Science.gov

Sample records for including subcritical cases

  1. Iterative optimal subcritical aerodynamic design code including profile drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A subcritical aerodynamic design computer code has been developed, which uses linearized aerodynamics along with sweep theory and airfoil data to obtain minimum total drag preliminary designs for multiple planform configurations. These optimum designs consist of incidence distributions yielding minimum total drag at design values of Mach number and lift and pitching moment coefficients. Linear lofting is used between airfoil stations. Solutions for isolated transport wings have shown that the solution is unique, and that including profile drag effects decreases tip loading and incidence relative to values obtained for minimum induced drag solutions. Further, including effects of variation of profile drag with Reynolds number can cause appreciable changes in the optimal design for tapered wings. Example solutions are also discussed for multiple planform configurations.

  2. Benchmarking criticality safety calculations with subcritical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    Calculation of the neutron multiplication factor at delayed criticality may be necessary for benchmarking calculations but it may not be sufficient. The use of subcritical experiments to benchmark criticality safety calculations could result in substantial savings in fuel material costs for experiments. In some cases subcritical configurations could be used to benchmark calculations where sufficient fuel to achieve delayed criticality is not available. By performing a variety of measurements with subcritical configurations, much detailed information can be obtained which can be compared directly with calculations. This paper discusses several measurements that can be performed with subcritical assemblies and presents examples that include comparisons between calculation and experiment where possible. Where not, examples from critical experiments have been used but the measurement methods could also be used for subcritical experiments.

  3. Numerical simulation of CO2 leakage from a geologic disposal reservoir including transitions from super- to sub-critical conditions, and boiling of liquid of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-31

    The critical point of CO{sub 2} is at temperature and pressure conditions of T{sub crit} = 31.04 C, P{sub crit} = 73.82 bar. At lower (subcritical) temperatures and/or pressures, CO{sub 2} can exist in two different phase states, a liquid and a gaseous state, as well as in two-phase mixtures of these states. Disposal of CO{sub 2} into brine formations would be made at supercritical pressures. However, CO{sub 2} escaping from the storage reservoir may migrate upwards towards regions with lower temperatures and pressures, where CO{sub 2} would be in subcritical conditions. An assessment of the fate of leaking CO{sub 2} requires a capability to model not only supercritical but also subcritical CO{sub 2}, as well as phase changes between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2} in sub-critical conditions. We have developed a methodology for numerically simulating the behavior of water-CO{sub 2} mixtures in permeable media under conditions that may include liquid, gaseous, and supercritical CO{sub 2}. This has been applied to simulations of leakage from a deep storage reservoir in which a rising CO{sub 2} plume undergoes transitions from supercritical to subcritical conditions. We find strong cooling effects when liquid CO{sub 2} rises to elevations where it begins to boil and evolve a gaseous CO{sub 2} phase. A three-phase zone forms (aqueous - liquid - gas), which over time becomes several hundred meters thick as decreasing temperatures permit liquid CO{sub 2} to advance to shallower elevations. Fluid mobilities are reduced in the three-phase region from phase interference effects. This impedes CO{sub 2} upflow, causes the plume to spread out laterally, and gives rise to dispersed CO{sub 2} discharge at the land surface. Our simulation suggests that temperatures along a CO{sub 2} leakage path may decline to levels low enough so that solid water ice and CO{sub 2} hydrate phases may be formed.

  4. Non-normal and stochastic amplification of magnetic energy in the turbulent dynamo: subcritical case.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Sergei

    2003-12-01

    Our attention focuses on the stochastic dynamo equation with non-normal operator that gives an insight into the role of stochastics and non-normality in magnetic field generation. The main point of this Brief Report is a discussion of the generation of a large-scale magnetic field that cannot be explained by traditional linear eigenvalue analysis. The main result is a discovery of nonlinear deterministic instability and growth of finite magnetic field fluctuations in alpha beta dynamo theory. We present a simple stochastic model for the thin-disk axisymmetric alpha Omega dynamo involving three factors: (a) non-normality generated by differential rotation, (b) nonlinearity reflecting how the magnetic field affects the turbulent dynamo coefficients, and (c) stochastic perturbations. We show that even for the subcritical case (all eigenvalues are negative), there are three possible mechanisms for the generation of magnetic field. The first mechanism is a deterministic one that describes an interplay between transient growth and nonlinear saturation of the turbulent alpha effect and diffusivity. It turns out that the trivial state is nonlinearly unstable to small but finite initial perturbations. The second and third are stochastic mechanisms that account for the interaction of non-normal effect generated by differential rotation with random additive and multiplicative fluctuations.

  5. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  6. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative

  7. ECO2M: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2, Including Super- and Sub-Critical Conditions, and Phase Change Between Liquid and Gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    2011-04-01

    ECO2M is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O - NaCl - CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for temperature, pressure and salinity conditions in the range of 10 C {le} T {le} 110 C, P {le} 600 bar, and salinity from zero up to full halite saturation. The fluid property correlations used in ECO2M are identical to the earlier ECO2N fluid property package, but whereas ECO2N could represent only a single CO{sub 2}-rich phase, ECO2M can describe all possible phase conditions for brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This allows for seamless modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-and three-phase mixtures of aqueous, liquid CO{sub 2} and gaseous CO{sub 2} phases. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. TOUGH2/ECO2M is upwardly compatible with ECO2N and accepts ECO2N-style inputs. This report gives technical specifications of ECO2M and includes instructions for preparing input data. Code applications are illustrated by means of several sample problems, including problems that had been previously solved with TOUGH2/ECO2N.

  8. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  9. A Proposal for a Subcritical Reactivity Meter based on Gandini and Salvatores' point kinetics equations for Multiplying Subcritical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Leticia N.; Dos Santos, Adimir

    2015-07-01

    Multiplying Subcritical Systems were for a long time poorly studied and its theoretical description remains with plenty open questions. Great interest on such systems arose partly due to the improvement of hybrid concepts, such as the Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS). Along with the need for new technologies to be developed, further study and understanding of subcritical systems are essential also in more practical situations, such as in the case of a PWR criticalization in their physical startup tests. Point kinetics equations are fundamental to continuously monitor the reactivity behavior to a possible variation of external sources intensity. In this case, quickly and accurately predicting power transients and reactivity becomes crucial. It is known that conventional Reactivity Meters cannot operate in subcritical levels nor describe the dynamics of multiplying systems in these conditions, by the very structure of the classical kinetic equations. Several theoretical models have been proposed to characterize the kinetics of such systems with special regard to the reactivity, as the one developed by Gandini and Salvatores among others. This work presents a discussion about the derivation of point kinetics equations for subcritical systems and the importance of considering the external source. From the point of view of the Gandini and Salvatores' point kinetics model and based on the experimental results provided by Lee and dos Santos, it was possible to develop an innovative approach. This article proposes an algorithm that describes the subcritical reactivity with external source, contributing to the advancement of studies in the field. (authors)

  10. Subcritical water as reaction environment: fundamentals of hydrothermal biomass transformation.

    PubMed

    Möller, Maria; Nilges, Peter; Harnisch, Falk; Schröder, Uwe

    2011-05-23

    Subcritical water, that is, water above the boiling and below critical point, is a unique and sustainable reaction medium. Based on its solvent properties, in combination with the often considerable intrinsic water content of natural biomass, it is often considered as a potential solvent for biomass processing. Current knowledge on biomass transformation in subcritical water is, however, still rather scattered without providing a consistent picture. Concentrating on fundamental physical and chemical aspects, this review summarizes the current state of knowledge of hydrothermal biomass conversion in subcritical water. After briefly introducing subcritical water as a reaction medium, its advantages for biomass processing compared to other thermal processes are highlighted. Subsequently, the physical-chemical properties of subcritical water are discussed in the light of their impact on the occurring chemical reactions. The influence of major operational parameters, including temperature, pressure, and reactant concentration on hydrothermal biomass transformation processes are illustrated for selected carbohydrates. Major emphasis is put on the nature of the carbohydrate monomers, since the conversion of the respective polymers is analogous with the additional prior step of hydrolytic depolymerization.

  11. A Case for Including Transactions in OpenMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M; Bihari, B L; de Supinski, B R; Wu, P; Michael, M; Liu, Y; Chen, W

    2010-01-25

    Transactional Memory (TM) has received significant attention recently as a mechanism to reduce the complexity of shared memory programming. We explore the potential of TM to improve OpenMP applications. We combine a software TM (STM) system to support transactions with an OpenMP implementation to start thread teams and provide task and loop-level parallelization. We apply this system to two application scenarios that reflect realistic TM use cases. Our results with this system demonstrate that even with the relatively high overheads of STM, transactions can outperform OpenMP critical sections by 10%. Overall, our study demonstrates that extending OpenMP to include transactions would ease programming effort while allowing improved performance.

  12. Modeling new coal projects: supercritical or subcritical?

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino, A.J.; Jones, R.B.

    2006-11-15

    Decisions made on new build coal-fired plants are driven by several factors - emissions, fuel logistics and electric transmission access all provide constraints. The crucial economic decision whether to build supercritical or subcritical units often depends on assumptions concerning the reliability/availability of each technology, the cost of on-fuel operations including maintenance, the generation efficiencies and the potential for emissions credits at some future value. Modeling the influence of these key factors requires analysis and documentation to assure the assets actually meet the projected financial performance. This article addresses some of the issue related to the trade-offs that have the potential to be driven by the supercritical/subcritical decision. Solomon Associates has been collecting cost, generation and reliability data on coal-fired power generation assets for approximately 10 years using a strict methodology and taxonomy to categorize and compare actual plant operations data. This database provides validated information not only on performance, but also on alternative performance scenarios, which can provide useful insights in the pro forma financial analysis and models of new plants. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use.

  14. A thermodynamic analysis of propagating subcritical cracks with cohesive zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the so-called energetic approach to fracture with particular attention to the issue of energy dissipation due to crack propagation are applied to the case of a crack with cohesive zone. The thermodynamic admissibility of subcritical crack growth (SCG) is discussed together with some hypotheses that lead to the derivation of SCG laws. A two-phase cohesive zone model for discontinuous crack growth is presented and its thermodynamics analyzed, followed by an example of its possible application.

  15. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    of 34 to 38 and the parameter A has the range of 1.02x10-2 to 6.52x10-2 m/s. The effect of confining stress, specimen size, and water saturation on subcritical crack growth under mode II loading has also been investigated. Finally strength parameters for Coconino sandstone were determined experimentally, including tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, in-plane/our-of-plane shear strength and the fracture toughness under mode I, II, and III loading.

  16. ENHANCED ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN SUBCRITICAL WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2000-07-01

    This project involved designing and performing preliminary electrochemical experiments in subcritical water. An electrochemical cell with substantially better performance characteristics than presently available was designed, built, and tested successfully. The electrochemical conductivity of subcritical water increased substantially with temperature, e.g., conductivities increased by a factor of 120 when the temperature was increased from 25 to 250 C. Cyclic voltammograms obtained with platinum and nickel demonstrated that the voltage required to produce hydrogen and oxygen from water can be dropped by a factor of three in subcritical water compared to the voltages required at ambient temperatures. However, no enhancement in the degradation of 1,2-dichlorobenzene and the polychlorinated biphenyl 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl was observed with applied potential in subcritical water.

  17. Feedback control of subcritical oscillatory instabilities.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2006-04-01

    Feedback control of a subcritical oscillatory instability is investigated in the framework of a globally-controlled complex Ginzburg-Landau equation that describes the nonlinear dynamics near the instability threshold. The control is based on a feedback loop between the system linear growth rate and the maximum of the amplitude of the emerging pattern. It is shown that such control can suppress the blow up and result in the formation of spatially localized pulses similar to oscillons. In the one-dimensional case, depending on the values of the linear and nonlinear dispersion coefficients, several types of the pulse dynamics are possible in which the computational domain contains: (i) a single stationary pulse; (ii) several coexisting stationary pulses; (iii) competing pulses that appear one after another at random locations so that at each moment of time there is only one pulse in the domain; (iv) spatiotemporally chaotic system of short pulses; (v) spatially-synchronized pulses. Similar dynamic behavior is found also in the two-dimensional case. The effect of the feedback delay is also studied. It is shown that the increase of the delay leads to an oscillatory instability of the pulses and the formation of pulses with oscillating amplitude.

  18. Accelerator-driven subcritical facility:Conceptual design development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry; Bolshinsky, Igor; Naberezhnev, Dmitry; Duo, Jose; Belch, Henry; Bailey, James

    2006-06-01

    A conceptual design development of an accelerator-driven subcritical facility has been carried out in the preparation of a joint activity with Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine. The main functions of the facility are the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. An electron accelerator is considered to drive the subcritical assembly. The neutron source intensity and spectrum have been studied. The energy deposition, spatial neutron generation, neutron utilization fraction, and target dimensions have been quantified to define the main target performance parameters, and to select the target material and beam parameters. Different target conceptual designs have been developed based the engineering requirements including heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux level with a Keff of 0.98. Different fuel materials, uranium enrichments, and reflector materials are considered in the design process. The possibility of using low enrichment uranium without penalizing the facility performance is carefully evaluated. The mechanical design of the facility has been developed to maximize its utility and minimize the time for replacing the target and the fuel assemblies. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements, upgrades, and new missions. In addition, it has large design margins to accommodate different operating conditions and parameters. In this paper, the conceptual design and the design analyses of the facility will be presented.

  19. High-value use of weapons-plutonium by burning in molten salt accelerator-driven subcritical systems or reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.; Venneri, F.

    1993-11-01

    The application of thermal-spectrum molten-salt reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems to the destruction of weapons-return plutonium is considered from the perspective of deriving the maximum societal benefit. The enhancement of electric power production from burning the fertile fuel {sup 232}Th with the plutonium is evaluated. Also the enhancement of destruction of the accumulated waste from commercial nuclear reactors is considered using the neutron-rich weapons plutonium. Most cases examined include the concurrent transmutation of the long-lived actinide and fission product waste ({sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se).

  20. Cygnus Performance in Subcritical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, S. Lutz, C. Mitton, et al.

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources with the following specifications: 4-rad dose at 1 m, 1-mm spot size, 50-ns pulse length, 2.25-MeV endpoint energy. The facility is located in an underground tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site. Here SubCritical Experiments (SCEs) are performed to study the dynamic properties of plutonium. The Cygnus sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for these tests. Since SCEs are single-shot, high-value events - reliability and reproducibility are key issues. Enhanced reliability involves minimization of failure modes through design, inspection, and testing. Many unique hardware and operational features were incorporated into Cygnus to insure reliability. Enhanced reproducibility involves normalization of shot-to-shot output also through design, inspection, and testing. The first SCE to utilize Cygnus, Armando, was executed on May 25, 2004. A year later, April - May 2005, calibrations using a plutonium step wedge were performed. The results from this series were used for more precise interpretation of the Armando data. In the period February - May 2007 Cygnus was fielded on Thermos, which is a series of small-sample plutonium shots using a one-dimensional geometry. Pulsed power research generally dictates frequent change in hardware configuration. Conversely, SCE applications have typically required constant machine settings. Therefore, while operating during the past four years we have accumulated a large database for evaluation of machine performance under highly consistent operating conditions. Through analysis of this database Cygnus reliability and reproducibility on Armando, Step Wedge, and Thermos is presented.

  1. An experimental investigation of the subcritical and supercritical flow about a swept semispan wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, W. K.; Seegmiller, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the turbulent, subcritical and supercritical flow over a swept, semispan wing in a solid wall wind tunnel is described. The program was conducted over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack to provide a variety of test cases for assessment of wing computer codes and tunnel wall interference effects. Wing flows both without and with three dimensional flow separation are included. Data include mean surface pressures for both the wing and tunnel walls; surface oil flow patterns on the wing; and mean velocity, flow field surveys. The results are given in tabular form and presented graphically to illustrate some of the effects of the test parameters. Comparisons of the wing pressure data with the results from two inviscid wing codes are also shown to assess the importance of viscous flow and tunnel wall effects.

  2. Dynamics of parabolic problems with memory. Subcritical and critical nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the long-time behavior of the solutions of non-autonomous parabolic equations with memory in cases when the nonlinear term satisfies subcritical and critical growth conditions. In order to do this, we show that the family of processes associated to original systems with heat source f(x, t) being translation bounded in Lloc 2 ( R ; L 2 ( Ω ) ) is dissipative in higher energy space M α , 0 < α ≤ 1, and possesses a compact uniform attractor in M 0 .

  3. Preliminary design concept of a subcritical reactor using available resources

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, E.L.; Hoyny, V.; Chaudhuri, B.R.; Taprantzis, A.; Yavas, A.

    1993-12-31

    During the Fall 1993 semester, a project was initiated within the Nuclear Engineering Department of the University of Tennessee with the objective of developing a design for a subcritical reactor with maximized multiplication factor using materials currently available. Such a device, if constructed, would serve as a teaching tool for the Department of Nuclear Engineering. Design work was conducted as a large number of computer calculations, with trial pile configurations based on fundamental nuclear engineering principles, in an effort to maximize multiplication factor through fuel element geometry, moderator type, fissile/moderator ratio, and reflector character. The principal objective of the design group for the early phase of this project was to present several possible ``baseline`` reactor designs and identify directions for improvements. For the sake of calculational ease, the cores analyzes to date have been of nearly cubic shape. The SCALE CSAS25 software which runs KENO.Va, a Monte Carlo code, was used for all neutronics calculations. The baseline reactors resulting from work to date are cuboidal in shape and graphite reflected. Two types of fuel element geometries are proposed, a typical triangular pitch rod lattice and an arrangement of discrete fuel slugs placed in a lattice corresponding to body centered cubic packing. The latter arrangement provides slightly higher multiplication factors than the former. Calculations were performed for both graphite and heavy water moderation with heavy water moderation producing considerably higher multiplication factors, as expected. In general, the maximum k{sub eff} for the reactors are in the range of 0.5 to 0.9, well subcritical, except in the cases of the extreme possible values of fuel assay where critical configurations are possible. In these cases, designs with reduced fuel loading are recommended to assure a subcritical multiplication factor.

  4. Detector positioning for the initial subcriticality level determination in accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Van Den Eynde, G.; Baeten, P.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Van Der Hagen, T. J. H. H.; Wols, F.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Thybault, H. E.

    2012-07-01

    Within the GUINEVERE project (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol, the continuous deuteron accelerator GENEPI-3C was coupled to the VENUS-F fast simulated lead-cooled reactor. Today the FREYA project (Fast Reactor Experiments for hYbrid Applications) is ongoing to study the neutronic behavior of this Accelerator Driven System (ADS) during different phases of operation. In particular the set-up of a monitoring system for the subcriticality of an ADS is envisaged to guarantee safe operation of the installation. The methodology for subcriticality monitoring in ADS takes into account the determination of the initial subcriticality level, the monitoring of reactivity variations, and interim cross-checking. At start-up, the Pulsed Neutron Source (PNS) technique is envisaged to determine the initial subcriticality level. Thanks to its reference critical state, the PNS technique can be validated on the VENUS-F core. A detector positioning methodology for the PNS technique is set up in this paper for the subcritical VENUS-F core, based on the reduction of higher harmonics in a static evaluation of the Sjoestrand area method. A first case study is provided on the VENUS-F core. This method can be generalised in order to create general rules for detector positions and types for full-scale ADS. (authors)

  5. Subcritical crack growth and mechanical weathering: a new consideration of how moisture influences rock erosion rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell; Hancock, Gregory S.

    2016-04-01

    The contributions of moisture to the mechanical aspects of rock weathering and regolith production are poorly quantified. In particular, geomorphologists have largely overlooked the role of subcritical crack growth processes in physical weathering and the fact that moisture strongly influences the rates of those processes. This influence is irrespective of the function that moisture plays in stress loading mechanisms like freezing or hydration. Here we present a simple numerical model that explores the efficacy of subcritical crack growth in granite rock subaerially exposed under a range of moisture conditions. Because most weathering-related stress loading for rocks found at, or near, Earth's surface (hereafter surface rocks) is cyclic, we modeled crack growth using a novel combination of Paris' Law and Charles' Law. This combination allowed us to apply existing empirically-derived data for the stress corrosion index of Charles' Law to fatigue cracking. For stress, we focused on the relatively straightforward case of intergranular stresses that arise during solar-induced thermal cycling by conductive heat transfer, making the assumption that such stresses represent a universal minimum weathering stress experienced by all surface rocks. Because all other tensile weathering-related stresses would be additive in the context of crack growth, however, our model can be adapted to include other stress loading mechanisms. We validated our calculations using recently published thermal-stress-induced cracking rates. Our results demonstrate that 1) weathering-induced stresses as modeled herein, and as published by others, are sufficient to propagate fractures subcritically over long timescales with or without the presence of water 2) fracture propagation rates increase exponentially with respect to moisture, specifically relative humidity 3) fracture propagation rates driven by thermal cycling are strongly dependent on the magnitude of diurnal temperature ranges and the

  6. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

    1999-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C

  7. Subcritical string and large N QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Charles B.

    2008-10-15

    We pursue the possibility of using subcritical string theory in 4 spacetime dimensions to establish a string dual for large N QCD. In particular we study the even G-parity sector of the 4 dimensional Neveu-Schwarz dual resonance model as the natural candidate for this string theory. Our point of view is that the open string dynamics given by this model will determine the appropriate subcritical closed string theory, a tree level background of which should describe the sum of planar multiloop open string diagrams. We examine the one-loop open string diagram, which contains information about the closed string spectrum at weak coupling. Higher loop open string diagrams will be needed to determine closed string interactions. We also analyze the field theory limit of the one-loop open string diagram and recover the correct running coupling behavior of the limiting gauge theory.

  8. Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roland

    2011-08-03

    Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

  9. Critical and Subcritical 0-Power Experiment at Rensselaer (CaSPER)

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Jennifer Ann

    2016-05-09

    This report discusses the 0-power experiment at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (CaSPER). Keff simulation results, list-mode multiplication results, and related work are included. The aim of the work is subcritical measurements for code and nuclear data validation.

  10. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and {sup 252}Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-{alpha}), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-{alpha}) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the {alpha} value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the {sup 252}Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  11. Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1999-11-01

    Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossia and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossia measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor.

  12. 30 CFR 250.415 - What must my casing and cementing programs include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Applying for A Permit to Drill § 250.415 What must my casing and cementing programs include? Your casing... (incorporated by reference as specified in § 250.198), if you drill a well in water depths greater than 500...

  13. Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1999-11-24

    Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossi-{alpha} and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossi-{alpha} measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. More elaborate models can also be developed using a generalized stochastic model. These measurements can be simulated using Monte Carlo codes to determine the subcritical neutron multiplication factor or to determine the sensitivity of calculations to nuclear cross section data. The interpretation of the measurement using a Monte Carlo method is based on a perturbation model for the relationship between the spectral ratio and the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. The subcritical source-driven noise measurement has advantages over other subcritical measurement methods in that reference measurements at delayed critical are not required for interpreting the measurements. Therefore, benchmark or in-situ subcritical measurements can be performed outside a critical experiment facility. Furthermore, a certain ratio of frequency spectra has been shown to be independent of detection efficiency thereby making the measurement more robust and unaffected by drifts or changes in instrumentation during the measurement. Criteria have been defined for application of this measurement method for benchmarks and in-situ subcritical measurements. An extension of the source-driven subcritical noise measurement has also been discussed that eliminates the few technical challenges for in-situ applications.

  14. Upper Subcritical Calculations Based on Correlated Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Rearden, Bradley T; Mueller, Don; Marshall, William BJ J; Scaglione, John M; Dunn, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The American National Standards Institute and American Nuclear Society standard for Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations defines the upper subcritical limit (USL) as “a limit on the calculated k-effective value established to ensure that conditions calculated to be subcritical will actually be subcritical.” Often, USL calculations are based on statistical techniques that infer information about a nuclear system of interest from a set of known/well-characterized similar systems. The work in this paper is part of an active area of research to investigate the way traditional trending analysis is used in the nuclear industry, and in particular, the research is assessing the impact of the underlying assumption that the experimental data being analyzed for USL calculations are statistically independent. In contrast, the multiple experiments typically used for USL calculations can be correlated because they are often performed at the same facilities using the same materials and measurement techniques. This paper addresses this issue by providing a set of statistical inference methods to calculate the bias and bias uncertainty based on the underlying assumption that the experimental data are correlated. Methods to quantify these correlations are the subject of a companion paper and will not be discussed here. The newly proposed USL methodology is based on the assumption that the integral experiments selected for use in the establishment of the USL are sufficiently applicable and that experimental correlations are known. Under the assumption of uncorrelated data, the new methods collapse directly to familiar USL equations currently used. We will demonstrate our proposed methods on real data and compare them to calculations of currently used methods such as USLSTATS and NUREG/CR-6698. Lastly, we will also demonstrate the effect experiment correlations can have on USL calculations.

  15. Subcritical water extraction of lipids from wet algal biomass

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Shuguang; Reddy, Harvind K.; Schaub, Tanner; Holguin, Francisco Omar

    2016-05-03

    Methods of lipid extraction from biomass, in particular wet algae, through conventionally heated subcritical water, and microwave-assisted subcritical water. In one embodiment, fatty acid methyl esters from solids in a polar phase are further extracted to increase biofuel production.

  16. Subcritical water extraction of organic matter from sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Luong, Duy; Sephton, Mark A; Watson, Jonathan S

    2015-06-16

    Subcritical water extraction of organic matter containing sedimentary rocks at 300°C and 1500 psi produces extracts comparable to conventional solvent extraction. Subcritical water extraction of previously solvent extracted samples confirms that high molecular weight organic matter (kerogen) degradation is not occurring and that only low molecular weight organic matter (free compounds) are being accessed in analogy to solvent extraction procedures. The sedimentary rocks chosen for extraction span the classic geochemical organic matter types. A type I organic matter-containing sedimentary rock produces n-alkanes and isoprenoidal hydrocarbons at 300°C and 1500 psi that indicate an algal source for the organic matter. Extraction of a rock containing type II organic matter at the same temperature and pressure produces aliphatic hydrocarbons but also aromatic compounds reflecting the increased contributions from terrestrial organic matter in this sample. A type III organic matter-containing sample produces a range of non-polar and polar compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and oxygenated aromatic compounds at 300°C and 1500 psi reflecting a dominantly terrestrial origin for the organic materials. Although extraction at 300°C and 1500 psi produces extracts that are comparable to solvent extraction, lower temperature steps display differences related to organic solubility. The type I organic matter produces no products below 300°C and 1500 psi, reflecting its dominantly aliphatic character, while type II and type III organic matter contribute some polar components to the lower temperature steps, reflecting the chemical heterogeneity of their organic inventory. The separation of polar and non-polar organic compounds by using different temperatures provides the potential for selective extraction that may obviate the need for subsequent preparative chromatography steps. Our results indicate that subcritical water extraction can act as a suitable

  17. On a 1D nonlocal transport equation with nonlocal velocity and subcritical or supercritical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    We study a 1D transport equation with nonlocal velocity with subcritical or supercritical dissipation. For all data in the weighted Sobolev space Hk (wλ,κ) ∩L∞, where k = max ⁡ (0 , 3 / 2 - α) and wλ,κ is a given family of Muckenhoupt weights, we prove a global existence result in the subcritical case α ∈ (1 , 2). We also prove a local existence theorem for large data in H2 (wλ,κ) ∩L∞ in the supercritical case α ∈ (0 , 1). The proofs are based on the use of the weighted Littlewood-Paley theory, interpolation along with some new commutator estimates.

  18. 30 CFR 250.415 - What must my casing and cementing programs include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... include? 250.415 Section 250.415 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Applying for A Permit to Drill § 250.415 What must my casing...

  19. 30 CFR 250.527 - What must I include in my casing pressure request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations Casing Pressure Management § 250.527 What must I include in...: (a) API number; (b) Lease number; (c) Area name and OCS block number; (d) Well number; (e)...

  20. Microdeformation and subcritical cracking in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deformation processes in chalks, both in relation to changing pore fluids and stress conditions has been of great interest as chalk is an important reservoir rock for both hydrocarbons and ground water. Lately it has also gained interest as a potential reservoir rock for captured CO2. Chalks are composed of large amounts of biogenic calcite grains, the skeletal debris of marine microorganisms. Its deformation is highly time and stress dependent, and governed by a transition from distributed to localized deformation at the onset of yield, affected by mechanisms such as subcritical crack growth and pore collapse. We present a microdeformation rig which makes use of thermal expansion as a means of subjecting small samples to strictly controlled tensile stresses. High resolution imaging provides resolutions down to 0.5 micrometers, enabling study of pore scale processes during slow deformation. Examples of localized and distributed deformation are presented.

  1. How to include the variability of TMS responses in simulations: a speech mapping case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, N.; Lioumis, P.; Laakso, A.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2016-11-01

    When delivered over a specific cortical site, TMS can temporarily disrupt the ongoing process in that area. This allows mapping of speech-related areas for preoperative evaluation purposes. We numerically explore the observed variability of TMS responses during a speech mapping experiment performed with a neuronavigation system. We selected four cases with very small perturbations in coil position and orientation. In one case (E) a naming error occurred, while in the other cases (NEA, B, C) the subject appointed the images as smoothly as without TMS. A realistic anisotropic head model was constructed of the subject from T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI. The induced electric field distributions were computed, associated to the coil parameters retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Finally, the membrane potentials along relevant white matter fibre tracts, extracted from DTI-based tractography, were computed using a compartmental cable equation. While only minor differences could be noticed between the induced electric field distributions of the four cases, computing the corresponding membrane potentials revealed different subsets of tracts were activated. A single tract was activated for all coil positions. Another tract was only triggered for case E. NEA induced action potentials in 13 tracts, while NEB stimulated 11 tracts and NEC one. The calculated results are certainly sensitive to the coil specifications, demonstrating the observed variability in this study. However, even though a tract connecting Broca’s with Wernicke’s area is only triggered for the error case, further research is needed on other study cases and on refining the neural model with synapses and network connections. Case- and subject-specific modelling that includes both electromagnetic fields and neuronal activity enables demonstration of the variability in TMS experiments and can capture the interaction with complex neural networks.

  2. Carbon dioxide modified subcritical water chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fogwill, Michael O; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2008-07-18

    A novel method of increasing the elution strength in subcritical water chromatography (SWC) by adding CO2 to the water mobile phase is presented. Since the polarity of water reduces dramatically with increasing temperature, this property is used in SWC to create an isocratic mobile phase with tunable elutropic strength in reversed-phase separations. Unfortunately, thermal stability of the stationary phase dictates the upper temperature limit and therefore also the minimum available mobile phase polarity. As a result SWC is often not very effective at eluting non-polar analytes. However, when CO2 is blended into subcritical water, a considerable reduction in mobile phase polarity results and improves such separations. For example, in conventional SWC 1-octanol is not observed to elute from a PRP-1 column after several hours at the maximum column temperature of 200 degrees C. In contrast to this, when CO2 is present at 180atm (1atm=101325Pa) in the mobile phase, 1-octanol elutes with good peak shape in less than 4min at only 100 degrees C. The technique is applied to the separation of a variety of analytes which have previously been challenging or even not possible to analyze by conventional SWC. Further, the ability to use temperature and composition programming with the blended CO2/water mobile phase in SWC is also presented and discussed. Overall, the developed method considerably extends the range of non-polar analytes amenable to SWC analysis, while maintaining the beneficial conventional SWC features of flame ionization detection and environmental compatibility.

  3. Fibrous hamartoma of infancy: a clinicopathologic study of 145 cases, including 2 with sarcomatous features.

    PubMed

    Al-Ibraheemi, Alyaa; Martinez, Anthony; Weiss, Sharon W; Kozakewich, Harry P; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R; Tran, Henry; Parham, David M; Sukov, William R; Fritchie, Karen J; Folpe, Andrew L

    2017-04-01

    clinicopathologic features, including the triphasic morphologic appearance of most cases. In contrast to earlier studies, our series illustrates a broader histologic spectrum than previously appreciated, including its close resemblance to giant cell fibroblastoma in one quarter of cases and the rare presence of 'sarcomatous' areas, the latter providing evidence that these are complex neoplasms rather than hamartomas.

  4. Astrobionibbler: In Situ Microfluidic Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, A. C.; Fisher, A. M.; Takano, N.; Fors-Francis, K.; Sherrit, S.; Grunthaner, F.

    2016-10-01

    A fluidic-chip based instrument for subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of amino acids and other organics from powder samples has been developed. A variety of soil analog extractions have been performed to better understand SCWE capabilities.

  5. Structural changes in microcrystalline cellulose in subcritical water treatment.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Lasse K; Zuckerstätter, Gerhard; Penttilä, Paavo A; Milacher, Walter; Habicht, Wilhelm; Serimaa, Ritva; Kruse, Andrea; Sixta, Herbert

    2011-07-11

    Subcritical water is a high potential green chemical for the hydrolysis of cellulose. In this study microcrystalline cellulose was treated in subcritical water to study structural changes of the cellulose residues. The alterations in particle size and appearance were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and those in the degree of polymerization (DP) and molar mass distributions by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Further, changes in crystallinity and crystallite dimensions were quantified by wide-angle X-ray scattering and (13)C solid-state NMR. The results showed that the crystallinity remained practically unchanged throughout the treatment, whereas the size of the remaining cellulose crystallites increased. Microcrystalline cellulose underwent significant depolymerization in subcritical water. However, depolymerization leveled off at a relatively high degree of polymerization. The molar mass distributions of the residues showed a bimodal form. We infer that cellulose gets dissolved in subcritical water only after extensive depolymerization.

  6. Women convicted of a sexual offence, including child pornography production: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Prat, S; Bertsch, I; Chudzik, L; Réveillère, Ch

    2014-03-01

    All available studies addressing the clinical and legal aspects of child pornography have systematically concerned male abusers. The social lens through which women are viewed tends to play down their responsibility in the sexual abuse of children. Unlike men, women rarely abuse children outside the close or family circle. Furthermore, they have frequently been abused themselves in their childhood. To our knowledge, no cases of women charged with sex-related offences, including child pornography, have been described in the literature. The psychopathological characteristics of female sexual abusers and of the two women in our cases tend to suggest that the deliberate downloading of child pornography images by women is unusual, as their deviant behaviour is not related to paedophile sexual arousal It is hypothesized that the act enables women perpetrators to satisfy the sexual urges of their spouse. Sexual abuse by women exists, but the nature of the abuse appears to be specific to the gender of the perpetrator. We present two cases of women charged with sexual offences concerning minors, including the production of child pornography material.

  7. Determination of subcritical frequency and damping from B-1 flight flutter test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobbs, S. K.; Hodson, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    The application of the time-lag products correlation/frequency analysis procedure to determine subcritical frequency and damping from structural response measurements made during flight flutter test of the B-1 prototype airplane is described. The analysis procedure, the test airplane, and flight test procedures are discussed. Summary frequency and damping results are presented for six transonic flight conditions. Illustrative results obtained by applying various options and variations of the analysis method are included for one flight condition.

  8. Quadruple cancer including Bowen's disease after arsenic injections 40 years earlier: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Murata, K; Iwazawa, T; Takayama, T; Yamashita, K; Okagawa, K

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the successful treatment of quadruple cancer including Bowen's disease in a 71-year-old man who had been given injections of salvarsan, an arsenic compound, for syphilis more than 40 years earlier. Resection of a skin lesion on his chest subsequently confirmed a diagnosis of Bowen's disease, 3 years after which he was operated on for concurrent gastric cancer and sigmoid colon cancer. A fourth cancer was discovered on his left vocal cord 2 weeks after this operation; it was resected 2 years later. A discussion of multiple malignant neoplasms and the possible relationship between arsenic and cancer is presented following this case report.

  9. Subcritical growth of natural hydraulic fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D.

    2014-12-01

    Joints are the most common example of brittle tensile failure in the crust. Their genesis at depth is linked to the natural hydraulic fracturing, which requires pore fluid pressure in excess of the minimum in situ stress [Pollard and Aidyn, JSG1988]. Depending on the geological setting, high pore pressure can result form burial compaction of interbedded strata, diagenesis, or tectonics. Common to these loading scenarios is slow build-up of pore pressure over a geological timescale, until conditions for initiation of crack growth are met on favorably oriented/sized flaws. The flaws can vary in size from grain-size cracks in igneous rocks to a fossil-size flaws in clastic rock, and once activated, are inferred to propagate mostly subcritically [Segall JGR 1984; Olson JGR 1993]. Despite many observational studies of natural hydraulic fractures, the modeling attempts appear to be few [Renshaw and Harvey JGR 1994]. Here, we use boundary integral formulation for the pore fluid inflow from the permeable rock into a propagating joint [Berchenko et al. IJRMMS 1997] coupled with the criteria for subcritical propagation assisted by the environmental effects of pore fluid at the crack tip to solve for the evolution of a penny-shape joint, which, in interbedded rock, may eventually evolve to short-blade geometry (propagation confined to a bed). Initial growth is exceedingly slow, paced by the stress corrosion reaction kinetics at the crack tip. During this stage the crack is fully-drained (i.e. the fluid pressure in the crack is equilibrated with the ambient pore pressure). This "slow" stage is followed by a rapid acceleration, driven by the increase of the mechanical stress intensity factor with the crack length, towards the terminal joint velocity. We provide an analytical expression for the latter as a function of the rock diffusivity, net pressure loading at the initiation (or flaw lengthscale), and parameters describing resistance to fracture growth. Due to a much slower

  10. Neutron Detector Signal Processing to Calculate the Effective Neutron Multiplication Factor of Subcritical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-06-01

    This report describes different methodologies to calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor of subcritical assemblies by processing the neutron detector signals using MATLAB scripts. The subcritical assembly can be driven either by a spontaneous fission neutron source (e.g. californium) or by a neutron source generated from the interactions of accelerated particles with target materials. In the latter case, when the particle accelerator operates in a pulsed mode, the signals are typically stored into two files. One file contains the time when neutron reactions occur and the other contains the times when the neutron pulses start. In both files, the time is given by an integer representing the number of time bins since the start of the counting. These signal files are used to construct the neutron count distribution from a single neutron pulse. The built-in functions of MATLAB are used to calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor through the application of the prompt decay fitting or the area method to the neutron count distribution. If the subcritical assembly is driven by a spontaneous fission neutron source, then the effective multiplication factor can be evaluated either using the prompt neutron decay constant obtained from Rossi or Feynman distributions or the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method.

  11. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  12. Subcritical transmutation of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Christopher M.

    2011-07-01

    A series of fuel cycle simulations were performed using CEA's reactor physics code ERANOS 2.0 to analyze the transmutation performance of the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR). SABR is a fusion-fission hybrid reactor that combines the leading sodium cooled fast reactor technology with the leading tokamak plasma technology based on ITER physics. Two general fuel cycles were considered for the SABR system. The first fuel cycle is one in which all of the transuranics from light water reactors are burned in SABR. The second fuel cycle is a minor actinide burning fuel cycle in which all of the minor actinides and some of the plutonium produced in light water reactors are burned in SABR, with the excess plutonium being set aside for starting up fast reactors in the future. The minor actinide burning fuel cycle is being considered in European Scenario Studies. The fuel cycles were evaluated on the basis of TRU/MA transmutation rate, power profile, accumulated radiation damage, and decay heat to the repository. Each of the fuel cycles are compared against each other, and the minor actinide burning fuel cycles are compared against the EFIT transmutation system, and a low conversion ratio fast reactor.

  13. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate in sub-critical water in fused silica capillary reactor with in situ Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Z.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of using fused silica capillary reactor (FSCR) instead of conventional autoclave for studying chemical reactions at elevated pressure and temperature conditions were demonstrated in this study, including the allowance for visual observation under a microscope and in situ Raman spectroscopic characterization of polycarbonate and coexisting phases during hydrolysis in subcritical water. ?? 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Verrucous Oesophageal Carcinoma: Single Case Report and Case Series Including 15 Patients – Issues for Consideration of Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Angelika; Stolte, Manfred; Pech, Oliver; May, Andrea; Ell, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Verrucous carcinomas (VC) of the oesophagus are a rarity. Due to their histological resemblance to squamous cell carcinoma, the diagnostic and treatment standards applicable to the latter have so far also been applied to VC as a disease entity. Quite limited data are available including two case series of 5 or 11 patients. The present study reports on a single case treated by local endoscopic therapy and a series of 15 patients, 9 of whom received local endoscopic therapy. Methods The data for patients diagnosed with VC of the oesophagus who had been treated from January 1999 to May 2011 were analysed retrospectively. Results 15 patients with the diagnosis of oesophageal VC were included. The male-female ratio was 3:1. 9 of 11 pT1-VC patients presented with the cardinal symptom dysphagia or odynophagia. For the majority of the patients, the growth pattern is one of extensive superficial expansion showing a median length of 9 cm (range: 2-22 cm). Surprisingly, none of the VC patients showed lymph node or distant metastasis. 9 of 15 VC patients received local endoscopic therapy; 4 were treated with curative intent and 5 were treated palliatively. 3 patients underwent oesophageal resection, and definitive chemoradiotherapy was administered in a further 3 patients. One severe complication, consisting of a postoperative anastomotic insufficiency with a fatal outcome, occurred in this group of patients. Conclusion This is the largest published study describing patients diagnosed with VC of the oesophagus so far. The option of local endoscopic therapy and its results in 9 patients are reported for the first time. The superficial growth pattern of the tumour and the frequent absence of lymph node or distant metastasis suggest that endoscopic resection can be carried out as a diagnostic and/or therapeutic approach. Due to the rarity of this entity, the case numbers are unfortunately so limited that evidence-based recommendations are unlikely to become available

  15. MCNPX, MONK, and ERANOS analyses of the YALINA booster subcritical assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Aliberti, G.; Cao, Y.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I.

    2011-05-01

    This paper compares the numerical results obtained from various nuclear codes and nuclear data libraries with the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly (Minsk, Belarus) experimental results. This subcritical assembly was constructed to study the physics and the operation of accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) for transmuting the light water reactors (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. The YALINA Booster facility has been accurately modeled, with no material homogenization, by the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX (MCNP/MCB) and MONK. The MONK geometrical model matches that of MCNPX. The assembly has also been analyzed by the deterministic code ERANOS. In addition, the differences between the effective neutron multiplication factor and the source multiplication factors have been examined by alternative calculational methodologies. The analyses include the delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, generation time, neutron flux profiles, and spectra in various experimental channels. The accuracy of the numerical models has been enhanced by accounting for all material impurities and the actual density of the polyethylene material used in the assembly (the latter value was obtained by dividing the total weight of the polyethylene by its volume in the numerical model). There is good agreement between the results from MONK, MCNPX, and ERANOS. The ERANOS results show small differences relative to the other results because of material homogenization and the energy and angle discretizations.The MCNPX results match the experimental measurements of the {sup 3}He(n,p) reaction rates obtained with the californium neutron source.

  16. Subcritical and supercritical fuel injection and mixing in single and binary species systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arnab

    Subcritical and supercritical fluid injection using a single round injector into a quiescent atmosphere comprising single and binary species was investigated using optical diagnostics. Different disintegration and mixing modes are expected for the two cases. In the binary species case, the atmosphere comprised an inert gas of a different composition than that of the injected fluid. In single species case, the atmosphere consisted of the same species as that of the injected fluid. Density values were quantified and density gradient profiles were inferred from the experimental data. A novel method was applied for the detection of detailed structures throughout the entire jet center plane. Various combinations of injectant and chamber conditions were tested and a wide range of density ratios were covered. The subcritical cases demonstrated the importance of surface tension and inertial forces, while the supercritical cases showed no signs of surface tension and, in most situations, resembled the mixing characteristics of a gaseous jet injected into a gaseous environment. A comparison between the single and binary species systems has also been provided. A detailed laser calibration procedure was undertaken to account for the laser absorption through the gas and liquid phases and for fluorescence in the non-linear excitation regime for high laser pulse energy. Core lengths were measured for binary species cases and correlated with visualization results. An eigenvalue approach was taken to determine the location of maximum gradients for determining the core length. Jet divergence angles were also calculated and were found to increase with chamber-to-injectant density ratio for both systems. A model was proposed for the spreading angle dependence on density ratio for both single and binary species systems and was compared to existing theoretical studies and experimental work. Finally, a linear stability analysis was performed for the jet injected into both subcritical and

  17. Mesoscopic approach to subcritical fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Maycon S.; Vieira, André P.; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate a model for fatigue crack growth in which damage accumulation is assumed to follow a power law of the local stress amplitude, a form that can be generically justified on the grounds of the approximately self-similar aspect of microcrack distributions. Our aim is to determine the relation between model ingredients and the Paris exponent governing subcritical crack-growth dynamics at the macroscopic scale, starting from a single small notch propagating along a fixed line. By a series of analytical and numerical calculations, we show that, in the absence of disorder, there is a critical damage-accumulation exponent γ , namely γc=2 , separating two distinct regimes of behavior for the Paris exponent m . For γ >γc , the Paris exponent is shown to assume the value m =γ , a result that proves robust against the separate introduction of various modifying ingredients. Explicitly, we deal here with (i) the requirement of a minimum stress for damage to occur, (ii) the presence of disorder in local damage thresholds, and (iii) the possibility of crack healing. On the other hand, in the regime γ <γc , the Paris exponent is seen to be sensitive to the different ingredients added to the model, with rapid healing or a high minimum stress for damage leading to m =2 for all γ <γc , in contrast with the linear dependence m =6 -2 γ observed for very long characteristic healing times in the absence of a minimum stress for damage. Upon the introduction of disorder on the local fatigue thresholds, which leads to the possible appearance of multiple cracks along the propagation line, the Paris exponent tends to m ≈4 for γ ≲2 while retaining the behavior m =γ for γ ≳4 .

  18. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  19. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes FMRI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Zonana, J.; Gunter, K.; Peterson, K.L.; Magenis, R.E., Popovich, B.W.

    1995-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation and results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene. In the vast majority of cases, this is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. We describe here a phenotypically atypical case of fragile X syndrome, caused by a deletion that includes the entire FMR1 gene and {ge}9.0 Mb of flanking DNA. The proband, RK, was a 6-year-old mentally retarded male with obesity and anal atresia. A diagnosis of fragile X syndrome was established by the failure of RK`s DNA to hybridize to a 558-bp PstI-XhoI fragment (pfxa3) specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR1 gene. The analysis of flanking markers in the interval from Xq26.3-q28 indicated a deletion extending from between 160-500 kb distal and 9.0 Mb proximal to the FMR1 gene. High-resolution chromosome banding confirmed a deletion with breakpoints in Xq26.3 and Xq27.3. This deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X chromosome. The maternal transmission of the deletion was confirmed by FISH using a 34-kb cosmid (c31.4) containing most of the FMR1 gene. These results indicated that RK carried a deletion of the FMR1 region with the most proximal breakpoint described to date. This patient`s unusual clinical presentation may indicate the presence of genes located in the deleted interval proximal to the FMR1 locus that are able to modify the fragile X syndrome phenotype. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  20. A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Ågren, O.; Noack, K.

    2012-06-01

    Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and 238U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

  1. A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Agren, O.; Noack, K.

    2012-06-19

    Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and {sup 238}U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

  2. Enhanced Capabilities for Subcritical Experiments (ECSE) Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-05-02

    Risk is a factor, element, constraint, or course of action that introduces an uncertainty of outcome that could impact project objectives. Risk is an inherent part of all activities, whether the activity is simple and small, or large and complex. Risk management is a process that identifies, evaluates, handles, and monitors risks that have the potential to affect project success. The risk management process spans the entire project, from its initiation to its successful completion and closeout, including both technical and programmatic (non-technical) risks. This Risk Management Plan (RMP) defines the process to be used for identifying, evaluating, handling, and monitoring risks as part of the overall management of the Enhanced Capabilities for Subcritical Experiments (ECSE) ‘Project’. Given the changing nature of the project environment, risk management is essentially an ongoing and iterative process, which applies the best efforts of a knowledgeable project staff to a suite of focused and prioritized concerns. The risk management process itself must be continually applied throughout the project life cycle. This document was prepared in accordance with DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, its associated guide for risk management DOE G 413.3-7, Risk Management Guide, and LANL ADPM AP-350-204, Risk and Opportunity Management.

  3. Kinetic behavior of liquefaction of Japanese beech in subcritical phenol.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gaurav; Saka, Shiro

    2011-12-01

    Non-catalytic liquefaction of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) wood in subcritical phenol was investigated using a batch-type reaction vessel. After samples were treated at 160 °C/0.9 MPa-350 °C/4.2 MPa for 3-30 min, they were fractionated into a phenol-soluble portion and phenol-insoluble residues. These residues were then analyzed for their chemical composition. Based on the obtained data, the kinetics for liquefaction was modeled using first-order reaction rate law. Subsequently, the liquefaction rate constants of the major cell wall components including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin were determined. The different kinetic mechanisms were found to exist for lignin and cellulose at two different temperature ranges, lower 160-290 °C and higher 310-350 °C, whereas for hemicellulose, it was only liquefied in the lower temperature range. Thus, the liquefaction behaviors of these major cell wall components highlighted hemicellulose to be the most susceptible to liquefaction, followed by lignin and cellulose.

  4. 30 CFR 250.527 - What must I include in my casing pressure request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., riser, and tubing sizes, weights, grades, and MIYP; (g) All casing/riser calculated MAWOPs; (h) All casing/riser pre-bleed down pressures; (i) Shut-in tubing pressure; (j) Flowing tubing pressure; (k) Date...) Volumes and types of fluid bled from each casing or riser evaluated; (r) Type of diagnostic test...

  5. Reactor Dynamics Experiments with a Sub-Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Yang, Y.; Wu, L.; Momota, H.

    2004-10-06

    A resurgence in use of nuclear power is now underway worldwide. However due to the shutdown of many university research reactors , student laboratories must rely more heavily on use of sub-critical assemblies. Here a driven sub-critical is described that uses a cylindrical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device to provide a fusion neutron source. The small IEC neutron source would be inserted in a fuel element position, with its power input controlled externally at a control panel. This feature opens the way to use of the critical assembly for a number of transient experiments such as sub-critical pulsing and neutron wave propagation. That in turn adds important new insights and excitement for the student teaching laboratory.

  6. Subcritical-supercritical bifurcation crossover in directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Williams, L.; Cummins, H. )

    1994-12-01

    The Mullins-Sekerka planar-cellular instability in directional solidification should be subcritical when the partition coefficient [ital k][lt]0.45 and latent heat is ignored. However, Merchant and Davis [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 63], 573 (1989)] predicted that as the solute concentration is reduced, the increasingly important thermal diffusion field would lead to a crossover from a subcritical to a supercritical bifurcation. We have performed directional solidification experiments on a series of succinonitrile samples containing different concentrations of Coumarin 152, and have found preliminary evidence for the predicted crossover at a concentration [ital C][sub [ital t

  7. Subcritical crack-growth behavior in advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Ajay

    Advanced silicon nitride ceramics (Sisb3Nsb4) are leading candidates for structural components in gas turbine and reciprocating engines. However, widespread use of these materials has been deterred due to their low fracture toughness under tensile loads. In the last decade, novel processing techniques have allowed extrinsic toughening of this material through grain bridging processes. The extrinsic toughening mechanisms, however, are prone to subcritical crack-growth processes through environmental, mechanical and high temperature degradation mechanisms. Understanding these failure mechanisms is critical for long term reliability and design. In the first part of this study, fracture and environmentally-assisted subcritical crack-growth processes were examined in bulk Y-Si-Al-O-N oxynitride glasses with compositions typical of the grain boundary phase of silicon nitride ceramics. Both long crack as well as short crack behavior were investigated to establish a reliable fracture toughness value and to elucidate the anomalous densification behavior of the oxynitride glass under indentation loads. Environmentally assisted subcritical crack-growth processes were studied in inert, moist and wet environments under both cyclic and static loading conditions and compared to commercial soda lime and borosilicate glasses. The second part of this study involved the effect of loading, microstructure and temperature on subcritical crack-growth behavior in silicon nitride ceramics. Crack-growth rates under an alternating applied stress intensity were compared to those under static loads. The effect of microstructure on fatigue crack-growth rates was determined in silicon nitrides sintered using different processing techniques and with different grain sizes. Unique experimental techniques were used to determine subcritical crack-growth behavior from room temperature to elevated temperatures of 1250sp°C. Frictional wear models were used to explain the trends in experimental data at

  8. Pneumoconiosis in Makers of Artificial Grinding Wheels, Including a Case of Caplan's Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Posner, E.

    1960-01-01

    Mass miniature radiography surveys in a factory producing artificial grinding wheels detected cases of pneumoconiosis, mostly of the silicotic type. All cases were traced to the department where the so-called “bond” is prepared and mixed with the abrasive grains of carborundum and artificial corundum. This ceramic-vitrified bond, similar in composition to English general earthenware, contained until recently a significant proportion of free silica. The miniature film survey was followed up by an investigation on full-sized films, in which 92% of all workers in the bond department participated. The radiographs were subjected to dual independent viewing and it was found that 66% of the men who had worked in the bond department for more than 10 years showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis with a high proportion of progressive massive fibrosis (P.M.F.) Recently the amount of free silica in the ceramic bond has been reduced by the introduction of “frits” in place of powdered flint and part of the factory has been rebuilt and new methods of dust suppression and dust extraction have been introduced. One of the cases presented with the rheumatoid-pneumoconiotic syndrome, first described by Caplan. It is suggested that some of the cases of pneumoconiosis, attributed to carborundum, may be due to the binding materials of artificial grinding wheels. Images PMID:14434374

  9. 30 CFR 250.415 - What must my casing and cementing programs include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Applying for A Permit to Drill § 250.415 What must my casing and cementing... in Deep Water Wells (as incorporated by reference in § 250.198), if you drill a well in water...

