctions beginning prior to the stratigraphic cosmogenic signature or protracted extinctions seemingly too long after the proposed event may not be evidence against an impact as a cause but evidence for a more complex but probable sequence of events.

  3. Outcomes of pediatric inguinal hernia repair with or without opening the external oblique muscle fascia

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Masoud; Dastgerdi, Mohamad Masoud Heydari; Sirousfard, Motaherh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering that complications and outcome of each method of pediatric inguinal hernia repair are one of the determinants for pediatric surgeons for selection of the appropriate surgical technique, we compared the early and late complications of two inguinal repair techniques, with and without opening the external oblique muscle fascia. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial study, boy children aged 1-month to 6 years with diagnosed inguinal hernia were included and randomly allocated into two groups for undergoing two types of hernia repair techniques, with and without opening the external oblique muscle fascia. Surgical complications such as fever, scrotal edema and hematoma, and wound infections classified as early complication and recurrence, testis atrophy and sensory impairment of inguinal area classified as late complications. The rates of mentioned early and late complications were compared in the two interventional groups. Results: In this study, 66 patients were selected and allocated to the two interventional groups. The prevalence of early and late complications in two studied groups were not different significantly in two interventional groups (P > 0.05). Operation time was significantly shorter in inguinal repair techniques without opening the external oblique muscle fascia than the other studied technique (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The findings of our study indicated that though early and late complications of the two repair methods were similar, but the time of procedure was shorter in herniotomy without opening the external oblique muscle, which considered the superiority of this method than inguinal hernia repair with opening the external oblique muscle. PMID:26958052

  4. Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Humm, John R; Stadter, Gregory W; Curry, William H; Brasel, Karen J

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed skeletal and organ injuries in pure lateral and oblique impacts from 20 intact post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) sled tests at 6.7 m/s. Injuries to the shoulder, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and spine were scored using AIS 1990-1998 update and 2005. The Injury Severity Scores (ISS) were extracted for both loadings from both versions. Mean age, stature, total body mass and body mass index for pure lateral and oblique tests: 58 and 55 years, 1.7 and 1.8 m, 69 and 66 kg, and 24 and 21 kg/m(2). Skeletal injuries (ribs, sternum) occurred in both impacts. However, oblique impacts resulted in more injuries. Pure lateral and oblique impacts ISS: 0 to 16 and 0 to 24, representing a greater potential for injury-related consequences in real-world situations in oblique impacts. Internal organs were more involved in oblique impacts. ISS decreased in AIS 2005, reflecting changes to scoring and drawing attention to potential effects for pre-hospital care/medical aspects. Mean AIS scores for the two load vectors and two AIS coding schemes are included. From automotive crashworthiness perspectives, decreases in injury severities might alter injury risk functions with a shift to lower metrics for the same risk level than current risk estimations. This finding influences dummy-based injury criteria and occupant safety as risk functions are used for countermeasure effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses by regulatory bodies. Increase in organ injuries in oblique loading indicate the importance of this vector as current dummies and injury criteria used in regulations are based on pure lateral impact data.

  5. Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Humm, John R.; Stadter, Gregory W.; Curry, William H.; Brasel, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed skeletal and organ injuries in pure lateral and oblique impacts from 20 intact post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) sled tests at 6.7 m/s. Injuries to the shoulder, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and spine were scored using AIS 1990–1998 update and 2005. The Injury Severity Scores (ISS) were extracted for both loadings from both versions. Mean age, stature, total body mass and body mass index for pure lateral and oblique tests: 58 and 55 years, 1.7 and 1.8 m, 69 and 66 kg, and 24 and 21 kg/m2. Skeletal injuries (ribs, sternum) occurred in both impacts. However, oblique impacts resulted in more injuries. Pure lateral and oblique impacts ISS: 0 to 16 and 0 to 24, representing a greater potential for injury-related consequences in real-world situations in oblique impacts. Internal organs were more involved in oblique impacts. ISS decreased in AIS 2005, reflecting changes to scoring and drawing attention to potential effects for pre-hospital care/medical aspects. Mean AIS scores for the two load vectors and two AIS coding schemes are included. From automotive crashworthiness perspectives, decreases in injury severities might alter injury risk functions with a shift to lower metrics for the same risk level than current risk estimations. This finding influences dummy-based injury criteria and occupant safety as risk functions are used for countermeasure effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses by regulatory bodies. Increase in organ injuries in oblique loading indicate the importance of this vector as current dummies and injury criteria used in regulations are based on pure lateral impact data. PMID:24406958

  6. On the obliquity and tidal heating of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, David G.; Chyba, Christopher F.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    1989-01-01

    Although tidal heating is generally associated with spin-locked satellites on eccentric orbits, a satellite with a large obliquity can undergo substantial heating due to obliquity tides, even on a circular orbit. The near-100-deg obliquity of the Neptune moon, Triton, could generate significant tidal heating and eventually lead to a damping of its orbital inclination to 180 deg. Ground-based observations of Triton have tentatively found a synchronous rotational state that is consistent with despinning times of about 10,000 years, indicating that Triton is almost certainly rotating synchronously.

  7. 3D Numerical simulations of oblique subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, C.; Gerya, T.; Scambelluri, M.; Crispini, L.; Federico, L.; Capponi, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the past 2D numerical studies (e.g. Gerya et al., 2002; Gorczyk et al., 2007; Malatesta et al., 2012) provided evidence that during intraoceanic subduction a serpentinite channel forms above the downgoing plate. This channel forms as a result of hydration of the mantle wedge by uprising slab-fluids. Rocks buried at high depths are finally exhumed within this buoyant low-viscosity medium. Convergence rate in these 2D models was described by a trench-normal component of velocity. Several present and past subduction zones worldwide are however driven by oblique convergence between the plates, where trench-normal motion of the subducting slab is coupled with trench-parallel displacement of the plates. Can the exhumation mechanism and the exhumation rates of high-pressure rocks be affected by the shear component of subduction? And how uprise of these rocks can vary along the plate margin? We tried to address these questions performing 3D numerical models that simulate an intraoceanic oblique subduction. The models are based on thermo-mechanical equations that are solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010). In most of the models a narrow oceanic basin (500 km-wide) surrounded by continental margins is depicted. The basin is floored by either layered or heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere with gabbro as discrete bodies in serpentinized peridotite and a basaltic layer on the top. A weak zone in the mantle is prescribed to control the location of subduction initiation and therefore the plate margins geometry. Finally, addition of a third dimension in the simulations allowed us to test the role of different plate margin geometries on oblique subduction dynamics. In particular in each model we modified the dip angle of the weak zone and its "lateral" geometry (e.g. continuous, segmented). We consider "continuous" weak zones either parallel or increasingly moving away from the continental margins

  8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST SIDES OF WATER TREATMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST SIDES OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Water Treatment Plant, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  9. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND WEST SIDES OF WATER TREATMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND WEST SIDES OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, FIRE PUMP HOUSE IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Water Treatment Plant, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  10. OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST AND NORTH SIDES OF WATER TREATMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST AND NORTH SIDES OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, LOCK TENDER'S HOUSE IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Water Treatment Plant, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  11. Oblique view showing western abutment, looking ENE along main line. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view showing western abutment, looking ENE along main line. Septa commuter train in foreground. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Whitford Bridge, Spanning Amtrak tracks at Whitford Road, Whitford, Chester County, PA

  12. West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, and the deep shadow of the 1962 annex. View to northeast. - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. 5. Oblique view of rear (southeast) and right side (southwest) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Oblique view of rear (southeast) and right side (southwest) elevations, looking north. - Downtown Short Pump Grocery, West Broad Street (State Route 250) & Three Chopt Road, Short Pump, Henrico County, VA

  14. 3. Oblique view of front (northwest) and left side (northeast) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of front (northwest) and left side (northeast) elevations, looking south. - Downtown Short Pump Grocery, West Broad Street (State Route 250) & Three Chopt Road, Short Pump, Henrico County, VA

  15. 4. Building 11 north elevation oblique, showing detail of concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Building 11 north elevation oblique, showing detail of concrete landings, window treatments. Very obscured by unremovable vegetation. View looking west. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), Building No. 11, 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Oblique view of northwest corner showing screened openings at ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of northwest corner showing screened openings at ground floor and mission scrolls, facing east. - Albrook Air Force Station, Field Officer's Quarters, West side of Dargue Avenue Circle, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  17. 7. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTRATION ROOM IN FILTRATION PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTRATION ROOM IN FILTRATION PLANT (#1773), LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING PUMP NO. 1 AND METERING EQUIPMENT - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 9. WEST ELEVATION OBLIQUE FROM UNDER DRISCOLL BRIDGE. LOOKING NORTHBYNORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. WEST ELEVATION OBLIQUE FROM UNDER DRISCOLL BRIDGE. LOOKING NORTH-BY-NORTHEAST. - Rue Road Bridge, Rue Road, spanning Matchaponix Brook, .35 mile east of intersection with Route 613, Jamesburg, Middlesex County, NJ

  19. 2. BUILDING 522, NORTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUILDING 522, NORTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF BUILDING 421, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Aeronautical Materials Storehouses, Between E & G Streets, between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. 1. BUILDING 522, SOUTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM NORTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUILDING 522, SOUTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM NORTHEAST CORNER OF BUILDING 431, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Aeronautical Materials Storehouses, Between E & G Streets, between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. 19. Oblique, typical cell (south cells) from rear of cell; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Oblique, typical cell (south cells) from rear of cell; view to north, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  2. 13. 64 foot truss oblique view of the 64 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. 64 foot truss - oblique view of the 64 foot pony truss showing its general configuration. The 80 foot pony trusses are similar. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  3. 13. OBLIQUE VIEW, THREE DWARF SIGNALS, EAST OF CATENARY BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OBLIQUE VIEW, THREE DWARF SIGNALS, EAST OF CATENARY BRIDGE 522 - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  4. 1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on southeast (context) - Puente Guillermo Esteves, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-25 (Juan Ponce de Leon Avenue), San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  5. Building L west elevation oblique from cartway (between Buildings L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building L west elevation oblique from cartway (between Buildings L and M), also showing west elevation of Building J - Daniel F. Waters Germantown Dye Works, Building L, 37-55 East Wister Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. 3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing rear (west) facade and north side, Fairbanks Company appears at left and 215 Division Street is visible at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  7. 1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing front (east) facade and north side, 213 Division Street is visible at left and 217 Division Street appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  8. 2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 217 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  9. 3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 215 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 213 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  10. 2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF WEST WING. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF WEST WING. THE VAULT ROOM IS ATTACHED TO THE WEST WALL, SHOWN AT FAR RIGHT. - Oakland Army Base, General Purpose Administration Building, Chungking & Algiers Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  11. Oblique view to the northwest of the Antenna Array ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view to the northwest of the Antenna Array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Six Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  12. COURTYARD CREATED BY FACILITIES 176, 177, AND 178, OBLIQUE VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COURTYARD CREATED BY FACILITIES 176, 177, AND 178, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING SE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Oblique of north end and west side, brig is in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique of north end and west side, brig is in background to the right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, United States All-Steel Hangar, Wasp Boulevard between Kingfisher Street and Ranger Loop, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Facility No. 175, exterior oblique view of northeast and northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 175, exterior oblique view of northeast and northwest sides, corner of Facility No. 176 is in background - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Facility No. 176, oblique view of north and east sides, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 176, oblique view of north and east sides, corner of Facility No. 175 is to the right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST END AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST END AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, SHOWING THE PROJECTING ENTRY FOYER. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, First Aid & Decontamination Building, Wasp Boulevard near Ranger Loop, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  18. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  19. 21. General oblique view of main central building mass looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. General oblique view of main central building mass looking to southeast, showing meeting of north and central building elements. - Fort Ord, Soldiers' Club, California State Highway 1 near Eighth Street, Seaside, Monterey County, CA

  20. 10. VIEW TO NORTHWEST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW TO NORTHWEST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH END OF MBE BUILDING (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 24. VIEW TO NORTHEAST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH RETAINING WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW TO NORTHEAST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH RETAINING WALL AND PARKING STRUCTURE BELOW REA LOADING DOCK (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 12. VIEW TO NORTHWEST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW TO NORTHWEST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH END OF MBE BUILDING AND ADJOINING TRACK SHED (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 8. VIEW TO NORTHEAST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW TO NORTHEAST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH END OF MBE BUILDING (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 3. General oblique view of west facade showing brick piers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General oblique view of west facade showing brick piers and industrial windows; view to southeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, Paper Machine Building, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  5. Oblique of east facade of Hangar 1 with Building 32 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique of east facade of Hangar 1 with Building 32 in the background. View toward south - Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Hanger No. 1, Cummins Avenue, Moffett Field, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, CA

  6. 37. OBLIQUE VIEW, INTERIOR, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. OBLIQUE VIEW, INTERIOR, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  7. 43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  8. 6. OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING WEST PORTAL, THROUGH TRUSSES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING WEST PORTAL, THROUGH TRUSSES OF WEST SPAN, AND PORTION OF WEST APPROACH - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  9. 3. OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF EASTERN FACADE OF UNITY PLANT SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF EASTERN FACADE OF UNITY PLANT SHOWING LANDSCAPING AND HILL. NOTE THE CORBELED BRICK SUPPORT FOR THE FIRE WALL BETWEEN SECTIONS OF THE MILL. - Unity Spinning Mill, 1402 Austin Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  10. Oblique view of blacksmith shop, showing south and east (front) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of blacksmith shop, showing south and east (front) elevations; camera facing northwest - Lemmon-Anderson-Hixson Ranch, Blacksmith Shop, 11220 North Virginia Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  11. Oblique view of blacksmith shop, showing north and west (rear) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of blacksmith shop, showing north and west (rear) elevations; camera facing southeast - Lemmon-Anderson-Hixson Ranch, Blacksmith Shop, 11220 North Virginia Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  12. 9. Oblique view northwest of east elevation at northeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Oblique view northwest of east elevation at northeast corner of building; previous view taken at corner visible at extreme right. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Hayloft Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  13. 50. Oblique view aft of saloon skylight with steering gear ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Oblique view aft of saloon skylight with steering gear beyond, mizzen gaff boom above. Photograph by Russell Booth, June 1989. - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. Oblique view to the west of the southeast elevation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view to the west of the southeast elevation - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Mountain Home Air Force Operations Building, On Desert Street at 9th Avenue Mountain Home Air Force Base, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  15. Oblique view to the west of two communications antennas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view to the west of two communications antennas - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Mountain Home Air Force Operations Building, On Desert Street at 9th Avenue Mountain Home Air Force Base, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  16. 14. INTERIOR OBLIQUE VIEW OF GAME ROOM IN BUILDING 746, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR OBLIQUE VIEW OF GAME ROOM IN BUILDING 746, LOOKING WEST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Gymnasium-Cafeteria-Theater, East K Street between Eleventh & Twelfth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  17. 8. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTRATION ROOM IN FILTRATION PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTRATION ROOM IN FILTRATION PLANT (#1773), LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING MEZZANINE WITH FILTER TANKS AT REAR - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. Interior oblique view with wagon in foreground; camera facing southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior oblique view with wagon in foreground; camera facing southwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Mechanics Shop, Waterfront Avenue, west side between A Street & Third Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  19. Oblique view of building 11050, showing east and south sides, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of building 11050, showing east and south sides, looking northwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Fire Station & Marine Barracks, D Street, at corner of 4th Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  20. 12. Oblique view of northeast facade, showing missing rain gutter, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Oblique view of northeast facade, showing missing rain gutter, deteriorated slate roof, broken windows in tower; view west-northwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  1. 17. Oblique view to southsoutheast of downstream (west) side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Oblique view to south-southeast of downstream (west) side of bridge, with southbound 'piggyback' train on structure. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  2. 10. OBLIQUE VIEW, PORTION OF EAST TRUSS AND TIMBER DECK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. OBLIQUE VIEW, PORTION OF EAST TRUSS AND TIMBER DECK, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING TOP CHORD, VERTICALS, METAL RAILING, AND TRANSVERSE DECK PLANKS - River Road Bridge, Crossing Casselman River on Casselman River Road, Grantsville, Garrett County, MD