  10. 30 CFR 250.415 - What must my casing and cementing programs include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Applying for A Permit to Drill § 250.415 What must my casing and cementing... in Deep Water Wells (as incorporated by reference in § 250.198), if you drill a well in water...

  11. 30 CFR 250.415 - What must my casing and cementing programs include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Applying for A Permit to Drill § 250.415 What must my casing and cementing... in Deep Water Wells (as incorporated by reference in § 250.198), if you drill a well in water...

  12. Multiple and various anaesthetics, ketamine included, in a young patient with familial dysautonomia, Case report.

    PubMed

    Dell'oste, C; Vincenti, E; Torre, G

    1996-03-01

    A case report is presented of a 16-year-old patient who had undergone 16 general anaesthetics by different anaesthesists and under various anaesthetic techniques for dental, endoscopic, orthopaedic and ophthalmic surgical procedures over a period of 14 years. Use of ketamine, especially in an ambulatory setting, was found more suitable in terms of cardiovascular stability, safety and patient preference.

  13. Subcritical transition scenarios via linear and nonlinear localized optimal perturbations in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farano, Mirko; Cherubini, Stefania; Robinet, Jean-Christophe; De Palma, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    Subcritical transition in plane Poiseuille flow is investigated by means of a Lagrange-multiplier direct-adjoint optimization procedure with the aim of finding localized three-dimensional perturbations optimally growing in a given time interval (target time). Space localization of these optimal perturbations (OPs) is achieved by choosing as objective function either a p-norm (with p\\gg 1) of the perturbation energy density in a linear framework; or the classical (1-norm) perturbation energy, including nonlinear effects. This work aims at analyzing the structure of linear and nonlinear localized OPs for Poiseuille flow, and comparing their transition thresholds and scenarios. The nonlinear optimization approach provides three types of solutions: a weakly nonlinear, a hairpin-like and a highly nonlinear optimal perturbation, depending on the value of the initial energy and the target time. The former shows localization only in the wall-normal direction, whereas the latter appears much more localized and breaks the spanwise symmetry found at lower target times. Both solutions show spanwise inclined vortices and large values of the streamwise component of velocity already at the initial time. On the other hand, p-norm optimal perturbations, although being strongly localized in space, keep a shape similar to linear 1-norm optimal perturbations, showing streamwise-aligned vortices characterized by low values of the streamwise velocity component. When used for initializing direct numerical simulations, in most of the cases nonlinear OPs provide the most efficient route to transition in terms of time to transition and initial energy, even when they are less localized in space than the p-norm OP. The p-norm OP follows a transition path similar to the oblique transition scenario, with slightly oscillating streaks which saturate and eventually experience secondary instability. On the other hand, the nonlinear OP rapidly forms large-amplitude bent streaks and skips the phases

  14. Implementing School Policies That Include Sexual Orientation: A Case Study in School and Community Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macgillivray, Ian K.

    This paper highlights factors that either facilitated or hampered the work of a local Safe Schools Coalition in a Rocky Mountain state in advocating adoption and implementation of their school district's policies that include sexual orientation. Non-discrimination policies that include sexual orientation and gender identity are needed to help stop…

  15. Conversion of Japanese red pine wood (Pinus densiflora) into valuable chemicals under subcritical water conditions.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Feridoun Salak; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-11

    A comparative study on the decomposition of Japanese red pine wood under subcritical water conditions in the presence and absence of phosphate buffer was investigated in a batch-type reaction vessel. Since cellulose makes up more than 40-45% of the components found in most wood species, a series of experiments were also carried out using pure cellulose as a model for woody biomass. Several parameters such as temperature and residence time, as well as pH effects, were investigated in detail. The best temperature for decomposition and hydrolysis of pure cellulose was found around 270 degrees C. The effects of the initial pH of the solution which ranged from 1.5 to 6.5 were studied. It was found that the pH has a considerable effect on the hydrolysis and decomposition of the cellulose. Several products in the aqueous phase were identified and quantified. The conditions obtained from the subcritical water treatment of pure cellulose were applied for the Japanese red pine wood chips. As a result, even in the absence of acid catalyst, a large amount of wood sample was hydrolyzed in water; however, by using phosphate buffer at pH 2, there was an increase in the hydrolysis and dissolution of the wood chips. In addition to the water-soluble phase, acetone-soluble and water-acetone-insoluble phases were also isolated after subcritical water treatment (which can be attributed mainly to the degraded lignin, tar, and unreacted wood chips, respectively). The initial wood:acid ratio in the case of reactions catalyzed by phosphate buffer was also investigated. The results showed that this weight ratio can be as high as 3:1 without changing the catalytic activity. The size of the wood chips as one of the most important experimental parameters was also investigated.

  16. Local heat transfer measurement with liquid crystals on rotating surfaces including non-axisymmetric cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, D. E.; Kim, Y. K.

    1993-01-01

    An overview and summary of test methods and results are given for the problem of measuring local heat transfer on rotating surfaces that model gas turbine engine disks. Disk cavity situations generically similar to those encountered in the high pressure stage disk cooling are considered, with cooling air supplied both at or near the wheel centerline as well as through single or multiple jets impinging outboard on the wheel near the blade attachment region. In some situations provision has been made for ingestion into the disk-cavity from the gas path region radially outboard of the disk. Local heat transfer rates in all cases are determined from the color display from a thin coating of encapsulated liquid crystals sprayed onto the disk, in conjunction with use of a video camera and computer vision system. For cases with axisymmetric disk surfaces, the coated surfaces are illuminated and viewed continuously, and detailed radial distributions of local Nusselt number are obtained. For non-axisymmetric disk surfaces, such as encountered in the vicinity of bolt heads, the disk is illuminated with stroboscopic light, and a method has been developed and used to synchronize the computer frame grabber with the illumination.

  17. Ready for School: The Case for Including Babies and Toddlers as We Expand Preschool Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilen, Julie Rubins

    While the notion of starting education early with children has gained momentum in the public's mind, our public policies and investments still do not reflect society's increasing knowledge of how the human brain grows and how very early experiences beginning at birth affect a child's future. Arguing that if policymakers fail to include the needs…

  18. Including an Autistic Middle School Child in General Physical Education: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kristen J.; Block, Martin E.

    2006-01-01

    Autism is a brain disorder that affects a person's social, communication, and behavioral skills. Social deficits are noted by the child's lack of interest or inability to interact with peers and family members. This article highlights some of the successful methods and techniques used to include an autistic middle school child in a general…

  19. Coma blisters after poisoning caused by central nervous system depressants: case report including histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Branco, Maira Migliari; Capitani, Eduardo Mello De; Cintra, Maria Letícia; Hyslop, Stephen; Carvalho, Adriana Camargo; Bucaretchi, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis is a cutaneous manifestation associated with states of impaired consciousness, most frequently reported after overdoses of central nervous system depressants, particularly phenobarbital. The case of a 45-year-old woman who developed "coma blisters" at six distinct anatomic sites after confirmed (laboratory) phenobarbital poisoning, associated with other central nervous system depressants (clonazepam, promethazine, oxcarbazepine and quetiapine), is presented. A biopsy from the left thumb blister taken on day 4 revealed focal necrosis of the epidermis and necrosis of sweat gland epithelial cells; direct immunofluorescence was strongly positive for IgG in superficial blood vessel walls but negative for IgM, IgA, C3 and C1q. The patient was discharged on day 21 with no sequelae.

  20. Including the introduction of exotic species in life cycle impact assessment: the case of inland shipping.

    PubMed

    Hanafiah, Marlia M; Leuven, Rob S E W; Sommerwerk, Nike; Tockner, Klement; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-12-17

    While the ecological impact of anthropogenically introduced exotic species is considered a major threat for biodiversity and ecosystems functioning, it is generally not accounted for in the environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) of products. In this article, we propose a framework that includes exotic species introduction in an LCA context. We derived characterization factors for exotic fish species introduction related to the transport of goods across the Rhine-Main-Danube canal. These characterization factors are expressed as the potentially disappeared fraction (PDF) of native freshwater fish species in the rivers Rhine and Danube integrated over space and time per amount of goods transported (PDF·m(3)·yr·kg(-1)). Furthermore, we quantified the relative importance of exotic fish species introduction compared to other anthropogenic stressors in the freshwater environment (i.e., eutrophication, ecotoxicity, greenhouse gases, and water consumption) for transport of goods through the Rhine-Main-Danube waterway. We found that the introduction of exotic fish species contributed to 70-85% of the total freshwater ecosystem impact, depending on the distance that goods were transported. Our analysis showed that it is relevant and feasible to include the introduction of exotic species in an LCA framework. The proposed framework can be further extended by including the impacts of other exotic species groups, types of water bodies and pathways for introduction.

  1. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma: the first submandibular case reported including findings on fine needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Lian, Derrick; Chau, Yuk Ping; Yan, Benedict

    2012-03-01

    We present the first case (male, 35 years old) of a mammary analogue secretory carcinoma occurring in a submandibular gland and document findings on fine needle aspiration cytology. On histology, the tumor displayed characteristic features: circumscribed nodules composed of bland, pink to light red neoplastic cells with low proliferative/mitotic activity arranged in tubular, vaguely cribriform, and microcystic structures containing Periodic acid Schiff-positive, diastase-resistant secretory material. Immunohistochemistry showed strong and diffuse positivity for cytokeratin 7, S100 protein, and vimentin, as well as moderate to strong immunoreactivity for c-kit in the majority of tumor cells. A rearrangement of the ETV6 gene on fluorescence in situ hybridization was documented. The patient underwent an ipsilateral selective (levels I-IV) neck dissection which showed metastasis in 3 out of 36 lymph nodes (levels 1-3). Adjuvant radiotherapy was administered. No local recurrence or metastatic disease has been detected during a follow up period of 28 months.

  2. Caudal regression: a review of seven cases, including the mermaid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guidera, K J; Raney, E; Ogden, J A; Highhouse, M; Habal, M

    1991-01-01

    Caudal regression consists of sacral agenesis combined with variable lower extremity deformities. The patients have contractures of the lower extremities, hip dislocations, neurologic impairment, and spine instability. Treatment consists of soft tissue releases, osteotomies, or orthotics. The goal of orthopaedic intervention is proper seating and standing, which may be achieved without amputation. In our patients, the lower extremity deformities were corrected surgically, but long-term function is unknown. We report the problems and treatment of seven patients with caudal regression syndrome, including the only known survivor with sirenomelia (mermaid syndrome), who underwent separation of the lower extremities.

  3. Fatigue of Self-Healing Nanofiber-based Composites: Static Test and Subcritical Crack Propagation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; Sett, Soumyadip; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2016-07-20

    Here, we studied the self-healing of composite materials filled with epoxy-containing nanofibers. An initial incision in the middle of a composite sample stretched in a static fatigue test can result in either crack propagation or healing. In this study, crack evolution was observed in real time. A binary epoxy, which acted as a self-healing agent, was encapsulated in two separate types of interwoven nano/microfibers formed by dual-solution blowing, with the core containing either epoxy or hardener and the shell being formed from poly(vinylidene fluoride)/ poly(ethylene oxide) mixture. The core-shell fibers were encased in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) matrix. When the fibers were damaged by a growing crack in this fiber-reinforced composite material because of static stretching in the fatigue test, they broke and released the healing agent into the crack area. The epoxy used in this study was cured and solidified for approximately an hour at room temperature, which then conglutinated and healed the damaged location. The observations were made for at least several hours and in some cases up to several days. It was revealed that the presence of the healing agent (the epoxy) in the fibers successfully prevented the propagation of cracks in stretched samples subjected to the fatigue test. A theoretical analysis of subcritical cracks was performed, and it revealed a jumplike growth of subcritical cracks, which was in qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Feedback control of transient energy growth in subcritical plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Fulvio; Quadrio, Maurizio; McKernan, John; Whidborne, James F.

    Subcritical flows may experience large transient perturbation energy amplifications, that could trigger nonlinear mechanisms and eventually lead to transition to turbulence. In plane Poiseuille flow, controlled via wall blowing/suction with zero net mass flux, optimal and robust control theory has been recently applied to a state-space representation of the Orr-Sommerfeld-Squire equations, leading to reduced transient growth as well as increased transition thresholds. However, to date no feedback control law has been found that is capable of ensuring the closed-loop Poiseuille flow to be monotonically stable. The present paper addresses first the possibility of complete feedback suppression of the transient growth mechanism in subcritical plane Poiseuille flow when wall actuation is available, and demonstrates that closed-loop monotonic stability cannot be achieved in such a case. Secondly, a Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) technique is employed to design controllers that directly target the energy growth mechanism. The performance of such control laws is quantified by using Direct Numerical Simulations of transitional plane Poiseuille flow, and the increase in transition thresholds due to the control action is assessed.

  5. A case for integrity: gains from including more than animal welfare in animal ethics committee deliberations.

    PubMed

    Röcklinsberg, H; Gamborg, C; Gjerris, M

    2014-01-01

    From January 2013, a new EU Directive 63/2010/EU requires that research using animals must undergo a harm-benefit analysis, which takes ethical considerations into account (Art. 38 (2) d) - a so-called 'project authorization' (Art. 36). A competent authority in each member state has to ensure that no project is carried out without such a project validation process, but often delegates the actual assessment to an animal ethics committee (AEC) or its equivalent. The core task of the AEC is to formulate a justifiable balance between the animals' suffering caused by research and the potential human benefit. AECs traditionally focus on animal welfare issues, but according to the new directive other public concerns must also be taken into account. Taking the new EU Directive as a point of departure, the central aim of this paper is to discuss the evaluation process in relation to animal welfare and animal ethics through the concept of animal integrity. A further aim is to elaborate on possible improvements to project evaluation by considering animal integrity. We argue that concepts like animal integrity are often left out of project authorization processes within AECs, because animal ethics is often interpreted narrowly to include only certain aspects of animal welfare. Firstly, we describe the task of an AEC and discuss what has typically been regarded as ethically relevant in the assessment process. Secondly, we categorize four notions of integrity found in the literature to show the complexity of the concept and furthermore to indicate its strengths. Thirdly, we discuss how certain interpretations of integrity can be included in AEC assessments to encapsulate wider ethical concerns and, perhaps even increase the democratic legitimacy of AECs.

  6. Sediment budget including the role of floodplains: the case of Lake Tana Basin (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemma, Hanibal; Admasu, Teshager; Dessie, Mekete; Fentie, Derbew; Poesen, Jean; Lanckriet, Sil; Adgo, Enyew; Nyssen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Based on the collection of a large new dataset, we quantify the sediment 1) mobilized on the hillslopes surrounding Lake Tana (Ethiopia), 2) stored on the floodplains, 3) transported into the lake, 4) deposited in the lake and 5) delivered out of the lake so as to establish a sediment budget. In 2012 and 2013, suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and discharge measurements were made at 13 monitoring stations, including two lake outlets. 4635 SSC samples were collected and sediment rating curves that account for land cover conditions and rainfall seasonality were established for the 11 river stations, and mean monthly SSC was calculated for the outlets. Effects of the floodplain on rivers' sediment yield (SY) were investigated using the measurements at the upper and lower stations of Gilgel Abay, Gumara, Megech and Rib Rivers. SY from ungauged rivers was assessed using a model that includes catchment area and rainfall, whereas bedload and direct sediment input from lake shores were estimated. As a result, the gross annual SY from both gauged and ungauged rivers, bedload and lake shores was ca. 3.14 million tons, dominantly from Gilgel Abay and Gumara Rivers. The 0.48 million tons sedimentation in floodplains indicate that the floodplains serve as sediment sink. Moreover, annually about 1.09 million tons of sediment leaves the lake through the two outlets. Annual deposition in Lake Tana was about 1.56 million tons with a trapping efficiency of 60%. Furthermore, SSC and SY are generally higher at the beginning of the rainy season because soil in cultivated fields is bare and loose due to frequent ploughing and seedbed preparation. Later on in the season, increased crop and vegetation cover lead to a decrease in sediment supplies. Based on the established sediment budget and its calculated components, one can conclude that the expected lifetime of Lake Tana (20,396 years) is longer than what was anticipated in earlier studies.

  7. Sequential extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Latawiec, Agnieszka E; Reid, Brian J

    2010-02-01

    A rapid sequential subcritical (superheated) water extraction method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and sediment is presented. Decreasing the polarity of water by successive increase of the extraction temperature from 50 degrees C to 200 degrees C at the moderate pressure (10.3MPa) enabled selective, non-exhaustive extractions to be performed. Concurrent with increasing temperatures to 150 degrees C there was an increase in PAH extraction efficiencies. For the majority of determinations no significant differences between extractions at 150 degrees C and 200 degrees C were observed. Varied extraction efficiencies of PAHs at the same extraction conditions reflected dissimilarities between environmental matrices investigated. Selective subcritical water extraction of PAHs was proportional to their octanol-water partition coefficients. This technique may be applicable in evaluation of risks associated with PAH contaminated sites and in assessments of their bioremediation potential.

  8. Droplet turbulence interactions under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, E. B.; Greenfield, S. C.; Ondas, M. S.; Song, Y.-H.; Spegar, T. D.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to experimentally characterize the behavior of droplets in vaporizing liquid sprays under conditions typical of those encountered in high pressure combustion systems such as liquid fueled rocket engines. Of particular interest are measurements of droplet drag, droplet heating, droplet vaporization, droplet distortion, and secondary droplet breakup, under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The paper presents a brief description of the specific accomplishments which have been made over the past year.

  9. Subcritical patterns and dissipative solitons due to intracavity photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gomila, Damia; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2007-10-15

    Manipulation of the bifurcation structure of nonlinear optical systems via intracavity photonic crystals is demonstrated. In particular, subcritical regions between spatially periodic states are stabilized by modulations of the material's refractive index. An family of dissipative solitons within this bistability range due to the intracavity photonic crystal is identified and characterized in both one and two transverse dimensions. Nontrivial snaking of the modulated-cavity soliton solutions is also presented.

  10. Subcritical dynamo bifurcation in the Taylor-Green flow.

    PubMed

    Ponty, Y; Laval, J-P; Dubrulle, B; Daviaud, F; Pinton, J-F

    2007-11-30

    We report direct numerical simulations of dynamo generation for flow generated using a Taylor-Green forcing. We find that the bifurcation is subcritical and show its bifurcation diagram. We connect the associated hysteretic behavior with hydrodynamics changes induced by the action of the Lorentz force. We show the geometry of the dynamo magnetic field and discuss how the dynamo transition can be induced when an external field is applied to the flow.

  11. Include dispersion in quantum chemical modeling of enzymatic reactions: the case of isoaspartyl dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Mei; Chen, Shi-Lu

    2015-06-09

    The lack of dispersion in the B3LYP functional has been proposed to be the main origin of big errors in quantum chemical modeling of a few enzymes and transition metal complexes. In this work, the essential dispersion effects that affect quantum chemical modeling are investigated. With binuclear zinc isoaspartyl dipeptidase (IAD) as an example, dispersion is included in the modeling of enzymatic reactions by two different procedures, i.e., (i) geometry optimizations followed by single-point calculations of dispersion (approach I) and (ii) the inclusion of dispersion throughout geometry optimization and energy evaluation (approach II). Based on a 169-atom chemical model, the calculations show a qualitative consistency between approaches I and II in energetics and most key geometries, demonstrating that both approaches are available with the latter preferential since both geometry and energy are dispersion-corrected in approach II. When a smaller model without Arg233 (147 atoms) was used, an inconsistency was observed, indicating that the missing dispersion interactions are essentially responsible for determining equilibrium geometries. Other technical issues and mechanistic characteristics of IAD are also discussed, in particular with respect to the effects of Arg233.

  12. Autoimmunity Including Intestinal Behçet Disease Bearing the KRAS Mutation in Lymphocytes: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kinoshita, Mariko; Ohara, Osamu; Yamamoto, Shojiro; Moriguchi, Sayaka; Nunoi, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    We experienced the case of a 3-year-old male with a very rare combination of autoimmunity, including immune thrombocytopenia, recurrent Henoch-Schönlein purpura and intestinal Behçet disease. Exome sequencing of the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells identified a KRAS G13C mutation. Interestingly, the KRAS G13C mutation was observed in T and B lymphocytes, as well as natural killer cells, but not granulocytes. Our case was completely phenotypically different from RASopathies and did not meet the criteria for Ras-associated lymphoproliferative disease or juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. This is the first reported case in which the KRAS mutation existed only in the lymphoid lineage. Based on the findings of our case and the current literature, it is clear that the RAS mutation in lymphoid cells is tightly linked with various autoimmune symptoms. The presence of the RAS mutation in lymphocytes should be reconsidered as a pathogenesis in cases of autoimmunity.

  13. PNS and statistical experiments simulation in subcritical systems using Monte-Carlo method on example of Yalina-Thermal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovich, Sergey; Talamo, A.; Burnos, V.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Fokov, Yu.

    2014-06-01

    In subcritical systems driven by an external neutron source, the experimental methods based on pulsed neutron source and statistical techniques play an important role for reactivity measurement. Simulation of these methods is very time-consumed procedure. For simulations in Monte-Carlo programs several improvements for neutronic calculations have been made. This paper introduces a new method for simulation PNS and statistical measurements. In this method all events occurred in the detector during simulation are stored in a file using PTRAC feature in the MCNP. After that with a special code (or post-processing) PNS and statistical methods can be simulated. Additionally different shapes of neutron pulses and its lengths as well as dead time of detectors can be included into simulation. The methods described above were tested on subcritical assembly Yalina-Thermal, located in Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research SOSNY, Minsk, Belarus. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results was shown.

  14. Subcritical Hopf bifurcations in low-density jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanhang; Gupta, Vikrant; Li, Larry K. B.

    2016-11-01

    Low-density jets are known to bifurcate from a steady state (a fixed point) to self-excited oscillations (a periodic limit cycle) when the Reynolds number increases above a critical value corresponding to the Hopf point, ReH . In the literature, this Hopf bifurcation is often considered to be supercritical because the self-excited oscillations appear only when Re > ReH . However, we find that under some conditions, there exists a hysteretic bistable region at ReSN < Re < ReH , where ReSN denotes a saddle-node bifurcation point. This shows that the Hopf bifurcation can also be subcritical, which has three main implications. First, low-density jets could be triggered into self-excited oscillations even when Re < ReH . Second, in the modeling of low-density jets, the subcritical or supercritical nature of the Hopf bifurcation should be taken into account because the former is caused by cubic nonlinearity whereas the latter is caused by square nonlinearity. Third, the response of the system to external forcing and noise depends on its proximity to the bistable region. Therefore, when investigating the forced response of low-density jets, it is important to consider whether the Hopf bifurcation is subcritical or supercritical.

  15. The Otosclerosis Problem: including Reports of Two Cases Pathologically Examined (Dalby Memorial Lecture)

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Albert A.

    1934-01-01

    The essential causative factor of otosclerosis is a gradually increasing defect in the vasomotor mechanism which governs the nutrition of the structures of the organ of hearing as a whole. The axon reflexes are, of course, included in this vasomotor mechanism, and the stimulus which excites the vasomotor mechanism is sound and sound alone. Consequently the vestibular apparatus and the semicircular canals are unaffected in otosclerosis. There is no evidence whatever of any defect in any of the endocrine glands or their secretions in otosclerosis. Neither is there any evidence of any defect in the bone metabolism of the body. On the contrary the subjects of otosclerosis are, apart from their deafness, perfectly normal individuals with ordinary average health. The deafness of otosclerosis bears very little relationship to the extent of the disease in the bone. The deafness may be very severe when the stapes is hardly fixed at all. The severity of the tinnitus bears no relationship at all to the extent of the disease in the bone. The extent of the change in the bone bears very little relationship to the duration of the disease. The extent of the changes in the bone appears to depend upon the age of onset of the disease. The earlier in life that the otosclerosis begins, the more extensive will the bone lesion become. The deafness of otosclerosis is to a large extent functional, and is the result of the insufficient supply of blood to all the nerve-structures concerned in the perception of sound. The preponderance of women as subjects of otosclerosis is the result of the greater instability of their vasomotor system and the more frequent disturbances to which it is exposed. The changes in the bone show a remarkable bilateral symmetry even to minute details. This symmetrical distribution is readily explained by the writer's view of the causative factor of otosclerosis. The vasomotor nerves governing the nutrition of the organ of hearing are anatomically symmetrical like

  16. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-05-12

    This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

  17. High order statistical signatures from source-driven measurements of subcritical fissile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, John Kelly

    1998-11-01

    This research focuses on the development and application of high order statistical analyses applied to measurements performed with subcritical fissile systems driven by an introduced neutron source. The signatures presented are derived from counting statistics of the introduced source and radiation detectors that observe the response of the fissile system. It is demonstrated that successively higher order counting statistics possess progressively higher sensitivity to reactivity. Consequently, these signatures are more sensitive to changes in the composition, fissile mass, and configuration of the fissile assembly. Furthermore, it is shown that these techniques are capable of distinguishing the response of the fissile system to the introduced source from its response to any internal or inherent sources. This ability combined with the enhanced sensitivity of higher order signatures indicates that these techniques will be of significant utility in a variety of applications. Potential applications include enhanced radiation signature identification of weapons components for nuclear disarmament and safeguards applications and augmented nondestructive analysis of spent nuclear fuel. In general, these techniques expand present capabilities in the analysis of subcritical measurements.

  18. Ultrasound-Enhanced Subcritical CO2 Extraction of Lutein from Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao-Dan; Hou, Yan; Huang, Xing-Xin; Qiu, Tai-Qiu; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-13

    Lutein is an important pigment of Chlorella pyrenoidosa with many beneficial functions in human health. The main purpose of this study was to extract lutein from C. pyrenoidosa using ultrasound-enhanced subcritical CO2 extraction (USCCE). Effects of operating conditions on the extraction, including extraction pretreatment, temperature, pressure, time, CO2 flow rate, and ultrasonic power, were investigated, and an orthogonal experiment was designed to study the effects of extraction pressure, temperature, cosolvent amount, and time on the extraction yields. The USCCE method was compared with other extraction methods in terms of the yields of lutein and the microstructure of C. pyrenoidosa powder by scanning electron microscopy. A maximal extraction yield of 124.01 mg lutein/100 g crude material was achieved under optimal conditions of extraction temperature at 27 °C, extraction pressure at 21 MPa, cosolvent amount at 1.5 mL/g ethanol, and ultrasound power at 1000 W. Compared to other methods, USCCE could significantly increase the lutein extraction yield at lower extraction temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the kinetic models of USCCE and subcritical CO2 extraction (SCCE) of lutein from C. pyrenoidosa were set as E = 130.64 × (1 - e(-0.6599t)) and E = 101.82 × (1 - e(-0.5683t)), respectively. The differences of parameters in the kinetic models indicate that ultrasound was able to enhance the extraction process of SCCE.

  19. A Case Study of Tack Tiles[R] Literacy Instruction for a Student with Multiple Disabilities Including Congenital Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenk, Jessicia A.; Pufpaff, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Research on literacy instruction for students with multiple disabilities is limited. Empirical research on braille instruction for students with multiple disabilities that include congenital blindness is virtually nonexistent. This case study offers initial insight into possible methods of early braille literacy instruction for a student with…

  20. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part

  1. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands: a clinicopathologic and molecular study including 2 cases harboring ETV6-X fusion.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yohei; Ishibashi, Kenichiro; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Kana; Fujiyoshi, Yukio; Hattori, Hideo; Kawakita, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Manabu; Miyabe, Satoru; Shimozato, Kazuo; Nagao, Toshitaka; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described low-grade carcinoma with morphologic and genetic similarity, including ETV6-NTRK3 fusion, to secretory carcinoma of the breast. ETV6 is frequently involved in other epithelial and nonepithelial tumors, and many fusion partners of ETV6 have been reported. In the present study, 14 Japanese MASC cases were clinicopathologically and molecularly analyzed. The median age of the patients was 39 years, and the male:female ratio was 6:8. All cases showed histopathologic findings compatible with those previously described for MASC and harbored an ETV6 split as visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Two cases showed thick fibrous septa and invasive features including vascular or perineural tumor involvement, findings that are rare in MASC. In addition, in these 2 cases, non-NTRK3 genes appeared to fuse with ETV6 (ETV6-X fusion). NTRK1 and NTRK2, both members of the NTRK family, were not involved. Of the 14 MASC cases, the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript was positive in 6 cases, and the relative expression level of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript was variable, ranging from 1 to 5.8. Results of the present study of MASC suggest that (1) ETV6 occasionally fuses with unknown non-NTRK3 genes, (2) ETV6-X cases might have an invasive histology, (3) for molecular diagnosis of MASC, fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect ETV6 splits is the method of choice, and (4) the expression level of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript is considerably variable. These findings provide a novel insight into the oncogenesis, histopathology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this newly recognized carcinoma.

  2. Macrofollicular variant of papillary carcinoma, a potential diagnostic pitfall: A report of two cases including a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Policarpio-Nicolas, Maria Luisa C.; Sirohi, Deepika

    2013-01-01

    Macrofollicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (MFVPTC) is one of the rarest histologic types of papillary carcinoma. This tumor may mimic an adenomatoid/colloid nodule or follicular neoplasm (macrofollicular type) both on histology and cytology. There are very few articles describing the cytologic features of MFVPTC. We report the cytologic findings of two surgically confirmed MFVPTC. The first case showed abundant thin colloid with moderate amount of follicular cells arranged in a honeycombed and syncytial pattern. Some but not all the follicular cells showed enlarged round to ovoid nuclei, overlapping nuclei, few nuclear grooves and rare intranuclear inclusions. The second case showed abundant thin colloid and predominantly benign appearing follicular cells with few overlapping nuclei, enlarged round to ovoid nuclei and rare nuclear grooves. No intranuclear inclusions were identified. A review of the literature was done and the cytologic findings of MFVPTC including our two cases were tabulated. The cytologic findings showed moderate to abundant thin with focally thick colloid in 75% of cases and sheet like arrangement of follicular cells in 76%. Although nuclear features such as chromatin clearing, overlapping and grooves were present in majority of cases, the quantity varied from rare to focal. Small to prominent nucleoli were present in all of the evaluable cases. Intranuclear inclusions were seen only in 45% of patients. Hence, the cytologic features of macrofollicular variant of papillary carcinoma though present can be subtle and intranuclear inclusions may not be present always. PMID:24082912

  3. Benzo(a)pyrene accumulation in soils of technogenic emission zone by subcritical water extraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkova, Svetlana; Minkina, Tatiana; Kizilkaya, Ridvan; Mandzhieva, Saglara; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Bauer, Tatiana; Gulser, Coskun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of research is the assessment of main marker of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) content in soils of emission zone of the power complex plant in soils with use of ecologically clean and effective subcritical water extraction method. Studies were conducted on the soils of monitoring plots subjected to Novocherkassk Power Plant emissions from burning coal. In 2000, monitoring plots were established at different distances from the NPS (1.0-20.0 km). Soil samples for the determination of soil properties and the contents of BaP were taken from a depth of 0-20 cm. The soil cover in the region under study consisted of ordinary chernozems, meadow-chernozemic soils, and alluvial meadow soils. This soil revealed the following physical and chemical properties: Corg-3.1-5.0%, pH-7.3-7.6, ECE-31.2-47.6 mmol(+)/100g; CaCO3-0.2-1.0%, the content of physical clay - 51-67% and clay - 3-37%. BaP extraction from soils was carried out by a subcritical water extraction method. Subcritical water extraction of BaP from soil samples was conducted in a specially developed extraction cartridge made of stainless steel and equipped with screw-on caps at both ends. It was also equipped with a manometer that included a valve for pressure release to maintain an internal pressure of 100 atm. The extraction cartridge containing a sample and water was placed into an oven connected to a temperature regulator under temperature 250oC and pressure 60 atm. The BaP concentration in the acetonitrile extract was determined by HPLC. The efficiency of BaP extraction from soil was determined using a matrix spike. The main accumulation of pollutant in 20 cm layer of soils is noted directly in affected zone on the plots situated at 1.2, 1.6, 5.0, 8.0 km from emission source in the direction of prevailing winds. The maximum quantity of a pollutant was founded in the soil of the plot located mostly close to a source of pollution in the direction of prevailing winds

  4. Theoretical prediction of airplane stability derivatives at subcritical speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulinius, J.; Clever, W.; Nieman, A.; Dunn, K.; Gaither, B.

    1973-01-01

    The theoretical development and application is described of an analysis for predicting the major static and rotary stability derivatives for a complete airplane. The analysis utilizes potential flow theory to compute the surface flow fields and pressures on any configuration that can be synthesized from arbitrary lifting bodies and nonplanar thick lifting panels. The pressures are integrated to obtain section and total configuration loads and moments due side slip, angle of attack, pitching motion, rolling motion, yawing motion, and control surface deflection. Subcritical compressibility is accounted for by means of the Gothert similarity rule.

  5. Spatial and spectral effects in subcritical system pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Nervo, M.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate neutronic models are needed for the interpretation of pulsed experiments in subcritical systems. In this work, the extent of spatial and spectral effects in the pulse propagation phenomena is investigated and the analysis is applied to the GUINEVERE experiment. The multigroup cross section data is generated by the Monte Carlo SERPENT code and the neutronic evolution following the source pulse is simulated by a kinetic diffusion code. The results presented show that important spatial and spectral aspects need to be properly accounted for and that a detailed energy approach may be needed to adequately capture the physical features of the system to the pulse injection. (authors)

  6. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  7. Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes - Update to Include Evaluation of Impact of Including a Humidifier Option

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D

    2007-02-01

    --A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment, ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. In 2006, the two top-ranked options from the 2005 study, air-source and ground-source versions of a centrally ducted integrated heat pump (IHP) system, were subjected to an initial business case study. The IHPs were subjected to a more rigorous hourly-based assessment of their performance potential compared to a baseline suite of equipment of legally minimum efficiency that provided the same heating, cooling, water heating, demand dehumidification, and ventilation services as the IHPs. Results were summarized in a project report, Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes, ORNL/TM-2006/130 (Baxter 2006a). The present report is an update to that document which summarizes results of an analysis of the impact of adding a humidifier to the HVAC system to maintain minimum levels of space relative humidity (RH) in winter. The space RH in winter has direct impact on occupant comfort and on control of dust mites, many types of disease bacteria, and 'dry air' electric shocks. Chapter 8 in ASHRAE's 2005 Handbook of Fundamentals (HOF) suggests a 30% lower limit on RH for indoor temperatures in the range of {approx}68-69F based on comfort (ASHRAE 2005). Table 3 in chapter 9 of the same reference suggests a 30-55% RH range for winter as established by a Canadian study of exposure limits for residential indoor environments (EHD 1987). Harriman, et al (2001) note that for RH levels of 35% or higher, electrostatic shocks are minimized and that dust mites cannot live at RH levels below 40%. They also indicate that many disease bacteria life spans are minimized when space RH is held within a 30-60% range. From the foregoing it is reasonable to assume that a winter space RH range of 30-40% would be an acceptable compromise between comfort

  8. NUMERICAL COMPUTATIONS OF CO-EXISTING SUPER-CRITICAL AND SUB-CRITICAL FLOWS BASED UPON CRD SCHEMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Katsuya; Okamura, Seiji; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Hyodo, Makoto; Hida, Yoshihisa; Nishimoto, Naoshi; Mori, Akio

    Stream flows in steep gradient bed form complicating flow configurations, where co-exist super-critical and sub-critical flows. Computing numerically such flows are the key to successful river management. This study applied CRD schemes to 1D and 2D stream flow computations and proposed genuine ways to eliminate expansion shock waves. Through various cases of computing stream flows conducted, CRD schemes showed that i) conservativeness of discharge and accuracy of four significant figures are ensured, ii) artificial viscosity is not explicitly used for computational stabilization, and thus iii) 1D and 2D computations based upon CRD schemes are applicable to evaluating complicating stream flows for river management.

  9. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Ashley D; Morawicki, Rubén O; Hager, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolyzed whey protein isolate (WPI) is used in the food industry for protein enrichment and modification of functional properties. The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility of subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) on WPI and to determine the temperature and reaction time effects on the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and the production of peptides and free amino acids (AAs). Effects of temperature (150 to 320 °C) and time (0 to 20 min) were initially studied with a central composite rotatable design followed by a completely randomized factorial design with temperature (250 and 300 °C) and time (0 to 50 min) as factors. SWH was conducted in an electrically heated, 100-mL batch, high pressure vessel. The DH was determined by a spectrophotometric method after derivatization. The peptide molecular weights (MWs) were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and AAs were quantified by high-performance liquid chromotography. An interaction of temperature and time significantly affected the DH and AA concentration. As the DH increased, the accumulation of lower MW peptides also increased following SWH (and above 10% DH, the majority of peptides were <1000 Da). Hydrolysis at 300 °C for 40 min generated the highest total AA concentration, especially of lysine (8.894 mg/g WPI). Therefore, WPI was successfully hydrolyzed by subcritical water, and with adjustment of treatment parameters there is reasonable control of the end-products.

  10. Subcritical water extractor for Mars analog soil analysis.

    PubMed

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank J; Patrick, Steven B; Yung, Pun To

    2008-06-01

    Abstract Technologies that enable rapid and efficient extraction of biomarker compounds from various solid matrices are a critical requirement for the successful implementation of in situ chemical analysis of the martian regolith. Here, we describe a portable subcritical water extractor that mimics multiple organic solvent polarities by tuning the dielectric constant of liquid water through adjustment of temperature and pressure. Soil samples, collected from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert (martian regolith analogue) in the summer of 2005, were used to test the instrument's performance. The total organic carbon was extracted from the samples at concentrations of 0.2-55.4 parts per million. The extraction data were compared to the total organic carbon content in the bulk soil, which was determined via a standard analytical procedure. The instrument's performance was examined over the temperature range of 25-250 degrees C at a fixed pressure of 20.7 MPa. Under these conditions, water remains in a subcritical fluid state with a dielectric constant varying between approximately 80 (at 25 degrees C) and approximately 30 (at 250 degrees C).

  11. Transition to subcritical turbulence in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, F.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Field, A. R.; Dorland, W.

    2016-12-01

    Tokamak turbulence, driven by the ion-temperature gradient and occurring in the presence of flow shear, is investigated by means of local, ion-scale, electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations (with both kinetic ions and electrons) of the conditions in the outer core of the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST). A parameter scan in the local values of the ion-temperature gradient and flow shear is performed. It is demonstrated that the experimentally observed state is near the stability threshold and that this stability threshold is nonlinear: sheared turbulence is subcritical, i.e. the system is formally stable to small perturbations, but, given a large enough initial perturbation, it transitions to a turbulent state. A scenario for such a transition is proposed and supported by numerical results: close to threshold, the nonlinear saturated state and the associated anomalous heat transport are dominated by long-lived coherent structures, which drift across the domain, have finite amplitudes, but are not volume filling; as the system is taken away from the threshold into the more unstable regime, the number of these structures increases until they overlap and a more conventional chaotic state emerges. Whereas this appears to represent a new scenario for transition to turbulence in tokamak plasmas, it is reminiscent of the behaviour of other subcritically turbulent systems, e.g. pipe flows and Keplerian magnetorotational accretion flows.

  12. Accelerated subcritical drying of large alkoxide silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiho; Kirkbir, Fikret; Chaudhuri, S. R.; Sarkar, Arnab

    1992-12-01

    Fracture during drying has been the key hurdle in fabrication of large monolithic silica glass from alkoxide gels. Although existing literature suggests pore enlargement, aging, chemical additives, supercritical drying and freeze drying as helpful in avoiding fracture during drying, successful accelerated sub-critical drying of large silica monoliths from alkoxide gels has not yet been reported. In the present approach, acid catalyzed sols of TEOS, ethanol and water (pH equals 2) were cast as cylindrical rods in plastic molds of 8.0 and 10.0 cm diameter with volumes of 2000 cc and 3000 cc respectively. The resultant gels were aged for about 7 days and dried in a specially designed chamber under sub-critical conditions of the pore field. We have obtained monolithic dry gels in drying times of 3 - 7 days for sizes of 2000 - 3000 cc. The dry gels have narrow unimodal pore size distributions, with average pore radius of about 20 angstroms as measured by BET. Although capillary stress during drying increases with reduction of pore size, it was found that in this approach it is easier to dry gels of smaller pore size.

  13. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of CELSS model wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Wydeven, T.; Koo, C.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of ammonium hydroxide with acetic acid and a slurry of human feces, urine, and wipes were used as CELSS model wastes to be wet-oxidized at temperatures from 250 to 500 C, i.e. below and above the critical point of water (374 C and 218 kg/sq cm or 21.4 MPa). The effects of oxidation temperature ( 250-500 C) and residence time (0-120 mn) on carbon and nitrogen and on metal corrosion from the reactor material were studied. Almost all of the organic matter in the model wastes was oxidized in the temperature range from 400 to 500 C, above the critical conditions for water. In contrast, only a small portion of the organic matter was oxidized at subcritical conditions. A substantial amount of nitrogen remained in solution in the form of ammonia at temperatures ranging from 350 to 450 C suggesting that, around 400 C, organic carbon is completely oxidized and most of the nitrogen is retained in solution. The Hastelloy C-276 alloy reactor corroded during subcritical and supercritical water oxidation.

  14. Sub-critical insonification of buried elastic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljkovic, Irena; Schmidt, Henrik

    2002-11-01

    In a shallow water environment a high frequency high grazing angle mine-hunting sonar approach is vastly limited by the coverage rate, making the detection and classification of buried objects using subcritical grazing incidence an attractive alternative. One of the central issues in mine countermeasurements regarding the physics of scattering from spherical shells is the isolation and the analysis of the resonant excitations of the system distinguishing the manmade elastic targets from rocks or other clutter. Burial of an elastic target in the seabed results in a variety of modifications to the scattered response caused by different physical mechanisms, geometric constrains, and intrinsic sediment properties. The aim of this research is to identify, analyze, and explain the fundamental effects of the sediment and the proximity of the seabed interface on the scattering of sound from elastic spherical shells insonified using low frequencies at subcritical incident angles. A new, comprehensive understanding of the goats98 experimental data was obtained distinguishing the effects of the acoustics environment from the resonant signature of a buried elastic target. To achieve this and to further investigate the more intricate details of the scattering process, a numerically improved, OASES-3D modeling framework was used. [Work supported by ONR.

  15. Clinicopathological features of five unusual cases of intraosseous myoepithelial carcinomas, mimicking conventional primary bone tumours, including EWSR1 rearrangement in one case.

    PubMed

    Rekhi, Bharat; Joshi, Sujit; Panchwagh, Yogesh; Gulia, Ashish; Borges, Anita; Bajpai, Jyoti; Jambehekar, Nirmala A; Pant, Vinita; Mandholkar, Mahesh; Byregowda, Suman; Puri, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    Primary intraosseous myoepithelial tumours, including carcinomas are rare tumours. The concept of histopathological spectrum of these tumours is evolving. We describe clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of five myoepithelial carcinomas, including molecular cytogenetic results in one case. There were five male patients within age-range of 8-40 years (median = 26). Four tumours occurred in the long bones, including two tumours, each, in the femur and fibula, respectively, while a single tumour occurred in the proximal phalanges. Tumour size (n = 3 cases) varied from 5.6 to 8.6 cm. On radiological imaging, most tumours appeared as expansile, lytic and destructive lesions. Two tumours appeared as sclerotic lesions. Two cases were referred with diagnoses of chondrosarcomas and a single case was referred with two different diagnoses, including an adamantinoma and an osteosarcoma. Histopathological examination in all these cases showed multinodular tumours comprising mostly polygonal cells, exhibiting moderate nuclear atypia and interspersed mitotic figures within a stroma containing variable amount of myxoid, chondroid, hyalinised and osteoid-like material. Three tumours revealed prominent squamous differentiation. By immunohistochemistry, tumour cells were positive for EMA (5/5), pan CK (AE1/AE3) (3/3), CK5/6 (4/4), CK MNF116 (1/1), S100 protein (5/5) and GFAP (3/5). The first tumour revealed EWSR1 rearrangement. The first patient, 10 months after tumour resection and a simultaneous lung metastatectomy, is free-of-disease (FOD). The second patient, 11 months after tumour resection is FOD. The third and fourth patients underwent wide resections and are on follow-up. The fifth patient underwent resections, including a lung metastatectomy. Primary intraosseous myoepithelial carcinomas are rare and mimic conventional primary bone tumours. Some primary intraosseous myoepithelial carcinomas display EWSR1 rearrangement. Squamous differentiation may be

  16. Survey of aircraft subcritical flight flutter testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, R.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a survey of U. S., British and French subcritical aircraft flight flutter testing methods are presented and evaluation of the applicability of these methods to the testing of the space shuttle are discussed. Ten U. S. aircraft programs covering the large civil transport aircraft and a variety of military aircraft are reviewed. In addition, three major French and British programs are covered by the survey. The significant differences between the U. S., French and British practices in the areas of methods of excitation, data acquisition, transmission and analysis are reviewed. The effect of integrating the digital computer into the flight flutter test program is discussed. Significant saving in analysis and flight test time are shown to result from the use of special digital computer routines and digital filters.

  17. Feedback control of subcritical Turing instability with zero mode.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Kanevsky, Y; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2009-04-01

    A global feedback control of a system that exhibits a subcritical monotonic instability at a nonzero wave number (short-wave or Turing instability) in the presence of a zero mode is investigated using a Ginzburg-Landau equation coupled to an equation for the zero mode. This system is studied analytically and numerically. It is shown that feedback control, based on measuring the maximum of the pattern amplitude over the domain, can stabilize the system and lead to the formation of localized unipulse stationary states or traveling solitary waves. It is found that the unipulse traveling structures result from an instability of the stationary unipulse structures when one of the parameters characterizing the coupling between the periodic pattern and the zero mode exceeds a critical value that is determined by the zero mode damping coefficient.

  18. Subcritical transition to turbulence in planar shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    The two-dimensional steady and time dependent properties of plane Poiseuille and plane Couette flows are analyzed using iterative techniques and full numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the finite-amplitude two-dimensional states investigated are strongly unstable to very small three-dimensional perturbations. It is also shown, through full numerical simulation, that this explosive secondary instability can explain the subcritical transitions that occur in real flows. Finally, it is shown that the three-dimensional instability can be analyzed by a linear stability analysis of a two-dimensional flow consisting of the basic parallel flow and a steady (or quasi-steady) finite-amplitude two-dimensional cellular motion.

  19. Glycolipid class profiling by packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Frantz S; Lesellier, Eric; Bleton, Jean; Baillet, Arlette; Tchapla, Alain; Chaminade, Pierre

    2004-06-18

    The potential of packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography (SubFC) for the separation of lipid classes has been assessed in this study. Three polar stationary phases were checked: silica, diol, and poly(vinyl alcohol). Carbon dioxide (CO2) with methanol as modifier was used as mobile phase and detection performed by evaporative light scattering detection. The influence of methanol content, temperature, and pressure on the chromatographic behavior of sphingolipids and glycolipids were investigated. A complete separation of lipid classes from a crude wheat lipid extract was achieved using a modifier gradient from 10 to 40% methanol in carbon dioxide. Solute selectivity was improved using coupled silica and diol columns in series. Because the variation of eluotropic strength depending on the fluid density changes, a normalized separation factor product (NSP) was used to select the nature, the number and the order of the columns to reach the optimum glycolipid separation.

  20. Gravity-driven soap film dynamics in subcritical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auliel, M. I.; Castro, F.; Sosa, R.; Artana, G.

    2015-10-01

    We undertake the analysis of soap-film dynamics with the classical approach of asymptotic expansions. We focus our analysis in vertical soap film tunnels operating in subcritical regimes with elastic Mach numbers Me=O(10-1) . Considering the associated set of nondimensional numbers that characterize this flow, we show that the flow behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) divergence free flow with variable mass density. When the soap film dynamics agrees with that of a 2D and almost constant mass density flow, the regions where the second invariant of the velocity gradient is non-null correspond to regions where the rate of change of film thickness is non-negligible.

  1. Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability With Dystonia Managed Using Chemodenervation Including Alcohol Neurolysis and Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Sun; Oh, Hyun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) is a rare complication of brain injury. Symptoms of PAID include diaphoresis, hyperthermia, hypertension, tachycardia, and tachypnea accompanied by hypertonic movement. Herein, we present the case of a 44-year-old female patient, who was diagnosed with paraneoplastic limbic encephalopathy caused by thyroid papillary cancer. The patient exhibited all the symptoms of PAID. On the basis that the symptoms were unresponsive to antispastic medication and her liver function test was elevated, we performed alcohol neurolysis of the musculocutaneous nerve followed by botulinum toxin type A (BNT-A) injection into the biceps brachii and brachialis. Unstable vital signs and hypertonia were relieved after chemodenervation. Accordingly, alcohol neurolysis and BNT-A injection are proposed as a treatment option for intractable PAID. PMID:25932429

  2. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  3. Subcritical-Water Extraction of Organics from Solid Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank; Patrick, Steven; Kirby, James; Bickler, Donald; Willis, Peter; Pelletier, Christine; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for extracting organic compounds from soils, sands, and other solid matrix materials utilizes water at subcritical temperature and pressure as a solvent. The apparatus, called subcritical water extractor (SCWE), is a prototype of subsystems of future instrumentation systems to be used in searching for organic compounds as signs of past or present life on Mars. An aqueous solution generated by an apparatus like this one can be analyzed by any of a variety of established chromatographic or spectroscopic means to detect the dissolved organic compound( s). The apparatus can be used on Earth: indeed, in proof-of-concept experiments, SCWE was used to extract amino acids from soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile), which was chosen because the dryness and other relevant soil conditions there approximate those on Mars. The design of the apparatus is based partly on the fact that the relative permittivity (also known as the dielectric constant) of liquid water varies with temperature and pressure. At a temperature of 30 C and a pressure of 0.1 MPa, the relative permittivity of water is 79.6, due to the strong dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions between individual molecular dipoles. As the temperature increases, increasing thermal energy causes increasing disorientation of molecular dipoles, with a consequent decrease in relative permittivity. For example, water at a temperature of 325 C and pressure of 20 MPa has a relative permittivity of 17.5, which is similar to the relative permittivities of such nonpolar organic solvents as 1-butanol (17.8). In the operation of this apparatus, the temperature and pressure of water are adjusted so that the water can be used in place of commonly used organic solvents to extract compounds that have dissimilar physical and chemical properties.

  4. Studies on subcritical and overcritical density laser ablated TAC foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, S.; Leshma, P.; Murali, C. G.; Borisenko, N. G.; Munda, D. S.; Orekhov, A.; Gromov, A. I.; Merkuliev, Yu. A.; Dhareshwar, L. J.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the interaction of high power laser with low density polymer foam with density as low as 2 mg/cm3, 4 mg/cm3, 20 mg/cm3 30 mg/cm3 and 50 mg/cm3 targets are investigated and compared with solid polymer targets. An understanding of such interaction is important from fusion research point of view. Low density foam coating of fusion capsule has been proposed in order to smooth in direct drive scheme and also it is being used as efficient x-ray converter in indirect drive scheme. It is observed that about 75-80% of the laser energy is absorbed in the subcritical (with density <4 mg/cm3) foam targets and the soft x-ray yield in this case is almost two times that measured in the over dense (supper critical) targets. The optical shadowgraphy of the targets shows that the laser coupling in low density foam is associated with a supersonic heat wave while, with increasing density this phenomenon is replaced by subsonic absorption and shock formation. In the case of a 50 mg/cm3 foams the foil velocity reduced by 35% (i.e. 5×106 cm/s), which further reduced to 3.8×106 cm/s in case solid polymer targets.

  5. Subcritical crack growth in a chemically reactive environment-implications for caprock integrity for CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Z.; Eichhubl, P.; Callahan, O. A.; Major, J. R.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    Seal integrity of cap-rock is a critical constraint on the long term performance of CO2 containment site. During fluid migration, the coupled geochemical reaction of minerals and geomechanical deformation of rock matrix may affect the seal integrity. The potential leakage of injected CO2 from cap-rock through preexisting fractures/faults represents a major concern associated with geological storage of CO2. To address the fundamental question of CO2 leakage through subcritical growth of fractures driven by chemically reactive fluid across caprocks, we build a Dugdale cohesive model. Ahead of the physical crack tip, a narrow band of cohesive zone is assumed to exist with the upper and lower cohesive surfaces held by the cohesive traction. In the vicinity of the crack tip, minerals dissolve due to the acidic environment and migrate from the physical crack tip into the cohesive zone causing damage of rock matrix in the form of a reduction of cohesive traction.Focusing on the dissolution of calcite and following the stress corrosion theory, we assume the degradation of cohesive traction is linearly proportional to the concentration of Ca2+whose evolution follows the reactive diffusion equation. Using a critical crack opening displacement criterion, the subcritical propagation behavior of crack due to stress corrosion is captured and the rate-limiting effects including the chemical reactions to produce the Ca2+ and the transport of minerals along the newly generated fracture cohesive zone are incorporated. Subcritical crack growth rate under different chemical environment conditions is examined and compared with the experimental fracture mechanics testing.