  3. 9. OBLIQUE VIEW, NORTH PORTAL AND TIMBER DECK, FROM NORTHWEST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. OBLIQUE VIEW, NORTH PORTAL AND TIMBER DECK, FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING INCLINED ENDPOSTS, OVERHEAD BRACING, VERTICALS OF EASTTRUSS PANELS, EAST RAILING, AND TRANSVERSE DECK PLANKS - River Road Bridge, Crossing Casselman River on Casselman River Road, Grantsville, Garrett County, MD

  4. 5. Oblique view of center and south sections of building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Oblique view of center and south sections of building. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF CENTER SECTION. - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, Building No. 3022, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  5. 9. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH DERRICK AND RAILWAY PASS-TROUGH ON WHARF, LOOKING NORTH - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. 3. OBLIQUE GENERAL VIEW SHOWING EAST CORNER OF SHED, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE GENERAL VIEW SHOWING EAST CORNER OF SHED, WITH RAILROAD TRACKS PASSING UNDER DERRICK ALONG WHARF - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  7. 14. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST CORNER OF SHED, OBSTRUCTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST CORNER OF SHED, OBSTRUCTED BY LATE METAL BUILDING, LOOKING EAST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. 5. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMICAL STORAGE BUILDING (#1776), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMICAL STORAGE BUILDING (#1776), LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Chemical Storage, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. 3. OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF DOOR AT CHEMICAL STORAGE BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF DOOR AT CHEMICAL STORAGE BUILDING (#1776), LOOKING NORTHWEST - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Chemical Storage, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT ELEVATION OF MARINE BARRACKS, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT ELEVATION OF MARINE BARRACKS, LOOKING NORTH. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Marine Barracks, Intersection of Tower Drive & Morse Street, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR ELEVATION OF MARINE BARRACKS, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR ELEVATION OF MARINE BARRACKS, LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Marine Barracks, Intersection of Tower Drive & Morse Street, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  12. 10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE AUXILIARY STRUCTURES. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  13. Oblique view of rear and south east sides, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of rear and south east sides, view towards the southwest, with scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4408, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  14. Oblique view of rear and south east sides, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of rear and south east sides, view towards the southwest, without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4408, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  15. Oblique view of rear and south sides of ammunition storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of rear and south sides of ammunition storage buildings 4403 and 4404, view towards the north without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4403, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  16. Oblique view of front and southeast sides, view towards the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of front and southeast sides, view towards the north, without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4408, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  17. Oblique view of rear and south sides of ammunition storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of rear and south sides of ammunition storage buildings 4404 and 4405, view towards the north without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4404, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  18. Oblique view of front and northwest sides, view towards the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of front and northwest sides, view towards the northeast, without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4409, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  19. Oblique view of front and south sides, view towards the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of front and south sides, view towards the northeast without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4414, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  20. Oblique view of rear and south sides of ammunition storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of rear and south sides of ammunition storage buildings 4404 and 4405, view towards the north with scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4404, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  1. Oblique view of front (east) and south sides of ammunition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of front (east) and south sides of ammunition storage buildings 4403 and 4404, view towards the northwest without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4403, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  2. Oblique view of front and northwest sides, view towards the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of front and northwest sides, view towards the northeast, with scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4409, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  3. Oblique view of arches and ironwork on south breezeway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of arches and ironwork on south breezeway - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; view northwest - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  5. Oblique view of the south and west sides, view facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the south and west sides, view facing northeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF PORTION OF SOUTH SIDE AT THE EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF PORTION OF SOUTH SIDE AT THE EAST END. VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Aviation Storehouse, Vincennes Avenue at Simms Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH SIDE WITH WEST END TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH SIDE WITH WEST END TO THE RIGHT. VIEW FACING EAST-SOUTHEAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Aviation Storehouse, Vincennes Avenue at Simms Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Oblique view of the north and east sides, view facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the north and east sides, view facing southwest - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  9. OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST END WITH SOUTH SIDE TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST END WITH SOUTH SIDE TO THE LEFT. VIEW FACING WEST-SOUTHWEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Aviation Storehouse, Vincennes Avenue at Simms Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. 7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CULVERT UNDER LATROBE ROAD WEST OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CULVERT UNDER LATROBE ROAD WEST OF THE WHITE ROCK RD. INTERSECTION; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Placerville Road, White Rock Road between Clarksville & White Rock, El Dorado Hills, El Dorado County, CA

  11. 6. ELEVATED, OBLIQUE VIEW OF INTERSECTION INFRASTRUCTURE AT LATROBE ROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ELEVATED, OBLIQUE VIEW OF INTERSECTION INFRASTRUCTURE AT LATROBE ROAD AND WHITE ROCK ROAD; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Placerville Road, White Rock Road between Clarksville & White Rock, El Dorado Hills, El Dorado County, CA

  12. FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Duplex Housing Type with Corner Entries, Between Hamilton & Tidball Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  13. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHEAST SIDE. SHOWING THE TWO REAR WINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHEAST SIDE. SHOWING THE TWO REAR WINGS OF THE BUILDING. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Y, 27 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  14. FACILITY 846, TOILET AND SHOWER WINGS, QUADRANGLE J, OBLIQUE VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 846, TOILET AND SHOWER WINGS, QUADRANGLE J, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING WEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Quadrangles I & J Barracks Type, Between Wright-Smith & Capron Avenues near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  15. 12. Oblique view of station from northwest at corner of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Oblique view of station from northwest at corner of Stillwell Avenue and Neptune Avenue. Looking southeast. - Stillwell Avenue Station, Intersection of Stillwell & Surf Avenues, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  16. FACILITY 710, FRONT FACADE AND PORTION OF NORTHWEST SIDE, OBLIQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 710, FRONT FACADE AND PORTION OF NORTHWEST SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Corner-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  17. FACILITY 728, LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 728, LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Corner-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  18. FACILITY 805, REAR AND SOUTHEAST SIDES, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING NORTHNORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 805, REAR AND SOUTHEAST SIDES, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Corner-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Hamilton & Tidball Streets, & between Williston & Ayres Avenues, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  19. FACILITY 703, FRONT FACADE AND PORTION OF SOUTHEAST SIDE, OBLIQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 703, FRONT FACADE AND PORTION OF SOUTHEAST SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING WEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Corner-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  20. FACILITY 713, REAR AND SOUTHEAST SIDES, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EASTNORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 713, REAR AND SOUTHEAST SIDES, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EAST-NORTHEAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Central-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Ayres Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  1. 9. CARRIAGE HOUSE, OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION. REMAINDER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CARRIAGE HOUSE, OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION. REMAINDER OF ELEVATION OBSCURED BY EXTERIOR STAIR AND CHAIN LINK FENCING. - Charles G. Carpenter House, 408-410 Cooper Street, Camden, Camden County, NJ

  2. Oblique view of east end and south side, view facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of east end and south side, view facing northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Temporary Storehouse & Gas Cylinder Storage, Avenue D, adjacent to east side of Facility No. 29, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. 14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative motifs used typically at midpoints of diagonals - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  4. Oblique view of the northwest end of the rear facade ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the northwest end of the rear facade showing structural glue-laminated beams, view facing southeast - Pearl Harbor Memorial Community Church, 20 Bougainville Drive, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Oblique view of east side mechanical additions and south side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of east side mechanical additions and south side of 1955 addition, facing northwest. - Albrook Air Force Station, Dispensary, East side of Canfield Avenue, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  6. Oblique view, north end and west side, Burton Park Club ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view, north end and west side, Burton Park Club House, view to south (90mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  7. 6. Interior oblique view from doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Interior oblique view from doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to north (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  8. 7. Interior oblique view toward doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior oblique view toward doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to south (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  9. 20. DETAILED OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTHWEST FURNACE 2, SHOWING STEEL FRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAILED OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTHWEST FURNACE 2, SHOWING STEEL FRAME BOXES FOR COUNTERWEIGHTS, AND FURNACE HEATING PIPES AT RIGHT. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  10. 15. DETAILED OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTHWEST OF FURNACE 1, SHOWING COUNTERWEIGHTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAILED OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTHWEST OF FURNACE 1, SHOWING COUNTER-WEIGHTED PIVOT ARMS TO RAISE AND LOWER DOORS. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  11. 19. DETAILED OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTHSOUTHEAST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAILED OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTH-SOUTHEAST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING PLATFORM AT UPPER LEFT HOLDING PULLEY SYSTEM AND ELECTRIC MOTOR TO ACTIVATE DOORS. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  12. 6. OVERALL OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTHSOUTHWEST, SHOWING NORTH & WEST FACADES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OVERALL OBLIQUE VIEW SOUTH-SOUTHWEST, SHOWING NORTH & WEST FACADES WITH SHED ROOF BUILDING 8 JUTTING FROM NORTH FACADE OF WEST BAY. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  13. 22. DETAIL OBLIQUE VIEW NORTHWEST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL OBLIQUE VIEW NORTHWEST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING GENERAL CONSTRUCTION. CONCRETE PAD AT LEFT IS SITE OF FORMER FURNACE USED TO HEAT URANIUM BILLETS. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  14. Oblique view of west front and north side facing southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of west front and north side facing southeast - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Oblique view of east front and north side facing southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of east front and north side facing southwest - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND EAST SIDES OF FIRE PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND EAST SIDES OF FIRE PUMP HOUSE WITH MAINTENANCE DEPOT SLIP AND DOCKS IN FOREGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH - Moore Haven Lock, Fire Pump House, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Moore Haven, Glades County, FL

  17. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND WEST SIDES OF FIRE PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND WEST SIDES OF FIRE PUMP HOUSE WITH MAINTENANCE DEPOT SLIP AND DOCKS IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST - Moore Haven Lock, Fire Pump House, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Moore Haven, Glades County, FL

  18. OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT SIDE (ENTRANCE) AND COURTYARD OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT SIDE (ENTRANCE) AND COURTYARD OF BUILDING 23, FACING SOUTHWEST - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Building 931, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 931, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Central Battery Charging Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  20. Building 904, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  1. Building 1204, oblique view to west, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 1204, oblique view to west, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Squadron Operations & Readiness Crew Facility, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  2. Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building 908 at extreme right for context. - Travis Air Force Base, Handling Crew Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  3. Building 1204, oblique view to east, 90 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 1204, oblique view to east, 90 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Squadron Operations & Readiness Crew Facility, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  4. Building 904, oblique view to northeast, 210mm lens Travis ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to northeast, 210mm lens - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  5. Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building 933-935 at extreme left. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 5, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  6. Building 931, oblique view to northwest, 210 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 931, oblique view to northwest, 210 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Central Battery Charging Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  7. Detail, rear door types, building 242, oblique view to southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, rear door types, building 242, oblique view to southwest, 90 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Building, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  8. Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering building 932, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Snack Bar, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  9. Building 904, oblique view to northwest, 135 mm lens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to northwest, 135 mm lens - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  10. OBLIQUE VIEW SHOWING THE SMALL ENCLOSURE WITH NO DOOR IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW SHOWING THE SMALL ENCLOSURE WITH NO DOOR IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ENTRY STAIRWAY ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ENTRY STAIRWAY ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ABOVEGROUND PORTION IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ABOVE-GROUND PORTION IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. OBLIQUE VIEW. NOTE THE ROUGHSURFACED EXTERIOR OF THE CONCRETE WALLS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW. NOTE THE ROUGH-SURFACED EXTERIOR OF THE CONCRETE WALLS. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH AND WEST FACADES, WITHOUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH AND WEST FACADES, WITHOUT SCALE BAR - Vancouver Barracks, Paint Shop and Central Heating Plant, East Fifth Street southeast of McLoughlin Road, Vancouver, Clark County, WA

  15. OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH AND WEST FACADES, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH AND WEST FACADES, WITH SCALE BAR - Vancouver Barracks, Paint Shop and Central Heating Plant, East Fifth Street southeast of McLoughlin Road, Vancouver, Clark County, WA

  16. CLOSE UP OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE UP OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH AND WEST FACADES - Vancouver Barracks, Paint Shop and Central Heating Plant, East Fifth Street southeast of McLoughlin Road, Vancouver, Clark County, WA

  17. Facility No. 171, oblique view of west side and north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 171, oblique view of west side and north end, with Facility Nos. 170 and S169 in the background - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Inert Ammunition Storehouses, Avocet and Kingfisher Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Oblique view showing north and west elevations; camera facing southeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view showing north and west elevations; camera facing southeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  19. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST SIDE. NOTE THE LAVA ROCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST SIDE. NOTE THE LAVA ROCK FOUNDATION PIERS AND DETAILING AT THE WINDOWS. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  20. 5. Contextual oblique view to northwest showing upstream (east) side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Contextual oblique view to northwest showing upstream (east) side of bridge in setting, with Jacob Meyer Park at right. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  1. 4. Contextual oblique view to southsouthwest from near north abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Contextual oblique view to south-southwest from near north abutment in Jacob Meyer Park, showing upstream (east) side of bridge in setting. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  2. 11. View toward southwest, northeast oblique of perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View toward southwest, northeast oblique of perimeter acquisition radar building showing - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  3. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. OBLIQUE SHOWING NORTHEAST END AND NORTHWEST SIDE. FACILITY 252 PORTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE SHOWING NORTHEAST END AND NORTHWEST SIDE. FACILITY 252 PORTION OF BUILDING IS ON LEFT. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Combat Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. OBLIQUE OF NORTHEAST END WITH FACILITY 252 PORTION OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF NORTHEAST END WITH FACILITY 252 PORTION OF BUILDING (FIRST-FLOOR CONCRETE PORTION) IN FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Combat Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. OBLIQUE OF THE NORTHEAST END (MAIN ENTRY) AND NORTHWEST SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF THE NORTHEAST END (MAIN ENTRY) AND NORTHWEST SIDE, WITH FACILITY 346 ON LEFT. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; chute building is in background - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  8. 6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, with chute building to the right - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  9. 17. Oblique view of northwest corner of main plant looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Oblique view of northwest corner of main plant looking southeast with railroad tracks in foreground - Skinner Meat Packing Plant, Main Plant, 6006 South Twenty-seventh Street, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  10. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE, FACING NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE, FACING NORTHWEST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Wing & Fuselage Assembly Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FIRE PUMP HOUSE, WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FIRE PUMP HOUSE, WATER TREATMENT PLANT IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Fire Pump House, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  12. 4. OBLIQUE VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OBLIQUE VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE 486 - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  13. Oblique view of southeast side, showing onestory section, camera facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast side, showing one-story section, camera facing north - Golden Gate International Exposition, Hall of Transportation, 440 California Avenue, Treasure Island, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. 1. Exterior oblique view of north and east sides showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Exterior oblique view of north and east sides showing entrance and typical window - Fort Hood, World War II Temporary Buildings, Dispatcher House, North of Park Avenue at Forty-ninth Street, Killeen, Bell County, TX

  15. 20. OBLIQUE VIEW, VANE LINE RELAY, CYLINDRICAL HOUSING, NEW HAVEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. OBLIQUE VIEW, VANE LINE RELAY, CYLINDRICAL HOUSING, NEW HAVEN SIGNAL SHOP - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  16. 3. Oblique view of south side of eastern end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of south side of eastern end of raised drawbridge and operator's house, facing west. - Palm Valley Bridge, County Road 210 spanning Intracoastal Waterway, Ponte Vedra Beach, St. Johns County, FL

  17. 3. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDINGS 208 AND 214 FROM BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDINGS 208 AND 214 FROM BUILDING 204, LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Bachelor Airmen Quarters, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  18. 5. INTERIOR OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE MAIN ROOM IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE MAIN ROOM IN THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 202, LOOKING WEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Administration Building, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  19. 1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE POOL BUILDING 307 AND THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE POOL BUILDING 307 AND THE POOL 308, LOOKING WEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Pool Building & Swimming Pool, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  20. Detail of generator number three, oblique. Control panels on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of generator number three, oblique. Control panels on the main floor and on the mezzanine are visible behind and above the generators. - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  1. 8. Oblique view northwest of south elevation. Industrial loft building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Oblique view northwest of south elevation. Industrial loft building in foreground middle, machine shop in background left, and foundry in foreground right. Looking down at Water Street. - Dry Dock Engine Works, 1801 Atwater Street, Detroit, MI

  2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST SIDES SHOWING THE VISOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST SIDES SHOWING THE VISOR WHICH EXTENDS AROUND THE BUILDING. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Theater, Hornet Avenue between Enterprise & Pokomoke Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. 1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING CABLE DRUM, WOODEN BRAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING CABLE DRUM, WOODEN BRAKE SHOES AND BRAKE HANDLE, LOOKING NORTH - Buffalo Coal Mine, Vulcan Cable Hoist, Wishbone Hill, Southeast end, near Moose Creek, Sutton, Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK

  4. 2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING CABLE DRUM, WOODEN BRAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING CABLE DRUM, WOODEN BRAKE SHOES, BRAKE HANDLE, AND REDUCTION GEARS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Buffalo Coal Mine, Vulcan Cable Hoist, Wishbone Hill, Southeast end, near Moose Creek, Sutton, Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK

  5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHEAST FRONT OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHEAST FRONT OF BUILDING 13, FACING NORTH. - Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Building 13, Harris Avenue at its intersection of Black Avenue and Woodfin Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST BACK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST BACK OF BUILDING 13, FACING SOUTH. - Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Building 13, Harris Avenue at its intersection of Black Avenue and Woodfin Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST FRONT AND NORTHEAST SIDE OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST FRONT AND NORTHEAST SIDE OF BUILDING 13, FACING WEST. - Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Building 13, Harris Avenue at its intersection of Black Avenue and Woodfin Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  8. Size of the Oblique Extraocular Muscles and Superior Oblique Muscle Contractility in Brown Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Soh Youn; Le, Alan; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study employed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate possible size and contractility changes in the superior oblique (SO) muscle, and possible isometric hypertrophy in the inferior oblique (IO) muscle, resulting from abnormal mechanical loading in Brown syndrome (BrS). Methods High resolution orbital MRI was obtained in 4 congenital and 11 acquired cases of BrS, and compared with 44 normal subjects. Maximal cross-section areas and posterior partial volumes (PPVs) of the SO were analyzed in central gaze, supraduction, and infraduction for the SO, and in central gaze only for the IO. Results In congenital BrS, mean maximum SO cross-sectional areas were 24% and 20% less than normal in affected and unaffected eyes, respectively (P = 0.0002). Mean PPV in congenital BrS was also significantly subnormal bilaterally (29% and 34% less in affected and unaffected eyes, respectively, P = 0.001). However, SO muscle size and volume were normal in acquired cases. The SO muscle did not relax in supraduction in BrS, although there was normal contractile thickening in infraduction. The IO muscle had normal size bilaterally in BrS. Conclusions Congenital BrS may be associated with SO hypoplasia that could reflect hypoinnervation. However, unique isometric loading of oblique extraocular muscles due to restrictive hypotropia in adduction in BrS is generally not associated with changes in muscle bulk or in SO contractility. Unlike skeletal muscles, the bulk and contractility of extraocular muscles can therefore be regarded as independent of isometric exercise history. Restriction to elevation in BrS typically arises in the trochlea–tendon complex. PMID:26397461

  9. Focusers of obliquely incident laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharskiy, A. V.; Danilov, V. A.; Popov, V. V.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Sisakyan, I. N.; Sayfer, V. A.; Stepanov, V. V.

    1984-08-01

    Focusing obliquely incident laser radiation along a given line in space with a given intensity distribution is treated as a problem of synthesizing a mirror surface. The intricate shape of such a surface, characterized by a function z= z (u,v) in the approximation of geometrical optics, is determined from the equation phi (u,v,z) - phi O(u,v,z)=O, which expresses that the incident field and the reflected field have identical eikonals. Further calculations are facilitated by replacing continuous mirror with a more easily manufactured piecewise continuous one. The problem is solved for the simple case of a plane incident wave with a typical iconal phi O(u,v,z)= -z cos0 at a large angle to a focus mirror in the z-plane region. Mirrors constructed on the basis of the theoretical solution were tested in an experiment with a CO2 laser. A light beam with Gaussian intensity distribution was, upon incidence at a 45 deg angle, focused into a circle or into an ellipse with uniform intensity distribution. Improvements in amplitudinal masking and selective tanning technology should reduce energy losses at the surface which results in efficient laser focusing mirrors.

  10. Oblique rifting at Tempe Fossae, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Carlos; Anguita, Francisco

    2007-09-01

    This work shows the results of a structural study of the faults observed at the Tempe Rift (northeastern Tharsis region), Mars. A new, detailed map of faults and fault systems was used to geometrically characterize the fracture architecture of the Tempe Rift and to measure fault length, displacement, and spacing data, to analyze the spatial distribution of fault centroids, and to investigate the fractal nature of fault trace maps. A comparison with analog models and the use of conventional techniques of fault population analysis show that the Tempe Rift was most probably generated under sinistral oblique-rifting processes, which highlights the importance of the presence of inherited fractures in the tectonic evolution of the Noachian crust. The angle between the extension direction and the rift axis varies along the Tempe Rift, ranging from 50°-60° at its central southern part to 66°-88° to the southwest. Fault scaling relationships are similar to those found at mid-ocean ridges on Earth with exponential fault length-frequency distributions. Localized, inhomogeneous deformation generated weakly interacting faults, spanning the entire thickness of the mechanical layer. This thickness decreased from southwest to northeast along the rift, along with distance from the central part of the Tharsis dome.

  11. Effects of Extreme Obliquity Variations on the Habitability of Exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, R.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Breiner, J.; Quinn, T.R.; Meadows, V.S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large-amplitude, high-frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restricted our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verified that these systems are stable for 108 years with N-body simulations and calculated the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We ran a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculated differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculated the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: (1) the full evolution of the planetary spin and orbit and (2) the eccentricity and obliquity fixed at their average values. We recovered previous results that higher values of fixed obliquity and eccentricity expand the habitable zone, but we also found that obliquity oscillations further expand habitable orbits in all cases. Terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone may be more likely to support life in systems that induce rapid obliquity oscillations as opposed to fixed-spin planets. Such planets may be the easiest to directly characterize with space-borne telescopes. Key Words: Exoplanets—Habitable zone—Energy balance models. Astrobiology 14, 277–291. PMID:24611714

  12. Effects of extreme obliquity variations on the habitability of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J C; Barnes, R; Domagal-Goldman, S; Breiner, J; Quinn, T R; Meadows, V S

    2014-04-01

    We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large-amplitude, high-frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restricted our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verified that these systems are stable for 10(8) years with N-body simulations and calculated the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We ran a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculated differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculated the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: (1) the full evolution of the planetary spin and orbit and (2) the eccentricity and obliquity fixed at their average values. We recovered previous results that higher values of fixed obliquity and eccentricity expand the habitable zone, but we also found that obliquity oscillations further expand habitable orbits in all cases. Terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone may be more likely to support life in systems that induce rapid obliquity oscillations as opposed to fixed-spin planets. Such planets may be the easiest to directly characterize with space-borne telescopes.

  13. Effects of Extreme Obliquity Variations on the Habitability of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Barnes, R.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Breiner, J.; Quinn, T. R.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large-amplitude, high-frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restricted our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verified that these systems are stable for 108 years with N-body simulations and calculated the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We ran a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculated differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculated the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: (1) the full evolution of the planetary spin and orbit and (2) the eccentricity and obliquity fixed at their average values. We recovered previous results that higher values of fixed obliquity and eccentricity expand the habitable zone, but we also found that obliquity oscillations further expand habitable orbits in all cases. Terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone may be more likely to support life in systems that induce rapid obliquity oscillations as opposed to fixed-spin planets. Such planets may be the easiest to directly characterize with space-borne telescopes.

  14. The Oblique Basis Method from an Engineering Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueorguiev, V. G.

    2012-12-01

    The oblique basis method is reviewed from engineering point of view related to vibration and control theory. Examples are used to demonstrate and relate the oblique basis in nuclear physics to the equivalent mathematical problems in vibration theory. The mathematical techniques, such as principal coordinates and root locus, used by vibration and control theory engineers are shown to be relevant to the Richardson - Gaudin pairing-like problems in nuclear physics.

  15. Mars Secular Obliquity Change Due to Water Ice Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David P.

    1998-01-01

    Mars may have substantially changed its average axial tilt over geologic time due to the waxing and waning of water ice caps. Depending upon Mars' climate and internal structure, the average obliquity could have increased or decreased through climate friction by tens of degrees. A decrease could account for the apparent youthfulness of the polar layered terrain. Alternatively, Mars' average obliquity may have changed until it became "stuck" at its present value of 24.4 deg.

  16. Analytical and experimental investigations of the oblique detonation wave engine concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Adelman, Henry G.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    Wave combustors, which include the oblique detonation wave engine (ODWE), are attractive propulsion concepts for hypersonic flight. These engines utilize oblique shock or detonation waves to rapidly mix, ignite, and combust the air-fuel mixture in thin zones in the combustion chamber. Benefits of these combustion systems include shorter and lighter engines which require less cooling and can provide thrust at higher Mach numbers than conventional scramjets. The wave combustor's ability to operate at lower combustor inlet pressures may allow the vehicle to operate at lower dynamic pressures which could lessen the heating loads on the airframe. The research program at NASA-Ames includes analytical studies of the ODWE combustor using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes which fully couple finite rate chemistry with fluid dynamics. In addition, experimental proof-of-concept studies are being performed in an arc heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Several fuel injection design were studied analytically and experimentally. In-stream strut fuel injectors were chosen to provide good mixing with minimal stagnation pressure losses. Measurements of flow field properties behind the oblique wave are compared to analytical predictions.

  17. Analytical and experimental investigations of the oblique detonation wave engine concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Adelman, Henry G.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    Wave combustors, which include the Oblique Detonation Wave Engine (ODWE), are attractive propulsion concepts for hypersonic flight. These engines utilize oblique shock or detonation waves to rapidly mix, ignite, and combust the air-fuel mixture in thin zones in the combustion chamber. Benefits of these combustion systems include shorter and lighter engines which will require less cooling and can provide thrust at higher Mach numbers than conventional scramjets. The wave combustor's ability to operate at lower combustor inlet pressures may allow the vehicle to operate at lower dynamic pressures which could lessen the heating loads on the airframe. The research program at NASA-Ames includes analytical studies of the ODWE combustor using CFD codes which fully couple finite rate chemistry with fluid dynamics. In addition, experimental proof-of-concept studies are being carried out in an arc heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Several fuel injection designs were studied analytically and experimentally. In-stream strut fuel injectors were chosen to provide good mixing with minimal stagnation pressure losses. Measurements of flow field properties behind the oblique wave are compared to analytical predictions.