  6. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M. M.; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4–87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5–69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5–78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5–57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  7. Burnup calculations for KIPT accelerator driven subcritical facility using Monte Carlo computer codes-MCB and MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Talamo, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-06-09

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility, using the KIPT electron accelerator. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron physics experiments and material structure analyses are planned using this facility. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}375 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products reduce continuously the reactivity during the operation, which reduces the neutron flux level and consequently the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, fuel assemblies should be added after long operating periods to compensate for the lost reactivity. This process requires accurate prediction of the fuel burnup, the decay behavior of the fission produces, and the introduced reactivity from adding fresh fuel assemblies. The recent developments of the Monte Carlo computer codes, the high speed capability of the computer processors, and the parallel computation techniques made it possible to perform three-dimensional detailed burnup simulations. A full detailed three-dimensional geometrical model is used for the burnup simulations with continuous energy nuclear data libraries for the transport calculations and 63-multigroup or one group cross sections libraries for the depletion calculations. Monte Carlo Computer code MCNPX and MCB are utilized for this study. MCNPX transports the

  8. SELECTIVE EXTRACTION OF OXYGENATES FROM SAVORY AND PEPPERMINT USING SUBCRITICAL WATER. (R825394)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The yields of oxygenated and non-oxygenated flavour and fragrance compounds from savory (Satureja hortensis) and peppermint (Mentha piperita) were compared using subcritical water extraction, supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) and hydrodistillation. Extraction rates wi...

  9. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Johnson, D.B.; Anoe, K.S.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR-1 gene. This is commonly caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG trinucleotide repeat in the first exon of the FMR-1 gene. We describe here an atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene. RK is a 6-year-old hyperactive, mentally retarded male. Southern analysis of PstI digested genomic DNA was performed using a 558 bp XhoI-PstI fragment specific for the 5`-end of the FMR-1 gene. This analysis revealed the absence of the normal 1.0 kb PstI fragment, indicating the deletion of at least a portion of the FMR-1 gene. PCR analysis using Xq27.3 microsatellite and STS markers confirmed the presence of a deletion of at least 600 kb encompassing the FMR-1 gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis demonstrated that this deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X-chromosome. High resolution chromosome banding revealed an extremely small deletion of a portion of band Xq27 which was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridrization (FISH) analysis using a 34 kb cosmid containing the FMR-1 gene. As expected, RK manifests physical features typical of fragile X syndrome, including a high arched palate, prognathism, and large ears. Interestingly, RK also presents with anal atresia, obesity and short stature, features not part of fragile X syndrome. In addition, RK has normal sized testicles and does not exhibit the characteristic gaze avoidance, hand-flapping, and crowd anxiety behaviors. These atypical features may result from the deletion of additional genes in the vicinity of the FMR-1 gene. Further work is underway to determine more precisely the extent of the deletion in RK`s DNA.

  10. A Case of 9.7 Mb Terminal Xp Deletion Including OA1 Locus Associated with Contiguous Gene Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Hae; Kim, Sook-Young

    2012-01-01

    Terminal or interstitial deletions of Xp (Xp22.2→Xpter) in males have been recognized as a cause of contiguous gene syndromes showing variable association of apparently unrelated clinical manifestations such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (SHOX), chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1), mental retardation (NLGN4), ichthyosis (STS), Kallmann syndrome (KAL1), and ocular albinism (GPR143). Here we present a case of a 13.5 yr old boy and sister with a same terminal deletion of Xp22.2 resulting in the absence of genes from the telomere of Xp to GPR143 of Xp22. The boy manifested the findings of all of the disorders mentioned above. We began a testosterone enanthate monthly replacement therapy. His sister, 11 yr old, manifested only Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and had engaged in growth hormone therapy for 3 yr. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a male with a 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including the OA1 locus in Korea. PMID:23091330

  11. How to detect polymorphisms undergoing selection in marine fishes? A review of methods and case studies, including flatfishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinand, Bruno; Lemaire, Christophe; Bonhomme, François

    2004-05-01

    Populations of marine organisms are potentially affected by numerous selective pressures such as temperature and salinity, or anthropogenic pressures such as xenobiotics that may preclude adaptation to particular habitats. Such selective pressures may also affect their demography. Examples include modifications of the population dynamics through shifts in growth rate, and in life history traits affecting fitness such as size or age of first reproduction. However, the documentation of variation in phenotypically plastic traits specific to distinct environments cannot be taken as the ultimate proof that natural selection has occurred. Measurement of the impact of selection and subsequent local adaptation of fish populations based exclusively on morphological or physiological characters is one of the most difficult things to achieve because it depends on the use of phenotypic characters that closely match the genotype. Molecular markers can help to overcome this problem and, under some circumstances, can record the footprints of selection. A combination of polymorphisms that are under selection and those that are not can provide complementary information. In this paper, we review how and why selection can be detected at the molecular level, using genetic markers analysed in a population genetic framework. We then report and discuss case studies in fish.

  12. Carcinoma showing thymus-like elements of the thyroid gland: report of three cases including one case with breast cancer history.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanjun; Liu, Xi; Huang, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Johnstone, Marianne; Deng, Yuan; Ke, Yongqiang; Nunes, Quentin M; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Yili; Zhang, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma showing thymus-like elements (CASTLE) is a rare malignant tumor of the thyroid or adjacent neck soft tissues, whose histogenesis is still debated. It may resemble other primary or metastatic poorly differentiated tumors histologically and the differential diagnosis is crucial for CASTLE has a better prognosis. However, CASTLE as a second primary tumor has not been reported in the literature. We report three cases of thyroid CASTLE, including a unique tumor following breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast invasive carcinoma. There were two female and one male. All three tumors were located in the right lobe of the thyroid, and one tumor showed extension into the surrounding soft tissue. Histologically, all tumors showed expansive growth and consisted of cords, nests or sheets of epithelial cells divided into irregularly shaped lobules by fibrous connective tissue with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. Focal squamous differentiation resembling Hassall's corpuscles were observed. All cases stained positively for CD5, CD117, high molecular weight cytokeratin, cytokeratin, P63, carcinoembryonic antigen and epithelial membrane antigen. Positive staining for Bcl-2 in two cases and chromogranin A in one case was noted. Ki-67 expression ranged from 15 to 25%. Thyroid transcription factor and CD3 were negative. There was no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease at following surgery. These features demonstrated CASTLE may arise from branchial pouch remnants, the thyroid solid cell nests. CASTLE is a rare entity, awareness of its occurrence as a second primary tumor is important to avoid overtreatment because it is associated with a favorable prognosis.

  13. Subcritical Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a Hele-Shaw cell.

    PubMed

    Meignin, L; Gondret, P; Ruyer-Quil, C; Rabaud, M

    2003-06-13

    We investigate experimentally the subcritical behavior of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for a gas-liquid shearing flow in a Hele-Shaw cell. The subcritical curve separating the solutions of a stable plane interface and a fully saturated nonlinear wave train is determined. Experimental results are fitted by a fifth order complex Ginzburg-Landau equation whose linear coefficients are compared to theoretical ones.

  14. Target normal sheath acceleration of foil ions by laser-trapped hot electrons from a long subcritical-density preplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, S. X.; Yu, Wei; Shen, B. F.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Xu, Han; Wong, A. Y.; Wang, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    In a long subcritical density plasma, an ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse can self-organize into a fast but sub-relativistic propagating structure consisting of the modulated laser light and a large number of trapped electrons from the plasma. Upon impact of the structure with a solid foil target placed in the latter, the remaining laser light is reflected, but the dense and hot trapped electrons pass through the foil, together with the impact-generated target-frontsurface electrons to form a dense hot electron cloud at the back of the target suitable for enhancing target normal sheath acceleration of the target-backsurface ions. The accelerated ions are well collimated and of high charge and energy densities, with peak energies a full order of magnitude higher than that from target normal sheath acceleration without the subcritical density plasma. In the latter case, the space-charge field accelerating the ions is limited since they are formed only by the target-frontsurface electrons during the very short instant of laser reflection.

  15. Super- and sub-critical regions in shocks driven by radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs

    PubMed Central

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    White-light coronagraphic images of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO/LASCO C2 have been used to estimate the density jump along the whole front of two CME-driven shocks. The two events are different in that the first one was a “radio-loud” fast CME, while the second one was a “radio quiet” slow CME. From the compression ratios inferred along the shock fronts, we estimated the Alfvén Mach numbers for the general case of an oblique shock. It turns out that the “radio-loud” CME shock is initially super-critical around the shock center, while later on the whole shock becomes sub-critical. On the contrary, the shock associated with the “radio-quiet” CME is sub-critical at all times. This suggests that CME-driven shocks could be efficient particle accelerators at the shock nose only at the initiation phases of the event, if and when the shock is super-critical, while at later times they lose their energy and the capability to accelerate high energetic particles. PMID:25685431

  16. Super- and sub-critical regions in shocks driven by radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs.

    PubMed

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2013-05-01

    White-light coronagraphic images of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO/LASCO C2 have been used to estimate the density jump along the whole front of two CME-driven shocks. The two events are different in that the first one was a "radio-loud" fast CME, while the second one was a "radio quiet" slow CME. From the compression ratios inferred along the shock fronts, we estimated the Alfvén Mach numbers for the general case of an oblique shock. It turns out that the "radio-loud" CME shock is initially super-critical around the shock center, while later on the whole shock becomes sub-critical. On the contrary, the shock associated with the "radio-quiet" CME is sub-critical at all times. This suggests that CME-driven shocks could be efficient particle accelerators at the shock nose only at the initiation phases of the event, if and when the shock is super-critical, while at later times they lose their energy and the capability to accelerate high energetic particles.

  17. Comparing methods for estimating R0 from the size distribution of subcritical transmission chains.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, S; Lloyd-Smith, J O

    2013-09-01

    Many diseases exhibit subcritical transmission (i.e. 0cases in each chain can be used to infer R0, which is of crucial importance for monitoring the risk that a disease will emerge to establish endemic circulation. However, the challenge of imperfect case detection has led authors to adopt a variety of work-around measures when inferring R0, such as discarding data on isolated cases or aggregating intermediate-sized chains together. Each of these methods has the potential to introduce bias, but a quantitative comparison of these approaches has not been reported. By adapting a model based on a negative binomial offspring distribution that permits a variable degree of transmission heterogeneity, we present a unified analysis of existing R0 estimation methods. Simulation studies show that the degree of transmission heterogeneity, when improperly modeled, can significantly impact the bias of R0 estimation methods designed for imperfect observation. These studies also highlight the importance of isolated cases in assessing whether an estimation technique is consistent with observed data. Analysis of data from measles outbreaks shows that likelihood scores are highest for models that allow a flexible degree of transmission heterogeneity. Aggregating intermediate sized chains often has similar performance to analyzing a complete chain size distribution. However, truncating isolated cases is beneficial only when surveillance systems clearly favor full observation of large chains but not small chains. Meanwhile, if data on the type and proportion of cases that are unobserved were known, we demonstrate that maximum likelihood inference of R0 could be adjusted accordingly. This motivates the need for future empirical and theoretical work to quantify observation error and incorporate relevant mechanisms into stuttering chain models used

  18. Well Wishes: A Case on Septic Systems and Well Water Requiring In-Depth Analysis and Including Optional Laboratory Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczak, Mary M.; Lantz, Juliette M.

    2004-01-01

    The case of Well Wishes involves students in a thorough examination of the interaction among nitrogen-composed species in the septic systems and well water, which helps to clean household water. The case supports the attainment of five goals for students, and can be analyzed through classroom discussions or laboratory experiments.

  19. Case studies on recent fossil-fired plants

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C.

    2007-12-31

    The article summarises the findings of case studies on fossil-fired power plants carried out by the IEA Clean Coal Centre for the IEA at the request of world leaders at the Gleneagles G8 Summit in July 2005. The studies compared the cost, efficiency and emissions of eight recently constructed coal-fired plants using pulverized coal combustion with subcritical, supercritical or ultra-supercritical steam turbine cycles. Also included was a review of IGCC developments. A case study of a natural gas combined-cycle plant was included for comparison. The full report has been published by the IEA. 1 tab.

  20. Life cycle assessment of biodiesel production from algal bio-crude oils extracted under subcritical water conditions.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Sundaravadivelnathan; Reddy, Harvind Kumar; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Downes, Cara Meghan; Deng, Shuguang

    2014-10-01

    A life cycle assessment study is performed for the energy requirements and greenhouse gas emissions in an algal biodiesel production system. Subcritical water (SCW) extraction was applied for extracting bio-crude oil from algae, and conventional transesterification method was used for converting the algal oil to biodiesel. 58MJ of energy is required to produce 1kg of biodiesel without any co-products management, of which 36% was spent on cultivation and 56% on lipid extraction. SCW extraction with thermal energy recovery reduces the energy consumption by 3-5 folds when compared to the traditional solvent extraction. It is estimated that 1kg of algal biodiesel fixes about 0.6kg of CO2. An optimized case considering the energy credits from co-products could further reduce the total energy demand. The energy demand for producing 1kg of biodiesel in the optimized case is 28.23MJ.

  1. Co-liquefaction of micro- and macroalgae in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Binbin; Duan, Peigao; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Feng; Fan, Yunchang

    2013-12-01

    Co-liquefaction of microalgae (Spirulina platensis, SP) and macroalgae (Entermorpha prolifera, EP) was studied in subcritical water by using a stainless-steel batch reactor at different temperature (250 to 370°C), time (5 to 120 min), SP/EP mass ratio (0 to 100%), and water/algae mass ratio (1:1 to 6:1). The results suggested that a positive synergetic effect existed during the co-liquefaction of SP and EP, and this synergetic effect was dependent on reaction conditions. Co-liquefaction alleviated the severe reaction conditions compared to the separate liquefaction of SP and EP and also promoted the in situ deoxygenation of the bio-oil. The higher-heating-value of bio-oil produced from the co-liquefaction of SP and EP (wSP:wEP=1) is 35.3 MJ/kg. The energy recovery from the co-liquefaction is larger than the average value from the separate liquefaction of SP and EP. Co-liquefaction did not affect the molecular composition but affect the relative amount of each component in the bio-oil.

  2. Advances in Subcritical Hydro-/Solvothermal Processing of Graphene Materials.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, Suchithra Padmajan; Poulin, Philippe; Aymonier, Cyril

    2017-02-28

    Many promising graphene-based materials are kept away from mainstream applications due to problems of scalability and environmental concerns in their processing. Hydro-/solvothermal techniques overwhelmingly satisfy both the aforementioned criteria, and have matured as alternatives to wet-chemical methods with advances made over the past few decades. The insolubility of graphene in many solvents poses considerable difficulties in their processing. In this context hydro-/solvothermal techniques present an ideal opportunity for processing of graphenic materials with their versatility in manipulating the physical and thermodynamic properties of the solvent. The flexibility in hydro-/solvothermal techniques for manipulation of solvent composition, temperature and pressure provides numerous handles to manipulate graphene-based materials during synthesis. This review provides a comprehensive look at the subcritical hydro-/solvothermal synthesis of graphene-based functional materials and their applications. Several key synthetic strategies governing the morphology and properties of the products such as temperature, pressure, and solvent effects are elaborated. Advances in the synthesis, doping, and functionalization of graphene in hydro-/solvothermal media are highlighted together with our perspectives in the field.

  3. Subcritical Transition to Turbulence in Couette-Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo; Klotz, Lukasz

    2016-11-01

    We study the subcritical transition to turbulence in the plane Couette-Poiseuille shear flow with zero mean advection velocity. Our experimental configuration consists on one moving wall of the test section (the second one remains stationary), which acts like a driving force for the flow, imposing linear streamwise velocity profile (Couette) and adverse pressure gradient in the streamwise direction (Poiseuille) at the same time. This flow, which had only been studied theoretically up to now, is always linearly stable. The transition to turbulence is forced by a very well controlled finite-size perturbation by injection, into the test section, of a water jet during a very short time. Using PIV technique, we characterized quantitatively the initial development of the triggered turbulent spot and compared its energy evolution with the theoretical predictions of the transient growth theory. In addition, we show results concerning the importance of nonlinearities, when waviness of streaks in streamwise direction induced self-sustained process in the turbulent spot. We also measured precisely the large-scale flow which is generated around the turbulent spot and studied its strength as a function of the Reynolds number.

  4. Pati-Salam version of subcritical hybrid inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present a model of subcritical hybrid inflation with a Pati-Salam (PS) symmetry group. Both the inflaton and waterfall fields contribute to the necessary e -foldings of inflation, while only the waterfall field spontaneously breaks PS hence monopoles produced during inflation are diluted during the inflationary epoch. The model is able to produce a tensor-to-scalar ratio, r <0.09 consistent with the latest BICEP2/Keck and Planck data, as well as scalar density perturbations and spectral index, ns, consistent with Planck data. For particular values of the parameters, we find r =0.084 and ns=0.0963 . The energy density during inflation is directly related to the PS breaking scale, vPS. The model also incorporates a Z4R symmetry which can resolve the μ problem and suppress dimension 5 operators for proton decay, leaving over an exact R parity. Finally the model allows for a complete three-family extension with a D4 family symmetry which reproduces low energy precision electroweak and LHC data.

  5. Evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, A. S.; Hsieh, W. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Brown, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions was studied experimentally and theoretically. In experiments, the evaporation rate and surface temperature were measured for LOX strand vaporizing in helium environments at pressures ranging from 5 to 68 atmospheres. Gas sampling and chromatography analysis were also employed to profile the gas composition above the LOX surface for the purpose of model validation. A comprehensive theoretical model was formulated and solved numerically to simulate the evaporation process of LOX at high pressures. The model was based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentrations for a multicomponent system, with consideration of gravitational body force, solubility of ambient gases in liquid, and variable thermophysical properties. Good agreement between predictions and measured oxygen mole fraction profiles was obtained. The effect of pressure on the distribution of the Lewis number, as well as the effect of variable diffusion coefficient, were further examined to elucidate the high-pressure transport behavior exhibited in the LOX vaporization process.

  6. Rapid column heating method for subcritical water chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fogwill, Michael O; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2007-01-19

    A novel resistive heating method is presented for subcritical water chromatography (SWC) that provides higher column heating rates than those conventionally obtained from temperature-programmed gas chromatography (GC) convection ovens. Since the polarity of water reduces dramatically with increasing temperature, SWC employs column heating to achieve gradient elution. As such, the rate at which the mobile phase is heated directly impacts the magnitude of such gradients applied in SWC. Data from the current study demonstrate that the maximum column heating rate attainable in a typical SWC apparatus (i.e. using a GC convection oven) is around 10 degrees C/min, even at instrument oven settings of over three times this value. Conversely, by wrapping the separation column with ceramic insulation and a resistively heated wire, the column heating rates are increased five-fold. As a result, elution times can be greatly decreased in SWC employing gradients. Separations of standard alcohol test mixtures demonstrate that the retention time of the latest eluting component decreases by 35 to 50% using the prototype method. Additionally, solute retention times in this mode deviate by less than 1% RSD over several trials, which compares very well to those obtained using a conventional GC convection oven. Results suggest that the developed method can be a useful alternative heating technique in SWC.

  7. Retention behavior of phenols, anilines, and alkylbenzenes in liquid chromatographic separations using subcritical water as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Jones, A D; Eaton, C D

    1999-09-01

    The unique characteristic of subcritical water is its widely tunable physical properties. For example, the polarity (measured by dielectric constant) of water is significantly decreased by raising water temperature. At temperatures of 200-250 °C (under moderate pressure to keep water in the liquid state), the polarity of pure water is similar to that of pure methanol or acetonitrile at ambient conditions. Therefore, pure subcritical water may be able to serve as the mobile phase for reversed-phase separations. To investigate the retention behavior in subcritical water separation, the retention factors of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene), phenol, aniline, and their derivatives have been determined using subcritical water, methanol/water, and acetonitrile/water systems. Subcritical water separations were also performed using alumina, silica-bonded C18, and poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) columns to study the influence of the stationary phase on analyte retention under subcritical water conditions.

  8. Beyond the ponderomotive limit: Direct laser acceleration of relativistic electrons in sub-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, A. V.; Khudik, V. N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Shvets, G.; Willingale, L.; Schollmeier, M.

    2016-05-01

    We examine a regime in which a linearly polarized laser pulse with relativistic intensity irradiates a sub-critical plasma for much longer than the characteristic electron response time. A steady-state channel is formed in the plasma in this case with quasi-static transverse and longitudinal electric fields. These relatively weak fields significantly alter the electron dynamics. The longitudinal electric field reduces the longitudinal dephasing between the electron and the wave, leading to an enhancement of the electron energy gain from the pulse. The energy gain in this regime is ultimately limited by the superluminosity of the wave fronts induced by the plasma in the channel. The transverse electric field alters the oscillations of the transverse electron velocity, allowing it to remain anti-parallel to laser electric field and leading to a significant energy gain. The energy enhancement is accompanied by the development of significant oscillations perpendicular to the plane of the driven motion, making trajectories of energetic electrons three-dimensional. Proper electron injection into the laser beam can further boost the electron energy gain.

  9. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-state simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.

  10. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the uterus: clinical and pathologic review of 10 cases including a subset with aggressive clinical course.

    PubMed

    Parra-Herran, Carlos; Quick, Charles M; Howitt, Brooke E; Dal Cin, Paola; Quade, Bradley J; Nucci, Marisa R

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is currently regarded as a neoplasm with intermediate biological potential and a wide anatomic distribution. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors of the female genital tract are rare, and to date reported cases behaved indolently. We describe, herein, 10 cases of uterine inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, 3 of which had an aggressive clinical course. Subject age ranged from 29 to 73 years. Tumors were composed of spindle and epithelioid myofibroblastic cells admixed with lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in a variably myxoid stroma. Two growth patterns, myxoid and fascicular (leiomyoma-like), were noted. All tumors were positive for ALK expression by immunohistochemistry, which was stronger in the myxoid areas. Smooth muscle marker and CD10 expression was variable in extent, but typically positive. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for ALK rearrangements was positive in both fascicular and myxoid areas in all 8 cases tested. Three subjects showed clinical evidence of tumor aggressiveness as defined by extrauterine spread, local recurrence, or distant metastasis. Aggressive tumors were larger, had a higher proportion of myxoid stroma, and higher mitotic activity than indolent tumors. Tumor cell necrosis was seen only in cases with adverse outcome. This is the first report to describe aggressive biological behavior in uterine inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. This diagnosis is often underappreciated and merits inclusion in the differential diagnosis of myxoid mesenchymal lesions of the uterus, particularly because patients with an aggressive course may benefit from targeted therapy.

  11. Organic Sulfur and HAP Removal from Coal with Subcritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    To date, no economically feasible organic sulfur and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursor removal process has been developed; however, an effective sulfur and selected HAP removal process is needed to enhance the utilization of high-sulfur coals and to comply with increasingly stringent regulations. Subcritical water has been shown by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) researchers on this project to be an extremely effective fluid for the removal of organic sulfur from coals. A multigram reactor designed and built at the EERC for supercritical water extraction was used to scale up from milligram-sized samples to 10-20 grams of coal charge. Work performed during this project year resulted in production of low-sulfur (as low as 0.5% S) extracted coal first at supercritical conditions, i.e., 450{degrees}C and 400 atm (5880 psig), but then at conditions below the critical conditions, i.e., 420{degrees}C and 156 atm (2300 psig). Still milder conditions of 400{degrees}C and 156 atm (2300 psig) resulted in sulfur values similar to those of obtained under the supercritical conditions. IBC-102 extracted with supercritical water had a sulfur value of 0.7 wt%. Extraction of IBC-102 at subcritical conditions of 420{degrees}C and 156 atm (2300 psig) resulted in a sulfur content of 0.490A. The tar obtained from the extracted coal had sulfur values ranging from 1.4 to 6.5 wt% and when treated by catalytic desulfurization, tar was quantitatively recovered with a sulfur value of 0.6 wt%. Float-sink physical cleaning of IBC-102 with Certigrav 1.4 reduced the sulfur content of the coal to 1.5 wt% in a recovered float fraction of 83.3%. Approximately 300 lb of IBC-102 was obtained for use in preparing 100 lb of low-sulfur fuel. Float- sink cleaning on a sample of this new coal returned 87.1 wt% as float fraction, with 1.7 wt% sulfur. 158 lb of physically cleaned IBC-102 was used for the continuous process test on the pilot scale. An additional 150 lb of physically

  12. Subcritical water extraction of flavoring and phenolic compounds from cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum).

    PubMed

    Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Sayputikasikorn, Nucha; Samuhasaneetoo, Suched; Penroj, Parinda; Siriwongwilaichat, Prasong; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) powder was treated with subcritical water at 150 and 200°C in a semi-continuous system at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min) and pressure (6 MPa). Major flavoring compounds, i.e., cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol and coumarin, were extracted at lower recoveries than the extraction using methanol, suggesting that degradation of these components might occur during the subcritical water treatment. Caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic and vanillic acids were identified from the subcritical water treatment. Extraction using subcritical water was more effective to obtain these acids than methanol (50% v/v) in both number of components and recovery, especially at 200°C. Subcritical water treatment at 200°C also resulted in a higher total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity than the methanol extraction. The DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content linearly correlated but the results suggested that the extraction at 200°C might result in other products that possessed a free radical scavenging activity other than the phenolic compounds.

  13. Sudden hearing loss and vertigo after tooth extraction successfully treated with combined therapy including HBO2: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Huseyin Baki; Erdogan, Raziye Banu Atalay; Paksoy, Mustafa; Sanli, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a decrease in hearing of at least 30 dB that occurs within three days and which affects at least three consecutive frequencies in either ear or both ears. This case report describes a woman who had sudden hearing loss and vertigo in the right ear after tooth extraction. As the first-line therapy, systemic and intratympanic steroid injections were used this led to a slight improvement; however, the majority of improvement in hearing was not observed until hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy was instituted on the 20th day of hearing loss. Sudden hearing loss and vertigo after tooth extraction is an otologic emergency and early evaluation and treatment are effective. HBO2, although employed beyond the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society's recommended initial 14 days of symptom onset, very was effective for this particular case.

  14. A case study involving allergic reactions to sulfur-containing compounds including, sulfite, taurine, acesulfame potassium and sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Stohs, Sidney J; Miller, Mark J S

    2014-01-01

    A case study is reported whereby an individual with known sulfite and sulfonamide allergies develops hypersensitivity to taurine above a threshold level as well as to the non-nutritive sweetener acesulfame potassium, compounds that are not normally associated with allergic reactions. Sulfites, sulfonamides, taurine and acesulfame potassium all contain a SO3 moiety. Challenge tests provide evidence for the hypersensitivities to taurine and acesulfame potassium. The subject is also allergic to thiuram mix and thimerosal, sulfur containing compounds, as well as to various food products. This may be the first case where hypersensitivities to taurine and acesulfame potassium have been documented and reported. Several mechanistic explanations are provided for the untoward reactions to taurine and acesulfame potassium.

  15. [A case of Sjögren syndrome associated with multiple mononeuritis and dysautonomia including bilateral tonic pupils].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Y; Tsukishima, E; Sudo, K; Aimoto, Y; Tashiro, K

    1997-09-01

    Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is a glandular disease characterized by dry eyes and dry mouth. Extraglandular manifestations in SjS are also common, and peripheral nerve involvement has been reported in 10-20% of cases. We report a case of Sjögren syndrome with bilateral tonic pupils, dysautonomia, and multiple mononeuritis. The fact that sural nerve sections, in addition to marked loss of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, showed an increased number of infiltrating macrophages without lymphocytes and aberrant expression of HLA-DR (class II) antigen in Schwann cells was an especially interesting finding. No evidence of active vasculitis was detected. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and her condition gradually improved, as confirmed by thermography. Our findings suggested the presence of specific immunological abnormalities simultaneously involving the ciliary ganglia, autonomic ganglia, and dorsal root ganglia in this peculiar form of SjS.

  16. Including exposure variability in the life cycle impact assessment of indoor chemical emissions: the case of metal degreasing.

    PubMed

    Golsteijn, Laura; Huizer, Daan; Hauck, Mara; van Zelm, Rosalie; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2014-10-01

    The present paper describes a method that accounts for variation in indoor chemical exposure settings and accompanying human toxicity in life cycle assessment (LCA). Metal degreasing with dichloromethane was used as a case study to show method in practice. We compared the human toxicity related to the degreasing of 1m(2) of metal surface in different exposure scenarios for industrial workers, professional users outside industrial settings, and home consumers. The fraction of the chemical emission that is taken in by exposed individuals (i.e. the intake fraction) was estimated on the basis of operational conditions (e.g. exposure duration), and protective measures (e.g. local exhaust ventilation). The introduction of a time-dependency and a correction for protective measures resulted in reductions in the intake fraction of up to 1.5 orders of magnitude, compared to application of existing, less advanced models. In every exposure scenario, the life cycle impacts for human toxicity were mainly caused by indoor exposure to metal degreaser (>60%). Emissions released outdoors contributed up to 22% of the life cycle impacts for human toxicity, and the production of metal degreaser contributed up to 19%. These findings illustrate that human toxicity from indoor chemical exposure should not be disregarded in LCA case studies. Particularly when protective measures are taken or in the case of a short duration (1h or less), we recommend the use of our exposure scenario-specific approach.

  17. Including Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Ellen Brantlinger's paper, "Using ideology: cases of non-recognition of the politics of research and practice in special education" (Brantlinger, E. 1997. "Using ideology: Cases of nonrecognition of the politics of research and practice in special education." "Review of Educational Research" 67, no. 4: 425-59),…

  18. Complete degradation of Orange G by electrolysis in sub-critical water.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Asli; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2011-06-15

    Complete degradation of azo dye Orange G was studied using a 500 mL continuous flow reactor made of SUS 316 stainless steel. In this system, a titanium reactor wall acted as a cathode and a titanium plate-type electrode was used as an anode in a subcritical reaction medium. This hydrothermal electrolysis process provides an environmentally friendly route that does not use any organic solvents or catalysts to remove organic pollutants from wastewater. Reactions were carried out from 30 to 90 min residence times at a pressure of 7 MPa, and at different temperatures of 180-250°C by applying various direct currents ranging from 0.5 to 1A. Removal of dye from the product solution and conversion of TOC increased with increasing current value. Moreover, the effect of salt addition on degradation of Orange G and TOC conversion was investigated, because in real textile wastewater, many salts are also included together with dye. Addition of Na(2)CO(3) resulted in a massive degradation of the dye itself and complete mineralization of TOC, while NaCl and Na(2)SO(4) obstructed the removal of Orange G. Greater than 99% of Orange G was successfully removed from the product solution with a 98% TOC conversion.

  19. Energy conversion of biomass with supercritical and subcritical water using large-scale plants.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Idzumi; Sako, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting unused or waste biomass as an alternative fuel is currently receiving much attention because of the potential reductions in CO2 emissions and the lower cost in comparison to expensive fossil fuels. If we are to use biomass domestically or industrially, we must be able to convert biomass to high-quality and easy-to-use liquid, gas, or solid fuels that have high-calorific values, low moisture and ash contents, uniform composition, and suitable for stored over long periods. In biomass treatment, hot and high-pressure water including supercritical and subcritical water is an excellent solvent, as it is clean and safe and its action on biomass can be optimized by varying the temperature and pressure. In this article, the conversion of waste biomass to fuel using hot and high-pressure water is reviewed, and the following examples are presented: the production of large amounts of hydrogen from waste biomass, the production of cheap bioethanol from non-food raw materials, and the production of composite powder fuel from refractory waste biomass in the rubble from the Great East Japan Earthquake. Several promising techniques for the conversion of biomass have been demonstrated in large-scale plants and commercial deployment is expected in the near future.

  20. Subcritical co-solvents extraction of lipid from wet microalgae pastes of Nannochloropsis sp

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Liu, Tianzhong; Chen, Xiaolin; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Gao, Lili; Chen, Yu; Peng, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    In this paper subcritical co-solvents extraction (SCE) of algal lipid from wet pastes of Nannochloropsis sp. is examined. The influences of five operating parameters including the ratio between ethanol to hexane, the ratio of mixed solvents to algal biomass (dry weight), extraction temperature, pressure, and time were investigated. The determined optimum extraction conditions were 3:1 (hexane to ethanol ratio), 10:1 ratio (co-solvents to microalgae (dry weight) ratio), 90°C, 1.4 MPa, and 50 min, which could produce 88% recovery rate of the total lipids. In addition, electron micrographs of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were conducted to show that the algal cell presented shrunken, collapsed with some wrinkles and microholes after SCE extraction. The main composition of total lipids extracted under the optimum conditions was TAG which represented more than 80%. And the fatty acid profile of triglycerides revealed that C16:0 (35.67 ± 0.2%), C18:1 (26.84 ± 0.044%) and C16:1 (25.96 ± 0.011%) were dominant. Practical applications: The reported method could save energy consumption significantly through avoiding deep dewatering (for example drying). The composition of the extracted lipid is suitable for the production of high quality biodiesel. PMID:22745570

  1. 50 mm Diameter digital DC/pulse neutron generator for subcritical reactor test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhong-Shuai; Chi, Qian; Liu, Lin-Mao

    2012-11-01

    A 50 mm diameter digital DC/pulse neutron generator was developed with 25 mm ceramic drive-in target neutron tube. It was applied in the subcritical reactor test of China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The generator can produce neutron in three modes: DC, pulse and multiple pulse. The maximum neutron yield of the generator is 1 × 108 n/s, while the maximum pulse frequency is 10 kHz, and the minimum pulse width is 10 μs. As a remote controlled generator, it is small in volume, easy to be connected and controlled. The tested results indicate that penning ion source has the feature of delay time in glow discharge, and it is easier for glow discharge to happen when switching the DC voltage of penning ion source into pulse. According to these two characteristics, the generator has been modified. This improved generator can be used in many other areas including Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA), neutron testing and experiment.

  2. Decontamination of PCBs-containing soil using subcritical water extraction process.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Park, Jeong-Hun; Shin, Moon-Su; Park, Ha-Seung

    2014-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are one of the excision compounds listed at the Stockholm convention in 2001. Although their use has been heavily restricted, PCBs can be found in some specific site-contaminated soils. Either removal or destruction is required prior to disposal. The subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of organic hazardous compounds from contaminated soils is a promising technique for hazardous waste contaminated-site cleanup. In this study, the removal of PCBs by the SCWE process was investigated. The effects of temperature and treatment time on removal efficiency have been determined. In the SCWE experiments, a removal percentage of 99.7% was obtained after 1h of treatment at 250°C. The mass removal efficiency of low-chlorinated species was higher than high-chlorinated congeners at lower temperatures, but it was oppositely observed at higher temperatures because the lower chlorinated congeners are formed by dechlorination of higher chlorinated congeners. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that the PCBs underwent partial degradation. Several degradation products including mono- and di-chlorinated biphenyls, oxygen-containing aromatic compounds, and small-size hydrocarbons were identified in the effluent water, which were not initially present in the contaminated soil.

  3. Optimization of subcritical water extraction of polysaccharides from Grifola frondosa using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liuqing; Qu, Hongyuan; Mao, Guanghua; Zhao, Ting; Li, Fang; Zhu, Bole; Zhang, Bingtao; Wu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Background: This research is among the few that has been conducted on the feasibility of subcritical water extraction (SWE) as a rapid and efficient extraction tool for polysaccharides. Objective: The aim of the study was to extractand optimize the parameter conditions of SWE of polysaccharides from Grifola frondosa using response surface methodology. Materials and Methods: In the study, SWEwas applied to extractbioactive compounds from G. frondosa. A preliminary analysis was made on the physical properties and content determination of extracts using SWE and hot water extraction (HWE). Analysis of the sample residues and antioxidant activities of the polysaccharides extracted by SWE and HWE were then evaluated. Results: The optimal extraction conditions include: extraction temperature of 210°C, extraction time of 43.65 min and the ratio of water to raw material of 26.15:1. Under these optimal conditions, the experimental yield of the polysaccharides (25.1 ± 0.3%) corresponded with the mean value predicted by the model and two times more than the mean value obtained by the traditional HWE. The antioxidant activities of polysaccharides extracted by SWE were generally higher than those extracted by HWE. From the study, the SWE technology could be a time-saving, high yield, and bioactive technique for production of polysaccharides. PMID:23772107

  4. Environmental risk assessment of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the aquatic environment: a case study including a cocktail scenario.

    PubMed

    Styrishave, Bjarne; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Ingerslev, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    We present an environmental risk assessment of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; citalopram, sertraline, and fluoxetine) in the aquatic environment based on two case scenarios. Abiotic and biotic degradation experiments and sorption estimates were used to predict environmental concentrations of three SSRIs from the wastewater of two psychiatric hospitals, the primary sector, and wastewater entering and leaving wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Assuming a sewage treatment retention time of 8 h, abiotic degradation was low, for all three SSRIs inhibitors, ranging between 0 and 2% for hydrolysis and 0 and 6% for photolysis. The biodegradation was also slow, ranging from 0 to 3% within an 8-h period. In untreated sewage, citalopram (CIT) and sertraline (SER) concentrations may be high enough to exert effects on the aquatic biota (CIT: 0.19-10.3 µg/L; SER: 0.14-17.1 µg/L). Removal of the pharmaceuticals is due primarily to sorption in the WWTP. Sertraline was estimated to have the highest concentrations in the sewage effluents, 4.4 and 19.9 ng/L for the two cases, respectively. In treated wastewater, individual SSRI concentrations are probably too low to exert effects on biota. By using concentration addition, a cocktail exposure scenario was estimated. The predicted concentration in the biota calculated from the cocktail effect was 0.05 and 0.16 nmol/g for the two cases, respectively, and SER was found to give the highest contribution to this cocktail effect. The results indicate that the concentrations in the wastewater effluents are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations likely to cause an effect in the aquatic biota.

  5. [Four cases of 5-fluorouracil-related hyperammonemia in patients with large intestinal cancer and multiple liver metastases, including a case of hyperammonemia treated using hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Wagatsuma, Kohei; Tani, Motohiro; Sasaki, Hajime; Naganawa, Yumiko; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Kayo; Satoh, Shuji; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    Systemic chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a standard treatment for unresectable or recurrent large intestinal cancer. Although hyperammonemia is a known side effect of 5-FU that can cause serious pathological conditions, only a few cases have been reported. We describe 4 cases of 5-FU-related hyperammonemia with impairment of consciousness in patients who received 5-FU chemotherapy for large intestinal cancer with multiple liver metastases. Hemodialysis was effective in 1 severe case. There have been no detailed reports on the use of hemodialysis for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU. Renal dysfunction is considered to be a risk factor for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU and it is necessary to pay particular attention in patients with renal dysfunction who receive chemotherapy with 5-FU. Here we summarize our cases together with 16 previously reported cases of hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU in Japan.

  6. Invariance Under Quasi-isometries of Subcritical and Supercritical Behavior in the Boolean Model of Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Cristian F.; Miranda, Daniel; Mussini, Filipe

    2016-02-01

    In this work we study the Poisson Boolean model of percolation in locally compact Polish metric spaces and we prove the invariance of subcritical and supercritical phases under mm-quasi-isometries. More precisely, we prove that if a metric space M is mm-quasi-isometric to another metric space N and the Poisson Boolean model in M exhibits any of the following: (a) a subcritical phase; (b) a supercritical phase; or (c) a phase transition, then respectively so does the Poisson Boolean model of percolation in N. Then we use these results in order to understand the phase transition phenomenon in a large family of metric spaces. Indeed, we study the Poisson Boolean model of percolation in the context of Riemannian manifolds, in a large family of nilpotent Lie groups and in Cayley graphs. Also, we prove the existence of a subcritical phase in Gromov spaces with bounded growth at some scale.

  7. Influence of humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki

    2014-05-01

    For the prevention of natural hazards related to the failure of rock, it is essential to investigate time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials. In addition, to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures, information of subcritical crack growth is essential. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. On the other hand, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Especially, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term integrity of a rock mass. However, influence of surrounding environmental conditions on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock has not been clarified yet. In this study, we investigated subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks. Specifically, we investigated the influence of relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in air at a constant temperature (50 °C). A marble obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia was used as a rock sample, because this is a homogeneous, fine-grained and brittle carbonate rock. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. In order to investigate the influence of environmental condition, all measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. It was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity in air was higher than that predicted from a calculation theoretically at 100 % relative

  8. Incubation time for sub-critical crack propagation in SiC-SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the time for sub-critical crack propagation is SiC-SiC composites at high temperatures. The effects of fiber thermal creep on the relaxation of crack bridging tractions in SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is considered in the present work, with the objective of studying the time-to propagation of sub-critical matrix cracks in this material at high temperatures. Under the condition of fiber stress relaxation in the bridiging zone, it is found that the crack opening and the stress intensity factor increase with time for sub-critical matrix cracks. The time elapsed before the stress intensity reaches the critical value for crack propagation is calculated as a function of the initial crack length, applied stress and temperature. Stability domains for matrix cracks are defined, which provide guidelines for conducting high-temperature crack propagation experiments.

  9. Enhanced enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis by subcritical carbon dioxide pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2014-04-01

    Most biomass pretreatment processes for sugar production are run at low-solid concentration (<10 wt.%). Subcritical carbon dioxide (CO2) could provide a more sustainable pretreatment medium while using relative high-solid contents (15 wt.%). The effects of subcritical CO2 pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse to the solid and glucan recoveries at different pretreatment conditions were investigated. Subsequently, enzymatic hydrolysis at different hydrolysis time was applied to obtain maximal glucose yield, which can be used for ethanol fermentation. The maximum glucose yield in enzyme hydrolyzate reached 38.5 g based on 100g raw material after 72 h of enzymatic hydrolysis, representing 93.0% glucose in sugarcane bagasse. The enhanced digestibilities of subcritical CO2 pretreated sugarcane bagasse were due to the removal of hemicellulose, which were confirmed by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA analyses.

  10. Subcritical transition to turbulence: What we can learn from the physics of glasses.

    PubMed

    Dauchot, Olivier; Bertin, Eric

    2012-09-01

    In this note, we discuss possible analogies between the subcritical transition to turbulence in shear flows and the glass transition in supercooled liquids. We briefly review recent experimental and numerical results, as well as theoretical proposals, and compare the difficulties arising in assessing the divergence of the turbulence lifetime in subcritical shear flow with that encountered for the relaxation time in the study of the glass transition. In order to go beyond the purely methodological similarities, we further elaborate on this analogy and propose a simple model for the transition to turbulence, inspired by the random energy model (a standard model for the glass transition), with the aim to possibly foster yet-unexplored directions of research in subcritical shear flows.

  11. On parameterization of spectral line profiles including the speed-dependence in the case of gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    The physically grounded parameterization of a line profile including the speed-dependence was performed. It was shown that two actual parameters of the quadratic speed-dependence appear in gas mixtures instead of a single parameter in a pure gas. One of the parameters is associated with hard elastic velocity-changing collisions; the second is connected with the other sorts of collisions. For comparable concentrations of gas species, they may differ by 50% and depend nonlinearly on partial gas pressures. The dimensionless line narrowing parameter also reveals nonlinear pressure-dependence. The computational expressions for the line profile including all main physical mechanisms of its forming in conditions of gas mixtures are derived.

  12. Mathematical speech and practical action: a case study of the challenges of including mathematics in a school technology project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bungum, Berit; Manshadi, Saeed; Atle Lysne, Dag

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a case study of how a teacher and nine-year-old students deal with mathematics in a practical technology project. By analysing videotaped dialogues between teacher and a pair of students working on constructing a house model, we identify challenges of meaningful inclusion of mathematics in the project. The dialogues are analysed in terms of an analytical framework where four categories of interaction patterns are combined with two main paradigms of mathematics teaching: the exercise paradigm and landscapes of interaction. The project in itself has a potential for facilitating landscapes of investigation in mathematics teaching. However, we find that the teacher as well as students adheres to the exercise paradigm when mathematics is involved in the activity. Two illustrating episodes from the project are examined and presented in detail in this paper. The findings illustrate that the conceptions teachers and students hold of what mathematics teaching means can act as an obstacle in attempts to realize mathematics teaching in creative and meaningful contexts for young students. We suggest that making the various purposes of a project more explicit may help overcome this obstacle, and that the mathematics involved might be taught in separate sessions in order to form a constructive part of a cross-curricular project.

  13. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  14. Including the urban heat island in spatial heat health risk assessment strategies: a case study for Birmingham, UK

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heatwaves present a significant health risk and the hazard is likely to escalate with the increased future temperatures presently predicted by climate change models. The impact of heatwaves is often felt strongest in towns and cities where populations are concentrated and where the climate is often unintentionally modified to produce an urban heat island effect; where urban areas can be significantly warmer than surrounding rural areas. The purpose of this interdisciplinary study is to integrate remotely sensed urban heat island data alongside commercial social segmentation data via a spatial risk assessment methodology in order to highlight potential heat health risk areas and build the foundations for a climate change risk assessment. This paper uses the city of Birmingham, UK as a case study area. Results When looking at vulnerable sections of the population, the analysis identifies a concentration of "very high" risk areas within the city centre, and a number of pockets of "high risk" areas scattered throughout the conurbation. Further analysis looks at household level data which yields a complicated picture with a considerable range of vulnerabilities at a neighbourhood scale. Conclusions The results illustrate that a concentration of "very high" risk people live within the urban heat island, and this should be taken into account by urban planners and city centre environmental managers when considering climate change adaptation strategies or heatwave alert schemes. The methodology has been designed to be transparent and to make use of powerful and readily available datasets so that it can be easily replicated in other urban areas. PMID:21682872

  15. Development of a computer algorithm for the analysis of variable-frequency AC drives: Case studies included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Benjamin, Owen

    1991-01-01

    The development of computer software for performance prediction and analysis of voltage-fed, variable-frequency AC drives for space power applications is discussed. The AC drives discussed include the pulse width modulated inverter (PWMI), a six-step inverter and the pulse density modulated inverter (PDMI), each individually connected to a wound-rotor induction motor. Various d-q transformation models of the induction motor are incorporated for user-selection of the most applicable model for the intended purpose. Simulation results of selected AC drives correlate satisfactorily with published results. Future additions to the algorithm are indicated. These improvements should enhance the applicability of the computer program to the design and analysis of space power systems.

  16. Including impacts of particulate emissions on marine ecosystems in life cycle assessment: the case of offshore oil and gas production.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Karin; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Rye, Henrik; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2011-10-01

    Life cycle assessment is increasingly used to assess the environmental performance of fossil energy systems. Two of the dominant emissions of offshore oil and gas production to the marine environment are the discharge of produced water and drilling waste. Although environmental impacts of produced water are predominantly due to chemical stressors, a major concern regarding drilling waste discharge is the potential physical impact due to particles. At present, impact indicators for particulate emissions are not yet available in life cycle assessment. Here, we develop characterization factors for 2 distinct impacts of particulate emissions: an increased turbidity zone in the water column and physical burial of benthic communities. The characterization factor for turbidity is developed analogous to characterization factors for toxic impacts, and ranges from 1.4 PAF (potentially affected fraction) · m(3) /d/kg(p) (kilogram particulate) to 7.0 x 10³ [corrected] for drilling mud particles discharged from the rig. The characterization factor for burial describes the volume of sediment that is impacted by particle deposition on the seafloor and equals 2.0 × 10(-1) PAF · m(3) /d/kg(p) for cutting particles. This characterization factor is quantified on the basis of initial deposition layer characteristics, such as height and surface area, the initial benthic response, and the recovery rate. We assessed the relevance of including particulate emissions in an impact assessment of offshore oil and gas production. Accordingly, the total impact on the water column and on the sediment was quantified based on emission data of produced water and drilling waste for all oil and gas fields on the Norwegian continental shelf in 2008. Our results show that cutting particles contribute substantially to the total impact of offshore oil and gas production on marine sediments, with a relative contribution of 55% and 31% on the regional and global scale, respectively. In contrast, the

  17. Chemical alternatives assessment of different flame retardants - A case study including multi-walled carbon nanotubes as synergist.

    PubMed

    Aschberger, Karin; Campia, Ivana; Pesudo, Laia Quiros; Radovnikovic, Anita; Reina, Vittorio

    2017-04-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) are a diverse group of chemicals used as additives in a wide range of products to inhibit, suppress, or delay ignition and to prevent the spread of fire. Halogenated FRs (HFRs) are widely used because of their low impact on other material properties and the low loading levels necessary to meet the required flame retardancy. Health and environmental hazards associated with some halogenated FRs have driven research for identifying safer alternatives. A variety of halogen-free FRs are available on the market, including organic (phosphorus and nitrogen based chemicals) and inorganic (metals) materials. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been demonstrated to act as an effective/synergistic co-additive in some FR applications and could thereby contribute to reducing the loading of FRs in products and improving their performance. As part of the FP7 project DEROCA we carried out a chemical alternatives assessment (CAA). This is a methodology for identifying, comparing and selecting safer alternatives to chemicals of concern based on criteria for categorising human and environmental toxicity as well as environmental fate. In the project we assessed the hazard data of different halogen-free FRs to be applied in 5 industrial and consumer products and here we present the results for MWCNT, aluminium diethylphosphinate, aluminium trihydroxide, N-alkoxy hindered amines and red phosphorus compared to the HFR decabromodiphenylether. We consulted the REACH guidance, the criteria of the U.S.-EPA Design for Environment (DfE) and the GreenScreen® Assessment to assess and compare intrinsic properties affecting the hazard potential. A comparison/ranking of exposure reference values such as Derived No Effect Levels (DNELs) showed that FRs of concern are not identified by a low DNEL. A comparison based on hazard designations according to the U.S.-EPA DfE and GreenScreen® for human health endpoints, aquatic toxicity and environmental fate showed that the

  18. ELUTION OF ORGANIC SOLUTES FROM DIFFERENT POLARITY SORBENTS USING SUBCRITICAL WATER. (R825394)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intermolecular interactions between organic solutes and sorbent matrices under subcritical water conditions have been investigated at a pressure of 50 bar and temperatures ranging from 50 to 250°C. Both polar and nonpolar organics (chlorophenols, amines, n-alkanes...

  19. Development of reactivity feedback effect measurement techniques under sub-critical condition in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, A.; Nishi, H.; Suzuki, T.; Okajima, S.; Kanemoto, S.

    2012-07-01

    The first-of-a-kind reactor has been licensed by a safety examination of the plant design based on the measured data in precedent mock-up experiments. The validity of the safety design can be confirmed without a mock-up experiment, if the reactor feed-back characteristics can be measured before operation, with the constructed reactor itself. The 'Synthesis Method', a systematic and sophisticated method of sub-criticality measurement, is proposed in this work to ensure the safety margin before operation. The 'Synthesis Method' is based on the modified source multiplication method (MSM) combined with the noise analysis method to measure the reference sub-criticality level for MSM. A numerical simulation for the control-rod reactivity worth and the isothermal feed-back reactivity was conducted for typical fast reactors of 100 MWe-size, 300 MWe-size, 750 MWe-size, and 1500 MWe-size to investigate the applicability of Synthesis Method. The number of neutron detectors and their positions necessary for the measurement were investigated for both methods of MSM and the noise analysis by a series of parametric survey calculations. As a result, it was suggested that a neutron detector located above the core center and three or more neutron detectors located above the radial blanket region enable the measurement of sub-criticality within 10% uncertainty from -$0.5 to -$2 and within 15% uncertainty for the deeper sub-criticality. (authors)

  20. K/sub infinity/-meter concept verified via subcritical-critical TRIGA experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ocampo Mansilla, H.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents a technique for building a device to measure the k/sub infinity/ of a spent nuclear fuel assembly discharged from the core of a nuclear power plant. The device, called a k/sub infinity/-meter, consists of a cross-shaped subcritical assembly, two artificial neutron sources, and two separate neutron counting systems. The central position of the subcritical assembly is used to measure k/sub infinity/ of the spent fuel assembly. The initial subcritical assembly is calibrated to determine its k/sub eff/ and verify the assigned k/sub infinity/ of a selected fuel assembly placed in the central position. Count rates are taken with the fuel assembly of known k/sub infinity/'s placed in the central position and then repeated with a fuel assembly of unknown k/sub infinity/ placed in the central position. The count rate ratio of the unknown fuel assembly to the known fuel assembly is used to determine the k/sub infinity/ of the unknown fuel assembly. The k/sub infinity/ of the unknown fuel assembly is represented as a polynomial function of the count rate ratios. The coefficients of the polynomial equation are determined using the neutronic codes LEOPARD and EXTERMINATOR-II. The analytical approach has been validated by performing several subcritical/critical experiments, using the Penn State Breazeale TRIGA Reactor (PSBR), and comparing the experimental results with the calculations.

  1. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-15

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  2. Production of keto-disaccharides from aldo-disaccharides in subcritical aqueous ethanol.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Ming; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Isomerization of disaccharides (maltose, isomaltose, cellobiose, lactose, melibiose, palatinose, sucrose, and trehalose) was investigated in subcritical aqueous ethanol. A marked increase in the isomerization of aldo-disaccharides to keto-disaccharides was noted and their hydrolytic reactions were suppressed with increasing ethanol concentration. Under any study condition, the maximum yield of keto-disaccharides produced from aldo-disaccharides linked by β-glycosidic bond was higher than that produced from aldo-disaccharides linked by α-glycosidic bond. Palatinose, a keto-disaccharide, mainly underwent decomposition rather than isomerization in subcritical water and subcritical aqueous ethanol. No isomerization was noted for the non-reducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose. The rate constant of maltose to maltulose isomerization almost doubled by changing solvent from subcritical water to 80 wt% aqueous ethanol at 220 °C. Increased maltose monohydrate concentration in feed decreased the conversion of maltose and the maximum yield of maltulose, but increased the productivity of maltulose. The maximum productivity of maltulose was ca. 41 g/(h kg-solution).