  18. Large capacity oblique all-wing transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, Thomas L.; Phillips, James A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Waters, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Dr. R. T. Jones first developed the theory for oblique wing aircraft in 1952, and in subsequent years numerous analytical and experimental projects conducted at NASA Ames and elsewhere have established that the Jones' oblique wing theory is correct. Until the late 1980's all proposed oblique wing configurations were wing/body aircraft with the wing mounted on a pivot. With the emerging requirement for commercial transports with very large payloads, 450-800 passengers, Jones proposed a supersonic oblique flying wing in 1988. For such an aircraft all payload, fuel, and systems are carried within the wing, and the wing is designed with a variable sweep to maintain a fixed subsonic normal Mach number. Engines and vertical tails are mounted on pivots supported from the primary structure of the wing. The oblique flying wing transport has come to be known as the Oblique All-Wing (OAW) transport. This presentation gives the highlights of the OAW project that was to study the total concept of the OAW as a commercial transport.

  19. Velocity field measurements in oblique static divergent vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron

    2005-11-01

    During normal phonation, the vocal fold cycle is characterized by the glottal opening transitioning from a convergent to a divergent passage and then closing before the cycle is repeated. Under ordinary phonatory conditions, both vocal folds, which form the glottal passage, move in phase with each other, creating a time-varying symmetric opening. However, abnormal pathological conditions, such as unilateral paralysis, and polyps, can result in geometrical asymmetries between the vocal folds throughout the phonatory cycle. This study investigates pulsatile flow fields through 7.5 times life-size vocal fold models with included divergence angles of 5 to 30 degrees, and obliquities between the vocal folds of up to 15 degrees. Flow conditions were scaled to match physiological parameters. Data were taken at the anterior posterior mid-plane using phase-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Viscous flow phenomena including the Coanda effect, flow separation points, and jet "flapping" were investigated. The results are compared to previously reported work of flow through symmetric divergent vocal fold models.

  20. OBLIQUELY ROTATING PULSARS: SCREENING OF THE INDUCTIVE ELECTRIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D. B.; Yuen Rai

    2012-02-01

    Pulsar electrodynamics has been built up by taking ingredients from two models, the vacuum-dipole model, which ignores the magnetosphere but includes the inductive electric field due to the obliquely rotating magnetic dipole, and the corotating-magnetosphere model, which neglects the vacuum inductive electric field and assumes a corotating magnetosphere. We argue that the inductive field can be neglected only if it is screened by a current, J{sub sc}, which we calculate for a rigidly rotating magnetosphere. Screening of the parallel component of the inductive field can be effective, but the perpendicular component cannot be screened in a pulsar magnetosphere. The incompletely screened inductive electric field has not been included in any model for a pulsar magnetosphere, and taking it into account has important implications. One effect is that it implies that the magnetosphere cannot be corotating, and we suggest that drift relative to corotation offers a natural explanation for the drifting of subpulses. A second effect is that this screening of the parallel inductive electric field must break down in the outer magnetosphere, and this offers a natural explanation for the acceleration of the electrons that produce pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  1. A Hybrid Orbit-Finite Difference Treatment of Oblique Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanguansak, Nuanwan; Ruffolo, D.

    We present a hybrid numerical technique for solving a pitch angle transport equation for energetic particles near an oblique shock, without recourse to the approximation of magnetic moment conservation. The transport equation on either side of the shock, which incorporates convection and pitch angle scattering and may also include adiabatic focusing and deceleration, is solved using well-tested finite difference code. Calculations of particle orbits near the shock are incorporated into a transfer matrix that treats the transmission or reflection of particles at the shock. We examine the range of validity of the assumption of gyrotropy outside the immediate vicinity of the shock. This technique provides solutions of the spatial, pitch angle, and momentum distribution of particles near an oblique shock for previously unexplored regions of particle velocity and shock velocity. This work was partially supported by a Basic Research Grant from the Thailand Research Fund.

  2. Manual cataract extraction via a subconjunctival limbus oblique incision for mature cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Lai, P; Wu, D; Long, Z

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To report the technique and outcomes of sutureless manual cataract extraction via a subconjunctival limbus oblique incision for mature cataracts. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study comprised of 112 eyes of 83 patients with mature cataract who all had manual cataract extraction via a subconjunctival limbus oblique incision. A transconjunctival tunnel is fashioned with a 3.0 mm keratome, 0.5 mm behind the limbal vascular arcades. A limbal tunnel, with a transverse extent of 9 mm in the cornea and 7.0 mm in the limbus, is created beneath the conjunctival/Tenon's tissue using an angled bevel-up crescent blade. Outcome measures included visual acuity, intraoperative complications, surgically induced astigmatism, endothelial cell loss rate and surgery time. Results: Self-sealing wound was achieved in 112 eyes (98.2%). The nucleus was delivered in whole in 108 eyes (96.4%). Intraoperative complications included hyphema in 3 eyes (2.7%), iridodialysis in 2 eyes 1.8%), posterior capsular rupture and zonular dialysis in 2 eyes (1.8%). At the 3-month follow-up, 91% patients achieved a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, the mean of surgically induced astigmatism was -0.62 ± 0.41 Diopters and endothelial cell loss was 4.2%. Average surgical time was 3.75 min per case. Conclusion: This subconjunctival limbus oblique incision has the potential to serve as safe and effective technique for mature cataracts. PMID:24722270

  3. Superior Oblique Anterior Transposition with Horizontal Recti Recession-Resection for Total Third-Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Muhsin; Cerman, Eren; Onal, Sumru; Ogut, Mehdi Suha

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To report the results of lateral rectus muscle recession, medial rectus muscle resection, and superior oblique muscle transposition in the restoration and maintenance of ocular alignment in primary position for patients with total third-nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent surgery between March 2007 and September 2011 for total third-nerve palsy were reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative assessment, including a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Results. A total of 6 patients (age range, 14–45 years) were included. The median preoperative horizontal deviation was 67.5 Prism Diopter (PD) (interquartile range [IQR] 57.5–70) and vertical deviation was 13.5 PD (IQR 10–20). The median postoperative horizontal residual exodeviation was 8.0 PD (IQR 1–16), and the vertical deviation was 0 PD (IQR 0–4). The median correction of hypotropia following superior oblique transposition was 13.5 ± 2.9 PD (range, 10–16). All cases were vertically aligned within 5 PD. Four of the six cases were aligned within 10 PD of the horizontal deviation. Adduction and head posture were improved in all patients. All patients gained new area of binocular single vision in the primary position after the operation. Conclusion. Lateral rectus recession, medial rectus resection, and superior oblique transposition may be used to achieve satisfactory cosmetic and functional results in total third-nerve palsy. PMID:26640703

  4. Ocular Manifestations of Oblique Facial Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Ortube, Maria Carolina; Dipple, Katrina; Setoguchi, Yoshio; Kawamoto, Henry K.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the Tessier classification, craniofacial clefts are numbered from 0 to 14 and extend along constant axes through the eyebrows, eyelids, maxilla, nostrils, and the lips. We studied a patient with bilateral cleft 10 associated with ocular abnormalities. Method Clinical report with orbital and cranial computed tomography. Results After pregnancy complicated by oligohydramnios, digoxin, and lisinopril exposure, a boy was born with facial and ocular dysmorphism. Examination at age 26 months showed bilateral epibulbar dermoids, covering half the corneal surface, and unilateral morning glory anomaly of the optic nerve. Ductions of the right eye were normal, but the left eye had severely impaired ductions in all directions, left hypotropia, and esotropia. Under anesthesia, the left eye could not be rotated freely in any direction. Bilateral Tessier cleft number 10 was implicated by the presence of colobomata of the middle third of the upper eyelids and eyebrows. As the cleft continued into the hairline, there was marked anterior scalp alopecia. Computed x-ray tomography showed a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst and calcification of the reflected tendon of the superior oblique muscle, trochlea, and underlying sclera, with downward and lateral globe displacement. Discussion Tessier 10 clefts are very rare and usually associated with encephalocele. Bilateral 10 clefts have not been reported previously. In this case, there was coexisting unilateral morning glory anomaly and arachnoid cyst of the left middle cranial fossa but no encephalocele. Conclusions Bilateral Tessier facial cleft 10 may be associated with alopecia, morning glory anomaly, epibulbar dermoids, arachnoid cyst, and restrictive strabismus. PMID:20856062

  5. Constraints on the Galilean protosatellite disk from Jupiter's obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. R.

    2003-12-01

    The obliquity of Jupiter is only 3 degrees. Although a small obliquity seems consistent with its gas accretion phase, there are processes that could have altered it after its formation. The current spin axis precession period of Jupiter is ˜ 4.5 \\langle 105 years due mostly to the solar torque exerted on the Galilean satellites (e.g., Ward 1975; Harris and Ward 1982; Tremaine 1991). However, this would have been up to ˜ O(102) shorter if a minimum mass pre-satellite disk had been present. If this disk were subsequently photoevaporated after the solar nebula itself was dissipated, Jupiter's precession frequency would have drifted through one of the mutual orbital precession frequencies of Jupiter and Saturn, i.e., the so-called ν16 that describes the precession of their orbital nodes with a period of P16 ˜ 5 \\langle 104 years. An adiabatic passage could generate an obliquity of 25.6 degrees (e.g., Henrard and Murigande 1987). This could be avoided if passage is fast enough to be non-adiabatic, in which case the final obliquity is rate dependent (i.e., Ward et al. 1976). If α S denotes the spin axis precession parameter, which is a function of the circumplanetary disk and satellite masses in addition to the Jovian oblateness (e.g., Ward 1975), and we define Ω pole \\{ Δ S / Δ S and calculate its value to yield an obliquity comparable to Jupiter's current obliquity, we obtain O(105) years. But since the change in α S would be due primarily to dissipation of the protosatellite disk, we conclude that a disk life much longer than this is not consistent with Jupiter's low obliquity spin state. Alternatively, the pre-satellite disk may have been of insufficient mass to cause passage through the Jupiter-Saturn resonance (e.g., Canup & Ward 2002).

  6. RTJ-303: Variable geometry, oblique wing supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaran, Albert; Belete, Hailu; Dryzmkowski, Mark; Higgins, James; Klenk, Alan; Rienecker, Lisa

    1992-01-01

    This document is a preliminary design of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) named the RTJ-303. It is a 300 passenger, Mach 1.6 transport with a range of 5000 nautical miles. It features four mixed-flow turbofan engines, variable geometry oblique wing, with conventional tail-aft control surfaces. The preliminary cost analysis for a production of 300 aircraft shows that flyaway cost would be 183 million dollars (1992) per aircraft. The aircraft uses standard jet fuel and requires no special materials to handle aerodynamic heating in flight because the stagnation temperatures are approximately 130 degrees Fahrenheit in the supersonic cruise condition. It should be stressed that this aircraft could be built with today's technology and does not rely on vague and uncertain assumptions of technology advances. Included in this report are sections discussing the details of the preliminary design sequence including the mission to be performed, operational and performance constraints, the aircraft configuration and the tradeoffs of the final choice, wing design, a detailed fuselage design, empennage design, sizing of tail geometry, and selection of control surfaces, a discussion on propulsion system/inlet choice and their position on the aircraft, landing gear design including a look at tire selection, tip-over criterion, pavement loading, and retraction kinematics, structures design including load determination, and materials selection, aircraft performance, a look at stability and handling qualities, systems layout including location of key components, operations requirements maintenance characteristics, a preliminary cost analysis, and conclusions made regarding the design, and recommendations for further study.

  7. Oblique corrections in the Dine-Fischler-Srednicki axion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanaeva, Alisa; Espriu, Domènec

    2016-11-01

    In the Minimal Standard Model (MSM) there is no degree of freedom for dark matter. There are several extensions of the MSM introducing a new particle - an invisible axion, which can be regarded as a trustworthy candidate at least for a part of the dark matter component. However, as it is extremely weakly coupled, it cannot be directly measured at the LHC. We propose to explore the electroweak sector indirectly by considering a particular model that includes the axion and derive consequences that could be experimentally tested. We discuss the Dine-Fischler-Srednicki (DFS) model, which extends the two-Higgs doublet model with an additional Peccei-Quinn symmetry and leads to a physically acceptable axion. The non-linear parametrization of the DFS model is exploited in the generic case where all scalars except the lightest Higgs and the axion have masses at or beyond the TeV scale. We compute the oblique corrections and use their values from the electroweak experimental fits to put constraints on the mass spectrum of the DFS model.

  8. Oblique Aerial Photography Tool for Building Inspection and Damage Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Remondino, F.; Rupnik, E.; Nex, F.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerial photography has a long history of being employed for mapping purposes due to some of its main advantages, including large area imaging from above and minimization of field work. Since few years multi-camera aerial systems are becoming a practical sensor technology across a growing geospatial market, as complementary to the traditional vertical views. Multi-camera aerial systems capture not only the conventional nadir views, but also tilted images at the same time. In this paper, a particular use of such imagery in the field of building inspection as well as disaster assessment is addressed. The main idea is to inspect a building from four cardinal directions by using monoplotting functionalities. The developed application allows to measure building height and distances and to digitize man-made structures, creating 3D surfaces and building models. The realized GUI is capable of identifying a building from several oblique points of views, as well as calculates the approximate height of buildings, ground distances and basic vectorization. The geometric accuracy of the results remains a function of several parameters, namely image resolution, quality of available parameters (DEM, calibration and orientation values), user expertise and measuring capability.

  9. The Martian polar caps: Stability and water transport at low obliquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, B. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal cycle of water on Mars is regulated by the two polar caps. In the winter hemisphere, the seasonal CO2 deposits at a temperature near 150 K acts as a cold trap to remove water vapor from the atmosphere. When summer returns, water is pumped back into the atmosphere by a number of mechanisms, including release from the receding CO2 frost, diffusion from the polar regolith, and sublimation from a water-ice residual cap. These processes drive an exchange of water vapor between the polar caps that helps shape the Martian climate. Thus, understanding the behavior of the polar caps is important for interpreting the Martian climate both now and at other epochs. Mars' obliquity undergoes large variations over large time scales. As the obliquity decreases, the poles receive less solar energy so that more CO2 condenses from the atmosphere onto the poles. It has been suggested that permanent CO2 condenses from the atmosphere onto the poles. It has been suggested that permanent CO2 caps might form at the poles in response to a feedback mechanism existing between the polar cap albedo, the CO2 pressure, and the dust storm frequency. The year-round presence of the CO2 deposits would effectively dry out the atmosphere, while diffusion of water from the regolith would be the only source of water vapor to the atmosphere. We have reviewed the CO2 balance at low obliquity taking into account the asymmetries which make the north and south hemispheres different. Our analysis linked with a numerical model of the polar caps leads us to believe that one summertime cap will always lose its CO2 cover during a Martian year, although we cannot predict which cap this will be. We conclude that significant amounts of water vapor will sublime from the exposed cap during summer, and the Martian atmosphere will support an active water cycle even at low obliquity.