  3. Measuring alpha eigenvalue of a subcritical system by a intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Meng-chun; Gong, Jian; Peng, Tai-ping; Li, Zhong-bao; Zhang, Jian-hua; Tang, Deng-pan; Bai, Yun; Peng, Xian-jue; Zeng, Qing

    2015-07-01

    Intense-Pulsed-Neutron-Source (IPNS) technique is a new approach to measure the subcriticality of a reactor system, which has been theoretically analyzed by us while not been verified in experiment in other reference. In INPS technique the reactivity is derived via the system response to a prompt pulsed neutron source. The method utilizes very intense neutron pulses (about 1010 neutrons/pulse) with the duration ranging from 10 ns to 100 ns, which are generated by the dense plasma focus (DPF) device filled with pure DT mixture as the working gas. The neutron pulse in high intensity provides the opportunity to measure the signal using a scintillator and a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) (the intense pulse radiation measure method) with the flight distance of only twenty centimeters. The attenuation of the dense plasma focus device must be faster than the subcritical system so that the attenuation of the system can be researched. In this paper, after a neutron pulse is injected into the subcritical reactor, the subcriticality is determined by measuring the instantaneous characteristics of the leaking reactor neutron. The Monte Carlo analysis shows that, with the linear arrangement of the dense plasma focus, the subcritical system and the detector, the signal-to-noise ratio at the measure point meets the investigate requirement, in which the 14 MeV neutrons are attenuated by the subcritical system. The detector is close with the subcritical system to reduce the influence of the outer background and the spread of time-of-flight of the neutrons. The measure system utilizing gated detection technology is characterized with fast attenuation time and large linear current, the a value obtained with this method is 2.05 μs{sup -1} while the measurements using the {sup 252}Cf stochastic pulsed source method and the Rossi-a method were 2.18μs{sup -1} and 2.16μs{sup -1}.It showed that the measured result obtained with dense plasma focus instantaneous pulsed source is consistent

  4. Plutonium Critical Mass Curve Comparison to Mass at Upper Subcritical Limit (USL) Using Whisper

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise; Zhang, Ning

    2016-09-27

    Whisper is computational software designed to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst with validation studies with the MCNP® Monte Carlo radiation transport package. Standard approaches to validation rely on the selection of benchmarks based upon expert judgment. Whisper uses sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) methods to select relevant benchmarks to a particular application or set of applications being analyzed. Using these benchmarks, Whisper computes a calculational margin. Whisper attempts to quantify the margin of subcriticality (MOS) from errors in software and uncertainties in nuclear data. The combination of the Whisper-derived calculational margin and MOS comprise the baseline upper subcritical limit (USL), to which an additional margin may be applied by the nuclear criticality safety analyst as appropriate to ensure subcriticality. A series of critical mass curves for plutonium, similar to those found in Figure 31 of LA-10860-MS, have been generated using MCNP6.1.1 and the iterative parameter study software, WORM_Solver. The baseline USL for each of the data points of the curves was then computed using Whisper 1.1. The USL was then used to determine the equivalent mass for plutonium metal-water system. ANSI/ANS-8.1 states that it is acceptable to use handbook data, such as the data directly from the LA-10860-MS, as it is already considered validated (Section 4.3 4) “Use of subcritical limit data provided in ANSI/ANS standards or accepted reference publications does not require further validation.”). This paper attempts to take a novel approach to visualize traditional critical mass curves and allows comparison with the amount of mass for which the keff is equal to the USL (calculational margin + margin of subcriticality). However, the intent is to plot the critical mass data along with USL, not to suggest that already accepted handbook data should have new and more rigorous requirements for validation.

  5. Catalyst-free ethyl biodiesel production from rice bran under subcritical condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zullaikah, Siti; Afifudin, Riza; Amalia, Rizky

    2015-12-01

    In-situ ethyl biodiesel production from rice bran under subcritical water and ethanol with no catalyst was employed. This process is environmentally friendly and is very flexible in term of feedstock utilization since it can handle relatively high moisture and free fatty acids (FFAs) contents. In addition, the alcohol, i.e. bioethanol, is a non-toxic, biodegradable, and green raw material when produced from non-edible biomass residues, leading to a 100% renewable biodiesel. The fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, ethyl biodiesel) are better than fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs, methyl biodiesel) in terms of fuel properties, including cetane number, oxidation stability and cold flow properties. The influences of the operating variables such as reaction time (1 - 10 h), ethanol concentration (12.5 - 87.5%), and pressurizing gas (N2 and CO2) on the ethyl biodiesel yield and purity have been investigated systematically while the temperature and pressure were kept constant at 200 °C and 40 bar. The optimum results were obtained at 5 h reaction time and 75% ethanol concentration using CO2 as compressing gas. Ethyl biodiesel yield and purity of 58.78% and 61.35%, respectively, were obtained using rice bran with initial FFAs content of 37.64%. FFAs level was reduced to 14.22% with crude ethyl biodiesel recovery of 95.98%. Increasing the reaction time up to 10 h only increased the yield and purity by only about 3%. Under N2 atmosphere and at the same operating conditions (5h and 75% ethanol), ethyl biodiesel yield and purity decreased to 54.63% and 58.07%, respectively, while FFAs level was increased to 17.93% and crude ethyl biodiesel recovery decreased to 87.32%.

  6. Kinetic and Thermodynamics studies for Castor Oil Extraction Using Subcritical Water Technology.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoez, Wael; Ashour, Eman; Naguib, Shahenaz M; Hilal, Amr; Al Mahdy, Dalia A; Mahrous, Engy A; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2016-06-01

    In this work both kinetic and thermodynamics of castor oil extraction from its seeds using subcritical water technique were studied. It was found that the extraction process followed two consecutive steps. In these steps, the oil was firstly extracted from inside the powder by diffusion mechanism. Then the extracted oil, due to extending the extraction time under high temperature and pressure, was subjected to a decomposition reaction following first order mechanism. The experimental data correlated well with the irreversible consecutive unimolecular-type first order mechanism. The values of both oil extraction rate constants and decomposition rate constants were calculated through non-linear fitting using DataFit software. The extraction rate constants were found to be 0.0019, 0.024, 0.098, 0.1 and 0.117 min(-1), while the decomposition rate constants were 0.057, 0.059, 0.014, 0.019 and 0.17 min(-1) at extraction temperatures of 240, 250, 260, 270 and 280°C, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of the oil extraction process were investigated using Arrhenius equation. The values of the activation energy, Ea, and the frequency factor, A, were 73 kJ mol(-1) and 946, 002 min(-1), respectively. The physicochemical properties of the extracted castor oil including the specific gravity, viscosity, acid value, pH value and calorific value were found to be 0.947, 7.487, 1.094 mg KOH/g, 6.1, and 41.5 MJ/Kg, respectively. Gas chromatography analysis showed that ricinoleic acid (83.6%) appears as the predominant fatty acid in the extracted oil followed by oleic acid (5.5%) and linoleic acid (2.3%).

  7. Influence of temperature and water on subcritical crack growth parameters and long-term strength for igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Yamanaka, Hiroshi; Oe, Yuma; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Understanding of time-dependent deformation and fracture propagation in rock is essential, since the knowledge of the long-term integrity of rock is required for many subsurface structures excavated in a rock mass. Time-dependent fracture propagation has been invoked as a potential key mechanism responsible for the increase in seismicity preceding earthquake ruptures and volcanic eruptions. In engineering projects, and in preventing natural hazards, the study of subcritical crack growth and the long-term strength of rock is necessary. Since the long-term strength is affected by the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters, it is important to know the influence of the surrounding environment on the subcritical crack growth parameters and long-term strength. The influence of the surrounding environment on the subcritical crack growth parameters, however, has not been completely clarified yet. In this study, the subcritical crack growth parameters were estimated under various environmental conditions on igneous rocks (andesite and granite) using the Double-Torsion method. Based on the results of subcritical crack growth parameters estimations, we calculated the long-term strength of rock. It was shown that the subcritical crack growth parameters were affected by the environmental conditions such as the temperature, humidity and existence of water. Especially, it was shown that the subcritical crack growth index in water was smaller than that in air. When the relative humidity of the air was higher, subcritical crack growth index tended to be smaller. The subcritical crack growth index at 90 per cent relative humidity was close to the value in water. By the calculation based on the results of our subcritical crack growth parameters estimation, it was shown that long-term strength decreased under the conditions of higher temperature, humidity in air and in water. It is concluded that the subcritical crack growth parameters and long-term strength are affected by

  8. Preparation of salvianolic acid A by the degradation reaction of salvianolic acid B in subcritical water integrated with pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaizhi; Cheng, Yan; Dong, Hongjing; Wang, Xiao; Li, Jia; Gao, Qianshan

    2016-10-14

    Salvianolic acid A is the major bioactive compound in Danshen, however, due to the chemical instability and low content in Danshen, it is difficult to extract amount of salvianolic acid A. Therefore, this study was to establish an effective strategy for obtaining adequate amount of salvianolic acid A, subcritical water extraction was used to degrade salvianolic acid B and prepare salvianolic acid A. Different reaction conditions including temperature, time, concentration and pH value in subcritical water were investigated. Under 40mg/mL of reactant concentration, 180°C of temperature, 4.0 of pH value and 60min of reaction time, the highest yield rate of salvianolic acid A reached 34.86%. Then, the degradation products were successfully separated by pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography with the solvent system Pet-EtAc-n-BuOH-H2O (2:3:1:9, v/v), where 10mM TFA was added in stationary phase and 10mM NH3·H2O in mobile phase. As a result, a total of 227.3mg of salvianolic acid A at 98.2% purity, 38.9mg of danshensu at 99.3% purity, 9.5mg of salvianolic acid D at 92.7% purity, and 32.8mg of protocatechuic aldehyde at 93.1% purity were obtained from 1.2g degradation products of salvianolic acid B by one-step purification. The results demonstrated that the combinative application of subcritical water and pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography is a potential technique for the preparative separation of salvianolic acid A from salvianolic acid B.

  9. Intestinal metaplasia of the stomach and esophagus: an immunohistochemical study of 60 cases including comparison with normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chlumská, Alena; Mukenšnabl, Petr; Mareček, Petr; Zámečník, Michal

    2014-07-01

    Recently, a new classification of intestinal metaplasia (IM) using immunohistochemical mucin markers was proposed. Two following types of IM were defined: (1) a mixed gastric and intestinal type also called incomplete IM; (2) a purely intestinal type, also called complete IM. We present a series of 30 cases of gastric IM and 30 cases of IM of the esophagus, using this new classification. In all gastric cases, IM developed in the mucus-neck region in the form of incomplete IM. Toward the mucosa surface, it matured gradually into complete IM. This maturation showed a gradual reduction of both foveolar mucin MUC5AC and pyloric gland mucin MUC6. In two of 30 cases, IM was of the incomplete hyperproliferative type. In one case, focal high-grade adenomatous dysplasia was found in the incomplete IM. In the esophageal cases, IM was found in inflamed cardiac-type mucosa, and it was usually of the incomplete type, with almost diffuse positivity for MUC5AC and with rare positivity of MUC6. The goblet cells and some cylindrical cells expressed intestinal mucin MUC2. The proliferation was higher than in the complete IM, and in one case, focal low grade adenomatous dysplasia was found. In addition, we examined the expression of mucins in normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa. These cases included 50 duodenal biopsies, 50 biopsies from the ileum, and 50 biopsies from the colon. The inflamed cases included celiac disease, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. Some goblet cells of the normal intestinal mucosa expressed both MUC2 and MUC5AC. More numerous MUC5AC+ goblet cells were found in the inflamed intestinal mucosa. In the duodenal and small intestinal mucosa, even the MUC6 positivity of a few goblet or cylindrical cells was found. In sum, our results indicate that incomplete IM is an initial step of the metaplastic process. It can mature into complete IM, or alternatively, it can develop dysplasia or adenocarcinoma. In addition, we found that gastric-type mucins are also

  10. Coupling MCNP-DSP and LAHET Monte Carlo Codes for Designing Subcriticality Monitors for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Rugama, Y. Munoz-Cobos, J.; Perez, R.

    2000-10-23

    The design of reactivity monitoring systems for accelerator-driven systems must be investigated to ensure that such systems remain subcritical during operation. The Monte Carlo codes LAHET and MCNP-DSP were combined together to facilitate the design of reactivity monitoring systems. The coupling of LAHET and MCNP-DSP provides a tool that can be used to simulate a variety of subcritical measurements such as the pulsed neutron, Rossi-{alpha}, or noise analysis measurements.

  11. Comparing the new generation accelerator driven subcritical reactor system (ADS) to traditional critical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemah, Elif; Akkaya, Recep; Tokgöz, Seyit Rıza

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the accelerator driven subcritical reactors have taken great interest worldwide. The Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been used to produce neutron in subcritical state by the external proton beam source. These reactors, which are hybrid systems, are important in production of clean and safe energy and conversion of radioactive waste. The ADS with the selection of reliability and robust target materials have been the new generation of fission reactors. In addition, in the ADS Reactors the problems of long-lived radioactive fission products and waste actinides encountered in the fission process of the reactor during incineration can be solved, and ADS has come to the forefront of thorium as fuel for the reactors.

  12. Subcritical CO2 pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse and its enzymatic hydrolysis for sugar production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2013-12-01

    The present work investigated the effects of subcritical CO2 pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse at different CO2 pressure, pretreatment time, and temperature with relative high-solid concentration (15% w/v) to the composition of prehydrolyzate and the enzymatic hydrolysis. The results indicated that the maximum xylose yields in prehydrolyzate liquid were 15.78 g (combined 3.16 g xylose and 12.62 g xylo-oligosaccharides per 100g raw material). Due to the effective removal of hemicellulose, the maximum glucose yield in enzyme hydrolyzate reached 37.99 g per 100g raw material, representing 91.87% of glucose in the sugarcane bagasse. The maximal total sugars yield (combined xylose and glucose both in prehydrolyzate and enzymatic hydrolyzate) were 52.95 g based on 100g raw material. These results indicated that subcritical CO2 pretreatment can effectively improve the enzymatic hydrolysis, so it could be successfully applied to sugarcane bagasse.

  13. Sub-critical water hydrolysis of hog hair for amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Esteban, M B; García, A J; Ramos, P; Márquez, M C

    2010-04-01

    A recycling method using sub-critical water hydrolysis to convert hog hair from slaughterhouses into amino acids was developed. The influence of the reaction parameters such as temperature, time of reaction and initial substrate concentration were investigated in a batch reactor. The quality and quantity of amino acids in hydrolysates were determined and 17 kinds of amino acids were obtained. Under the tested conditions, the highest amino acid yield (325 mg/g protein) was reached at an initial substrate concentration of 10 g/l, a temperature of 250 degrees C and a reaction time of 60 min. A large amount of low-molecular weight amino acids, such alanine and glycine, was observed at these operating conditions. Sub-critical water hydrolysis was confirmed as an effective and practical process to recover amino acids from hog hair waste.

  14. Subcritical ethanol extraction of flavonoids from Moringa oleifera leaf and evaluation of antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Yujie; Ding, Hui; Liu, Shejiang; Han, Xu; Gui, Jianzhou; Liu, Dan

    2017-03-01

    A large-scale process to extract flavonoids from Moringa oleifera leaf by subcritical ethanol was developed and HPLC-MS analysis was conducted to qualitatively identify the compounds in the extracts. To optimize the effects of process parameters on the yield of flavonoids, a Box-Behnken design combined with response surface methodology was conducted in the present work. The results indicated that the highest extraction yield of flavonoids by subcritical ethanol extraction could reach 2.60% using 70% ethanol at 126.6°C for 2.05h extraction. Under the optimized conditions, flavonoids yield was substantially improved by 26.7% compared with the traditional ethanol reflux method while the extraction time was only 2h, and obvious energy saving was observed. FRAP and DPPH assays showed that the extracts had strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities.

  15. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  16. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  17. Solvent tailoring in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1982-August 1982. [Comparison of subcritical and supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrer, A.R.; Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Williams, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The initial objective of this work was to study the phase distribution of donor solvents and solvent mixtures during the liquefaction of coal, to investigate the effects of phase distribution on coal conversion, and to determine the advantages, if any, of operating at subcritical and/or supercritical conditions. Computer simulations were used to predict the phase distribution, for various binary systems, as a function of temperature. The FLASH program was used to theoretically predict phase distribution for various model systems. Due to limitations in the computer program, success was achieved only in a few cases. Even in these cases, the existence of two-phase regions was observed only at temperatures and pressures far below normal liquefaction conditions. An extensive review of the literature was carried out in order to survey methods of experimentally studying vapor-liquid equilibria. Finally, some preliminary laboratory studies were carried out with the use of benzothiophene-dodecane as the model reaction system. It was felt that the study of the effect of reactor configuration on conversion would provide insight into whether phase distribution or mass transfer was the limiting consideration for coal conversion. However, no conclusive results were obtained from these studies.

  18. Micromechanisms of Cyclic and Environmentally-Assisted Subcritical Crack Growth in Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    and not simply a consequence of stress - corrosion cracking (static fatigue) [4,12]. To achieve this, crack extension has been monitored at constant K...11 m/cycle, for crack sizes of between 20 and 300 tm, were found to show a negative power-law dependency on the nominal (applied) maximum stress ... stress /life (S/N) approach or using fracture mechanics concepts which incorporate the subcritical growth behavior of both "long" and "small" cracks (Fig

  19. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron experiments : data processing and spatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    The YALINA-Booster experiments and analyses are part of the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory of USA and the Joint Institute for Power & Nuclear Research - SOSNY of Belarus for studying the physics of accelerator driven systems for nuclear energy applications using low enriched uranium. The YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly is utilized for studying the kinetics of accelerator driven systems with its highly intensive D-T or D-D pulsed neutron source. In particular, the pulsed neutron methods are used to determine the reactivity of the subcritical system. This report examines the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster facility with different configurations for the subcritical assembly. The 1141 configuration with 90% U-235 fuel and the 1185 configuration with 36% or 21% U-235 fuel are examined. The Sjoestrand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the different configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from the experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations inside the subcritical assembly and the types of detector used for the measurements. In this report, Bell's spatial correction factors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo model to remove the detector dependences. The large differences between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone of the YALINA-Booster are reduced after applying the spatial corrections. In addition, the estimated reactivity values after the spatial corrections are much less spatially dependent.

  20. The effect of fluid composition, salinity, and acidity on subcritical crack growth in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, Anne Schad; Røyne, Anja; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Aubry, Jérôme; Renard, François

    2016-03-01

    Chemically activated processes of subcritical cracking in calcite control the time-dependent strength of this mineral, which is a major constituent of the Earth's brittle upper crust. Here experimental data on subcritical crack growth are acquired with a double torsion apparatus to characterize the influence of fluid pH (range 5-7.5) and ionic strength and species (Na2SO4, NaCl, MgSO4, and MgCl2) on the propagation of microcracks in calcite single crystals. The effect of different ions on crack healing has also been investigated by decreasing the load on the crack for durations up to 30 min and allowing it to relax and close. All solutions were saturated with CaCO3. The crack velocities reached during the experiments are in the range 10-9-10-2 m/s and cover the range of subcritical to close to dynamic rupture propagation velocities. Results show that for calcite saturated solutions, the energy necessary to fracture calcite is independent of pH. As a consequence, the effects of fluid salinity, measured through its ionic strength, or the variation of water activity have stronger effects on subcritical crack propagation in calcite than pH. Consequently, when considering the geological sequestration of CO2 into carbonate reservoirs, the decrease of pH within the range of 5-7.5 due to CO2 dissolution into water should not significantly alter the rate of fracturing of calcite. Increase in salinity caused by drying may lead to further reduction in cracking and consequently a decrease in brittle creep. The healing of cracks is found to vary with the specific ions present.

  1. Pressure recovery, drag, and subcritical stability characteristics of conical supersonic diffusers with boundary-layer removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obey, Leonard T; Englert, Gerald W; Nussdorfer, Theodore J , Jr

    1952-01-01

    A study of two 20 degrees half-angle, low mass-flow ratio conical supersonic inlets with cone boundary-layer bleed was made on a 16-inch ram-jet engine in the Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel. A greater stable subcritical range of operation was obtained with the bleed inlets than with the corresponding inlet without boundary-layer bleed. The drag added by the bleed system was small.

  2. Advanced Subcritical Assistance Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator: An Imperative Solution for the Future of NASA Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, F. J.

    A new generation of radioisotope thermoelectrical generator is proposed for very long space exploration missions. The Advanced Subcritical Assistance Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (ASA-RTG) amplify the power from natural decay of pu-238 by a small subcritical multiplication produced from the small neutron background generated from (α, n) reactions between the α particles from Pu-238 and beryllium, lithium or other low-Z isotope, extracting the maximum advantage and performance from the precious α disintegration, and then of the very scarce pu-238. The process is self controlled by the natural decay of Pu-238 with the progressive reduction of the power output (RTG) and additionally and simultaneously compensate by the natural decay of a neutronic poisson which increase simultaneously the subcritical multiplication resulting in a contrary effect, i.e., causing an increase in the power. ASA-RTG is not in conflict with previous RTG, and could fit within the type of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator developed for NASA space missions as the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG).

  3. Optimization of subcritical fluid extraction of bioactive compounds using Hansen solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, K; King, J W; Monrad, J K; Howard, L R; Hansen, C M

    2009-08-01

    Process engineering operations in food and nutraceutical industries pertaining to the design of extraction of value-added products from biomass using pressurized liquids involve a careful selection of the solvent and optimal temperature conditions to achieve maximum yield. Complex molecular structure and limited physical property data in the literature of biological solutes extracted from biomass compounds have necessitated the process modeling of such operations. In this study, we have applied the Hansen 3-dimensional solubility parameter concept to optimize the extraction of molecularly complex solutes using subcritical fluid solvents. Hansen solubility spheres characterized by the relative energy differences (RED) have been used to characterize and quantify the solute-subcritical solvent interactions as a function of temperature. The solvent power of subcritical water and compressed hydroethanolic mixtures above their boiling points has been characterized using the above-mentioned method. The use of group contribution methods in collaboration with computerized algorithms to plot the Hansen spheres provides a quantitative prediction tool for optimizing the design of extraction conditions. The method can be used to estimate conditions for solute-solvent miscibility, an optimum temperature range for conducting extractions under pressurized conditions, and approximate extraction conditions of solutes from natural matrices.

  4. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio; Davila, Jesus

    2015-07-23

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  5. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, G. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1-20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ˜0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  6. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  7. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Davila, Jesus; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides 232Th, 238U and 237Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  8. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V. Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1–20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ∼0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  9. Turbulence effect on crossflow around a circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, W. Z.; Saharon, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of freestream turbulence on the flow around a smooth circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers from 5.2 x 10 to the 4th power to 2.09 x 10 to the 5th power was conducted. Measurements show that the interaction of incident turbulence with the initial laminar boundary layer: (1) modifies the characteristics of the mean surface pressure distribution; (2) induces an aft shift in the separation point ranging from 5 to 50 beyond the laminar separation angle of 80 degrees; and, (3) reduces the mean drag coefficient to values between 97 and 46% of its nearly constant laminar counterpart. The extent of these changes depends on the particular Reynolds number background turbulence combination. These results demonstrate that a boundary-layer flow similar to that found in critical, supercritical and/or transcritical flow regimes is induced by turbulence at subcritical Reynolds numbers and, hence, the effect of turbulence is equivalent to an effective increase in the Reynolds number. The change in the nature and properties of the boundary layer in the subcritical regime, consequent upon the penetration of turbulence into it, is in agreement with the model proposed by the vorticity-amplification theory.

  10. Efficiency comparison of subcritical OTEC power cycle using various working fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jung-In; Son, Chang-Hyo; Baek, Seung-Moon; Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Lee, Ho-Saeng

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the thermal efficiency and main component size of the subcritical ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power cycle using various working fluids under different operation conditions. The analysis procedure was performed with a simulation program written in Engineering Equation Solver. With the given analysis conditions, efficiencies of three types of working fluids were evaluated and compared. It was found that the thermal efficiencies of the subcritical OTEC power cycle depend strongly on the evaporating and condensing temperature, and turbine efficiency, while not roughly depending on superheating degrees and pump efficiencies. With a thorough grasp of these results, an efficient OTEC power cycle can be designed. R717 and R404A yielded the highest and lowest thermal efficiencies among the wet fluids, and R22 showed the largest efficiency among the dry fluids. For the iso-entropic fluids, R245fa provided the highest thermal efficiency. In comparison of main component sizes, R404A and R744 had the largest and smallest condenser size, respectively. Also, R744 exhibited the smallest evaporator size, and R404A and R227ea show the largest size. And R744 and R245fa gave the largest and smallest pump size, respectively. From the results of thermal efficiency and main components for various working fluids in the OTEC power cycle, R717 in the subcritical OTEC power cycle is the preferred working fluid, except for its toxicity and flammability.

  11. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of organic, wet wastes for carbon cycling in regenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Luther, Amanda; Rabaey, Korneel; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter; Brilman, Wim

    2016-07-01

    For long-term human spaceflight missions, one of the major requirements is the regenerative life support system which has to be capable of recycling carbon, nutrients and water from both solid and liquid wastes generated by the crew and by the local production of food through living organisms (higher plants, fungi, algae, bacteria, …). The European Space Agency's Life Support System, envisioned by the MELiSSA project, consists of a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem, in which the waste receiving compartment (so-called compartment I or briefly 'CI') is based on thermophilic fermentation. However, as the waste generated by the crew compartment and food production compartment contain typical plant fibres (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), these recalcitrant fibres end up largely unaffected in the digestate (sludge) generated in the C-I compartment. Therefore, the C-I compartment has to be supplemented with a so-called fibre degradation unit (in short, FDU) for further oxidation or degradation of said plant fibres. A potential solution to degrading these plant fibres and other recalcitrant organics is their oxidation, by means of subcritical or supercritical water, into reusable CO2 while retaining the nutrients in an organic-free liquid effluent. By taking advantage of the altered physicochemical properties of water above or near its critical point (647 K, 22.1 MPa) - including increased solubility of non-polar compounds and oxygen, ion product and diffusivity - process conditions can be created for rapid oxidation of C into CO2. In this research, the oxidizer is provided as a hydrogen peroxide solution which, at elevated temperature, will dissociated into O2. The purpose of this study is to identify ideal process conditions which (a) ensure complete oxidation of carbon, (b) retaining the nutrients other than C in the liquid effluent and (c) require as little oxidizer as possible. Experiments were conducted on a continuous, tubular heated reactor and on batch

  12. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  13. Active Folding In The Puli Basin, Constraints On Strain Across A Sub-Critical Region Of The Taiwanese Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, T.; Mueller, K.; Chen, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Puli topographic embayment in central western Taiwan is interpreted as a region of sub-critical taper (assuming uniform decollement geometry) within the otherwise critically tapered wedge of the Taiwanese orogen. This sub-critical portion of the thrust belt drives the current orogenic architecture and reorganization of strain in and around Puli. Age dating and mapping of fold axis' that deform Late Quaternary terrace deposits in the Puli Basin suggest that at least 380 meters of fault slip (or a minimum of about 350 meters of horizontal shortening) has occurred over the last 50-60 Ka, yielding a minimum slip rate of 8mm/yr for the Shuilikeng blind thrust and fault-related fold. Given our existing age constraints, which only define the oldest Late Quaternary strata in the Puli Basin, the slip rate on this same structure could approach 13mm/yr (i.e. we use strain in younger deposits as a starting point for measuring shortening). Geodetic convergence rates (with respect to Asia) in the northern half of the island average ~10mm/yr or less, while convergence rates in the southwestern part of the orogen average ~40mm/yr. Previous maps of geodetic strain suggest the Puli Basin, corresponds with strain gradients of about 15mm/yr. Identifiable kink bends in terrace deposits were used to define the kinematics of actively growing folds, indicating the sense and magnitude of slip on blind thrusts that currently accommodate strain. This implies that active contraction occurs over a broader area across Puli than in other parts of Taiwan, but within the Basin contraction appears most likely limited to slip on a single fault (in addition to rapidly slipping thrusts in the foreland). Backstepping of thrusts at Puli is due to the first-order decrease in mass of the wedge at this latitude. While decreased mass in the wedge can be initially estimated by its thickness (as measured by the distance between the decollement as mapped at depth by microseismicity and average topography

  14. Continuous hydrolysis of Cuphea seed oil in subcritical water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cuphea seed oil (CSO) is a source of medium chain fatty acids for use in chemical manufacturing, including detergents, shampoos and lubricants. Cuphea seed oil is high in decanoic acid and this fatty acid is especially useful in the preparation of estolide biobased lubricants, which have excellent ...

  15. Method of cleaning plastics using super and subcritical media

    DOEpatents

    Sawan, Samuel P.; Spall, W. Dale; Talhi, Abdelhafid

    1998-05-26

    A method for treating a plastic, such as polyethylene or polypropylene, to remove at least a portion of at least one contaminant includes combining the plastic with a supercritical medium, such as carbon dioxide or sulfur hexafluoride, whereby at least a portion of the contaminant dissolves in the supercritical medium. Alternatively, the plastic can be combined with a suitable liquid medium, such as carbon dioxide or liquid sulfur hexafluoride. At least a portion of the medium, containing the dissolved contaminant, is separated from the plastic, thereby removing at least a portion of the contaminant from the plastic.

  16. Method of cleaning plastics using super and subcritical media

    DOEpatents

    Sawan, S.P.; Spall, W.D.; Talhi, A.

    1998-05-26

    A method for treating a plastic, such as polyethylene or polypropylene, to remove at least a portion of at least one contaminant includes combining the plastic with a supercritical medium, such as carbon dioxide or sulfur hexafluoride, whereby at least a portion of the contaminant dissolves in the supercritical medium. Alternatively, the plastic can be combined with a suitable liquid medium, such as carbon dioxide or liquid sulfur hexafluoride. At least a portion of the medium, containing the dissolved contaminant, is separated from the plastic, thereby removing at least a portion of the contaminant from the plastic. 10 figs.

  17. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  18. Subcritical instabilities in a convective fluid layer under a quasi-one-dimensional heating.

    PubMed

    Miranda, M A; Burguete, J

    2008-10-01

    The study and characterization of the diversity of spatiotemporal patterns generated when a rectangular layer of fluid is locally heated beneath its free surface is presented. We focus on the instability of a stationary cellular pattern of wave number ks which undergoes a globally subcritical transition to traveling waves by parity-breaking symmetry. The experimental results show how the emerging traveling mode (2ks/3) switches on a resonant triad (ks, ks/2, 2ks/3) within the cellular pattern yielding a "mixed" pattern. The nature of this transition is described quantitatively in terms of the evolution of the fundamental modes by complex demodulation techniques. The Bénard-Marangoni convection accounts for the different dynamics depending on the depth of the fluid layer and on the vertical temperature difference. The existence of a hysteresis cycle has been evaluated quantitatively. When the bifurcation to traveling waves is measured in the vicinity of the codimension-2 bifurcation point, we measure a decrease of the subcritical interval in which the traveling mode becomes unstable. From the traveling wave state the system undergoes a global secondary bifurcation to an alternating pattern which doubles the wavelength (ks/2) of the primary cellular pattern; this result compares well with theoretical predictions [P. Coullet and G. Iooss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 866 (1990)]. In this cascade of bifurcations towards a defect dynamics, bistability due to the subcritical behavior of our system is the reason for the coexistence of two different modulated patterns connected by a front. These fronts are stationary for a finite interval of the control parameters.

  19. Subcritical instabilities in a convective fluid layer under a quasi-one-dimensional heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, M. A.; Burguete, J.

    2008-10-01

    The study and characterization of the diversity of spatiotemporal patterns generated when a rectangular layer of fluid is locally heated beneath its free surface is presented. We focus on the instability of a stationary cellular pattern of wave number ks which undergoes a globally subcritical transition to traveling waves by parity-breaking symmetry. The experimental results show how the emerging traveling mode (2ks/3) switches on a resonant triad (ks,ks/2,2ks/3) within the cellular pattern yielding a “mixed” pattern. The nature of this transition is described quantitatively in terms of the evolution of the fundamental modes by complex demodulation techniques. The Bénard-Marangoni convection accounts for the different dynamics depending on the depth of the fluid layer and on the vertical temperature difference. The existence of a hysteresis cycle has been evaluated quantitatively. When the bifurcation to traveling waves is measured in the vicinity of the codimension-2 bifurcation point, we measure a decrease of the subcritical interval in which the traveling mode becomes unstable. From the traveling wave state the system undergoes a global secondary bifurcation to an alternating pattern which doubles the wavelength (ks/2) of the primary cellular pattern; this result compares well with theoretical predictions [P. Coullet and G. Iooss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 866 (1990)]. In this cascade of bifurcations towards a defect dynamics, bistability due to the subcritical behavior of our system is the reason for the coexistence of two different modulated patterns connected by a front. These fronts are stationary for a finite interval of the control parameters.

  20. Subcritical and supercritical technology for the production of second generation bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Mauricio A; Prado, Juliana M; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Santos, Diego T; Forster-Carneiro, Tânia; Meireles, M Angela A

    2015-01-01

    There is increased interest in reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and increasing the share of renewable raw materials in our energy supply chain due to environmental and economic concerns. Ethanol is emerging as a potential alternative to liquid fuels due to its eco-friendly characteristics and relatively low production costs. As ethanol is currently produced from commodities also used for human and animal consumption, there is an urgent need of identifying renewable raw materials that do not pose a competitive problem. Lignocellulosic agricultural residues are an ideal choice since they can be effectively hydrolyzed to fermentable sugars and integrated in the context of a biorefinery without competing with the food supply chain. However, the conventional hydrolysis methods still have major issues that need to be addressed. These issues are related to the processing rate and generation of fermentation inhibitors, which can compromise the quality of the product and the cost of the process. As the knowledge of the processes taking place during hydrolysis of agricultural residues is increasing, new techniques are being exploited to overcome these drawbacks. This review gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of hydrolysis with subcritical and supercritical water in the context of reusing agricultural residues for the production of suitable substrates to be processed during the fermentative production of bioethanol. Presently, subcritical and/or supercritical water hydrolysis has been found to yield low sugar contents mainly due to concurrent competing degradation of sugars during the hydrothermal processes. In this line of thinking, the present review also revisits the recent applications and advances to provide an insight of future research trends to optimize on the subcritical and supercritical process kinetics.

  1. Including screening in van der Waals corrected density functional theory calculations: The case of atoms and small molecules physisorbed on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi; Ambrosetti, Alberto

    2014-03-28

    The Density Functional Theory (DFT)/van der Waals-Quantum Harmonic Oscillator-Wannier function (vdW-QHO-WF) method, recently developed to include the vdW interactions in approximated DFT by combining the quantum harmonic oscillator model with the maximally localized Wannier function technique, is applied to the cases of atoms and small molecules (X=Ar, CO, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) weakly interacting with benzene and with the ideal planar graphene surface. Comparison is also presented with the results obtained by other DFT vdW-corrected schemes, including PBE+D, vdW-DF, vdW-DF2, rVV10, and by the simpler Local Density Approximation (LDA) and semilocal generalized gradient approximation approaches. While for the X-benzene systems all the considered vdW-corrected schemes perform reasonably well, it turns out that an accurate description of the X-graphene interaction requires a proper treatment of many-body contributions and of short-range screening effects, as demonstrated by adopting an improved version of the DFT/vdW-QHO-WF method. We also comment on the widespread attitude of relying on LDA to get a rough description of weakly interacting systems.

  2. Subcritical flow past a circular cylinder surrounded by a porous layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobera, M. P.; Kleijn, C. R.; Van den Akker, H. E. A.

    2006-03-01

    A study of the flow at subcritical Re =3900 around a circular cylinder, surrounded at some fixed small distance by a porous layer with a hydraulic resistance typical for that of textile materials, has been performed by means of direct numerical simulations. The flow in the space between the porous layer and the solid cylinder was found to be laminar and periodic, with a frequency locked to that of the vortex shedding in the wake behind the cylinder. Time averaged flow velocities underneath the porous material were in good agreement with experimental data from laser Doppler anemometry.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of the synthesis of a novel protein-based plastic using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoez, Wael; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the intermolecular mechanism and kinetics of the synthesis of a novel biodegradable protein-based plastic from bovine serum albumin under subcritical water conditions using batch reactors. The reaction mechanism could be viewed as a chain reaction stabilized by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. The kinetic analysis was based on non-steady-state kinetics using a theoretical model developed in one of our previous works. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor were found to be 7.2 kJ/mol and 0.9 s-1, respectively. These low values signify that the reaction is relatively temperature-insensitive with some diffusion limitation.

  4. Simple go/no-go test for subcritical damage in body armor panels

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jason; Chimenti, D. E.

    2011-06-23

    The development of a simple test for subcritical damage in body armor panels using pressure-sensitive dye-indicator film has been performed and demonstrated effective. Measurements have shown that static indicator levels are accurately reproduced in dynamic loading events. Impacts from hard blunt impactors instrumented with an accelerometer and embedded force transducer were studied. Reliable correlations between the indicator film and instrumented impact force are shown for a range of impact energies. Force and acceleration waveforms with corresponding indicator film results are presented for impact events onto damaged and undamaged panels. We find that panel damage can occur at impact levels far below the National Institute of Justice acceptance test standard.

  5. Simple No-Go Test for Subcritical Damage in Body Armor Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jason; Chimenti, D. E.

    2011-06-01

    The development of a simple test for subcritical damage in body armor panels using pressure-sensitive dye-indicator film has been performed and demonstrated effective. Measurements have shown that static indicator levels are accurately reproduced in dynamic loading events. Impacts from hard blunt impactors instrumented with an accelerometer and embedded force transducer were studied. Reliable correlations between the indicator film and instrumented impact force are shown for a range of impact energies. Force and acceleration waveforms with corresponding indicator film results are presented for impact events onto damaged and undamaged panels. We find that panel damage can occur at impact levels far below the National Institute of Justice acceptance test standard.

  6. Impact of bleaching on subcritical water- and Formosolv-pretreated tulip tree to enhance enzyme accessibility.

    PubMed

    Myint, Aye Aye; Kim, Dae Sung; Lee, Hun Wook; Yoon, Junho; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Joon Weon; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2013-10-01

    A novel method was developed for fractionating cellulose microfibrils from forest residue (tulip tree sawdust) to enhance cellulose digestibility, particularly at minimum enzyme loadings. This method involved three main stages: selective hemicellulose solubilization by subcritical water (SCW) pretreatment, delignification of the SCW-pretreated solids using the Formosolv process, and deformylation/bleaching of the cellulose pulp with alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution. This process produced nearly 98% white cellulose microfibrils with 23-fold higher conversion to glucose as compared to the raw substrate after 72 h of enzymatic hydrolysis. This study showed that cellulose swelling had the greatest effect on the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of delignified pulp obtained by the Formosolv process.

  7. Criticality Safety Evaluation of the LLNL Inherently Safe Subcritical Assembly (ISSA)

    SciTech Connect

    Percher, Catherine

    2012-06-19

    The LLNL Nuclear Criticality Safety Division has developed a training center to illustrate criticality safety and reactor physics concepts through hands-on experimental training. The experimental assembly, the Inherently Safe Subcritical Assembly (ISSA), uses surplus highly enriched research reactor fuel configured in a water tank. The training activities will be conducted by LLNL following the requirements of an Integration Work Sheet (IWS) and associated Safety Plan. Students will be allowed to handle the fissile material under the supervision of LLNL instructors. This report provides the technical criticality safety basis for instructional operations with the ISSA experimental assembly.

  8. Analysis of subcritical experiments using fresh and spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zino, John Frederick

    1999-11-01

    This research investigated the concepts associated with crediting the burnup of spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purposes of criticality safety. To accomplish this, a collaborative experimental research program was undertaken between Westinghouse, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) facility and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the program was to characterize the subcritical behavior of a small array of fresh and spent MURR fuel assemblies using the 252Cf Source-driven noise technique. An aluminum test rig was built which was capable of holding up to four, highly enriched (93.15 wt.% 235U) MURR fuel assemblies in a 2 x 2 array. The rig was outfitted with one source and four detector drywells which allowed researchers to perform active neutron noise measurements on the array of fuel assemblies. The 1 atmosphere gas 3He neutron detectors used to perform the measurements were quenched with CF4 gas to allow improved discrimination of the neutron signals in the very high gamma-ray fields associated with spent fuel (˜8000 R/hr). In addition, the detector drywells were outfitted with 1″ lead collars to provide additional gamma-ray shielding from the spent fuel. Reactivity changes were induced in the subcritical lattice by replacing individual fresh assemblies (in a 4-assembly array) with spent assemblies of known, maximum burnup (143 Mw-D). The absolute and relative measured reactivity changes were then compared to those predicted by three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations. The purpose of these comparisons was to investigate the accuracy of modern transport theory depletion calculations to accurately simulate the reactivity effects of burnup in spent nuclear fuel. A total of seven subcritical measurements were performed at the MURR reactor facility on July 20th and 27th, 1998. These measurements generated several estimates of prompt neutron decay constants (alpha) and ratios of spectral densities through frequency correlations

  9. Aeroacoustic Simulations of Tandem Cylinders with Subcritical Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Tandem cylinders are being studied because they model a variety of component level interactions of landing gear. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders with their centroids separated in the streamwise direction by 1.435 diameters. Experiments in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel and Quiet Flow Facility at NASA Langley Research Center have provided an extensive experimental database of the nearfield flow and radiated noise. The measurements were conducted at a Mach number of 0.1285 and Reynolds number of 1.66x10(exp 5) based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent flow separation and, hence, to simulate a major aspect of high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The experiments exhibited an asymmetry in the surface pressure that was persistent despite attempts to eliminate it through small changes in the configuration. To model the asymmetry, the simulations were run with the cylinder configuration at a nonzero but small angle of attack. The computed results and experiments are in general agreement that vortex shedding for the spacing studied herein is weak relative to that observed at supercritical spacings. Although the shedding was subdued in the simulations, it was still more prominent than in the experiments. Overall, the simulation comparisons with measured near-field data and the radiated acoustics are reasonable, especially if one is concerned with capturing the trends relative to larger cylinder spacings. However, the flow details of the 1.435 diameter spacing have not been captured in full even though very fine grid computations have been performed. Some of the discrepancy may be associated with the simulation s inexact representation of the

  10. Subcritical crack growth of selected aerospace pressure vessel materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Bixler, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of combined cyclic/sustained loads, stress level, and crack shape on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of cracks subjected to plane strain conditions. Material/environment combinations tested included: 2219-T87 aluminum plate in gaseous helium, room air, and 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen; 5Al-2.5 Sn (ELI) titanium plate in liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen and 6AL-4V (ELI) STA titanium plate in gaseous helium and methanol at room temperature. Most testing was accomplished using surface flawed specimens instrumented with a clip gage to continuously monitor crack opening displacements at the specimen surface. Tapered double cantilever beam specimens were also tested. Static fracture and ten hour sustained load tests were conducted to determine fracture toughness and apparent threshold stress intensity values. Cyclic tests were performed using sinusoidal loading profiles at 333 MHz (20 cpm) and trapezoidal loading profiles at both 8.3 MHz (0.5 cpm) and 3.3 MHz (0.2 cpm). Data were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  11. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  12. A study of the effect of subcritical crack growth on the geometry dependence on nonlinear fracture toughness parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Poulose, P. K.; Liebowitz, H.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of subcritical crack growth on the geometry dependence of nonlinear fracture toughness parameters was studied by comparing the toughness values for different specimen geometries at the onset of subcritical crack growth and at the initiation of unstable crack propagation. Center-cracked thin sheet specimens of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys were tested by varying the specimen length L, width w, and crack length-to-width ratio c/w. When the onset of unstable crack propagation was selected as the critical point, the nonlinear energy toughness and the R curve toughness increased with increasing w and decreasing L and c/w. However, when the onset of subcritical crack growth was taken as the critical point, energy toughness and the linear toughness values were independent of these geometrical variables.

  13. Evaluation of the predisposing factors and involved outcome of surgical treatment in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw cases including bone biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the statistical relevance of whether the systemic predisposing factors affect the prognosis of surgical treatment of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). All cases had undergone bone biopsies to determine the characteristics of the mechanisms of BRONJ by optical microscopy. Materials and Methods The data included 54 BRONJ cases who underwent surgery and in whom bone biopsies were performed. The results of surgery were evaluated and the results were classified into 3 categories: normal recovery, delayed recovery, and recurrence after surgery. The medical history, such as diabetes mellitus, medication of steroids, malignancies on other sites was investigated for an evaluation of the systemic predisposing factors in relation to the prognosis. The three factors involved with the medication of bisphosphonate (BP) were the medication route, medication period, and drug holiday of BP before surgery. The serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide (CTX) value and presence of microorganism colony in bone biopsy specimens were also checked. Statistical analysis was then carried out to determine the relationship between these factors and the results of surgery. Results The group of patients suffering from diabetes and on steroids tended to show poorer results after surgery. Parenteral medication of BP made the patients have a poorer prognosis after surgery than oral medication. In contrast, the medication period and drug holiday of BP before surgery did not have significance with the results of surgery nor did the serum CTX value and presence of microorganism colony. Necrotic bone specimens in this study typically showed disappearing new bone formation around the osteocytic lacunae and destroyed Howship's lacunae. Conclusion Although many variables exist, this study could in part, predict the prognosis of surgical treatment of BRONJ by taking the patient's medical history. PMID:27595086

  14. Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-30

    Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

  15. Subcritical Water Technology for Enhanced Extraction of Biochemical Compounds from Chlorella vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Awaluddin, S. A.; Thiruvenkadam, Selvakumar; Izhar, Shamsul; Hiroyuki, Yoshida; Danquah, Michael K.; Harun, Razif

    2016-01-01

    Subcritical water extraction (SWE) technology has been used for the extraction of active compounds from different biomass materials with low process cost, mild operating conditions, short process times, and environmental sustainability. With the limited application of the technology to microalgal biomass, this work investigates parametrically the potential of subcritical water for high-yield extraction of biochemicals such as carbohydrates and proteins from microalgal biomass. The SWE process was optimized using central composite design (CCD) under varying process conditions of temperature (180–374°C), extraction time (1–20 min), biomass particulate size (38–250 μm), and microalgal biomass loading (5–40 wt.%). Chlorella vulgaris used in this study shows high volatile matter (83.5 wt.%) and carbon content (47.11 wt.%), giving advantage as a feedstock for biofuel production. The results showed maximum total carbohydrate content and protein yields of 14.2 g/100 g and 31.2 g/100 g, respectively, achieved under the process conditions of 277°C, 5% of microalgal biomass loading, and 5 min extraction time. Statistical analysis revealed that, of all the parameters investigated, temperature is the most critical during SWE of microalgal biomass for protein and carbohydrate production. PMID:27366748

  16. Experimental investigation on flow patterns of RP-3 kerosene under sub-critical and supercritical pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Active cooling with endothermic hydrocarbon fuel is proved to be one of the most promising approaches to solve the thermal problem for hypersonic aircraft such as scramjet. The flow patterns of two-phase flow inside the cooling channels have a great influence on the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, phase transition processes of RP-3 kerosene flowing inside a square quartz-glass tube were experimentally investigated. Three distinct phase transition phenomena (liquid-gas two phase flow under sub-critical pressures, critical opalescence under critical pressure, and corrugation under supercritical pressures) were identified. The conventional flow patterns of liquid-gas two phase flow, namely bubble flow, slug flow, churn flow and annular flow are observed under sub-critical pressures. Dense bubble flow and dispersed flow are recognized when pressure is increased towards the critical pressure whilst slug flow, churn flow and annular flow disappear. Under critical pressure, the opalescence phenomenon is observed. Under supercritical pressures, no conventional phase transition characteristics, such as bubbles are observed. But some kind of corrugation appears when RP-3 transfers from liquid to supercritical. The refraction index variation caused by sharp density gradient near the critical temperature is thought to be responsible for this corrugation.

  17. Terpene degradation and extraction from basil and oregano leaves using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Kayan, Berkant; Bozer, Neval; Pate, Bryan; Baker, Christopher; Gizir, Ahmet M

    2007-06-08

    In the first part of this study, the stability of five terpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene, camphor, citronellol, and carvacrol) under subcritical water conditions was investigated. The stability studies were carried out at four different temperatures (100, 150, 200, and 250 degrees C) with two different heating times (30 and 300 min). When water temperature was increased, the degradation of terpenes became more serious. Prolonged exposure time to each heating temperature also caused decreased terpene stability. The terpene recoveries were determined by conducting subcritical water extraction of sand spiked with terpenes. The recoveries are typically around 70 to 80% for extractions at 100 degrees C. Terpene recoveries were decreased with increasing water temperature due to poorer stability of terpenes. After the degradation and recovery studies, basil and oregano leaves were extracted using water at both 100 and 150 degrees C. The concentrations of each individual terpene in the water extract generally ranged from trace quantity to 65 microg terpene/g herb. However, the concentration of carvacrol in the oregano-water extract at 150 degrees C was found to be as high as 4270 microg carvacrol/g oregano.

  18. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron e xperiments: detector dead time and apatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    In almost every detector counting system, a minimal dead time is required to record two successive events as two separated pulses. Due to the random nature of neutron interactions in the subcritical assembly, there is always some probability that a true neutron event will not be recorded because it occurs too close to the preceding event. These losses may become rather severe for counting systems with high counting rates, and should be corrected before any utilization of the experimental data. This report examines the dead time effects for the pulsed neutron experiments of the YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly. The nonparalyzable model is utilized to correct the experimental data due to dead time. Overall, the reactivity values are increased by 0.19$ and 0.32$ after the spatial corrections for the YALINA-Booster 36% and 21% configurations respectively. The differences of the reactivities obtained with He-3 long or short detectors at the same detector channel diminish after the dead time corrections of the experimental data for the 36% YALINA-Booster configuration. In addition, better agreements between reactivities obtained from different experimental data sets are also observed after the dead time corrections for the 21% YALINA-Booster configuration.

  19. Production of valued materials from squid viscera by subcritical water hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M Salim; Ahn, Hyang-Min; Kishimura, Hideki; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2010-09-01

    Subcritical water hydrolysis was carried out to produce valued materials from squid viscera, the waste product of fish processing industries. The reaction temperatures for hydrolysis of rawand deoiled squid viscera were maintained from 180 to 280 degrees C for5 min. The ratio of material to water forhydrolysis was 1:50. Most of the proteins from deoiled squid viscera were recovered at high temperature. The protein yield in raw squid viscera hydrolyzate decreased with the rise of temperature. The reducing sugar yield was higher at high temperature in subcritical water hydrolysis of both raw and deoiled squid viscera. The highest yield of amino acids in raw and deoiled squid viscera hydrolyzates were 233.25 +/- 3.25 and 533.78 +/- 4.13 mg g(-1) at 180 and 280 degrees C, respectively. Most amino acids attained highest yield at the reaction temperature range of 180-220 degrees C and 260-280 degrees C for raw and deoiled samples, respectively. The recovery of amino acids from deoiled squid viscera was about 1.5 times higher than that of raw squid viscera.

  20. Interaction of soil, water and TNT during degradation of TNT on contaminated soil using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Kalderis, Dimitrios; Hawthorne, Steven B; Clifford, Anthony A; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2008-11-30

    Subcritical water was used at laboratory scale to reveal information with respect to the degradation mechanism of TNT on contaminated soil. Highly contaminated soil (12% TNT) was heated with water at four different temperatures, 150, 175, 200 and 225 degrees C and samples were obtained at appropriate time intervals. At the same time, similar experiments were performed with TNT spiked on to clean soil, sand and pure water in order to compare and eliminate various factors that may be present in the more complex contaminated soil system. Subcritical water was successful at remediating TNT-contaminated soil. TNT destruction percentages ranged between 98 and 100%. The aim of this work was to study the soil-water-contaminant interaction and determine the main physical parameters that affect TNT degradation. It was shown that the rate-limiting step of the process is the extraction/diffusion of TNT molecules from the soil core to the soil surface, where they degrade. Additionally, it was determined that the soil matrix also catalyses degradation to a lesser extent. Autocatalytic effects were not clearly observed.

  1. Pyrolysis of low density polyethylene waste in subcritical water optimized by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wong, S L; Ngadi, N; Amin, N A S; Abdullah, T A T; Inuwa, I M

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis of low density polyethylene (LDPE) waste from local waste separation company in subcritical water was conducted to investigate the effect of reaction time, temperature, as well as the mass ratio of water to polymer on the liquid yield. The data obtained from the study were used to optimize the liquid yield using response surface methodology. The range of reaction temperature used was 162-338°C, while the reaction time ranged from 37 min to 143 min, and the ratio of water to polymer ranged from 1.9 to 7.1. It was found that pyrolysis of LDPE waste in subcritical water produced hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, while the liquid product contained alkanes and alkenes with 10-50 carbons atoms, as well as heptadecanone, dichloroacetic acid and heptadecyl ester. The optimized conditions were 152.3°C, reaction time of 1.2 min and ratio of water solution to polymer of 32.7, with the optimum liquid yield of 13.6 wt% and gases yield of 2.6 wt%.