  10. Long oblique distal osteotomy of the fifth metatarsal for correction of tailor's bunion: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    London, Barry P; Stern, Stephen F; Quist, Mark A; Lee, Robert K; Picklesimer, Edison K

    2003-01-01

    A long-term retrospective review of a long oblique distal osteotomy of the fifth metatarsal for correction of a tailor's bunion deformity is presented. The technique, results, and follow-up of this procedure are described. The long oblique distal osteotomy was performed on 25 feet on 16 patients. Follow-up ranged from 11 to 110 months with an average of 64.4 months. The average preoperative intermetatarsal 4-5 angle and lateral deviation angle improved from 10.88 degrees and 4.24 degrees, respectively, to 5.52 degrees and -4.24 degrees postoperatively, respectively. A modified scoring scale for lesser metatarsal procedures was used, showing an average postoperative score of 94 out of 100 possible points. Subjectively, 96% (24 of 25) of feet that underwent surgery were rated as excellent or good. Complications included one patient with paresthesias, one soft-tissue infection, and 2 patients had irritation from screws. The authors conclude that the long oblique distal osteotomy is a viable alternative in the correction of tailor's bunion deformity.

  11. Improved depth resolution in near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using obliquely oriented fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilwind, Rachel Estelle; 't Hooft, Gert; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a significant improvement of depth selectivity when using obliquely oriented fibers for near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. This is confirmed by diffuse reflectance measurements of a two-layer tissue-mimicking phantom across the spectral range from 1000 to 1940 nm. The experimental proof is supported by Monte Carlo simulations. The results reveal up to fourfold reduction in the mean optical penetration depth, twofold reduction in its variation, and a decrease in the number of scattering events when a single fiber is oriented at an angle of 60 deg. The effect of reducing the mean optical penetration depth is enhanced by orienting both fibers inwardly. Using outwardly oriented fibers enables more selective probing of deeper layers, while reducing the contribution from surface layers. We further demonstrate that the effect of an inward oblique arrangement can be approximated to a decrease in fiber-to-fiber separation in the case of a perpendicular fiber arrangement. This approximation is valid in the weak- or absorption-free regime. Our results assert the advantages of using obliquely oriented fibers when attempting to specifically address superficial tissue layers, for example, for skin cancer detection, or in noninvasive glucose monitoring. Such flexibility could be further advantageous in a range of minimally invasive applications, including catheter-based interventions.

  12. How obliquity cycles powered early Pleistocene global ice-volume variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Clay R.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pollard, David

    2015-03-01

    Milankovitch theory proposes that the magnitude of high-latitude summer insolation dictates the continental ice-volume response by controlling summer snow melt, thus anticipating a substantial ice-volume contribution from the strong summer insolation signal of precession. Yet almost all of the early Pleistocene δ18O records' signal strength resides at the frequency of obliquity. Here we explore this discrepancy using a climate-vegetation-ice sheet model to simulate climate-ice sheet response to transient orbits of varying obliquity and precession. Spectral analysis of our results shows that despite contributing significantly less to the summer insolation signal, almost 60% of the ice-volume power exists at the frequency of obliquity due to a combination of albedo feedbacks, seasonal offsets, and orbital cycle duration differences. Including eccentricity modulation of the precession ice-volume component and assuming a small Antarctic ice response to orbital forcing produce a signal that agrees with the δ18O ice-volume proxy records.

  13. RBA: Reduced Bundle Adjustment for oblique aerial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanbiao; Sun, Huabo; Yan, Lei; Fan, Shiyue; Chen, Rui

    2016-11-01

    This study proposes an efficient Bundle Adjustment (BA) model for oblique aerial photogrammetry to reduce the number of unknown parameters and the dimensions of a non-linear optimization problem. Instead of serving as independent exterior orientations, oblique camera poses are parameterized with nadir camera poses and constant relative poses between oblique and nadir cameras. New observation functions are created with image points as a function of the nadir pose and the relative pose parameters. With these observation functions, the problem of BA is defined as finding optimal unknown parameters by minimizing the total difference between estimated and observed image points. A Gauss-Newton optimization method is utilized to provide a solution for this least-square problem with a reduced normal equation, which plays a very critical role in the convergence and efficiency of BA. Compared with traditional BA methods, the number of unknown parameters and the dimension of the normal equations decrease, this approach dramatically reduces the computational complexity and memory cost especially for large-scale scenarios with a number of oblique images. Four synthetic datasets and a real dataset were used to check the validation and the accuracy of the proposed method. The accuracy of the proposed method is very close to that of the traditional BA method, but the efficiency can be significantly improved by the proposed method. For very large-scale scenarios, the proposed method can still address the limitation of memory and orientate all images captured by an oblique aerial multi-camera system.

  14. Obliquity pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial terminations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter; Wunsch, Carl

    2005-03-24

    The 100,000-year timescale in the glacial/interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene epoch (the past approximately 700,000 years) is commonly attributed to control by variations in the Earth's orbit. This hypothesis has inspired models that depend on the Earth's obliquity (approximately 40,000 yr; approximately 40 kyr), orbital eccentricity (approximately 100 kyr) and precessional (approximately 20 kyr) fluctuations, with the emphasis usually on eccentricity and precessional forcing. According to a contrasting hypothesis, the glacial cycles arise primarily because of random internal climate variability. Taking these two perspectives together, there are currently more than thirty different models of the seven late-Pleistocene glacial cycles. Here we present a statistical test of the orbital forcing hypothesis, focusing on the rapid deglaciation events known as terminations. According to our analysis, the null hypothesis that glacial terminations are independent of obliquity can be rejected at the 5% significance level, whereas the corresponding null hypotheses for eccentricity and precession cannot be rejected. The simplest inference consistent with the test results is that the ice sheets terminated every second or third obliquity cycle at times of high obliquity, similar to the original proposal by Milankovitch. We also present simple stochastic and deterministic models that describe the timing of the late-Pleistocene glacial terminations purely in terms of obliquity forcing.

  15. Oblique ionospheric reflections in the MARSIS data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. J.; Duru, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Witasse, O. G.; Withers, P.

    2012-12-01

    In addition to reflections from the Martian ionosphere along the nadir direction, the Mars Advanced Radar for Sub-surface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on board ESA's Mars Express (MEX) orbiter frequently detects 'oblique reflections' from additional targets away from the nadir direction. Such oblique reflections have been attributed to the presence of anomalous horizontal structure within the ionosphere, in which the ionospheric scale height is thought to have increased in regions where Mars' remnant crustal magnetic field has a 'open' or cusp-like configuration, possibly allowing for the heating of the ionosphere by precipitating solar wind plasma. This spatial structuring gives constant-density surfaces which are not parallel to the planet's surface, from which the sounding pulse from the MARSIS instrument can be reflected back towards the spacecraft at what would otherwise be oblique incidence. These oblique reflections form distinctive hyperbolas in time and apparent range, the apices of which are generally above the surrounding ionosphere, strongly suggesting that they have an extended horizontal structure. Here, employing the substantial MARSIS data set, we examine both the spatial distribution and repeatability of detection of these oblique reflections. These results are then related to the highly structured Martian crustal magnetic field, utilising a simplified ray-tracing code.

  16. Oblique ionospheric reflections in the MARSIS data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David; Duru, Firdevs; Morgan, David; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Witasse, Olivier; Withers, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In addition to reflections from the Martian ionosphere along the nadir direction, the Mars Advanced Radar for Sub-surface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on board ESA's Mars Express (MEX) orbiter frequently detects 'oblique reflections' from additional targets away from the nadir direction. Such oblique reflections have been attributed to the presence of anomalous horizontal structure within the ionosphere, in which the ionospheric scale height is thought to have increased in regions where Mars' remnant crustal magnetic field has a 'open' or cusp-like configuration, possibly allowing for the heating of the ionosphere by precipitating solar wind plasma. This spatial structuring gives constant-density surfaces which are not parallel to the planet's surface, from which the sounding pulse from the MARSIS instrument can be reflected back towards the spacecraft at what would otherwise be oblique incidence. These oblique reflections form distinctive hyperbolas in time and apparent range, the apices of which are generally above the surrounding ionosphere, strongly suggesting that they have an extended horizontal structure. Here, employing the substantial MARSIS data set, we examine both the spatial distribution and repeatability of detection of these oblique reflections. These results are then related to the highly structured Martian crustal magnetic field, utilising a simplified ray-tracing code.

  17. Assessment Of An Oblique ECE Diagnostic For ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Taylor and Robert W. Harvey

    2009-07-15

    A systematic disagreement between the electron temperature measured by electron cyclotron emission (TECE) and laser Thomson scattering (TTS), that increases with TECE, is observed in JET and TFTR plasmas, such that TECE ~ 1.2 TTS when TECE ~ 10 keV. The disagreement is consistent with a non-Maxwellian distortion in the bulk electron momentum distribution. ITER is projected to operate with Te(0) ~ 20-40 keV so the disagreement between TECE and TTS could be > 50%, with significant physics implications. The GENRAY ray tracing code predicts that a two-view ECE system, with perpendicular and moderately oblique viewing antennas, would be sufficient to reconstruct a two-temperature bulk distribution. If the electron momentum distribution remains Maxwellian the moderately oblique view could still be used to measure Te(R). A viewing dump will not be required for the oblique view and plasma refraction will be minimal. The oblique view has a similar radial resolution to the perpendicular view, but with some reduction in radial coverage. Oblique viewing angles of up to 20o can be implemented without a major revision to the front end of the existing ITER ECE diagnostic design.

  18. Oblique impact: Projectile richochet, concomitant ejecta and momentum transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, Donald E.; Schultz, Peter H.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of oblique impact indicate that projectile richochet occurs for trajectory angles less than 30 deg and that the richocheted projectile, accompanied by some target material, are ejected at velocities that are a large fraction of the impact velocity. Because the probability of occurrence of oblique impact less than 30 deg on a planetary body is about one out of every four impact events, oblique impacts would seem to be a potential mechanism to provide a source of meteorites from even the largest atmosphere-free planetary bodies. Because the amount of richocheted target material cannot be determined from previous results, additional experiments in the Ames Vertical Gun laboratory were undertaken toward that purpose using pendulums; one to measure momentum of the richocheted projectile and concomitant target ejecta, and a second to measure the momentum transferred from projectile to target. These experiments are briefly discussed.

  19. Pre-late heavy bombardment evolution of the Earth's obliquity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gongjie; Batygin, Konstantin

    2014-11-01

    The Earth's obliquity is stabilized by the Moon, which facilitates a rapid precession of the Earth's spin axis, detuning the system away from resonance with orbital modulation. It is, however, likely that the architecture of the solar system underwent a dynamical instability-driven transformation, where the primordial configuration was more compact. Hence, the characteristic frequencies associated with orbital perturbations were likely faster in the past, potentially allowing for secular resonant encounters. In this work, we examine if, at any point in the Earth's evolutionary history, the obliquity varied significantly. Our calculations suggest that even though the orbital perturbations were different, the system nevertheless avoided resonant encounters throughout its evolution. This indicates that the Earth obtained its current obliquity during the formation of the Moon.

  20. Atomic diffraction under oblique incidence: An analytical expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiossac, Maxime; Roncin, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The semiclassical perturbation method developed by Henkel et al. [J. Phys. II 4, 1955 (1994), 10.1051/jp2:1994242] to model cold-atom diffraction by optical standing waves, is applied to the diffraction of fast atoms on crystal surfaces at grazing incidence (GIFAD or FAD). We first show that the interaction time and interaction length embedded in the obliquity factor is well suited to explain the transition from three-dimensional to two-dimensional (2D) diffraction. The situation of a slightly misaligned primary beam, corresponding to oblique incidence in the effective 2D system, is addressed pointing out discrepancies such as the absence of net deflection of the atomic beam. Guided by time-reversal considerations, we propose an arbitrarily symmetrized form significantly improving the agreement with experimental data recorded in oblique incidence.

  1. Measurements in a large angle oblique jet impingement flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The flow field associated with the oblique impingement of an axisymmetric jet was investigated in the externally blown flap configuration for the STOL aircraft. The passive and active spreading characteristics of the shallow angle (a greater than or = approximately to 15 degrees) oblique impingement flow, the role of the initially azimuthal vorticity field, and the stagnation point region were studied, and compared to the large ( a = 45 degres) oblique jet impingement flow. A description of the characteristics of the large angle impingement flow is presented: A flow field near the plate as showing two distinct patterns, one near the location of the maximum surface pressure, and another about the geometric intersection of the jet axis with the plate; and turbulence in the region above the plate which is greater than the one accounted for by the convection of turbulence energy by the mean motion.

  2. Chaotic obliquity and the nature of the Martian climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    Recent calculations of the Martian obliquity suggests that it varies chaotically on timescales longer than about 10(exp 7) years and varies between about 0 and 60 deg. We examine the seasonal water behavior at obliquities between 40 and 60 deg. Up to several tens of centimeters of water may sublime from the polar caps each year, and possibly move to the equator, where it is more stable. The CO2 frost and CO2-H2O clathrate hydrate are stable in thepolar deposits below a few tens of meters depth, so that the polar cap could contain a significant CO2 reservoir. If CO2 is present, it could be left over from the early history of Mars; also, it could be released into the atmosphere during periods of high obliquity, causing occasional periods of more-clement climate.

  3. Recent progress of obliquely deposited thin films for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Itoh, Tadayoshi; Taga, Yasunori

    1999-06-01

    More than 10 years ago, birefringent films of metal oxides were formed by oblique vapor deposition and investigated with a view of their application to optical retardation plates. The retardation function of the films was explained in terms of the birefringence caused by the characteristic anisotropic nanostructure inside the films. These films are now classified in the genre of the so-called sculptured thin films. However, the birefringent films thus prepared are not yet industrialized even now due to the crucial lack of the durability and the yield of products. In this review paper, we describe the present status of application process of the retardation films to the information systems such as compact disc and digital versatile disc devices with a special emphasis on the uniformity of retardation properties in a large area and the stability of the optical properties of the obliquely deposited thin films. Finally, further challenges for wide application of the obliquely deposited thin films are also discussed.