  2. Kinetic analysis for the isomerization of cellobiose to cellobiulose in subcritical aqueous ethanol.

    PubMed

    Soisangwan, Nontanut; Gao, Da-Ming; Kobayashi, Takashi; Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Adachi, Shuji

    2016-10-04

    The isomerization of cellobiose to cellobiulose, and other degradation reactions of cellobiose were investigated in subcritical aqueous ethanol with concentrations of ethanol ranging from 0 to 60% (w/w) and at temperatures ranging from 170 to 200 °C. The maximum yield of cellobiulose (ca. 40%) was obtained from the treatment of cellobiose in 60% (w/w) aqueous ethanol at 190 °C. Glucose and fructose were also detected as byproducts. The concentration-time integral method was employed to analyze the rate constants for the isomerization and degradation processes. The rate constant of cellobiose isomerization to cellobiulose was greater than those of the degradation reactions under all experimental conditions, and it increased significantly with treatment temperature and ethanol concentration. However, the use of higher temperatures and ethanol concentrations was restricted due to decomposition of the saccharides and the low solubility of cellobiose, respectively. The effect of initial feed concentration (0.5-5.5% w/w) was also studied. The maximum productivity of cellobiulose, 54.1 kg/(h m(3)-reactor), was accomplished at a feed concentration of 5.5% (w/w) in 20% (w/w) subcritical aqueous ethanol.

  3. Functional properties and structure changes of soybean protein isolate after subcritical water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Ting; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wang, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Fan, Liang-Liang; Bao, Zhong-Yu; Xiao, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Subcritical water is an emerging method in food industry. In this study, soybean protein isolate (SPI) was treated by subcritical water (SBW) at various temperatures (0, 120, 160, 200 °C) for 20 min. The changes in the appearances, physicochemical properties and structural changes were investigated. After SBW treatment, the color of SPI solution modified turned to be yellow. The mean particle size and turbidity of SPI had similar behaviors. The mean particle size was decreased from 263.7 nm to 116.8 nm at 120 °C and then reached the maximum at 160 °C (1446.1 nm) due to the aggregation of protein. Then it was decreased to 722.9 nm at 200 °C caused by the protein degradation. SBW treatment could significantly enhance the solubility, emulsifying and foaming properties of SPI. With increasing temperature, the crystalline structure of protein was gradually collapsed. The degradation of the protein advanced structure occurred, especially at 200 °C revealed by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. Better functional properties exhibited in hydrolysis products indicating that SBW treatment could be used as a good method to modify the properties of soy proteins isolate for specific purposes under appropriate treatment condition.

  4. Subcritical measurements using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Kryter, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes recent measurements of the subcritical neutron multiplication factor using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method. This work was supported by a program of collaboration between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan related to the development of fast breeder technology. The experiment reported consists of a configuration of two interacting tanks of uranyl nitrate aqueous solution with different uranium concentrations in each tank. The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method obtains the subcriticality from the signals of three detectors: the first, a parallel plate ionization chamber with /sup 252/Cf electroplated on one of its plates that is located in or near the system containing the fissile material, and produces an electrical pulse for every spontaneous fission that occurs and thereby serves as a timed source of fission neutrons; and the second and third detectors that are placed in or near the system containing fissile material and serve to detect particles from the fission chain multiplication process. 9 refs.

  5. Influence of temperature and water on subcritical crack growth in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Yoneda, Tetsuro; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    2010-05-01

    Understanding time-dependent brittle deformation due to slow crack growth is important in many geological applications. Time-dependent fracture propagation has been invoked as the key mechanism responsible for the increase in seismicity preceding earthquake ruptures and volcanic eruptions. In addition, when designing sub-surface structures in the rock mass, such as repositories for radioactive waste and underground power plants, it is essential to consider their long-term stability. In order to ensure long-term stability, it is necessary to evaluate the long-term strength of the rock. In turn, this requires an understanding of time-dependent fracture propagation such as subcritical crack growth. Environmental dependence of subcritical crack growth in igneous rocks has been studied well. However, that in sedimentary rocks has not been clarified yet. In this study, the effects of the temperature and water on subcritical crack growth in sandstone were investigated. Berea sandstone and Shirahama sandstone were used as rock samples. The load relaxation method of Double Torsion (DT) testing method was used to measure the crack velocity and the stress intensity factor under controlled environmental conditions. In water, it was shown that the crack velocity at a given stress intensity factor increased when the temperature increased. This agrees well with the theory of stress corrosion. In air, however, it was shown that the change of the crack velocity at a given stress intensity factor was not clear when the temperature increased under a constant relative humidity. On the other hand, the crack velocity at a given stress intensity factor increased by several orders of magnitude when the relative humidity increased threefold or fourfold under a constant temperature. This increase is much larger than that expected from the conventional concept based on the theory of stress corrosion. Additionally, the increase of the crack velocity was larger for Shirahama sandstone which

  6. Association between CYP1A1 Ile462Val Variation and Acute Leukemia Risk: Meta-Analyses Including 2164 Cases and 4160 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Wenlei; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Qiu, Zhiqun; Chen, Zhengtang

    2012-01-01

    Background Previously, CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphism has been indicated to be a risk factor for several malignancies. Increasing reports have focused on the association of CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphisms with susceptibility to acute leukemia and have generated controversial results. The goal of the present study was to derive a more precise estimation of the relationship. Methods Relevant literature has been rigorously searched and screened. Eligible studies were identified for the period up to Apr 2012. Meta-analyses evaluating the association of CYP1A1 Ile462Val variation with acute leukemia were carried out. Subgroup analyses on ethnicity, clinical types and source of controls were further performed. Results A total of thirteen publications including fourteen case-control studies with 2164 cases and 4160 controls were selected for analysis. The overall data indicated a significant association of CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphism with acute leukemia risk (Val/Val vs Ile/Ile OR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.11–1.98; dominant model: OR = 1.26; 95% CI = 1.05–1.51; recessive model: OR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.04–1.83). In subgroup analysis on ethnicity, increased risk was shown among mixed ethnicities (Val/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.46–3.82; dominant model: OR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.01–1.86; recessive model: OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.37–3.53) but not Asians or Caucasians. In subgroup analysis on clinical types, increased risk was observed in the acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) subgroup (Val/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.42–3.01; recessive model: OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.32–2.76) but not in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroup. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphism might be a low-penetrant risk factor for acute leukemia. Subgroup analyses suggest that homozygous Val/Val alleles might modify the susceptibility to ALL. PMID:23056546

  7. Correlation of nuclear criticality safety computer codes with plutonium benchmark experiments and derivation of subcritical limits. [MGBS, TGAN, KEFF, HRXN, GLASS, ANISN, SPBL, and KENO

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, H.K.

    1981-10-01

    A compilation of benchmark critical experiments was made for essentially one-dimensional systems containing plutonium. The systems consist of spheres, series of experiments with cylinders and cuboids that permit extrapolation to infinite cylinders and slabs, and large cylinders for which separability of the neutron flux into a product of spatial components is a good approximation. Data from the experiments were placed in a form readily usable as computer code input. Aqueous solutions of Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ are treated as solutions of PuO/sub 2/ in nitric acid. The apparent molal volume of PuO/sub 2/ as a function of plutonium concentration was derived from analyses of solution density data and was incorporated in the Savannah River Laboratory computer codes along with density tables for nitric acid. The biases of three methods of calculation were established by correlation with the benchmark experiments. The oldest method involves two-group diffusion theory and has been used extensively at the Savannah River Laboratory. The other two involve S/sub n/ transport theory with, in one method, Hansen-Roach cross sections and, in the other, cross sections derived from ENDF/B-IV. Subcritical limits were calculated by all three methods. Significant differences were found among the results and between the results and limits currently in the American National Standard for Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactor (ANSI N16.1), which were calculated by yet another method, despite the normalization of all four methods to the same experimental data. The differences were studied, and a set of subcritical limits was proposed to supplement and in some cases to replace those in the ANSI Standard, which is currently being reviewed.

  8. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Jonathan J.; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E.; Appleyard, Sharon A.; Tobin, Andrew J.; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; White, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species’ life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were  L¯∞ = 159 cm TL and  L¯0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more

  9. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Smart, Jonathan J; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E; Appleyard, Sharon A; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; White, William T

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species' life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were L∞ = 159 cm TL and L0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more accurate data

  10. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA-booster subcritical assembly part 1: analytical models and main neutronics parameters.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-09-11

    This study was carried out to model and analyze the YALINA-Booster facility, of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus, with the long term objective of advancing the utilization of accelerator driven systems for the incineration of nuclear waste. The YALINA-Booster facility is a subcritical assembly, driven by an external neutron source, which has been constructed to study the neutron physics and to develop and refine methodologies to control the operation of accelerator driven systems. The external neutron source consists of Californium-252 spontaneous fission neutrons, 2.45 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium reactions, or 14.1 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Tritium reactions. In the latter two cases a deuteron beam is used to generate the neutrons. This study is a part of the collaborative activity between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus. In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a coordinated research project benchmarking and comparing the results of different numerical codes with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility and ANL has a leading role coordinating the IAEA activity. The YALINA-Booster facility has been modeled according to the benchmark specifications defined for the IAEA activity without any geometrical homogenization using the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCNP/MCNPX/MCB. The MONK model perfectly matches the MCNP one. The computational analyses have been extended through the MCB code, which is an extension of the MCNP code with burnup capability because of its additional feature for analyzing source driven multiplying assemblies. The main neutronics parameters of the YALINA-Booster facility were calculated using these computer codes with different nuclear data libraries based on ENDF/B-VI-0, -6, JEF-2.2, and JEF-3.1.

  11. Effects of Soy Protein Hydrolysates Prepared by Varying Subcritical Media on the Physicochemical Properties of Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    Davaatseren, Munkhtugs

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soy protein hydrolysates (SPH) prepared by varying subcritical media on the physicochemical properties of pork patties. For resource of SPH, two different soybean species (Glycine max Merr.) of Daewonkong (DWK) and Saedanbaek (SDB) were selected. SPH was prepared by subcritical processing at 190℃ and 25 MPa under three different of media (water, 20% ethanol and 50% ethanol). Solubility and free amino group content revealed that water was better to yield larger amount of SPH than ethanol/water mixtures, regardless of species. Molecular weight (Mw) distribution of SPH was also similar between two species, while slightly different Mw distribution was obtained by subcritical media. For pork patty application, 50% ethanol treatment showed clear red color comparing to control after 14 d of storage. In addition, ethanol treatment had better oxidative stability than control and water treatment based on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) analysis. For eating quality, although 20% ethanol treatment in SDB showed slightly higher cooking loss than control, generally addition of SPH did not affect the water-binding properties and hardness of pork patties. Consequently, the present study indicated that 50% ethanol was the best subcritical media to produce SPH possessing antioxidant activity, and the SPH produced from DWK exhibited better antioxidant activity than that produced SDB. PMID:27499657

  12. A portable measurement system for subcriticality measurements by the Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Ragan, G.E.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    A portable measurement system consisting of a personal computer used as a Fourier analyzer and three detection channels (with associated electronics that provide the signals to analog-to-digital (A/D) convertors) has been assembled to measure subcriticality by the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method. 8 refs.

  13. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of the Lift and Drag Characteristics of Hydrofoils at Subcritical and Supercritical Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadlin, Kenneth L; Shuford, Charles L , Jr; Mcgehee, John R

    1955-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation at subcavitation speeds was made of the effect of the free-water surface and rigid boundaries on the lift and drag of an aspect-ratio-10 hydrofoil at both subcritical and supercritical speeds and of an aspect ratio-4 hydrofoil at supercritical speeds. Approximate theoretical solutions for the effects of the free-water surface and rigid boundaries on drag at subcritical speeds are developed. An approximate theoretical solution for the effects of these boundaries on drag at subcritical speeds is also presented. The agreement between theory and experiment at both supercritical and subcritical speeds is satisfactory for engineering calculations of hydrofoil characteristics from aerodynamic data. The experimental investigation indicated no appreciable effect of the limiting speed of wave propagation on lift-curve slope or angle of zero lift. It also showed that the increase in drag as the critical speed is approached from the supercritical range is gradual. The result is contrary to the abrupt increase at the critical speed predicted by theory.

  14. PILOT-SCALE SUBCRITICAL WATER REMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON- AND PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825394)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subcritical water (hot water under enough pressure to maintain the liquid
    state) was used to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides
    from highly contaminated soils. Laboratory-scale (8 g of soil) experiments were
    used to determine conditions f...

  15. Benchmark Analysis of Subcritical Noise Measurements on a Nickel-Reflected Plutonium Metal Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Jesson Hutchinson

    2009-09-01

    Subcritical experiments using californium source-driven noise analysis (CSDNA) and Feynman variance-to-mean methods were performed with an alpha-phase plutonium sphere reflected by nickel shells, up to a maximum thickness of 7.62 cm. Both methods provide means of determining the subcritical multiplication of a system containing nuclear material. A benchmark analysis of the experiments was performed for inclusion in the 2010 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Benchmark models have been developed that represent these subcritical experiments. An analysis of the computed eigenvalues and the uncertainty in the experiment and methods was performed. The eigenvalues computed using the CSDNA method were very close to those calculated using MCNP5; however, computed eigenvalues are used in the analysis of the CSDNA method. Independent calculations using KENO-VI provided similar eigenvalues to those determined using the CSDNA method and MCNP5. A slight trend with increasing nickel-reflector thickness was seen when comparing MCNP5 and KENO-VI results. For the 1.27-cm-thick configuration the MCNP eigenvalue was approximately 300 pcm greater. The calculated KENO eigenvalue was about 300 pcm greater for the 7.62-cm-thick configuration. The calculated results were approximately the same for a 5-cm-thick shell. The eigenvalues determined using the Feynman method are up to approximately 2.5% lower than those determined using either the CSDNA method or the Monte Carlo codes. The uncertainty in the results from either method was not large enough to account for the bias between the two experimental methods. An ongoing investigation is being performed to assess what potential uncertainties and/or biases exist that have yet to be properly accounted for. The dominant uncertainty in the CSDNA analysis was the uncertainty in selecting a neutron cross-section library for performing the analysis of the data. The uncertainty in the

  16. Experimental investigation of inclination effect on subcritical and supercritical water flows heat transfer in an internally ribbed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taklifi, Alireza; Akhavan-Behabadi, Mohammad Ali; Hanafizadeh, Pedram; Aliabadi, Abbas

    2017-02-01

    The effect of various inclination angles on heat transfer of water at subcritical and supercritical operating pressures is investigated experimentally. The test section was a SA213T12 steel six-headed internally ribbed tube with minimum inner diameter of 19.5 mm. The operating test pressures were 15, 21.5, 22.5, 25 and 28 MPa, the mass flux was 800 kg/m2 s and the heat flux was 400 kW/m2. To keep the mass flux to heat flux ratio equal to 2 kg/kJ. These operating conditions covered subcritical, near critical and supercritical water flows and also refers to low mass flux conditions. The inclination angles were 5, 20, 30, 45 and 90 (vertical) degrees respecting to horizontal plane. The heat flux was kept constant along the test tube by controlling of electric heating. As a result the inner wall temperature and convective heat transfer coefficient variations with respect to heated length and bulk enthalpy of fluid were considered in order to study the heat transfer characteristics of various flows at different inclinations. The corresponding correlation for heat transfer coefficient was developed which is applicable for wide range of inclination angles. The heat transfer enhancement was obvious for inclination angles other than 90°, however, this effect was more obvious in 5° and 20° in some operating conditions. It was also concluded that the effect of inclination on heat transfer of water was more considerable in subcritical flow conditions than supercritical ones. Also, it was observed that angle of 20° seems to be the best for subcritical flows from heat transfer point of view, but for supercritical flows 5 or 45 seem to be more advantageous. These differences could be related to different heat transfer mechanisms of subcritical and supercritical flows.

  17. Use of the subcritical-plasticity effect in manufacturing preforms for cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, V. V.; Buyanskaya, T. A.; Yartsev, A. N.; Matveev, S. V.; Andreev, V. V.

    1996-10-01

    Increasing the efficiency of utilization of expensive high-speed steels is an important problem of modern production. It is solved by VAZ specialists by introducing low-waste technological processes in manufacturing tool preforms. At present, side milling cutters and edging saws are blanked out from square preforms of rolled sheets. Up to 40% of the sheet goes to waste in blanking. Gear cutters and shavers are commonly produced from forged preforms with a considerable (up to 15 mm for each dimension) size allowance for mechanical treatment. It should also be noted that the microstructure of the forgings often contains coarse grains and grains of different sizes. The aim of the present work consists in determining the possibility of using deformation at a subcritical temperature in industrial-scale production of tools (side milling cutters, edging saws, gear cutters, shavers).

  18. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilia Anisa, Nor; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10-11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10-11 m2/s.

  19. Subcritical crack growth and other time- and environment-dependent behavior in crustal rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    Stable crack growth strongly influences both the fracture strength of brittle rocks and some of the phenomena precursory to catastrophic failure. Quantification of the time and environment dependence of fracture propagation is attempted with the use of a fracture mechanics technique. Some of the difficulties encountered when applying techniques originally developed for simple synthetic materials to complex materials like rocks are examined. A picture of subcritical fracture propagation is developed that embraces the essential ingredients of the microstructure, a microcrack process zone, and the different roles that the environment plays. To do this, the results of (1) fracture mechanics experiments on five rock types, (2) optical and scanning electron microscopy, (3) studies of microstructural aspects of fracture in ceramics, and (4) exploratory tests examining the time-dependent response of rock to the application of water are examined.

  20. Subcritical Crack Growth in Ceramic Composites at High Temperature Measured Using Digital Image Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Mumm, D.R.; Morris, W.L.; Dadkhah, M.S.; Cox, B.N.

    1996-01-11

    An in situ experimental technique is described that allows high resolution, high sensitivity determination of displacements and full-field strains during high temperature mechanical testing. The technique is used to investigate elevated temperature crack growth in SiC/Nicalon sub f composites. At 1150 degrees C, the reinforcing fibers have a higher creep susceptibility than the matrix. Fiber creep leads to relaxation of crack bridging tractions, resulting in subcritical crack growth. Differential image analysis is used to measure the crack opening displacement profile u(x) of an advancing, bridged crack. With appropriate modeling, such data can be used to determine the traction law, from which the mechanics of cracking and failure may be determined.

  1. Superconducting Accelerating Structure for High-Current Cyclotrons for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2011-10-01

    An accelerator driven molten salt fission core is being designed to provide reliable power by subcritical nuclear fission for the next few millennia. Fission is driven by proton beams from a flux-coupled stack of three high-current cyclotrons. A key innovation in attaining the needed beam current and efficiency is a superconducting Niobium rf accelerating cavity that can accelerate bunches in the 200 orbits uniformly. The unique design allows for several cavities to be stacked, and also provides uniform acceleration and eliminates higher order modes in the cyclotron. The design and properties of the superconducting cavity will increase the efficiency of the cyclotron and the overall energy amplification from the molten salt core by an order of magnitude compared to conventional designs.

  2. Utilization of /sup 252/Cf-/sup 235/U fueled subcritical multiplier for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, N.A.; Lepel, E.A.

    1983-10-05

    Neutron activation analysis is normally performed at thermal fluxes of 10/sup 13/ n/cm/sup 2//s irradiating samples of a few milligrams. When a ten thousand-fold larger sample is available, neutron activation can be performed at proportionately lower fluxes. Thus, a 10 g sample irradiated at 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2//s contains as much activity as a 1 mg sample irradiated at 10/sup 13/ n/cm/sup 2//s. This paper describes the utilization of a subcritical multiplier operating at about 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2//s for the activation of a broad range of sample types and elemental concentrations.

  3. Nonlinear elastic behavior of sub-critically damaged body armor panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jason T.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    A simple go/no-go test for body armor panels using pressure-sensitive, dye-indicator film (PSF) has been shown to be statistically effective in revealing subcritical damage to body armor panels. Previous measurements have shown that static indicator levels are accurately reproduced in dynamic loading events. Further impact tests on armor worn by a human resuscitation dummy using instrumented masses with an attached accelerometer and embedded force transducer have been performed and analyzed. New impact tests have shown a reliable correlation between PSF indication (as digitized images) and impact force for a wide range of impactor energies and masses. Numerical evaluation of digital PSF images is presented and correlated with impact parameters. Relationships between impactor mass and energy, and corresponding measured force are shown. We will also report on comparisons between ballistic testing performed on panels damaged under various impact conditions and tests performed on undamaged panels.

  4. Out-of-equilibrium stationary states, percolation, and subcritical instabilities in a fully nonconservative system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génois, Mathieu; Hersen, Pascal; Bertin, Eric; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The exploration of the phase diagram of a minimal model for barchan fields leads to the description of three distinct phases for the system: stationary, percolable, and unstable. In the stationary phase the system always reaches an out-of-equilibrium, fluctuating, stationary state, independent of its initial conditions. This state has a large and continuous range of dynamics, from dilute—where dunes do not interact—to dense, where the system exhibits both spatial structuring and collective behavior leading to the selection of a particular size for the dunes. In the percolable phase, the system presents a percolation threshold when the initial density increases. This percolation is unusual, as it happens on a continuous space for moving, interacting, finite lifetime dunes. For extreme parameters, the system exhibits a subcritical instability, where some of the dunes in the field grow without bound. We discuss the nature of the asymptotic states and their relations to well-known models of statistical physics.

  5. Out-of-equilibrium stationary states, percolation, and subcritical instabilities in a fully nonconservative system.

    PubMed

    Génois, Mathieu; Hersen, Pascal; Bertin, Eric; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The exploration of the phase diagram of a minimal model for barchan fields leads to the description of three distinct phases for the system: stationary, percolable, and unstable. In the stationary phase the system always reaches an out-of-equilibrium, fluctuating, stationary state, independent of its initial conditions. This state has a large and continuous range of dynamics, from dilute-where dunes do not interact-to dense, where the system exhibits both spatial structuring and collective behavior leading to the selection of a particular size for the dunes. In the percolable phase, the system presents a percolation threshold when the initial density increases. This percolation is unusual, as it happens on a continuous space for moving, interacting, finite lifetime dunes. For extreme parameters, the system exhibits a subcritical instability, where some of the dunes in the field grow without bound. We discuss the nature of the asymptotic states and their relations to well-known models of statistical physics.

  6. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Observations During Subcritical Heat Treatments of a High-Chromium Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karantzalis, A. E.; Lekatou, A.; Kapoglou, A.; Mavros, H.; Dracopoulos, V.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, Cr white iron of 18.23 wt.% was subjected to a series of subcritical heat treatments. At both temperatures of 350 and 450 °C, no precipitation of secondary carbides was observed, and the overall microstructure resembles to that of the as-cast condition. At 550 °C, hardness values increased slightly compared to the as-cast values. No evidence of secondary carbide formation was observed. At 650 and 750 °C, extensive-to-complete transformation to pearlite-ferrite structures has occurred. Some evidence of secondary carbide precipitation especially for prolonged treatment periods was not adequate to obstruct the hardness decrease due to the dominating effect of pearlitic-ferritic formation. At 850 °C, secondary carbide precipitation and martensite formation lead to high hardness values.

  7. Surface Plasmon States in Inhomogeneous Media at Critical and Subcritical Metal Concentrations

    DOE PAGES

    Seal, Katyayani; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2012-01-01

    Semicontinuous metal-dielectric films are composed of a wide range of metal clusters of various geometries—sizes as well as structures. This ensures that at any given wavelength of incident radiation, clusters exist in the film that will respond resonantly, akin to resonating nanoantennas, resulting in the broad optical response (absorption) that is a characteristic of semicontinuous films. The physics of the surface plasmon states that are supported by such systems is complex and can involve both localized and propagating plasmons. This chapter describes near-field experimental and numerical studies of the surface plasmon states in semicontinuous films at critical and subcritical metalmore » concentrations and evaluates the local field intensity statistics to discuss the interplay between various eigenmodes.« less

  8. A Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor with a Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.; Beavers, V.L.; Casino, W.A.; Cheatham, J.R.; Friis, Z.W.; Green, R.D.; Hamilton, W.R.; Haufler, K.W.; Hutchinson, J.D.; Lackey, W.J.; Lorio, R.A.; Maddox, J.W.; Mandrekas, J.; Manzoor, A.A.; Noelke, C.A.; Oliveira, C. de; Park, M.; Tedder, D.W.; Terry, M.R.; Hoffman, E.A.

    2005-05-15

    A design is presented for a subcritical, He-cooled fast reactor, driven by a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The reactor is fueled with coated transuranic (TRU) particles and is intended for the deep-burn (>90%) transmutation of the TRUs in SNF without reprocessing of the coated fuel particles. The reactor design is based on the materials, fuel, and separations technologies under near-term development in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Program and on the plasma physics and fusion technologies under near-term development in the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program, with the objective of intermediate-term ({approx}2040) deployment. The physical and performance characteristics and research and development requirements of such a reactor are described.

  9. Subcritical measurements with a cylindrical tank of Pu-U nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; King, W.T.

    1997-04-01

    This series of measurements with a mixed Pu-U nitrate solution (280 g Pu/liter, 180 g U/liter) in a 35.54-cm-diam cylindrical tank provides a wide variety of experimental data for subcritical configurations that can be used to verify calculational methods and nuclear data. The Pu contained 7.85 wt% {sup 240}Pu and the uranium was natural uranium. The measurements performed were: inverse count rate, prompt neutron decay constants, inverse kinetics, and frequency analysis by the {sup 252}Cf source driven method. These data are presented in sufficient detail that the results of the experiments can be calculated directly. For purposes of extrapolating to the delayed critical height the ratio of spectral densities was linear with height and thus provided the best estimate of critical height.

  10. Subcritical instability on the attachment-line of an infinite swept wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, T. K.; Dipankar, A.

    2005-04-01

    The leading-edge contamination (LEC) problem of an infinite swept wing is shown here as vortex-induced instability. The governing equation for receptivity is presented for LEC in terms of disturbance energy based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The unperturbed shear layer given by the swept Hiemenz boundary-layer solution is two-dimensional and an exact solution of incompressible the Navier-Stokes equation. Thus, the LEC problem is solved numerically by solving the full two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation. The contamination at the attachment-line is shown by solving a receptivity to a convecting vortex moving outside the attachment-line boundary layer, which triggers subcritical spatio-temporal instability.

  11. Improved design of subcritical and supercritical cascades using complex characteristics and boundary layer correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The method of complex characteristics and hodograph transformation for the design of shockless airfoils was extended to design supercritical cascades with high solidities and large inlet angles. This capability was achieved by introducing a conformal mapping of the hodograph domain onto an ellipse and expanding the solution in terms of Tchebycheff polynomials. A computer code was developd based on this idea. A number of airfoils designed with the code are presented. Various supercritical and subcritical compressor, turbine and propeller sections are shown. The lag-entrainment method for the calculation of a turbulent boundary layer was incorporated to the inviscid design code. The results of this calculation are shown for the airfoils described. The elliptic conformal transformation developed to map the hodograph domain onto an ellipse can be used to generate a conformal grid in the physical domain of a cascade of airfoils with open trailing edges with a single transformation. A grid generated with this transformation is shown for the Korn airfoil.

  12. The mechanism of lipids extraction from wet microalgae Scenedesmus sp. by ionic liquid assisted subcritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuanni; Chen, Xiaolin; Xia, Shuwei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the total sugar concentration, protein concentration, lipid yield and morphology characteristics of the algae residue were determined to explain the mechanism of lipids extraction from wet microalgae Scenedesmus sp. by ionic liquid assisted subcritical water. The results showed similar variation for the sugar, protein and lipid. However, the total sugar was more similar to lipids yield, so the results showed that the reaction between ionic liquid and cellulose and hemicellulose in cell wall was the most important step which determined the lipids extration directly. And the total sugar variation may be representing the lipids yield. For later lipids extraction, we can determine the total sugar concentration to predict the extraction end product.

  13. The GUINEVERE experiment: First PNS measurements in a lead moderated sub-critical fast core

    SciTech Connect

    Thyebault, H. E.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) experimental program is dedicated to the study of Accelerator Driven System reactivity monitoring. It was partly carried out within the EUROTRANS integrated project (EURATOM FP6). GUINEVERE consists in coupling the fast core of the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)), composed of enriched uranium and solid lead, with a T(d,n) neutron source provided by the GENEPI-3C deuteron accelerator. This neutron source can be operated in several modes: pulsed mode, continuous mode and also continuous mode with short beam interruptions (the so called 'beam trips'). In the past, the key questions of the reactivity control and monitoring in a subcritical system were studied in the MUSE experiments (1998-2004). These experiments highlighted the difficulty to determine precisely the reactivity with a single technique. This led to investigate a new strategy which is based on the combination of the relative reactivity monitoring via the core power to beam current relationship with absolute reactivity cross-checks during programmed beam interruptions. Consequently, to determine the reactivity, several dynamical techniques of reactivity determination have to be compared. In addition, their accuracy for absolute reactivity determination must be evaluated using a reference reactivity determination technique (from a critical state: rod drop and MSM measurements). The first sub-critical configuration which was studied was around k{sub eff} = 0.96 (SCI). Pulsed Neutron Source experiments (PNS) were carried out. The neutron population decrease was measured using fission chambers in different locations inside the core and the reflector. Neutron population time decrease was analyzed using fitting techniques and the Area Method Results obtained for the SCI reactivity will be shown, discussed and compared to the reference value given by the MSM method. (authors)

  14. Effects of Pb and Bi cross sections on ATW subcriticality predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, H. S.; Yang, W. S.

    1999-06-25

    The accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) system has been proposed for transmuting the long-lived radioactive nuclei of high-level waste to stable or short-lived species. In recent ATW design concepts, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), consisting of 44.5% Pb and 55.5% Bi by weight is used as the spallation target, system coolant, and reflector. Because of the excellent neutron reflection properties of LBE, the subcriticality level of ATW is quite sensitive to the cross sections of lead and bismuth. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of these cross sections on subcriticality and other core characteristics of ATW and to compare the results obtained using cross sections in different evaluated nuclear data files. The effects of lead and bismuth cross sections on the core characteristics of ATW were studied using 33 group cross section sets derived from the ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-V, JENDL-3.2, and BROND-2.2 nuclear data. A 2000 MW(thermal) ATW configuration similar to that described in Reference 1 was used in this study. In this configuration, the spallation target region is 55 cm high and 25 cm in radius, and is surrounded by a 15-cm thick LBE buffer. The adjacent fueled region is {approximately}65 cm thick and 200 cm high. The volume fractions of fuel, coolant, and structure are 25.7%, 59.3%, and 15%, respectively. The metal alloy fuel is composed of roughly 70% zirconium, 25% transuranics (TRU), and 5% Tc-99 by weight. A thick LBE reflector surrounds the whole core; its axial thickness is 250 cm, and its radial thickness is 295.2 cm.

  15. Diethylstilbestrol in fish tissue determined through subcritical fluid extraction and with GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Qinghui; Shi, Nianrong; Feng, Xiaomei; Lu, Jie; Han, Yuqian; Xue, Changhu

    2016-06-01

    As the key point in sex hormone analysis, sample pre-treatment technology has attracted scientists' attention all over the world, and the development trend of sample preparation forwarded to faster and more efficient technologies. Taking economic and environmental concerns into account, subcritical fluid extraction as a faster and more efficient method has stood out as a sample pre-treatment technology. This new extraction technology can overcome the shortcomings of supercritical fluid and achieve higher extraction efficiency at relatively low pressures and temperatures. In this experiment, a simple, sensitive and efficient method has been developed for the determination of diethylstilbestrol (DES) in fish tissue using subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) extraction in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After extraction, freezing-lipid filtration was utilized to remove fatty co-extract. Further purification steps were performed with C18 and NH2 solid phase extraction (SPE). Finally, the analyte was derived by heptafluorobutyric anhydride (HFBA), followed by GC-MS analysis. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimizing the extraction condition, and the optimized was as follows: extraction pressure, 4.3 MPa; extraction temperature, 26°C; amount of co-solvent volume, 4.7 mL. Under this condition, at a spiked level of 1, 5, 10 μg kg-1, the mean recovery of DES was more than 90% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 10%. Finally, the developed method has been successfully used to analyzing the real samples.

  16. Spike avalanches in vivo suggest a driven, slightly subcritical brain state.

    PubMed

    Priesemann, Viola; Wibral, Michael; Valderrama, Mario; Pröpper, Robert; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Geisel, Theo; Triesch, Jochen; Nikolić, Danko; Munk, Matthias H J

    2014-01-01

    In self-organized critical (SOC) systems avalanche size distributions follow power-laws. Power-laws have also been observed for neural activity, and so it has been proposed that SOC underlies brain organization as well. Surprisingly, for spiking activity in vivo, evidence for SOC is still lacking. Therefore, we analyzed highly parallel spike recordings from awake rats and monkeys, anesthetized cats, and also local field potentials from humans. We compared these to spiking activity from two established critical models: the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model, and a stochastic branching model. We found fundamental differences between the neural and the model activity. These differences could be overcome for both models through a combination of three modifications: (1) subsampling, (2) increasing the input to the model (this way eliminating the separation of time scales, which is fundamental to SOC and its avalanche definition), and (3) making the model slightly sub-critical. The match between the neural activity and the modified models held not only for the classical avalanche size distributions and estimated branching parameters, but also for two novel measures (mean avalanche size, and frequency of single spikes), and for the dependence of all these measures on the temporal bin size. Our results suggest that neural activity in vivo shows a mélange of avalanches, and not temporally separated ones, and that their global activity propagation can be approximated by the principle that one spike on average triggers a little less than one spike in the next step. This implies that neural activity does not reflect a SOC state but a slightly sub-critical regime without a separation of time scales. Potential advantages of this regime may be faster information processing, and a safety margin from super-criticality, which has been linked to epilepsy.

  17. Spike avalanches in vivo suggest a driven, slightly subcritical brain state

    PubMed Central

    Priesemann, Viola; Wibral, Michael; Valderrama, Mario; Pröpper, Robert; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Geisel, Theo; Triesch, Jochen; Nikolić, Danko; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2014-01-01

    In self-organized critical (SOC) systems avalanche size distributions follow power-laws. Power-laws have also been observed for neural activity, and so it has been proposed that SOC underlies brain organization as well. Surprisingly, for spiking activity in vivo, evidence for SOC is still lacking. Therefore, we analyzed highly parallel spike recordings from awake rats and monkeys, anesthetized cats, and also local field potentials from humans. We compared these to spiking activity from two established critical models: the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model, and a stochastic branching model. We found fundamental differences between the neural and the model activity. These differences could be overcome for both models through a combination of three modifications: (1) subsampling, (2) increasing the input to the model (this way eliminating the separation of time scales, which is fundamental to SOC and its avalanche definition), and (3) making the model slightly sub-critical. The match between the neural activity and the modified models held not only for the classical avalanche size distributions and estimated branching parameters, but also for two novel measures (mean avalanche size, and frequency of single spikes), and for the dependence of all these measures on the temporal bin size. Our results suggest that neural activity in vivo shows a mélange of avalanches, and not temporally separated ones, and that their global activity propagation can be approximated by the principle that one spike on average triggers a little less than one spike in the next step. This implies that neural activity does not reflect a SOC state but a slightly sub-critical regime without a separation of time scales. Potential advantages of this regime may be faster information processing, and a safety margin from super-criticality, which has been linked to epilepsy. PMID:25009473

  18. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  19. TNT and RDX degradation and extraction from contaminated soil using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Shin, Moon-Su; Jo, Young-Tae; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-01-01

    The use of explosives either for industrial or military operations have resulted in the environmental pollution, poses ecological and health hazard. In this work, a subcritical water extraction (SCWE) process at laboratory scale was used at varying water temperature (100-175 °C) and flow rate (0.5-1.5 mL min(-1)), to treat 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) contaminated soil, to reveal information with respect to the explosives removal (based on the analyses of soil residue after extraction), and degradation performance (based on the analyses of water extracts) of this process. Continuous flow subcritical water has been considered on removal of explosives to avoid the repartitioning of non-degraded compounds to the soil upon cooling which usually occurs in the batch system. In the SCWE experiments, near complete degradation of both TNT and RDX was observed at 175 °C based on analysis of water extracts and soil. Test results also indicated that TNT removal of >99% and a complete RDX removal were achieved by this process, when the operating conditions were 1 mL min(-1), and treatment time of 20 min, after the temperature reached 175 °C. HPLC-UV and ion chromatography analysis confirmed that the explosives underwent for degradation. The low concentration of explosives found in the process wastewater indicates that water recycling may be viable, to treat additional soil. Our results have shown in the remediation of explosives contaminated soil, the effectiveness of the continuous flow SCWE process.

  20. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall Defects Using a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap including the Vastus Lateralis Muscle: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki; Ishiyama, Satoko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of abdominal wall reconstruction is to prevent hernias and protect the abdominal viscera. In cases involving full-thickness defects of the rectus abdominis muscle, the muscle layer should be repaired. We present 2 cases in which full-thickness lower rectus abdominis muscle defects were reconstructed using vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flaps. The pedicled vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flap provides skin, fascia, and muscle tissue. Furthermore, it has a long neurovascular pedicle and can reach up to the periumbilical area and cover large defects. We consider that this muscle flap is a good option for repairing full-thickness lower abdominal defects. PMID:28074168

  1. Including Pupils with Special Educational Needs and Disability in National Assessment: Comparison of Three Country Case Studies through an Inclusive Assessment Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Graeme; McLinden, Mike; Robertson, Christopher; Travers, Joseph; Smith, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of educational progress and outcomes of pupils is important to all concerned with education. This includes testing which is undertaken for accountability and award bearing purposes. This article examines how students with special educational needs and disability (SEND) are included in assessment. An "inclusive assessment"…

  2. Examining the Including and Excluding Roles of Positive Evidence: A Study of a Case Where L2/L1 Grammar Intersects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inaba, Midori

    1993-01-01

    This study argues that positive second-language (L2) data do not necessarily rule out inappropriate L2 grammar. Rather, L2 learners appear to postulate first-language (L1) grammar as an interim theory about the L2, at least in the initial stages of L2 acquisition. The case where L2 grammar intersects L1 concerning time adverbial clauses was chosen…

  3. Pooled analysis of case-control studies on malignant brain tumours and the use of mobile and cordless phones including living and deceased subjects.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Hansson Mild, Kjell

    2011-05-01

    We studied the association between use of mobile and cordless phones and malignant brain tumours. Pooled analysis was performed of two case-control studies on patients with malignant brain tumours diagnosed during 1997-2003 and matched controls alive at the time of study inclusion and one case-control study on deceased patients and controls diagnosed during the same time period. Cases and controls or relatives to deceased subjects were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Replies were obtained for 1,251 (85%) cases and 2,438 (84%) controls. The risk increased with latency period and cumulative use in hours for both mobile and cordless phones. Highest risk was found for the most common type of glioma, astrocytoma, yielding in the >10 year latency group for mobile phone use odds ratio (OR) = 2.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.9-3.7 and cordless phone use OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.9. In a separate analysis, these phone types were independent risk factors for glioma. The risk for astrocytoma was highest in the group with first use of a wireless phone before the age of 20; mobile phone use OR = 4.9, 95% CI = 2.2-11, cordless phone use OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.7-8.7. In conclusion, an increased risk was found for glioma and use of mobile or cordless phone. The risk increased with latency time and cumulative use in hours and was highest in subjects with first use before the age of 20.

  4. ACTH-producing microadenoma of the pituitary in a young female infant with Cushing's disease: report of a case including immunocytologic and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, M S; Wilson, G J; Holland, F J; Kovacs, K

    1986-01-01

    A female infant, younger than any other case in the literature, with ACTH-producing microadenoma of the pituitary is reported. She had full-blown symptoms and signs as well as laboratory evidence of Cushing's disease. The tumor was investigated by histology, immunocytology (avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex technique), and electron microscopy. The possibility that the tumor was derived from the fetal intermediate lobe is discussed.

  5. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can supply useful

  6. Multi-drug resistant E.coli urosepsis in physicians following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies--three cases including one death.

    PubMed

    Carlson, William H; Bell, David G; Lawen, Joseph G; Rendon, Ricardo A

    2010-04-01

    Three male physicians underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies for elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or irregular digital rectal exam findings. All three of these patients developed urosepsis secondary to multi-drug resistant organisms despite antibiotic prophylaxis. There are increasing reports of infectious complications following prostate biopsy caused by multi-drug resistant organisms. These cases highlight the potentially lethal risks to healthcare workers who are more likely to harbor multi-drug resistant organisms than the general population. Further research into preoperative assessment and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in all potentially high risk patients is warranted.

  7. High-loading low-speed fan study. 4: Data and performance with redesign stator and including a rotor tip casing treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harley, K. G.; Odegard, P. A.; Burdsall, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    A single stage fan with a rotor tip speed of 1000 ft/sec(304.8 m/sec) and a hub-to-tip ratio of 0.392 was retested with a redesigned stator. Tests were conducted with uniform inlet, tip-radial, hub-radial, and circumferential inlet distortions. With uniform inlet flow, stall margin was improved 12 percentage points above that with the original stator. The fan demonstrated an efficiency of 0.883 and a stall margin of 15 percent at a pressure ratio of 1.488 and a specific flow of 41.17 lb/sec/sq ft. Tests were also made with a redesigned casing treatment consisting of skewed slots over the rotor blade tips. This casing treatment gave a 7 percentage point improvement in stall margin when tested with tip radial distortion (when the rotor tip initiated stall). Noise measurements at the fan inlet and exit indicate no effect from closing the stator 10 degrees, nor were there measurable effects from adding skewed slots over the blade tips.

  8. BM platform, B Field, Offshore Northwest Java: A case history of multi-disciplinary integration including 3D seismic, reservoir simulation and horizontal drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.; Aziz, A.; Baldauff, J.; Diswarin, N.

    1996-12-31

    This case history describes how a multidisciplinary team used a 3D survey and reservoir simulation to review and revise the development plans for the BM platform, located in the B Field, Offshore Northwest Java, Indonesia. The case history starts with the collection of necessary parophysical, geologic and production data. These data are input to a reservoir simulation which shows there should be no problems with the new platform. However, this initial simulation has known problems with contradicting input structure maps and fluid contacts. Hopefully, these problems can be addressed with a new 3D seismic survey - if the seismic data can be acquired, processed, interpreted and input to the simulation before drilling starts at the BM platform. The seismic acquisition could not be done with the traditional towed seismic streamer cables - instead stationary ocean bottom cables with dual geophone-hydrophone sensors were used. Processing of the seismic data was done in a way that allowed interpretation of the critical area even before acquisition of the entire survey was finished. The new 3D structure maps changed the MDT`s opinion of what reservoir and what areas contained the bulk of the oil reserves. Unfortunately, the new maps were not available until after the jacket was set but before the wells drilled. The NMT updated the simulation with the new 3D data, which led to changes in development well bottom hole locations and an ambitious horizontal well.

  9. Two patients with overlapping de novo duplications of the long arm of chromosome 9, including one case with Di George sequence.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, V; Rosinsky, B; Chin, J; Berry-Kravis, E

    1994-01-01

    Duplications of chromosome 9q are rare. We describe the cytogenetic and phenotypic findings in 2 patients, one with a large duplication covering most of 9q(q12-q33.2) and one with a smaller duplication (q21.12-q22.1) who had Di George sequence (DGS). The chromosome 9 origin of the extra material in the second case was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a whole chromosome 9 paint. Microdeletions of chromosome 22 are common in DGS and have been reported in CHARGE association. This is the first report of an association of a chromosome 9 abnormality with DGS in the absence of a chromosome 22 abnormality and the seventh report of a patient with a duplication of a large portion of 9q (q11-q13 to q32-q33).

  10. Two patients with overlapping de novo duplications of the long arm of chromosome 9, including one case with Di George sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, V.; Rosinsky, B.; Chin, J.; Berry-Kravis, E.

    1994-01-01

    Duplications of chromosome 9q are rare. The authors describe the cytogenetic and phenotypic findings in 2 patients, one with a large duplication covering most of 9q (q12-q33.2) and one with a smaller duplication (q21.12-q22.1) who had Di George sequence (DGS). The chromosome 9 origin of the extra material in the second case was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a whole chromosome 9 paint. Microdeletions of chromosome 22 are common in DGS and have been reported in CHARGE association. This is the first report of an association of a chromosome 9 abnormality with DGS in the absence of a chromosome 22 abnormality and the seventh report of a patient with a duplication of a large portion of 9q (q11-q13 to q32-q33). 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Spiradenocylindroma-like basaloid carcinoma of the anus and rectum: case report, including HPV studies and analysis of the CYLD gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Kacerovska, Denisa; Szepe, Peter; Vanecek, Tomas; Nemcova, Jana; Michal, Michal; Mukensnabl, Petr; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2008-10-01

    The authors report a case of basaloid carcinoma involving the anus and rectum of a 57-year-old woman. Microscopically, the tumor showed unusual morphologic features strongly resembling a spiradenocylindroma because it consisted, in most parts, of basaloid cell nodules arranged in a jigsaw-puzzle fashion containing or surrounded by eosinophilic basal membrane material; in addition, there were intratumoral lymphocytes. The overlying squamous epithelium manifested dysplastic changes compatible with in situ squamous carcinoma that gradually became invasive and blended with basaloid cell islands; additionally, there were koilocytes in the squamous epithelium. A molecular biology study identified HPV-16 in the lesional tissue. Analysis of the CYLD gene did not prove any mutation.

  12. Effects of subcritical crack growth on fracture toughness of ceramics assessed in chevron-notched three-point bend tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, L. Y.; Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical computational study was carried out to assess the effects of subcritical crack growth on crack stability in the chevron-notched three-point bend specimens. A power-law relationship between the subcritical crack velocity and the applied stress intensity were used along with compliance and stress-intensity relationships for the chevron-notched bend specimen to calculate the load response under fixed deflection rate and a machine compliance. The results indicate that the maximum load during the test occurs at the same crack length for all the deflection rates; the maximum load, however, is dependent on the deflection rate for rates below the critical rate. The resulting dependence of the apparent fracture toughness on the deflection rate is compared to experimental results on soda-lime glass and polycrystalline alumina.

  13. Apparent activation energy of subcritical crack growth of SiC/SiC composites at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y.S.; Stackpoole, M.M.; Bordia, R.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the environmental effect of oxygen-containing gases on the subcritical crack growth of continuous fiber (Nicalon {open_quotes}SiC{close_quotes}) reinforced ceramic matrix (SiC) composites at elevated temperatures. This is a continuing project and the primary goal for this time period is to obtain an apparent activation energy for SiC/SiC materials with two different interfaces: carbon and boron nitride coatings. In the past six months, the authors have conducted studies of subcritical crack growth on SiC/SiC composite materials in a corrosive (O{sub 2}) as well as an inert (Ar) atmosphere for temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100{degree}C.

  14. Monte Carlo Modeling of Fast Sub-critical Assembly with MOX Fuel for Research of Accelerator-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, A.; Barashenkov, V.; Puzynin, I.; Rakhno, I.; Sissakian, A.

    It is considered a sub-critical assembly driven with existing 660 MeV JINR proton accelerator. The assembly consists of a central cylindrical lead target surrounded with a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (PuO2 + UO2) and with reflector made of beryllium. Dependence of the energetic gain on the proton energy, the neutron multiplication coefficient, and the neutron energetic spectra have been calculated. It is shown that for subcritical assembly with a mixed-oxide (MOX) BN-600 fuel (28%PuO 2 + 72%UO2) with effective density of fuel material equal to 9 g/cm 3 , the multiplication coefficient keff is equal to 0.945, the energetic gain is equal to 27, and the neutron flux density is 1012 cm˜2 s˜x for the protons with energy of 660 MeV and accelerator beam current of 1 uA.

  15. Criticality Expermints with Subcritical Clusters of 2.35 Wt% and 4.31 Wt% 2.35U Enriched UO2 Rods in Water at a Water-to-Fuel Volume Ratio of 1.6

    SciTech Connect

    SR Bierman; ED Clayton

    1980-07-01

    The fourth in a series of Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded criticality experiments have provided data for 2.35 wt% and 4.31 wt% {sup 235}U enriched U0{sub 2} rods at a water-to-fuel volume ratio of 1.6. The results from some 147 critical experiments are presented. They include for each enrichment: {sm_bullet}The critical size of single lattices or clusters of fuel {sm_bullet}The critical separation between sub-critical clusters of fuel {sm_bullet}The critical separation between sub-critical clusters of fuel having fixed neutron absorbers between the fuel clusters {sm_bullet}The isolation distance between fuel clusters {sm_bullet}The critical size of fuel clusters containing water holes and voids {sm_bullet}The critical size of fuel clusters separated by flux traps The fixed neutron absorbers for which data were obtained include 304-L steel, borated 304-L steel, copper, copper containing 1 wt% cadmium, cadmium, aluminium, zirconium and two trade name materials containing boron (Boral and Borofl ex).

  16. Stability of localized solutions in a subcritically unstable pattern-forming system under a global delayed control.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, B Y; Nepomnyashchy, A A; Golovin, A A

    2007-04-01

    The formation of spatially localized patterns in a system with subcritical instability under feedback control with delay is investigated within the framework of globally controlled Ginzburg-Landau equation. It is shown that feedback control can stabilize spatially localized solutions. With the increase of delay, these solutions undergo oscillatory instability that, for large enough control strength, results in the formation of localized oscillating pulses. With further increase of the delay the solution blows up.

  17. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevinitsa, V. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing 233U from 232Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  18. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nevinitsa, V. A. Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing {sup 233}U from {sup 232}Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  19. Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, In-Hee; Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

  20. Subcritical crack propagation due to chemical rock weakening: macroscale chemo-plasticity and chemo-elasticity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueckel, T.; Hu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Crack propagation in a subcritically stressed rock subject to chemically aggressive environment is analyzed and numerically simulated. Chemically induced weakening is often encountered in hydraulic fracturing of low-permeability oil/gas reservoirs and heat reservoirs, during storage of CO2 and nuclear waste corroding canisters, and other circumstances when rock matrix acidizing is involved. Upon acidizing, mineral mass dissolution is substantially enhanced weakening the rock and causing crack propagation and eventually permeability changes in the medium. The crack process zone is modeled mathematically via a chemo-plastic coupling and chemo-elastic coupling model. In plasticity a two-way coupling is postulated between mineral dissolution and a yield limit of rock matrix. The rate of dissolution is described by a rate law, but the mineral mass removal per unit volume is also a function of a variable internal specific surface area, which is in turn affected by the micro-cracking (treated as a plastic strain). The behavior of the rock matrix is modeled as rigid-plastic adding a chemical softening capacity to Cam-Clay model. Adopting the Extended Johnson's approximation of processes around the crack tip, the evolution of the stress field and deformation as a function of the chemically enhanced rock damage is modeled in a simplified way. In addition, chemical reactive transport is made dependent on plastic strain representing micro-cracking. Depending on mechanical and chemical boundary conditions, the area of enhanced chemical softening is near or somewhat away from the crack tip.In elasticity, chemo-mechanical effect is postulated via a chemical volumetric shrinkage strain proportional to mass removal variable, conceived analogously to thermal expansion. Two versions are considered: of constant coefficient of shrinkage and a variable one, coupled to deviatoric strain. Airy Potential approach used for linear elasticity is extended considering an extra term, which is

  1. An exome sequencing study of Moebius syndrome including atypical cases reveals an individual with CFEOM3A and a TUBB3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, David; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Lu, James T.; Sutton, V. Reid; Fernbach, Susan D.; Azamian, Mahshid; White, Lisa; Edmond, Jane C.; Paysse, Evelyn A.; Belmont, John W.; Muzny, Donna; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Lee, Brendan H.; Lalani, Seema R.

    2017-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is characterized by congenital unilateral or bilateral facial and abducens nerve palsies (sixth and seventh cranial nerves) causing facial weakness, feeding difficulties, and restricted ocular movements. Abnormalities of the chest wall such as Poland anomaly and variable limb defects are frequently associated with this syndrome. Most cases are isolated; however, rare families with autosomal dominant transmission with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity have been described. The genetic basis of this condition remains unknown. In a cohort study of nine individuals suspected to have Moebius syndrome (six typical, three atypical), we performed whole-exome sequencing to try to identify a commonly mutated gene. Although no such gene was identified and we did not find mutations in PLXND1 and REV3L, we found a de novo heterozygous mutation, p.E410K, in the gene encoding tubulin beta 3 class III (TUBB3), in an individual with atypical Moebius syndrome. This individual was diagnosed with near-complete ophthalmoplegia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and absence of the septum pellucidum. No substantial limb abnormalities were noted. Mutations in TUBB3 have been associated with complex cortical dysplasia and other brain malformations and congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 3A (CFEOM3A). Our report highlights the overlap of genetic etiology and clinical differences between CFEOM and Moebius syndrome and describes our approach to identifying candidate genes for typical and atypical Moebius syndrome. PMID:28299356

  2. Recovery of Palm Oil and Valuable Material from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch by Sub-critical Water.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Kurnin, Nor Azrin; Shah Ismail, Mohd Halim; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Izhar, Shamsul

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) is one of the solid wastes produced in huge volume by palm oil mill. Whilst it still contains valuable oil, approximately 22.6 million tons is generated annually and treated as solid waste. In this work, sub-critical water (sub-cw) was used to extract oil, sugar and tar from spikelet of EFB. The spikelet was treated with sub-cw between 180-280°C and a reaction time of 2 and 5 minutes. The highest yield of oil was 0.075 g-oil/g-dry EFB, obtained at 240°C and reaction time of 5 minutes. Astonishingly, oil that was extracted through this method was 84.5% of that obtained through Soxhlet method using hexane. Yield of oil extracted was strongly affected by the reaction temperature and time. Higher reaction temperature induces the dielectric constant of water towards the non-polar properties of solvent; thus increases the oil extraction capability. Meanwhile, the highest yield of sugar was 0.20 g-sugar/g-dry EFB obtained at 220°C. At this temperature, the ion product of water is high enough to enable maximum sub-critical water hydrolysis reaction. This study showed that oil and other valuable material can be recovered using water at sub-critical condition, and most attractive without the use of harmful organic solvent.

  3. Different dosages of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in treating immune thrombocytopenia with long-term follow-up of three years: Results of a prospective study including 167 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zeping; Qiao, Zhuoqing; Li, Huiyuan; Luo, Na; Zhang, Xian; Xue, Feng; Yang, Renchi

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of different dosages of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) against immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). A total of 167 patients, 91 adults and 76 children, with ITP, followed-up for three years in the case-control study, were divided into three subgroups according to the dosages of IVIg administered: group A (0.2 g/kg/day), group B (0.3 g/kg/day) and group C (0.4 g/kg/day). The therapeutic response in 91 adult patients did not differ significantly among the three groups of IVIg dosages (p = 0.459). The response rate of IVIg treatment in the three adult groups was 97.1% for group A, 97.2% for group B and 100% for group C. The mean time for raising platelets to 30 × 10(9)/L in group A was 2.5 days, group B 3.2 days and group C 2.9 days (p = 0.324). The median IVIg consumption in group A was 0.83 g/kg, group B 1.22 g/kg and group C 1.64 g/kg (p < 0.01). Similar results were shown in the children groups. The follow-up results showed no significant difference of clinical outcome between groups A, B and C. In conclusion, low-dose IVIg treatment is shown to be as effective as high-dose regimen without increasing the risk of developing the patients into chronic ITP conditions, suggesting that ITP patients could be treated more cost-effectively by lower conventional dosage of IVIg regimen.

  4. Including land cover change in analysis of greenness trends using all available Landsat 5, 7, and 8 images: A case study from Guangzhou, China (2000–2014)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Zhe; Fu, Yingchun; Woodcock, Curtis; Olofsson, Pontus; Vogelmann, James; Holden, Christopher; Wang, Min; Dai, Shu; Yu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    An assessment of the consistency of surface reflectance from Landsat 8 with past Landsat sensors indicates biases in the visible bands of Landsat 8, especially the blue band. Landsat 8 NDVI values were found to have a larger bias than the EVI values; therefore, EVI was used in the analysis of greenness trends for Guangzhou. In spite of massive amounts of development in Guangzhou from 2000 to 2014, greenness was found to increase, mostly as a result of gradual change. Comparison of the greening magnitudes estimated from the approach presented here and a Simple Linear Trend (SLT) method indicated large differences for certain time intervals as the SLT method does not include consideration for abrupt land cover changes. Overall, this analysis demonstrates the importance of considering land cover change when analyzing trends in greenness from satellite time series in areas where land cover change is common.

  5. Ketamine Infusion Therapy as an Alternative Pain Control Strategy in Patients with Multi-Trauma including Rib Fracture; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Losing, Ashley K; Jones, Justin M; Keric, Adis; Briggs, Steven E; Leedahl, David D

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is a promising alternative agent for pain control that offers benefit to traditional strategies, particularly in the setting of rib fracture. Current pharmacologic therapies have clear adverse effects, and other options may be invasive, cost prohibitive, or marginally effective. We describe three consecutive patients with traumatic injuries including rib fracture for which a ketamine infusion was utilized as part of their pain control strategy.  For each patient, use of a ketamine infusion trended toward reduced opioid requirements with stable pain scores. One patient experienced a dissociative adverse effect prompting decrease and discontinuation of ketamine. No pulmonary complications in the form of emergent intubation or new diagnosis of pneumonia were observed. We believe the addition of ketamine infusion to be a valid alternative strategy for managing pain associated with rib fracture. PMID:27540552

  6. Dynamics of subcritical CO/sub 2//brine floods for heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, G.; Faroug, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    Immiscible carbon dioxide flooding is an important, field-proven heavy oil recovery method, particularly suited for thin, marginal, or otherwise poor heavy oil reservoirs, where thermal recovery processes are likely to be uneconomical. This paper describes dynamics of this recovery technique, based upon experiments conducted in a scaled model. The experiments represent a medium heavy oil (1032 mPa.s at 23/sup 0/ C) occurring in a shallow, thin sand. Carbon dioxide was injected at subcritical conditions (5.5 MPa, 21-23/sup 0/ C), together with brine. The scaled experiment results showed that oil recoveries at CO/sub 2/ and brine breakthroughs were ratedependent. While recovery at CO/sub 2/ breakthrough decreased with increasing rate, recovery at brine breakthrough increased. Reduction of interfacial tension between brine and oil, leading to the formation of brine-in-oil emulsions, was found to be an additional effective mechanism of heavy oil recovery by CO/sub 2//brine injection.

  7. Efficient, high-speed methane fermentation for sewage sludge using subcritical water hydrolysis as pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Tokumoto, Hayato; Ishii, Kyoko; Ishii, Ryo

    2009-06-01

    A novel biomass-energy process for the production of methane from sewage sludge using a subcritical water (sub-CW) hydrolysis reaction as pretreatment is proposed. The main substances of sewage sludge hydrolyzed by sub-CW at 513 K for 10 min were acetic acid, formic acid, pyroglutamic acid, alanine, and glycine. Fermentation experiments were conducted in an anaerobic-sludge reactor for two different samples: real sewage sludge and a model solution containing components typically produced by the sub-CW pretreatment of sewage sludge. In the experiment for the sub-CW pretreatment of sewage sludge, methane generation was twice that for non-pretreatment after 3 days of incubation. In the model experiment, the methane conversion was about 40% with the application of mixture of organic acids and amino acids after 5 days of incubation. Furthermore, the methane conversion was about 60% for 2 days when only organic acids, such as acetic acid and formic acid, were applied. Because acetic acid is the key intermediate and main precursor of the methanogenesis step, fermentation experiments were conducted in an anaerobic-sludge reactor with high concentrations of acetic acid (0.01-0.1M). Nearly 100% of acetic acid was converted to methane and carbon dioxide in 1-3 days.

  8. High performance curcumin subcritical water extraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    PubMed

    Valizadeh Kiamahalleh, Mohammad; Najafpour-Darzi, Ghasem; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Valizadeh Kiamahalleh, Meisam

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenolic compound derived from turmeric rhizome, which consists about 2-5% of the total rhizome content and is a more valuable component of turmeric. For reducing the drawbacks of conventional extraction (using organic solvents) of curcumin, the water as a clean solvent was used for extracting curcumin. Subcritical water extraction (SWE) experimental setup was fabricated in a laboratory scale and the influences of some parameters (e.g. extraction temperature, particle size, retention time and pressure) on the yield of extraction were investigated. Optimum extraction conditions such as SWE pressure of 10bar, extractive temperature of 140°C, particle size of 0.71mm and retention time of 14min were defined. The maximum amount of curcumin extracted at the optimum condition was 3.8wt%. The yield of curcumin extraction was more than 76wt% with regards to the maximum possible curcumin content of turmeric, as known to be 5%. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images from the outer surface of turmeric, before and after extraction, clearly demonstrated the effect of each parameter; changes in porosity and hardness of turmeric that is directly related to the amount of extracted curcumin in process optimization of the extraction parameters.

  9. The sup 252 Cf-source-driven noise measurements of unreflected uranium hydride cylinder subcriticality

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Pare, V.K.; Blakeman, E.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Subcritical neutron multiplication factors have been measured by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method for unreflected, 15.0-cm-diam uranium hydride cylinders of varying heights. Because of the difficulty and cost of controlling the H/U ratio in damp uranium (93.2 wt% {sup 235}U) oxide power and fabricating sufficient material for experiments, few experiments have been performed with materials of low H/U ratios. These measurements may provide alternate information that can be used for verifying calculational methods since the H/U ratio for this material is 3.00. These measurements, which are the first application of this method to uranium hydride, were performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility in 1989. These measurements were used to demonstrate the capability of this measurement method for this type of material and to provide a benchmark experiment for calculational methods with slightly moderated systems. Previous experiments by this method were for a wide variety of well-moderated systems or unmoderated uranium metal cylinders.

  10. Sub-critical crack growth in silicate glasses: Role of network topology

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-05

    The presence of water in the surrounding atmosphere can cause sub-critical crack growth (SCCG) in glasses, a phenomenon known as fatigue or stress corrosion. Here, to facilitate the compositional design of more fatigue-resistant glasses, we investigate the composition dependence of SCCG by studying fourteen silicate glasses. The fatigue curves (V-K{sub I}) have been obtained by indentation experiments through measurements of the crack length as a function of post-indentation fatigue duration. Interestingly, we find that the fatigue resistance parameter N is generally improved by increasing the alumina content and is thereby found to exhibit a fairly linear dependence on the measured Vickers hardness H{sub V} for a wide range of N and H{sub V} values. This finding highlights the important role of network topology in governing the SCCG in silicate glasses, since hardness has been shown to scale linearly with the number of atomic constraints. Our results therefore suggest that glasses showing under-constrained flexible networks, which feature floppy internal modes of deformation, are more readily attacked by water molecules, thus promoting stress corrosion and reducing the fatigue resistance.

  11. Polyethylene-reflected plutonium metal sphere : subcritical neutron and gamma measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.

    2009-11-01

    Numerous benchmark measurements have been performed to enable developers of neutron transport models and codes to evaluate the accuracy of their calculations. In particular, for criticality safety applications, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Program (ICSBEP) annually publishes a handbook of critical and subcritical benchmarks. Relatively fewer benchmark measurements have been performed to validate photon transport models and codes, and unlike the ICSBEP, there is no program dedicated to the evaluation and publication of photon benchmarks. Even fewer coupled neutron-photon benchmarks have been performed. This report documents a coupled neutron-photon benchmark for plutonium metal reflected by polyethylene. A 4.5-kg sphere of ?-phase, weapons-grade plutonium metal was measured in six reflected configurations: (1) Bare; (2) Reflected by 0.5 inch of high density polyethylene (HDPE); (3) Reflected by 1.0 inch of HDPE; (4) Reflected by 1.5 inches of HDPE; (5) Reflected by 3.0 inches of HDPE; and (6) Reflected by 6.0 inches of HDPE. Neutron and photon emissions from the plutonium sphere were measured using three instruments: (1) A gross neutron counter; (2) A neutron multiplicity counter; and (3) A high-resolution gamma spectrometer. This report documents the experimental conditions and results in detail sufficient to permit developers of radiation transport models and codes to construct models of the experiments and to compare their calculations to the measurements. All of the data acquired during this series of experiments are available upon request.

  12. Preparation and characterization of foxtail millet bran oil using subcritical propane and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuzhong; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhang, Ruitin; Ma, Hanjun; Liu, Benguo

    2015-05-01

    The foxtail millet (Setaria italica Beauv) bran oil was extracted with traditional solvent extraction (SE), supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCE) and subcritical propane extraction (SPE) and analyzed the yield, physicochemical property, fatty acid profile, tocopherol composition, oil oxidative stability in this study. The yields of foxtail millet bran oil by SE, SCE and SPE were 17.14 %, 19.65 %, 21.79 % of raw material weight (corresponded to 75.54 %, 86.60 %, 96.03 % of the total amount of the oil measured by using Soxhlet extraction), respectively. The effect of the extraction methods on the physicochemical properties (peroxide value, saponification value and color) was significant while the difference in fatty acid profile was negligible based on GC analysis. The major components of vitamin E in the obtained oils were identified as α- and β-tocopherols by HPLC, and SPE was superior to SE and SCE in the extraction of tocopherols. In Rancimat test, the oil obtained by SPE showed the highest oil oxidative stability, which could attribute to its high tocopherol content and low peroxide value. In view of oil quality, SPE employed smaller times and lower pressures compared to SE and SCE. SPE was a suitable and selective method for the extraction of the foxtail millet bran oil.

  13. Effect of Porcine Placenta Extract from Subcritical Water Extraction on Photodamage in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bok Kyung; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Hong, Yang Hee; Jung, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluated the photoprotective effects of porcine placenta extract (PPE) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) to evaluate its functional activities as a skin food ingredient. PPE prepared by subcritical water extraction was termed SPE, and subsequently digested by enzymes to prepare E-SPE. Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels (192.0%) induced by UVB were decreased by SPE and E-SPE. SPE had more effective ROS scavenging activity than E-SPE treatment. UVB treatment increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), and this elevated expression was decreased by E-SPE treatment. High-dose treatment with E-SPE (50 and 100 µg/mL) reduced TIMP-1 expression levels of UVB-C (control) to 33.5 and 34.6%, respectively. In contrast, at low SPE doses (1 and 10 µg/mL), the treatment slightly decreased TIMP-1 expression levels to 73.3% and 71.3% of UVB-C, respectively. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated the protective effect of SPE and E-SPE against UVB damage in keratinocytes via ROS scavenging, down-regulating MMP-2 expression and up-regulating TIMP-1 expression. This highlights the potential for SPE as an ingredient in the preparation of functional food against photoaging. PMID:26761824

  14. Acceleration and localization of subcritical crack growth in a natural composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.; Zaiser, M.; Graham, C. C.

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic failure of natural and engineered materials is often preceded by an acceleration and localization of damage that can be observed indirectly from acoustic emissions (AE) generated by the nucleation and growth of microcracks. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of the statistical properties and spatiotemporal characteristics of AE signals generated during triaxial compression of a sandstone sample. We demonstrate that the AE event amplitudes and interevent times are characterized by scaling distributions with shapes that remain invariant during most of the loading sequence. Localization of the AE activity on an incipient fault plane is associated with growth in AE rate in the form of a time-reversed Omori law with an exponent near 1. The experimental findings are interpreted using a model that assumes scale-invariant growth of the dominating crack or fault zone, consistent with the Dugdale-Barenblatt "process zone" model. We determine formal relationships between fault size, fault growth rate, and AE event rate, which are found to be consistent with the experimental observations. From these relations, we conclude that relatively slow growth of a subcritical fault may be associated with a significantly more rapid increase of the AE rate and that monitoring AE rate may therefore provide more reliable predictors of incipient failure than direct monitoring of the growing fault.

  15. Subcritical carbon dioxide-water hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse pith for reducing sugars production.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiezhen; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Linlin; Wei, Xiaojie; Wang, Huasheng; Lu, Songzhou; Li, Yunhua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of present study was to obtain total reducing sugars (TRS) by hydrolysis in subcritical CO2-water from sugarcane bagasse pith (SCBP), the fibrous residue remaining after papermaking from sugarcane bagasse. The optimum hydrolysis conditions were evaluated by L16(4(5)) orthogonal experiments. The TRS yield achieved 45.8% at the optimal conditions: 200°C, 40min, 500rmin(-1), CO2 initial pressure of 1MPa and liquid-to-solid ratio of 50:1. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance were used to characterize hydrolysis liquor, treated and untreated SCBP, resulting in the removal of hemicelluloses to mainly produce xylose, glucose and arabinose during hydrolysis. The severity factors had no correlation to TRS yield, indicating that the simple kinetic processes of biomass solubilisation cannot perfectly describe the SCBP hydrolysis. The first-order kinetic model based on consecutive reaction was used to obtain rate constants, activation energies and pre-exponential factors.

  16. Subcritical Butane Extraction of Wheat Germ Oil and Its Deacidification by Molecular Distillation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinwei; Sun, Dewei; Qian, Lige; Liu, Yuanfa

    2016-12-07

    Extraction and deacidification are important stages for wheat germ oil (WGO) production. Crude WGO was extracted using subcritical butane extraction (SBE) and compared with traditional solvent extraction (SE) and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCE) based on the yield, chemical index and fatty acid profile. Furthermore, the effects of the molecular distillation temperature on the quality of WGO were also investigated in this study. Results indicated that WGO extracted by SBE has a higher yield of 9.10% and better quality; at the same time, its fatty acid composition has no significant difference compared with that of SE and SCE. The molecular distillation experiment showed that the acid value, peroxide value and p-anisidine value of WGO were reduced with the increase of the evaporation temperatures, and the contents of the active constituents of tocopherol, polyphenols and phytosterols are simultaneously decreased. Generally, the distillation temperature of 150 °C is an appropriate condition for WGO deacidification with the higher deacidification efficiency of 77.78% and the higher retention rate of active constituents.

  17. Sub-critical crack growth in silicate glasses: Role of network topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    The presence of water in the surrounding atmosphere can cause sub-critical crack growth (SCCG) in glasses, a phenomenon known as fatigue or stress corrosion. Here, to facilitate the compositional design of more fatigue-resistant glasses, we investigate the composition dependence of SCCG by studying fourteen silicate glasses. The fatigue curves (V-KI) have been obtained by indentation experiments through measurements of the crack length as a function of post-indentation fatigue duration. Interestingly, we find that the fatigue resistance parameter N is generally improved by increasing the alumina content and is thereby found to exhibit a fairly linear dependence on the measured Vickers hardness HV for a wide range of N and HV values. This finding highlights the important role of network topology in governing the SCCG in silicate glasses, since hardness has been shown to scale linearly with the number of atomic constraints. Our results therefore suggest that glasses showing under-constrained flexible networks, which feature floppy internal modes of deformation, are more readily attacked by water molecules, thus promoting stress corrosion and reducing the fatigue resistance.

  18. Subcritical water extraction of nutraceuticals with antioxidant activity from oregano. Chemical and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Meizoso, I; Marin, F R; Herrero, M; Señorans, F J; Reglero, G; Cifuentes, A; Ibáñez, E

    2006-08-28

    In the present work, oregano leaves (Origanum vulgare L.) are explored as natural source of nutraceuticals with antioxidant activity. To do this, subcritical water extraction (SWE), a new environmentally friendly technique, is employed as extraction procedure and HPLC coupled to DAD is used for the chemical characterization of the extracts. Moreover, the radical scavenging 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method and the determination of the total phenolic content (measured with the Folin test) are applied to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the extracts. The extraction of antioxidants from oregano leaves by SWE is studied considering different temperatures (25, 50, 100, 150 and 200 degrees C) to investigate the selectivity of the process. The highest antioxidant activity is observed for the extract obtained at the highest temperature, 200 degrees C (EC(50) equal to 10 microg/ml). Moreover, the extraction yield was also the highest (54% dry weight) at these extraction conditions. The total phenolic content showed no differences among the different extracts, concluding that the amount of phenolic compounds extracted was similar but the type and structure of the phenolics was different, providing in this way different antioxidant activity. Some compounds could be tentatively identified, proposing some probable chemical structures for some of them, such as flavanones, dihydroflavonols, favonols and flavones.

  19. Co-liquefaction of microalgae and lignocellulosic biomass in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Gai, Chao; Li, Yi; Peng, Nana; Fan, Aonan; Liu, Zhengang

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated co-liquefaction of microalgae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa, CP) and lignocellulosic biomass (Rice husk, RH) in subcritical water for bio-oil production. The effects of liquefaction temperature (200-350°C), residence time (10-90min), solid concentration (10-30wt.%) and mass ratio of CP/RH on product distribution were investigated. The results showed that the highest yield of bio-crude oils at the combination of 50% CP with 50% RH was obtained at 300°C temperature, 60min residence time and 20wt.% solid concentration. The oil yields increased gradually with the increased mass ratio of CP/RH. The major compounds identified in bio-crude oils from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of RH were cyclic oxygenates (20.62%), followed by esters, ketones and alcohols (17.19%). As for CP, the main components were straight & branched amides (28.38%). A synergistic interaction was observed between CP and RH during co-liquefaction, resulting in decreased acidity and nitrogen content of bio-crude oils.

  20. Subcritical water extraction and characterization of bioactive compounds from Haematococcus pluvialis microalga.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Meizoso, I; Jaime, L; Santoyo, S; Señoráns, F J; Cifuentes, A; Ibáñez, E

    2010-01-20

    In this work, extraction and characterization of compounds with antioxidant and antimicrobial activity from Haematococcus pluvialis microalga in red phase have been carried out. To do this, subcritical water extraction (SWE) has been combined with analytical techniques such as HPLC-DAD, HPLC-QqQ-MS and GC-MS and in vitro assays (i.e., for antioxidant and antimicrobial activity). The effect of the extraction temperature (50, 100, 150 and 200 degrees C) and solvent polarity has been studied in terms of yield and activity of the extracts. Results demonstrate that the extraction temperature has a positive influence in the extraction yield and antioxidant activity. Thus, the extraction yield achieved with this process was higher than 30% of dry weight at 200 degrees C as extraction temperature. Moreover, the extract obtained at 200 degrees C presented the highest antioxidant activity by far, while temperature does not seem to significatively affect the antimicrobial activity. Chemical composition was determined by HPLC-DAD, HPLC-QqQ-MS and GC-MS. Short chain fatty acids turned out to be responsible of the antimicrobial activity, whereas the antioxidant activity was correlated to vitamin E (present exclusively in the 200 degrees C extract), together with simple phenols, caramelization products and possible Maillard reaction products obtained during the extraction at high temperatures.

  1. Production of monosaccharides and bio-active compounds derived from marine polysaccharides using subcritical water hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Meillisa, Aviannie; Woo, Hee-Chul; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2015-03-15

    Polysaccharides are the major components of brown seaweed, accounting for approximately 40-65% of the total mass. The majority of the brown seaweed polysaccharides consists of alginate (40% of dry matter), a linear hetero-polysaccharides commonly developed in fields. However, depolymerisation of alginate is required to recover high-value compounds. In this report, depolymerisation was performed using subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) at 180-260°C, with a ratio of material to water of 1:25 (w/v) and 1% formic acid as a catalyst. Sugar recovery was higher at low temperatures in the presence of catalyst. The antioxidant properties of Saccharina japonica showed the best activity at 180°C in the presence of a catalyst. The mass spectra produced using MALDI-TOF showed that polysaccharides and oligosaccharides were produced during hydrothermal treatment. Hydrolysis treatment at 180°C in the presence of a catalyst may be useful for modifying the structure of S. japonica and purified alginate.

  2. Electron versus proton accelerator driven sub-critical system performance using TRIGA reactors at power

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Burgio, N.; D'Angelo, A.; Santagata, A.; Petrovich, C.; Schikorr, M.; Beller, D.; Felice, L. S.; Imel, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison of the performance of an electron accelerator-driven experiment, under discussion within the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project, being conducted within the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and of the proton-driven experiment TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) originally planned at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. Both experiments foresee the coupling to sub-critical TRIGA core configurations, and are aimed to investigate the relevant kinetic and dynamic accelerator-driven systems (ADS) core behavior characteristics in the presence of thermal reactivity feedback effects. TRADE was based on the coupling of an upgraded proton cyclotron, producing neutrons via spallation reactions on a tantalum (Ta) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 200 kW. RACE is based on the coupling of an Electron Linac accelerator, producing neutrons via photoneutron reactions on a tungsten-copper (W-Cu) or uranium (U) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 50 kW. The paper is focused on analysis of expected dynamic power response of the RACE core following reactivity and/or source transients. TRADE and RACE target-core power coupling coefficients are compared and discussed. (authors)

  3. On the unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow.

    PubMed

    Parmar, M; Haselbacher, A; Balachandar, S

    2008-06-28

    The unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow is investigated. In the limit of incompressible flow, the unsteady inviscid force on a cylinder or sphere is the so-called added-mass force that is proportional to the product of the mass displaced by the body and the instantaneous acceleration. In compressible flow, the finite acoustic propagation speed means that the unsteady inviscid force arising from an instantaneously applied constant acceleration develops gradually and reaches steady values only for non-dimensional times c(infinity)t/R approximately >10, where c(infinity) is the freestream speed of sound and R is the radius of the cylinder or sphere. In this limit, an effective added-mass coefficient may be defined. The main conclusion of our study is that the freestream Mach number has a pronounced effect on both the peak value of the unsteady force and the effective added-mass coefficient. At a freestream Mach number of 0.5, the effective added-mass coefficient is about twice as large as the incompressible value for the sphere. Coupled with an impulsive acceleration, the unsteady inviscid force in compressible flow can be more than four times larger than that predicted from incompressible theory. Furthermore, the effect of the ratio of specific heats on the unsteady force becomes more pronounced as the Mach number increases.

  4. Subcritical hydrothermal treatment for the recovery of liquid fertilizer from scallop entrails.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hee; Aoyama, Hiroya; Abe, Natsuki; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Scallop entrails are organic wastes containing abundant proteins and minerals but are considered difficult to recycle because of high cadmium concentrations. In this work, the current problem of scallop entrails recycling was investigated and a subcritical hydrothermal treatment (SCHT) was examined for the recovery of liquid fertilizer from scallop entrails. Scallop entrails are mainly recycled for composting and feedstuff production. However, the dilution by mixing scallop entrails with other feed waste was the sole countermeasure to reduce the cadmium concentration of compost. For feedstuff production, whole product derived from scallop entrails was exported to other countries instead of domestic utilization. Temperature, retention time (RT) at given temperature, and liquid-to-solid (LS) ratio were examined as SCHT conditions for scallop entrails processing. The extraction ratio of each constituent mainly depends on the temperature rather than the RT or the LS ratio. Upon the SCHT of scallop entrails at 200°C, an RT of 20 min, and an LS ratio of 10, the extraction of fertilizer constituents such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium from the liquid product was optimum, whereas the release of cadmium was suppressed. The concentrations of heavy metals in the liquid product obtained using the above-mentioned SCHT conditions were below the maximum permissible concentration stipulated by the Fertilizer Control Law. SCHT is considered to be a feasible recycling method for scallop entrails to recover fertilizer components with a concomitant separation of cadmium from the product.

  5. Structural elucidation and immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharide isolated by subcritical water extraction from Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Duan, Yuqing; Yang, Wenya; Zhang, Haihui; Li, Changzheng; Zhang, Jixian

    2017-02-10

    Water-soluble polysaccharides were obtained from Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) (CMP) by subcritical water extraction (SWE). Two polysaccharides fractions, CMP-W1 and CMP-S1, were isolated from CMP using DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephadex G-150 column chromatography. The structural characteristics of CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 were investigated. The results showed that the molecular weight of CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 are 3.66×105Da and 4.60×105Da, respectively, and both of them were heteropolysaccharides composed of d-mannose, d-glucose, d-galactose with the molar ratios of 2.84:1:1.29 and 2.05:1:1.09, respectively. FT-IR spectra analysis suggested that CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 belonged to pyranose form sugar and protein free. For immunostimulatory activity assay in vitro, CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 significantly promoted lymphatic spleen cell proliferation of mice. Therefore, the polysaccharides obtained from C. militaris by SWE can be used as potential natural immunostimulant in functional foods or medicine.

  6. Control of ZnO morphologies via surfactants assisted route in the subcritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jimin; Liu, Zhimin; Huang, Ying; Gao, Yanan; Han, Buxing; Li, Wenjing; Yang, Guanying

    2005-06-01

    ZnO micromaterials were fabricated from the decomposition of soluble [Zn(OH) 4] 2- precursor in subcritical water at 280 °C and 7.5 MPa in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), EO 17-PO 60-EO 17 (P103), and their mixture, respectively. The morphology and structure of the resultant materials were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electronic diffraction (SAED), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), and high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results demonstrated that ZnO microflowers with an average size of about 1.7 μm were fabricated as the CTAB/P103 mixture was used as the structure-directing agents, while nanorods and microrods were synthesized in the presence of CTAB and P103 under similar conditions, respectively. Based on our serials of experimental results, surfactant-assisted growth mechanisms are responsible for the shape evolution of ZnO morphologies. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the samples were determined, and the catalytic activity of the ZnO flowers and rods for Friedel-Crafts acylation of anisole and benzoyl chloride were tested. The results showed that ZnO flowers had more intense emission and higher catalytic activity for Friedel-Crafts acylation than the rods.

  7. Investigation of radiation fields outside the Sub-critical Assembly in Dubna.

    PubMed

    Seltbor, P; Lopatkin, A; Gudowski, W; Shvetsov, V; Polanski, A

    2005-01-01

    The radiation fields outside the planned experimental Sub-critical Assembly in Dubna (SAD) have been studied in order to provide a basis for the design of the concrete shielding that cover the reactor core. The effective doses around the reactor, induced by leakage of neutrons and photons through the shielding, have been determined for a shielding thickness varying from 100 to 200 cm. It was shown that the neutron flux and the effective dose is higher above the shielding than at the side of it, owing to the higher fraction of high-energy spallation neutrons emitted in the direction of the incident beam protons. At the top, the effective dose was found to be -150 microSv s(-1) for a concrete thickness of 100 cm, while -2.5 microSv s(-1) for a concrete thickness of 200 cm. It was also shown that the high-energy neutrons (> 10 MeV), which are created in the proton-induced spallation interactions in the target, contribute for the major part of the effective doses outside the reactor.

  8. Improved design of subcritical and supercritical cascades using complex characteristics and boundary-layer correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The method of complex characteristics and hodograph transformation for the design of shockless airfoils was extended to design supercritical cascades with high solidities and large inlet angles. This capability was achieved by introducing a conformal mapping of the hodograph domain onto an ellipse and expanding the solution in terms of Tchebycheff polynomials. A computer code was developed based on this idea. A number of airfoils designed with the code are presented. Various supercritical and subcritical compressor, turbine and propeller sections are shown. The lag-entrainment method for the calculation of a turbulent boundary layer was incorporated to the inviscid design code. The results of this calculation are shown for the airfoils described. The elliptic conformal transformation developed to map the hodograph domain onto an ellipse can be used to generate a conformal grid in the physical domain of a cascade of airfoils with open trailing edges with a single transformation. A grid generated with this transformation is shown for the Korn airfoil. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24474

  9. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of the Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S and 4) Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2007-01-30

    Detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses of the S and 4 reactor are performed to reduce the maximum fuel temperature of the Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S and 4) reactor to below 1300 K. The fuel pellet diameter is reduced from 1.315 cm to 1.25 cm, decreasing the thermal resistance of the pellets and each of the 1.54 cm diameter coolant channels in the reactor core are replaced with several 0.3 cm ID channels to increase the effective heat transfer area and to encourage mixing of the flowing helium-28% xenon coolant. The calculated maximum fuel temperature decreased from more than 1900 K to 1302 K and the relative pressure drop across the reactor core increased from 1.98% to 2.57% of the inlet pressure. Moving the concentric inlet and outlet pipes 1 cm towards the center of the reactor core encouraged more flow through the center region, further reducing the maximum fuel temperature by 14 degrees to 1288 K, with a negligible effect on the core pressure losses.

  10. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Spirulina and Nannochloropsis salina under subcritical and supercritical water conditions.

    PubMed

    Toor, Saqib S; Reddy, Harvind; Deng, Shuguang; Hoffmann, Jessica; Spangsmark, Dorte; Madsen, Linda B; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Rosendahl, Lasse A

    2013-03-01

    Six hydrothermal liquefaction experiments on Nannochloropsis salina and Spirulina platensis at subcritical and supercritical water conditions (220–375 °C, 20–255 bar) were carried out to explore the feasibility of extracting lipids from wet algae, preserving nutrients in lipid-extracted algae solid residue, and recycling process water for algae cultivation. GC–MS, elemental analyzer, FT-IR, calorimeter and nutrient analysis were used to analyze bio-crude, lipid-extracted algae and water samples produced in the hydrothermal liquefaction process. The highest bio-crude yield of 46% was obtained on N. salina at 350 °C and 175 bar. For S. platensis algae sample, the optimal hydrothermal liquefaction condition appears to be at 310 °C and 115 bar, while the optimal condition for N. salina is at 350 °C and 175 bar. Preliminary data also indicate that a lipid-extracted algae solid residue sample obtained in the hydrothermal liquefaction process contains a high level of proteins.

  11. Evolution of newly formed aerosol particles in the continental boundary layer: A case study including OH and H2SO4 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2000-08-01

    An event of new particle formation is presented, based on simultaneous measurements of aerosol number size distributions, relevant gaseous components including H2SO4 and OH, and meteorological parameters. Measurements were conducted at Hohenpeissenberg, a rural continental mountain site in southern Germany. The event was observed under intense solar radiation, with total particle number concentrations increasing from 6000 to 25000 cm-3 within one hour, and ultrafine particles (3-11 nm) accounting for more than 50% of total number. Observed OH and H2SO4 concentrations reached maximum levels around 107 cm-3. A lower limit of the particle nucleation rate was estimated to be 3 cm-3·s-1, consistent with present models of ternary nucleation involving the H2SO4-H2O-NH3 system. Roughly 80% of the subsequent drop in ultrafine mode particle number concentration could be explained by coagulation. The observed particle growth rate of 2.1±0.1 nm/h was largely attributed to the condensation of measured H2SO4, assuming neutralization by ammonia.

  12. 272 cases of rattlesnake envenomation in dogs: Demographics and treatment including safety of F(ab')2 antivenom use in 236 patients.

    PubMed

    Witsil, Amanda J; Wells, Raegan J; Woods, Craig; Rao, Sangeeta

    2015-10-01

    Medical records of 272 rattlesnake envenomations of canines from 5 veterinary emergency centers in Maricopa County, Arizona between 2010 and 2012 were investigated. The objectives were to examine the patient demographics, severity of clinical signs, and treatment modalities employed, in order to discuss the outcomes of certain therapies including glucocorticoid use, antibiotic use, rattlesnake vaccination, and safety of antivenom administration in dogs. Evaluation was performed to model each response (survival, proposed canine snakebite severity score (cSSS), and length of stay) as a function of multiple variables. Of the 272 bite incidences, 8 dogs had a fatal outcome. In dogs older than 10 years, there was a greater likelihood of fatal outcome associated with a longer delay between the bite and presentation. 236 of the envenomated patients were treated with a F(ab')2 antivenom, 24 with a whole immunoglobulin antivenom, and 12 with both products. Overall incidence of acute hypersensitivity reaction was 0.7% with one incident observed in each antivenom group and F(ab')2 antivenom administration having the lowest rate of acute hypersensitivity reactions; no reactions were life-threatening. Antivenom administration was found to be generally safe in treatment of canine rattlesnake envenomation. In view of the results of this study, in dogs with rattlesnake envenomation, there is no evidence that use of glucocorticoids, diphenhydramine, prophylactic antibiotics, or vaccination lessen morbidity or mortality.

  13. Applying Rb/Sr isochron geochronology on phengite included in garnet: a case study on the meta-sediments of the Zermatt-Saas Fee ophiolite (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meyer, C. M.; Baumgartner, L.; Johnson, C.; Beard, B. L.; Skora, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    We report Rb/Sr isochron ages obtained from phengites included in garnets of meta-sediments of the Zermatt-Saas Fee ophiolite (ZSFO) in the Western Alps. The ZSFO represents the remnants of the Mesozoic Piemonte-Ligurien Ocean. It consists of several sheets of ultramafic, mafic and meta-sedimentary rocks. The ZSFO underwent (U)HP peak metamorphic conditions (P ~15-25 kbar; T~500-600°C) in the Tertiary, followed by a greenschist-facies overprint during exhumation. Phengites included in garnets of two meta-pelites and one calcschist sample from two different localities were separated for Rb/Sr geochronology. The phengite inclusions-whole rock pairs give Rb/Sr isochron ages of 44.25 ±0.48 Ma and 43.19 ±0.32 Ma for one locality and 40.58 ±0.24 Ma for the other locality. Rb/Sr isochron ages using different size phengites from the matrix and a combination of bulk rock, tourmaline, zoisite or calcite yield ages of 40.12 ±0.51 Ma, 39.37 ±0.66 Ma and 39.8 ±1.5 Ma for the samples above. The phengite inclusion ages are hence about 4 and 1 Ma older than the phengite matrix isochrones. It is important to note that isochron initial ratios from phengite inclusion and phengite matrix isochrones are consistent with closed system behavior. The differences in initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios are proportional to the differences in time between them and the 87Rb/86Sr of the bulk rock. We interpret the phengite matrix isochrones to date early stages of exhumation (closure temperature of ca. 500°C). Older phengite inclusion ages are the result of garnet preventing Rb-Sr isotope exchange between the phengite inclusion and the rest of the rock matrix. For an even distribution of inclusions, there will be more inclusions recovered from the outer parts of the garnet (larger volume). Thus, we conclude that the phengite inclusion ages date the later part of the garnet growth. Hence ages slightly older than the peak of HP metamorphism. Previous studies of the prograde geochronology at Zermatt

  14. [A Case of GIST of the Stomach with Long-Term Survival after Multidisciplinary Treatment, Including Four Surgical Resections of Liver Metastases].

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, Masatoshi; Hirao, Motohiro; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Hamakawa, Takuya; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Sakae; Uemura, Mamoru; Miyake, Masakazu; Hama, Naoki; Miyazaki, Michihiko; Ikeda, Masataka; Nakamori, Shoji; Kiyokawa, Hiroki; Mano, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2016-11-01

    The most frequent relapse site of gastrointestinal stromal tumors(GIST)is the liver. We encountered a patient with longterm survival treated with multidisciplinary treatment, including4 hepatectomies for liver metastases. The patient was a woman aged 69 years at the time of the first medical treatment. She underwent total gastrectomy and S6 segmental hepatec- tomy for a stomach GIST with a hepatic metastasis. The tumor diameter was 24 cm and the mitotic figure was 65/50 HPF. According to the guidelines, it was diagnosed as a high risk GIST based on strong positive immunostaining for CD34 and c-kit. The tumor had metastasized to the liver and greater omentum. She took imatinib in the year following surgery. Because the GIST had spread to the lung1 8 months after the operation, she took imatinib again. Two years after the operation the pulmonary metastasis showed a clinical complete response(cCR)and the CR lasted for 4 years. Six years after the surgery she had a hepatic recurrence in S5, and she underwent an S5/4 partial hepatic resection. Seven years after the first operation, a liver S7 metastasis developed and she underwent S7 partial hepatectomy. Ten years after the first surgery, the GIST relapsed in liver S6 with right adrenal gland permeation. She underwent partial S6/7 liver resection and a right adrenal gland resection. She resumed takingimatinib after this surgical resection. Now, 11 years after the first operation, she is alive with an S1 hepatic recurrence taking sunitinib. Therefore, multidisciplinary treatment with surgical resection prolongs the survival of patients with resectable liver metastases of GIST.

  15. Integrating theory, synthesis, spectroscopy and device efficiency to design and characterize donor materials for organic photovoltaics: a case study including 12 donors

    DOE PAGES

    Oosterhout, S. D.; Kopidakis, N.; Owczarczyk, Z. R.; ...

    2015-04-07

    There have been remarkable improvements in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processable Organic Photovoltaics (OPV) have largely been driven by the development of novel narrow bandgap copolymer donors comprising an electron-donating (D) and an electron-withdrawing (A) group within the repeat unit. The large pool of potential D and A units and the laborious processes of chemical synthesis and device optimization, has made progress on new high efficiency materials slow with a few new efficient copolymers reported every year despite the large number of groups pursuing these materials. In our paper we present an integrated approach toward new narrow bandgap copolymersmore » that uses theory to guide the selection of materials to be synthesized based on their predicted energy levels, and time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) to select the best-performing copolymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction to be incorporated into complete OPV devices. We validate our methodology by using a diverse group of 12 copolymers, including new and literature materials, to demonstrate good correlation between (a) theoretically determined energy levels of polymers and experimentally determined ionization energies and electron affinities and (b) photoconductance, measured by TRMC, and OPV device performance. The materials used here also allow us to explore whether further copolymer design rules need to be incorporated into our methodology for materials selection. For example, we explore the effect of the enthalpy change (ΔH) during exciton dissociation on the efficiency of free charge carrier generation and device efficiency and find that ΔH of -0.4 eV is sufficient for efficient charge generation.« less

  16. Integrating theory, synthesis, spectroscopy and device efficiency to design and characterize donor materials for organic photovoltaics: a case study including 12 donors

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterhout, S. D.; Kopidakis, N.; Owczarczyk, Z. R.; Braunecker, W. A.; Larsen, R. E.; Ratcliff, E. L.; Olson, D. C.

    2015-04-07

    There have been remarkable improvements in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processable Organic Photovoltaics (OPV) have largely been driven by the development of novel narrow bandgap copolymer donors comprising an electron-donating (D) and an electron-withdrawing (A) group within the repeat unit. The large pool of potential D and A units and the laborious processes of chemical synthesis and device optimization, has made progress on new high efficiency materials slow with a few new efficient copolymers reported every year despite the large number of groups pursuing these materials. In our paper we present an integrated approach toward new narrow bandgap copolymers that uses theory to guide the selection of materials to be synthesized based on their predicted energy levels, and time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) to select the best-performing copolymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction to be incorporated into complete OPV devices. We validate our methodology by using a diverse group of 12 copolymers, including new and literature materials, to demonstrate good correlation between (a) theoretically determined energy levels of polymers and experimentally determined ionization energies and electron affinities and (b) photoconductance, measured by TRMC, and OPV device performance. The materials used here also allow us to explore whether further copolymer design rules need to be incorporated into our methodology for materials selection. For example, we explore the effect of the enthalpy change (ΔH) during exciton dissociation on the efficiency of free charge carrier generation and device efficiency and find that ΔH of -0.4 eV is sufficient for efficient charge generation.

  17. Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-11-04

    In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS

  18. Subcritical water extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds from XiLan olive fruit dreg.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue-Mei; Zhu, Ping; Zhong, Qiu-Ping; Li, Meng-Ying; Ma, Han-Ruo

    2015-08-01

    Olive fruit dreg (OFD), waste from olive softdrink processing, has caused disposal problems. Nevertheless, OFD is a good source of functional ingredients, such as phenolic compounds. This study investigated the extraction conditions of phenolic compounds from OFD by using subcritical water (SCW) extraction method, antioxidant activity of SCW extracts, and components of phenolic compounds by LC-MS. SCW extraction experiments were performed in a batch stainless steel reactor at temperatures ranging from 100 to 180 °C at residence time of 5 to 60 min, and at solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:20 to 1:60. Higher recoveries of phenolic compounds [37.52 ± 0.87 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g, dry weight (DW)] were obtained at 160 °C, solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:50, and extract time of 30 min than at 2 h extraction with methanol (1.21 ± 0.16 mg GAE/g DW), ethanol (0.24 ± 0.07 mg GAE/g DW), and acetone (0.34 ± 0.01 mg GAE/g DW). The antioxidant activities of the SCW extracts were significantly stronger than those in methanol extracts at the same concentration of total phenolic contents. LC-MS analysis results indicated that SCW extracts contained higher amounts of phenolic compounds, such as chlorogenic acid, homovanillic acid, gallic acid, hydroxytyrosol, quercetin, and syringic acid. SCW at 160 °C, 30 min, and solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:50 may be a good substitute of organic solvents, such as methanol, ethanol, and acetone to recover phenolic compounds from OFD.

  19. Phenomenology of a flow around a circular cylinder at sub-critical and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Di Felice, Fabio; Miozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the flow around a circular cylinder is investigated at Reynolds numbers ranging from 79 000 up to 238 000 by means of a combined acquisition system based on Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) and particle velocimetry. The proposed setup allows simultaneous and time-resolved measurement of absolute temperature and relative skin friction fields onto the cylinder surface and near-wake velocity field. Combination of time-resolved surface measurements and planar near-field velocity data allows the investigation of the profound modifications undergone by the wall shear stress topology and its connections to the near-field structure as the flow regime travels from the sub-critical to the critical regime. Laminar boundary-layer separation, transition, and re-attachment are analyzed in the light of temperature, relative skin friction maps, and Reynolds stress fields bringing about a new perspective on the relationship between boundary layer development and shear layer evolution. The fast-responding TSP employed allows high acquisition frequency and calculation of power spectral density from surface data. Correlation maps of surface and near-wake data provide insight into the relationship between boundary-layer evolution and vortex shedding. We find that as the Reynolds number approaches the critical state, the separation line oscillations feature an increasingly weaker spectrum peak compared to the near-wake velocity spectrum. In the critical regime, separation line oscillations are strongly reduced and the correlation to the local vorticity undergoes an overall decrease giving evidence of modifications in the vortex shedding mechanism.

  20. Subcritical Fluid Extraction of Chinese Quince Seed: Optimization and Product Characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wu, Min; Liu, Hua-Min; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xue-De; Qin, Guang-Yong

    2017-03-25

    Chinese quince seed (CQS) is an underutilized oil source and a potential source of unsaturated fatty acids and α-tocopherol-rich oil. Subcritical fluid (SCF) extraction is executed at lower pressures and temperatures than the pressures and temperatures used in supercritical fluid extraction. However, no studies on the SCF extraction of CQS oil are reported. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the use of SCF for the extraction of CQS oil and to compare the use of SCF with the classical Soxhlet (CS) and supercritical CO₂ (SC-CO₂) extraction methods. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to investigate the extraction conditions: temperature (45-65 °C), time (30-50 min), and solvent/solid ratio (5-15 mL/g). The optimization results showed that the highest yield (27.78%) was obtained at 56.18 °C, 40.20 min, and 12.57 mL/g. The oil extracted by SCF had a higher unsaturated fatty acid content (86.37%-86.75%), higher α-tocopherol content (576.0-847.6 mg/kg), lower acid value (3.97 mg/g), and lower peroxide value (0.02 meq O₂/kg) than extractions using CS and SC-CO2 methods. The SCF-defatted meal of oilseed exhibited the highest nitrogen solubility index (49.64%) and protein dispersibility index (50.80%), demonstrating that SCF extraction was a promising and efficient technique as an alternative to CS and SC-CO2 methods, as very mild operating conditions and an eco-friendly solvent can be used in the process with maximum preservation of the quality of the meal.

  1. Sub-critical two-phase seawater convection near a dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Robert P.; Xu, Wenyue

    2000-01-01

    We address the circulation of hydrothermal seawater near an igneous dike emplaced in the oceanic crust. By using the two-phase finite difference hydrothermal code GTHM, we are able to treat the sub-critical two-phase flow that occurs just after emplacement as well as the later single-phase circulation, which occurs as the dike cools. We investigate the effects of bulk rock permeability and dike width. The simulations show that for a 2 m wide dike emplaced in country rock with uniform permeability of 10 -9 m 2, two-phase flow may occur briefly adjacent to the dike margin in a region that is less than 0.1 m across. The width of the two-phase region and the duration of two-phase flow vary inversely with permeability, but they increase as the dike width increases. During two-phase flow, the advective heat flux at the seafloor fluctuates about its mean and the temperature near the seafloor remains nearly constant. The mean heat flux increases with permeability, but is independent of dike width. The model is used in conjunction with chlorinity data from 'A' vent near 9°N on the East Pacific Rise to indicate that the permeability there is ˜10 -12 m 2. The model suggests, however, that an additional heat source is required to account for the high-temperature vent fluids at 9°N that have persisted for more than 3 years. The calculations also show that heat transport near a high permeability dike (i.e., ≥10 -9 m 2) is consistent with the heat transport measured for the CoAxial event plumes. The calculations further suggest, however, that for a dike to generate an event plume, the zone of high permeability should be concentrated near the dike margin.

  2. Subcritical CO2 Sintering of Microspheres of Different Polymeric Materials to Fabricate Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bhamidipati, Manjari; Sridharan, BanuPriya; Scurto, Aaron M; Detamore, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use CO2 at sub-critical pressures as a tool to sinter 3D, macroporous, microsphere-based scaffolds for bone and cartilage Tissue Engineering Porous scaffolds composed of ~200 µm microspheres of either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or polycaprolactone (PCL) were prepared using dense phase CO2 sintering, which were seeded with rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs), and exposed to either osteogenic (PLGA, PCL) or chondrogenic (PLGA) conditions for 6 weeks. Under osteogenic conditions, the PLGA constructs produced over an order of magnitude more calcium than the PCL constructs, whereas the PCL constructs had far superior mechanical and structural integrity (125 times stiffer than PLGA constructs) at week 6, along with twice the cell content of the PLGA constructs. Chondrogenic cell performance was limited in PLGA constructs, perhaps as a result of the polymer degradation rate being too high. The current study represents the first long-term culture of CO2-sintered microsphere-based scaffolds, and has established important thermodynamic differences in sintering between the selected formulations of PLGA and PCL, with the former requiring adjustment of pressure only, and the latter requiring the adjustment of both pressure and temperature. Based on more straightforward sintering conditions and more favorable cell performance, PLGA may be the material of choice for microspheres in a CO2 sintering application, although a different PLGA formulation with the encapsulation of growth factors, extracellular matrix-derived nanoparticles, and/or buffers in the microspheres may be advantageous for achieving a more superior cell performance than observed here. PMID:24094202

  3. Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hee; Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki

    2012-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234°C and 3MPa (LT condition) and 295°C and 8MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

  4. In-situ biodiesel and sugar production from rice bran under subcritical condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zullaikah, Siti; Rahkadima, Yulia Tri

    2015-12-01

    An integrated method of producing biodiesel and sugar using subcritical water and methanol has been employed as a potential way to reduce the high cost of single biofuel production from rice bran. The effects of temperature, methanol to water ratio and reaction time on the biodiesel yield and purity, and the concentration of sugar in hydrolysate were investigated systematically. Biodiesel with yield and purity of 65.21%and 73.53%, respectively, was obtained from rice bran with initial free fatty acid (FFA) content of 37.64% under the following conditions: T= 200 oC, P= 4.0 MPa (using CO2 as pressurizing gas), ratio of rice bran/water/methanol of 1/2/6 (g/mL/mL), and 3 h of reaction time. FFAs level was reduced to 10.00% with crude biodiesel recovery of 88.69%. However, the highest biodiesel yield (67.39%) and crude biodiesel recovery (100.00%) were obtained by decreasing the amount of methanol so that the ratio of rice bran/water/methanol became 1/4/4, g/mL/mL. In addition, the highest sugar concentration of 0.98 g/L was obtained at 180 oC and 4.0 MPa with ratio of rice bran/water/methanol of 1/4/4 (g/mL/mL) and reaction time of 3 h. Since no catalyst was employed and the biodiesel and reducing sugar were produced directly from rice bran with high water and FFA contents, the process was simple and environmentally friendly, which would make the production of biofuel more economical and sustainable.

  5. Innovative leaching of cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion batteries and simultaneous dechlorination of polyvinyl chloride in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-10-05

    In this work, an effective and environmentally friendly process for the recovery of cobalt (Co) and lithium (Li) from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and simultaneously detoxification of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in subcritical water was developed. Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) power from spent LIBs and PVC were co-treated by subcritical water oxidation, in which PVC served as a hydrochloric acid source to promote metal leaching. The dechlorination of PVC and metal leaching was achieved simultaneously under subcritical water oxidation. More than 95% Co and nearly 98% Li were recovered under the optimum conditions: temperature 350°C, PVC/LiCoO2 ratio 3:1, time 30min, and a solid/liquid ratio 16:1 (g/L), respectively. Moreover, PVC was completely dechlorinated at temperatures above 350°C without any release of toxic chlorinated organic compounds. Assessment on economical and environmental impacts revealed that the PVC and LiCoO2 subcritical co-treatment process had significant technical, economic and environmental benefits over the traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy processes. This innovative co-treatment process is efficient, environmentally friendly and adequate for Co and Li recovery from spent LIBs and simultaneous dechlorination of PVC in subcritical water.

  6. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  7. A portable measurement system for subcriticality measurements by the CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    A portable system has been assembled that is capable of measuring the subcriticality of fissile materials using the /sup 252/CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method. The measurement system consists of a parallel-plate ionization chamber containing /sup 252/CF, two /sup 3/He proportional counters with their associated electronics, and a small computer containing anti-aliasing filters and A/D convertors. The system Fourier analyzes the digitized data and forms the appropriate auto and cross-power spectral densities. These spectra are used to form a ratio of spectral densities, G/sub 12/G/sub 13//G/sub 11/G/sub 23/, where 1 refers to the ionization chamber, and 2 and 3 refer to the /sup 3/He counters, from which subcriticality can be determined. The chamber and detectors are located appropriately near the fissile material. The system is capable of sampling signals at rates of up to 80 kHz and processing these data at rates of 2 kHz to form the appropriate spectra. The presently configured system is a two-channel system, hence the measurement of G/sub 12/, G/sub 13/, and G/sub 23/ must be done sequentially before the ratio of spectral densities is obtained. Future improvements of the system will allow simultaneous measurement of all spectra and will further reduce size, thereby enhancing portability. This measurement system can provide reliable, cost effective, and convenient determination of the subcriticality of a wide variety of fissile materials and moderators.

  8. Efficient decomposition of a new fluorochemical surfactant: perfluoroalkane disulfonate to fluoride ions in subcritical and supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Saito, Hiroki; Sakai, Hidenori; Kitahara, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Takehiko

    2015-06-01

    Decomposition of (-)O3SC3F6SO3(-) in subcritical and supercritical water was investigated, and the results were compared with the results for C3F7SO3(-). This is the first report on the decomposition of perfluoroalkane disulfonates, which are being introduced in electronics industry as greener alternatives to environmentally persistent and bioaccumulative perfluoroalkyl surfactants. Addition of zerovalent iron to the reaction system dramatically increased the yield of F(-) in the reaction solution: when the reaction of (-)O3SC3F6SO3(-) was carried out in subcritical water at 350°C for 6h, the F(-) yield was 70%, which was 23times the yield without zerovalent iron. Prolonged reaction increased the F(-) formation: after 18h, the F(-) yield from the reaction of (-)O3SC3F6SO3(-) reached 81%, which was 2.1times the F(-) yield from the reaction of C3F7SO3(-). Although the reactivity of FeO toward these substrates was lower than zerovalent iron in subcritical water, the reactivity was enhanced when the reaction temperature was elevated to supercritical state, at which temperature FeO underwent in situ disproportionation to form zerovalent iron, which acted as the reducing agent. When the reaction of (-)O3SC3F6SO3(-) was carried out in the presence of FeO in supercritical water at 380°C for 18h, the F(-) yield reached 92%, which was the highest yield among tested.