  4. Low-latitude glaciation and rapid changes in the Earth's obliquity explained by obliquity-oblateness feedback.

    PubMed

    Williams, D M; Kasting, J F; Frakes, L A

    1998-12-03

    Palaeomagnetic data suggest that the Earth was glaciated at low latitudes during the Palaeoproterozoic (about 2.4-2.2 Gyr ago) and Neoproterozoic (about 820-550 Myr ago) eras, although some of the Neoproterozoic data are disputed. If the Earth's magnetic field was aligned more or less with its spin axis, as it is today, then either the polar ice caps must have extended well down into the tropics-the 'snowball Earth' hypothesis-or the present zonation of climate with respect to latitude must have been reversed. Williams has suggested that the Earth's obliquity may have been greater than 54 degrees during most of its history, which would have made the Equator the coldest part of the planet. But this would require a mechanism to bring the obliquity down to its present value of 23.5 degrees. Here we propose that obliquity-oblateness feedback could have reduced the Earth's obliquity by tens of degrees in less than 100 Myr if the continents were situated so as to promote the formation of large polar ice sheets. A high obliquity for the early Earth may also provide a natural explanation for the present inclination of the lunar orbit with respect to the ecliptic (5 degrees), which is otherwise difficult to explain.

  5. Experimental studies of oblique impact. [of meteorites on planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Meteoritic materials most probably impact planetary bodies along oblique trajectories inclined less than 45 deg above their surfaces. Laboratory studies of hypervelocity impacts against rock and particulate media are presented that indicate important effects of obliquity on crater size, shape, and ejecta distribution. The effects are particularly important to crater size-frequency analyses and geologic interpretations of crater formations. Impacts at shallow incidence, which are not uncommon, lead to ricochet of the impacting object accompanied with some entrained excavated materials at velocities only slightly reduced from the pre-impact value.

  6. Depth sensitive oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with epithelial cancerous lesions can be challenging in the oral cavity where variable epithelial thicknesses and troublesome keratin growths are prominent. Spectroscopic methods with enhanced depth resolution would immensely aid in isolating optical properties associated with malignant transformation. Combining multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating, oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) achieves depth sensitive detection. We report promising results from a clinical trial of patients with oral lesions suspected of dysplasia or carcinoma demonstrating the potential of OPRS for the analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of multilayer, epithelial oral tissue.

  7. Numerical simulations of an oblique detonation wave engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, Henry; Menees, Gene P.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the numerical methods employed in a code for the simulation of supersonic combustion, which is then applied to the simulation of attached detonations and flames associated with the oblique-detonation wave supersonic combustor concept. The addition of heat by a detonation wave results in a shorter combustor than can be obtained in more conventional scramjet designs. Pure oblique detonations have been produced in a stoichiometric, uniformly mixed hydrogen/air stream; the wave rotates upstream with energy release, according to simple analytical arguments. Flow visualization maps for Mach number and temperature are presented.

  8. Obliquity variation in a Mars climate evolution model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, D.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The existence of layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is strong evidence supporting a cyclic variation in climate. It has been suggested that periods of net deposition have alternated with periods of net erosion in creating the layered structure that is seen today. The cause for this cyclic climatic behavior is variation in the annually averaged latitudinal distribution of solar insolation in response to obliquity cycles. For Mars, obliquity variation leads to major climatological excursion due to the condensation and sublimation of the major atmospheric constituent, CO2. The atmosphere will collapse into the polar caps, or existing caps will rapidly sublimate into the atmosphere, dependent upon the polar surface heat balance and the direction of the change in obliquity. It has been argued that variations in the obliquity of Mars cause substantial departures from the current climatological values of the surface pressure and the amount of CO2 stored in both the planetary regolith and polar caps. In this new work we have modified the Haberle et al. model to incorporate variable obliquity by allowing the polar and equatorial insolation to become functions of obliquity, which we assume to vary sinusoidally in time. As obliquity varies in the model, there can be discontinuities in the time evolution of the model equilibrium values for surface pressure, regolith, and polar cap storage. The time constant, tau r, for the regolith to find equilibrium with the climate is estimated--depending on the depth, thermal conductivity, and porosity of the regolith--between 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 6) yr. Thus, using 2000-yr timesteps to move smoothly through the 0.1250 m.y. obliquity cycles, we have an atmosphere/regolith system that cannot be assumed in equilibrium. We have dealt with this problem by limiting the rate at which CO2, can move between the atmosphere and regolith, mimicking the diffusive nature and effects of the temperature and pressure waves, by setting the time

  9. A method for real height analysis of oblique ionograms

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.H.; Kolesar, J.D. Mitre Corp., McLean, VA )

    1989-08-01

    A method is presented for the conversion of an HF oblique ionogram to an ionospheric density true height profile, within the usual approximations of spherical symmetry and no magnetic field. It is a lamination method for inversion of the equations for group path delay and sounder range, which are treated on equal footing, similarly to an earlier method by Rao. A reentrant procedure has been added to alleviate the problem of valley ambiguity. Use of the method and its clear improvement over other methods, which invoke further approximations, are demonstrated by calculations on oblique ionograms from known, model daytime profiles. Future directions are indicated. 6 refs.

  10. Oblique sounding using the DPS-4D stations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosna, Zbysek; Kouba, Daniel; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Gok, Gokhan; Rejfek, Lubos

    2016-07-01

    The DPS-4D Digisondes are capable of detection of echoes from neighbouring European stations. Currently, a campaign with high-temporal resolution of 5 min is being run. Further, ionograms from regular vertical sounding with 15 min resolution provide us with oblique reflections together with vertical reflections. We analyzed profiles of electron concentration and basic ionospheric parameters derived from the ionograms. We compared results derived from reflections from the ionosphere above the stations (vertical sounding) with information derived from oblique reflections between the stations. This study is supported by the Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  11. Oblique drop impact onto a deep liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Marise V.; Sleutel, Pascal; Benschop, Jos; Riepen, Michel; Voronina, Victoria; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Versluis, Michel; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2016-11-01

    While perpendicular drop impact onto a deep liquid pool is widely studied, the dynamics after oblique drop impact remain to be quantified. Here we study, for the first time, oblique drop impact experiments onto a deep liquid pool using ultrafast imaging. We quantify the splashing behavior and derive a model to describe the splashing threshold based on the impact angle and Weber number of the impacting drop. In addition, we study the cavity formation below the water surface and quantify the cavity depth and displacement. Based on the asymmetric cavity dynamics, we develop a method to predict the direction in which a jetted droplet can escape the cavity.

  12. Obliquity variation in a Mars climate evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, D.; Haberle, Robert M.

    The existence of layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is strong evidence supporting a cyclic variation in climate. It has been suggested that periods of net deposition have alternated with periods of net erosion in creating the layered structure that is seen today. The cause for this cyclic climatic behavior is variation in the annually averaged latitudinal distribution of solar insolation in response to obliquity cycles. For Mars, obliquity variation leads to major climatological excursion due to the condensation and sublimation of the major atmospheric constituent, CO2. The atmosphere will collapse into the polar caps, or existing caps will rapidly sublimate into the atmosphere, dependent upon the polar surface heat balance and the direction of the change in obliquity. It has been argued that variations in the obliquity of Mars cause substantial departures from the current climatological values of the surface pressure and the amount of CO2 stored in both the planetary regolith and polar caps. In this new work we have modified the Haberle et al. model to incorporate variable obliquity by allowing the polar and equatorial insolation to become functions of obliquity, which we assume to vary sinusoidally in time. As obliquity varies in the model, there can be discontinuities in the time evolution of the model equilibrium values for surface pressure, regolith, and polar cap storage. The time constant, tau r, for the regolith to find equilibrium with the climate is estimated--depending on the depth, thermal conductivity, and porosity of the regolith--between 104 and 106 yr. Thus, using 2000-yr timesteps to move smoothly through the 0.1250 m.y. obliquity cycles, we have an atmosphere/regolith system that cannot be assumed in equilibrium. We have dealt with this problem by limiting the rate at which CO2, can move between the atmosphere and regolith, mimicking the diffusive nature and effects of the temperature and pressure waves, by setting the time rate of

  13. High-Power Prismatic Devices for Oblique Peripheral Prisms

    PubMed Central

    Peli, Eli; Bowers, Alex R.; Keeney, Karen; Jung, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Horizontal peripheral prisms for hemianopia provide field expansion above and below the horizontal meridian; however, there is a vertical gap leaving the central area (important for driving) without expansion. In the oblique design, tilting the bases of both prism segments toward the horizontal meridian moves the field expansion area vertically and centrally (closing the central gap) while the prisms remain in the peripheral location. However, tilting the prisms results also in a reduction of the lateral field expansion. Higher prism powers are needed to counter this effect. Methods We developed, implemented, and tested a series of designs aimed at increasing the prism power to reduce the central gap while maintaining wide lateral expansion. The designs included inserting the peripheral prisms into carrier lenses that included yoked prism in the opposite direction, combination of two Fresnel segments attached at the base and angled to each other (bi-part prisms), and creating Fresnel prism–like segments from nonparallel periscopic mirror pairs (reflective prisms). Results A modest increase in lateral power was achieved with yoked-prism carriers. Bi-part combination of 36Δ Fresnel segments provided high power with some reduction in image quality. Fresnel reflective prism segments have potential for high power with superior optical quality but may be limited in field extent or by interruptions of the expanded field. Extended apical scotomas, even with unilateral fitting, may limit the utility of very high power prisms. The high-power bi-part and reflective prisms enable a wider effective eye scanning range (more than 15 degrees) into the blind hemifield. Conclusions Conventional prisms of powers higher than the available 57Δ are limited by the binocular impact of a wider apical scotoma and a reduced effective eye scanning range to the blind side. The various designs that we developed may overcome these limitations and find use in various other

  14. Fault Orientations at Obliquely Rifted Margins: Where? When? Why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sascha

    2015-04-01

    Present-day knowledge of rifted margin formation is largely based on 2D seismic lines, 2D conceptual models, and corroborated by 2D numerical experiments. However, the 2D assumption that the extension direction is perpendicular to the rift trend is often invalid. In fact, worldwide more than 75% of all rifted margin segments have been formed under significant obliquity exceeding 20° (angle measured between extension direction and rift trend normal): During formation of the Atlantic Ocean, oblique rifting dominated at the sheared margins of South Africa and Patagonia, the Equatorial Atlantic margins, separation of Greenland and North America, and it played a major role in the protracted rift history of the North East Atlantic. Outside the Atlantic Ocean, oblique rifting occurred during the split between East and West Gondwana, the separation of India and Australia, India and Madagascar, Australia and Antarctica, as well as Arabia and Africa. It is presently observed in the Gulf of California, the Aegean and in the East African Rift. Despite its significance, the degree to which oblique lithospheric extension affects first-order rift and passive margin properties like surface stress pattern, fault azimuths, and basin geometry, is still not entirely clear. This contribution provides insight in crustal stress patterns and fault orientations by applying a 3D numerical rift model to oblique extensional settings. The presented forward experiments cover the whole spectrum of oblique extension (i.e. rift-orthogonal extension, low obliquity, high obliquity, strike-slip deformation) from initial deformation to breakup. They are conducted using an elasto-visco-plastic finite element model and involve crustal and mantle layers accounting for self-consistent necking of the lithosphere. Results are thoroughly compared to previous analogue experiments, which yields many similarities but also distinct differences for late rift stages and for high obliquity. Even though the model

  15. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    simplified, generic subduction zone similar to the northern Andes. The upper surface is initially defined to resemble the Andes, but is free to deform during the experiments. We consider two main model designs, one with and one without a volcanic arc (weak continental zone). A relatively high angle of convergence obliquity is predicted to favor strain partitioning, but preliminary model results show no strain partitioning for a uniform continental crustal strength with a friction angle of Φ = 15° . However, strain partitioning does occur when including a weak zone in the continental crust resulting from arc volcanic activity with Φ = 5° . This results in margin-parallel northeastward translation of a continental sliver at 3.2 cm/year. The presence of the sliver agrees well with observations of a continental sliver identified by GPS measurements in the Northern Volcanic Zone with a translation velocity of about 1 cm/year, though the GPS-derived velocity may not be representative of the long-term rate of translation depending on whether the observation period includes one or more seismic cycles. Regardless, the observed behavior is consistent with the observed earthquake focal mechanisms and GPS measurements, suggesting significant northeastward transport of Andean crust along the margin of the northern Andes.

  16. OBLIQUE VIEW SHOWING THE ADDED TABLELIKE CAST CONCRETE STRUCTURE WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW SHOWING THE ADDED TABLE-LIKE CAST CONCRETE STRUCTURE WITH ARM PROJECTING TO THE WEST (RIGHT). VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, East Gun Emplacement, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Oblique of recreation center portion, showing onestory exercise room with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique of recreation center portion, showing one-story exercise room with louvered windows and two-story section as left. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Cleopatra's Bedroom oblique with picture tube wall along walkway. Structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cleopatra's Bedroom oblique with picture tube wall along walkway. Structure is made solely of amber colored bottles. Roof supported by telephone poles. Areas of bottle wall above window opening collapsed in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Camera facing northeast. - Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village, 4595 Cochran Street, Simi Valley, Ventura County, CA

  19. 34. LOW OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST OVER THE FUTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. LOW OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST OVER THE FUTURE SITE OF THE NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER TO DOWNTOWN OAKLAND. THE FEDERAL CHANNEL IS AT THE RIGHT. No date, probably mid 1930's. Clyde Sunderland, photographer. Original print on file at the Port of Oakland, California. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. Combined obliquity and precession pacing of late Pleistocene deglaciations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter

    2011-12-08

    Milankovitch proposed that Earth resides in an interglacial state when its spin axis both tilts to a high obliquity and precesses to align the Northern Hemisphere summer with Earth's nearest approach to the Sun. This general concept has been elaborated into hypotheses that precession, obliquity or combinations of both could pace deglaciations during the late Pleistocene. Earlier tests have shown that obliquity paces the late Pleistocene glacial cycles but have been inconclusive with regard to precession, whose shorter period of about 20,000 years makes phasing more sensitive to timing errors. No quantitative test has provided firm evidence for a dual effect. Here I show that both obliquity and precession pace late Pleistocene glacial cycles. Deficiencies in time control that have long stymied efforts to establish orbital effects on deglaciation are overcome using a new statistical test that focuses on maxima in orbital forcing. The results are fully consistent with Milankovitch's proposal but also admit the possibility that long Southern Hemisphere summers contribute to deglaciation.