  9. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  10. Batteries not included.

    PubMed

    Hand, F; McDowell, D; Gillick, J

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of oesophageal lodgement of ingested button batteries (BB) in young children. In one case the diagnosis and subsequent treatment was made in a timely fashion and the patient suffered no sequelae. In the second case there was a delay in diagnosis and the patient subsequently suffered both early and late complications. The purpose of this report is to highlight theingestion importance of the correct management of suspected BB ingestion.

  11. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  12. Enhanced Production of Phenolic Compounds from Pumpkin Leaves by Subcritical Water Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jeong-Yeon; Ko, Mi-Ok; Kim, Dong-Shin; Lim, Sang-Bin

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced production of individual phenolic compounds by subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) of pumpkin leaves was investigated at various temperatures ranging from 100 to 220°C at 20 min and at various reaction times ranging from 10 to 50 min at 160°C. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and gentisic acid were the major phenolic compounds in the hydrolysate of pumpkin leaves. All phenolic compounds except gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 160°C, but gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 180°C. The cumulative amount of individual phenolic compounds gradually increased by 48.1, 52.2, and 78.4 μg/g dry matter at 100°C, 120°C, and 140°C, respectively, and then greatly increased by 1,477.1 μg/g dry matter at 160°C. The yields of caffeic acid and ferulic acid showed peaks at 20 min, while those of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and procatechuic acid showed peaks at 30 min. Antioxidant activities such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power values gradually increased with hydrolysis temperature and ranged from 6.77 to 12.42 mg ascorbic acid equivalents/g dry matter and from 4.25 to 8.92 mmol Fe(2+)/100 g dry matter, respectively. Color L* and b* values gradually decreased as hydrolysis temperature increased from 100°C to 140°C. At high temperatures (160°C to 220°C), L* and b* values decreased suddenly. The a* value peaked at 160°C and then decreased as temperature increased from 160°C to 220°C. These results suggest that SWH of pumpkin leaves was strongly influenced by hydrolysis temperature and may enhanced the production of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities.

  13. Enhanced Production of Phenolic Compounds from Pumpkin Leaves by Subcritical Water Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jeong-Yeon; Ko, Mi-Ok; Kim, Dong-Shin; Lim, Sang-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced production of individual phenolic compounds by subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) of pumpkin leaves was investigated at various temperatures ranging from 100 to 220°C at 20 min and at various reaction times ranging from 10 to 50 min at 160°C. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and gentisic acid were the major phenolic compounds in the hydrolysate of pumpkin leaves. All phenolic compounds except gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 160°C, but gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 180°C. The cumulative amount of individual phenolic compounds gradually increased by 48.1, 52.2, and 78.4 μg/g dry matter at 100°C, 120°C, and 140°C, respectively, and then greatly increased by 1,477.1 μg/g dry matter at 160°C. The yields of caffeic acid and ferulic acid showed peaks at 20 min, while those of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and procatechuic acid showed peaks at 30 min. Antioxidant activities such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power values gradually increased with hydrolysis temperature and ranged from 6.77 to 12.42 mg ascorbic acid equivalents/g dry matter and from 4.25 to 8.92 mmol Fe2+/100 g dry matter, respectively. Color L* and b* values gradually decreased as hydrolysis temperature increased from 100°C to 140°C. At high temperatures (160°C to 220°C), L* and b* values decreased suddenly. The a* value peaked at 160°C and then decreased as temperature increased from 160°C to 220°C. These results suggest that SWH of pumpkin leaves was strongly influenced by hydrolysis temperature and may enhanced the production of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities. PMID:27390730

  14. Response of a subcritically growing macrocrack in the mining environment to induced stress changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Dirk; Cailleau, Beatrice; Kaiser, Diethelm; Dahm, Torsten

    2013-04-01

    calculated stresses. This suggests a reorganization of the acting stress field and a stress transfer on the scale of 10s meters partly inhibiting further growth of the damage zone. This observation gives insights into the role of a sudden fracture formation or earthquake rupture on subcritical growth of neighboring fractures or fault patches.

  15. Sub-critical fouling in a membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment: experimental investigation and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Saroj, Devendra Prakash; Chiarani, Daniele; Andreottola, Gianni

    2007-09-01

    Fouling is a major limitation for the application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) in municipal wastewater treatment; the critical flux concept represents a valid tool for process optimisation in planning fouling control strategies. The paper presents the results obtained on a large pilot MBR equipped with a plate-and-frame ultrafiltration membrane. The experimental assessment of flux criticality was carried out by flux-stepping tests showing the positive impact of liquid temperature on the value of the critical threshold. The reliability of short-term tests was then verified over a long period by determining the time of sustainability, t(sust), of six different sub-critical fluxes ranging between 17 and 30Lm(-2)h(-1). An exponential fitting was observed in terms of fouling rate both before and after t(sust), though fouling after t(sust) is likely to be ascribed not only to cake formation. Finally, a new mathematical formulation was proposed according to the local flux approach to model the sub-critical TMP transients. The model involves both bound and free forms of EPS and, once experimentally calibrated, it provided a fair prediction of the TMP jump.

  16. Subcritical crack growth in SiNx thin-film barriers studied by electro-mechanical two-point bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Qingling; Laven, Jozua; Bouten, Piet C. P.; de With, Gijsbertus

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical failure resulting from subcritical crack growth in the SiNx inorganic barrier layer applied on a flexible multilayer structure was studied by an electro-mechanical two-point bending method. A 10 nm conducting tin-doped indium oxide layer was sputtered as an electrical probe to monitor the subcritical crack growth in the 150 nm dielectric SiNx layer carried by a polyethylene naphthalate substrate. In the electro-mechanical two-point bending test, dynamic and static loads were applied to investigate the crack propagation in the barrier layer. As consequence of using two loading modes, the characteristic failure strain and failure time could be determined. The failure probability distribution of strain and lifetime under each loading condition was described by Weibull statistics. In this study, results from the tests in dynamic and static loading modes were linked by a power law description to determine the critical failure over a range of conditions. The fatigue parameter n from the power law reduces greatly from 70 to 31 upon correcting for internal strain. The testing method and analysis tool as described in the paper can be used to understand the limit of thin-film barriers in terms of their mechanical properties.

  17. Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission in a Molten Salt Core: Green Nuclear Power for the New Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Scientists at Texas A&M University, Brookhaven National Lab, and Idaho National Lab are developing a design for accelerator-drive subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). Three high-power proton beams are delivered to spallation targets in a molten salt core, where they provide ˜3% of the fast neutrons required to sustain 600 MW of fission. The proton beams are produced by a flux-coupled stack of superconducting strong-focusing cyclotrons. The fuel consists of a eutectic of sodium chloride with either spent nuclear fuel from a conventional U power reactor (ADSMS-U) or thorium (ADSMS-Th). The subcritical core cannot go critical under any failure mode. The core cannot melt down even if all power is suddenly lost to the facility for a prolonged period. The ultra-fast neutronics of the core makes it possible to operate in an isobreeding mode, in which neutron capture breeds the fertile nuclide into a fissile nuclide at the same rate that fission burns the fissile nuclide, and consumes 90% of the fertile inventory instead of the 5% consumed in the original use in a conventional power plant. The ultra-fast neutronics produces a very low equilibrium inventory of the long-lived minor actinides, ˜10^4 less than what is produced in conventional power plants. ADSMS offers a method to safely produce the energy needs for all mankind for the next 3000 years.

  18. SIMPLE METHOD FOR ESTIMATING POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL CONCENTRATIONS ON SOILS AND SEDIMENTS USING SUBCRITICAL WATER EXTRACTION COUPLED WITH SOLID-PHASE MICROEXTRACTION. (R825368)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid method for estimating polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in contaminated soils and sediments has been developed by coupling static subcritical water extraction with solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Soil, water, and internal standards are placed in a seale...

  19. Optimization of supercritical phase and combined supercritical/subcritical conversion of lignocellulose for hexose production by using a flow reaction system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wu, Hua-Yong; Liu, Jin-Wen; Wang, Hong-Tao

    2012-12-01

    A flow reaction system was utilized to investigate lignocellulose conversion using combined supercritical/subcritical conditions for hexose production. Initially, investigation of cellulose hydrolysis in supercritical water and optimization of reaction parameters were done. Oligosaccharide yields reached over 30% at cellulose concentrations of 3-5 gL(-1) and reaction times of 6-10s at 375 °C, and 2.5-4 gL(-1) and 8-10s at 380 °C. Temperatures above 380 °C were not appropriate for the supercritical phase in the combined process. Subsequently, conversion of lignocellulosic materials under combined supercritical/subcritical conditions was studied. Around 30% hexose was produced from corn stalks under the optimal parameters for supercritical (380 °C, 23-24 MPa, 9-10s) and subcritical (240 °C, 8-9 MPa, 45-50s) phases. Flow systems utilizing the combined supercritical/subcritical technology present a promising method for lignocellulosic conversion. The results of this study provide an important guide for the operational optimization and practical application of the proposed system.

  20. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  1. Characterization and Benzo[a]pyrene Content Analysis of Camellia Seed Oil Extracted by a Novel Subcritical Fluid Extraction.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianyin; Che, Ke; Xi, Ruchun; He, Liping; Chen, Xuexiang; Guan, Xiaosheng; Zhuang, Xueying; Wen, Xiujun; Cao, Yong

    2013-01-01

    A novel continuous subcritical n-butane extraction technique for Camellia seed oil was explored. The fatty acid composition, physicochemical properties, and benzo[a]pyrene content of Camellia seed oil extracted using this subcritical technique were analyzed. Orthogonal experiment design (L9(3(4))) was adopted to optimize extraction conditions. At a temperature of 45 °C, a pressure of 0.5 MPa, a time of 50 min and a bulk density of 0.7 kg/L, an extraction yield of 99.12 ± 0.20 % was obtained. The major components of Camellia seed oil are oleic acid (73.12 ± 0.40 %), palmitic acid (10.38 ± 0.05 %), and linoleic acid (9.15 ± 0.03 %). Unsaturated fatty acids represent 83.78 ± 0.03 % of the total fatty acids present. Eight physicochemical indexes were assayed, namely, iodine value (83.00 ± 0.21 g I/100 g), saponification value (154.81 ± 2.00 mg KOH/g), freezing-point (-8.00 ± 0.10 °C), unsaponifiable matter (5.00 ± 0.40 g/kg), smoke point (215.00 ± 1.00 °C), acid value (1.24 ± 0.03 mg KOH/g), refrigeration test (transparent, at 0 °C for 5.5 h), and refractive index (1.46 ± 0.06, at 25 °C). Benzo[a]pyrene was not detected in Camellia seed oil extracted by continuous subcritical n-butane extraction. In comparison, the benzo[a]pyrene levels of crude Camellia seed oil extracted by hot press extraction and refined Camellia seed oil were measured at 26.55 ± 0.70 and 5.69 ± 0.04 μg/kg respectively.

  2. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  3. Decomposition of prepolymers and molding materials of phenol resin in subcritical and supercritical water under an Ar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Tagaya, Hideyuki; Kadokawa, Junichi; Chiba, Koji; Asou, Tetsuo

    1999-04-01

    Seven prepolymers of phenol resin were decomposed into their monomers such as phenol, cresols, and p-isopropylphenol by reactions at 523--703 K under an Ar atmosphere in subcritical and supercritical water. The total yield of identified products depended on the kind of prepolymers, and the maximum yield reached 78% in the reaction at 703 K for 0.5 h. The decomposition reactions were accelerated by the addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and the yields of identified monomers reached more than 90%. Two kinds of molding materials of phenol resin whose content of phenol resin was less than 50% were also decomposed mainly into phenol and cresols by the reaction in supercritical water.

  4. Optimization of subcritical water extraction parameters of antioxidant polyphenols from sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides L.) seed residue.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ying; Zhang, Xiaofei; He, Li; Yan, Qiuli; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang

    2015-03-01

    Polyphenols was extracted with subcritical water from the sea buckthorn seed residue (after oil recovery), and the extraction parameters were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The independent processing variables were extraction temperature, extraction time and the ratio of water to solid. The optimal extraction parameters for the extracts with highest ABTS radical scavenging activity were 120 °C, 36 min and the water to solid ratio of 20, and the maximize antioxidant capacity value was 32.42 mmol Trolox equivalent (TE)/100 g. Under the optimal conditions, the yield of total phenolics, total flavonoids and proanthocyanidins was 36.62 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g, 19.98 mg rutin equivalent (RE)/g and 10.76 mg catechin equivalents (CE)/g, respectively.

  5. Design and producing of fine-group cross section library HENDL3.0/FG for subcritical system

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, J.; Zeng, Q.; Xu, D.; Hu, L.; Long, P.

    2012-07-01

    To improve the accuracy of the neutron analyses for subcritical system with thermal fission blanket, a coupled neutron and photon (315 n + 42{gamma}) fine-group cross section library HENDL3.0/FG based on ENDF/B-VII, JEFF3.1 and JENDL3.3 was produced by FDS team. In order to test the availability and reliability of the HENDL3.0/FG data library, shielding and critical safety benchmarks were performed with VisualBUS code. The testing results indicated that the discrepancy between calculation and experimental values of nuclear parameters fell in a reasonable range. It showed that the nuclear data library had accuracy and availability. (authors)

  6. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  7. Effect of Subcritical Fluid Extraction on the High Quality of Headspace Oil from Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qiuping; Jin, Xinyi; Wei, Shiqin; Zheng, Gongyu; Li, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Subcritical fluid extraction (SFE), as a novel method, was applied to investigate the yield, quality, and sensory evaluation of headspace oil from Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton in comparison with petroleum ether extraction (PEE). The results indicated that the yield of the headspace oil using SFE was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than when using PEE. SFE contributed to obtaining alcohols and ethers, prevented the thermal reaction of terpenes, and reduced α-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene in the headspace oil. The contents of linalool (21.90%) and benzyl acetate (16.31%) were higher via SFE than PEE. In addition, the sensory evaluation of SFE was superior to PEE, indicating a fresh, jasmine-like odor and green-yellow color. Thus, SFE is an improved method for obtaining natural headspace oil from jasmine flowers.

  8. Characterisation of stationary phases in subcritical fluid chromatography with the solvation parameter model. III. Polar stationary phases.

    PubMed

    West, C; Lesellier, E

    2006-03-31

    In this third paper, varied types of polar stationary phases, namely silica gel (SI), cyano (CN)- and amino-propyl (NH2)-bonded silica, propanediol-bonded silica (DIOL), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), were investigated in subcritical fluid mobile phase. This study was performed to provide a greater knowledge of the properties of these phases in SFC, and to allow a more rapid and efficient choice of polar stationary phase in regard of the chemical nature of the solutes to be separated. The effect of the nature of the stationary phase on interactions between solute and stationary phases and between solute and carbon dioxide-modifier mobile phases was studied by the use of a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER), the solvation parameter model. The retention behaviour observed with sub/supercritical fluid with carbon dioxide-methanol is close to the one reported in normal-phase liquid chromatography with hexane. The hydrogen bond acidity and basicity, and the polarity/polarizability favour the solute retention when the molar volume of the solute reduces it. As with non-polar phases, the absence of water in the subcritical fluid allows the solute/stationary phase interactions to play a greater part in the retention behaviour. As expected, the DIOL phase and the bare silica display a similar behaviour towards acidic and basic solutes, when interactions with basic compounds are lower with the NH2 phase. On the CN phase, all interactions (hydrogen bonding, dipole-dipole and charge transfer) have a nearly equivalent weight on the retention. The polymeric phases, PEG and PVA, provide the most accurate models, possibly due to their better surface homogeneity.

  9. Hysteretic and intermittent regimes in the subcritical bifurcation of a quasi-one-dimensional system of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessup, Tommy; Coste, Christophe; Saint Jean, Michel

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we study the effects of white Gaussian additive thermal noise on a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional system of particles that are transversally confined, with short-range (non-Coulombic) interactions and periodic boundary conditions in the longitudinal direction. In such systems, there is a structural transition from a linear order to a staggered row, called the zigzag transition. There is a finite range of transverse confinement stiffnesses for which the stable configuration at zero temperature is a localized zigzag pattern surrounded by aligned particles, which evidences the subcriticality of the bifurcation. We show that these configurations remain stable for a wide temperature range. At zero temperature, the transition between a straight line and such localized zigzag patterns is hysteretic. We have studied the influence of thermal noise on the hysteresis loop. Its description is more difficult than at T =0 K since thermally activated jumps between the two configurations always occur and the system cannot stay forever in a unique metastable state. Two different regimes have to be considered according to the temperature value with respect to a critical temperature Tc(τobs) that depends on the observation time τobs. An hysteresis loop is still observed at low temperature, with a width that decreases as the temperature increases toward Tc(τobs) . In contrast, for T >Tc(τobs) the memory of the initial condition is lost by stochastic jumps between the configurations. The study of the mean residence times in each configuration gives a unique opportunity to precisely determine the barrier height that separates the two configurations, without knowing the complete energy landscape of this many-body system. We also show how to reconstruct the hysteresis loop that would exist at T =0 K from high-temperature simulations.

  10. Dynamics of On-Off Neural Firing Patterns and Stochastic Effects near a Sub-Critical Hopf Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Huaguang, Gu; Zhiguo, Zhao; Bing, Jia; Shenggen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    On-off firing patterns, in which repetition of clusters of spikes are interspersed with epochs of subthreshold oscillations or quiescent states, have been observed in various nervous systems, but the dynamics of this event remain unclear. Here, we report that on-off firing patterns observed in three experimental models (rat sciatic nerve subject to chronic constrictive injury, rat CA1 pyramidal neuron, and rabbit blood pressure baroreceptor) appeared as an alternation between quiescent state and burst containing multiple period-1 spikes over time. Burst and quiescent state had various durations. The interspike interval (ISI) series of on-off firing pattern was suggested as stochastic using nonlinear prediction and autocorrelation function. The resting state was changed to a period-1 firing pattern via on-off firing pattern as the potassium concentration, static pressure, or depolarization current was changed. During the changing process, the burst duration of on-off firing pattern increased and the duration of the quiescent state decreased. Bistability of a limit cycle corresponding to period-1 firing and a focus corresponding to resting state was simulated near a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation point in the deterministic Morris—Lecar (ML) model. In the stochastic ML model, noise-induced transitions between the coexisting regimes formed an on-off firing pattern, which closely matched that observed in the experiment. In addition, noise-induced exponential change in the escape rate from the focus, and noise-induced coherence resonance were identified. The distinctions between the on-off firing pattern and stochastic firing patterns generated near three other types of bifurcations of equilibrium points, as well as other viewpoints on the dynamics of on-off firing pattern, are discussed. The results not only identify the on-off firing pattern as noise-induced stochastic firing pattern near a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation point, but also offer practical indicators to

  11. Potential of chiral anion-exchangers operated in various subcritical fluid chromatography modes for resolution of chiral acids.

    PubMed

    Pell, Reinhard; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2012-07-06

    Anion-exchange-type chiral stationary phases (CSPs) derived from quinine or quinidine were applied in subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC) for the direct separation of chiral acidic compounds. Employing subcritical (sc) mobile phase modes (CO₂ + methanol as co-solvent and acids and bases as additives) first the influence of type and amount of acidic and basic additives on separation performance was investigated. Secondly, water was tested as a neutral additive and the influence of temperature variation on enantioselectivity was studied. Thirdly, we could chromatographically confirm that the often verbalized "inherent acidity" of sc CO₂ + methanol is manifested by the in situ formation of methylcarbonic acids in the sc mobile phase and thus functioning as acidic additive. Accordingly the dissociated methylcarbonic acid, acting as a counterion, enables an anion exchange mechanism between the cationic CSP and the corresponding acidic analyte. In the absence of a dissociable acid in the mobile phase such an ion exchange mode would not work following a stoichiometric displacement model. This finding is further corroborated by the use of ammonia in methanol as co-solvent thus generating in situ the ammonium salt of methylcarbonic acid. In summary, we report on ion-exchange mediated chromatographic separations in SFC modes by merely using (i) sc CO₂ and MeOH, (ii) sc CO₂ and ammonia in MeOH, and (iii) sc CO₂ and MeOH plus acids and bases as additives. Comparisons to HPLC mode have been undertaken to evaluate merits and limitations. This mode exhibits high potential for preparative chromatography of chiral acids combining pronounced enantioselectivity with high column loadability and avoiding possibly troublesome mobile phase additives, as the in situ formed methylcarbonic acid disintegrates to CO₂ and methanol upon pressure release.

  12. The Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in the Two-Zone Subcritical System Driven by High- Intensity Neutron Generator - 12098

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V.O.; Gulik, V.I.; Pavlovych, V.M.

    2012-07-01

    The main problems of transmutation of high-level radioactive waste (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) are considered in our work. The range of radioactive waste of nuclear power is analyzed. The conditions under which the transmutation of radioactive waste will be most effective are analyzed too. The modeling results of a transmutation of the main radioactive isotopes are presented and discussed. The transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products are modeled in our work (minor actinides - Np-237, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245; long-lived fission products - I-129, Tc-99). The two-zone subcritical system is calculated with help of different neutron-physical codes (MCNP, Scale, Montebarn, Origen). The ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library used in above calculations. Thus, radioactive wastes can be divided into two main groups that need to be transmuted. The minor actinides form the first group and the long-lived fission products form the second one. For the purpose of effective transmutation these isotopes must be extracted from the spent nuclear fuel with the help of either PUREX technology or pyrometallurgical technology. The two-zone reactor system with fast and thermal regions is more effective for nuclear waste transmutation than the one-zone reactor. Modeling results show that nearly all radioactive wastes can be transmuted in the two-zone subcritical system driven by a high-intensity neutron generator with the external neutron source strength of 1.10{sup 13} n/sec. Obviously, transmutation rate will increase with a rise of the external neutron source strength. From the results above we can also see that the initial loading of radioactive isotopes into the reactor system should exceed by mass those isotopes that are finally produced. (authors)

  13. Including Jews in Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langman, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the lack of attention to Jews as an ethnic minority within multiculturalism both by Jews and non-Jews; why Jews and Jewish issues need to be included; and addresses some of the issues involved in the ethical treatment of Jewish clients. (Author)

  14. The chemistry of subcritical water reactions of a hardwood derived lignin and lignin model compounds with nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill Bembenic, Meredith A.

    Biofuels, like cellulosic ethanol, may only be cost effective if the lignin byproduct is upgraded to value-added products. However, lignin's inherent aromatic structure and interunit crosslinkages hinder effective conversion. High temperature H2O is considered for lignin conversion, because H2O exhibits unusual properties at higher temperatures (particularly at its supercritical point of 374°C and 3205 psi) including a decreased ion product and a decreased static dielectric constant (similar to those of polar organic solvents at room temperature) such that there is a high solubility for organic compounds, like lignin. Much of the research concerning lignin and supercritical H2O has focused on further decomposition to gases (e.g., H2, CH4, and CO2) where nearly no char formation is expected in the presence of a catalyst. However, the conditions required for supercritical H2O are difficult to maintain, catalysts can be expensive, and gases are not favorable to the current liquid fuel infrastructure. Reactions using Organosolv lignin, subcritical H2O (365°C) and various industrial gases (N2, H2, CO, and CO2 at an initial pressure of 500 psi) for 30 min. were examined to determine both lignin's potential to generate value-added products (e.g., monomer compounds and methanol) and the role (if any) of the H2O and the gases during the reactions. The behavior of H2O at reaction temperature and pressure is expected to be similar to the behavior of supercritical H 2O without the need to maintain supercritical conditions. Different characterization techniques were used for the products collected including primarily GC/FID-TCD of the evolved gases, GC/MS analysis of the organic liquids, solid phase microextraction analysis of the water, and solid state 13C-NMR analysis of the residues. The reactor pressure at temperature was shown to influence the reactivity of the H2O and lignin, and the highest conversions (≈54--62%) were obtained when adding a gas. However, the

  15. Overlapping 16p13.11 deletion and gain of copies variations associated with childhood onset psychosis include genes with mechanistic implications for autism associated pathways: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Kleiman, Robin J; Engle, Elizabeth C; Towne, Meghan C; D'Angelo, Eugene J; Yu, Timothy W; Beggs, Alan H; Picker, Jonathan; Fogler, Jason M; Carroll, Devon; Schmitt, Rachel C O; Wolff, Robert R; Shen, Yiping; Lip, Va; Bilguvar, Kaya; Kim, April; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Copy number variability at 16p13.11 has been associated with intellectual disability, autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Adolescent/adult- onset psychosis has been reported in a subset of these cases. Here, we report on two children with CNVs in 16p13.11 that developed psychosis before the age of 7. The genotype and neuropsychiatric abnormalities of these patients highlight several overlapping genes that have possible mechanistic relevance to pathways previously implicated in Autism Spectrum Disorders, including the mTOR signaling and the ubiquitin-proteasome cascades. A careful screening of the 16p13.11 region is warranted in patients with childhood onset psychosis.

  16. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  17. Subcritical Water Hydrolysis Effectively Reduces the In Vitro Seeding Activity of PrPSc but Fails to Inactivate the Infectivity of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Prions

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takata, Eri; Masujin, Kentaro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The global outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been attributed to the recycling of contaminated meat and bone meals (MBMs) as feed supplements. The use of MBMs has been prohibited in many countries; however, the development of a method for inactivating BSE prions could enable the efficient and safe use of these products as an organic resource. Subcritical water (SCW), which is water heated under pressure to maintain a liquid state at temperatures below the critical temperature (374°C), exhibits strong hydrolytic activity against organic compounds. In this study, we examined the residual in vitro seeding activity of protease-resistant prion protein (PrPSc) and the infectivity of BSE prions after SCW treatments. Spinal cord homogenates prepared from BSE-infected cows were treated with SCW at 230–280°C for 5–7.5 min and used to intracerebrally inoculate transgenic mice overexpressing bovine prion protein. Serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) analysis detected no PrPSc in the SCW-treated homogenates, and the mice treated with these samples survived for more than 700 days without any signs of disease. However, sPMCA analyses detected PrPSc accumulation in the brains of all inoculated mice. Furthermore, secondary passage mice, which inoculated with brain homogenates derived from a western blotting (WB)-positive primary passage mouse, died after an average of 240 days, similar to mice inoculated with untreated BSE-infected spinal cord homogenates. The PrPSc accumulation and vacuolation typically observed in the brains of BSE-infected mice were confirmed in these secondary passage mice, suggesting that the BSE prions maintained their infectivity after SCW treatment. One late-onset case, as well as asymptomatic but sPMCA-positive cases, were also recognized in secondary passage mice inoculated with brain homogenates from WB-negative but sPMCA-positive primary passage mice. These results indicated that SCW-mediated hydrolysis was

  18. Subcritical Water Hydrolysis Effectively Reduces the In Vitro Seeding Activity of PrPSc but Fails to Inactivate the Infectivity of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Prions.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takata, Eri; Masujin, Kentaro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The global outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been attributed to the recycling of contaminated meat and bone meals (MBMs) as feed supplements. The use of MBMs has been prohibited in many countries; however, the development of a method for inactivating BSE prions could enable the efficient and safe use of these products as an organic resource. Subcritical water (SCW), which is water heated under pressure to maintain a liquid state at temperatures below the critical temperature (374°C), exhibits strong hydrolytic activity against organic compounds. In this study, we examined the residual in vitro seeding activity of protease-resistant prion protein (PrPSc) and the infectivity of BSE prions after SCW treatments. Spinal cord homogenates prepared from BSE-infected cows were treated with SCW at 230-280°C for 5-7.5 min and used to intracerebrally inoculate transgenic mice overexpressing bovine prion protein. Serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) analysis detected no PrPSc in the SCW-treated homogenates, and the mice treated with these samples survived for more than 700 days without any signs of disease. However, sPMCA analyses detected PrPSc accumulation in the brains of all inoculated mice. Furthermore, secondary passage mice, which inoculated with brain homogenates derived from a western blotting (WB)-positive primary passage mouse, died after an average of 240 days, similar to mice inoculated with untreated BSE-infected spinal cord homogenates. The PrPSc accumulation and vacuolation typically observed in the brains of BSE-infected mice were confirmed in these secondary passage mice, suggesting that the BSE prions maintained their infectivity after SCW treatment. One late-onset case, as well as asymptomatic but sPMCA-positive cases, were also recognized in secondary passage mice inoculated with brain homogenates from WB-negative but sPMCA-positive primary passage mice. These results indicated that SCW-mediated hydrolysis was

  19. Nutritional therapies (including fosteum).

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2009-03-01

    Nutrition is important in promoting bone health and in managing an individual with low bone mass or osteoporosis. In adult women and men, known losses of bone mass and microarchitecture occur, and nutrition can help minimize these losses. In every patient, a healthy diet with adequate protein, fruits, vegetables, calcium, and vitamin D is required to maintain bone health. Recent reports on nutritional remedies for osteoporosis have highlighted the importance of calcium in youth and continued importance in conjunction with vitamin D as the population ages. It is likely that a calcium intake of 1200 mg/d is ideal, and there are some concerns about excessive calcium intakes. However, vitamin D intake needs to be increased in most populations. The ability of soy products, particularly genistein aglycone, to provide skeletal benefit has been recently studied, including some data that support a new medical food marketed as Fosteum (Primus Pharmaceuticals, Scottsdale, AZ).

  20. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Comparison studies of surface cleaning methods for PAN-based carbon fibers with acetone, supercritical acetone and subcritical alkali aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Linghui; Fan, Dapeng; Huang, Yudong; Jiang, Zaixing; Zhang, Chunhua

    2012-11-01

    Four kinds of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were cleaned by three methods and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, monofilament tensile strength test and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experimental results of these tests reveal that the method using supercritical acetone or subcritical potassium hydroxide aqueous solution act as the processing medium shows a better cleaning effect compared to the traditional method, Soxhlet extraction with acetone. The method using supercritical acetone is more appropriate to wipe off the oxygenated contaminants on carbon fibers' surfaces and causes a relatively smaller damage to the bulk strength of each carbon fiber. As far as treating method using the subcritical alkali aqueous solution, it can thoroughly remove silicious contaminants on the surfaces of treated fibers.

  2. Effect of residence time on two-step liquefaction of rice straw in a CO2 atmosphere: Differences between subcritical water and supercritical ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianhua; Wang, Jian; Li, Bingshuo; Kai, Xingping; Li, Rundong

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of temperature and residence time on liquefaction of rice straw in subcritical CO2-subcritical water (subCO2-subH2O) and in subcritical CO2-supercritical ethanol (subCO2-scEtOH), considering the final reaction temperatures (270-345°C) and residence times (15 and 30min). Residence time was identified as a crucial parameter in the subCO2-subH2O liquefaction, whereas residence time had a marginal influence on subCO2-scEtOH liquefaction. When reaction conditions were 320°C and 15min, solvents have weak impact on the quality of bio-oil, HHV 28.57MJ/kg and 28.62MJ/kg, respectively. There was an obvious difference between the subCO2-subH2O and subCO2-scEtOH liquefaction mechanisms. In subCO2-subH2O, CO2 promoted the carbonyl reaction. In subCO2-scEtOH, supercritical ethanol have the function of donating hydrogen and promoting the reaction of hydroxyl-alkylation.

  3. Equivalence of macroscopic and microscopic Griffith conditions for subcritical crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Exact relations are derived for a simple bond-snapping model of fracture and numerical results from a previous work are presented. A lattice model with a nonlinear cohesive force law is then considered. In both cases, the results confirm the equivalence of the microscopic and macroscopic Griffith conditions. The Griffith stress intensity is to be identified with the quiescent stress intensity.

  4. PRELIMINARY TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY STUDY ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND ULTRASONICS WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, Saravanan; Kuczynska, Agnieszka; Hume, Scott; Mulgundmath, Vinay; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Remias, Joe; Ambedkar, Balraj; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan

    2012-11-01

    The results of the preliminary techno-economic assessment for integrating a process utilizing low-energy solvents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture enabled by a combination of enzymes and ultrasonics with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant are presented. Four cases utilizing the enzyme-activated solvent are compared using different methodologies of regeneration against the DOE/NETL reference MEA case. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for post-combustion CO2 capture and the net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the power plant integrated with the post-combustion capture (PCC) plant. A levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) assessment was performed showing the costs of the options presented in the study. The key factors contributing to the reduction of LCOE were identified as enzyme make-up rate and the capability of the ultrasonic regeneration process. The net efficiency of the integrated PC power plant with CO2 capture changes from 24.9% with the reference Case 10 plant to between 24.34% and 29.97% for the vacuum regeneration options considered, and to between 26.63% and 31.41% for the ultrasonic regeneration options. The evaluation also shows the effect of the critical parameters on the LCOE, with the main variable being the initial estimation of enzyme dosing rate. The LCOE ($/MWh) values range from 112.92 to 125.23 for the vacuum regeneration options and from 108.9 to 117.50 for the ultrasonic regeneration cases considered in comparison to 119.6 for the reference Case 10. A sensitivity analysis of the effect of critical parameters on the LCOE was also performed. The results from the preliminary techno-economic assessment show that the proposed technology can be investigated further with a view to being a viable alternative to conventional CO2 scrubbing technologies.

  5. Direct Treatment of Isada Krill under Subcritical Water Conditions to Produce Seasoning with Shrimp-Like Flavour

    PubMed Central

    Koomyart, Intira; Nagamizu, Hironori; Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Kobayashi, Takashi; Shiga, Hirokazu; Yoshii, Hidefumi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Characterization, sensory evaluation, and astaxanthin stability of isada krill under various subcritical water conditions were investigated to optimize the quality of krill extract and residue for producing food seasoning. Raw krill (82% wet basis moisture content) without additional water was treated in a pressure-resistant vessel for 10 min at a temperature range of 100–240 °C. The yield of water-soluble protein was maximized by treatment at 200 °C and decreased with treatment at higher temperatures. The degradation of large molecules and the concomitant production of small molecules depended on the treatment temperature. Astaxanthin in the krill was unstable at temperatures higher than 140 °C. The odour intensities of krill extract and residue increased with higher treatment temperature; however, the highest intensity of pleasant shrimp-like flavour was obtained by treatment at 140 °C. Subjective preference scores were the highest for extract and residue obtained at 140 °C. Thus, treatment at 140 °C is the most promising method for production of seasoning with shrimp-like flavour from isada krill. PMID:27956865

  6. Multiplication and Presence of Shielding Material from Time-Correlated Pulse-Height Measurements of Subcritical Plutonium Assemblies

    DOE PAGES

    Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Paff, Marc; ...

    2017-04-01

    Here, we present the results from the first measurements of the Time-Correlated Pulse-Height (TCPH) distributions from 4.5 kg sphere of α-phase weapons-grade plutonium metal in five configurations: bare, reflected by 1.27 cm and 2.54 cm of tungsten, and 2.54 cm and 7.62 cm of polyethylene. A new method for characterizing source multiplication and shielding configuration is also demonstrated. The method relies on solving for the underlying fission chain timing distribution that drives the spreading of the measured TCPH distribution. We found that a gamma distribution fits the fission chain timing distribution well and that the fit parameters correlate with bothmore » multiplication (rate parameter) and shielding material types (shape parameter). The source-to-detector distance was another free parameter that we were able to optimize, and proved to be the most well constrained parameter. MCNPX-PoliMi simulations were used to complement the measurements and help illustrate trends in these parameters and their relation to multiplication and the amount and type of material coupled to the subcritical assembly.« less

  7. Preparation, application, and optimization of Zn/Al complex oxides for biodiesel production under sub-critical conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Lu, Hou-Fang; Qi, Tao; Yan, Shu-Li; Liang, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Biodiesel produced by transesterification is a promising green fuel in the future. A new heterogeneous catalyst, Zn/Al complex oxide, was prepared for biodiesel production. The results showed that the catalyst derived from a hydrotalcite-like precursor with a zinc/aluminum atom ratio of 3.74:1 and calcined at 450 degrees C gave the highest conversion of 84.25%. Analysis of XRD, XPS, FI-IF, TG-DTA, BET and alkalinity tests demonstrated that it is the unique structure of hydrotalcite-like compound precursor that gave the catalyst a high alkalinity greater than 11.1. The optimal reaction condition for Zn/Al complex oxide was under methanol sub-critical condition: 200 degrees C, 2.5MPa, 1.4% (wt) catalyst dosage, and 24:1 methanol to oil ratio. Under these conditions, the conversion reached 84.25% after 90min, which was better than Mg/Al complex oxides. The excellent tolerance to water and free fatty acid was exhibited when the oil feed had fewer than 6% FFA or 10% water content with a conversion greater than 80%.

  8. High antioxidant activity of coffee silverskin extracts obtained by the treatment of coffee silverskin with subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Narita, Yusaku; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2012-12-01

    Coffee silverskin (CS) is a thin tegument of the outer layer of green coffee beans and a major by-product of the roasting process to produce roasted coffee beans. CS extracts obtained by the treatment of CS with subcritical water at 25-270°C were investigated for their antioxidant activity using hydrophilic oxygen radical absorption capacity (H-ORAC) and DPPH radical scavenging capacity assays. The antioxidant activity increased with increasing the extraction temperature and the highest activity was observed with the extracts obtained at 270°C. The H-ORAC and DPPH values of the extracts were 2629±193 and 379±36μmol TE/g of CS extract, respectively. High correlation (R=0.999) was observed between H-ORAC and DPPH values for the CS extracts. High correlation of the antioxidant activity was also observed with protein and phenolic contents in the extracts. The CS extracts could be useful as a good source of antioxidative materials.

  9. Subcritical water hydrolysis of rice straw for reducing sugar production with focus on degradation by-products and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Qi, Feng; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-06-01

    The competitive reactions of reducing sugar production and degradation in the subcritical water hydrolysis of rice straw were investigated to optimise reducing sugar yield. The optimised conditions (280°C, 20 MPa, rice straw concentration of 5 wt.% and agitation speed of 200 rpm) resulted in a reducing sugar yield of 0.346 g/g rice straw because of the enhanced reducing sugar production and decreased sugar degradation. The sugar yield increased when the temperature increased from 250°C to 280°C, but it decreased when the temperature further increased to 300°C because of the degradation of monosaccharides (e.g. glucose and xylose) into by-products (e.g. 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and acetic acid). A first-order reaction model was developed to elucidate the competitive reaction kinetics of sugar production and degradation at various temperatures. The highest reducing sugar yield based on the model was achieved at 280°C with the highest production and lowest degradation rates.

  10. Optimisation for subcritical fluid extraction of 17-methyltestosterone with 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane for HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuqian; Ma, Qinchuan; Lu, Jie; Xue, Yong; Xue, Changhu

    2012-12-15

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method was developed for determination of 17α-methyltestosterone in aquatic products by extraction with subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted to optimise extraction pressure, temperature and co-solvent volume. The optimum extraction conditions predicted within the experimental ranges were as follows: pressure 5 MPa, temperature 31°C, and co-solvent volume 3.35ml. The analysis was carried out on XDB-C(18) column (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 μm) with the mobile phase acetonitrile-water (55:45, v/v), flow rate 0.8 ml/min, temperature 30°C and wavelength 245 nm. Good linearity of detection was obtained for 17α-methyltestosterone between concentrations of 50-250 ng/ml, r(2)=0.999. The method was validated using samples fortified with 17α-methyltestosterone at levels of 10, 30 and 50 ng/g, the mean recovery exceeds 90%, and the RSD values were less than 10%.

  11. [Transformation Regularity of Nitrogen in Aqueous Product Derived from Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Sewage Sludge in Subcritical Water].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-qing; Sun, Zhen; Zhang, Jing-lai

    2015-06-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction in subcritical water is a potential way to treat sewage sludge as a resource rather than a waste. This study focused on the transformation regularity of nitrogen in aqueous product which was derived from hydrothermal liquefaction of sewage sludge under different operating conditions. Results showed, within the studied temperature scope and time span, the concentration of total nitrogen (TN) fluctuated in the range of 2867.62 mg x L(-1) to 4171.30 mg x L(-1). The two major exiting formation of nitrogen in aqueous product was ammonia nitrogen (NH4+ -N) and organic nitrogen (Org-N). NH4+ -N possessed 54.6%-90.7% of TN, while Org-N possessed 7.4%-44.5%. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen (NO- -N) was far more less than NH4+ -N and Org-N. Temperature had a great influence on the transformation regularity of nitrogen. Both the concentration of TN and Org-N increased accordingly to the increase of reaction temperature. With the reaction time prolonging, the concentration of TN and Org-N increased, while the concentration of NH4+ -N increased first, then became stationary, and then decreased slightly.

  12. Multiplication and Presence of Shielding Material from Time-Correlated Pulse-Height Measurements of Subcritical Plutonium Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Paff, Marc; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2017-04-01

    We present the results from the first measurements of the Time-Correlated Pulse-Height (TCPH) distributions from 4.5 kg sphere of α-phase weapons-grade plutonium metal in five configurations: bare, reflected by 1.27 cm and 2.54 cm of tungsten, and 2.54 cm and 7.62 cm of polyethylene. A new method for characterizing source multiplication and shielding configuration is also demonstrated. The method relies on solving for the underlying fission chain timing distribution that drives the spreading of the measured TCPH distribution. We found that a gamma distribution fits the fission chain timing distribution well and that the fit parameters correlate with both multiplication (rate parameter) and shielding material types (shape parameter). The source-to-detector distance was another free parameter that we were able to optimize, and proved to be the most well constrained parameter. MCNPX-PoliMi simulations were used to complement the measurements and help illustrate trends in these parameters and their relation to multiplication and the amount and type of material coupled to the subcritical assembly.

  13. Mechanism of oxidation of 3-hydroxy-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid disodium salt with oxygen in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Imbierowicz, Mirosław

    2017-06-01

    The article presents the results of studies on the oxidation mechanism of 3-hydroxy-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid disodium salt (R-salt) with oxygen in subcritical water. To this aim, a series of experiments were carried out which showed that at a temperature of 413 K and pH > 9 the oxidation reaction of a substrate with oxygen was relatively quick and after approximately 40 min the R-salt oxidation yield exceeded 95%. In an acidic medium (pH < 7), the rate of R-salt oxidation is small. In order to identify the mechanism of R-salt oxidation, experiments were carried out at 413-569 K in solutions with pH = 10.0 and at partial oxygen pressure pO2 = 1.73 MPa. As a result of these experiments, a stable oxidation product was isolated from the reaction mixture and subjected to spectroscopic analysis. The analysis of (H)NMR of this product proved that a stable intermediate product of R-salt oxidation was 4-sulfophthalic acid sodium salt. The results of the experiments have shown that destructive oxidation of R-salt can easily be obtained at a temperature of 413 K, but satisfactory reduction of TOC in wastewater containing this substrate requires the use of very high temperature: at 569 K only 60% reduction of TOC was achieved.

  14. Comparing the effect of sub-critical water extraction with conventional extraction methods on the chemical composition of Lavandula stoechas.

    PubMed

    Giray, E Sultan; Kirici, Saliha; Kaya, D Alpaslan; Türk, Murat; Sönmez, Ozgür; Inan, Memet

    2008-01-15

    The volatile extract composition of Lavandula stoechas flowers obtained by hydrodistillation (HD), subcrtical water extraction (SbCWE) and organic solvent extraction under ultrasonic irradiation (USE) were estimated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). One hundred and twenty four components were detected in SbCWE extracts while 94 and 65 signals were gained from HD and USE extracts, respectively. Most of the constituents were identified. The major compounds in all three extracts were fenchon, camphor, myrtenyl acetate, myrtenol and 1,8-cineol, but they differ in quantitatively. The total monoterpene hydrocarbons are higher in HD and USE extracts than those of SbCWE extract. However, SbCWE extract had higher concentration of light oxygenated compounds which contributes to the fragrance of the oil in a major extension. Heavy-oxygenated compounds was also in higher abundance in SbCWE extract (9.90%) than those of HD and USE extracts (3.19 and 4.78%, respectively). Effect of temperature on the extraction yield of SbCWE was investigated and while oil yield was increasing with an increase in temperature, a decrease in the extraction ability of sub-critical water toward the more polar compounds such as, 1,8-cineol, camphor and fenchon, was observed. Kinetic studies shown that SbCWE is clearly quicker than conventional alternatives. Most of components of volatile compounds were extracted at 15min.

  15. An uncertainty analysis of the PVT gauging method applied to sub-critical cryogenic propellant tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dresar, Neil T.

    2004-06-01

    The PVT (pressure, volume, temperature) method of liquid quantity gauging in low-gravity is based on gas law calculations assuming conservation of pressurant gas within the propellant tank and the pressurant supply bottle. There is interest in applying this method to cryogenic propellant tanks since the method requires minimal additional hardware or instrumentation. To use PVT with cryogenic fluids, a non-condensable pressurant gas (helium) is required. With cryogens, there will be a significant amount of propellant vapor mixed with the pressurant gas in the tank ullage. This condition, along with the high sensitivity of propellant vapor pressure to temperature, makes the PVT method susceptible to substantially greater measurement uncertainty than is the case with less volatile propellants. A conventional uncertainty analysis is applied to example cases of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks. It appears that the PVT method may be feasible for liquid oxygen. Acceptable accuracy will be more difficult to obtain with liquid hydrogen.

  16. The morphologic and immunohistochemical spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma: study including 132 cases with pure type 1 and type 2 morphology as well as tumors with overlapping features.

    PubMed

    Chevarie-Davis, Myriam; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Arseneault, Madeleine; Aprikian, Armen; Kassouf, Wassim; Tanguay, Simon; Latour, Mathieu; Brimo, Fadi

    2014-07-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinomas (pRCC) are classically divided into type 1 and 2 tumors. However, many cases do not fulfill all the criteria for either type. We describe the clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of 132 pRCCs to better characterize the frequency and nature of tumors with overlapping features. Cases were reviewed and classified; IHC evaluation of CK7, EMA, TopoIIα, napsin A, and AMACR was performed on 95 cases. The frequencies of type 1, type 2, and "overlapping" pRCC were 25%, 28%, and 47%, respectively. The 2 categories of "overlapping" tumors were: (1) cases with bland cuboidal cells but no basophilic cytoplasm (type A); and (2) cases with predominantly type 1 histology admixed with areas showing prominent nucleoli (type B). The pathologic stage of "overlapping" cases showed concordance with type 1 tumors. Using the 2 discriminatory markers (CK7, EMA), "type A" cases were similar to type 1. Although the high-nuclear grade areas of "type B" tumors showed some staining differences from their low-nuclear grade counterpart, their IHC profile was closer to type 1. Single nucleotide polymorphism array results, although preliminary and restricted to only 9 cases (3 with overlapping features), also seemed to confirm those findings. In conclusion, we demonstrate that variations in cytoplasmic quality and/or presence of high-grade nuclei in tumors otherwise displaying features of type 1 pRCCs are similar in stage and IHC profile those with classic type 1 histology, suggesting that their spectrum might be wider than originally described.

  17. Frequency measurements in a finite cylinder wake at a subcritical Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budair, M.; Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1991-01-01

    A spectral study of a hot-wire investigation in the near wake of a finite circular cylinder of high-aspect ratio is reported. The measurements included frequency spectra and cross correlations in spanwise and streamwise directions. The study identifies four spanwise regions, in terms of frequency, in the immediate wake of the finite cylinder.

  18. Co-precipitation of asiatic acid and poly( l-lactide) using rapid expansion of subcritical solutions into liquid solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sane, Amporn; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2011-09-01

    Poly( l-lactide) (PLLA) nanoparticles loaded with asiatic acid (AA) were successfully produced by rapid expansion of a subcritical solution into an aqueous receiving solution containing a dispersing agent. A mixture of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ethanol (EtOH) with a weight ratio of 1:1 was used as the solvent for AA and PLLA. Two surfactants, Pluronic F127 and sodium dodecyl sulfate were employed. The former was found to be more effective for stabilizing AA-loaded PLLA nanoparticles, as a rapid expansion into a 0.1 wt% Pluronic F127 solution produced a stable nanosuspension consisting mainly of well-dispersed, individual nanoparticles. The effects of rapid expansion-processing conditions—AA to PLLA weight ratio and pre-expansion temperature (Tpre)—on the size and morphology of composite nanoparticles, and the loading capacity and entrapment efficiency of AA in PLLA nanoparticles, were systematically investigated. It was found that AA-loaded PLLA nanoparticles with a size range of 30-100 nm were consistently fabricated by rapid expansion at Tpre of 70-100 °C and AA to PLLA weight ratios of 1:2 and 1:4, and with a constant pre-expansion pressure of 330 bar. The Tpre and AA to PLLA weight ratio had no significant effects on the size of the nanoparticles. The AA to PLLA weight ratio is a controlling parameter for both the loading capacity and the entrapment efficiency of AA in PLLA nanoparticles. The loading capacity and entrapment efficiency increased from 8-11 to 16-21 wt%, and 38-57 to 50-62 wt%, respectively, when the AA to PLLA weight ratio changed from 1:4 to 1:2. However, increasing the Tpre from 70 to 100 °C decreased both the loading capacity and entrapment efficiency of AA in PLLA nanoparticles by 20-30%.

  19. Vortex dynamics at subcritical currents at microwave frequencies in DyBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tamalika; Bagwe, V. C.; John, J.; Pai, S. P.; Pinto, R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of vortices at subcritical microwave currents in dc magnetic fields (up to 0.8 T) in epitaxial DyBa2Cu3O7-δ (DBCO) thin films. Microwave measurements were performed using microstrip resonators as test vehicles at 4.88 GHz and 9.55 GHz on laser ablated DBCO thin films in the thickness range 1800 3800 Å. Experimental evidence indicates that the peak effect (PE) observed in surface resistance vs temperature (Rs vs T) plots in applied dc magnetic fields up to 0.8 T is primarily due to the extended defects in thinner films (1800 Å) such as twin boundaries at the substrate(LaAlO3)-film interface; whereas, the high density of point defect disorder in thicker (⩾3000 Å) films is responsible for low Rs and high depinning frequency ωp. This has been confirmed by generation of columnar defects using 200 MeV Ag ion irradiation which showed that even thicker DBCO films show PE in Rs after the introduction of columnar defects. Further, DBCO films grown on low-twinned LaAlO3 substrates (which cause low density of substrate-related extended defects in the film) have shown PE only at 9.55 GHz but not at 4.88 GHz. Values of ωp have been calculated from experimental Rs data. ωp vs T plots obtained for the thinner films show a peak which is a result of the peaks in Rs vs T plots of these films at 4.88 GHz and 9.55 GHz.

  20. Selective enrichment in bioactive compound from Kniphofia uvaria by super/subcritical fluid extraction and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Duval, Johanna; Destandau, Emilie; Pecher, Virginie; Poujol, Marion; Tranchant, Jean-François; Lesellier, Eric

    2016-05-20

    Nowadays, a large portion of synthetic products (active cosmetic and therapeutic ingredients) have their origin in natural products. Kniphofia uvaria is a plant from Africa which has proved in the past by in-vivo tests an antioxidant activity due to compounds present in roots. Recently, we have observed anthraquinones in K. uvaria seeds extracts. These derivatives are natural colorants which could have interesting bioactive potential. The aim of this study was to obtain an extract enriched in anthraquinones from K. uvaria seeds which mainly contains glycerides. First, the separation of the seed compounds was studied by using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) in the goal to provide a rapid quantification method of these bioactive compounds. A screening of numerous polar stationary phases was achieved for selecting the most suited phase to the separation of the four anthraquinones founded in the seeds. A gradient elution was optimized for improving the separation of the bioactive compounds from the numerous other families of major compounds of the extracts (fatty acids, di- and triglycerides). Besides, a non-selective and green Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with pure CO2 was applied to seeds followed by a Centrifugal Partition Chromatography (CPC). The CPC system was optimized by using the Arizona phase system, to enrich the extract in anthraquinones. Two systems were selected to isolate the bioactive compounds from the oily extract with varied purity target. The effect of the injection mode for these very viscous samples was also studied. Finally, in order to directly apply a selective process of extraction to the seeds, the super/subcritical fluid extraction was optimized to increase the anthraquinone yield in the final extract, by studying varied modifier compositions and nature, as well as different temperatures and backpressures. Conditions suited to favour an enrichment factor bases on the ratio of anthraquinone and trilycerides extracted are

  1. Rapid chiral separation of racemic cetirizine in human plasma using subcritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eom, Han Young; Kang, Myunghee; Kang, Seung Woo; Kim, Unyong; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Junghyun; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Jung, Yura; Yang, Dong-Hyug; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-01-05

    A method for fast chiral separation of cetirizine and quantitation of levocetirizine in human plasma using subcritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. The chromatographic separation was performed using a Chiralpak IE column (2.1 mm×150 mm, 5 μm) with an isocratic elution of CO2/organic modifier (55/45, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.85 mL/min. The organic modifier was composed of water/methanol (5/95, v/v). The makeup flow was optimized at water/methanol (10/90, v/v) and 0.2 mL/min. The most influential parameters on the separation of cetirizine affecting resolution, retention time and sensitivity were selected by fractional factorial design. The 3 selected factors were optimized by response surface methodology. Tandem mass spectrometry was used at electrospray ionization, positive ion mode, and multiple-reaction monitoring mode. Isotope-labeled cetirizine-d4 was used as the internal standard. The sample preparation of human plasma was conducted by solid phase extraction of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) type. The developed method was validated for selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of quantitation (LOQ), and limit of detection (LOD). The real human plasma samples were analyzed and the pharmacokinetic results were compared with results of previous research. The developed method was found to be reliable based on the similarity between the results of the current and previous methods. The chiral separation for cetirizine and economic feasibility were compared with those of previous studies using normal phase-HPLC or reversed phase-HPLC. The established analytical method could be successfully applied to pharmacokinetic study with reduction in the analysis time and costs.

  2. Strong cation exchange-type chiral stationary phase for enantioseparation of chiral amines in subcritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wolrab, Denise; Kohout, Michal; Boras, Mario; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2013-05-10

    A new strong cation exchange type chiral stationary phase (SCX CSP) based on a syringic acid amide derivative of trans-(R, R)-2-aminocyclohexanesulfonic acid was applied to subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC) for separation of various chiral basic drugs and their analogues. Mobile phase systems consisting of aliphatic alcohols as polar modifiers and a broad range of amines with different substitution patterns and lipophilicity were employed to evaluate the impact on the SFC retention and selectivity characteristics. The observed results point to the existence of carbonic and carbamic acid salts formed as a consequence of reactions occurring between carbon dioxide, the alcoholic modifiers and the amine species present in the sub/supercritical fluid medium, respectively. Evidence is provided that these species are essential for affecting ion exchange between the strongly acidic chiral selector units and the basic analytes, following the well-established stoichiometric displacement mechanisms. Specific trends were observed when different types of amines were used as basic additives. While ammonia gave rise to the formation of the most strongly eluting carbonic and carbamic salt species, simple tertiary amines consistently provided superior levels of enantioselectivity. Furthermore, trends in the chiral SFC separation characteristics were investigated by the systematic variation of the modifier content and temperature. Different effects of additives are interpreted in terms of changes in the relative concentration of the transient ionic species contributing to analyte elution, with ammonia-derived carbamic salts being depleted at elevated temperatures by decomposition. Additionally, in an effort to optimize SFC enantiomer separation conditions for selected analytes, the impact of the type of the organic modifier, temperature, flow rate and active back pressure were also investigated.

  3. Effect of Soy Protein Hydrolysates Prepared by Subcritical Water Processing on the Physicochemical Properties of Pork Patty during Chilled Storage

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Gi

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of soy protein hydrolysates (SPHs) addition on the quality characteristics of pork patties. The SPHs was prepared by subcritical water process (SWP) at 180℃ without holding time and mixed with the pork patty components at varying concentrations (0-3%), and the patties were stored at 4℃ for 14 d. As quality parameters, instrumental color, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), pH, water holding capacity (WHC) and shear force were measured at the end of storage. Regardless of SPHs concentration, the addition of SPHs significantly manifested low L* and high a* values compared to those of untreated control (p<0.05). For b* value, addition of SPHs in the 0.5-1.5% was unaffected, while >2.0% of SPHs caused significantly lower b* than control (p<0.05). The color changes in pork patties with and without SPHs were also identified in visual appearance where the pork patties containing 0.5-2.0% showed bright red color which was comparable to brownish color of control and patties containing >2.5% SPHs. Lipid oxidation was delayed by the addition of 0.5-1.5% SPHs, while it was accelerated by the addition of 3% SPHs. The pH of patties increased with increasing concentration of SPHs, whereas there were no significant differences in WHC and shear force of patties. Consequently, the results indicated that the addition of 0.5-1.5% SPHs had a potential advantage in suppressing oxidative deterioration of fat-containing meat products during chilled storage. PMID:26761879

  4. Calculations of ADS with deep subcritical uranium active cores - comparison with experiments and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivkov, P.; Furman, W.; Stoyanov, Ch

    2014-09-01

    The main characteristics of the neutron field formed within the massive (512 kg) natural uranium target assembly (TA) QUINTA irradiated by deuteron beam of JINR Nuclotron with energies 1,2,4, and 8 GeV as well as the spatial distributions and the integral numbers of (n,f), (n,γ) and (n,xn)- reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data [1] . The MCNPX 27e code with ISABEL/ABLA/FLUKA and INCL4/ABLA models of intra-nuclear cascade (INC) and experimental cross-sections of the corresponding reactions were used. Special attention was paid to the elucidation of the role of charged particles (protons and pions) in the fission of natural uranium of TA QUINTA. Extensive calculations have been done for quasi-infinite (with very small neutron leakage) depleted uranium TA BURAN having mass about 20 t which are intended to be used in experiments at Nuclotron in 2014-2016. As in the case of TA QUINTA which really models the central zone of TA BURAN the total numbers of fissions, produced 239Pu nuclei and total neutron multiplicities are predicted to be proportional to proton or deuteron energy up to 12 GeV. But obtained values of beam power gain are practically constant in studied incident energy range and are approximately four. These values are in contradiction with the experimental result [2] obtained for the depleted uranium core weighting three tons at incident proton energy 0.66 GeV.

  5. Method for destroying hazardous organics and other combustible materials in a subcritical/supercritical reactor

    DOEpatents

    Janikowski, Stuart K.

    2000-01-01

    A waste destruction method using a reactor vessel to combust and destroy organic and combustible waste, including the steps of introducing a supply of waste into the reactor vessel, introducing a supply of an oxidant into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste forming a waste and oxidant mixture, introducing a supply of water into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste and oxidant mixture forming a waste, water and oxidant mixture, reciprocatingly compressing the waste, water and oxidant mixture forming a compressed mixture, igniting the compressed mixture forming a exhaust gas, and venting the exhaust gas into the surrounding atmosphere.

  6. Determination of 13 endocrine disrupting chemicals in sediments by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using subcritical water extraction coupled with dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ke; Kang, Haining; Yue, Zhenfeng; Yang, Lihua; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Luan, Tiangang

    2015-03-25

    In this study, a sample pretreatment method was developed for the determination of 13 endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in sediment samples based on the combination of subcritical water extraction (SWE) and dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The subcritical water that provided by accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) was the sample solution (water) for the following DLLME and the soluble organic modifier that spiked in the subcritical water was also used as the disperser solvent for DLLME in succession. Thus, several important parameters that affected both SWE and DLLME were investigated, such as the extraction solvent for DLLME (chlorobenzene), extraction time for DLLME (30s), selection of organic modifier for SWE (acetone), volume of organic modifier (10%) and extraction temperature for SWE (150 °C). In addition, good chromatographic behavior was achieved for GC-MS after derivatisation by using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). As a result, proposed method sensitive and reliable with the limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.006 ng g(-1) (BPA) to 0.639 ng g(-1) (19-norethisterone) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) between 1.5% (E2) and 15.0% (DES). Moreover, the proposed method was compared with direct ASE extraction that reported previously, and the results showed that SWE-DLLME was more promising with recoveries ranging from 42.3% (dienestrol) to 131.3% (4,5α-dihydrotestosterone), except for diethylstilbestrol (15.0%) and nonylphenols (29.8%). The proposed method was then successfully applied to determine 13 EDCs sediment of Humen outlet of the Pearl River, 12 of target compounds could be detected, and 10 could be quantitative analysis with the total concentration being 39.6 ng g(-1), and which indicated that the sediment of Humen outlet was heavily contaminated by EDCs.

  7. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed.

  8. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  9. High anti-inflammatory activity of harpagoside-enriched extracts obtained from solvent-modified super- and subcritical carbon dioxide extractions of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens.

    PubMed

    Günther, M; Laufer, S; Schmidt, P C

    2006-01-01

    Solvent-modified carbon dioxide extractions of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens have been investigated with respect to extraction efficiency and content of harpagoside, and compared with a conventional extract. The effects of pressure, temperature, type and concentration of the modifier have been examined. Two extraction steps were necessary in order to achievehigh anti-inflammatory harpagoside-enriched extracts. The first extraction step was carried out in the supercritical state using carbon dioxide modified with n-propanol to remove undesired lipophilic substances. The main extraction was performed either in the supercritical or in the subcritical state with carbon dioxide modified with ethanol. The supercritical fluid extraction resulted in extracts containing up to 30% harpagoside. The subcritical extracts showed a harpagoside content of ca. 20%, but the extraction yield was nearly three times greater compared with supercritical conditions. The total harpagoside recovery resulting from the sum of the extract and the crude drug residue was greater than 99% in all experiments. The conventional extract and two carbon dioxide extracts were tested for in-vitro inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase-2 biosynthesis. Both carbon dioxide extracts showed total inhibition on 5-lipoxygenase biosynthesis at a concentration of 51.8 mg/L. In contrast, the conventional extract failed to show any inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase biosynthesis.

  10. The use of sub-critical water hydrolysis for the recovery of peptides and free amino acids from food processing wastes. Review of sources and main parameters.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Ismael; Álvarez, Carlos; Paredes, Benjamín; Díaz, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Food industry processing wastes are produced in enormous amounts every year, such wastes are usually disposed with the corresponding economical cost it implies, in the best scenario they can be used for pet food or composting. However new promising technologies and tools have been developed in the last years aimed at recovering valuable compounds from this type of materials. In particular, sub-critical water hydrolysis (SWH) has been revealed as an interesting way for recovering high added-value molecules, and its applications have been broadly referred in the bibliography. Special interest has been focused on recovering protein hydrolysates in form of peptides or amino acids, from both animal and vegetable wastes, by means of SWH. These recovered biomolecules have a capital importance in fields such as biotechnology research, nutraceuticals, and above all in food industry, where such products can be applied with very different objectives. Present work reviews the current state of art of using sub-critical water hydrolysis for protein recovering from food industry wastes. Key parameters as reaction time, temperature, amino acid degradation and kinetic constants have been discussed. Besides, the characteristics of the raw material and the type of products that can be obtained depending on the substrate have been reviewed. Finally, the application of these hydrolysates based on their functional properties and antioxidant activity is described.

  11. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco, R.; Ghiglino, A.; de Vicente, J. P.; Sordo, F.; Terrón, S.; Magán, M.; Perlado, J. M.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final keff value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle.

  12. Estimation of the sub-criticality of the sodium-cooled fast reactor Monju using the modified neutron source multiplication method

    SciTech Connect

    Truchet, G.; Van Rooijen, W. F. G.; Shimazu, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.

    2012-07-01

    The Modified Neutron Source Method (MNSM) is applied to the Monju reactor. This static method to estimate sub-criticality has already given good results on commercial Pressurized Water Reactors. The MNSM consists both in the extraction of the fundamental mode seen by a detector to avoid the effect of higher modes near sources, and the correction of flux distortion effects due to control rod movement. Among Monju's particularities that have a big influence on MNSM factors are: the presence of two californium sources and the position of the detector which is located far from the core outside of the reactor vessel. The importance of spontaneous fission and ({alpha}, n) reactions which have increased during the shutdown period of 15 years will also be discussed. The relative position of detectors and sources deeply affect the correction factors in some regions. In order to evaluate the detector count rate, an analytical propagation has been conducted from the reactor vessel. For two subcritical states, an estimation of the reactivity has been made and compared to experimental data obtained in the restart experiments at Monju (2010). (authors)

  13. Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumors of anogenital mammary-like glands: a series of 13 neoplasms in 12 cases, including mammary-type juvenile fibroadenoma, fibroadenoma with lactation changes, and neurofibromatosis-associated pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated giant cells.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Dmitry V; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Stewart, Colin J; Thompson, Jane; Agaimy, Abbas; Magro, Gaetano; Bisceglia, Michele; Vazmitel, Marina; Kacerovska, Denisa; Kutzner, Heinz; Mukensnabl, Petr; Michal, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a series of 13 fibroepithelial neoplasms involving anogenital mammary-like glands, all occurring in 12 female patients, whose age at diagnosis ranged from 30 to 51 years (mean, 38 y; median, 42 y). All women presented with a solitary asymptomatic nodule in the vulva (n=8), perineum (n=2), or near the anus (n=2) ranging in size from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. Microscopically, 8 lesions were classified as fibroadenoma, and 5, including 1 recurrent tumor, as phyllodes tumor, of which 1 was benign and 4 low-grade malignant. In addition to conventional findings, we describe several hitherto unreported features including juvenile fibroadenoma-like proliferation, fibroadenoma with lactation change, and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells in a patient with neurofibromatosis, type 1 all constituting potential diagnostic pitfalls, which are best averted by using the same approach to diagnosis as for their analogous mammary counterparts.

  14. A review of the differences and similarities between generic drugs and their originator counterparts, including economic benefits associated with usage of generic medicines, using Ireland as a case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Generic medicines are those where patent protection has expired, and which may be produced by manufacturers other than the innovator company. Use of generic medicines has been increasing in recent years, primarily as a cost saving measure in healthcare provision. Generic medicines are typically 20 to 90% cheaper than originator equivalents. Our objective is to provide a high-level description of what generic medicines are and how they differ, at a regulatory and legislative level, from originator medicines. We describe the current and historical regulation of medicines in the world’s two main pharmaceutical markets, in addition to the similarities, as well as the differences, between generics and their originator equivalents including the reasons for the cost differences seen between originator and generic medicines. Ireland is currently poised to introduce generic substitution and reference pricing. This article refers to this situation as an exemplar of a national system on the cusp of significant health policy change, and specifically details Ireland’s history with usage of generic medicines and how the proposed changes could affect healthcare provision. PMID:23289757

  15. MitoPhAST, a new automated mitogenomic phylogeny tool in the post-genomic era with a case study of 89 decapod mitogenomes including eight new freshwater crayfish mitogenomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mun Hua; Gan, Han Ming; Schultz, Mark B; Austin, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    The increased rate at which complete mitogenomes are being sequenced and their increasing use for phylogenetic studies have resulted in a bioinformatic bottleneck in preparing and utilising such data for phylogenetic analysis. Hence, we present MitoPhAST, an automated tool that (1) identifies annotated protein-coding gene features and generates a standardised, concatenated and partitioned amino acid alignment directly from complete/partial GenBank/EMBL-format mitogenome flat files, (2) generates a maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree using optimised protein models and (3) reports various mitochondrial genes and sequence information in a table format. To demonstrate the capacity of MitoPhAST in handling a large dataset, we used 81 publicly available decapod mitogenomes, together with eight new complete mitogenomes of Australian freshwater crayfishes, including the first for the genus Gramastacus, to undertake an updated test of the monophyly of the major groups of the order Decapoda and their phylogenetic relationships. The recovered phylogenetic trees using both Bayesian and ML methods support the results of studies using fragments of mtDNA and nuclear markers and other smaller-scale studies using whole mitogenomes. In comparison to the fragment-based phylogenies, nodal support values are generally higher despite reduced taxon sampling suggesting there is value in utilising more fully mitogenomic data. Additionally, the simple table output from MitoPhAST provides an efficient summary and statistical overview of the mitogenomes under study at the gene level, allowing the identification of missing or duplicated genes and gene rearrangements. The finding of new mtDNA gene rearrangements in several genera of Australian freshwater crayfishes indicates that this group has undergone an unusually high rate of evolutionary change for this organelle compared to other major families of decapod crustaceans. As a result, freshwater crayfishes are likely to be a useful model for

  16. Properties and extraction of pectin-enriched materials from sugar beet pulp by ultrasonic-assisted treatment combined with subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-ming; Fu, Xiong; Luo, Zhi-gang

    2015-02-01

    Pectin-enriched material (PEM) was extracted from sugar beet pulp using subcritical water combined with ultrasonic-assisted treatment. Optimisation of the reaction parameters for maximum extraction yield of PEM was carried out using response surface methodology. Optimum modification conditions were as follows: liquid/solid ratio 44.03, extraction temperature 120.72°C, extraction time 30.49min and extraction pressure 10.70MPa. Under optimal conditions, the maximum yield of PEM was 24.63%. The composition of the PEM was determined. The data showed that the contents of galacturonic acid and arabinose were 59.12% and 21.66%, respectively. The flow behaviours were investigated by a rheometer. The effects of PEM on the pasting and thermal properties of maize starch were also conducted. The results showed that the addition of PEM increased pasting temperature and decreased other pasting parameters. Increasing PEM concentrations resulted in increased gelatinisation temperature and enthalpy.

  17. Evaluation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of LWR fuel storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method was evaluated to determine if it could be used to measure the subcriticality of storage casks of burnt light water reactor (LWR) fuel submerged in fuel storage pools, fully loaded and as they are being loaded. Measurements of k/sub eff/ would provide the parameter most directly related to the criticality safety of storage cask configurations of LWR fuel and could allow proper credit for fuel burnup without reliance on calculations. This, in turn, could lead to more cost-effective cask designs. Evaluation of the method for this application was based on experiments already completed at a critical experiments facility using arrays of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel pins typical of the size of storage cask configurations, the existence of neutron detectors that can function in shipping cask environments, and the ability to construct ionization chambers containing /sup 252/Cf of adequate intensity for these measurements.

  18. SUBCRITICAL CRACK PROPAGATION STUDIES IN HI-NICALON AND HI-NICALON TYPE-S FIBER SiC/SiC COMPOSITES USING COMPACT TENSION SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2007-10-02

    PNNL has performed subcritical crack growth tests under constant applied load at various elevated temperatures in inert environments using subscale compact tension (CT) specimens of two types of SiC-composite materials. The use of CT specimens is preferred over the usual dingle-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens due to more uniform applied stresses over the crack growth region. This study will compare crack growth data taken between two materials as well as specimen geometry types, CT compared to SENB. Plain weave [0/90] Hi-Nicalon CT specimens were tested in argon atmospheres and compared to similar tests of 5-harness satin weave [0/90] Hi-Nicalon Type-S composites. We report here some of the preliminary fractographic examinations of the two materials and an initial assessment of the crack growth data. Additional information on this study will be presented later and also at ICFRM-13 in December.

  19. Comparisons of soxhlet extraction, pressurized liquid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction and subcritical water extraction for environmental solids: recovery, selectivity and effects on sample matrix.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, S B; Grabanski, C B; Martin, E; Miller, D J

    2000-09-15

    Extractions of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site were performed with a Soxhlet apparatus (18 h), by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) (50 min at 100 degrees C), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) (1 h at 150 degrees C with pure CO2), and subcritical water (1 h at 250 degrees C, or 30 min at 300 degrees C). Although minor differences in recoveries for some PAHs resulted from the different methods, quantitative agreement between all of the methods was generally good. However, the extract quality differed greatly. The organic solvent extracts (Soxhlet and PLE) were much darker, while the extracts from subcritical water (collected in toluene) were orange, and the extracts from SFE (collected in CH2Cl2) were light yellow. The organic solvent extracts also yielded more artifact peaks in the gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry and GC-flame ionization detection chromatograms, especially compared to supercritical CO2. Based on elemental analysis (carbon and nitrogen) of the soil residues after each extraction, subcritical water, PLE, and Soxhlet extraction had poor selectivity for PAHs versus bulk soil organic matter (approximately 1/4 to 1/3 of the bulk soil organic matter was extracted along with the PAHs), while SFE with pure CO2 removed only 8% of the bulk organic matrix. Selectivities for different compound classes also vary with extraction method. Extraction of urban air particulate matter with organic solvents yields very high concentrations of n- and branched alkanes (approximately C18 to C30) from diesel exhaust as well as lower levels of PAHs, and no selectivity between the bulk alkanes and PAHs is obtained during organic solvent extraction. Some moderate selectivity with supercritical CO2 can be achieved by first extracting the bulk alkanes at mild conditions, followed by stronger conditions to extract the remaining PAHs, i.e., the least polar organics are the easiest organics to extract

  20. Subcritical water liquefaction of oil palm fruit press fiber in the presence of sodium hydroxide: an optimisation study using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Hossein; Lee, Keat Teong; Bhatia, Subhash; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2010-12-01

    Thermal decomposition of oil palm fruit press fiber (FPF) into a liquid product (LP) was achieved using subcritical water treatment in the presence of sodium hydroxide in a high pressure batch reactor. This study uses experimental design and process optimisation tools to maximise the LP yield using response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The independent variables were temperature, residence time, particle size, specimen loading, and additive loading. The mathematical model that was developed fit the experimental results well for all of the response variables that were studied. The optimal conditions were found to be a temperature of 551 K, a residence time of 40 min, a particle size of 710-1000 microm, a specimen loading of 5 g, and a additive loading of 9 wt.% to achieve a LP yield of 76.16%.

  1. Short communication: antiviral activity of subcritical water extract of Brassica juncea against influenza virus A/H1N1 in nonfat milk.

    PubMed

    Lee, N-K; Lee, J-H; Lim, S-M; Lee, K A; Kim, Y B; Chang, P-S; Paik, H-D

    2014-09-01

    Subcritical water extract (SWE) of Brassica juncea was studied for antiviral effects against influenza virus A/H1N1 and for the possibility of application as a nonfat milk supplement for use as an "antiviral food." At maximum nontoxic concentrations, SWE had higher antiviral activity against influenza virus A/H1N1 than n-hexane, ethanol, or hot water (80°C) extracts. Addition of 0.5mg/mL of B. juncea SWE to culture medium led to 50.35% cell viability (% antiviral activity) for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with influenza virus A/H1N1. Nonfat milk supplemented with 0.28mg/mL of B. juncea SWE showed 39.62% antiviral activity against influenza virus A/H1N1. Thus, the use of B. juncea SWE as a food supplement might aid in protection from influenza viral infection.

  2. Effect of Subcritical Fluid Extraction on the High Quality of Headspace Oil from Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton.

    PubMed

    2016-04-22

    Subcritical fluid extraction (SFE), as a novel method, was applied to investigate the yield, quality, and sensory evaluation of headspace oil from Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton in comparison with petroleum ether extraction (PEE). The results indicated that the yield of the headspace oil using SFE was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than when using PEE. SFE contributed to obtaining alcohols and ethers, prevented the thermal reaction of terpenes, and reduced α-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene in the headspace oil. The contents of linalool (21.90%) and benzyl acetate (16.31%) were higher via SFE than PEE. In addition, the sensory evaluation of SFE was superior to PEE, indicating a fresh, jasmine-like odor and green-yellow color. Thus, SFE is an improved method for obtaining natural headspace oil from jasmine flowers.

  3. Experimental and analytical study of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of analytically and empirically designed Strake-wing configurations at subcritical speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Frink, N. T.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen analytically and empirically designed strakes have been tested experimentally on a wing-body at three subcritical speeds in such a way as to isolate the strake-forebody loads from the wing-afterbody loads. Analytical estimates for these longitudinal results are made using the suction analogy and the augmented vortex lift concepts. The synergistic data are reasonably well estimated or bracketed by the high- and low-angle-of-attack vortex lift theories over the Mach number range and up to maximum lift or strake-vortex breakdown over the wing. Also, the strake geometry is very important in the maximum lift value generated and the lift efficiency of a given additional area. Increasing size and slenderness ratios are important is generating lift efficiently, but similar efficiency can also be achieved by designing a strake with approximately half the area of the largest gothic strake tested. These results correlate well with strake-vortex-breakdown observations in the water tunnel.

  4. Promoting Social Inclusion Counting with Everyone: Learning Communities and INCLUD-ED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatt, Suzanne; Ojala, Mikko; Soler, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The scientific community has provided a wide range of evidence that family and community involvement in schools benefits not only students' learning but also their surrounding community. The INCLUD-ED project has conducted case studies of successful schools around Europe that have strong community participation. Some of them are engaged in the…

  5. Distributed Leadership Includes Staff: One Rural Custodian as a Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Gerri; Scheurich, Jim; Skrla, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Distribution of leadership tasks, often described as distributed leadership, has emerged as an innovative concept for describing the deployment of leadership within schools. A distributed leadership perspective suggests that successful school leadership is not simply the charge of the formal leaders (e.g., Gronn, 2000; Ogawa & Bossert, 1995;…

  6. Keno-Nr a Monte Carlo Code Simulating the Californium -252-SOURCE-DRIVEN Noise Analysis Experimental Method for Determining Subcriticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficaro, Edward Patrick

    The ^{252}Cf -source-driven noise analysis (CSDNA) requires the measurement of the cross power spectral density (CPSD) G_ {23}(omega), between a pair of neutron detectors (subscripts 2 and 3) located in or near the fissile assembly, and the CPSDs, G_{12}( omega) and G_{13}( omega), between the neutron detectors and an ionization chamber 1 containing ^{252}Cf also located in or near the fissile assembly. The key advantage of this method is that the subcriticality of the assembly can be obtained from the ratio of spectral densities,{G _sp{12}{*}(omega)G_ {13}(omega)over G_{11 }(omega)G_{23}(omega) },using a point kinetic model formulation which is independent of the detector's properties and a reference measurement. The multigroup, Monte Carlo code, KENO-NR, was developed to eliminate the dependence of the measurement on the point kinetic formulation. This code utilizes time dependent, analog neutron tracking to simulate the experimental method, in addition to the underlying nuclear physics, as closely as possible. From a direct comparison of simulated and measured data, the calculational model and cross sections are validated for the calculation, and KENO-NR can then be rerun to provide a distributed source k_ {eff} calculation. Depending on the fissile assembly, a few hours to a couple of days of computation time are needed for a typical simulation executed on a desktop workstation. In this work, KENO-NR demonstrated the ability to accurately estimate the measured ratio of spectral densities from experiments using capture detectors performed on uranium metal cylinders, a cylindrical tank filled with aqueous uranyl nitrate, and arrays of safe storage bottles filled with uranyl nitrate. Good agreement was also seen between simulated and measured values of the prompt neutron decay constant from the fitted CPSDs. Poor agreement was seen between simulated and measured results using composite ^6Li-glass-plastic scintillators at large subcriticalities for the tank of

  7. Determination of hydroxylated metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment samples by combining subcritical water extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with derivatization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Lin, Li; Luan, Tiangang; Yang, Lihua; Tam, Nora F Y

    2012-11-13

    A sample preparation method for the determination of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) in sediment samples was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) with derivatization was performed following the subcritical water extraction (SWE) that provided which was provided by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). Several important parameters that affected both SWE extraction and DLLME, such as the selection of organic modifier, its volume, extraction temperature, extraction pressure and extraction time were also investigated. High sensitivity of the hydroxylated PAHs derivatives by N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) could be achieved with the limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.0139 (2-OH-nap) to 0.2334 μg kg(-1) (3-OH-fluo) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) between 2.81% (2-OH-phe) and 11.07% (1-OH-pyr). Moreover, the proposed method was compared with SWE coupled with solid phase extraction (SPE), and the results showed that ASE-DLLME was more promising with recoveries ranging from 57.63% to 91.07%. The proposed method was then applied to determine the hydroxylated metabolites of phenanthrene in contaminated sediments produced during the degradation by two PAH-degraders isolated from mangrove sediments.

  8. Evaluation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of LWR fuel storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1987-11-15

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method was evaluated to determine if it could be used to measure the subcriticality of storage casks of burnt LWR fuel submerged in fuel storage pools, fully loaded and as they are being loaded. The motivation for this evaluation was that measurements of k/sub eff/ would provide the parameter most directly related to the criticality safety of storage cask configurations of LWR fuel and could allow proper credit for fuel burnup without reliance on calculations. This in turn could lead to more cost-effective cask designs. Evaluation of the method for this application was based on (1) experiments already completed at a critical experiments facility using arrays of PWR fuel pins typical of the size of storage cask configurations, (2) the existence of neutron detectors that can function in shipping cask environments, and (3) the ability to construct ionization chambers containing /sup 252/Cf of adequate intensity for these measurements. These three considerations are discussed.

  9. Pharmacological modulation of histone demethylase activity by a small molecule isolated from subcritical water extracts of Sasa senanensis leaves prolongs the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extracts of Sasa senanensis Rehder are used in traditional Japanese medicine; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of their potential health benefits. Methods S. senanensis leaves were extracted with subcritical water. An active small-molecule was isolated using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and identified as 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (protocatechuic aldehyde or PA). The effects of PA on the activity of histone demethylase, the Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and gene expression in Drosophila S2 cells were investigated. Results PA inhibited the activity of Jumonji domain-containing protein 2A (JMJD2A) histone demethylase in a dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 11.6 μM. However, there was no effect on lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) or HDAC8. PA significantly extended the lifespan of female, but not male, Drosophila. In Drosophila S2 cells, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP) was up-regulated by PA exposure. Conclusions Our findings provide insight into the possible relationship between the pharmacological modulation of histone demethylation and lifespan extension by PA; they might also be important in the development of alternative therapies for age-related disorders. PMID:22809229

  10. Subcritical water treatment of explosive and heavy metals co-contaminated soil: Removal of the explosive, and immobilization and risk assessment of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Jung, Ho-Young; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Co-contamination of explosives and heavy metals (HMs) in soil, particularly army shooting range soil, has received increasing environmental concern due to toxicity and risks to ecological systems. In this study, a subcritical water (SCW) extraction process was used to remediate the explosives-plus-HMs-co-contaminated soil. A quantitative evaluation of explosives in the treated soil, compared with untreated soil, was applied to assess explosive removal. The immobilization of HMs was assessed by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure tests, and by investigating the migration of HMs fractions. The environmental risk of HMs in the soil residue was assessed according to the risk assessment code (RAC) and ecological risk indices (Er and RI). The results indicated that SCW treatment could eliminate the explosives, >99%, during the remediation, while the HM was effectively immobilized. The effect of water temperature on reducing the explosives and the risk of HMs in soil was observed. A marked increase in the non-bioavailable concentration of each HM was observed, and the leaching rate of HMs was decreased by 70-97% after SCW treatment at 250 °C, showing the effective immobilization of HMs. According to the RAC or RI, each tested HM showed no or low risk to the environment after treatment.

  11. Early Afterdepolarizations with Growing Amplitudes via Delayed Subcritical Hopf Bifurcations and Unstable Manifolds of Saddle Foci in Cardiac Action Potential Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are pathological oscillations in cardiac action potentials during the repolarization phase and may be caused by drug side effects, ion channel disease or oxidative stress. The most widely observed EAD pattern is characterized by oscillations with growing amplitudes. So far, its occurence has been explained in terms of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the action potential dynamics from which stable limit cycles with growing amplitudes emerge. The novel contribution of this article is the introduction of two alternative explanations of EAD genesis with growing amplitudes that do not involve stable limit cycles in fast subsystems. In particular, we demonstrate that EAD patterns with growing amplitudes may alternatively arise due to a delayed subcritical Hopf bifurcation or an unstable manifold of a saddle focus fixed point in the full fast-slow system modelling the action potential. Our work extends the list of possible dynamical EAD mechanisms and may contribute to a classification of drug effects in preclinical cardiotoxicity testing. PMID:26977805

  12. The effect of filler addition and oven temperature to the antioxidant quality in the drying of Physalis angulata fruit extract obtained by subcritical water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, R. F.; Christianto, G.

    2016-01-01

    Physalis angulata or ceplukan is medicinal herb, which grows naturally in Indonesia. It has been used in traditional medicine to treat several diseases. It is also reported to have antimycobacterial, antileukemic, antipyretic. In this research, Pysalis angulata fruit was investigated for its antioxidant capacity. In order to avoid the toxic organic solvent commonly used in conventional extraction, subcritical water extraction method was used. During drying, filler which is inert was added to the extract. It can absorb water and change the oily and sticky form of extract to powder form. The effects of filler types, concentrations and drying temperatures were investigated to the antioxidant quality covering total phenol, flavonoid and antioxidant activity. The results showed that total phenol, flavonoid and antioxidant activity were improved by addition of filler because the drying time was shorter compared to extract without filler. Filler absorbs water and protects extract from exposure to heat during drying. The combination between high temperature and shorter drying time are beneficial to protect the antioxidant in extract. The type of fillers investigation showed that aerosil gave better performance compared to Microcrystalline Celullose (MCC).

  13. Subcritical hydrothermal liquefaction of cattle manure to bio-oil: Effects of conversion parameters on bio-oil yield and characterization of bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sudong; Dolan, Ryan; Harris, Matt; Tan, Zhongchao

    2010-05-01

    In this study, cattle manure was converted to bio-oil by subcritical hydrothermal liquefaction in the presence of NaOH. The effects of conversion temperature, process gas, initial conversion pressure, residence time and mass ratio of cattle manure to water on the bio-oil yield were studied. The bio-oil was characterized in terms of elemental composition, higher heating value, ultraviolet-visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed that the bio-oil yield depended on the conversion temperature and the process gas. Higher initial conversion pressure, longer residence time and larger mass ratio of cattle manure to water, however, had negative impacts on the bio-oil yield. The higher heating value of bio-oil was 35.53MJ/kg on average. The major non-polar components of bio-oil were toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, which are components of crude oil, gasoline and diesel.

  14. Materials Testing for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Molten Salt Fission System: A look at the Materials Science of Molten Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Balachandran, Shreyas; Foley, David; Hartwig, Karl; McIntyre, Peter; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    For an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt fission core to survive its 50+ year fuel life, the primary vessel, heat exchanger, and various internal components must be made of materials that resist corrosion and radiation damage in a high-temperature environment, (500-800 C). An experimental study of the corrosion behavior of candidate metals in contact with molten salt is being conducted at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Initial experiments have been run on Nb, Ta, Ni, two zirconium alloys, Hastelloy-N, and a series of steel alloys to form a base line for corrosion in both chloride and bromide salt. Metal coupons were immersed in LiCl-KCl or LiBr-KBr at 700 C in an inert-atmosphere. Salt samples were extracted on a time schedule over a 24-hr period. The samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of metals from corrosion. Preliminary results will be presented.

  15. Sub-critical filtration conditions of commercial hollow-fibre membranes in a submerged anaerobic MBR (HF-SAnMBR) system: the effect of gas sparging intensity.

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Ruano, M V; García-Usach, F; Ferrer, J

    2012-06-01

    A submerged anaerobic MBR demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON®, Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was operated using municipal wastewater at high levels of mixed liquor total solids (MLTS) (above 22 g L(-1)). A modified flux-step method was applied to assess the critical flux (J(C)) at different gas sparging intensities. The results showed a linear dependency between J(C) and the specific gas demand per unit of membrane area (SGD(m)). J(C) ranged from 12 to 19 LMH at SGD(m) values of between 0.17 and 0.5 Nm(3) h(-1) m(-2), which are quite low in comparison to aerobic MBR. Long-term trials showed that the membranes operated steadily at fluxes close to the estimated J(C), which validates the J(C) obtained by this method. After operating the membrane for almost 2 years at sub-critical levels, no irreversible fouling problems were detected, and therefore, no chemical cleaning was conducted.

  16. Incompressible boundary-layer stability analysis of LFC experimental data for sub-critical Mach numbers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    An incompressible boundary-layer stability analysis of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) experimental data was completed and the results are presented. This analysis was undertaken for three reasons: to study laminar boundary-layer stability on a modern swept LFC airfoil; to calculate incompressible design limits of linear stability theory as applied to a modern airfoil at high subsonic speeds; and to verify the use of linear stability theory as a design tool. The experimental data were taken from the slotted LFC experiment recently completed in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Linear stability theory was applied and the results were compared with transition data to arrive at correlated n-factors. Results of the analysis showed that for the configuration and cases studied, Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) amplification was the dominating disturbance influencing transition. For these cases, incompressible linear stability theory correlated with an n-factor for TS waves of approximately 10 at transition. The n-factor method correlated rather consistently to this value despite a number of non-ideal conditions which indicates the method is useful as a design tool for advanced laminar flow airfoils.

  17. Simple model of membrane proteins including solvent.

    PubMed

    Pagan, D L; Shiryayev, A; Connor, T P; Gunton, J D

    2006-05-14

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two-dimensional model, similar to the one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three-dimensional model.

  18. Fate of mass-transport deposits in convergent margins: Super- or sub-critical state in accretionary- or non-accretionary slope toes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Anma, R.

    2011-12-01

    (Kawamura et al., 2009 GSAB, 2011; Anma et al., 2011; Michiguchi and Ogawa, 2011 all in Springer Book). Most of them must be related to tsunami hazards in the recent ages. For the lateral variation of inside and surface of the present Nankai accretionary prism, the slope instability might also be explained by the difference in whether gravitational mass transportation works or not, depending upon the instability (supercritical) or stability (subcritical) of the slope angle. Such differences are known laterally from off western Shikoku to Tokai areas, and are probably controlled by either pore-fluid pressure difference or by the different stages for super- or sub-critical state of slope development due to a seamount or ridge subduction-collision. By careful consideration of the present trench slope topography of the Japan trench status which is the results of thrusting and mass transportation during large earthquakes, the total extent of the discussion between the instability and collapse of the trench slope for further generation of large-scale tsunamis must be understood.

  19. Neutronics Study on Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems with Thorium-Based Fuel for Comparison Between Solid and Molten-Salt Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Kenji; Tenzou, Hideki; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2002-06-15

    Since thorium is an abundant fertile material, there is hope for the thorium-cycle fuels for an accelerator driven subcritical system (ADS). The ADS utilizes neutrons, which are generated by high-energy protons of giga-electron-volt-grade, but cross sections for the interaction of high-energy particles are not available for use in current ADS engineering design. In this paper the neutron behavior in the ADS target based on the related experimental data is clarified, and the feasibility of the ADS regarding both the molten salts (Flibe: {sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4}, chloride: NaCl-ThCl{sub 4}-{sup 233}UCl{sub 4}) and oxide ([Th, {sup 233}U]O{sub 2}) fuels is examined. The difference between the experiment and the calculated result at the ADS high-energy region is discussed. In a comparison of the fuels, the time evolution of k{sub eff} and the beam current in the burning period are calculated. The calculated results suggest that the ADS with solid fuel has better future prospects than that with molten-salt fuels. The ADS with Flibe molten-salt fuel tends to require a high beam current and consequently needs the installation of a metallic spallation target and the continuous removal for fission products and protactinium. In comparison with the Flibe fuel, the ADS with chloride fuel has a flux distribution that is similar to a solid fuel reactor.

  20. The effect of filler addition and oven temperature to the antioxidant quality in the drying of Physalis angulata leaf extract obtained by subcritical water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, R. F.; Natalia, Desy

    2016-11-01

    In traditional medicine, Physalis angulata which is well known as ceplukan in Indonesia, has been utilized to cure several diseases by conventional extraction in hot water. The investigation of the Swietenia mahagoni extract activity in modern medicine typically utilized organic solvents such as ethanol, methanol, chloroform and hexane in extraction. In this research, subcritical water was used as a solvent instead of organic solvent to extract the Pysalis angulata leaf part. The focus of this research was the investigation of extract drying condition in the presence of filler to preserve the quality of antioxidant in Swietenia mahagoni extract. Filler, which is inert, was added to the extract during drying to help absorb the water while protect the extract from exposure in heat during drying. The effects of filler types, concentrations and oven drying temperatures were investigated to the antioxidant quality covering total phenol and antioxidant activity. Aerosil and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were utilized as fillers with concentration was varied from 0-30 wt% for MCC and 0-15 wt% for aerosil. The oven drying temperature was varied from 40-60 oC. The results showed that compare to extract dried without filler, total phenol and antioxidant activity were improved upon addition of filler. The higher the concentration of filler, the better the antioxidant; however it was limited by the homogeneity of filler in the extract. Both of the variables (oven temperature and concentration) played an important role in the improvement of extract quality of Swietenia mahagoni leaf. It was related to the drying time which can be minimized to protect the deterioration of extract from heat. In addition, filler help to provide the powder form of extract instead of the typical extract form which is sticky and oily.

  1. A method and apparatus for destroying hazardous organics and other combustible materials in a subcritical/supercritical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Janikowski, Stuart K.

    1997-12-01

    A waste destruction method is described using a reactor vessel to combust and destroy organic and combustible waste, including the steps of introducing a supply of waste into the reactor vessel, introducing a supply of an oxidant into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste forming a waste and oxidant mixture, introducing a supply of water into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste and oxidant mixture forming a waste, water and oxidant mixture, reciprocatingly compressing the waste, water and oxidant mixture forming a compressed mixture, igniting the compressed mixture forming a exhaust gas, and venting the exhaust gas into the surrounding atmosphere.

  2. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  3. Utilization of a /sup 252/Cf-/sup 235/U fueled subcritical multiplier for neutron activation analysis. Rev

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, N.A.; Lepel, E.A.

    1984-02-01

    A /sup 252/Cf neutron activation analysis facility developed in 1975 has been used for the routine multielement analysis of a wide variety of solid and liquid samples. The present neutron flux is on the order of 10/sup 9/ thermal neutrons per cm/sup 2/ per second. Following activation, the radioisotopes are analyzed through their photon emissions with lithium drifted germanium detectors, anticoincidence shielded germanium detectors and NaI(T1) coincidence spectrometers. Although over 65 elements have been measured in environmental materials with this system, typical analyses include the elements Na, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Br, Sr, Rb, Ba, and Dy. Detection limits range from the sub parts per million upward. Over 8000 samples have been analyzed at an amortized neutron cost per sample of $31.

  4. Combustion of LOX with H2(sub g) under subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions (Task 1) and experimental observation of dense spray and mixing of impinging jets (Task 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, W. H.; Cheung, F. B.; Yang, A. S.; Brown, J. J.; Woodward, R. D.; Kline, M. C.; Burch, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to achieve a better understanding of the combustion processes of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen under broad range of pressure covering subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. The scope of the experimental work falls into the following areas: (1) design of the overall experimental setup; (2) modification of an existing windowed high pressure chamber; (3) design of the LOX feeding system; (4) provision of the safety features in the test rig design; (5) LOX cleanliness requirements; (6) cold shock testing; (7) implementation of data acquisition systems; (8) preliminary tests for system checkout; (9) modification of LOX feeding system; and (10) evaporation tests. Progress in each area is discussed.

  5. An experimental investigation of the flow past a finite circular cylinder at a low subcritical Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budair, M.; Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of hot wire measurements made in the near wake at a Reynolds number of 9955 are reported. The measurements include the mean velocity profiles, root mean square values of the velocity fluctuations, frequency spectra, and velocity cross correlations. The mean velocity profiles were used to determine the wake width, whose variation in the downstream and spanwise directions was examined. It is observed that close to the cylinder, the wake is narrower toward the free end than it is away from it, while further downstream the wake is wider toward the tip than it is away from it. It is found that the flow over the span can be characterized by four regions: a tip region where vortex shedding occurs at a lower frequency than that prevalent for away from the tip; an intermediate region adjacent to the first one where a frequency component of a nonshedding character is present; a third region characterized by a gradually increasing shedding frequency with increasing distance from the tip; and a two dimensional region where the shedding frequency is constant.

  6. Combustion of LOX with H2(sub g) under subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions and experimental observation of dense spray and mixing of impinging jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Kenneth K.; Hsieh, W. H.; Yang, A. S.; Brown, J. J.; Cheung, F. B.; Woodward, R. D.; Kline, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    Progress made during the period of February 1 to October 15, 1992 is reported. The overall objective of Task 1 of the investigation is to achieve a better understanding of the combustion processes of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen under subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. Specific objectives of the research program are: (1) to determine the evaporation- and burning-rate characteristics of LOX in hydrogen/helium environments under broad ranges of operating conditions; (2) to measure species concentration profile and surface temperature of LOX employing the gas chromatography and fine-wire thermocouples under non-reacting flow situations; (3) to perform a fugacity-based multicomponent thermodynamic phase equilibrium analysis for examining the high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibrium behavior at the liquid surface of LOX; (4) to formulate and solve a theoretical model for simulating the evaporation and combustion processes in a LOX/H2/He system; and (5) to validate the theoretical model with the measured experimental data. Task 2 of the investigation is described. Observation of a like-on-like injector element in the near-injector region performed in the previous phase of this project has identified the existence of a high Reynolds number regime in which the pre-impingement jets are fully turbulent and undergoing surface breakup. The new spray regime, which has not been observed by previous investigators, is characterized by the presence of many fine droplets and the disappearance of the well-defined liquid breakup wave pattern in the post-impingement region. It is speculated that a cavitating region may be present within the orifice so that it could induce strong turbulence, leading to an onset of atomization of the jets prior to impingement. To further investigate the dense spray behavior of the impinging jets in the high Reynolds number region, experiments were conducted using Plexiglas injector components for direct internal flow observation

  7. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  8. Environmental Sustainability - Including Land and Water Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of environmental sustainability can be conducted in many ways with one of the most quantitative methods including Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). While historically LCIA has included a comprehensive list of impact categories including: ozone depletion, global c...

  9. Case Studies in Systems Chemistry. Final Report. [Includes Complete Case Study, Carboxylic Acid Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, George

    This publication was produced as a teaching tool for college chemistry. The book is a text for a computer-based unit on the chemistry of acid-base titrations, and is designed for use with FORTRAN or BASIC computer systems, and with a programmable electronic calculator, in a variety of educational settings. The text attempts to present computer…

  10. Cygnus Performance in Subcritical Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Note the high degree of similarity in performance between the two machines. Figure 2. Sample diode and x-ray... thermoluminescent dosimeters: (top to bottom) Armando, Step Wedge, Thermos, and All Shots. Data for Cygnus 1 (red circles), and Cygnus 2 (blue

  11. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Haemophilus influenzae , including Hib, disease causes different symptoms depending on ...

  12. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  13. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  14. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  15. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules...

  16. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules...

  17. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  18. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  19. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  20. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  1. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  2. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  3. Server-Side Includes Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2002-01-01

    Describes server-side include (SSI) codes which allow Webmasters to insert content into Web pages without programming knowledge. Explains how to enable the codes on a Web server, provides a step-by-step process for implementing them, discusses tags and syntax errors, and includes examples of their use on the Web site for Southern Illinois…

  4. Microdeletion del(22)(q12.2) encompassing the facial development-associated gene, MN1 (meningioma 1) in a child with Pierre-Robin sequence (including cleft palate) and neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2): a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS) is defined by micro- and/or retrognathia, glossoptosis and cleft soft palate, either caused by deformational defect or part of a malformation syndrome. Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q12.2. NF2 is characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas, spinal cord schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas, and juvenile cataracts. To date, NF2 and PRS have not been described together in the same patient. Case presentation We report a female with PRS (micrognathia, cleft palate), microcephaly, ocular hypertelorism, mental retardation and bilateral hearing loss, who at age 15 was also diagnosed with severe NF2 (bilateral cerebellopontine schwannomas and multiple extramedullary/intradural spine tumors). This is the first published report of an individual with both diagnosed PRS and NF2. High resolution karyotype revealed 46, XX, del(22)(q12.1q12.3), FISH confirmed a deletion encompassing NF2, and chromosomal microarray identified a 3,693 kb deletion encompassing multiple genes including NF2 and MN1 (meningioma 1). Five additional patients with craniofacial dysmorphism and deletion in chromosome 22-adjacent-to or containing NF2 were identified in PubMed and the DECIPHER clinical chromosomal database. Their shared chromosomal deletion encompassed MN1, PITPNB and TTC28. MN1, initially cloned from a patient with meningioma, is an oncogene in murine hematopoiesis and participates as a fusion gene (TEL/MN1) in human myeloid leukemias. Interestingly, Mn1-haploinsufficient mice have abnormal skull development and secondary cleft palate. Additionally, Mn1 regulates maturation and function of calvarial osteoblasts and is an upstream regulator of Tbx22, a gene associated with murine and human cleft palate. This suggests that deletion of MN1 in the six patients we describe may be causally linked to their cleft palates and/or craniofacial abnormalities. Conclusions

  5. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  6. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 48533, August 15, 2014. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to the...

  7. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  8. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  9. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  10. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  11. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  12. Include Passive Solar in Your Renovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Gerald F.; Probasco, Jack F.

    1981-01-01

    A checklist covers potential energy saving modifications in a building scheduled for renovation, and includes suggestions for room utilization, landscaping, and building envelope, solar control, and active system modifications. (Author)

  13. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  14. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  15. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  16. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  17. Eddy Resolving Global Ocean Prediction including Tides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    tensor scheme reduced at supercritical slopes, and their scalar sisters, a Nycander scalar limited in shallow water , and the Jayne and St. Laurent [2001...NAVOCEANO) starting in FY14. The model will include shallow water and provide boundary conditions to finer resolution coastal models that may use HYCOM or a...latter out to 30 days in many deep water regions, including regions of high Navy interest such as the Western Pacific and the Arabian Sea/Gulf of

  18. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  19. Transmission line including support means with barriers

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

  20. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  1. 75 FR 28298 - Avaya Inc., Worldwide Services Group, Global Support Services (GSS) Organization, Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Interactive LLC., Sapphire Technologies, Highlands Ranch, CO; Including Employees in Support of Avaya Inc... Consulting, Inc., Case Interactive LLC., and Sapphire Technologies, Highlands Ranch, Colorado. The notice was..., CCSI Inc., ICONMA LLC, MGD Consulting, Inc., Case Interactive LLC., and Sapphire...

  2. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE...) Cash working capital. The average amount of investor-supplied capital needed to provide funds for...

  3. Parachute Line Hook Includes Integral Loop Expander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, G. B.

    1983-01-01

    Parachute packing simplified with modified line hook. One person packs parachutes for test recovery vehicles faster than previously two-person team. New line hook includes expander that opens up two locking loops so parachute lines are pulled through them. Parachutes are packed at high pressure to be compressed into limited space available in test vehicles.

  4. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  5. Including the Excluded: One School for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EFA 2000 Bulletin, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of "EFA 2000" focuses on the theme of inclusive education, i.e., including children with disabilities in general education classrooms. The cover story discusses a 1995 UNESCO survey of 63 countries that showed that integration of children with disabilities in regular schools is a declared policy in almost every country.…

  6. Effects of Including Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    Two 50-item multiple-choice forms of a grammar test were developed differing only in humor being included in 20 items of one form. One hundred twenty-six (126) eighth graders received the test plus alternate forms of a questionnaire. Humor inclusion did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items nor on common post-treatment…

  7. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  8. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  9. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  10. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  11. A group of VIPs, including Orville Wright

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    A group of VIPs, including Orville Wright, center. Left to right bottom row ?, Walter Reiser, Elton Miller, Orville Wright, Starr Truscutt, Addison Rothrock, Eastman Jacobs, Dr. Lewis Top row Gus Crowley, Ernie Johnson, Carlton Kemper, H.J.E. Reid, Smith DeFrance, Theodore Theodorsen.

  12. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  13. The Occupational Neuroses (including Miners' Nystagmus)

    PubMed Central

    Culpin, Millais

    1933-01-01

    These disorders seem to conform to the conception of “functional nervous disorder” in the narrow sense of the phrase. Specific difficulties in writers' cramp, however, often found to have symbolic significance to the patient. Cramp frequently one symptom in a larger syndrome. Both writers' and telegraphists' cramp are excrescences upon an underlying psychoneurosis, though associated symptoms are often overlooked. Miners' nystagmus supposed to be a physiological disorder that produces “neurasthenia”; ocular symptoms mostly psychoneurotic; the oscillation not a disability of itself. Night-blindness as a hysterical symptom. History of night-blindness in armies; its epidemic prevalence in Continental armies in the Great War and its comparative rarity in ours. Its absence in war pensioners and possible replacement by fear of the dark. Night-blindness in nystagmus probably a conversion of this fear. Accounts of nystagmus in crane-workers and train dispatchers. Cases of miners' nystagmus shown to be identical with psychoneuroses arising apart from nystagmus. The nervous symptoms increase as the nystagmus diminishes. Possibly the ocular disability behaves as a hysteria in guarding against further symptoms. Appearance of an occupational disorder among deep-sea divers, and the psychological investigation of individual cases described. Spurious unconsciousness was due to a condition of Angst which could be experimentally reproduced. The existence of a psychoneurotic basis and the possibility of foretelling the development of the specific disorder were demonstrated, Conclusion.—The occupational neuroses are to be regarded as minor psychoses (or psychoneuroses) and handled in accordance with modern principles of psychopathology. PMID:19989240

  14. Dynamic Analyses Including Joints Of Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1991-01-01

    Method for mathematically modeling joints to assess influences of joints on dynamic response of truss structures developed in study. Only structures with low-frequency oscillations considered; only Coulomb friction and viscous damping included in analysis. Focus of effort to obtain finite-element mathematical models of joints exhibiting load-vs.-deflection behavior similar to measured load-vs.-deflection behavior of real joints. Experiments performed to determine stiffness and damping nonlinearities typical of joint hardware. Algorithm for computing coefficients of analytical joint models based on test data developed to enable study of linear and nonlinear effects of joints on global structural response. Besides intended application to large space structures, applications in nonaerospace community include ground-based antennas and earthquake-resistant steel-framed buildings.

  15. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  16. SKIRT: Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Maarten; Dejonghe, Herwig; Davies, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    SKIRT is a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo technique. The name SKIRT, acronym for Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer, reflects the original motivation for its creation: it has been developed to study the effects of dust absorption and scattering on the observed kinematics of dusty galaxies. In a second stage, the SKIRT code was extended with a module to self-consistently calculate the dust emission spectrum under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. This LTE version of SKIRT has been used to model the dust extinction and emission of various types of galaxies, as well as circumstellar discs and clumpy tori around active galactic nuclei. A new, extended version of SKIRT code can perform efficient 3D radiative transfer calculations including a self-consistent calculation of the dust temperature distribution and the associated FIR/submm emission with a full incorporation of the emission of transiently heated grains and PAH molecules.

  17. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  18. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  19. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  20. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)