  1. An oblique view of the forward fuselage and starboard side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    An oblique view of the forward fuselage and starboard side of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  2. An oblique view of the forward fuselage and port side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    An oblique view of the forward fuselage and port side of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. 11. UNDERSIDE, VIEW PERPENDICULAR TO PIERS, SHOWING FLOOR SYSTEM OBLIQUELY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. UNDERSIDE, VIEW PERPENDICULAR TO PIERS, SHOWING FLOOR SYSTEM OBLIQUELY AND NORTH PIER. LOOKING NORTH. - Route 31 Bridge, New Jersey Route 31, crossing disused main line of Central Railroad of New Jersey (C.R.R.N.J.) (New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line), Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ

  4. 8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION. LOOKING EAST. Route ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION. LOOKING EAST. - Route 31 Bridge, New Jersey Route 31, crossing disused main line of Central Railroad of New Jersey (C.R.R.N.J.) (New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line), Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ

  5. 7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION. LOOKING WEST. Route ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION. LOOKING WEST. - Route 31 Bridge, New Jersey Route 31, crossing disused main line of Central Railroad of New Jersey (C.R.R.N.J.) (New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line), Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ

  6. 6. View toward southeast, northwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View toward southeast, northwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar building, with view of par power plant - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  7. 7. Oblique view southeast of north end of building. Scale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Oblique view southeast of north end of building. Scale visible adjacent to door at lower right. Compare to HABS-CA-2611-B-4. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Hayloft Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  8. Oblique view of stacks and towers alongside the Dryer House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of stacks and towers alongside the Dryer House, note the pivot windows in the saw tooth monitor atop the Dryer House, view facing southeast - Kahului Cannery, Plant No. 28, Cannery Building and Dryer House/Feed Storage Building, 120 Kane Street, Kahului, Maui County, HI

  9. FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW WITH STREET ON RIGHT HAND SIDE. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW WITH STREET ON RIGHT HAND SIDE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Type 9, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. 2. West portal of Tunnel 18, oblique view to northnortheast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 18, oblique view to north-northeast, 135mm lens. Note the use of concrete face and wingwalls, with dressed stone voussoirs, wingwall coping, parapet with stone belt course and coping, and coursed stone masonry slope protection flanking the portal. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 18, Milepost 410, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  11. 13. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UPPER ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UPPER ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST. THIS ORE BIN WAS ADDED IN THE LATE 1930'S. IT IS TRAPAZOIDAL IN SHAPE, WIDER AT THE REAR THAN THE FRONT, AND DIVIDED INTO THREE BINS, EACH WITH ITS OWN CONTROL DOOR (SEE CA-290-15). - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  12. 5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST FACES. THE REFRIGERATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST FACES. THE REFRIGERATION SPACE PROJECTING FROM THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE BUILDING WAS ADDED IN MARCH 1944. - Oakland Army Base, Private Exchange Cafeteria, Bataan Avenue & Attu Street, facing Post Headquarters Building, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. Oblique perspective, due east by 70 degrees. Note concrete pier, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique perspective, due east by 70 degrees. Note concrete pier, added CA. 1930's. Other piers and abutments are heavily mortared rubble stone. - Watson Mill Bridge, Spanning South Fork Broad River, Watson Mill Road, Watson Mill Bridge State Park, Comer, Madison County, GA

  14. 1. OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NE FROM WEST BANK OF SUSQUEHANNA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OBLIQUE VIEW, LOOKING NE FROM WEST BANK OF SUSQUEHANNA RIVER. PIERS FROM SOUTH PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD AT LEFT, PHILADELPHIA & READING RAILROAD BRIDGE AT RIGHT. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Susquehanna River Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River, North of I-83 Bridge, Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  15. Oblique view of south end and west side from Wasp ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of south end and west side from Wasp Boulevard, with Facility No. S168 oh right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, United States All-Steel Hangar, Wasp Boulevard between Kingfisher Street and Ranger Loop, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHWEST END, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHWEST END, SHOWING THE WOOD-FRAMED WING (IN BACKGROUND) AND THE PROJECTING ENTRY FOYER. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, First Aid & Decontamination Building, Wasp Boulevard near Ranger Loop, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Facility No. 175, oblique view of southwest doors and northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 175, oblique view of southwest doors and northwest side, corner of Facility No. 176 is on the right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Facility No. 175, oblique view of southeast side and southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 175, oblique view of southeast side and southwest doors, corner of Facility No. 176 is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. 5. Oblique view, west end and south side, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Oblique view, west end and south side, view to northeast. Shed-roofed entries on south side of lean-to will be replaced in this project to provide handicap access. - Interurban Electric Railway Bridge Yard Shop, Interstate 80 at Alameda County Postmile 2.0, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. 1. General oblique view from south side of Canal Street ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General oblique view from south side of Canal Street showing Paper Machine Building at southwest corner of site; view to northeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, Paper Machine Building, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  1. 7. General oblique view of rear (north) facade of Paper ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. General oblique view of rear (north) facade of Paper Machine Building, with ruins of brick engine house in foreground; view to southwest. - Champion-International Paper Company, Paper Machine Building, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  2. 5. General oblique view of brick engine house spanning the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. General oblique view of brick engine house spanning the raceway and attached to north wall of Paper Machine Building; view to southeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, Paper Machine Building, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  3. 3. OBLIQUE CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING OVER HALF OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING OVER HALF OF MILLS HALL MAIN WING, NORTH WALL, ALL OF MILLS HALL NORTH WING WEST WALL, AND ADDITION NORTH AND WEST WALLS. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND EAST SIDES OF NORTHWEST CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH AND EAST SIDES OF NORTHWEST CONTROL HOUSE WITH SOUTHWEST CONTROL HOUSE IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Machinery and Control Houses, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH AND WEST SIDES OF SOUTHWEST CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH AND WEST SIDES OF SOUTHWEST CONTROL HOUSE WITH NORTHWEST CONTROL HOUSE AND BUILDING NO. 52 IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Machinery and Control Houses, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  6. Composite Material Property Nondestructive Characterization Using Obliquely Insonified Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mal, A. K.; Lih, S.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of reflected ultrasonic waves induced by oblique insonification of composite materials is a powerful tool for providing informations about defects and material properties. A device was developed to manipulate a pair of transmitting and receiving transducers at vrious angles of wave incidence and propagation with the fiber orientation.

  7. OBLIQUE PHOTO OF NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE PHOTO OF NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) LOOKING SOUTHEAST. LABORATORY AND OFFICE BUILDING (CPP-602) APPEAR ON LEFT IN PHOTO. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-22-2-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 11/1998 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. 2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST FRONT. The frames on an ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST FRONT. The frames on an angle originally held mirrors for viewing the tests from inside the building. Vertical frame originally held bullet glass. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing Control Blockhouse, South of Sled Track at east end, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 15. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of central panel point ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of central panel point connection at top chord; note recess in chord bar to right of joint, and missing third (central) vertical tie rod - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  10. Oblique view to the northwest detailing four overhead rolling doors ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view to the northwest detailing four overhead rolling doors on the northeast elevation - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Mountain Home Air Force Operations Building, On Desert Street at 9th Avenue Mountain Home Air Force Base, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  11. Oblique view of Sector Five Compound, looking southwest. Water Tank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of Sector Five Compound, looking southwest. Water Tank to right, Receiver Building to left, antenna array in background - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Five Water Storage Tank, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  12. Oblique view of Sector Four Compound, looking southwest. Water Storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of Sector Four Compound, looking southwest. Water Storage Tank in center behind fence, in front of Receiver Building - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Four Water Storage Facility, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  13. 31. OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST, SHOWING THE FEDERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST, SHOWING THE FEDERAL CHANNEL IN RELATION TO DOWNTOWN OAKLAND AND LAKE MERRITT. Date and time of photography "12-9-98 10:54." - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  14. 32. OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST, SHOWING THE FEDERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST, SHOWING THE FEDERAL CHANNEL IN RELATION TO SAN FRANCISCO BAY AND SAN BRUNO MOUNTAIN AT TOP CENTER. Date and time of photography "12-9-98 10:58." - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  15. Oblique view of southeast machinery house, SF 109, with NE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast machinery house, SF 109, with NE machinery house in background, at downstream end of lock, view towards north northwest - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  16. Oblique view of southeast machinery house, SF 109, at downstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast machinery house, SF 109, at downstream end of lock, with interior of lack gate at left, view towards southeast - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  17. Oblique view of southeast and southwest sides of southeast machinery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast and southwest sides of southeast machinery house, SF 107, showing interior of lower lock wall and closed interior of upper lock gate to right, view towards north - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  18. 4. WEST PORTION OF SOUTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM APPROXIMATELY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. WEST PORTION OF SOUTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM APPROXIMATELY 30 FEET WEST OF SOUTHWEST CORNER, LOOKING EAST, WITH WEST SIDE OF BUILDING 123 AT RIGHT BEYOND LIGHTING POLE. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Pier Transit Shed, South of D Street between First & Second Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  19. Calibrating the New Ultracam Osprey Oblique Aerial Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Walcher, W.

    2014-03-01

    We present methods and results to calibrate the new oblique sensor UltraCam Osprey which was presented for the first time at the ASPRS 2013 conference and exhibition in Baltimore, MD, March 2013. Even if this was not the first time when oblique sensors were introduced into the market, the UltraCam Osprey did show several new conceptual details which are illustrated in this presentation. The design of the camera is focusing on two important characteristics, a metric nadir component which has been derived from the UltraCam Lp sensor, and collection efficiency through very large swath width. The nadir sensor consists of the 90 megapixel panchromatic camera, true-color RGB, and a near-infrared camera. Adding six oblique camera heads, with two each in forward and backwards direction, results in unmatched oblique collection efficiency. We first explain the camera and cone configuration along with the geometric layout of the sensor system. Then we describe the laboratory setup for geometric calibration of the UltraCam Osprey and the calibration process along with the actual results of one such calibration showing sub-pixel accurate image geometry. This proves that the UltraCam Osprey is a fully calibrated metric camera system suitable for photogrammetric survey applications.

  20. Oblique view of north end and east side, taken from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of north end and east side, taken from back side of bus stop, with stair to Facility 2 in foreground, view facing southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Passenger Shelter, Seventh Street near Avenue F intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Interior oblique view from hall doorway of typical unit bedroom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior oblique view from hall doorway of typical unit bedroom in 2nd floor of Building 6 looking southeast, showing radiator and closet - North Beach Place, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. Interior oblique view of unit living room in ground floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior oblique view of unit living room in ground floor of Building 6 from kitchen hall, looking northeast, showing radiator and barred windows - North Beach Place, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. Exterior oblique view of northeast and southeast sides with heavy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior oblique view of northeast and southeast sides with heavy weight sliding doors, louvered entry door, view facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Oblique view from southwest showing newer (1966) addition with taller ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view from southwest showing newer (1966) addition with taller original structure, view facing east-northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE JAW CRUSHER FOUNDATION CAN BE CLEARLY SEEN AT CENTER LEFT WITH A CONVEYOR TO CARRY CRUSHED ORE UP TO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN,LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.

    1994-01-01

    The Fermi shock acceleration mechanism may be responsible for the production of high-energy cosmic rays in a wide variety of environments. Modeling of this phenomenon has largely focused on plane-parallel shocks, and one of the most promising techniques for its study is the Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in shocked fluid flows. One of the principal problems in shock acceleration theory is the mechanism and efficiency of injection of particles from the thermal gas into the accelerated population. The Monte Carlo technique is ideally suited to addressing the injection problem directly, and previous applications of it to the quasi-parallel Earth bow shock led to very successful modeling of proton and heavy ion spectra, as well as other observed quantities. Recently this technique has been extended to oblique shock geometries, in which the upstream magnetic field makes a significant angle Theta(sub B1) to the shock normal. Spectral resutls from test particle Monte Carlo simulations of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique, nonrelativistic shocks are presented. The results show that low Mach number shocks have injection efficiencies that are relatively insensitive to (though not independent of) the shock obliquity, but that there is a dramatic drop in efficiency for shocks of Mach number 30 or more as the obliquity increases above 15 deg. Cosmic-ray distributions just upstream of the shock reveal prominent bumps at energies below the thermal peak; these disappear far upstream but might be observable features close to astrophysical shocks.

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE HOUSE FROM THE NORTH. THIS VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE HOUSE FROM THE NORTH. THIS VIEW SHOWS THE PRIVACY FENCE AND AMOUNT OF COMMON AREA BETWEEN THE HOUSES - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Type 7, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Facility 136, oblique view of east side and north end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility 136, oblique view of east side and north end with entry door, electrical panel with soda bottles, view facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Latrines, Off Avenue C, at Repair Basins B13, B15-B18 & B20, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of (W) and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of (W) and (S) sides, view to northeast - Fort McKinley, South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, South side of Weymouth Way, approximately 100 feet west of East Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  10. South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of east side; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of east side; view northwest - Fort McKinley, South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, South side of Weymouth Way, approximately 100 feet west of East Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE SHOWING THE LEANTO SECTION. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE SHOWING THE LEAN-TO SECTION. NOTE THE FRAMEWORK WHICH SUPPORTS THE OVERHEAD GUIDE WAYS FOR THE SLIDING DOORS. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Hangar, Lexington Boulevard, south of Enterprise Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. 10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, BUILDING 8200 (OBSERVATION TOWER) AT LEFT, AND B-52 AIRCRAFT PARKED ALONG APRON IN BACKGROUND, DATED OCTOBER 1967, PHOTOGRAPH FROM BASE MASTER PLAN LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Arch Hangar, East of Arizona Road near southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  13. 10. COPY OF OBLIQUE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF FLIGHTLINE SHOWING BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. COPY OF OBLIQUE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF FLIGHTLINE SHOWING BUILDING 8280 (DOUBLE CANTILEVER HANGAR) AT LEFT DATED JANUARY 18, 1968. PHOTOGRAPH FROM LORING AIR FORCE BASE MASTER PLAN LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Airfield, Central portion of base, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  14. 9. COPY OF UNDATED OBLIQUE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH WEST SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. COPY OF UNDATED OBLIQUE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH WEST SIDE OF BASE, PROBABLY TAKEN IN THE 1960'S. PHOTOGRAPH LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MARINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Airfield, Central portion of base, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  15. Oblique view of rear, showing threestory northwest and southwest wings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of rear, showing three-story northwest and southwest wings with one-story kitchen wing at center - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Barracks & Mess Hall, Hornet Avenue between Liscome Bay & Enterprise Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely. Bridges crossing a body of water at an angle other than 90° with the axis of the channel shall be lighted...

  17. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely. Bridges crossing a body of water at an angle other than 90° with the axis of the channel shall be lighted...

  18. 14. LOW OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION, FROM OPPOSITE BANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. LOW OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION, FROM OPPOSITE BANK OF BUTTE CREEK Historic photograph no. 136, no date, held at Media Arts and Services Department, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., San Francisco, CA. - Centerville Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse, Butte Creek, Centerville, Butte County, CA

  19. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT B. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT B. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ON THE RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR SIDE WITH UNIT A IN FOREGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR SIDE WITH UNIT A IN FOREGROUND. NOTE THE FLOOR TO CEILING WINDOWS OF THE LIVING ROOM. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 3, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF UNIT B. NOTE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF UNIT B. NOTE THE TERRACING WHICH IS TYPICAL OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 3, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT A. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT A. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR SIDE WITH UNIT B ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR SIDE WITH UNIT B ON THE LEFT. NOTE THE TERRACING OF THE YARD WHICH IS TYPICAL OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 2, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF UNIT A. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF UNIT A. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE FRONT OF UNIT B. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE FRONT OF UNIT B. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 2, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR SIDE WITH UNIT A ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR SIDE WITH UNIT A ON THE RIGHT. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 2, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHWEST CORNER UNIT A. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHWEST CORNER UNIT A. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 2, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER UNIT A. NOTE THE ADDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER UNIT A. NOTE THE ADDED OPENING WITH AIR CONDITIONER. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT A NORTHEAST CORNER. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT A NORTHEAST CORNER. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 3, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF UNIT B. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF UNIT B. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 3, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF UNIT B. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF UNIT B. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. 10. Credit JTL: Oblique view, two panels of truss showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Credit JTL: Oblique view, two panels of truss showing wrought iron bottom chord, cast iron joint blocks, and cast iron diagonal members - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  13. North rear, oblique view to the southeast, showing the east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North rear, oblique view to the southeast, showing the east wing and rear wall construction. Note the outline of the former windows beneath the current small aluminum-frame windows - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Building No. 16 A-B (Duplex), 30652 & 30654 Wellton-Mohawk Drive, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  14. 2. Oblique view of west corner shows mainly NW side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of west corner shows mainly NW side of partially dismantled building. In 1994 circular braces still supported retorts in which wood was processed with creosote. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Engine Room Building, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  15. The aerodynamic design of the oblique flying wing supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervelden, Alexander J. M.; Kroo, Ilan

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a supersonic oblique flying wing is strongly influenced by the requirement that passengers must be accommodated inside the wing. It was revealed that thick oblique wings of very high sweep angle can be efficient at supersonic speeds when transonic normal Mach numbers are allowed on the upper surface of the wing. The goals were motivated by the ability to design a maximum thickness, minimum size oblique flying wing. A 2-D Navier-Stokes solver was used to design airfoils up to 16 percent thickness with specified lift, drag and pitching moment. A new method was developed to calculate the required pressure distribution on the wing based on the airfoil loading, normal Mach number distribution and theoretical knowledge of the minimum drag of oblique configurations at supersonic speeds. The wing mean surface for this pressure distribution was calculated using an inverse potential flow solver. The lift to drag ratio of this wing was significantly higher than that of a comparable delta wing for cruise speeds up to Mach 2.

  16. 8. LOW OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF TEST AREA 1115, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. LOW OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF TEST AREA 1-115, SHOWING TEST STANDS 1-5, 1-4, AND 1-3 (LEFT TO RIGHT). - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 2. AERIAL VIEW OF MINUTEMAN SILOS. Low oblique aerial view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW OF MINUTEMAN SILOS. Low oblique aerial view (original in color) of the two launch silos, covered. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Missile Silo Type, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 2. OVERALL OBLIQUE VIEW NORTHNORTHWEST FROM CORNER OF FIRST STREET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL OBLIQUE VIEW NORTH-NORTHWEST FROM CORNER OF FIRST STREET AND BEAVER AVENUE, SOUTH FACADES OF BUILDINGS, NO. 1 ON RIGHT WITH OFFSET GABLE, NO. 2 ON RIGHT WITH GABLE ROOF WITH SIGN AND SHED ROOF, WHITE OF NO. 3 BARELY VISIBLE AT LEFT. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  19. 6. Oblique view, south side and east end, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Oblique view, south side and east end, view to northwest. Note original bi-fold doors in left and right bays, replacement door in center bay. - Interurban Electric Railway Bridge Yard Shop, Interstate 80 at Alameda County Postmile 2.0, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. OBLIQUE VIEW OF POWERHOUSE OFFICE AND CORRUGATED METALCLAD VEHICLE GARAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF POWERHOUSE OFFICE AND CORRUGATED METAL-CLAD VEHICLE GARAGE AND FUEL PUMP. MAINTENANCE BUILDING IS AT RIGHT CENTER. 90mm lens - Tule River Hydroelectric Complex, CA Highway 190 at North Fork of Middle Fork of Tule River, Springville, Tulare County, CA

  1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR (NORTH) AND EAST SIDES OF GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR (NORTH) AND EAST SIDES OF GENERATOR HOUSE, DIESEL TANK IN FOREGROUND, LOCKTENDER'S HOUSE AND LEVEE ON RIGHT, FIRE PUMP HOUSE AND MAINTENANCE DEPOT SLIP ON LEFT - Moore Haven Lock, Generator House, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Moore Haven, Glades County, FL

  2. 4. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 (with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 (with sliding door open to milking area), Sioux silo and slaughter addition, facing northeast - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  3. 2. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 (with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 (with slaughter addition at far left), facing southwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. Detail, oblique view to northeast atop building 935 showing exposed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, oblique view to northeast atop building 935 showing exposed roof sections of buildings 934 (center) and 933 (left), 90 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 3, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  5. Building 933935, oblique view to southwest showing, left to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 933-935, oblique view to southwest showing, left to right, rear doors to building 933, 934, 935, 90 mm lens. Building 934 in the center of complex. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 3, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  6. Building 933935, oblique view to southeast showing, left to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 933-935, oblique view to southeast showing, left to right, rear doors to building 933, 934, 935, 90 mm lens. Building 933 is in foreground. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 4, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  7. 67. COPY OF UNDATED OBLIQUE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING WEAPONS STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. COPY OF UNDATED OBLIQUE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING WEAPONS STORAGE AREA, FROM MASTER PLAN OF CARIBOU AFS. PHOTOGRAPH, PROBABLY TAKEN IN THE 1960'S LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  8. 16. OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF STAMP BATTERIES AND APRONS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF STAMP BATTERIES AND APRONS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. EACH BATTERY CONTAINS FIVE STAMPS. TWO OF THE THREE BATTERIES ARE SIDE BY SIDE IN FOREGROUND, WHILE THE THIRD BATTERY IS SEPARATE (LOWER RIGHT). STAIRWAY UP IS AT LEFT SIDE. SEE CA-290-43 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Junior Officers' Quarters Type, 9-10 Hale Alii Avenue, 1-2 Eighth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Oblique overview, looking eastsoutheast, of fish ladder construction activity after ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique overview, looking east-southeast, of fish ladder construction activity after dewatering of north side. The east abutment wall, concrete crest, and north side apron are exposed. Easternmost roller gate (raised position) and service bridge at upper right - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  11. 5. OBLIQUE VIEW WASTE CALCINING FACILITY, LOOKING AT SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OBLIQUE VIEW WASTE CALCINING FACILITY, LOOKING AT SOUTH END AND EAST SIDE OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. STACK IN UPPER LEFT OF VIEW IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH THE BUILDING. INEEL PROOF SHEET NOT NUMBERED. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Oblique view of southeast and northeast sides with covered walk ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast and northeast sides with covered walk to Facility 367, Facility 324 beyond, view facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Hospital, Animal House, Near intersection of Hospital Way & Third Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. 9. Oblique view to southsouthwest of upstream (east) side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Oblique view to south-southwest of upstream (east) side of bridge from near north abutment in Jacob Meyer Park. Note cutwaters on piers, distinctive appearance of boxed, repaired vertical compression members as compared to original, laced compression members. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  14. 8. View toward northeast, southwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View toward northeast, southwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar building showing accessway #101 leading into par power plant from service road B in foreground - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  15. 12. Distant view toward southwest, northeast oblique of perimeter acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Distant view toward southwest, northeast oblique of perimeter acquisition radar building, with view of site grounds - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  16. 10. View toward northwest, southwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View toward northwest, southwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar building, showing docking facility. Left of the knockout panel on lower right is emergency exit blast door #BD5/#127 - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  17. 7. Distant view toward southeast, northwest oblique of perimeter acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Distant view toward southeast, northwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar building. Cooling towers can be seen on the far right - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  18. 9. View toward northeast, southwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View toward northeast, southwest oblique of perimeter acquisition radar building showing, from left to right, fuel oil pump station, cooling towers, power plant, and diesel intake/exhaust - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  19. 6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING WOODEN BRAKE SHOES, REDUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING WOODEN BRAKE SHOES, REDUCTION GEARS AND BED FOR (MISSING) CLUTCH/DRIVE GEAR UNIT, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Buffalo Coal Mine, Vulcan Cable Hoist, Wishbone Hill, Southeast end, near Moose Creek, Sutton, Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK

  20. 5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING REDUCTION GEARS AND BED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF HOIST, SHOWING REDUCTION GEARS AND BED FOR (MISSING) CLUTCH/DRIVE GEAR UNIT, LOOKING EAST (McNALLY DRYER AND COVER SHOWN IN EXTREME UPPER RIGHT BACKGROUND) - Buffalo Coal Mine, Vulcan Cable Hoist, Wishbone Hill, Southeast end, near Moose Creek, Sutton, Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK

  1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE WEST FACADE OF THE AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE WEST FACADE OF THE AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURING AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING ROOF MONITORS, NORTH RAIL, DOCK AND BOILER HOUSE. - Offutt Air Force Base, Glenn L. Martin-Nebraska Bomber Plant, Building D, Peacekeeper Drive, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  2. Rotational Uniqueness Conditions under Oblique Factor Correlation Metric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Carel F. W.

    2012-01-01

    In an addendum to his seminal 1969 article Joreskog stated two sets of conditions for rotational identification of the oblique factor solution under utilization of fixed zero elements in the factor loadings matrix (Joreskog in "Advances in factor analysis and structural equation models," pp. 40-43, 1979). These condition sets, formulated under…

  3. Origins of oblique-slip faulting during caldera subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holohan, Eoghan P.; Walter, Thomas R.; SchöPfer, Martin P. J.; Walsh, John J.; Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Troll, Valentin R.

    2013-04-01

    Although conventionally described as purely dip-slip, faults at caldera volcanoes may have a strike-slip displacement component. Examples occur in the calderas of Olympus Mons (Mars), Miyakejima (Japan), and Dolomieu (La Reunion). To investigate this phenomenon, we use numerical and analog simulations of caldera subsidence caused by magma reservoir deflation. The numerical models constrain mechanical causes of oblique-slip faulting from the three-dimensional stress field in the initial elastic phase of subsidence. The analog experiments directly characterize the development of oblique-slip faulting, especially in the later, non-elastic phases of subsidence. The combined results of both approaches can account for the orientation, mode, and location of oblique-slip faulting at natural calderas. Kinematically, oblique-slip faulting originates to resolve the following: (1) horizontal components of displacement that are directed radially toward the caldera center and (2) horizontal translation arising from off-centered or "asymmetric" subsidence. We informally call these two origins the "camera iris" and "sliding trapdoor" effects, respectively. Our findings emphasize the fundamentally three-dimensional nature of deformation during caldera subsidence. They hence provide an improved basis for analyzing structural, geodetic, and geophysical data from calderas, as well as analogous systems, such as mines and producing hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  4. 5. General oblique view of Shell Interlocking Tower to southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. General oblique view of Shell Interlocking Tower to southwest, showing east and north facades. Relay station is on far left. - New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Shell Interlocking Tower, New Haven Milepost 16, approximately 100 feel east of New Rochelle Junction, New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY

  5. Exterior oblique closeup view of typical bathroom hopper window at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior oblique close-up view of typical bathroom hopper window at west side of Building 10, from walkway, looking east-northwest - North Beach Place, 501 Bay Street, 600 Francisco Street, 501 Bay Street, 600 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 3. Oblique view shows east corner. Pipe loops in roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view shows east corner. Pipe loops in roof are part of a condenser apparatus for the retorts. Ruin in foreground was concrete foundation for a water cooling tank. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Engine Room Building, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDING SHOWING NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDING SHOWING NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDING SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDING SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDING SHOWING NORTHEAST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDING SHOWING NORTHEAST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CRANE FROM ROOF OF BUILDING SHOWING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF CRANE FROM ROOF OF BUILDING SHOWING NORTHEAST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF UNIT A. NOTE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF UNIT A. NOTE THE GABLE ON HIP ROOF. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 4, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, Cedar Drive and Elm Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Exterior oblique view of the north and west sides, Facility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior oblique view of the north and west sides, Facility No. 7 is on the right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Paint & Oil Storage, Near intersection of Avenue E & Seventh Street, adjacent to Facility Nos. 3A & 56, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Exterior oblique view of the east and south sides, taken ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior oblique view of the east and south sides, taken from the roadway on the east side, Facility No. 3A is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Paint & Oil Storage, Near intersection of Avenue E & Seventh Street, adjacent to Facility Nos. 3A & 56, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. NOTE THE THREE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. NOTE THE THREE LEVEL EQUIPMENT AREA WITH VENTILATION LOUVERS ON THE NORTHWEST SIDE AND COVERED PROMENADE ON THE NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Theater, Hornet Avenue between Enterprise & Pokomoke Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Oblique view of the northeast side, note the lava rock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the northeast side, note the lava rock stem wall below the windows of the shed-roof addition, view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 6. East portal of Tunnel 17, oblique view to westsouthwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. East portal of Tunnel 17, oblique view to west-southwest, 90mm lens. This view shows to advantage the stepped concrete wingwalls and fitted stone masonry coping protection flanking the portal, features typical of the Southern Pacific Common Standard tunnels of this period. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 17, Milepost 408, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  19. 6. East portal of Tunnel 18, oblique view to northwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. East portal of Tunnel 18, oblique view to northwest, 135mm lens. This view shows to advantage the stepped ashlar granite wingwalls and fitted rubble slab slope protection flanking the portal, features typical of the Southern Pacific Common Standard tunnels. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 18, Milepost 120.5, Newcastle, Placer County, CA

  20. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES OF UPPER GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES OF UPPER GATE MACHINERY HOUSE, NORTH OF LOCK, WITH HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER HOUSE AND DAM IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARD NORTH NORTHWEST - St. Lucie Canal, Lock No. 1, Machinery Houses, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL