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Sample records for incontinence inpatient procedures

  1. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... incontinence. Over time, the leakage may come back. Alternative Names ... Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education and Research. Update of AUA guideline on the ...

  2. [Incontinence].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J; Muñoz Bueno, A M; Guerrero Palmero, A; Segovia Gómez, T

    2007-12-01

    Incontinence presents an additional problem for a bedridden patient, among other reasons because incontinence increases the risk of perineal dermatitis. Recently evaluation scales have been drawn up which permit evaluating the effects incontinence provokes on the integrity of the skin and new products have been developed which act as non-irritating barriers and which permit professionals to visually inspect the affected area. These new products increase the arsenal of already known products and tools such as bed pans, catheters, etc. which professionals have at their disposal to control incontinence.

  3. Markov chain decision model for urinary incontinence procedures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Ghildayal, Nidhi; Ghildayal, Neha

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common chronic health condition, a problem specifically among elderly women that impacts quality of life negatively. However, UI is usually viewed as likely result of old age, and as such is generally not evaluated or even managed appropriately. Many treatments are available to manage incontinence, such as bladder training and numerous surgical procedures such as Burch colposuspension and Sling for UI which have high success rates. The purpose of this paper is to analyze which of these popular surgical procedures for UI is effective. Design/methodology/approach This research employs randomized, prospective studies to obtain robust cost and utility data used in the Markov chain decision model for examining which of these surgical interventions is more effective in treating women with stress UI based on two measures: number of quality adjusted life years (QALY) and cost per QALY. Treeage Pro Healthcare software was employed in Markov decision analysis. Findings Results showed the Sling procedure is a more effective surgical intervention than the Burch. However, if a utility greater than certain utility value, for which both procedures are equally effective, is assigned to persistent incontinence, the Burch procedure is more effective than the Sling procedure. Originality/value This paper demonstrates the efficacy of a Markov chain decision modeling approach to study the comparative effectiveness analysis of available treatments for patients with UI, an important public health issue, widely prevalent among elderly women in developed and developing countries. This research also improves upon other analyses using a Markov chain decision modeling process to analyze various strategies for treating UI.

  4. [Urinary stress incontinence in the female: comparison of incontinence theories and new tension-free surgical procedures].

    PubMed

    Perucchini, D; Fink, D

    2002-01-01

    Urethral sphincter competence involves a complicated inter action of many factors which act in concert. Stress incontinence occurs due to damage to the urethral support and loss or deterioration of urethral sphincter function as a consequence of delivery or aging. Recent research indicates that a more integrated, comprehensive view regarding the different structures, both inside and outside the urethra, is needed to explain the mechanism of incontinence. According to the theories of de Lancey, urinary stress incontinence is caused by defects in the supporting tissues that both actively and passively stabilize the urethra in its correct anatomical position. The integral theory of Petros and Ulmstein explains how laxity in the vagina or its supporting ligaments may cause stress incontinence favored by laxity in the ligamentous insertion points of the vagina. Colposuspension procedures have dominated incontinence surgery for the last 50 years. The introduction of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure was a real innovation that has challenged our understanding of the continence mechanism and taught us the importance of the midurethra. Different modifications of the tension-free procedures have been introduced recently and are discussed in this paper.

  5. Voiding trial outcome following pelvic floor repair without incontinence procedures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Won, Sara; Haviland, Miriam J.; Bargen, Emily Von; Hacker, Michele R.; Li, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our aim was to identify predictors of postoperative voiding trial failure among patients who had a pelvic floor repair without a concurrent incontinence procedure in order to identify low-risk patients in whom postoperative voiding trials may be modified. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent pelvic floor repair without concurrent incontinence procedures at two institutions from 1 November 2011 through 13 October 2013 after abstracting demographic and clinical data from medical records. The primary outcome was postoperative retrograde voiding trial failure. We used modified Poisson regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 371 women who met eligibility criteria, 294 (79.2 %) had complete data on the variables of interest. Forty nine (16.7%) failed the trial, and those women were less likely to be white (p = 0.04), more likely to have had an anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.001), and more likely to have had a preoperative postvoid residual (PVR) ≥150 ml (p = 0.001). After adjusting for race, women were more likely to fail their voiding trial if they had a preoperative PVR of ≥150 ml (RR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.1–3.2); institution also was associated with voiding trial failure (RR: 3.0; 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4). Conclusions Among our cohort, postoperative voiding trial failure was associated with a PVR of ≥150 ml and institution at which the surgery was performed. PMID:26886553

  6. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  7. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  8. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  9. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Home For Patients Search FAQs Surgery ... Incontinence FAQ166, July 2014 PDF Format Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Special Procedures What is stress urinary ...

  10. [Postoperative evaluation of different surgical procedures in genuine stress urinary incontinence: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Pérez-Soriano, P; Alvarez-Mercado, R L; Herbert, A; Kunhardt-Rasch, J

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation of the surgical treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence and pelvic relaxation. One-year follow-up, was done. A retrospective study with 144 files from the surgeries performed between February 1993 and June 1994, at the Clínica de Urología Ginecológica del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. We excluded 37 files because of incomplete information. The age, parity, hormonal stage, preoperative diagnosis by urodynamic studies, surgical treatments and one-year follow-up were analyzed. The mean age was 45.5 years. Pereyra procedure was performed in 53, Burch procedure in 47, anterior colporrhaphy in 5, and sling procedure in 2 patients. The incidence of complications was similar between the different groups. Resumption of spontaneous postsurgical voiding was delayed in the Pereyra group. The Burch urethropexy and Pereyra procedures were equally effective, with no statistical differences observed. Burch vaginal suspension was not more effective for the correction of urinary stress incontinence than Pereyra procedure.

  11. Does menopausal status impact urinary continence outcomes following abdominal sacrocolpopexy without anti-incontinence procedures in continent women?

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Abdurrahman Hamdi; Toz, Emrah; Beyan, Emrah; Gurbuz, Tutku; Ozcan, Aykut; Oner, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the impact of menopausal status on urinary continence following abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC) without an anti-incontinence procedure in continent women. Methods: We conducted a clinical follow-up study of 137 patients diagnosed with stage 3 or higher pelvic organ prolapse (POP) without urinary incontinence between January 2012 and December 2014. Patients were provided with detailed a priori information pertaining to the abdominal sacrocolpopexy procedure and were invited to attend follow-up visits at 1, 3, 12, and 24 months. Follow-up visits included a gynecological examination, cough test, and validated Urinary Distress Inventory-6 (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7) questionnaires. Results: The mean follow-up time for the cohort was 16.5±3.45 months. The study group was divided according to menopausal status: premenopausal (Group-1) and postmenopausal women (Group-II). Anatomical recurrence was not detected during the follow-up period in either group, but de novo stress urinary incontinence was seen in 15 of 53 (28.3%) Group-I patients and in 6 of 84 (7.1%; p < 0.01) Group-II patients. Conclusions: The risk of de novo stress urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women after ASC is low. However, premenopausal patients have a higher incidence of de novo stress incontinence which affect quality of life. PMID:27648027

  12. Comparison of the Bologna and Ingelman-Sundberg procedures for stress incontinence associated with genital prolapse: prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Debodinance, P; Querleu, D

    1993-11-01

    It is difficult to make a choice among the many surgical procedures designed for the correction of stress urinary incontinence by the vaginal route because their results have not been correctly compared. The Bologna (B) operation uses two flaps from the anterior vaginal wall that are anchored to the abdominal wall; the Ingelman-Sundberg (IS) operation is a suburethral sling made from two transplants from the pubococcygeus muscle. A prospective randomized study has been carried out in order to compare these two procedures. A selection of cases has been based upon the presence of genuine or potential stress incontinence, genital prolapse and available tissues (anterior vaginal wall excess and palpable pubococcygeus muscles) for both procedures. No significant difference was noted for clinical results (91.7% and 93.7% of patients cured by the B and IS operations, respectively) or for transmission rate gain at 3 months and 1 year. Maximum urethral closing pressure was maintained in both treatment arms. No significant postoperative complication or persistent dysuria occurred. The Bologna procedure is best indicated in case of frank anterior vaginal excess, and the Ingelman-Sundberg procedure when strong anterior parts of pubococcygeus muscles are available. Both are excellent in the cure of stress incontinence associated with genital prolapse.

  13. 42 CFR 405.1206 - Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care. 405.1206 Section 405.1206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND...

  14. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may begin around the time of menopause. Urgency urinary incontinence happens when people have a sudden need ... urinary incontinence is a mix of stress and urgency urinary incontinence. You may leak urine with a laugh ...

  15. Incontinence - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - incontinence ... The following organizations are good resources for information on incontinence. Fecal incontinence : The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- www.acog.org/~/media/for%20patients/faq139.ashx ...

  16. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  17. Recurrence rate of stress urinary incontinence in females with initial cure after transobturator tape procedure at 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Taeyong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Kim, Hyung Suk; Lee, Jeong Woo; Bae, Jungbum

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess recurrence rates of urinary incontinence in women with initial cure after transobturator tape (TOT) procedure at 3-year follow-up. Materials and Methods Between June 2006 and May 2013, a total of 402 consecutive patients underwent the TOT procedure for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital. Of the 402 patients, 223 had sufficient medical records for analysis. Therefore, they were followed-up for 3 years postoperatively. Patient characteristics, urinary symptoms, physical examination, and urodynamic parameters were evaluated. The primary end point of “cure” was defined as the absence of any complaint of urinary leakage without needing pads for usual activities. Results Of the 223 patients, 196 patients (87.9%) were initially cured within 6 months postoperatively. Of the 196 patients, 70 (35.7%) had recurrent urinary incontinence at 3 years postoperatively, 51 (26.0%) had SUI, 16 (8.2%) had urgency urinary incontinence, and 3 (1.5%) had mixed urinary incontinence. In univariate analysis, preoperative urinary obstructive symptom was found to significant contributor to the recurrence of urinary incontinence at 3-year postoperatively (p=0.004). Conclusions In our study, 35.7% of the women with initial cure after TOT experienced the recurrence of urinary leakage during the 3-year follow-up. The cure rate of TOT was decreased as time went by, although the initial cure rate was high. PMID:28097269

  18. Preoperative maximal flow rate may be a predictive factor for the outcome of tension-free vaginal tape procedure for stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Paick, Jae-Seung; Kim, Soo Woong; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Oh, Seung-June; Son, Hwancheol; Park, Jae Young

    2004-01-01

    This study examined factors potentially predicting on the outcome of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure for stress urinary incontinence. A total of 60 women (aged 35-71 years, mean 57) with at least follow-up of 2 years were included in the study. The tension-free vaginal tape procedure was performed under local anesthesia except in two patients. At the latest follow-up 50 (83.3%) were cured of stress urinary incontinence. Two patients had new-onset urge symptoms without urge incontinence episodes. Multivariate regression analysis showed maximal flow rate to be associated with 0.9-fold risk of the failure; no other parameters had statistical significance. Our results confirm the feasibility and safety of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure and demonstrate that preoperative low maximal flow rate may be associated with the failure of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

  19. Radiofrequency remodelling of the endopelvic fascia is not an effective procedure for urodynamic stress incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Sharif I M F

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of transvaginal radiofrequency remodelling of the endopelvic fascia as a primary procedure for urodynamic stress incontinence due to urethral hypermobility in women. It included 24 patients who had the procedure at two district general hospitals. Outcome measures included the pad test, urodynamic assessment, continence diary, pain scores and operative as well as post-operative complications and assessment was made on recruitment during hospital admission and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. A rising failure rate was noted as early as 3 months, leading to a cumulative cure rate of 45.8% at 12 months follow-up. This low effectiveness could be attributed to inherent weakness of the endopelvic fascia. No major complications were encountered and pain scores were mild.

  20. Therapeutic Efficacy of a New Procedure for Male Urinary Incontinence Combining a Suburethral Polypropylene Mesh and Cardiovascular Patch

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in men is a complication secondary to prostatectomy or resulting from neurological lesions. This study presents our experiences with male suburethral slings over the past decade. Methods In this study, we considered patients who presented with SUI and were diagnosed with an intrinsic sphincteric deficiency due to postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI) or other causes (non-PPI). Patients who underwent the suburethral sling procedure using a polypropylene mesh and a cardiovascular patch were retrospectively included. An urodynamic study was performed before and after the operation. Global response assessment (GRA) and SUI grading were used for surgical outcome. The revision rate and the infection rate were also evaluated. Results A total 31 patients were enrolled in this study; the mean patient age was 59.5±18.9 years, and the mean follow-up period was 36.9±29.4 months. Fourteen patients comprised the non-PPI group and 17 were in the PPI group. The preoperative SUI of all patients were categorized as a moderate to severe problem according to the SUI grade, with a mean score of 2.32±0.48 before the operation and 0.48±0.57 after the operation. With a mean score of 2.35±0.71, GRA showed that the patients were satisfied with the treatment. After the sling procedure, 4 patients (13%) reported a mild improvement, 12 (38.7%) a moderate improvement, while 15 (48.4%) reported an excellent improvement. Six patients (19.4%), including 5 from the non-PPI group (35.7%) and 1 (5.9%) from the PPI group (P=0.037), underwent sling removal because of infection. Conclusions The male suburethral sling procedure using a polypropylene mesh and a cardiovascular patch is a safe, efficacious, and inexpensive surgical procedure for PPI. In cases of neurological incontinence, however, the higher infection rate in non-PPI patients means that they should be carefully managed. PMID:28361511

  1. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... urinary incontinence. Initial pilot studies have shown that acupuncture can provide some short-term benefit, but more ... Urology. 2013;190:113. Wang Y, et al. Acupuncture for stress urinary incontinence in adults. Cochrane Database ...

  2. Urinary incontinence - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help with my urinary incontinence? What are Kegel exercises? What can I do when I want ... tape Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Self catheterization - ...

  3. An Evaluation of the Effects of the Transobturator Tape Procedure on Sexual Satisfaction in Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence Using the Libido Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Narin, Raziye; Nazik, Hakan; Narin, Mehmet Ali; Aytan, Hakan; Api, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Hypothesis. Most women experience automatic urine leakage in their lifetimes. SUI is the most common type in women. Suburethral slings have become a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence when conservative therapy failed. The treatment of stress urinary incontinence by suburethral sling may improve body image by reducing urinary leakage and may improve sexual satisfaction. Methods. A total of 59 sexually active patients were included in the study and underwent a TOT outside-in procedure. The LSS was applied in all patients by self-completion of questionnaires preoperatively and 6 months after the operation. General pleasure with the operation was measured by visual analogue score (VAS). Pre- and postoperative scores were recorded and analyzed using SPSS 11.5. Results. Two parameters of the LSS, orgasm and who starts the sexual activity, increased at a statistically significant rate. Conclusion. Sexual satisfaction and desire have partially improved after the TOT procedure. PMID:24288621

  4. A Content Incontinent: Report of Liposomal Bupivacaine Induced Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Proper surgical management of anal fistula demands sound clinical judgment and extraordinary care to prevent incontinence and adequate postoperative pain control and provide satisfactory resolution to optimize quality of life. Fecal incontinence can be a devastating complication of procedures performed for fistula in ano. We report a unique case in which temporary incontinence (for less than 4 days) followed injection of liposomal bupivacaine for postoperative pain control after draining seton placement for fistula in ano. Patients and physicians should be aware as it may be mistaken for a more serious anatomical and permanent cause of fecal incontinence. PMID:27747127

  5. External incontinence devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices; Urinary incontinence - devices; Fecal incontinence - devices; Stool incontinence - devices ... of these different products are listed below. FECAL INCONTINENCE DEVICES There are many types of products for managing long-term diarrhea or fecal incontinence . ...

  6. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - skin care; Incontinence - pressure sore; Incontinence - pressure ulcer ... redness, peeling, irritation, and yeast infections likely. Bedsores ( pressure sores ) may also develop if the person: Has ...

  7. A real-world comparative assessment of complications following various mid-urethral sling procedures for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Magee, Glenn; Roy, Sanjoy; Hinoul, Piet; Moretz, Chad; Kozarev, Roumen; Waters, Heidi; Whitmore, Kristene

    2012-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence affects a significant proportion of the adult female population in the United States with prevalence increasing with growing age. Mid-urethral slings are among surgical options offering important improvement in the condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of different mid-urethral sling products with respect to postsurgery complications. This retrospective study utilized data from the Premier Perspective Database for mid-urethral sling procedures between 2005 and 2009. Patients were grouped into retropubic or transobturator cohorts, and these cohorts were further divided by the sling utilized during the procedure. Surgical outcomes and 12-month complication rates were assessed. In general, there were fewer complications noted for transobturator procedures than for retropubic procedures. In the retropubic category, Gynecare TVT had significantly lower rates of urinary obstruction/retention than other retropubic procedures. In the transobturator category, lower rates of overall pelvic complications as well as urologic complications, including urgency incontinence and urinary tract infections, were observed in the Gynecare TVTO subgroup than other transobturator procedures. Results of this study confirm the low overall rate of complications for midurethral sling procedures while at the same time suggesting that product choice may also have an impact on complication rates.

  8. Fecal Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? FAQs Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms ...

  9. Bowel incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... may lead to incontinence in some people include: Alcohol Caffeine Dairy products (in people who are unable to digest lactose , a sugar found in most dairy products) Fatty, fried, or greasy foods Spicy foods Cured or ...

  10. [Urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Incontinence is a common age-dependent and increasing problem in women that may mainly present as stress incontinence, overactive bladder, mixed incontinence or other forms. A thorough history, gynaecological and neurological examination and urinalysis as initial step will lead to the diagnosis and treatment. If midstream urine is difficult to receive, a catheter urine will be easy to obtain. Further investigations as urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasound may be required. As initial step, stress incontinence should be treated with physiotherapy and pelvic floor exercises, if not successful with operations as suburethral slings. Slings have good long-term success rates of approximately 85 % with a low morbidity and can even be inserted under local anaesthetic. The treatment of idiopathic overactive bladder consists of bladder training, a behavioural therapy, and mainly anticholinergics. Anticholinergics may cause side effects particularly in the elderly who are under several medications that may add anticholinergic effects as antidepressants, antibiotics or antihistaminics.

  11. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... org editorial staff Tags: bowel management program, bowel movements, defecation, fecal incontinence, leaking feces, leaking stool, perineal exercises Family Health, Seniors, Women September 2000 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  12. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fecal Incontinence Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  13. Incontinence Treatment: Surgical Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of Incontinence Diarrhea Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding a Doctor ...

  14. Current Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer Y; Abbas, Maher A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the management of fecal incontinence, which affects more than 1 in 10 people and can have a substantial negative impact on quality of life. Methods: The medical literature between 1980 and April 2012 was reviewed for the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence. Results: A comprehensive history and physical examination are required to help understand the severity and type of symptoms and the cause of incontinence. Treatment options range from medical therapy and minimally invasive interventions to more invasive procedures with varying degrees of morbidity. The treatment approach must be tailored to each patient. Many patients can have substantial improvement in symptoms with dietary management and biofeedback therapy. For younger patients with large sphincter defects, sphincter repair can be helpful. For patients in whom biofeedback has failed, other options include injectable medications, radiofrequency ablation, or sacral nerve stimulation. Patients with postdefecation fecal incontinence and a rectocele can benefit from rectocele repair. An artificial bowel sphincter is reserved for patients with more severe fecal incontinence. Conclusion: The treatment algorithm for fecal incontinence will continue to evolve as additional data become available on newer technologies. PMID:24355892

  15. Improving outcomes using German Inpatient Quality Indicators in conjunction with peer review procedures.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Thomas; Völzke, Tatjana; Nimptsch, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Some hospital comparisons seem to generate confusion because different methods of outcome comparisons lead to different results in hospital rankings. This article questions the concept of overall comparisons of hospitals, which are multiproduct enterprises and may have specialties that provide good results in some areas despite having worse outcomes in others. Therefore, the authors argue for a disease specific view of outcome measurement. The concept of the German Inpatient Quality Indicators is explained. These indicators cover volume, mortality, and other information by a disease specific approach, which includes information for potential patients as well as specific feedback to the physicians responsible for the respective specialty. This article focuses on the feedback to the hospitals and explains how these indicators can be used for improvement in conjunction with a peer review process. The indicators provide information to the hospitals regarding their relative position because German reference values are available for all indicators. Thus, the indicators can serve as a trigger instrument for identifying possible quality problems. Based on these indications, peer review can be used to analyze the treatment processes and to eventually verify weaknesses and define actions for improvement. The first studies indicate that the use of this approach within hospital quality management can largely improve hospital outcomes in hospitals with subpar results compared to the German average.

  16. Does Preoperative Urodynamic Testing Improve Surgical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing the Transobturator Tape Procedure for Stress Urinary Incontinence? A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Sudheer; Patnaik, Pranab; Shaw, Dipak; Jain, Madhu; Trivedi, Sameer; Dwivedi, Udai Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Urodynamic studies are commonly performed as part of the preoperative work-up of patients undergoing surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). We aimed to assess the extent to which these urodynamic parameters influence patient selection and postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods Patients presenting with SUI were randomly assigned to two groups: one undergoing office evaluation only and the other with a preoperative urodynamic work-up. Patients with unfavorable urodynamic parameters (detrusor overactivity [DO] and/or Valsalva leak point pressure [VLPP]<60 cm H2O and/or maximum urethral closure pressure [MUCP]<20 cm H2O) were excluded from the urodynamic testing group. All patients in both groups underwent the transobturator midurethral sling procedure. Evaluation for treatment success (reductions in urogenital distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire scoring along with absent positive stress test) was done at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Results A total of 72 patients were evaluated. After 12 patients with any one or more of the abnormal urodynamic parameters were excluded, 30 patients were finally recruited in each of the "urodynamic testing" and "office evaluation only" groups. At both the 6- and the 12-month follow-ups, treatment outcomes (reduction in scores and positive provocative stress test) were significantly better in the urodynamic testing group than in the office evaluation only group (p-values significant for all outcomes). Conclusions Our findings showed statistically significantly better treatment outcomes in the urodynamic group (after excluding those with poor prognostic indicators such as DO, low VLPP, and MUCP) than in the office evaluation only group. We recommend exploiting the prognostic value of these urodynamic parameters for patient counseling and treatment decisions. PMID:25512817

  17. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? FAQs Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms ...

  18. Urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peggy; Brubaker, Linda

    2006-01-07

    Urinary incontinence is common in women, but is under-reported and under-treated. Urine storage and emptying is a complex coordination between the bladder and urethra, and disturbances in the system due to childbirth, aging, or other medical conditions can lead to urinary incontinence. The two main types of incontinence in women, stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence, can be evaluated by history and simple clinical assessment available to most primary care physicians. There is a wide range of therapeutic options, but the recent proliferation of new drug treatments and surgical devices for urinary incontinence have had mixed results; direct-to-consumer advertising has increased public awareness of the problem of urinary incontinence, but many new products are being introduced without long-term assessment of their safety and efficacy.

  19. Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Jay, J; Staskin, D

    1998-10-01

    Despite the prevalence of urinary incontinence, most affected women don't seek help, primarily because of embarrassment or because they are not aware that effective treatment is available. Failure to store urine may be caused by an abnormality in any component of the lower urinary tract. Common abnormalities are poor bladder compliance and bladder outlet failure. Patients who experience failure to empty can present with recurrent urinary tract infections, retention or incontinence. Using a symptom-based classification of incontinence, this would be referred to as overflow incontinence. Other possible categories of urinary incontinence are failure to store and empty and functional incontinence. A combination of a failure to store and empty is difficult to diagnose and treat clinically. Treatments are directed at the particular cause of incontinence and can include medical or surgical therapies.

  20. [Stress urinary incontinence. Its surgical management].

    PubMed

    Neri Ruz, E S; Azcona Arteaga, F J

    1991-10-01

    Ninety eight patients with stress urinary incontinence treated surgically at Central Military Hospital, were studied. We analyzed the risk factors as age, weight, height, parity, menopause age, and previous medical and surgical procedures. They were divided in two groups. The Group I, vaginal approach, with 35 patients and Group II, retropubic surgery, with 63 patients. There were no differences both groups regarding age, weight, height, parity and menopausal age. The most frequent illness associated with stress urinary incontinence, was pelvic floor relaxation. The complications were 17.1% and 33.3%, respectively. The efficacy of Burch is procedure for the management of stress urinary incontinence, with a success rate of 84.1% versus 62.1% in the vaginal approach, was confirmed.

  1. [Inpatient psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Rullkötter, N; Dally, A

    2016-01-01

    In German-speaking countries inpatient psychotherapy plays a major role in the mental healthcare system. Due to its characteristic features, i. e. multiprofessionalism, multimodality and method integration, the inpatient approach represents a unique and independent type of psychotherapy. In order to be helpful, the manifold verbal and non-verbal methods need to be embedded into an overall treatment plan. Additionally, the therapeutic milieu of the hospital represents an important effective factor and its organization requires a more active construction. The indications for inpatient psychotherapy are not only based on the mental disorder but also on illness, setting and healthcare system-related criteria. In integrative concepts, the multiprofessional team is a key component with many functions. The effectiveness of psychotherapeutic hospital treatment has been proven by meta-analysis studies; however, 20-30% of patients do not benefit from inpatient psychotherapy and almost 13% drop-out prematurely.

  2. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Urinary Incontinence in Adults. December 12, 2007. Drossman DA, Li Z, Andruzzi E, et al. U.S. Householder ... Rectum Vol. 41, No. 10 October 1998. Drossman DA, Sandler RS, Broom CM, et al. Urgency and ...

  3. Incontinence Treatment: Biofeedback

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allis, WI . Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication ... of Hope "For a person who is incontinent, replacing feelings of helplessness with a measure of empowerment , with teaching a person that they can take steps to ...

  4. Eldercare at Home: Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... on long trips or in unfamiliar settings. However, diapers and pads can worsen incontinence if the older person relies only on them and does not practice bladder exercises. If pads or diapers are necessary, change them often to avoid odor, ...

  5. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  6. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence.

  7. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence. PMID:28124522

  8. Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000134.htm Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... Dmochowski RR, Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al; Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American ...

  9. Urinary incontinence. Noninvasive treatment options.

    PubMed

    Maloney, C; Cafiero, M R

    1999-06-01

    One in six women older than 45 experiences incontinence, but 31% of them never discuss their condition with anyone. A proactive approach on the part of all health care providers is needed to break this silence, particularly among clinicians who care for women. Urinary incontinence is classified as stress, urge, mixed, overflow or functional incontinence. Differential diagnosis of incontinence is essential to choosing appropriate treatment options. This article outlines noninvasive treatment options that are specific to diagnosis.

  10. Fecal incontinence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Syed H

    2007-11-01

    Fecal incontinence is an underreported and underappreciated problem in older adults. Although fecal incontinence is more common in women than in men, this difference narrows with aging. Risk factors that lead to the development of fecal incontinence include dementia, physical disability, and fecal impaction. Treatment options include medical or conservative therapy for older adults who have mild incontinence, and surgical options can be explored in selected older adults if surgical expertise is available.

  11. Management of patients with faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Duelund-Jakobsen, Jakob; Worsoe, Jonas; Lundby, Lilli; Christensen, Peter; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence, defined as the involuntary loss of solid or liquid stool, is a common problem affecting 0.8–8.3% of the adult population. Individuals suffering from faecal incontinence often live a restricted life with reduced quality of life. The present paper is a clinically oriented review of the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of faecal incontinence. First-line therapy should be conservative and usually include dietary adjustments, fibre supplement, constipating agents or mini enemas. Biofeedback therapy to improve external anal sphincter function can be offered but the evidence for long-term effect is poor. There is good evidence that colonic irrigation can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life, especially in patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence. Surgical interventions should only be considered if conservative measures fail. Sacral nerve stimulation is a minimally invasive procedure with high rate of success. Advanced surgical procedures should be restricted to highly selected patients and only performed at specialist centres. A stoma should be considered if other treatment modalities fail. PMID:26770270

  12. [Conservative treatment of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Soljanik, I; Schorsch, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    Urinary incontinence can be treated with medicinal products in addition to active pelvic floor muscle training and electrostimulation. A local hormone therapy should be first discussed with the gynaecologist. The active substance duloxetine has been used for a few years for treating stress incontinence. Several older and newer active substances are available for treating irritable bladder and stress incontinence.

  13. Diaper area granuloma of incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, W Z; Abahussein, A A; Alzayer, A A

    1992-05-01

    Granulomas in the diaper area developed in four patients; two male infants following surgery for Hirschsprung's disease and two female children with urinary (and/or fecal) incontinence. The use of the term 'Diaper area granuloma of incontinence' is suggested to describe these lesions seen in the elderly, as well as in incontinent infants and children.

  14. Sacral Nerve Stimulation For Urinary Urge Incontinence, Urgency-Frequency, Urinary Retention, and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. Background: Condition and Target Population Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. The Technology Being Reviewed: Sacral Nerve Stimulation Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is

  15. [Sexuality and incontinence].

    PubMed

    Buffat, J

    2009-03-18

    Incontinence is anything that inhibits the expression of sexuality. Male problems like premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunctions are forms of incontinence. The inability to retain ejaculation or maintain erection long enough to give pleasure to the partner generates feelings of shame and guilt which weaken virility. Feminine sexual dysfunctions like loss of desire, anorgasmia and vaginismus are results of excessive continence due to negative familial and religious education, moral and social values. The sexologist's task is first to find out the origins of the sexual trouble then to propose an adequate treatment.

  16. Faecal incontinence in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S; Owen, R E; Choo, P W; Jayaratnam, F J

    1991-04-01

    Faecal incontinence is distressing both to the patient and the carers. However with accurate diagnosis of its cause, the condition can often be treated. Causes can be classified by pathophysiology. The most common cause in the elderly is faecal impaction with overflow incontinence. Other causes include inflammatory conditions of the bowel, neurological disorder, functional incontinence and iatrogenic incontinence. Management depends on an accurate diagnosis. A proper bowel and drug history is important. A rectal examination is mandatory, in order not to miss a diagnosis of faecal impaction with overflow incontinence. Specific treatment is directed at the cause.

  17. Incontinence products and devices for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2004-08-01

    Devices and products to contain or collect the urine are part of the management of bladder dysfunction, particularly urinary incontinence (UI) (Newman, Bliss, & Fader, in press). The aim of continence nurse experts and those who care for incontinent individuals during the past decade has been to greatly decrease the indiscriminate use of absorbent pads and garments, external collecting devices, and indwelling catheterization, through the successful treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) with behavioral interventions, drug therapies, and new surgical procedures. However, these products and devices can be beneficial for persons who are elderly, fail treatment and remain incontinent, who are too ill or disabled to participate in behavioral programs, who cannot be helped by medications, or who have a type of UI that cannot be alleviated by other interventions (Newman, 2003). The judicious use of products to contain urine loss and maintain skin integrity is a first-line defense for these patients (Fantl et al., 1996). Urinary collection devices and products that are appropriate for elderly patients, that are used by nurses in all clinical settings, and are available at local pharmacies, retail stores, medical equipment dealers or directly from manufacturers are discussed.

  18. Symptoms of Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... might feel the urge to have a bowel movement, but impaired muscles are unable to control it ... sure when an episode might strike. The personal impact of incontinence becomes even more profound as sufferers begin to withdraw from social situations because of the problem. They may participate ...

  19. Outcome of the laparoscopic two-team sling procedure, tension-free vaginal tape insertion, and transobturator tape insertion in women with recurrent stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hassonah, Seham; Medel, Sebastian; Lovatsis, Danny; Drutz, Harold P; Alarab, May

    2013-11-01

    Objectif : Bien que la prise en charge chirurgicale de l’incontinence urinaire à l’effort primaire (IUE) ait été bien étudiée, la prise en charge optimale de l’IUE persistante ou récurrente constitue un défi considérable pour le chirurgien et les données publiées pertinentes sont limitées. Cette étude avait pour but de documenter les données quant aux issues de diverses techniques chirurgicales utilisées dans notre centre pour la prise en charge de l’IUE récurrente, ainsi que d’évaluer les complications immédiates et à long terme étant associées à ces interventions. Méthodes : Cette étude rétrospective a évalué l’issue de l’intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux équipes, de l’insertion d’une bandelette vaginale sans tension (TVT) et de l’insertion d’une bandelette transobturatrice (TOT) dans la prise en charge de l’IUE récurrente chez des femmes. Parmi les données recueillies, on trouvait les caractéristiques démographiques des patientes, les données urodynamiques, la guérison postopératoire subjective et la guérison objective (test à la toux négatif), ainsi que les complications peropératoires et postopératoires. Résultats : Quarante-six femmes présentant une IUE récurrente ont été admises à l’étude : 24 d’entre elles ont subi une intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux équipes, 15 ont subi une insertion de TVT et 7 ont subi une insertion de TOT. Les taux de guérison objective ont été de 91,7 %, de 73,3 % et de 85,7 %, respectivement, tandis que les taux de guérison subjective ont été de 79,2 %, de 60 % et de 57,1 %, respectivement. Au sein du groupe « intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux équipes », une des participantes en est venue à présenter un hématome infecté, tandis qu’une autre a nécessité une chirurgie en raison d’une occlusion de l’intestin grêle. Conclusion : L’intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux

  20. Efficacy of Physiotherapy for Urinary Incontinence following Prostate Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bakuła, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    The study enrolled 81 with urinary incontinence following radical prostate-only prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups. The patients in Group I were additionally subdivided into two subgroups with respect to the physiotherapeutic method used. The patients of subgroup IA received a rehabilitation program consisting of three parts. The patients of subgroup IB rehabilitation program consist of two parts. Group II, a control group, had reported for therapy for persistent urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy but had not entered therapy for personal reasons. For estimating the level of incontinence, a 1-hour and 24-hour urinary pad tests, the miction diary, and incontinence questionnaire were used, and for recording the measurements of pelvic floor muscles tension, the sEMG (surface electromyography) was applied. The therapy duration depended on the level of incontinence and it continued for not longer than 12 months. Superior continence outcomes were obtained in Group I versus Group II and the difference was statistically significant. The odds ratio for regaining continence was greater in the rehabilitated Group I and smaller in the group II without the rehabilitation. A comparison of continence outcomes revealed a statistically significant difference between Subgroups IA versus IB. The physiotherapeutic procedures applied on patients with urine incontinence after prostatectomy, for most of them, proved to be an effective way of acting, which is supported by the obtained results. PMID:24868546

  1. Slings in iatrogenic male incontinence: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Fabrizio; Schenone, M.; Giberti, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The increasing number of prostatectomies entails an increasing number of patients suffering from iatrogenic incontinence despite improved surgical techniques. The severity of this problem often requires invasive treatments such as periurethral injection of bulking agents, artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation, and sub-urethral sling positioning. The artificial urethral sphincter has represented, until today, the gold standard but, in the recent years, sling systems have been investigated as minimally invasive alternative options. Today, three different sling procedures are commonly performed: bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems. The aim of this review is to critically report the current status of sling systems in the treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched and all articles between 1974 and 2009 were evaluated. Results: With regard to bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems, cure rates ranged between 58.0% and 86.0%, 55.5% and 73.0%, and 40.0% and 63.0%, respectively, while major complication rates ranged between 0 and 14.5%, 10.0 and 22.2%, and 0 and 10.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Suburethral slings are the only alternative techniques which can be favorably compared with the AUS, showing more advantages with respect to AUS implantations which are mainly represented by a quick and less invasive approach, low morbidity, and low costs. In spite of the difficulty in identifying the most effective sling procedure, overall, sling systems can be recommended for patients with persistent mild or moderate incontinence. However, the indication can also be extended to patients with severe incontinence, after appropriate counseling, allowing AUS implantation in the event of sling failure. PMID:20877609

  2. Surgical management of pediatric urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Dave, Sumit; Salle, Joao Luiz Pippi

    2013-08-01

    The surgical management of pediatric urinary incontinence secondary to neurogenic bladder and congenital anomalies is challenging, and continues to evolve with new surgical innovations. The goal of these surgical procedures is to achieve complete and socially acceptable urinary dryness, while preserving volitional voiding where possible, without causing damage to the upper tracts. This review focuses on recent studies and highlights the pros and cons of these advances, based on our experience. The short-term success in achieving urinary continence has to be tempered with the long-term implications of these reconstructive procedures, about which our knowledge is limited.

  3. [Enuresis and pediatric urinary incontinence : Diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schultz-Lampel, D; Goepel, M; Reitz, A; Braun, P

    2016-12-01

    Differentiated non-invasive diagnostic procedures allow a discrimination between nocturnal enuresis and behavior-linked urinary incontinence in children with daytime symptoms, which are different entities of a pathological pediatric micturition syndrome. The article describes the diagnostic procedure as well as the therapeutic approach to all forms of micturition disorders in childhood. All behavioral, medical and biofeedback therapeutic methods according to the recently published S2k guidelines from the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) on enuresis and non-organic (functional) incontinence in children and adolescents are mentioned and discussed.

  4. Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ouslander, Joseph G.

    1981-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common and distressing problem for elderly patients, their families and friends, and the health professionals who care for them. It is a heterogeneous condition, and appropriate management depends on a thorough evaluation and understanding of the multiple factors that can play a role in its cause and perpetuation. Identifying reversible causes of transient incontinence, and appropriate management of incontinence that is associated with acute illness, can be important in preventing the problem from becoming established. A thorough diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence in the elderly, and appropriate use of the different types of therapy, will greatly improve the management in these cases. The need and opportunities for research to improve the management of incontinent elderly persons should be considered by all those involved in caring for this population. PMID:7039134

  5. Fecal incontinence - Challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Saldana Ruiz, Nallely; Kaiser, Andreas M

    2017-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is not a diagnosis but a frequent and debilitating common final pathway symptom resulting from numerous different causes. Incontinence not only impacts the patient’s self-esteem and quality of life but may result in significant secondary morbidity, disability, and cost. Treatment is difficult without any panacea and an individualized approach should be chosen that frequently combines different modalities. Several new technologies have been developed and their specific roles will have to be defined. The scope of this review is outline the evaluation and treatment of patients with fecal incontinence. PMID:28104977

  6. Managing incontinence: women's normalizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Skoner, M M; Haylor, M J

    1993-01-01

    Women's strategies for managing urinary incontinence were examined in a grounded-theory study. The women's basic social concern was dealing with incontinence in a manner that enabled them to feel normal. Feeling normal meant being able to do what they wanted to do and needed to do to have a normal life-style as they perceived it. This goal was accomplished by normalizing incontinence and its management. Normalization was achieved by directing its course through self-management, accounting for it in terms of personal history and life experiences, and delaying medical counsel. These strategies are described. The findings provide fresh insights about women's response to incontinence and their practice of self-managing its consequences.

  7. Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common condition that often impairs quality of life. It is generally caused by a variety of conditions that are associated with anorectal sensorimotor dysfunction and/or diarrhea. A detailed characterization of symptoms, particularly bowel habits, is useful for assessing symptom severity and guiding management. A careful digital rectal examination is invaluable for gauging anal resting and squeeze pressures and anorectal evacuation. Tests should be tailored to age, symptom severity, and response to previous therapy. Anorectal manometry and sphincter imaging are useful starting tests. Depending upon the clinical circumstances, additional testing and therapeutic options may be useful. Fecal continence can be improved by measures to regulate bowel habits and pelvic floor retraining. Surgical repair of anal sphincter defects improves fecal continence in the short but not in the long term. Newer surgical therapies and devices are of limited and/or unproven utility. PMID:21960903

  8. Management of male urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Katie C.; Lucas, Malcolm G.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of male urinary incontinence seen is secondary to sphincter weakness following prostatic surgery. As there is a rising elderly population and increasing numbers of surgical interventions for prostate cancer, incidence of male incontinence is increasing. Hence, management of male incontinence has become a subject of increased interest for urologists. Various non-surgical and surgical approaches have been suggested for this devastating condition. Non-invasive therapies are suggested for early postoperative and mild incontinence. For surgical treatment the artificial urinary sphincter is still labeled the gold standard despite the introduction of several more minimally invasive treatments. However, as yet there is no consensus on the optimal timing and best modality for managing these men. Well designed, centrally funded clinical trials are required to establish which treatment modality to offer and when in the broad spectrum of male incontinence. This review focuses mainly on the management of post-prostatectomy incontinence since the management of other types varies little from the modalities of treatment in women. PMID:20877603

  9. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a cross-sectional prevalence study in the Australian acute care hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jill L; Coyer, Fiona M; Osborne, Sonya R

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the prevalence of incontinence and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) in Australian acute care patients and to describe the products worn to manage incontinence, and those provided at the bedside for perineal skin care. Data on 376 inpatients were collected over 2 days at a major Australian teaching hospital. The mean age of the sample group was 62 years and 52% of the patients were male. The prevalence rate of incontinence was 24% (91/376). Urinary incontinence was significantly more prevalent in females (10%) than males (6%) (χ(2)  = 4·458, df = 1, P = 0·035). IAD occurred in 10% (38/376) of the sample group, with 42% (38/91) of incontinent patients having IAD. Semi-formed and liquid stool were associated with IAD (χ(2)  = 5·520, df = 1, P = 0·027). Clinical indication of fungal infection was present in 32% (12/38) of patients with IAD. Absorbent disposable briefs were the most common incontinence aids used (80%, 70/91), with soap/water and disposable washcloths being the clean-up products most commonly available (60%, 55/91) at the bedside. Further data are needed to validate this high prevalence. Studies that address prevention of IAD and the effectiveness of management strategies are also needed.

  10. [Urinary incontinence and obesity].

    PubMed

    Legendre, G; Fritel, X; Capmas, P; Pourcelot, A-G; Fernandez, H

    2012-06-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) more than or equal to 30kg/m(2), promotes pelvic floor disorders such as urinary incontinence (UI) and genital prolapse. Datas from cohort studies found an association between high BMI and the onset of UI. This association seems to be predominant with for mixed UI and stress UI. For the urge UI and overactive bladder syndrome, the analysis of the literature found a weaker association. The weight is therefore the only modifiable risk factor. Thus, the weight loss by a hypocaloric diet associated with pelvic floor muscle training should be the front line treatment in the obese patient suffering from UI. Bariatric surgery can be discussed in the most obese patient, even if the risk/benefit balance should be weighed because of significant morbidity of this surgery. The results of sub urethral sling (by retropubic tension-free vaginal tape or transobturator sling) in obese patients appear to be equivalent to those obtained in patients of normal weight. Datas on per- and postoperative complications for suburethral slings are reassuring.

  11. Urinary incontinence in the bitch: an update.

    PubMed

    Reichler, I M; Hubler, M

    2014-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), defined as the involuntary loss of urine during the filling phase of the bladder (Abrams et al. 2002), is a commonly seen problem in veterinary practice. Urinary sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) after spaying is the most common micturition disorder, and its medical treatment is normally successful, even though the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is not fully understood. Hormonal changes inducing structural and functional alterations in the bladder, as well as in the urethra composition, are discussed. To manage incontinent patients successfully, possible underlying abnormalities besides USMI should be ruled out. In the majority of cases, history, physical examination and simple tests including urinalysis and urine bacterial culture lead to a presumed aetiology. If USMI is the most likely cause, then the advantage of further diagnostic tests should be discussed with the owner before starting a trial therapy with alpha-adrenergic drugs. Potential side effects of this therapy have to be mentioned even though they rarely occur. It is important to thoroughly evaluate the success of the initial treatment. Its failure should lead to further diagnostic testing. Specialized clinical assessments may provide an aetiological diagnosis, and this could serve as a basis for discussing further treatment options. Surgical procedures, which may in rare cases cause irreversible side effects, may be instituted. If incontinence reoccurs after initial treatment was successfully performed, the diagnostic work-up including urinalysis should always be repeated. As results of urinalysis did not correlate well with results of bacterial culture, a urine culture is recommended (Comer and Ling 1981). Cystocentesis is the preferred method of urine collection (Bartges 2004). Equivocal results of quantitative cultures of urine samples obtained during midstream voiding or by catheterization require repeat collection by cystocentesis (Comer and Ling 1981).

  12. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  13. [Stress incontinence in elderly women].

    PubMed

    Loertzer, H; Schneider, P

    2013-06-01

    Stress incontinence is one of the major challenges in geriatric medicine. This is becoming more apparent in routine urology practice with the demographic changes in the population. A thorough diagnosis for a correct treatment of stress incontinence is as important in elderly women as it is in younger patients. This includes assessing the risk factors of incontinence and obesity, parturition, pelvic surgery and changes in hormone levels are risk factors usually found in elderly women. These are the main reasons why this patient group is most frequently affected. Treatment options do not differ significantly from these of younger women. Lifestyle modification, weight loss and supervised pelvic floor training are the mainstays of conservative therapy and surgical treatment should only be considered after these options have been exhausted. In these cases minimally invasive surgical techniques offer clear advantages especially for elderly often multimorbid women.

  14. Findings of universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and their sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Zyczynski, Halina M.; Sirls, Larry T.; Greer, W. Jerod; Rahn, David D.; Casiano, Elizabeth; Norton, Peggy; Kim, Hae-Young; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report the frequency of abnormal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and to identify risk factors and sequelae of injury. STUDY DESIGN Findings of cystoscopy were collected prospectively in 3 multicenter surgical trials. Clinical, demographic, and procedure characteristics and surgeon experience were analyzed for association with iatrogenic injury and noninjury abnormalities. Impact of abnormalities on continence outcomes and adverse events during 12 months after the procedure were assessed. RESULTS Abnormal findings in the bladder or urethra were identified in 95 of 1830 women (5.2%). Most injuries (75.8%) were iatrogenic. Lower urinary tract (LUT) injury was most common at retropubic urethropexy and retropubic midurethral sling procedures (MUS; 6.4% each), followed by autologous pubovaginal sling procedures (1.7%) and transobturator MUS (0.4%). Increasing age (56.9 vs 51.9 years; P = .04), vaginal deliveries (3.2 vs 2.6; P = .04), and blood loss (393 vs 218 mL; P=.01) were associated with LUT injury during retropubic urethropexy; however, only age (62.9 vs 51.4 years; P = .02) and smoking history (P = .04) were associated for pubovaginal sling procedures. No factors correlated with increased risk of injury at retropubic and transobturator MUS. Notably, previous incontinence surgery, concomitant procedures, anesthesia type, and trainee participation did not increase LUT injury frequency. Although discharge with an indwelling catheter was more common after trocar perforation compared with the noninjury group (55.6% vs 18.5%; P < .001), they did not differ in overall success, voiding dysfunction, recurrent urinary tract infections, or urge urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery detects abnormalities in 1 in 20 women. Urinary trocar perforations that are addressed intraoperatively have no long-term adverse sequelae. PMID:24380742

  15. Urinary incontinence: is cesarean delivery protective?

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid

    2006-10-01

    About half of all women develop transient urinary incontinence during pregnancy. Three months postpartum, the prevalence and incidence rates of urinary incontinence are 9% to 31% and 7% to 15%, respectively. Antenatal incontinence increases the risk of postpartum incontinence, which in turn increases the risk of long-term persistent incontinence. After the first delivery, women delivered vaginally have two-fold more incontinence than those delivered by cesarean. The protective effect of cesarean on urinary incontinence may dissipate after further deliveries, decreases with age, and is not present in older women. Data are mixed about whether cesarean done before labor confers greater protection than cesarean done after labor. To understand the true impact of cesarean delivery on urinary incontinence, future studies must compare incontinence by planned (not actual) delivery modes, consider a woman's entire reproductive career, focus on leakage severe enough to be problematic, consider other bladder symptoms as well as incontinence, and take into account other risk factors, particularly antepartum urinary incontinence.

  16. Use of Sacral Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Overlapping Constipation and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sreepati, Gouri; James-Stevenson, Toyia

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 51 Final Diagnosis: Fecal incontinence Symptoms: Constipation • fecal incontinence Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Sacral nerve stimulator Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Fecal incontinence and constipation are common gastrointestinal complaints, but rarely occur concurrently. Management of these seemingly paradoxical processes is challenging, as treatment of one symptom may exacerbate the other. Case Report: A 51-year-old female with lifelong neurogenic bladder secondary to spina bifida occulta presented with progressive symptoms of daily urge fecal incontinence as well as hard bowel movements associated with straining and a sensation of incomplete evacuation requiring manual disimpaction. Pelvic floor testing showed poor ability to squeeze the anal sphincter, which indicated sphincter weakness as a major contributor to her fecal incontinence symptoms. Additionally, on defecography she was unable to widen her posterior anorectal angle or relax the anal sphincter during defecation consistent with dyssynergic defecation. A sacral nerve stimulator was placed for management of her fecal incontinence. Interestingly, her constipation also dramatically improved with sacral neuromodulation. Conclusions: This unique case highlights the emerging role of sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of complex pelvic floor dysfunction with improvement in symptoms beyond fecal incontinence in a patient with dyssynergic-type constipation. PMID:28265107

  17. Incidence and predicting factors of falls of older inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Hellen Cristina de Almeida; Reiners, Annelita Almeida Oliveira; Azevedo, Rosemeiry Capriata de Souza; da Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido; Abreu, Débora Regina de Oliveira Moura; de Oliveira, Adriana Delmondes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the incidence and predicting factors associated with falls among older inpatients. METHODS Prospective cohort study conducted in clinical units of three hospitals in Cuiaba, MT, Midwestern Brazil, from March to August 2013. In this study, 221 inpatients aged 60 or over were followed until hospital discharge, death, or fall. The method of incidence density was used to calculate incidence rates. Bivariate analysis was performed by Chi-square test, and multiple analysis was performed by Cox regression. RESULTS The incidence of falls was 12.6 per 1,000 patients/day. Predicting factors for falls during hospitalization were: low educational level (RR = 2.48; 95%CI 1.17;5.25), polypharmacy (RR = 4.42; 95%CI 1.77;11.05), visual impairment (RR = 2.06; 95%CI 1.01;4.23), gait and balance impairment (RR = 2.95; 95%CI 1.22;7.14), urinary incontinence (RR = 5.67; 95%CI 2.58;12.44) and use of laxatives (RR = 4.21; 95%CI 1.15;15.39) and antipsychotics (RR = 4.10; 95%CI 1.38;12.13). CONCLUSIONS The incidence of falls of older inpatients is high. Predicting factors found for falls were low education level, polypharmacy, visual impairment, gait and balance impairment, urinary incontinence and use of laxatives and antipsychotics. Measures to prevent falls in hospitals are needed to reduce the incidence of this event. PMID:26083943

  18. Advances in the surgical treatment of fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Person, Benjamin; Wexner, Steven D

    2005-03-01

    Although surgery for fecal incontinence has been shown to be effective, it is still very challenging and sometimes frustrating. Overlapping sphincteroplasty, by far the most common procedure, is effective in patients with sphincter defects; however, recent data suggest that success rates tend to deteriorate over time. A thorough preoperative evaluation incorporates numerous factors, including patient characteristics, severity of incontinence, type and size of the sphincter defect as assessed by physical examination, anal ultrasound, and anorectal physiology studies including anal manometry, electromyography, and pudendal nerve terminal motor latency assessment. The use of these evaluation methods has allowed better patient assignment for a variety of new alternative treatment options. Innovations in the surgical treatment of fecal incontinence range from simple, office-based sphincter augmentation techniques to surgical implantation of mechanical devices. This article reviews 5 alternative surgical treatment options for fecal incontinence: injection of carbon-coated beads in the submucosa of the anal canal, radiofrequency energy delivery, stimulated graciloplasty, artificial bowel sphincter, and sacral nerve stimulation.

  19. Some Observations on the Surgical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Millin, Terence

    1939-01-01

    Types: A. Essential. B. Paradoxical. C. False. D. True. True incontinence.—A. Congenital: (a) Developmental abnormalities. (b) Malformations of nervous system. B. Acquired: (a) Local abnormalities. (b) False passages. (c) Disturbance of innervation. Anatomy of sphincteric mechanism in male and female. Diagnosis: Need for careful investigation including cysto-urethroscopy, cysto-urethrography, and cysto-manometry. Treatment: A. Physiotherapy. B. Direct surgical repair. C. Surgical diversion of urine. Types of true incontinence amenable to direct surgical repair: A. Epispadias. B. Aberrant ureteric ostia. C. Fistulæ. D. Congenital or acquired defective sphincteric mechanism. Operative treatment of vesico-vaginal fistulæ. Transvesical operation for cure of congenitally defective sphincteric mechanism—report of seven cases. Stress incontinence.—Value of urethrograms to ascertain nature of defect. Operative treatment. Incontinence following prostatic surgery.—Types of operation advocated. New operative procedure utilizing ribbon catgut with demonstrative moving picture. ImagesFig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:19991939

  20. [Use of a micturition-monitoring device in elderly inpatients].

    PubMed

    Toba, K; Sudo, N; Nagano, K; Eto, M; Kozaki, K; Akishita, M; Hashimoto, M; Yumita, K; Hara, M; Fukushima, M; Orimo, H; Ouchi, Y

    1996-09-01

    More than 100,000 people suffer from functional urinary incontinence in Japan. To improve the quality of life of these people, we tested a device for monitoring micturition by means of a thin-layer membrane sensor in a diaper. The device was tested in elderly inpatients, and associated changes in the wordload of the nursing staff were also recorded. The device was beneficial because the precise micturition time was easily obtained and thus the daily pattern of micturition became obvious. With the use of this device, the time during which the patients wore wet diapers was shorter than with the conventional system of scheduled changes. However, the increase in the frequency of diaper changed doubled the workload of the nursing staff. In conclusion, improving the quality of life with regard to urinary incontinence entails an increase in the workload of the nursing staff; efficient distribution of that work may require some staff members to devote all their time to changing diapers.

  1. [Therapy for urinary incontinence in general practice].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, A; Füsgen, I

    2009-08-01

    In national and international guidelines the general practitioner plays an important role in the diagnosis and first-line therapy for urinary incontinence. Nevertheless, there is a lack of data concerning details of the management of incontinence in primary care in Germany. Therefore a series of nationwide educational events for general practitioners and gynaecologists was used to perform a survey dealing with the situation of urinary incontinence in general practice. With 2530 questionnaires filled out and returned, this is the largest European survey on this subject. General practitioners declare in 57.3 % to be often involved with urinary incontinence. They usually question elderly patients about urinary incontinence (73.7 %) or those patients with diseases carrying the risk of developing urinary incontinence (64.9 %). Based on the diagnostic options in primary care, an incontinence anamnesis and urine evaluation are performed. A sonography or micturition diary was more infrequent in primary care in this survey. General practitioners most frequent refer the patient to a specialist (76.6 %) or prescribe the incontinence-type anticholinergic drugs (59.4 %) or absorbent products (45.4 %); duloxetine (27.3 %) is less frequently prescribed. The knowledge about urinary incontinence is gained in educational events (72.2 %); the course of studies was the source of incontinence skills for general practitioners only in 35 %. In conclusion, this survey gives a realistic view on the incontinence management in primary care in Germany. The majority of general practitioners are engaged in incontinence, perform basic diagnostic features and prescribe drugs or absorbent products. The course of (university medical school) studies as a source of skills to diagnose or to treat incontinence should be improved.

  2. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s).

  3. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marchetti-Krantz (MMK) procedure; Laparoscopic retropubic colposuspension; Needle suspension; Burch colposuspension ... bladder. There are two ways to do retropubic suspension: open surgery or laparoscopic surgery. Either way, surgery ...

  4. Role of antimuscarinics in the treatment of nonneurogenic daytime urinary incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Nijman, Rien J M

    2004-03-01

    Idiopathic or "functional" urinary incontinence in children--incontinence with no known neurologic or anatomic cause--may take the form of urge incontinence, the most common type of incontinence, which is characterized by detrusor overactivity during the filling phase, or dysfunctional voiding. The latter may be classified as staccato voiding (periodic bursts of pelvic floor activity with prolonged voiding and, in some cases, residual urine), interrupted voiding (insufficient bladder emptying, infrequent voiding with several phases of micturition), or "lazy bladder" syndrome (infrequent voiding and large bladder capacity). The etiology of functional incontinence is unknown. Theories include genetic predisposition, recurrent urinary tract infections, immaturity or too-early toilet training, and sexual abuse. A severe form of urge incontinence, nonneurogenic neurogenic (Hinman) bladder, may be the end stage of dysfunctional voiding, but an occult neurologic component should also be considered. Diagnostic procedures recommended for children with urinary incontinence include careful history taking, a voiding diary, and physical examination to identify symptoms and to minimize the need for invasive procedures. Treatments include behavioral modification, biofeedback, antibiotics, anticholinergics, counseling, and neuromodulation. The antimuscarinics oxybutynin and tolterodine are, at present, the most commonly used drugs to treat incontinence. Common side effects with these agents (ie, reduced saliva production and worsening constipation) can be severe and can cause up to 10% of children using oxybutynin to discontinue treatment. Current evidence suggests that tolterodine may have a more favorable safety profile than oxybutynin. In addition, new antimuscarinics in the pipeline, eg, darifenacin and solifenacin, are expected to possess more favorable safety and tolerability profiles and may therefore help to alleviate these limitations.

  5. High Costs of Urinary Incontinence Among Women Electing Surgery to Treat Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Brubaker, Linda; Chai, Toby C.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Diokno, Ananias C.; Goode, Patricia S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Kusek, John W.; Leng, Wendy W.; Lukacz, Emily S.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate costs for incontinence management, health-related quality of life, and willingness to pay for incontinence improvement in women electing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS A total of 655 incontinent women enrolled in the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial, a randomized surgical trial. Baseline out-of-pocket costs for incontinence management were calculated by multiplying self-report of resources used (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) by national resource costs ($2006). Health-related quality of life was estimated with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3. Participants estimated willingness to pay for 100% improvement in incontinence. Potential predictors of these outcomes were examined by using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS Mean age was 52±10 years, and mean number of weekly incontinence episodes was 22±21. Mean and median (25%, 75% interquartile range) estimated personal costs for incontinence management among all women were $14±$24 and $8 (interquartile range $3, $18) per week, and 617 (94%) women reported any cost. Costs increased significantly with incontinence frequency and mixed compared with stress incontinence. The mean and median Health Utilities Index Mark 3 scores were 0.73±0.25 and 0.84 (interquartile range 0.63, 0.92). Women were willing to pay a mean of $118±$132 per month for complete resolution of incontinence, and willingness to pay increased significantly with greater expected incontinence improvement, household income, and incontinent episode frequency. CONCLUSION Urinary incontinence is associated with substantial costs. Women spent nearly $750 per year out of pocket for incontinence management, had a significant decrement in quality of life, and were willing to pay nearly $1,400 per year for cure. PMID:18378749

  6. Fecal Incontinence: Etiology, Evaluation, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Weiss, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a debilitating problem facing ~2.2% of the U.S. general population over 65 years of age. Etiologic factors include traumatic, neurologic, congenital, and iatrogenic. Most commonly, obstetric trauma causes fecal incontinence as well as poorly performed anorectal surgery or pelvic radiation. Several severity scores and quality of life indexes have been developed to quantify incontinent symptoms. There are several nonsurgical and surgical options for the treatment of fecal incontinence. Biofeedback is among the most successful nonoperative strategies. Depending on the cause, anal sphincter repair, artificial bowel sphincter, and sacral nerve stimulation are used to treat fecal incontinence with some success. Unfortunately, fecal incontinence is an extremely difficult problem to manage: there has not been one, single treatment option that has proven to be both safe and effective in long-term studies. PMID:22379407

  7. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  8. [Female urinary incontinence: An update].

    PubMed

    González-Ruiz de León, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; Jalón-Monzón, A; García-Rodríguez, J

    2017-03-16

    The urinary incontinence is a highly prevalent symptom in the adult female population. It has important psychosocial and economic connotations, and affects the quality of life of these patients. As it is an under-diagnosed problem due to patients not always consulting for it, it is very important to keep this in mind and to provide an opportunistic screening from Primary Health Care. It is difficult to determine the costs of this, but it is estimated to be the 2% of the health budget. Because of all of this, it is very important to know how to make a correct diagnose of this condition, to determine the different types of incontinence, possible causes, and treatments available. The purpose of this review is to show the different diagnostic and therapeutic tools available, to show the Primary Health Care role in this condition, and when to refer to specialist care.

  9. Discreet products for women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra

    It is estimated that 10 million women in the UK suffer with urinary incontinence (Hunskarr et al, 2004). Many women consider bladder weakness to be an inevitable consequence of childbirth or the menopause. Haslam (2004) reported on a telephone survey that examined whether women were aware of stress urinary incontinence, their attitude to it and the impact it had on their daily lives. In the UK, 505 women were interviewed, 206 of whom responded positively to a question about symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, giving a prevalence rate of 41 per cent. There is also evidence that most patients with urinary incontinence do not present to their doctors

  10. Urological disorders in men: urinary incontinence and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan W; Miller, Mindi S

    2011-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are 2 common urogenital problems in men. UI is associated with involuntary leakage of urine and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of urgency, frequency, and nocturia. Types of UI include functional, urge, stress, and overflow. Treatment for UI is based on the type of incontinence, patient-specific factors, and treatment preferences of both patients and health care providers. Options for the management of UI include environmental modifications, disposable incontinence products, pelvic floor exercises, pharmacotherapy, surgically implanted devices, and intermittent catheterization. BPH may be also associated with LUTS. Patient symptoms, assessed with a measurement tool such as the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUASI), serve as the basis for determining treatment. Management approaches for BPH include pharmacotherapy, surgery, and minimally invasive procedures. Anticholinergic drugs as well as α-receptor antagonists and 5-α reductase inhibitors, either alone or in combination, are effective and useful for LUTS unresponsive to traditional pharmacotherapy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) can eliminate symptoms of BPH but is associated with relatively more complications than other available surgical and minimally invasive procedures.

  11. A Prospective, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Study to Decrease Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kimberly D; Clark, Rebecca C

    2015-07-01

    Incontinence is a common problem among hospitalized patients and has been associated with multiple health complications, including incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs). A prospective, descriptive study was conducted in 2 acute care neurology units to 1) assess the prevalence of incontinence and incidence of IAD and HAPUs among incontinent patients, and 2) evaluate the effect of caregiver education and use of a 1-step cleanser, moisturizer, barrier product on the development of IAD and HAPUs among patients with incontinence. During a period of 1 month, the incontinence status of admitted patients was recorded and skin was assessed for the presence/absence of IAD and HAPUs twice per day. After the 1-month data collection, all clinicians on the study units completed a facility-based online education program about IAD, HAPUs, and skin care followed by the implementation of a 1-step cleanser/barrier product for skin care of all patients with incontinence. Data collection procedures remained the same. Data were collected using a paper/pencil instrument and entered into a spreadsheet for analysis. Descriptive statistics were calculated and prevalence and incidence rates were compared between the pre-intervention and post-intervention phase using Fisher's exact analysis. During the first phase of the study, 17 of 40 admitted patients (42.5%) were incontinent. Of those, 5 (29.4%) developed IAD and all of these patients developed HAPUs (5 of 40 admitted, 29.4%) during an average length of stay of 7.3 (range: 2-14) days. In the intervention phase of the study, 25 of 46 (54.3%) patients were incontinent and none developed IAD or a HAPU during an average length of stay of 7.4 (range: 2-14) days. The average Braden scale score was 14.14 in the pre-intervention group of patients with incontinence and 12.74 in the intervention group. The prevalence of incontinence among patients admitted to acute care neurology units and the rate

  12. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  13. Managing a common dermatological problem: incontinence dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Nazarko, Linda

    2007-08-01

    Incontinence dermatitis is an under-recognized and under-researched problem that mostly affects older people who have continence problems. Nurses who are aware of the risk factors can provide care that reduces the risk of this distressing problem. If incontinence dermatitis occurs, evidence-based care can be used to treat the person and reduce the risks of further complications.

  14. Comparison between elderly inpatient fallers with and without dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Si Ching; Mamun, Kaysar; Lim, Jim KH

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to examine the various factors associated with inpatient falls among patients with and without dementia in a hospital setting. METHODS This was a retrospective one-year study using data collected from Singapore General Hospital's electronic reporting system for inpatient falls. RESULTS In the study period, 298 patients aged ≥ 65 years fell during their hospital stay. The majority of the patients (n = 248) did not have dementia. In our study, fallers with dementia were more likely to use ambulatory aids, be visually impaired and have urinary incontinence. More patients with dementia than those without had a history of previous falls, and were placed on fall precaution with restricted freedom of movement, which at times, included restraints. However, the difference between patients who were put on restraints and those who were allowed to move freely was not statistically significant. The majority of falls in both groups occurred at the bedside. We found that fallers without dementia were more likely to fall during the morning shift, whereas fallers with dementia were more likely to fall during the night shift. Fallers with dementia were more likely to be confused at the time of the fall. CONCLUSION In our study, we found that fallers with dementia were more likely to have visual impairment, have urinary incontinence, use walking aids, and to be confused and physically restrained at the time of the fall. The fallers without dementia in our study may have undiagnosed dementia. PMID:24570314

  15. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  16. Nonsurgical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Parker, William P; Griebling, Tomas Lindor

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in elderly women with significant associated morbidity. Incontinence can by grouped into several types: stress incontinence, urgency incontinence, overflow incontinence, functional incontinence, and mixed urinary incontinence. Careful evaluation, including history and physical examination, is critical to making the correct diagnosis and guiding therapy. A variety of nonsurgical treatments, including behavioral therapies, pelvic floor muscle exercise, medications, and other treatments, are available; can be successful for many older women; and may preclude the need for surgery. Working closely with the patient, understanding her goals of care, and targeting treatments accordingly are essential for success.

  17. An evaluation of two incontinence skin care protocols in a long-term care setting.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Byers, Kari; Thayer, Debra

    2002-12-01

    Caring for the skin of patients with incontinence is an essential activity in long-term care. A prospective descriptive study to compare the effect of two skin care protocols on skin condition, pain, and caregiver time was conducted. Thirty-two (32) skilled nursing facility residents with incontinence participated in the 3-week study. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard care regimen (soap and water cleansing after each incontinence episode, followed by application of a moisturizing lotion) or study care protocol (no-rinse skin cleanser after each episode and application of a barrier cream with durable properties after the first incontinence episode of each shift). Number and type of incontinence episodes, skin condition, pain, and caregiver time spent were assessed. Skin integrity was maintained in the majority of control (69%) and study group (72%) patients and improvement occurred in 8% of control and 17% of the study group (NS). Study protocol procedures took less time to complete than control procedures (a savings of 79 minutes/patient/day). A positive correlation between pain intensity and level of skin impairment was observed (r = 0.88). The results of this study suggest that at this facility, use of soap, water, and a moisturizer may be less effective and more time-consuming than using a no-rinse cleanser and a durable barrier product.

  18. Urinary Incontinence Management Costs are Reduced Following Burch or Sling Surgery for Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Goode, Patricia S.; Brubaker, Linda; Kusek, John W.; Schembri, Mr. Michael; Lukacz, Emily S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Chai, Toby C.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of Burch and fascial sling surgery on out-of-pocket urinary incontinence (UI) management costs at 24 months post-operatively and identify predictors of change in cost among women enrolled in a randomized trial comparing these procedures. Methods Resources used for UI management (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) were self-reported by 491 women at baseline and 24 months post-surgery and total out-of-pocket costs for UI management (in 2012 US dollars) were estimated. Data from the two surgical groups were combined to examine change in cost for UI management over 24 months. Univariate and bivariate changes in cost were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Predictors of change in cost were examined using multivariate mixed models. Results At baseline mean (±SD) age of participants was 53±10 years, and frequency of weekly UI episodes was 23±21. Weekly UI episodes decreased by 86% at 24 months (P<0.001). Mean weekly cost was $16.60±$27 (median $9.39) at baseline and $4.57±$15 (median $0.10) at 24 months (P<0.001), a decrease of 72%. In multivariate analyses, cost decreased by $3.38±$0.77 per week for each decrease of 1 UI episode per day (P<0.001) and was strongly associated with greater improvement in UDI and IIQ scores (P<0.001) and decreased 24-hour pad weight (P<0.02). Conclusion Following Burch or fascial sling surgery, UI management cost at 24 months decreased by 72% ($625 per woman per year) and was strongly associated with decreasing UI frequency. Reduced out-of-pocket expenses may be a benefit of these established urinary incontinence procedures. PMID:24631433

  19. Incontinence in persons with Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Niemczyk, J; Equit, M; Curfs, L; von Gontard, A

    2017-02-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a congenital syndrome with a prevalence of 1:15,000. Individuals with AS often have severe intellectual disability, typical dysmorphic signs, and behavioral problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the rate of incontinence and associated psychological problems in children and adults with AS. Ninety children (4-18 years) and 54 adults (18-31 years) with AS were recruited through a parent support group (55.6% male, mean age 15.1 years). The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the Incontinence Questionnaire-Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (ICIQ-CLUTS), as well as the Developmental Behaviour Checklist for parents (DBC-P) or for adults (DBC-A) were filled out by parents or caregivers. 85.6% of individuals with AS were affected by at least one subtype of incontinence (82.7% nocturnal enuresis (NE), 64.7% daytime urinary incontinence (DUI), and 57.1% fecal incontinence (FI)). 52.5% of the children and 32.6% of adults reached a clinically relevant DBC score. Incontinence was not associated with behavioral problems. NE and DUI were associated with genotype and epilepsy.

  20. Incidence and Characteristics of Incontinence Associated Dermatitis in Community-Dwelling Persons with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Zimmaro; Funk, Taylor; Jacobson, Megan; Savik, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the incidence and characteristics of incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) in community-living individuals with fecal incontinence. The primary aim of this study was to describe the incidence and characteristics of self-reported IAD among community-living individuals with fecal incontinence. The study also examined whether IAD was associated with older age, gender, presence of urinary incontinence, or fecal incontinence severity. Design Secondary data analysis using a prospective cohort design. Subjects and Setting Community-living adults (N = 98) with fecal incontinence (76% female, 34% aged 65+ years, 90% White) who participated in a study about dietary fiber supplementation and were free of IAD at the start. Thirty five percent also had urinary incontinence. Methods Subjects assessed their skin for IAD daily for 52 days reporting types of IAD damage (redness, rash/fungal infection, and skin loss), location of IAD, and symptoms. They reported fecal incontinence on a diary for the first and last 14 study days. Results The incidence of IAD was 41% (40/98). The fecal incontinence severity score for subjects developing IAD was 1.2 higher than those who never had IAD (p < .001). There was no significant association of IAD with age, gender, or dual fecal and urinary incontinence. Incontinence Associated Dermatitis developed within 2 weeks and healed in approximately 1 week. The most common sign and symptom were redness (60% patients) and soreness (78%), respectively. Most subjects (85%) had IAD in one location. Conclusions Assessing for IAD in community-living patients with fecal incontinence is important as IAD is common and causes discomfort. The relatively mild severity of IAD offers WOC nurses opportunity for improving patient outcomes by preventing and managing this problem. PMID:26336048

  1. Obesity and female stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Osborn, David James; Strain, Matthew; Gomelsky, Alex; Rothschild, Jennifer; Dmochowski, Roger

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for stress urinary incontinence in the obese female patient and draw conclusions regarding the optimal treatment of this condition in this unique patient population. Obesity results in increased intra-abdominal pressure and this leads to weakening of the pelvic floor innervation and musculature. Weight loss through lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery improves stress urinary incontinence. Success of stress urinary incontinence surgery in obese women is similar to nonobese patients. Obese women should not be excluded from potentially curative surgery based on their body mass index (BMI) alone.

  2. Preventing Suicide Among Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inpatient suicide comprises a proportionately small but clinically important fraction of suicide. This study is intended as a qualitative analysis of the comprehensive English literature, highlighting what is known and what can be done to prevent inpatient suicide. Method: A systematic search was conducted on the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and a personal database for articles on cohort series, preferably controlled, of inpatient suicide (not deliberate self-harm or attempted suicide, unless they also dealt specifically with suicide data). Results: A qualitative discussion is presented, based on the findings of the literature searched. Conclusions: The bulk of inpatient suicides actually occur not on the ward but off premises, when the patient was on leave or had absconded. Peaks occur shortly after admission and discharge. It is possible to reduce suicide risk on the ward by having a safe environment, optimizing patient visibility, supervising patients appropriately, careful assessment, awareness of and respect for suicide risk, good teamwork and communication, and adequate clinical treatment. PMID:24881161

  3. Predictors of Gains During Inpatient Rehabilitation in Patients with Stroke– A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chang, Enoch H.; Cragg, Samantha; Cramer, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke remains a major cause of disability. The cost of stroke rehabilitation is substantial. Understanding the factors that predict response to inpatient stroke rehabilitation may be useful, for example, to best individualize the content of therapy, or to maximize the efficiency with which resources are directed. This review reviewed the literature and found that numerous variables were associated with outcome after inpatient stroke rehabilitation. The strongest evidence exists for factors such as age, stroke subtype, nutritional status, psychosocial factors such as living with family prior to stroke or presence of a caregiver. Functional status on admission, urinary incontinence, post-stroke infection, and aphasia each can also impact prognosis. Strengths and weaknesses of cited studies are considered in an attempt to inform design of future studies examining the factors that predict response to inpatient rehabilitation after stroke. PMID:25541570

  4. [In-patient (early) rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Wallesch, Claus-W; Lautenschläger, Sindy

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to develop the financing and hospital provision of interventions for early rehabilitation within the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. In addition to a range of partially rehabilitative complex interventions, the system recognizes three main forms of early rehabilitative interventions: geriatric, neurological/neurosurgical, and interdisciplinary and others. In this article, the appropriate definitions and cost-effectiveness of these procedures are analyzed and compared. The early rehabilitative interventions are characterized by constant cooperation in the therapeutic team, especially neurological early rehabilitation through the incorporation of nursing as a therapeutic profession. Whereas geriatric and neurological early rehabilitation are reflected in the DRG system, the former provided in many general hospitals and the latter mainly in specialized institutions, interdisciplinary early rehabilitation has only occasionally been represented in the DRG system so far. If all acute in-patients who require early rehabilitation should receive such an intervention, an additional fee must be implemented for this this interdisciplinary service.

  5. New drug treatments for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Cardozo, Linda

    2010-04-01

    Urinary incontinence remains a common and distressing condition affecting many women and is known to have a significant effect on quality of life (QoL). Whilst conservative and behavioural therapy are important in the management of women with both stress incontinence and overactive bladder (OAB) ultimately many may benefit from pharmacological therapy. Antimuscarinic drugs are the commonly used agents in the treatment of OAB although often compliance and persistence are affected by adverse effects. Consequently many newer agents remain under investigation. In addition duloxetine has recently been introduced for the management of women with stress incontinence and may offer an alternative to surgery in selected cases. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and new developments in the management of women with urinary incontinence as well as reviewing the role of oestrogen therapy in relation to lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  6. Etiopathogenesis, diagnostics and history of surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jovan, Hadži-Djokić; Uroš, Babić; Aleksandar, Argirović; Miodrag, Aćimović; Milan, Radovanović; Bogomir, Milojević; Tomisla, Pejčić; Zoran, Džamić

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence represents involuntary urine leakage into the urethra. This pathological condition represents a major medical, social and hygienic problem. The paper presents risk factors for development of the disorder, as well as diagnostic methods applied in evaluation of the female patients. Chronological review of diverse surgical techniques used in treatment of stress urinary incontinence reported in the published scientific papers is also presented. Review of the literature data was also performed. Sling procedures with application of suburethral loops have been used since the beginning of the last century in treatment of this disorder. Surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence is applied when conservative treatment fails to give any effects according to strictly defined indications. During the last 100 years, surgical techniques have undergone different improvements and the results have also been significantly improved.

  7. Incontinence after radical prostatectomy: Anything new in its management?

    PubMed Central

    Caremel, Romain; Corcos, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: With the increasing number of radical prostatectomies (RP) performed, male stress urinary incontinence (SUI) has become common. The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is the gold standard to treat SUI post-RP, but new devices have recently been developed. We review the recent studies on the treatment of SUI post-RP; we also describe the surgical techniques, mechanisms of action and results of these new procedures. Methods: We conducted a literature review search in the PubMed/Medline and Embase databases. Our search was restricted to recent articles. We included studies even if the urinary incontinence was due to sphincter deficiency after RP in non-neurologic patients. Results: We found 8 cohort studies for the surgical procedure: 3 studies concerning slings, 1 involving balloons adjustable implant, and 4 involving new devices. The only randomized controlled trial (RCT) was a pharmacologic clinical trial comparing duloxetine to placebo. The social continence rates were analyzed for 6 studies and were up to 66%. Conclusion: New minimally invasive surgical procedures have emerged as the main alternative to AUS, with social continence rates up to 60% despite just 1 RCT studying the pharmacologic approach. There is an urgent need for well-designed clinical trials to clarify the role of new surgical alternatives in the management of SUI post-RP. New technologies should continue to be evaluated and compared with the AUS, which remains the gold standard. PMID:25024791

  8. Validation of questionnaires to assess quality of life related to fecal incontinence in children with anorectal malformations and Hirschsprung's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Arthur Loguetti; Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Ferreira, Mariana Aparecida Elisei; Santos, Maria Mercês; Tannuri, Uenis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Surgical treatment of anorectal malformations (ARMs) and Hirschsprung's disease (HD) leads to alterations in bowel habits and fecal incontinence, with consequent quality of life impairment. The objectives were to create and validate a Questionnaire for the Fecal Incontinence Index (FII) based on the Holschneider score, as well as a Questionnaire for the Assessment of Quality of Life Related to Fecal Incontinence in Children and Adolescents (QQVCFCA), based on the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life. Methods: The questionnaires were applied to 71 children submitted to surgical procedure, in two stages. Validity was tested by comparing the QQVCFCA and a generic quality of life questionnaire (SF-36), and between QQVCFCA and the FII. A group of 59 normal children was used as control. Results: At two stages, 45.0% (32/71) and 42.8% (21/49) of the patients had fecal incontinence. It was observed that the QQVCFCA showed a significant correlation with the SF-36 and FII (Pearson's correlation 0.57), showing that the quality of life is directly proportional to improvement in fecal incontinence. Quality of life in patients with fecal incontinence is still globally impaired, when compared with control subjects (p<0.05, Student's t-test). There were also significant differences between the results of children with ARMs and children with HD. Conclusions: QQVCFCA and FII are useful tools to assess the quality of life and fecal incontinence in these groups of children. Children with ARMs submitted to surgical procedure and HD have similar quality of life impairment. PMID:26522822

  9. What is the best surgical intervention for stress urinary incontinence in the very young and very old? An International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society update.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Castro-Diaz, David; Giarenis, Ilias; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Anding, Ralf; Burton, Claire; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of continence procedures are being performed in women of all ages. An overview of the existing literature and consensus regarding surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the young and the old was presented and discussed at the International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society Think Tank. This manuscript reflects the Think Tank's summary and opinion. Despite the increasing number of continence procedures, there are relatively few data to guide management in the very young and the very old. When considering continence surgery in the young, long-term efficacy and safety are paramount, and the future effects of pregnancy and childbirth need to be carefully considered. Conversely, in the elderly, minimally invasive procedures with low morbidity are important, especially in the frail elderly who may have significant co-morbidities. Further research including prospective randomised trials, cohort studies and national registries, should help guide our management in these two challenging groups of patients.

  10. Selecting appropriate absorbent products to treat urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Payne, Drew

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence can have a significant negative effect on a person's life, especially if left unmanaged and untreated. Continence assessment, often carried out by community nurses, is an important element in the management of a person's urinary incontinence, and so is the selection of appropriate absorbent incontinence pads. This article reviews: the causes and effects of urinary incontinence; how to derive the most appropriate information from a continence assessment; strategies for selecting incontinence pads for a person, on the basis of the results of the continence assessment; and some of the problems and risks associated with the use of incontinence pads.

  11. The use of synthetic materials in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kądziołka, Przemysław; Stanek, Anna M.; Szymanowski, Krzysztof; Wilczak, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a very serious problem which has been noticed by the WHO. This difficult medical condition poses a serious problem as it affects c.a. 20% of the female population and it increases up to 35% in the group of females over 60 years of age. Since there is no single standard surgical procedure which could solve this problem, numerous synthetic materials are used for the operations. It seems that the materials are effective as they improve the condition of women suffering from stress urinary incontinence. Unfortunately these materials have their shortcomings which might lead to certain post-operative complications. Stress urinary incontinence is a disease which affects the social life of the patients. It has a high percentage of recurrence and causes the patient substantial difficulties with keeping high standards of personal hygiene which is consequence makes it impossible to fulfill their social roles. The etiology of this disease is complex and calls for a cross-disciplinary approach to the problem. As there are no standardized or unanimous treatment methods of stress urinary incontinence, numerous sources based on the clinical experience of many medical centers suggest performing TVT and TOT procedures as the most effective treatment methods. The efficacy of the TOT procedure is about 90.8%. PMID:27582680

  12. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information.

  13. Urinary incontinence in the elderly. Drug treatment options.

    PubMed

    Chutka, D S; Takahashi, P Y

    1998-10-01

    Urinary incontinence is commonly seen in the elderly. It has multiple complications and is often the reason an elderly person is forced to abandon independent living and enter a nursing home. There are multiple causes of urinary incontinence: it is not a single entity or a specific diagnosis. In most patients, the incontinence can be placed into 1 of the following 4 categories: detrusor overactivity (urge incontinence), overflow incontinence, stress incontinence (outlet incompetence) or functional incontinence. To understand the pathophysiology of urinary incontinence, some knowledge of the urinary tract anatomy and physiology is required. It is also important to know how the anatomy and physiology changes in response to the aging process. Successful treatment depends on the specific cause of the incontinence. If incorrectly diagnosed, various treatments may actually worsen the incontinence or cause other problems. Since most elderly patients do not volunteer a problem of urinary incontinence, questions regarding the presence of symptoms must be asked. In most patients, the specific type of incontinence can be diagnosed with a thorough medical history and physical examination. Several simple and widely available laboratory tests may also be useful in the evaluation. Occasionally, urological consultation or urodynamic testing should be performed. Once correctly diagnosed, there are a large number of pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological treatments (behavioural, surgical) available. This article concentrates on the pharmacological therapies for patients with various types of urinary incontinence. Since most patients with urinary incontinence are elderly, they are more susceptible to the effects as well as the adverse effects of medications. This must be taken into account before any pharmacological therapy is initiated. Although many elderly patients believe their symptoms of urinary incontinence to be a part of growing old, urinary incontinence is never a

  14. Effects of bariatric surgery on urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bulbuller, Nurullah; Habibi, Mani; Yuksel, Mustafa; Ozener, Onur; Oruc, Mehmet Tahir; Oner, Osman Zekai; Kazak, Mehmet Altug

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is an important modifiable etiological factor associated with several diseases. There is strong evidence that urinary incontinence (UI) is positively correlated with body mass index (BMI). Aim One of the many benefits experienced by obese patients after bariatric surgery is decrease in UI. To investigate this correlation, we aimed to examine the effects of weight loss on UI in female patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and methods Obese female patients (n=120), ≥18 years of age, and planning to undergo LSG were included in this prospective study. We administered the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) to the patients prior to surgery and 6 months after the surgery. Using the collected data, we determined the incidence of UI and examined the relationship between the preoperative and postoperative BMI and UI values. Results The mean age of the patients was 39.19 (standard deviation [SD] =9.94) years and the mean preoperative BMI was 46.17 (SD =5.35). Of the 120 patients, 72 (60%) complained of UI preoperatively. Among these 72 patients, 23 (31.95%) described urge incontinence, 18 (25%) stress incontinence, and 31 (43.05%) mixed-type incontinence. At 6 months postoperatively, the percentage of excess weight loss was 70.33% (SD =14.84%). For all three UI subtypes, the 6-month postoperative ICIQ-UI-SF and IIQ-7 scores decreased significantly compared to the preoperative scores (P<0.05). Conclusion LSG results in a clinically significant improvement in most common types of UI, regardless of patient reproductive history, existence of comorbid conditions, and smoking status. PMID:28176911

  15. Cost savings of outpatient versus standard inpatient total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Adrian; Ryu, Jae-Jin; Dervin, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Background With diminishing reimbursement rates and strained public payer budgets, a high-volume inpatient procedure, such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA), is a common target for improving cost efficiencies. Methods This prospective case–control study compared the cost-minimization of same day discharge (SDD) versus inpatient TKA. We examined if and where cost savings can be realized and the magnitude of savings that can be achieved without compromising quality of care. Outcome variables, including detailed case costs, return to hospital rates and complications, were documented and compared between the first 20 SDD cases and 20 matched inpatient controls. Results In every case–control match, the SDD TKA was less costly than the inpatient procedure and yielded a median cost savings of approximately 30%. The savings came primarily from costs associated with the inpatient encounter, such as surgical ward, pharmacy and patient meal costs. At 1 year, there were no major complications and no return to hospital or readmission encounters for either group. Conclusion Our results are consistent with previously published data on the cost savings associated with short stay or outpatient TKA. We have gone further by documenting where those savings were in a matched cohort design. Furthermore, we determined where cost savings could be realized during the patient encounter and to what degree. In carefully selected patients, outpatient TKA is a feasible alternative to traditional inpatient TKA and is significantly less costly. Furthermore, it was deemed to be safe in the perioperative period. PMID:28234591

  16. Outcomes of Sacral Nerve Stimulation For Faecal Incontinence in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, GW; Dasari, BV; Irwin, R; Johnston, D

    2017-01-01

    Background Sacral nerve root stimulation (SNS) is an effective and developing therapy for faecal incontinence, a debilitating condition that can result in social and personal incapacitation. Objectives The objectives of this study are to assess the morbidity of the procedure, improvement in the incontinence scores and Quality of Life (QoL) following SNS. Materials and methods Patients were identified from the Northern Ireland regional SNS service from 2006 to 2012. Numbers of patients who had temporary placement and permanent placement were collated. Pre and postoperative assessment of severity of incontinence and QoL was performed using Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score (CCIS) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) respectively. Statistical analysis was undertaken using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Morbidity was assessed by retrospective review of patient records. Results Seventy-five patients were considered for trial of a temporary SNS. Sixty-one proceeded to insertion of a temporary SNS and, of these, 40 elected to have a permanent SNS. There was a significant reduction in the pre-SNS and post-SNS Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Scores from median of 14 to 9 respectively (p=0.008). There was a significant improvement in Role Physical (p=0.017), General Health (p=0.02), Vitality (p=0.043), Social Functioning (p=0.004), Role Emotional (p=0.007), Mental Health (p=0.013) and Mental Health Summary (p=0.003). However, this is not reflected in the bodily pain and physical functional domains. Conclusion Permanent sacral nerve stimulation is effective and results in significant improvement of faecal incontinence scores and quality of life. PMID:28298708

  17. Cell Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Melanie L; Izeta, Ander; Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Amend, Bastian; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2015-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is the involuntary loss of urine and is a common condition in middle-aged and elderly women and men. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is caused by leakage of urine when coughing, sneezing, laughing, lifting, and exercise, even standing leads to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Other types of UI also exist such as urge incontinence (also called overactive bladder), which is a strong and unexpected sudden urge to urinate, mixed forms of UI that result in symptoms of both urge and stress incontinence, and functional incontinence caused by reduced mobility, cognitive impairment, or neuromuscular limitations that impair mobility or dexterity. However, for many SUI patients, there is significant loss of urethral sphincter muscle due to degeneration of tissue, the strain and trauma of pregnancy and childbirth, or injury acquired during surgery. Hence, for individuals with SUI, a cell-based therapeutic approach to regenerate the sphincter muscle offers the advantage of treating the cause rather than the symptoms. We discuss current clinically relevant cell therapy approaches for regeneration of the external urethral sphincter (striated muscle), internal urethral sphincter (smooth muscle), the neuromuscular synapse, and blood supply. The use of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells is a major step in the right direction, but they may not be enough for regeneration of all components of the urethral sphincter. Inclusion of other cell types or biomaterials may also be necessary to enhance integration and survival of the transplanted cells.

  18. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  19. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  20. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  1. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  2. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  3. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: reducing adverse events.

    PubMed

    Rippon, Mark; Colegrave, Melanie; Ousey, Karen

    2016-10-13

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common problem in patients with faecal and/or urinary incontinence. Urine alters the normal skin flora and increases permeability of the stratum corneum and faecal enzymes on the skin contribute to skin damage. Faecal bacteria can then penetrate the skin, increasing the risk of secondary infection. However, IAD can be prevented and healed with timely and appropriate skin cleansing and skin protection. This includes appropriate use of containment devices. This article also looks at HARTMANN incontinence pads that have been developed to absorb the fluids that cause IAD and maintain the skin's acidic pH. The acidic pH of the skin contributes to its barrier function and defence against infection. Therefore, maintaining an acidic pH will help protect the skin from damage.

  4. Female Epispadias Presenting as Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nusret; Zvizdic, Zlatan; Milišic, Emir; Karavdic, Kenan; Paddy, Dewan

    2017-01-01

    Isolated female epispadias without bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital anomaly affecting 1 in 484,000 females. The presenting features of female epispadias are urinary incontinence and abnormal anatomical features. A 6-year-old girl presented with primary urinary incontinence who on physical examination had a bifid clitoris and labia minora. The vagina and hymen were normal. Voiding cystourethrogram showed no reflux and a funnel shaped proximal urethra. With the diagnosis of isolated female epispadias, one-stage reconstruction of the urethra, bladder neck, labia minora and clitoris was performed.

  5. Female Epispadias Presenting as Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jonuzi, Asmir; Popovic, Nusret; Zvizdic, Zlatan; Milišic, Emir; Karavdic, Kenan; Paddy, Dewan

    2017-01-01

    Isolated female epispadias without bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital anomaly affecting 1 in 484,000 females. The presenting features of female epispadias are urinary incontinence and abnormal anatomical features. A 6-year-old girl presented with primary urinary incontinence who on physical examination had a bifid clitoris and labia minora. The vagina and hymen were normal. Voiding cystourethrogram showed no reflux and a funnel shaped proximal urethra. With the diagnosis of isolated female epispadias, one-stage reconstruction of the urethra, bladder neck, labia minora and clitoris was performed.

  6. Incontinence Pad Usage in Medical Welfare Facilities in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyub; Kang, Ji Soon; Kim, Jeong-Wha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of urinary incontinence and the usage of incontinence pads by elderly residents in Korean medical welfare facilities were investigated. Methods From a total of 1,832 facilities, 33 medical welfare facilities in the capital area were randomly selected; all nursing homes were excluded. All data were collected by questionnaires to investigate the residents' age and sex, the presence or absence of urinary incontinence, incontinence pad usage per month, and management methods for urinary incontinence. Surveys were also conducted from January 2010 to August 2010. Results A total number of residents in medical welfare facilities were 2,783, and all of them were selected for this study. Approximately, 65.3% of residents (1,816 individuals) had incontinence. The mean usage was 75 incontinence pads per month. Only 15.6% of residents received proper management for urinary incontinence, while the remaining 84.4% of residents did not have any experience in evaluating or managing their urinary symptoms. Conclusions The prevalence of urinary incontinence in medical welfare facilities in Korea was about 65.3%. However, the management of urinary incontinence was insufficient. Urologists should make further efforts for the proper management of urinary incontinence in elders in these facilities. PMID:24466466

  7. Stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome: current options and new targets for management.

    PubMed

    Elser, Denise M

    2012-05-01

    In the United States, office visits for women seeking treatment for urinary incontinence more than doubled between 1994 and 2000, from 1845 per 100 000 women. This review article addresses treatment options for 2 common types of incontinence in women: stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and detrusor overactivity (DO), commonly referred to as urge urinary incontinence (UUI). In the past, those with SUI typically faced limited treatment options, such as Kegel exercises, pessaries, or major surgery (Burch or Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz operations). However, treatment options for women also included anticholinergic medications, behavioral therapy, and implantable neuromodulation. In recent years, more options have become available. For women with SUI, a variety of minimally invasive synthetic midurethral sling approaches (eg, retropubic, transobturator, and single incision) and office-based procedures (eg, periurethral injection of bulking agents and radiofrequency collagen denaturation [Renessa®; Novasys Medical]) are now offered. More outpatient options will hopefully be available soon, including an inflatable, free-floating balloon to act as a shock absorber, and injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the periurethral tissue. Women with UUI now have targeted options, such as posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) and intravesical injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox®; Allergan, Inc.), in addition to nonoral systemic medications.

  8. Electrokinetic properties of incontinence nonwoven devices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the water transport properties of nonwoven incontinence devices is a prerequisite to the design of cotton-based nonwovens. A complete understanding of the interfacial moisture movement which occurs between the layers of coverstock, acquisition layer, distribution layer, absorbent...

  9. Faecal incontinence products and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra

    Faecal incontinence has been defined as the involuntary or inappropriate passage of faeces (Royal College of Physicians, 1995). It is a distressing and isolating problem that affects people of all ages, with an estimated incidence of 1-2 per cent of the population (Soffer and Hull, 2000). Many people must rely on continence products to manage this stigmatising and embarrassing problem.

  10. Coping with the Impact of Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartley, Cheryle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents Part 2 of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. In this article, the author contends that it is extremely important to teach children coping skills…

  11. The medical management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Ahmed; Drake, Marcus J; Hashim, Hashim

    2010-01-15

    Urinary incontinence is the involuntary leakage of urine; it affects millions of people worldwide, causing significant detrimental effects on their quality of life. Direct expenses, such as containment products, long-term drug prescriptions and surgery, complemented by indirect costs, such as reduced employment productivity, result in overall expenditure running to billions of dollars. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) occurs on physical exertion, and results from weakness of the bladder outlet. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) results from inability to resist a sudden compelling desire to pass urine, arising as a consequence of bladder dysfunction. Clinical evaluation clarifies the underlying mechanisms and excludes diseases causing similar symptoms. Urodynamic studies to measure bladder and abdominal pressures and deduce the bladder and outlet function are undertaken when invasive treatments are being considered or when the nature of the incontinence is not entirely clear. Initial management of SUI involves pelvic floor muscle exercise training; if insufficient symptom improvement results, surgical measures are needed. UUI treatment commences with advice on suitable fluid intake and measures to improve ability to defer voiding, followed by antimuscarinic drugs. Refractory UUI is a difficult problem, currently managed with a range of surgical interventions, including bladder injections of botulinum-A neurotoxin, augmentation cystoplasty and nerve stimulation methods. New treatment options are needed, because of the risk of impeding voiding function, resulting in urinary retention. Persistent leakage is controlled with containment products, such as pads, or collection devices, such as catheters.

  12. Functional daytime incontinence: non-pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    van Gool, J D; Vijverberg, M A; Messer, A P; Elzinga-Plomp, A; de Jong, T P

    1992-01-01

    In children with 'functional incontinence', defined as any form of (daytime) wetting caused by non-neuropathic bladder/sphincter dysfunction, most signs and symptoms are rooted in habitual non-physiological responses to signals from bladder and urethra. These responses develop at toddler age, when children learn how to remain dry. Once they have become a habit, incomplete bladder emptying and recurrent urinary tract infections come into play, reiterating the non-physiological responses into fixed patterns of bladder/sphincter dysfunction with functional incontinence as the leading symptom. Non-pharmacological treatment of functional incontinence implies relearning and training the normal responses to signals from bladder and urethra: a cognitive process, with perception of the signals reinforced by biofeedback. This type of treatment is best combined with long-term chemoprophylaxis. Severe cases will benefit from anticholinergic drugs, as adjuvants to the training programme. Urodynamics play a crucial role in documenting the specific patterns of incontinence and in providing biofeedback. For a successful programme, psychological screening of the children is indispensable.

  13. [Delayed necrotizing fasciitis: a complication of stress incontinence surgery by suburethral sling].

    PubMed

    Tholozan, A-S; Delapparent, T; Terzibachian, J-J; Leung, F; Govyadovskiy, A; Maillet, R; Riethmuller, D

    2014-06-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman case with an extensive necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The NF appeared 10 years after a tension free vaginal tape procedure for urinary stress incontinence. Vital prognosis was engaged due to the initial sepsis severity. This kind of complication is rare and could be under estimated. NF usually appear soon after surgery, whatever within the year following implantation. Anyway, NF are always related to a vaginal erosion of the tape.

  14. Glycemic Control and Urinary Incontinence in Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J.; Thai, Julie N.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although many studies have shown that diabetes increases the risk for urinary incontinence, it is unclear whether poor glycemic control in women with diabetes is associated with incontinence. This study aims to determine the relationship between the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level and urinary incontinence in a large, diverse cohort of older women. Methods We examined 6026 older women who responded to a survey (62% response rate) and were enrolled in the Diabetes and Aging Study, an ethnically stratified random sample of patients with diabetes enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Our primary independent variable was the mean of all HbA1c measurements in the year preceding the survey. Outcomes included the presence/absence of incontinence and limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. We used modified Poisson regression and ordinal logistic regression models to account for age, race, body mass index, parity, diabetes treatment, duration of diabetes, and comorbidity. Results Sixty-five percent of women reported incontinence (mean age 59±10 years). After adjustment, HbA1c levels were not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, among women reporting incontinence, HbA1c ≥9% was associated with more limitations due to incontinence than HbA1c <6% (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.09–2.57). Conclusion In this cross-sectional analysis, HbA1c level is not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, for women with incontinence, poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥9%) is associated with more limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether improving glycemic control to HbA1c <9% leads to fewer limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. PMID:24032999

  15. Programmed Instruction, Self-Control, and In-Patient Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layng, Terrence; And Others

    The extension of the instructional programming process, as outlined by Markle and Tiemann (1967), to the treatment of psychiatric in-patients is described. Three case studies are presented as examples of the application of the programming procedures as derived from the Constructional Model of Dr. Israel Goldiamond. The emphasis throughout all…

  16. A Comparative Evaluation of Suburethral and Transobturator Sling in 209 Cases with Stress Urinary Incontinence in 8 years

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Prakash; D’Costa, Sylvia; Shirkande, Preeti; Kumar, Shilpi; Patil, Mangala

    2009-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of suburethral and transobturator sling in treatment of female stress urinary incontinence in 209 cases from 2002 to 2010. The criteria evaluated were success, failure, complications, operating time, ease of the procedure, availability and cost effectivity of the sling. Design and Setting: A retrospective comparative study was carried out at a tertiary referral centre for female urinary incontinence. Material and Methods: A total of 209 patients (females from 27 to 79 years of age) with proven stress urinary incontinence were treated by suburethral transvaginal tape (TVT) type of slings in 101 cases and transobturator Monarc type of sling in 108 cases at the National Institute of Endoscopic Surgery and Urinary Incontinence Center, Mumbai, India, from March 2002 to June 2010. The maximum follow up was for 8 years. Results: The TVT type of slings had higher complication rate like needle entering the bladder, retention of urine necessitating to cut the tape in the center and had a success rate of 94.5% compared to Monarc/Trivedi obturator tape (TrOT) type of sling with outside-in technique, which had a negligible complication (less than 1%), pain in groin or leg movement that reduced in 6 weeks and a success rate of 95%. Specially, the Indian design Trivedi’s stress urinary incontinence tape (TSUIT) and TrOT with reusable needles, the cost was only 15–20% of the international brands. PMID:22442522

  17. Efficacy of an improved absorbent pad on incontinence-associated dermatitis in older women: cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most older adults with urinary incontinence use absorbent pads. Because of exposure to moisture and chemical irritating substances in urine, the perineal skin region is always at risk for development of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of an improved absorbent pad against IAD. Methods A cluster randomized controlled design was used to compare the efficacy of two absorbent pads. Female inpatients aged ≥65 years who had IAD and used an absorbent pad or diaper all day were enrolled. Healing rate of IAD and variables of skin barrier function such as skin pH and skin moisture were compared between the usual absorbent pad group (n = 30) and the test absorbent pad group (n = 30). Results Thirteen patients (43.3%) from the test absorbent pad group and 4 patients (13.3%) from the usual absorbent pad group recovered completely from IAD. Moreover, the test absorbent pad group healed significantly faster than the usual absorbent pad group (p = 0.009). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between the two groups in skin barrier function. Conclusion The test absorbent pad for older adults with urinary incontinence might be more efficacious against IAD than usual absorbent pad. Trial registration UMIN-CTR: UMIN000006188 PMID:22642800

  18. Predictors of female urinary incontinence at midlife and beyond.

    PubMed

    Menezes, M; Pereira, M; Hextall, A

    2010-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is an important middle age health issue and approximately 20% of women over 40 years of age have problems with continence. Urinary incontinence poses a significant negative impact on social functioning and quality of life to many individuals. It is estimated that around three million people are regularly incontinent in the UK with a prevalence of about 40 per 1000 adults. There are various factors which can cause incontinence such as pregnancy, childbirth, obesity, menopause, or just inherent connective-tissue weakness. All of these factors can cause pathophysiology changes in the muscular and fascial structures of the pelvic floor and lead to pelvic support defects and possibly pelvic floor dysfunction. We aim with this review article to highlight predictors or predisposing factors of incontinence; in order to help clinicians during their decisions and put in place a policy of a preventive strategy to decrease the incontinence rate in the general population.

  19. Urinary incontinence in a vulnerable population: older women.

    PubMed

    Criner, J A

    2001-01-01

    Urinary incontinence creates a tremendous hardship on older women and results in social isolation, anxiety, low self-esteem, depression, and decreased life satisfaction. Stress, urge, overflow, and functional incontinence can be treated by behavioral methods, medications, or invasive techniques. The nurse should complete a health history before making an informed decision with the older women about the most appropriate treatment plan. There can be improved quality of life for women with incontinence if health care providers focus on this problem.

  20. Mixed Incontinence: How Best to Manage It?

    PubMed

    Porena, Massimo; Costantini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Although common in women, mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is under-reported and under-treated. It is linked to concomitant disturbances, which may be due to childbirth, ageing, or other medical conditions, in the complex bladder-urethra coordinated system of urine storage and emptying. Primary care physicians can evaluate MUI through history and simple clinical assessment or they can avail of more complex device and tools, such as urodynamic assessment. There is a wide range of therapeutic options. The recent proliferation of new drug treatments and surgical devices for urinary incontinence offers innovative strategies for therapy but products risk being introduced without long-term safety and efficacy assessment. Direct-to-consumer advertising has increased public awareness of MUI.

  1. [A survey on urinary incontinence in the institutionalized elderly].

    PubMed

    Homma, Y; Takai, K; Takahashi, S; Higashihara, E; Aso, Y; Urushibara, A

    1992-08-01

    A survey on urinary incontinence in 161 (41 male, 120 female) institutionalized elderly was independently performed by urologists and attending nurses. Urinary incontinence was found in 107 cases (66%), with 76 cases (47%) suffering from severe leakage (more than 5 times a day and needs diaper). The prevalences of incontinence and severe leakage were 63% and 52% at geriatric hospitals, 59% and 29% at intermediate care centers and 78% and 63% at nursing homes, respectively. The risk factors for incontinence were consciousness disturbance, urinary urgency, impaired mobility and dementia, and those for severe leakage were apathy, loss of urinary sensation, dementia and impaired mobility. The type of incontinence was considered functional one in 81% of cases. The agreement of the incontinence type evaluated by urologists and that by nurses was found in 90% of incontinent cases. Incontinence was estimated "incurable" in 54% of cases by attending nurses. These observations indicate a high prevalence of severe and "incurable" incontinence in the institutionalized elderly, urgently warranting an effective remedy for the increasing aged society.

  2. Urinary incontinence in the aged, Part 2: Management strategies.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, P; Fuentevilla-Clifton, A

    1992-06-01

    Treatments for urge incontinence associated with uninhibited bladder contractions include medications with anticholinergic and smooth muscle relaxant properties as well as habit training, bladder retraining, contingency therapy, and biofeedback. Pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises improve stress incontinence in 60 to 90% of female patients. For patients who fail to improve with pelvic floor exercises, a combination of an alpha-adrenergic agent and conjugated estrogen is recommended. Surgery is particularly effective in elderly women with significant pelvic prolapse. Management of overflow incontinence requires surgery or intermittent/chronic catheterization. Functional incontinence may be improved with correction of the underlying disorder and availability of a motivated caregiver.

  3. The Challenge of Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Graham

    1989-01-01

    By 2021 Canada will have an enormous population older than 65 years of age. Before the wholesale introduction of programs for seniors with urinary incontinence, careful evaluation of present treatments and the extent to which they can usefully be applied in the community is necessary. We need more information about the diagnosis and treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly and about both patient and caregiver compliance with treatment for urinary incontinence. There is a great need for research on the efficiency of programs targeted at the incontinent group and for community surveys to reassess the problem's long-term consequences. PMID:21249070

  4. [Causes and diagnosis of female urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schorsch, I; Soljanik, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    The primary cause of stress incontinence is birth traumata. However, obesity, asthma, chronic constipation or hard physical work can also overtax the pelvic floor and lead to injury of the connective tissue and a slackening of the ligamentous apparatus. Pelvic floor defects are initially diagnosed simply through a thorough urogynaecological examination. To predict the success of a surgical treatment, the functions can be tested by performing simulated operations.

  5. Novel Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Adam; Hurley, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a devastating condition affecting a substantial portion of the population. The etiologies of FI are wide ranging, as are the treatment options. When conservative measures fail, often surgical intervention is required. As in any area where a wide range of treatment options exist, there is no one perfect solution. Fortunately, novel treatment options for FI are becoming available, namely, posterior tibial nerve stimulation, magnetic anal sphincter, stem cell transplant, pyloric transplantation, and acupuncture. PMID:25320572

  6. Inpatient diabetology. The new frontier.

    PubMed

    Abourizk, Nicolas N; Vora, Chaula K; Verma, Parveen K

    2004-05-01

    Tight glycemic control is now an imperative of outpatient diabetes care. The inpatient arena remains under the influence of an ineffective paradigm characterized by tolerance for hyperglycemia and a reluctance to use insulin intensively. This article is a call to action against the lip service paid to inpatient diabetes care. The compelling in vitro and in vivo evidence for the benefit of intensive insulin-mediated glycemic control is summarized. The linchpin of current inpatient care is a commonly used insulin sliding scale. This autopilot approach as the sole mode of treatment for inpatient hyperglycemia has been strongly condemned. Nevertheless, it continues to survive. The evidence supports the compelling argument that the adverse effect of hyperglycemia on hospital length of stay, morbidity, and mortality is substantial. Clinicians, nurses, administrators, and insurers ought to look critically at the prevailing paradigm and spearhead the much-needed revolution in inpatient diabetology. The issue of glycemic targets, the need for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring, and the role of nursing staff in this revolution are raised. We call for the banning of the insulin sliding scale use as the sole diabetes order. Also, the use of basal insulin via continuous intravenous insulin infusion or subcutaneous insulin analogs should be embraced. Educating nurses, house staff, and other frontline professionals in the adverse consequences of the current paradigm is essential. Inpatient glycemic control matters; clinical and financial outcomes are at stake. It behooves the health care system and the diabetic public to address the contemporary state of inpatient diabetology as soon as possible.

  7. Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Radstaake, Maartje; Didden, Robert; Giesbers, Sanne; Korzilius, Hubert; Peters-Scheffer, Nienke; Lang, Russell; von Gontard, Alexander; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2013-11-01

    Frequency and type of incontinence and variables associated with incontinence were assessed in individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS; n=71) and in a matched control group (n=69) consisting of individuals with non-specific intellectual disability (ID). A Dutch version of the "Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence" (Beetz, von Gontard, & Lettgen, 1994) was administered and information on primary caretakers' perspectives regarding each individual's incontinence was gathered. Results show that diurnal incontinence and fecal incontinence during the day more frequently occurred in the control group than in the AS group. In both groups, nocturnal enuresis was the most common form of incontinence. More incontinence was seen in individuals with AS who were younger, had a lower level of adaptive functioning and/or had epilepsy. Individuals with AS were able to stay dry for longer periods of time than the controls and often showed both in-toilet urination and urinary accidents during the day, whereas accidents and correct voids during the day were more set apart in the control group. Also, persons with AS had a lower micturition frequency implying possible voiding postponement. Both groups showed high rates of LUTS (lower urinary tract symptoms) possibly indicative of functional bladder disorders such as voiding postponement, dysfunctional voiding, or even an underactive bladder. In general, most primary caretakers reported severe intellectual disability as the main cause for urinary incontinence. Based on these results incontinence does not appear to be part of the behavioral phenotype of Angelman syndrome. Therefore, pediatric or urologic diagnostics and treatment are recommended for all persons with incontinence and intellectual disability. Further implications for practice and research are given.

  8. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  9. [Fecal incontinence and rectal prolapse. Clinico-functional assessment].

    PubMed

    Santini, L; Pezzullo, L; Caracò, C; Candela, G; Esposito, B

    1995-09-01

    Rectal Prolapse is a rare and distressing condition, with a multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Often, this pathology is associated with fecal incontinence. The recommended approach to the patient with rectal prolapse and fecal incontinence is to repair the prolapse first, then deal particularly with fecal incontinence at a second operation. A retrospective, clinical and manometric study has varying degrees of fecal incontinence. Clinically five of their operation, and a further three patients improved, in two patients the degree of fecal incontinence remained invariable. One patient was worsened after surgery. Manometrically resting and pressure (RAP) was significantly higher in continent patients than in voluntary contraction pressure (MVCP) (p < 0.05) in preoperative testing. Postoperatively, there was a significant increase in the resting anal pressure as well as in maximum voluntary contraction pressure. Patients who remained incontinent had a significantly lower RAP and MVCP than patients who improved our regained continence. In conclusion this study shows an alteration of internal and external sphincteric function in patients with rectal prolapse. The surgical treatment of this disease improves sphincteric function. Incontinent patients with RAP < 10 mmHg and MCVP < 20 mmHg, probably they would be better treated simultaneously either for rectal prolapsus and incontinence. In this kind of patients the perianal proctectomy with total sphincteroplasty could be the elective treatment.

  10. School Experiences of an Adolescent with Medical Complexities Involving Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filce, Hollie Gabler; Bishop, John B.

    2014-01-01

    The educational implications of chronic illnesses which involve incontinence are not well represented in the literature. The experiences of an adolescent with multiple complex illnesses, including incontinence, were explored via an intrinsic case study. Data were gathered from the adolescent, her mother, and teachers through interviews, email…

  11. Consumer Perception of Inpatient Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Although it is currently popular to reflect consumers’ perspectives to medical service management, insufficient attempts have been made to understand detailed perception of the consumer side of medical services to promote medical services’ evaluation from the consumer viewpoint. The aim of this study was to descriptively reveal how consumers perceive medical services that they receive, focusing on inpatient medical services. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 adults who experienced hospitalization of five or more days. Constant comparative analysis was performed on the obtained descriptive data. We identified 1) medical procedures, 2) explanations from medical professionals, 3) behavior of medical service providers, 4) somatic sensations, and 5) self-perceived physical conditions as target factors that medical service consumers perceived during hospitalization. The response to the perceived target factors, “compared with the expectation that the consumer had before the hospitalization,” suggests that it is an important medical service consumer reaction to check if the service met their expectations for perceived factors. The response to the medical services perception targets suggested that medical service consumers are involved in medical services and interested in various perception targets. The expectations that medical service consumers have prior to hospitalization can largely influence inpatient medical services evaluation. PMID:27832165

  12. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  13. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  14. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  15. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  16. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  17. Women with Diabetes: Understanding Urinary Incontinence and Help Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Ashmi M.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Morrill, Michelle Y.; Schembri, Michael; Thom, David H.; Brown, Jeanette S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of urinary incontinence by diabetes status and race and evaluate beliefs and help-seeking around incontinence in a population-based cohort of women with and without diabetes. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 2,270 middle-aged and older racially/ethnically diverse women in Diabetes RRISK. Incontinence, help-seeking behavior, and beliefs were assessed by self-report questionnaires and in-person interviews. Incontinence characteristics of diabetics and non-diabetics were compared using univariate analysis and multivariate models. Results Women with diabetes reported weekly incontinence significantly more than women without diabetes (Weekly: 35.4% vs. 25.7%, respectively, p <0.001). Race prevalence patterns were similar (white and Latina women with the most prevalent incontinence and African-American and Asian women with the least) among women with and without diabetes. Less than 50% of women with diabetes discussed their incontinence with a doctor (42.2% vs. 55.5% (of women without diabetes) p <0.003). Women with diabetes were more likely than women without diabetes to report believing that incontinence is a rare condition (17% vs. 6%, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Incontinence is highly prevalent among women with diabetes. Race prevalence patterns are similar among women with and without diabetes. Understanding help-seeking behaviors are important to ensure appropriate care for patients. Physicians should be alert for urinary incontinence because it is often unrecognized and thereby under-treated among women with diabetes. PMID:20727547

  18. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  19. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64…

  20. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  1. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  2. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  3. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  4. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  5. Medium-term results of Mini-arc for urinary stress incontinence in ambulatory patients under local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Almog; Nasra, Rasha; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the medium-term outcome and patient's satisfaction after Single-incision mini-sling (SIMS) procedure done under local anesthesia in ambulatory set up for patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Materials and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including all patients submitted to SIMS procedure for SUI with MiniArc (AMS, U.S.A) without concomitant surgery between January 2011 and March 2013. Patients were followed up during 12 months after surgery and once a year subsequently. Telephone interviews were conducted to evaluate patient satisfaction. Outcome masseurs included: SUI cure rate, urinary urge incontinence (UUI) cure rate in patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), intra and post-operative complications and patient satisfaction. Results Ninety-three patients were included with mean follow-up of 23 months. Fifty percent had MUI with predominant SUI. The cure rates of SUI (objective and subjective) were 89%. UUI was cured in 40% of patients. No major complications occur, neither voiding obstruction or groin pain. Telephone interviews conducted after 26 months on average revealed high satisfaction rate from the procedure (8.8 out of 10) and from the local anesthesia. Visual analog scale (VAS) rating was low during and after the procedure (2.38 and 2.69 respectively). Conclusions The SIMS procedure is safe and highly effective for SUI and it can be performed successfully under local anesthesia in an ambulatory setup. PMID:27813384

  6. Promoting social continence using incontinence management products.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Lindsay

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common problem which affects men and women for a variety of reasons. For some people with UI cure is not achievable. For others, time is required to accurately diagnose and treat their urinary symptoms. In order to improve quality of life for people with UI, health professionals require awareness of the products available to achieve social continence. Continence products and devices fall into three categories: collective devices, containment products and occlusive devices. This article provides a brief overview of the more common products available and discusses some of the common benefits and drawbacks to their use.

  7. Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence in Neurological Patients With an Injectable Elastomer Prosthesis: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Citeri, Marco; Zanollo, Lucia; Guerrer, Chiara; Rizzato, Luigi; Frediani, Luca; Iselin, Christophe; Spinelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Many treatment options for stress urinary incontinence are difficult to apply to neurological patients. Urolastic is a new agent that is primarily indicated for women with mild stress urinary incontinence or men after prostate surgery. In this report, we present a series of 5 cases describing the first use of Urolastic to treat neurological patients. All patients were evaluated with a voiding diary and the use of auxiliary devices as the main indicators of continence. The median operative time was 30.8 minutes, and no complications were observed. Of the 5 patients, 4 reported improved incontinence: 2 switched from diapers to small pads, while the other 2 patients were able to discontinue urinary condom use. The only instance of treatment failure occurred in a patient with a low-compliance bladder. The advantages of this procedure appear to include a soft-cuff effect, reversibility, and minimal invasiveness. However, a future randomized study would be necessary to validate this treatment option. PMID:28361514

  8. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  9. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-05-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  10. [Transobturator slings for female stress urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana; Jesus, André; Carvalho, Maria; Carvalho, Giselda; Marques, João; Falcão, Francisco; Torgal, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A incontinência urinária de esforço afeta 20 a 40% das mulheres. Os slings colocados sob a uretra média, aplicados por via transobturadora, são a terapêutica consensualmente aceite na atualidade. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a eficácia e possíveis complicações associadas à aplicação dos slings colocados por via transobturadora no tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço. Material e Métodos: Avaliaram-se retrospetivamente 363 doentes submetidas a cirurgia de incontinência urinária de esforço por via transobturadora, nos Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra do Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, no período de 1 Janeiro de 2008 a 1 Julho de 2010. Resultados: A média das idades das doentes foi de 56 anos [28-86]. Além da correção da incontinência urinária de esforço, em 13,5% das mulheres foi associada outra cirurgia vaginal. A maioria (95,3%) das mulheres apresentou hipermobilidade da uretra. Ocorreram complicações per-operatórias em 0,8%, complicações pós-operatórias imediatas em 5,2% e complicações pós-operatórias tardias em 15,7%. A taxa de sucesso global foi de 93,7%. A taxa de sucesso nas doentes com uretra fixa foi 77,8%, verificando-se melhores resultados (94,5%) naquelas com hipermobilidade da uretra (p = 0,02). A taxa de sucesso foi comparável nas doentes com e sem cirurgias vaginais associadas. Discussão: As técnicas transobturadoras têm taxas de sucesso elevadas, tendo-se tornado o tratamento de primeira linha para as doentes com IUE, independentemente se tratadas pela técnica outside-in (TOT®) ou pela inside-out (TVT-O®). Ambas as técnicas foram concebidas com o intuito de evitar a passagem no espaço retropúbico, reduzindo assim o número de complicações. Conclusão: As taxas de cura para as abordagens transobturadoras oscilam entre 80 e 95%. A taxa de cura aumenta quando o mecanismo responsável pela incontinência urinária de esforço é a hipermobilidade da uretra

  11. Skin care in the frail, elderly, dependent, incontinent patient.

    PubMed

    Jeter, K F; Lutz, J B

    1996-01-01

    Despite a plethora of recommendations, protocols and dictums in the nursing literature, no research studies have defined the basic elements of preventive skin care for incontinent patients, and the prevalence of skin problems associated with incontinence is unknown. Yet the importance of skin care for incontinent elderly or immobilized patients has long been acknowledged. This literature review sought to determine current practices and principles for skin care of frail, elderly, dependent, incontinent patients. Protocols vary widely. And although there is mounting evidence that incontinence, particularly fecal incontinence, is a primary risk factor for pressure ulcer development, most preventive efforts focus on pressure relief, repositioning, and nutrition, rather than incontinence care. More clinical trials are needed in this area. The design and analysis of these trials should take into account the frequency and manner in which skin is cleansed, products used for skin care, risks and benefits of absorbent products and devices, the presence of infection, and patients' concomitant medical conditions and degree of immobility.

  12. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    PubMed Central

    Seheult, J. N.; Pazderska, A.; Gaffney, P.; Fogarty, J.; Sherlock, M.; Gibney, J.; Boran, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose. PMID:26290664

  13. Kegel's exercises with biofeedback therapy for treatment of stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Burns, P A; Marecki, M A; Dittmar, S S; Bullough, B

    1985-02-01

    True stress incontinence due to a weakened pelvic floor is one of the most frequently cited urologic complaints of multiparous women past age 40. One treatment modality currently used to treat stress incontinence is exercising the pubococcygeus muscle. Combining biofeedback therapy with a vaginal probe (perineometer) helps patients identify the muscle, provides immediate feedback and assists the nurse and patient in assessing problem resolution. This article describes an intervention program using biofeedback, and measured Kegel's exercises on a small number of women with symptoms of stress incontinence. The lessening of symptoms became a major factor in continued compliance with the exercise program.

  14. Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of Mixed Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Bilal; Laor, Leanna; Dunphy, Claire; Lee, Richard; Te, Alexis; Kaplan, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is a common clinical problem in the community and hospital setting. The broad definition of the term makes it difficult to diagnose, as well as determine effective treatment strategies. There are no current guidelines recommended for physicians. The estimated prevalence of this condition is approximately 30% in all women with incontinence. It has also been suggested that patients with MUI report more bothersome symptoms than either stress or urge incontinence; approximately 32% of 40- to 64-year-olds with MUI report symptoms of depression. The authors examine the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of patients with MUI. PMID:27222643

  15. Review of current technologies for urinary incontinence: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Fader, M

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of continence products is available, and this paper focuses on products to prevent incontinence (such as urinals and commodes) and to contain or manage urinary incontinence (such as absorbent pads, penile sheaths and urethral catheters). Drawing on results from published clinical evaluations at the Continence Product Evaluation Network at UCL and at other centres, the strengths and limitations of the major categories of incontinence products currently on the market are reviewed. It is concluded that, although products for continence have improved considerably over the last 20 years, there is considerable scope for the designer and engineer to improve on current products.

  16. Vascular incontinence: incontinence in the elderly due to ischemic white matter changes

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Panicker, Jalesh; Fowler, Clare J; Tateno, Fuyuki; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyuzaki, Yohei; Ogawa, Emina; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    This review article introduces the new concept of vascular incontinence, a disorder of bladder control resulting from cerebral white matter disease (WMD). The concept is based on the original observation in 1999 of a correlation between the severity of leukoareosis or WMD, urinary symptoms, gait disorder and cognitive impairment. Over the last 20 years, the realization that WMD is not a benign incidental finding in the elderly has become generally accepted and several studies have pointed to an association between geriatric syndromes and this type of pathology. The main brunt of WMD is in the frontal regions, a region recognized to be crucial for bladder control. Other disorders should be excluded, both neurological and urological, such as normal-pressure hydrocephalus, progressive supranuclear palsy, etc., and prostatic hyperplasia, physical stress incontinence, nocturnal polyuria, etc. Treatment involves management of small vessel disease risk factors and anticholinergic drugs that do not easily penetrate the blood brain barrier to improve bladder control. PMID:23139851

  17. Pelvic artery embolization in the management of pelvic arterial bleeding following midurethral sling surgery for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Ji; Kim, Jun-Bum; Park, So-Yun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Chung-Hoon; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2016-01-01

    The transobturator tape (TOT) method is the recent minimally invasive midurethral sling surgery. The TOT method was invented to reduce complication rate of surgical technique for female stress urinary incontinence. Pelvic bleeding following TOT procedure, although extremely rare, could be occurred. We presented three cases which treat pelvic arterial bleeding after midurethral sling (TOT and tension-free vaginal tape Secur) surgery via pelvic artery embolization. Therefore we report our cases with brief review of the literature. PMID:27004210

  18. Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100110.htm Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series— ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The vaginal opening lies just below the urethral opening, and ...

  19. Bladder Control Problems: Medications for Treating Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... used correctly, topical estrogen therapy typically doesn't cause side effects. However, to treat incontinence, topical estrogen is usually paired with another medication or therapy — which may cause side effects. How it works Imipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. ...

  20. Managing faecal incontinence or leakage: the Peristeen Anal Plug.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Willie

    Incontinence can be a devastating problem to many individuals. It is embarrassing and limiting socially, and prevents those with the problem from going about their day-to-day activities. People adopt coping strategies to manage the problem and those with urinary incontinence often look for containment products such as disposable pads or nappy-style products. These products have been developed using different absorbent materials and are accessible to sufferers in local supermarkets. Absorbency of the products has improved so that once wetted, they hold urine more easily. However, the same cannot be said for faecal incontinence management products and there are few that can be called upon to manage this devastating condition. The Peristeen Anal Plug, developed originally as the Conveen Anal Plug, stands alone in the search for a device to manage faecal incontinence or leakage.

  1. What's best--reusable or disposable incontinence products?

    PubMed

    Haeker, S

    1986-05-01

    To use paper or cloth? The director of nursing for a 72-bed intermediate care facility opted to continue using reusable incontinence products based on the results of a three-week study conducted by her staff.

  2. Olanzapine as a Cause of Urinary Incontinence: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Lateef Olutoyin; Adegun, Patrick T; Tareo, Peter O

    2012-01-01

    Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is one of the most commonly used antipsychotics. Though olanzapine is commonly associated with endocrine side effects, it is generally well tolerated by most patients and is rarely associated with urinary incontinence. This report highlights the case of a 23 -year old male patient with schizophrenia who developed severe urinary incontinence following the use of olanzapine. No medications were given to relieve the incontinence contrary to some other studies where ephedrine was used. Olanzapine was changed to trifluoperazine, and the patient's condition improved within two days. Urinary incontinence, though uncommon, is an embarrassing side effect of olanzapine which could negatively affect drug compliance. As such, clinicians should enquire about it in order to improve the patient's health. PMID:23139697

  3. Animal Models of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common health problem significantly affecting the quality of life of women worldwide. Animal models that simulate SUI enable the assessment of the mechanism of risk factors for SUI in a controlled fashion, including childbirth injuries, and enable preclinical testing of new treatments and therapies for SUI. Animal models that simulate childbirth are presently being utilized to determine the mechanisms of the maternal injuries of childbirth that lead to SUI with the goal of developing prophylactic treatments. Methods of assessing SUI in animals that mimic diagnostic methods used clinically have been developed to evaluate the animal models. Use of these animal models to test innovative treatment strategies has the potential to improve clinical management of SUI. This chapter provides a review of the available animal models of SUI, as well as a review of the methods of assessing SUI in animal models, and potential treatments that have been tested on these models. PMID:21290221

  4. Office-Based Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Costilla, Vanessa C.; Mayer, Anita P.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a devastating disorder that is more prevalent than previously realized. FI is the involuntary loss of stool. Many factors contribute to the pathophysiology of FI, including advanced age, bowel irregularity, parity, and obesity. A detailed history and focused rectal examination are important to making the diagnosis and determining contributing causes. Although multiple diagnostic studies are available to assess the cause of FI, specific guidelines that delineate when testing should be done do not exist. Clinicians must weigh the risk, benefit, and burden of testing against the need for empiric treatment. All types of FI are initially managed in the same way, which includes lifestyle modification to reduce bowel derangements, improved access to toileting, and initiation of a bulking regimen to improve stool consistency. If initial conservative management fails, pharmaco-logic agents, biofeedback, or surgery may be indicated. PMID:23935551

  5. [Neurogenic urinary incontinence. Value of surgical management].

    PubMed

    Kutzenberger, J

    2008-06-01

    Damage to the CNS, the cauda equina, and the pelvic nerval structures causes neurogenic bladder dysfunction with neurogenic urinary incontinence (NUI). The definitive diagnosis of NUI is made with urodynamic examination methods. The most frequent cause of NUI is neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The treatment concept must take into account the physical and emotional restrictions. The treatment of NUI due to NDO is a domain of conservative therapy, i.e., mostly antimuscarinics and intermittent catheterization (IC). In about 30%, there is a good chance for therapy failures. An advancement in therapy is the injection of BTX-A into the detrusor. The missing drug approval is a disadvantage.Operative treatments are considered if conservative and minimally invasive therapies are unsuccessful. Sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulator implantation (SARSI) are available as organ-preserving techniques only for paraplegics with NDO and reflex urinary incontinence and neuromodulation for the other forms of NDO provided that a successful percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test has previously taken place. Augmentation cystoplasty is indicated if SDAF and neuromodulation cannot be used and the bladder wall is damaged irreversibly by fibrosis. Kidney function of at least 25% and acceptance of IC are prerequisites. Myectomy (autoaugmentation) has an indication similar to augmentation cystoplasty but there must not be any fibrosis. Bladder neck insufficiency (BNI) caused by paralysis or iatrogenically can be treated by the implantation of an alloplastic sphincter high at the bladder neck. A stable reservoir function is required. If not all methods are possible, the ileum conduit or the suprapubic bladder fistula can be the last resort.

  6. Incontinence in Intellectual Disability: An Under Recognized Cause

    PubMed Central

    Sagayaraj, Benjamin; V.T.T., Rajan; Kumar, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Many children with Down syndrome may develop urinary incontinence during adolescence or nearing adulthood. Most often low mental ability, behavioural issues, urinary tract infection, hypothyroidism, atlanto-axial subluxation or sexual abuse may be suspected to be the reason. We report a case of Down syndrome with tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Lipoma of Filum terminale with Cauda equina in normal position, as a cause of bowel and bladder incontinence. The need for operating with Cauda Equina in normal position is debated. But a conscious decision was taken to operate and the incontinence improved markedly which was documented by using a standardized questionnaire (King’s questionnaire) and thereby making a difference in the child’s life. A literature search did not result in any case of Down syndrome with tethered cord syndrome and secondary incontinence as presentation. Considering the possibility of TCS as a cause of incontinence, often neglected even in normal children, careful evaluation and correction of such problems will make a difference in the life of many intellectually disabled children. Incontinence should not be casually attributed to intellectual disability without ruling out other causes. PMID:26500975

  7. [Urodynamic studies in the child with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schwöbel, M; Bodmer, C

    1998-01-01

    Voiding disorders in children are frequent. To establish an exact anamnesis, it has to be distinguished between enuresis and incontinence and this may consequently already have a therapeutical effect. Enuresis is defined as a normal void occurring at an inappropriate time or place. Incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine and a pathological voiding habit, often in combination with urinary infections. The causes of an enuresis are always functional, the causes for incontinence may be organic or functional. Organic causes are neurogenic bladder dysfunctions or structural anomalies of the lower urinary tract. The functional causes are divided in urge incontinence, dysfunctional voiding, lazy bladder syndrome and stress incontinence. The most important screening examination in each child with voiding disorders is the uroflowmetry, in combination with an electromyography (EMG) of pelvic floor and abdominal muscles. For registration of the muscle activity, surface electrodes are used that only show muscle groups, but do not hurt on application. Cystometry, an invasive method, is used as a second step. The therapy of functional incontinence consists in bladder training, physiotherapy of the pelvic floor and biofeedback. Medicaments are given in second priority. The therapy of functional voiding disorders is only successful in cooperation with the child and its parents.

  8. Recent developments in alcoholism: inpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Nace, E P

    1993-01-01

    The historical role of inpatient treatment for alcoholism is reviewed in terms of its advantages and disadvantages. The factors that have forced a change in the utilization of inpatient treatment include increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of alcoholic patients, negative outcome studies, and cost-containment efforts. The clinical domains that warrant inpatient treatment are outlined, and decisions of treatment placement are necessarily guided by the factors of acuteness, ability, safety, and stabilization.

  9. Controlling Costs for Inpatient CHAMPUS Psychiatric Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    average length of stay , primiry diagnoses, cost of admission, reimbursement rates, beneficiary category, and occupancy rates. Compare...Inpatient Psych 26 provided, total mental health care costs, average length of stay , average cost per admission, and average cost per day were calculated. A...depressions account for fully 46% of the total government inpatient bill. The average length of stay (LOS) for inpatient mental health for the

  10. Associated Factors and the Impact of Fecal Incontinence in Women with Urge Urinary Incontinence: From the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network’s BEDRI Study

    PubMed Central

    MARKLAND, Alayne D.; RICHTER, Holly E.; KENTON, Kimberly S.; WAI, Clifford; NAGER, Charles W.; KRAUS, Stephen R.; XU, Yan; TENNSTEDT, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine prevalence, risk factors, and impact on quality of life (QOL) that fecal incontinence (FI) symptoms have on women seeking treatment for urge urinary incontinence (UUI). Study Design Baseline sociodemographic, history, physical examination, and validated questionnaire data were analyzed in 307 women enrolled in the Behavior Enhances Drug Reduction of Incontinence (BEDRI) study for associations with FI. FI was defined as loss of liquid/solid stool occurring at least monthly. Multivariable logistic regression models compared women with FI and UUI to women with only UUI. Results Prevalence of monthly FI was 18%, liquid stool (12%) and solid stool (6%). In multivariable analysis, FI was associated with vaginal delivery, posterior vaginal wall prolapse, higher body mass index, and UUI symptoms. QOL was worse in women with FI/UUI than isolated UUI. Conclusion Women seeking treatment for UUI have high rates of monthly FI with a negative impact on QOL. PMID:19200939

  11. Challenges of Conducting Multi-Center, Multi-Disciplinary Urinary Incontinence Clinical Trials: Experience of the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network

    PubMed Central

    Steers, William; Richter, Holly; Nyberg, Leroy; Kusek, John; Kraus, Stephen; Dandrea, Kimberly; Chai, Toby; Brubaker, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Aims The Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network (UITN) was established in 2000 as a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional network by the National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to investigate treatments for urinary incontinence in women. Methods Over 8 years this network composed of urologists, urogynecologists, geriatricians, behavioral psychologists, physical therapists, nurses, epidemiologists, social scientists and statisticians from nine academic sites and a Data Coordinating Center has been effective in designing and completing prospective randomized clinical trials for treatments of urinary incontinence in women. Results Two major clinical trials have been completed and a third has completed recruitment. The focus of the completed trials was a comparison of surgical methods to treat stress urinary incontinence whereas the third examined the potential benefit of combined behavioral intervention and antimuscarinic drug therapy to eliminate the need for long-term use of drug therapy alone to manage urge urinary incontinence. The scientific output of the network measured by abstracts, original papers and presentations demonstrates the productivity of the network. Conclusions Many unique challenges are posed by a multi-disciplinary team located at sites across the United States undertaking several clinical trials. This review presents some of the logistics, barriers, tactics, and strategies used to create this successful clinical trials network focused on urinary incontinence. PMID:19030190

  12. A comprehensive inpatient discharge system.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, E. M.; Teich, J. M.; Pedraza, L. A.; Thomas, D.

    1996-01-01

    Our group has developed a computer system that supports all phases of the inpatient discharge process. The system fills in most of the physician's discharge order form and the nurse's discharge abstract, using information available from sign-out, order entry, scheduling, and other databases. It supplies information for referrals to outside institutions, and provides a variety of instruction materials for patients. Discharge forms can be completed in advance, so that the patient is not waiting for final paperwork. Physicians and nurses can work on their components independently, rather than in series. Response to the system has been very favorable. PMID:8947755

  13. Comparison of Perineal Sonographically Measured and Functional Urodynamic Urethral Length in Female Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Janetzki, Nadine; Kennes, Lieven; Stickeler, Elmar; Serno, Julia; Behrendt, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To detect the anatomical insufficiency of the urethra and to propose perineal ultrasound as a useful, noninvasive tool for the evaluation of incontinence, we compared the anatomical length of the urethra with the urodynamic functional urethral length. We also compared the urethral length between continent and incontinent females. Methods. 149 female patients were enrolled and divided into four groups (stress, urge, or mixed incontinence; control). Sonographically measured urethral length (SUL) and urodynamic functional urethral length (FUL) were analyzed statistically. Standardized and internationally validated incontinence questionnaire ICIQ-SF results were compared between each patient group. Results. Perineal SUL was significantly longer in incontinent compared to continent patients (p < 0.0001). Pairwise comparison of each incontinent type (stress, urge, or mixed incontinence) with the control group showed also a significant difference (p < 0.05). FUL was significantly shorter in incontinent patients than in the control group (p = 0.0112). But pairwise comparison showed only a significant difference for the stress incontinence group compared with the control group (p = 0.0084) and not for the urge or mixed incontinent group. No clear correlation between SUL, FUL, and ICIQ-SF score was found. Conclusions. SUL measured by noninvasive perineal ultrasound is a suitable parameter in the assessment of female incontinence, since incontinent women show a significantly elongated urethra as a sign of tissue insufficiency, independent of the type of incontinence. PMID:27819004

  14. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12%) to after childbirth (21 and 28%) in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women. PMID:20696633

  15. Muscle-Derived Cells for Treatment of Iatrogenic Sphincter Damage and Urinary Incontinence in Men

    PubMed Central

    Gerullis, H.; Eimer, C.; Georgas, E.; Homburger, M.; El-Baz, A. G.; Wishahi, M.; Borós, M.; Ecke, T. H.; Otto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of injection of autologous muscle-derived cells into the urinary sphincter for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence in men and to characterize the injected cells prior to transplantation. Methods. 222 male patients with stress urinary incontinence and sphincter damage after uroloical procedures were treated with transurethral injection of autologous muscle-derived cells. The transplanted cells were investigated after cultivation and prior to application by immunocytochemistry using different markers of myogenic differentiation. Feasibility and functionality assessment was achieved with a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Of the 222 treated patients, 120 responded to therapy of whom 26 patients (12%) were continent, and 94 patients (42%) showed improvement. In 102 (46%) patients, the therapy was ineffective. Clinical improvement was observed on average 4.7 months after transplantation and continued in all improved patients. The cells injected into the sphincter were at least ~50% of myogenic origin and representative for early stages of muscle cell differentiation. Conclusions. Transurethral injection of muscle-derived cells into the damaged urethral sphincter of male patients is a safe procedure. Transplanted cells represent different phases of myogenic differentiation. PMID:22919359

  16. Knowledge and understanding of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Katherina; Hunter, Kathleen F.; Wagg, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate family physicians’ knowledge of, attitudes toward, and understanding of urinary incontinence (UI), as well as their perceptions of barriers to continence care, as a foundation for designing interventions to improve service provision for those in northern Alberta who suffer from UI. Design Descriptive survey using a standardized instrument. The survey instrument was completed either by telephone interview or on paper copy faxed back to the researchers, depending on participant preference. Setting Northern Alberta. Participants Random sample of family physicians (N = 158). Main outcome measures Physician knowledge of and attitudes toward UI, UI management practices, and barriers to providing UI care. Results Survey response rate was 10.6% (158 of 1488); 84.2% (133 of 158) of respondents practised in urban settings, 44.9% (71 of 158) had been in practice for fewer than 15 years, 24.1% (38 of 158) reported having no training in UI management since graduation, and 53.8% (85 of 158) reported that they proactively discussed UI with their patients. Overall, 70.0% of respondents felt fairly confident in managing UI. Most family physicians referred patients for specialist care, with few referrals to community services. Respondents thought that continence services were scarce, with long waiting times, and that such services were generally overstretched; they believed that although high-quality continence care was a personal priority, it was not a priority focus for their practice partnerships or networks. In terms of the highest ranked areas for improvement in UI management, increased awareness and understanding among physicians (ranked first by 28.5% of respondents), followed by dedicated incontinence clinics or nurses for referral (17.7%) and improving patient awareness and understanding (12.0%). Conclusion There continues to be considerable variation in knowledge about UI management and a relative overreliance on specialist care, despite

  17. Dietary Issues Inpatients Face With Being Vegetarian

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Dunlop, Julie A.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the literature from 1985 through 2010 on research related to the dietary issues vegetarian inpatients may encounter in the acute care setting. A thematic portrayal of vegetarianism in the context of the inpatient setting is described. Implications for future research and nursing practice are identified. PMID:22157507

  18. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  19. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5-minute video) “ ... video in a new window) Are there other women like me? (8-minute video) Urinary incontinence happens ...

  20. Faecal incontinence: Current knowledges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Alban; Bouvier, Michel; Vitton, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence (FI) is a disabling and frequent symptom since its prevalence can vary between 5% and 15% of the general population. It has a particular negative impact on quality of life. Many tools are currently available for the treatment of FI, from conservative measures to invasive surgical treatments. The conservative treatment may be dietetic measures, various pharmacological agents, anorectal rehabilitation, posterior tibial nerve stimulation, and transanal irrigation. If needed, patients may have miniinvasive approaches such as sacral nerve modulation or antegrade irrigation. In some cases, a surgical treatment is proposed, mainly external anal sphincter repair. Although these different therapeutic options are available, new techniques are arriving allowing new hopes for the patients. Moreover, most of them are non-invasive such as local application of an α1-adrenoceptor agonist, stem cell injections, rectal injection of botulinum toxin, acupuncture. New more invasive techniques with promising results are also coming such as anal magnetic sphincter and antropylorus transposition. This review reports the main current available treatments of FI and the developing therapeutics tools. PMID:26909229

  1. Mapping liquid distribution in absorbent incontinence products.

    PubMed

    Landeryou, M A; Yerworth, R J; Cottenden, A M

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews methods available for mapping the distribution of fluid in incontinence pad materials to assist with evaluating existing products and developing new ones, and to provide data for building and validating predictive models. Specifically, the following technologies are considered and their strengths and limitations described: discrete sensors based on conductance, temperature or optical measurements, optical imaging, gravimetric methods, X-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. It is suggested that the ideal method would enable fluid distribution to be mapped in three dimensions with good spatial and time resolution in single materials and composite structures of simple and complex geometries under static and dynamic mechanical loading. It would also allow liquid to be mapped in products when worn by users. It is concluded that, although each existing method meets some of these requirements, and each requirement is met, at least reasonably well, by at least one method, improved techniques are needed. The particular need for methods that can provide some measurement of liquid saturation within absorbent products, both in the laboratory and in real use, is highlighted. In many cases, simple methods used appropriately are sufficient to elicit the important aspects of liquid transport and storage within absorbent products.

  2. Anti-diuresis in the management of daytime urinary -incontinence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D; Cardozo, L

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whilst not life threatening conditions, remain an important cause of morbidity in women and are responsible for significant impairment of quality of life. Drug therapy is often used to treat women who complain of urgency and urge incontinence and has an emerging role in the management of stress urinary incontinence. However, bothersome side effects are known to affect compliance and therefore compromise efficacy, making longterm drug therapy unpopular. The principle aim of this thesis is to assess the role of antidiuresis in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence and also to examine its role as a 'designer therapy' which women can choose to use as, or when, required. In addition both the patients' and clinicians' attitudes towards treatment have been studied to clarify the meaning of 'cure', and to determine treatment acceptability, overall outcome and patient satisfaction. In the first study the patients' concept of cure is explored as well as their expectations regarding treatment and outcome. The second study examines cure from the clinician's perspective in addition to reviewing outcome measures in the clinical and research settings. Finally in the third study the use of desmopressin in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence is reported.

  3. Incontinence-associated dermatitis in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Foxley, Susan; Baadjies, Ruth

    Evidence-based patient care for those with urinary and faecal incontinence involves routine tasks that are integral to essential patient care. However, over the past few decades, researchers have demonstrated how ritualistic practice in this area has become. There is also a growing range of skin care products that can be used to prevent incontinence-associated dermatitis and for nurses, deciding which ones to use can be problematic Incontinent patients have a 22% higher risk of developing pressure ulcers - when immobile this risk increases to 30% - and the often indiscriminate use of various lotions, without a significant evidence base, is a growing cause of concern. Maintaining healthy skin for those patients who have a spinal cord injury and also experience urinary and faecal incontinence is a challenge faced by nurses in primary and secondary care. Research undertaken in secondary care demonstrates that standardization to an evidence-based skin care regime, to be used after incontinent episodes, improves patient care in this specialist area.

  4. Incidence of fractures requiring inpatient care

    PubMed Central

    Somersalo, Axel; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lönnroos, Eija; Heinänen, Mikko; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Background The overall incidence of fractures has been addressed in several studies, but there are few data on different types of fractures that require inpatient care, even though they account for considerable healthcare costs. We determined the incidence of limb and spine fractures that required hospitalization in people aged ≥ 16 years. Patients and methods We collected data on the diagnosis (ICD10 code), procedure code (NOMESCO), and 9 additional characteristics of patients admitted to the trauma ward of Central Finland Hospital between 2002 and 2008. Incidence rates were calculated for all fractures using data on the population at risk. Results and interpretation During the study period, 3,277 women and 2,708 men sustained 3,750 and 3,030 fractures, respectively. The incidence of all fractures was 4.9 per 103 person years (95% CI: 4.8–5.0). The corresponding numbers for women and men were 5.3 (5.1–5.4) and 4.5 (4.3–4.6). Fractures of the hip, ankle, wrist, spine, and proximal humerus comprised two-thirds of all fractures requiring hospitalization. The proportion of ankle fractures (17%) and wrist fractures (9%) was equal to that of hip fractures (27%). Four-fifths of the hospitalized fracture patients were operated. In individuals aged < 60 years, fractures requiring hospitalization were twice as common in men as in women. In individuals ≥ 60 years of age, the opposite was true. PMID:24694275

  5. Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Allison M; Hughey, Lauren C

    2010-10-01

    Scurvy is a well-known disease of vitamin C deficiency that still occurs in industrialized countries. The clinical manifestations of follicular hyperkeratosis, perifollicular petechiae, corkscrew hairs, and easy bruising are due to defective collagen synthesis and can be mistaken for small vessel vasculitis. Populations at risk for development of scurvy include elderly patients, alcohol and drug users, individuals who follow restrictive diets or have eating disorders, patients with malabsorption, and individuals with mental illness. We report an acute case of scurvy presenting in the inpatient/hospital setting with clinical findings initially thought to represent vasculitis. A high index of suspicion for scurvy must be kept in the appropriate clinical context, and a thorough medical history and physical examination are vital to make the diagnosis.

  6. Evaluation of a behavioral treatment for female urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Santacreu, Marta; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a medical, psychological, social, economic, and hygienic problem. Although it is difficult to state its prevalence, all authors agree that it is related to age and gender. This study aimed to carry out a urinary incontinence behavioral treatment in order to reduce urine leakages in 14 participants recruited from a senior center. The program consists of daily training of the pelvic floor muscles with a weekly control by a supervisor during a 2-month period and follow-up of results 2 months after the last control session. Urinary incontinence episodes were reduced by 75.67% after program completion. It appears that pelvic floor muscles training, carried out under controlled and constant supervision, significantly reduces urinary leakage. Moreover, maintaining this improvement after treatment depends on the continuation of the exercises as well as on the urinary leakage frequency baseline and the urinary leakage frequency during the last treatment session. PMID:21753868

  7. Regional Correlates of Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Pirkola, Sami; Kaila, Minna; Saarni, Samuli I.; Joffe, Grigori; Kontio, Raija; Oranta, Olli; Sadeniemi, Minna; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Current reforms of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS) emphasize community-based care and the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals. Reductions in acute and semi-acute hospital beds are achieved through shortened stays or by avoiding hospitalization. Understanding the factors that drive the current inpatient treatment provision is essential. We investigated how the MHS service structure (diversity of services and balance of personnel resources) and indicators of service need (mental health index, education, single household, and alcohol sales) correlated with acute and semi-acute inpatient treatment provision. The European Service Mapping Schedule-Revised (ESMS-R) tool was used to classify the adult MHS structure in southern Finland (population 1.8 million, 18+ years). The diversity of MHS in terms of range of outpatient and day care services or the overall personnel resourcing in inpatient or outpatient services was not associated with the inpatient treatment provision. In the univariate analyses, sold alcohol was associated with the inpatient treatment provision, while in the multivariate modeling, only a general index for mental health needs was associated with greater hospitalization. In the dehospitalization process, direct resource re-allocation and substituting of inpatient treatment with outpatient care per se is likely insufficient, since inpatient treatment is linked to contextual factors in the population and the health care system. Mental health services reforms require both strategic planning of service system as a whole and detailed understanding of effects of societal components. PMID:27929403

  8. Sexual function following surgery for urodynamic stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jha, Swati; Moran, Paul; Greenham, Helen; Ford, Caroline

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare sexual function in women before and after surgery for urodynamic stress incontinence in the absence of pelvic organ prolapse. This was a prospective questionnaire survey. Fifty-four women undergoing surgery (tension-free vaginal tape/tension-free vaginal tape-obturator) for urodynamic stress incontinence with no evidence of detrusor overactivity or concomitant prolapse were assessed preoperatively and 6 months post operatively. Assessment was based on the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ), the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement. Paired t-tests were used for comparing pre- and post-op scores and unpaired t-tests for comparing observations between groups. Spearman's rank correlation was used for testing whether two numerically scored items were related, and McNemar test was used to compare pre- and postoperative responses to individual questions. ICIQ scores showed significant improvement after surgery (p < 0.001). Women completing PISQ were significantly younger (mean = 54) than those who did not (mean = 65; p < 0.001). The total PISQ score was better postoperatively (preoperative = 87.2, postoperative = 92.7; p < 0.001), with improvements in both the physical (preoperative = 31.0, postoperative = 35.2; p < 0.001) and partner-related domains (preoperative = 18.8, postoperative = 19.9; p = 0.002) but no improvement in behaviour emotive domains (preoperative = 37.3, postoperative = 37.6; p = 0.70). There was a reduction in episodes of coital incontinence postoperatively (preoperatively = 16/54, postoperatively = 39/54; p < 0.002). Previous vaginal surgery, oestrogen status of respondents and hysterectomy status did not affect the PISQ. Surgical correction of stress incontinence is associated with an improvement in sexual function.

  9. Pregnancy and postpartum bowel changes: constipation and fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Shin, Grace Hewon; Toto, Erin Lucinda; Schey, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period are often associated with many gastrointestinal complaints, including nausea, vomiting, and heartburn; however, the most troublesome complaints in some women are defecatory disorders such as constipation and fecal incontinence, especially postpartum. These disorders are often multifactorial in etiology, and many studies have looked to see what risk factors lead to these complications. This review discusses the current knowledge of pelvic floor and anorectal physiology, especially during pregnancy, and reviews the current literature on causes and treatments of postpartum bowel symptoms of constipation and fecal incontinence.

  10. Update on the Management of Fecal Incontinence for the Gastroenterologist

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with fecal incontinence respond to conservative measures based upon a careful assessment and a multimodality approach that Is within the expertise of the practicing gastroenterologist. However, there Is a need for new and effective strategies when conservative therapy fails. This article reviews established therapies for fecal incontinence, such as biofeedback, as well as new therapies that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), such as sacral neuromodulation and an injectable bulking agent. Also reviewed are some of the newer approaches that have not yet been approved by the FDA or that have uncertain efficacy. PMID:27231444

  11. [Update on current care guidelines: urinary incontinence (female)].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Female urinary incontinence (UI) is divided into stress (SUI), urgency (UUI), mixed (MUI) and overflow incontinence (chronic retention). Advanced age, obesity and pregnancy are the most important risk factors. Standardised questionnaires are used in diagnosis. The pad test, cough stress test and bladder diary are objective tools. A gynaecological examination includes pelvic floor muscle palpation and residual urine measurement. Urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasonography are complementary tools. Guided pelvic floor-muscle training is the first-line therapy. UUI can be treated with anticholinergic medicines. If conservative treatments are ineffective, SUI and MUI can be treated surgically with mid-urethral slings (TVT TOT and TVT-0).

  12. A newly designed deodorant pad for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Fukui, J; Sakai, Y; Hosaka, K; Yamashita, T; Ogawa, A; Shirai, H

    1990-08-01

    The authors designed a new pad for urinary incontinence. It is composed of a cloth of acrylonitrile copper sulfide and another cloth of iron-phthalocyanine. In vitro experiments showed that acrylonitrile copper sulfide cloth inhibited the growth of most bacteria causing urinary tract infection, and that iron-phthalocyanine cloth effectively eliminated bad-smelling gases. The use of this pad relieved diaper-dermatitis and diminished offensive smells from feces and urine. This pad was well received by nurses and helpers taking care of incontinent elderly people.

  13. The tethered vagina syndrome, post surgical incontinence and I-plasty operation for cure.

    PubMed

    Petros, P E; Ulmsten, U I

    1990-01-01

    Urinary incontinence was observed in 19 patients after bladder neck elevation or vaginal repair operations. Characteristically, patients could not suppress their urge to micturate on getting up in the morning, and they wet before arrival at the toilet. Urodynamically, a high posterior cough transmission ratio was noted. A 1.5 cm longitudinal incision in the vagina, dissected free and resutured horizontally (I-plasty), immediately cured this particular condition, but ultimately failed in 1/3 cases. Most of these failed patients were subsequently cured by further adjustment of vaginal tension under local anaesthesia (Tuck procedure). These findings confirm the emphasis given by the Integral Theory of Female Urinary Incontinence as to maintain adequate elasticity in the zone of critical elasticity (ZCE) of the supralevator vagina. The ZCE acts as an elastic hinge, allowing (i.e. facilitates) the separate and opposite contractile forces of anterior pubococcygeus, and levator plate which are necessary to close off urethra and bladder neck respectively. Inadequate elasticity at the ZCE converts the ZCE's role from facilitation to opposition. The stronger levator muscle contraction counteracts the forward section of the weaker anterior part of pubococcygeus muscle, preventing bladder neck closure.

  14. Concomitant repair of stress urinary incontinence with proximal urethrovaginal fistula: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakonda Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal urethrovaginal fistula (UVF) located close to the bladder neck may cause extensive sphincter damage and is usually associated with continuous incontinence, which may mask the associated stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simultaneous correction of SUI avoids a second surgery for SUI, which needs dissection in ischemic fields and carries a high risk of failure. The aim of this study is to describe our technique of concomitant repair of SUI with proximal UVF and our results. Methods: Between July 2010 and August 2014, 14 patients underwent UVF repair in Jackknife position by the interposition of a Martius flap and simultaneous correction of SUI by modified McGuire pubovaginal autologous fascial sling. The procedure was carried out a minimum of 3 months of presentation and after detailed preoperative evaluation. Results: After a mean follow-up of 28 months, all 14 patients were continent. None of the patients developed recurrence of the UVF. Two patients presented with retention immediately after catheter removal and clean intermittent catheterization training was given to both of them. Two patients became pregnant during the follow-up period and were advised cesarean section near term. Conclusions: Repair of proximal UVF and correction of SUI can be performed in the same session to avoid the operation in an ischemic field. PMID:27555683

  15. Development of an adolescent inpatient sexual abuse group: application of Lewin's model of change.

    PubMed

    Riddle, C R

    1994-01-01

    The development and implementation of an adolescent sexual abuse group on an inpatient psychiatric unit is described. Steps of Kurt Lewin's model of change are used as a framework for this planned change. Specific issues concerning group procedure and process are detailed. Recommendations for this group and broader use of the Lewin model are included.

  16. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Opara, Józef; Czerwińska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study's conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 interviewed women, stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was observed in 25% of respondents; this prevalence is similar to the age-matched population; 2) among the triggering factors mentioned in stress urinary incontinence the most frequent were: coughing, laughing and sneezing; 3) moderate impact of incontinence on quality of life has been shown, but this effect was not statistically significant.

  17. [Urinary incontinence - what can be done by the family doctor and when is the urologist needed?].

    PubMed

    Keller, Isabelle Sonja; Brachlow, Jan Frederic; Padevit, Christian; Kurz, Michael; John, Hubert

    2014-10-01

    About 15% of the women and 10% of the men past the age of 65 years suffer from urinary incontinence. In most cases, accurate history taking can help differentiate between urge incontinence, stress incontinence and overflow incontinence, and is essential in choosing the appropriate treatment. Initial diagnostic testing can be conducted by the general practitioner, especially tests to exclude urinary tract infections or to rule out an overactive bladder. Patient education on changes to fluid intake and voiding habits as well as advice on suitable incontinence products are important first steps in the management of urinary continence. Also, drug treatment can be initiated in general practice. Patients with refractory urinary incontinence, particularly those who did not respond to anticholinergic medication, should be referred to a urologist for further evaluation since there may be an underlying tumour or other disorder of the bladder that is causing the incontinence.

  18. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part two: treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jimbo, Masahito; Heidelbaugh, Joel J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. In this review article we address treatment of the various forms of incontinence with conservative treatments, medical therapy, devices and surgery. The US Preventive Services Task Force, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Conservative therapy with education, fluid and food management, weight loss, timed voiding and pelvic floor physical therapy are all simple office-based treatments for incontinence. Medical therapy for incontinence currently is only available for urgency incontinence in the form of anticholinergic medication. Condom catheters, penile clamps, urethral inserts and pessaries can be helpful in specific situations. Surgical therapies vary depending on the type of incontinence, but are typically offered if conservative measures fail. PMID:23904858

  19. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study's conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 interviewed women, stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was observed in 25% of respondents; this prevalence is similar to the age-matched population; 2) among the triggering factors mentioned in stress urinary incontinence the most frequent were: coughing, laughing and sneezing; 3) moderate impact of incontinence on quality of life has been shown, but this effect was not statistically significant. PMID:26327826

  20. Electrokinetic profiles of nonowoven cotton for absorbent incontinence material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses recent work on cotton/synthetic nonwovens, their electrokinetic analysis, and their potential use in incontinence materials. Electrokinetic analysis is useful in exploring fiber surface polarity properties, and it is a useful tool to render a snap shot of the role of fiber char...

  1. Staying Trim, Strong May Cut Risk of Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... in decreasing the odds of new or worsening stress type of urinary incontinence," she said. The study was published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society . SOURCES: Anne Suskind, M.D., assistant professor of urology, University of California, San Francisco; Megan Schimpf, M.D., ...

  2. [The defecation balloon proctogram in the study of idiopathic incontinence].

    PubMed

    Ciarelli, A; Ciarelli, F; Mascia, D; Tentarelli, M

    1991-01-01

    The authors report their findings in the study of idiopathic rectal incontinence using a defecatory balloon proctogram. The study provides a detailed anatomico-functional analysis of the sphincteric tract and, together with manometric and electromyographic studies, is useful in assessing the need for reconstructive surgery and for monitoring the results of ileoanal and coloanal anastomoses, sphincteric plastic surgery and posterior anal plastic surgery.

  3. Assessment of the female patient with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Bates, Frankie

    2002-10-01

    Understanding the pelvic floor anatomy and all of its components is crucial when performing pelvic floor examination and assessing patients suffering from urinary incontinence. It is important for urology nurses to understand the pelvic floor, including the muscle, nerve, and fascia involved; external and internal examination of the vulva; and global assessment of the patient.

  4. Urinary and Fecal Incontinence in Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Felix W.; Schnelle, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Urinary and fecal incontinence (UI, FI) are co-morbid conditions affecting over 50% of nursing home residents. Both forms of incontinence are risk factors for elderly persons to be placed in the nursing home, and such institutionalization itself is a risk factor for developing incontinence. Management should focus on identifying and treating underlying causes, such as detrusor instability, urinary tract infections, diet- or medication-induced diarrhea, constipation and fecal impaction. Despite appropriate management, residents may remain incontinent because of dementia and health or restraint-related immobility. Nursing homes lack the staff and financial resources to provide residents with sufficiently frequent toileting assistance (including prompted voiding). Use of special undergarments and absorbent pads is the usual practice. The article reviews the results of studies that have documented how prompted voiding programs can significantly reduce UI and FI, particularly if the intervention includes dietary and exercise components. Recent systematic anorectal testing of nursing home residents with FI has documented impaired sphincter function (risk factor for FI), decreased rectal sensation and sphincter dyssynergia (risk factor for constipation and impaction). The data suggest that the use of laxatives and stool softeners for prophylaxis against constipation and impaction related to underlying dyssynergia may have produced sufficient fluidity in the stool to predispose the residents with impaired sphincter function to manifest FI. Documentation of non-invasive and efficacious interventions by RCT and the labor costs of implementing these measures can lead to changes in how nursing home care is provided and funded. PMID:18794004

  5. The development of national quality performance standards for disposable absorbent products for adult incontinence.

    PubMed

    Muller, Nancy; McInnis, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    Disposable absorbent products are widely used in inpatient care settings and in the community to manage adult urinary and fecal incontinence, but few product standards exist to help guide their production or optimal use. Increasing costs and reduced revenues have caused a number of states to evaluate absorbent product use among persons who receive care at home with the assistance of the Medicaid Waiver Program, further increasing concerns about the lack of product performance standards. To address these issues, the National Association For Continence (NAFC) formed a council of experts and key stakeholders with the objective of establishing national, independent quality performance standards for disposable absorbent products provided by states to Waiver Program recipients. The Council consisted of representatives from five purposefully selected states, technical directors from six nonwoven product manufacturers, an officer of the nonwoven manufactures trade association, a delegate from an academic nursing program and professional societies, a family caregiver, and a patient representative. Following a consensus method and guidelines for use, nine specific recommendations were developed, posted for public comment, and further refined. Final recommendations for product performance assessment include: rewet rate (a measure of a product's ability to withstand multiple incontinent episodes between changes), rate of acquisition (a measure of the speed at which urine is drawn away from the skin by a product, product retention capacity (a measure of a product's capacity to hold fluid without rewetting the skin), sizing options, absorbency levels, product safety, closure technology, breathable zones (a measure of the air permeability across a textile-like fabric at a controlled differential pressure), and elasticity. The Council also set values for and recommended four quantifiable parameters, and the testing methodology associated with each, to help consumers and states

  6. Incontinence and gait disturbance after intraventricular extension of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Andrew J.; Sekar, Padmini; Haverbusch, Mary; Osborne, Jennifer; Moomaw, Charles J.; Martini, Sharyl; Hosseini, Shahla M.; Ferioli, Simona; Worrall, Bradford B.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sung, Gene; James, Michael L.; Testai, Fernando D.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Broderick, Joseph P.; Koch, Sebastian; Flaherty, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is associated with incontinence and gait disturbance among survivors of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) at 3-month follow-ups. Methods: The Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for Hemorrhagic Stroke study was used as the discovery set. The Ethnic/Racial Variations of Intracerebral Hemorrhage study served as a replication set. Both studies performed prospective hot-pursuit recruitment of ICH cases with 3-month follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were computed to identify risk factors for incontinence and gait dysmobility at 3 months after ICH. Results: The study population consisted of 307 ICH cases in the discovery set and 1,374 cases in the replication set. In the discovery set, we found that increasing IVH volume was associated with incontinence (odds ratio [OR] 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10–2.06) and dysmobility (OR 1.58; 95% CI 1.17–2.15) after controlling for ICH location, initial ICH volume, age, baseline modified Rankin Scale score, sex, and admission Glasgow Coma Scale score. In the replication set, increasing IVH volume was also associated with both incontinence (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.27–1.60) and dysmobility (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.24–1.57) after controlling for the same variables. Conclusion: ICH subjects with IVH extension are at an increased risk for developing incontinence and dysmobility after controlling for factors associated with severity and disability. This finding suggests a potential target to prevent or treat long-term disability after ICH with IVH. PMID:26850978

  7. Caffeine Intake and Risk of Urinary Incontinence Progression Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Mary K.; Resnick, Neil M.; Grodstein, Francine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between long-term caffeine intake and risk of urinary incontinence (UI) progression over 2 years among women with moderate UI. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in 21,564 women with moderate UI enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study II. Incontinence progression was identified from questionnaires during 2 years of follow-up. Baseline caffeine intake (ie, average intake during the past year) and change in caffeine intake during the 4 years prior to baseline were measured using food frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) for incontinence progression according to caffeine intake were calculated for each cohort separately, and then for both cohorts combined. Results The percentage of women with UI progression was similar across categories of baseline level of caffeine intake and change in caffeine intake prior to baseline. For example, percentages were 21% versus 22% comparing 450 mg or more to less than 150 mg of caffeine per day (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.08). Comparing women with increased caffeine intake to those with stable caffeine intake, percentages with progression were 22% versus 20% (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22). Results were similar in separate analyses of urgency and stress UI. Conclusion Long-term caffeine intake over one year was not associated with risk of UI progression over 2 years among women with moderate incontinence, although we could not examine acute effects of caffeine. Improved understanding of the effect of caffeine on the bladder is needed to better advise women with incontinence about caffeine intake. PMID:22525905

  8. Classification and treatment of functional incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Nijman, R J

    2000-05-01

    Functional urinary incontinence in children may be caused by disturbances of the filling phase, the voiding phase or a combination of both. Detrusor overactivity may cause frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence. Girls present with symptoms of detrusor overactivity more often than boys, but sometimes other symptoms, e.g. urinary tract infections or constipation, prevail. Frequent contractions of the detrusor may cause the pelvic floor muscles to become overactive, resulting in staccato or fractionated voiding. When incontinence is the result of a voiding disorder the term 'dysfunctional voiding' is used. Bladder function in these children may be normal, but instability may be present. In children with a 'lazy' bladder, voiding occurs with no detrusor contractions, and postvoid residual volumes and overflow incontinence are the main characteristics. Diagnosis is based on the medical and voiding history, a physical examination, bladder diaries and uroflowmetry. The upper urinary tract should be evaluated in children with recurrent infections and dysfunctional voiding (reflux). Uroflowmetry can be combined with pelvic floor electromyography to detect overactivity of the pelvic floor muscles. Urodynamic studies are usually reserved for patients with dysfunctional voiding and those not responding to anticholinergic drugs. Treatment is usually a combination of 'standard therapy', behavioural therapy, bladder training, physiotherapy and medical treatment. The role of alpha-blockers needs to be evaluated further. Also, neuromodulation may have a place in treatment but the exact indications need to be defined. Clean intermittent self-catheterization is sometimes necessary in children with a lazy bladder and large residual volumes who do not respond to a more conservative approach. Future research needs to be directed towards improving understanding of the pathophysiology, epidemiology, classification and treatment modalities of functional incontinence in

  9. Guideline-Based Strategies in the Surgical Treatment of Female Urinary Incontinence: The New Gold Standard is Almost the Same as the Old One

    PubMed Central

    Viereck, V.; Bader, W.; Lobodasch, K.; Pauli, F.; Bentler, R.; Kölbl, H.

    2016-01-01

    The modern sling procedures for treating female stress urinary incontinence encompass numerous methods, materials and manufacturers. On the basis of the current S2e guidelines, the methods used most frequently in the diagnosis of and therapy for stress urinary incontinence in women are critically illustrated. An individualised procedure is necessary for the choice of the surgical method, especially in the presence of accompanying pathologies. This article is intended to help the treating physician to carry out quality-assured diagnostics and therapy for the patient and to offer the best possible urogynaecological management. In addition to the complications and chances of success of the surgical options, the legal aspects of therapy planning are also taken into consideration. PMID:27570251

  10. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The reasons for either— (i) Hospitalization of the patient for inpatient medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for...

  11. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The reasons for either— (i) Hospitalization of the patient for inpatient medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for...

  12. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  13. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  14. Risk of Urinary Incontinence Following Prostatectomy: The Role of Physical Activity and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Luly, Jason; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Andriole, Gerald L.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Urinary incontinence is one of the most commonly reported and distressing side effects of radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma. Several studies have suggested that symptoms may be worse in obese men but to our knowledge no research has addressed the joint effects of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. We evaluated the association of obesity and lack of physical activity with urinary incontinence in a sample of men who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods Height and weight were abstracted from charts, and obesity was defined as body mass index 30 kg/m2 or greater. Men completed a questionnaire before surgery that included self-report of vigorous physical activity. Men who reported 1 hour or more per week of vigorous activities were considered physically active. Men reported their incontinence to the surgeon at their urology visits. Information on incontinence was abstracted from charts at 6 and 58 weeks after surgery. Results At 6 weeks after surgery 59% (405) of men were incontinent, defined as any pad use. At 58 weeks after surgery 22% (165) of men were incontinent. At 58 weeks incontinence was more prevalent in men who were obese and physically inactive (59% incontinent). Physical activity may offset some of the negative consequences of being obese because the prevalence of incontinence at 58 weeks was similar in the obese and active (25% incontinent), and nonbese and inactive (24% incontinent) men. The best outcomes were in men who were nonobese and physically active (16% incontinent). Men who were not obese and were active were 26% less likely to be incontinent than men who were obese and inactive (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.52–1.06). Conclusions Pre-prostatectomy physical activity and obesity may be important factors in post-prostatectomy continence levels. Interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and decreasing weight in patients with prostate cancer may improve quality of life by offsetting the negative side effects

  15. Delayed sigmoid colon perforation and enterocutaneous fistula due to tension free transvaginal tape operation for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Kyu; Sohn, Dong Wan

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old female patient presented with sustained sigmoid colon perforation at the time of a tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure and subsequently developed enterocutaneous fistula and subcutaneous abscess. She came to our emergency department complaining of left lower abdominal tenderness and swelling for 2 weeks previously. Her right thigh also was tender and swollen. A foreign body in sigmoid colon and subcutaneous abscess were found on computed tomography scan. We diagnosed the perforation of sigmoid colon and enterocutaneous fistula by TVT mesh. We performed laparoscopic excision of the mesh in sigmoid colon. We performed transobturator tape surgery for recurrence of stress urinary incontinence after 6 months. PMID:26085881

  16. The Impact of Central Obesity on Storage Luts and Urinary Incontinence After Prostatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gacci, Mauro; Sebastianelli, Arcangelo; Salvi, Matteo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Gravas, Stavros; Moncada, Ignacio; Serni, Sergio; Maggi, Mario; Vignozzi, Linda

    2016-09-01

    In the developed and developing countries, the overall prevalence of central obesity in the elderly men is growing. In addition, the progressive aging of male population increased the possibilities of coexisting morbidities associated with obesity such as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) or to prostate cancer (PCa) needing primary treatment, including radical prostatectomy (RP), which can further adversely affect the quality of life. Simple and radical prostatectomy are the most common surgical procedures in urologic unit all over the world for BPE and PCa, respectively. After both interventions, patients can present bothering storage LUTS that can worsen all the other clinical outcomes. Preset study will review the role of central obesity as a risk factor for storage LUTS or urinary incontinence, after prostatic surgery for BPE or PCa.

  17. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-15

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  18. A review of token economy treatment programs for psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Milby, J B

    1975-10-01

    The author has reviewed outcome studies of token economy programs for psychiatric inpatients. Only studies that employed some control procedures in their evaluation were included. Token economies were most effective in modifying inhospital work, personal care, and some psychotic behaviors. Studies that assessed token programs to prepare patients for community living and reduce recidivism generally affirmed the effectiveness of token procedures, but the studies were poorly designed, and they lacked systematic follow-up data. Almost all studies failed to examine possible interactions between chemotherapy and the token economies. The author suggests the need for studies using token economies with psychiatric patients other than chronic schizophrenics, who have been studied almost exclusively to date.

  19. Systematic review of the management of incontinence and promotion of continence in older people in care homes: descriptive studies with urinary incontinence as primary focus

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Brenda; Flanagan, Lisa; Jack, Barbara; Barrett, James; Chung, Alan; Shaw, Christine; Williams, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Aim This is a review of descriptive studies with incontinence as the primary focus in older people in care homes. Background Incontinence is prevalent among residents of care home populations. Data sources MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched from 1996 to 2007 using the highly sensitive search strings of the Cochrane Incontinence Review Group for urinary and faecal incontinence including all research designs. Search strings were modified to enhance selectiveness for care homes and older people and exclude studies involving surgical or pharmacological interventions. Searching of reference sections from identified studies was also used to supplement electronic searches. The Cochrane Library was searched for relevant systematic reviews to locate relevant studies from those included or excluded from reviews. The search was limited to English-language publications. Methods A systematic review of studies on the management of incontinence, promotion of continence or maintenance of continence in care homes was conducted in 2007–2009. This is a report of descriptive studies. Results Ten studies were identified that reported on prevalence and incidence of incontinence (urinary with or without faecal), policies, assessment, documentation, management or economic evaluation of its management. Use of incontinence pads and toileting programmes comprised the most common management approaches used. No studies were identified that attempted to maintain continence of residents in care homes. Conclusions Studies on maintaining continence and identifying components of toileting programmes that are successful in managing or preventing incontinence and promoting continence in residents of care home populations along with their economic evaluation are warranted. PMID:21105895

  20. Medicare program; hospital outpatient prospective payment system and CY 2007 payment rates; CY 2007 update to the ambulatory surgical center covered procedures list; Medicare administrative contractors; and reporting hospital quality data for FY 2008 inpatient prospective payment system annual payment update program--HCAHPS survey, SCIP, and mortality. Final rule with comment period and final rule.

    PubMed

    2006-11-24

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system, and to implement certain related provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 and the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005. In this final rule with comment period, we describe changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. In addition, this final rule with comment period implements future CY 2009 required reporting on quality measures for hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. This final rule with comment period revises the current list of procedures that are covered when furnished in a Medicare-approved ambulatory surgical center (ASC), which are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. This final rule with comment period revises the emergency medical screening requirements for critical access hospitals (CAHs). This final rule with comment period supports implementation of a restructuring of the contracting entities responsibilities and functions that support the adjudication of Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) claims. This restructuring is directed by section 1874A of the Act, as added by section 911 of the MMA. The prior separate Medicare intermediary and Medicare carrier contracting authorities under Title XVIII of the Act have been replaced with the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) authority. This final rule continues to implement the requirements of the DRA that require that we expand the "starter set" of 10 quality measures that we used in FY 2005 and FY 2006 for the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) Reporting Hospital Quality Data

  1. Female stress urinary incontinence: standard techniques revisited and critical evaluation of innovative techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: The treatment of female urinary incontinence (UI) is a growing health care concern in our aging society. Publications of recent innovations and modifications are creating expectations. This brief review provides some insight and structure regarding indications and expected outcomes for the different approaches. Materials: Data extraction is part of a Medline data base search, which was performed for "female stress incontinence" from 1960 until 2000. Additional literature search was performed to cover 2001 and 2002. Outcome data were extracted. Results: (1) INJECTION OF BULKING AGENTS (collagen, synthetic agents): The indication for mucosal coaptation was more clearly defined and in the majority of articles limited to ISD. (2) OPEN COLPOSUSPENSION (Burch, MMK): Best long-term results of all operative procedures, to date considered the gold standard. (3) LAPAROSCOPIC COLPOSUSPENSION (different modifications): Long-term success rates appear dependent on operator skills. There are few long-term data. (4) NEEDLE SUSPENSION: (Stamey, Pareyra and modifications): Initial results were equal to Burch with less morbidity, but long-term success rates are worse. (5) SLING PROCEDURES (autologous, synthetic, allogenic graft materials, different modes of support and anchoring, free tapes): The suburethral sling has traditionally been considered a procedure for those in whom suspension had failed and for those with severe ISD. The most current trend shows its use as a primary procedure for SUI. Long-term data beyond 5 years are insufficient. (6) EXTERNAL OCCLUSIVE DEVICES (vaginal sponges and pessaries, urethral insert): Both vaginal and urethral insert devices can be effective in selected patients. (7) IMPLANTABLE ARTEFICIAL URETHRAL SPHINCTERS: Modifications and improvements of the devices resulted in improved clinical results regarding durability and efficacy. CONCLUSION: (1) The Burch colposuspension is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of female

  2. Determining adolescents' suitability for inpatient psychotherapy: utility of the clinician-rated Readiness for Inpatient Psychotherapy Scale with an adolescent inpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Greg; Siefert, Caleb; Stoycheva, Valentina; Sinclair, Samuel Justin; Baity, Matthew; Zodan, Jennifer; Mehra, Ashwin; Chand, Vijay; Blais, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Growing economic pressure on inpatient services for adolescents has resulted in fewer clinicians to provide individual psychotherapy. As a result, inpatient treatment trends have favored group psychotherapy modalities and psychopharmacological interventions. Currently, no clinician-rated measures exist to assist clinicians in determining who would be able to better utilize individual psychotherapy on inpatient units. The current study sought to demonstrate the utility of the Readiness for Inpatient Psychotherapy Scale with an adolescent inpatient sample. This study also used the RIPS as it is intended to be used in everyday practice. Results from the authors' analyses reveal that the RIPS demonstrates good psychometrics and interrater reliability, as well as construct validity.

  3. [Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in female workers of hotels].

    PubMed

    Fontana, L; Falconi, G; Di Martino, T; Iavicoli, I

    2007-01-01

    The International Continence Society defines urinary incontinence (UI) as "a condition in which involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable". There are three different jorms of UI. stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed incontinence. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of UI in a group of female workers in the hotel sector. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI Short Form) was administered to all female workers and data were collected about age, body mass index, number of vaginal and Caesarean delivery. Results showed a prevalence of UI widely bigger in the plans waitress than in video display terminal workers and suggest the hypothesis that manual handling of loads representing a possible occupational risk for UI.

  4. Urinary incontinence in women: a comprehensive review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, P; Dmochowski, R

    2014-10-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) or involuntary leakage of urine is a distressing and serious health problem. It has a significant psychosocial and economic burden leading to significant quality of life issues. UI is more prevalent than most chronic diseases yet largely underreported. Aging and age-related changes in the bladder play a significant role in the development of UI. This in combination with cognitive dysfunction, functional impairment, pharmacotherapy, smoking, childbearing, obesity and coexisiting comorbidities worsen the condition. Due to the burden UI places on the individual, their family and society, it is important for providers to diagnose and have ready treatment options available. The three most common types of UI are stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge urinary incontinence (UUI), or a combination of both, mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). This review describes the pathophysiology of incontinence; and diagnosis and treatment (conservative, pharmacological, and surgical therapies) of incontinence in women.

  5. Live concerts reduce cancer inpatients' anxiety.

    PubMed

    Toccafondi, A; Bonacchi, A; Mambrini, A; Miccinesi, G; Prosseda, R; Cantore, M

    2016-10-10

    In Italy a new experience of music medicine called "The Music Givers" is spreading among Oncology Units; it aims to organise weekly live concerts (length 45-60 min) followed by a buffet. Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the format of The Music Givers on cancer in-patients' anxiety. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y) was administered to 111 in-patients before and after the concerts. After the concerts we observed a 3.87 point decrease in state anxiety (p < .001) and statistically significant differences in most of the domains assessed by STAI-Y. These results invite a reflection on the importance of offering to inpatients events such as live music concerts, in order to improve their psychological condition during hospitalisation.

  6. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    PubMed

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases.

  7. Teaching strategies for assessing and managing urinary incontinence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Cacchione, Pamela

    2010-07-01

    Urinary incontinence is common and affects many aspects of older adults' lives; therefore, it is essential that nursing faculty include this content in classroom and clinical teaching situations. This article describes innovative strategies for teaching upper-level nursing students (e.g., junior and senior undergraduates) about urinary incontinence in older adults, specifically, the relevant anatomy and physiology of continence and associated pathophysiology of urinary incontinence, risk factors and consequences, definitions and types, and effective nursing assessment and management strategies.

  8. The Association between Urinary Incontinence and Low Back Pain and Radiculopathy in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kaptan, Hulagu; Kulaksızoğlu, Haluk; Kasımcan, Ömür; Seçkin, Bedreddin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common dysfunction, affecting especially women of all ages. The terminology of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy (RP) may be misused interchangeably with each other. There are many reports of the association with LBP and incontinence but those involving compression of nerve root(as RP), has not been distinguished from isolated low back pain. This study was structured to analyse the association of UI, LBP and RP. METHODS: One hundred twenty patients were included in the study. Patients with spinal or urinary infection, tumour (spinal or others), cauda equine, pelvic operation, spinal trauma, spinal surgery, urogenital pathology were not accepted for this study. Age and weight of all patients were determined. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was utilised for assessment of loss of function and SEAPI incontinence index was used for urinary incontinence. All patients were examined for neurological pathology to differentiate between the LBP and RP by department of neurosurgery. Student t-test and Mann-Whitney-U tests were used for statistical significance. RESULTS: There was no statistical significance between low back pain with overall urinary incontinence (p = 0.131), urge (p = 0.103) or stress incontinence (p = 0.68), respectively. However; The statistical aspects were identified relationship between overall (p = 0.026) and urge (p = 0.001) urinary incontinence with radiculopathy. The association of urge incontinence and radiculopathy seems to show a more significant relationship. Yet there was no correlation between radiculopathy and stress incontinence (P = 0.062). CONCLUSION: Low back pain should not be regarded as a predisposing factor for urinary incontinence; however, radiculopathy has a statistically positive correlation between overall incontinence and urge incontinence. PMID:28028410

  9. Clinical profile of elderly urinary incontinence in Singapore: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S; Chan, C J; Merriman, A; Tan, E C; Osborn, V

    1991-11-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence in the elderly aged 65 years and above was found to be 4.6% (42 out of a total of 919 respondents), in a community-based study in Singapore. Urinary incontinence was defined as leakage of urine on at least two occasions in the previous one month. The clinical profile of 30 out of the 42 (71%) subjects were studied. There was equal distribution of male and female subjects. Eighteen (60%) of the subjects were below 75 years of age. Twenty-five (83.3%) subjects had severe incontinence. Twenty-four (80%) had the incontinence for more than one year. Despite the high percentage of patients with severe incontinence, only nine (30%) used some form of aid. Incontinence in our very old (75 years and above) was not related to frailty or physical dependence. Seven of the subjects (23.3%) were found to have functional incontinence associated with cognitive impairment. These patients were unable to indicate their toilet needs. They also had associated physical disability as well as double incontinence, and their carers were under stress. Ten of the subjects had pure urge incontinence. Seven of them had an underlying central nervous system disorder, suggesting that destrusor hyperreflexia may be the underlying cause for urinary incontinence in this group. All except one in this group had more than one possible precipitating factor for their incontinence. Eleven subjects had symptoms suggestive of outlet obstruction, although only two were found to have proven outlet obstruction. None of the female subjects had pure stress incontinence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Hypnotherapy for incontinence caused by the unstable detrusor.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R M; Baxby, K

    1982-01-01

    Fifty incontinent women with proved detrusor instability completed 12 sessions of hypnosis (symptom removal by direct suggestion and "ego strengthening") over one month. This was continued at home with a prerecorded cassette, and all patients were followed up for at least six months. At the end of the 12 sessions 29 patients were entirely symptom free, 14 improved, and seven unchanged. Three months later cystometry in 44 of the patients showed conversion of the cystometrogram to stability in 22 and a significant improvement in a further 16; only six showed no objective improvement. Seven patients relapsed (three after bereavement). Further treatment was given and five out of six patients were rendered symptom free again. Patients with detrusor instability were not found to have a noticeably increased susceptibility to hypnosis. It is concluded that psychological factors are very important in "idiopathic" detrusor instability and that hypnotherapy is effective for incontinence due to this disorder. PMID:6805716

  11. Barrier products in the treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yaping

    2016-07-20

    This article reviews contemporary primary research studies to establish the evidence supporting the use of barrier products and evaluate practice regarding their use in the acute hospital setting. Six primary research studies investigating the use of barrier products for preventing and managing incontinence-associated dermatitis were reviewed. The aim was to identify the most effective treatments for incontinence-associated dermatitis to enhance the quality of life of patients. The studies identified that there is no significant difference in efficacy between petrolatum, zinc oxide oil and a polymer-based barrier film, and that a polymer-based barrier film is more cost-effective than petrolatum or zinc oxide. However, further robust research studies are required to inform practice. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of barrier products can be enhanced by providing education in clinical practice on consistent skin care regimens and effective use of barrier products.

  12. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: new insights into an old problem.

    PubMed

    Voegeli, David

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common skin disorder seen in patients with incontinence. Typically IAD presents as inflammation of the skin surface characterised by redness, and in extreme cases, swelling and blister formation. If untreated this usually rapidly leads to excoriation and skin breakdown, which may subsequently become infected by the skin flora. While this is a common condition encountered in all areas of nursing practice, gaps remain in our understanding of the many contributing factors. A lack of standardised definitions of IAD, differences in terminology, and a bewildering increase in products available to prevent and manage IAD, makes it difficult for nurses to deliver evidence-based care. However, it is an area where nursing research has made a considerable contribution over the past few years. This article explores the current thinking on IAD and the implications for nursing practice.

  13. Inpatient Therapeutic Assessment With Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supporting the effectiveness of Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment (C/TA) has led clinicians and researchers to apply C/TA to a variety of clinical populations and treatment settings. This case example presents a C/TA inpatient adaptation illustrated with narcissistic personality disorder. After a brief overview of salient concepts, I provide a detailed account of the clinical interview, test interpretation paired with diagnostic considerations specific to narcissism, planned intervention, and discussion of assessment results. Throughout the case study, I attempt to demonstrate defining features of C/TA, inpatient adaptations, and clinical techniques that encourage meaningful engagement with a "hard to reach" personality.

  14. [Therapeutic factors of inpatient analytic group psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tschuschke, V; Catina, A; Beckh, T; Salvini, D

    1992-01-01

    Several change mechanisms, their interrelationship, and their relation to outcome as well as to long-term follow-ups have been investigated in an inpatient group therapy. Eight of initially ten patients finished a long-term group in an inpatient setting for severe neurotics and personality disorders. Successful patients were able to change significant behavior characteristics, to develop a higher cohesiveness towards the group and especially to use aspects of family reenactment in order to change internalized significant object representations. The results indicate that important changes occur early during the treatment. The contributing change mechanisms and their interdependency are described and discussed in detail.

  15. Risperidone-associated urinary incontinence in patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Koichiro; Imasaka, Yasushi; Iwata, Kazuhiko; Tomoda, Akemi; Mimura, Masaru

    2014-10-01

    We report several cases in which patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation who received risperidone experienced urinary incontinence. We retrospectively investigated the medical records of patients housed in facilities for patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation. Those who had undergone a medical examination at a hospital in Tokyo from April 1999 to March 2009 were included in the study.Retrospective data were gathered including age, sex, IQ, birth weight, dosage of risperidone, urinary density, as well as existence of urinary and fecal incontinence. We divided the participants into those who did and did not experience urinary incontinence after taking risperidone and compared the 2 groups. Risperidone had been prescribed to 35 patients. In spite of the fact that no patient had a history of urinary incontinence, 14 patients experienced urinary incontinence after receiving risperidone. Moreover, 4 of these 14 patients also had fecal incontinence. Among the variables we examined, the only significant difference between groups was in sex, with significantly more women experiencing incontinence compared with men. When the dose of risperidone was reduced or the patients switched to other drugs, urinary incontinence of the patients improved.Hence, risperidone may have a casual relationship with urinary incontinence. Further research is needed to understand the pathophysiology of possible effect.

  16. Promoting social continence: products and devices in the management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Doughty, Dorothy; Moore, Katherine N; Wooldridge, Leslie

    2003-12-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a prevalent problem occurring in men and women across the lifespan. Technologic innovations have provided individuals with incontinence and caregivers with an array of options for achieving social continence. Even when UI cannot be completely cured, it can always be managed with products, skin care regimens, occlusive or drainage devices and toileting equipment to ensure optimal skin integrity, odorless urine containment, social independence, comfort, and freedom of movement. Various products, devices, and equipment available to help incontinent individuals preserve independence and quality of life and manage incontinence are described.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF QUALITY INDICATORS FOR WOMEN WITH URINARY INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Scott, Victoria C. S.; Kiyosaki, Krista; Khan, Aqsa A.; Weinberg, Avivah; Connor, Sarah E.; Roth, Carol P.; Wenger, Neil; Shekelle, Paul; Litwin, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS To develop a means to measure the quality of care provided to women treated for urinary incontinence (UI) through the development of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). METHODS We performed an extensive literature review to develop a set of potential quality indicators for the management of urinary incontinence. QIs were modeled after those previously described in the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project. Nine experts ranked the indicators on a nine-point scale for both validity and feasibility. We analyzed preliminary rankings of each indicator using the RAND Appropriateness Method. A forum was then held in which each indicator was thoroughly discussed by the panelists as a group, after which the indicators were rated a second time individually using the same nine-point scale. RESULTS QIs were developed that addressed screening, diagnosis, work-up, and both non-surgical and surgical management. Areas of controversy included whether routine screening for incontinence should be performed, whether urodynamics should be performed before non-surgical management is initiated, and whether cystoscopy should be part of the pre-operative work-up of uncomplicated stress incontinence. Following the expert panel discussion, 27 of 40 potential indicators were determined to be valid for UI with a median score of at least seven on a nine-point scale. CONCLUSIONS We identified 27 quality indicators for the care of women with UI. Once these QIs are pilot-tested for feasibility, they will be applied on a larger scale to measure the quality of care provided to women with UI in the United States. PMID:24105879

  18. Regenerative medicine based applications to combat stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Hatim; Sharma, Arun K

    2013-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), as an isolated symptom, is not a life threatening condition. However, the fear of unexpected urine leakage contributes to a significant decline in quality of life parameters for afflicted patients. Compared to other forms of incontinence, SUI cannot be easily treated with pharmacotherapy since it is inherently an anatomic problem. Treatment options include the use of bio-injectable materials to enhance closing pressures, and the placement of slings to bolster fascial support to the urethra. However, histologic findings of degeneration in the incontinent urethral sphincter invite the use of tissues engineering strategies to regenerate structures that aid in promoting continence. In this review, we will assess the role of stem cells in restoring multiple anatomic and physiological aspects of the sphincter. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells and CD34+ cells have shown great promise to differentiate into muscular and vascular components, respectively. Evidence supporting the use of cytokines and growth factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor further enhance the viability and direction of differentiation. Bridging the benefits of stem cells and growth factors involves the use of synthetic scaffolds like poly (1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) thin films. POC scaffolds are synthetic, elastomeric polymers that serve as substrates for cell growth, and upon degradation, release growth factors to the microenvironment in a controlled, predictable fashion. The combination of cellular, cytokine and scaffold elements aims to address the pathologic deficits to urinary incontinence, with a goal to improve patient symptoms and overall quality of life. PMID:24179600

  19. Artificial urinary sphincter for post-prostatectomy incontinence: a review.

    PubMed

    James, Mary H; McCammon, Kurt A

    2014-06-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. The AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA) is the most commonly implanted artificial urinary sphincter. Having been on the market for almost 40 years, there is an abundance of literature regarding its use, but no recent review has been published. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes and complications of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. A PubMed search was carried out for articles on the artificial urinary sphincter from 1995 to present. The review was centered on articles related to the use of the AMS 800 for stress urinary incontinence in males after prostatectomy. Relevant articles were reviewed. The majority of patients will achieve social continence (1 pad per day) after artificial urinary sphincter implantation; however, rates of total continence (no pad usage) are significantly lower. Patient satisfaction outcomes average greater than 80% in most series. Potential complications requiring reoperation include infection (0.5-10.6%) and urethral erosion (2.9-12%). Revision surgeries are most commonly as a result of urethral atrophy, which ranges from 1.6 to 11.4%. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from reoperation ranges from 50 to 79%, while the 10-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from mechanical failure is 64%. The artificial urinary sphincter is a reliable device with good outcomes. As expected with any prosthetic device, complications including mechanical failure, infection, erosion and recurrent incontinence remain significant concerns. Despite known complications, the patient satisfaction rates after artificial urinary sphincter implantation remain high. Appropriate patient counseling and adherence to surgical principles are imperative.

  20. Inpatient Complexity in Radiology-a Practical Application of the Case Mix Index Metric.

    PubMed

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Hall, Christopher S; Flacke, Sebastian; Thomas, Shiby; Wald, Christoph

    2017-01-12

    With ongoing healthcare payment reforms in the USA, radiology is moving from its current state of a revenue generating department to a new reality of a cost-center. Under bundled payment methods, radiology does not get reimbursed for each and every inpatient procedure, but rather, the hospital gets reimbursed for the entire hospital stay under an applicable diagnosis-related group code. The hospital case mix index (CMI) metric, as defined by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has a significant impact on how much hospitals get reimbursed for an inpatient stay. Oftentimes, patients with the highest disease acuity are treated in tertiary care radiology departments. Therefore, the average hospital CMI based on the entire inpatient population may not be adequate to determine department-level resource utilization, such as the number of technologists and nurses, as case length and staffing intensity gets quite high for sicker patients. In this study, we determine CMI for the overall radiology department in a tertiary care setting based on inpatients undergoing radiology procedures. Between April and September 2015, CMI for radiology was 1.93. With an average of 2.81, interventional neuroradiology had the highest CMI out of the ten radiology sections. CMI was consistently higher across seven of the radiology sections than the average hospital CMI of 1.81. Our results suggest that inpatients undergoing radiology procedures were on average more complex in this hospital setting during the time period considered. This finding is relevant for accurate calculation of labor analytics and other predictive resource utilization tools.

  1. Outpatient- and inpatient-based buckling surgery: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Cheol; Kim, Yu Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes of ambulatory buckling surgery, comparing outpatient- with inpatient-based surgery. Methods The authors performed a retrospective study of 80 consecutive cases of rhegmato genous retinal detachment from January 2009 to December 2011 treated by scleral buckling surgery. Two groups of patients were defined according to inpatient (group 1) or outpatient (group 2) surgery, and a comparison of several parameters between these two groups was performed. Results Of the 80 subjects in this study, the average age of group 1 (50 patients) was 49.7 years, and that of group 2 (30 patients) was 47.5 years. There were no statistically significant differences in the average logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution-visual acuity, the condition of the lens, or the presence of retinal lattice degeneration prior to the surgery between the groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the patterns of tear or retinal detachment or in surgical procedure between the groups. Comparing the best-corrected visual acuity after 6 months with that prior to the surgery, the changes in group 1 and group 2 were 0.26 and 0.31, respectively. The functional success rates of group 1 and group 2 after 6 months were 90% and 93%, respectively, and the anatomical success rates of group 1 and group 2 after 6 months were 94% and 96%, respectively, but these were also statistically insignificant. Conclusion Hospitalization is not essential for buckling surgery in uncomplicated rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery. PMID:24812485

  2. The Impact of Stress Incontinence Surgery of Female Sexual Function

    PubMed Central

    BRUBAKER, Linda; CHIANG, Seing; ZYCZYNSKI, Halina; NORTON, Peggy; KALINOSKI, D. Lynn; STODDARD, Anne; KUSEK, John W.; STEERS, William

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe change in sexual function 2 years after surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence. Methods This analysis included 655 women randomized to Burch colposuspension or sling surgery. Sexual activity was assessed by the PISQ-12 among those sexually active at baseline and two years after surgery. Results Mean PISQ-12 total score improved from baseline 32.23±6.85 to 36.85± 5.89. After surgery, fewer subjects reported incontinence (9% vs. 53%, p<0.0001), restriction of sexual activity due to fear of incontinence (10% vs. 52%, p<0.0001), avoidance of intercourse because of vaginal bulging (3% vs. 24%, p<0.0001) or negative emotional reactions during sex (9% vs. 35%, p<0.0001). Women with successful surgery had greater improvement PISQ-12 scores (5.77 vs. 3.79), p<0.006. Sexually active women were younger, thinner, and had lower MESA scores (total and urge subscale) than sexually inactive women. Conclusion Sexual function improves following successful surgery and did not differ between Burch or sling. PMID:19286143

  3. Quality of Life after Surgery for Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tennstedt, S. L.; Litman, H. J.; Zimmern, P.; Ghetti, C.; Kusek, J. W.; Nager, C.W.; Mueller, E.R.; Kraus, S.R.; Varner, E.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated changes in condition-specific quality of life (QOL) after surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Data from 655 women in a clinical trial comparing the Burch and fascial sling were examined. Results Improvement in QOL, measured with the IIQ (mean decrease 133.1; s.d. 109.8), was observed 6 months after surgery and persisted at 24 months. Women for whom surgery was successful (regardless of surgery type) had greater improvement in QOL (mean decrease 160.0; s.d 103.9) than did women for whom surgery was not successful (mean decrease 113.6; s.d 110.9) (p<0.0001), although not statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. Multivariable analysis showed that QOL improvement was related to decreased UI symptom bother, greater improvement in UI severity, younger age, Hispanic ethnicity and receiving Burch surgery. Among sexually active women, worsening sexual function had a negative impact on QOL. Conclusion Improved QOL was explained most by UI symptom improvement. Brief Summary Improvements in quality of life after stress incontinence surgery are significant, durable over 24 months, and associated with improvement of incontinence symptoms and symptom bother. PMID:18682875

  4. [Female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy. A bibliographical review].

    PubMed

    Navarro García, Miguel Angel; De Carlos Alegre, Vanessa

    2009-10-01

    The authors have prepared a brief bibliographical review on female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy. The high degree of incidence this disorder has and the introduction of the latest sanitary techniques combine to make necessary a profound review which aids medical professionals to realize the magnitude of this problem, as well as to diagnose and treat it effectively. Female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy is an involuntary urine loss associated to the physical effort which an increase in abdominal pressure provokes. A literary review of articles related to this disorder leaves no doubt that among the risk factors which make a woman be predisposed to suffer female stress urinary incontinence, obstetric trauma as a consequence of pregnancy and birth is a main risk factor. The authors describe a couple of diagnostic tools, a ICIQ-SF questionnaire, and therapeutic tools, the pelvic floor muscle exercise program, whose effectiveness has been sufficiently demonstrated and may prove to have very beneficial clinical uses which can be applied in a nurse's office.

  5. Health Literacy and Emotional Responses Related to Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kristina; Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The primary purpose was to begin to examine continence literacy of individuals with fecal incontinence (FI) by describing terms by which these individuals referred to FI and to explore their emotional responses to FI. A secondary aim was to compare differences in these results between male versus female and younger (< 65 yrs) versus older persons with FI. Design Secondary analysis of data collected prospectively in a clinical trial of fiber supplementation for FI. Methods Content analysis of participants’ statements reported in field notes of data collectors and their responses to data forms and questions. Results Six thematic categories of terms for FI emerged. Only one person used the term “fecal incontinence.” Alternate terms described stool characteristics, named other gastrointestinal problems, or referred to FI using a term that seemed to depersonalize the problems. Emotional responses to FI focused on the influence of bothersome symptoms of FI, interference with social activities, and need for control. Others showed use of humor for coping and emotional benefits gained from being in a study. Women were impacted by the social limitations of having FI more than men. Younger people expressed feelings of emotional upset. Conclusion There is need to increase health literacy about fecal incontinence. Continence nurse specialists are well qualified to educate patients about FI and to evaluate if higher continence literacy increases reporting of FI. Understanding the various emotional responses to FI may guide the optimal support that nurses can provide and facilitate better management of FI. PMID:20075695

  6. A warning detector for urinary incontinence for home health care.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Nakajima, K; Matsushita, T; Fujimoto, T; Shimooki, S; Nakano, T

    1995-01-01

    A telemetry system for monitoring urinary incontinence has been developed using two principles, temperature and impedance changes of a diaper. The system is composed of a pair of sensors, a transmitter, and a receiver. Temperature changes are monitored using thermistors, one in the center of the diaper and the other attached to the abdomen, and the temperature differences between them after urinary incontinence is detected. For the impedance method, two electroconductive cloths as electrodes placed in the diaper are used as sensors. Urine acts as a conductor to produce a current between the sensors. Clinical evaluation showed that both methods operate well; 13 of 17 incontinence episodes were detected using the temperature method and 32 of 35 with the impedance method. The misdetections were caused by faulty sensor arrangement for temperature measurement and by detection of exudates by the conductive sensors. These monitors may be used for the care of elderly people who use diapers for home health care, to save care time and help maintain hygiene.

  7. Cystolithiasis in women as a distant complication after minimal invasive treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Michał; Kliś, Rafał; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a condition of social dimension which generally pertains to women of various age. The only effective treatments of SUI are surgical procedures. The use of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) ensures low invasiveness but also carries the risk of complications. One of the complications may be migration of the tape into the urinary bladder creating conditions for urinary stones. There is a number of treatment methods for cystolithiasis, among them the optical lithotripter, ultrasound and pneumatic probes, and recently, the holmium laser. Material and methods From January 2009 to February 2010, six women suffering from bladder stones were treated at our department. All patients had previously undergone SUI procedures and over time, thread or tape had penetrated into the urinary bladder. The stone diameters were in the range of 1.6 cm–3.5 cm. Lithotripsy was performed with the use of an 80 W holmium YAG laser as an endoscopic procedure: beam frequency length of 2100 nm and applied energy was in the range of 0.2–3.5 J. Results The urinary bladder stones were disintegrated and suctioned out. During the same procedure, the threads or tape from the SUI procedure were excised from the bladder. All patients were discharged from the hospital in good general condition after two days. Conclusions The holmium laser is an effective treatment for patients with bladder stone complications after SUI procedures when threads or tape have migrated and penetrated the bladder wall. The procedure is straightforward and safe for patients. PMID:25247087

  8. Current Developments and Perspectives on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Urinary Incontinence and Genital Prolapse in Women

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, G.; Kölbl, H.

    2012-01-01

    As a key area of gynaecology, urogynaecology has undergone impressive changes in the past few years. Together with the high prevalence of functional pelvic floor disorders, modern anaesthesia procedures and the introduction of new, innovative minimally invasive operation techniques have led to a dramatic increase in the number of operations for incontinence and prolapses. The increasingly subtle diagnostic options, such as, e. g., 2D and 3D sonography of the pelvic floor provide unambiguous findings and facilitate decision making. Tension-free vaginal slings in retro-pubic, trans-obturator or single-incision techniques show a high success rate with few complications and have almost completely replaced the more invasive abdominal surgical techniques for the operative management of stress incontinence. Especially for recurrent prolapse the use of alloplastic nets leads to a markedly improved anatomic and functional outcome. In spite of the euphoria about modern operation techniques and novel net materials, in-depth knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy, sufficient surgical experience and unequivocal guideline-conform indications are mandatory for satisfactory treatment outcomes. The afflicted women must be informed in detail about alternative procedures and more emphasis should be placed on conservative therapy. Novel surgical techniques should be monitored by registers or clinical trials. The professional society is called upon to improve the training curricula for pelvic floor surgery. PMID:25308980

  9. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  10. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  11. Tailoring Treatments for Diverse Inpatient Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Individualizing treatment to accommodate the diverse needs of patients has long been a priority among psychologists. In the inpatient realm, where heterogeneous client groupings are often common, individualizing treatment is an ongoing challenge for therapists compelled to rely increasingly on cost-effective group treatment modalities. This paper…

  12. Detecting Depression in Elderly Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Stephen R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess base rate of detection of depression in 150 elderly medical inpatients by nonpsychiatric physicians, and evaluated psychometric properties of screening instruments to assess depression. Found detection of depression by house staff extremely low (8.7 percent). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), BDI…

  13. Health Literacy Needs Related to Incontinence and Skin Damage among Family and Friend Caregivers of Individuals with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rolnick, Cheri; Jackson, Jody; Arntson, Casey; Mullins, Jean; Hepburn, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe health literacy needs related to incontinence and skin care among family or friend caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and develop supportive and educational materials that address these needs. Design Descriptive Subjects and Settings The sample included 48 family/friend adult caregivers of individuals who had advanced dementia. Caregivers were spouses (44%), daughters (31%) or extended family members/friends (25%) recruited from community-based agencies, aged 64 (14) years (mean (SD)), and 75% female. Nearly half (48%) had a racially or ethnically diverse background. Methods Focus groups, interviews, and written surveys were conducted to assess health literacy needs of AD caregivers related to incontinence and skin care; verbal responses were audiotaped, transcribed, and summarized. To address these needs, a set of educational and supportive materials were developed whose content was directed by caregiver responses and supported by a literature review of current evidence and consultation with clinical and research experts. Study procedures were guided by advisory committee of AD caregivers. Results Caregivers had numerous health literacy needs related to incontinence and skin care; areas of need were categorized into knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Caregivers expressed a need to validate the health literacy they possessed. Fourteen educational and supportive documents were developed to address these needs. Conclusion Materials developed in this study are suitable to incorporate into interventions that support caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease. They offer the potential to raise health literacy and care capacity of caregivers, increase communication with healthcare providers, and improve health outcomes of care recipients. PMID:24448620

  14. [Treatment of urinary incontinence in epispadias at the beginning of the third millenium].

    PubMed

    Touili, Y; Chebil, M; Bacha, K; Hajri, M; Hassine, B; Ayed, M

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of urinary incontinence in epispadias is delicate. Urinary continence is generally obtained after onerous and repetitive surgery. Different publications show a variable results. After the study of the results of our series (nine cases) and the results published in the literature, we propose a clarification on the therapeutic modalities of urinary incontinence associated to this malformation.

  15. Evidence-Based Update on Treatments for Fecal Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Isuzu; Richter, Holly E.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Fecal incontinence is a highly prevalent and distressing condition which negatively impacts quality of life. The etiology is often multifactorial, and the evaluation and treatment of this condition can be hindered by a lack of understanding of the mechanisms and currently available treatment options. This article will review the evidence-based update for the management of fecal incontinence. PMID:26880511

  16. Resident and Family Satisfaction with Incontinence and Mobility Care: Sensitivity to Intervention Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated whether the satisfaction levels of long-term-care residents and their family members concerning incontinence and mobility care were sensitive to an improvement intervention. Design and Methods: A randomized, controlled intervention trial with incontinent long-term-care residents was conducted wherein research staff…

  17. Current management of fecal incontinence: Choosing amongst treatment options to optimize outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Van Koughnett, Julie Ann M; Wexner, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The severity of fecal incontinence widely varies and can have dramatic devastating impacts on a person’s life. Fecal incontinence is common, though it is often under-reported by patients. In addition to standard treatment options, new treatments have been developed during the past decade to attempt to effectively treat fecal incontinence with minimal morbidity. Non-operative treatments include dietary modifications, medications, and biofeedback therapy. Currently used surgical treatments include repair (sphincteroplasty), stimulation (sacral nerve stimulation or posterior tibial nerve stimulation), replacement (artificial bowel sphincter or muscle transposition) and diversion (stoma formation). Newer augmentation treatments such as radiofrequency energy delivery and injectable materials, are minimally invasive tools that may be good options before proceeding to surgery in some patients with mild fecal incontinence. In general, more invasive surgical treatments are now reserved for moderate to severe fecal incontinence. Functional and quality of life related outcomes, as well as potential complications of the treatment must be considered and the treatment of fecal incontinence must be individualized to the patient. General indications, techniques, and outcomes profiles for the various treatments of fecal incontinence are discussed in detail. Choosing the most effective treatment for the individual patient is essential to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of fecal incontinence. PMID:24409050

  18. The incidence of urinary incontinence across Asian, black, and white women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    TOWNSEND, Mary K.; CURHAN, Gary C.; RESNICK, Neil M.; GRODSTEIN, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Objective We calculated incidence rates of urinary incontinence by incontinence frequency and type over 4 years in Asian, black, and white women in the United States. Study Design Prospective analyses included 76,724 participants aged 37–79 years in the Nurses’ Health Study cohorts with no incontinence at baseline. Results The 4-year incidence of incontinence at least monthly was higher in white women (7.3/100 person-years) compared with Asian (5.7/100 person-years, p=0.003) and black women (4.8/100 person-years, p<0.001). The incidence of at least weekly stress incontinence was significantly lower in black compared with white women (0.1 versus 0.8 per 100 person-years, p<0.001). The difference between black and white women in the incidence of any incontinence and stress incontinence remained significant after adjusting for known risk factors (p<0.001 for both). Conclusions Urinary incontinence incidence differs by race. Studies to confirm these results and better understand underlying mechanisms are needed. PMID:20042169

  19. Stigma and microaggressions experienced by older women with urinary incontinence: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Phyllis A; DeMucha, Cheryl M; Deguzman, Maryann M; Softa, Ridhima

    2013-01-01

    This literature review investigated stigma and identified episodes of microaggressions experienced by women with urinary incontinence. Three significant themes were revealed: lack of disclosure from psychological distress, microaggressions resulting from stigma, and factors associated with the intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity. Nursing implications include earning and maintaining patient trust, and demonstrating sensitivity about urinary incontinence.

  20. Fecal Incontinence: Prevalence, Severity, and Quality of Life Data from an Outpatient Gastroenterology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Alsheik, Eva H.; Coyne, Thomas; Hawes, Sara K.; Merikhi, Laleh; Naples, Scott P.; Kanagarajan, Nandhakumar; Reynolds, James C.; Myers, Scott E.; Ahmad, Asyia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of fecal incontinence varies tremendously as a result of inadequate data collection methods. Few office-based studies have assessed the prevalence of fecal incontinence and none have looked at modifiable risk factors or effect on quality of life. Design, Settings, Patients, and Main Outcome Measures. Five hundred patients who visited our inner city, university-based gastroenterology practice, were asked about symptoms of fecal incontinence. We also retrospectively reviewed 500 charts to identify the frequency of patient-physician reporting of fecal incontinence. Results. Of the 500 patients that were directly questioned, 58 (12%, 43 women, 15 men) admitted to fecal incontinence compared to 12 (2.4%) in the retrospective arm. Patients with fecal incontinence and loose/watery stool reported the lowest quality of life scores. While the average severity score was similar between men and women, women had a significantly lower average quality of life score (3.04 versus 2.51; P < 0.03). Conclusions. The identification of fecal incontinence increases when patients are directly questioned. Identifying and treating patients with loose stool is a potential strategy to improve quality of life in this patient population. In men and women with similar severity of fecal incontinence, women have a significantly lower quality of life. PMID:21960998

  1. An unusual case of urinary incontinence in an intersex West Highland white terrier.

    PubMed

    Connery, Neil A; Spotswood, Tim

    2012-11-01

    A 5-year-old neutered female West Highland white terrier dog was presented with a history of congenital urinary incontinence that had become refractory to medical management. Complex urogenital anomalies including urethrovestibular and vestibuloperineal fistulae with low vulvar position along with a penoclitoris were present. Vaginectomy with perineal urethral reconstruction resolved the incontinence.

  2. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  3. An analysis of the inpatient charge and length of stay for patients with joint diseases in Korea: specialty versus small general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Eun-Cheol; Jang, Sung In; Lee, Minjee; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2013-11-01

    In 2011, the Korean government designated hospitals with certain structural characteristics as specialty hospitals. This study compared the inpatient charges and length of stay of patients with joint diseases treated at these specialty hospitals with those of patients treated at small general hospitals. In addition, the study investigated whether the designation of certain hospitals as specialty hospitals had an effect on inpatient charges and length of stay. Multi-level models were used to perform regression analyses on inpatient claims data (N=268,809) for 2010-2012 because of the hierarchical structure of the data. The inpatient charge at specialty hospitals was 19% greater than that at small general hospitals, but the length of stay was 21% shorter. After adjusting for patient and hospital level confounders, specialty hospitals had a higher inpatient charge (34.6%) and a reduced length of stay (31.7%). However, the effect of specialty hospital designation on inpatient charge (2.7% higher) and length of stay (2.3% longer) was relatively smaller. Among the patient characteristics, female gender, age, and severity of illness were positively associated with inpatient charge and length of stay. In terms of location, hospitals in metropolitan area had higher inpatient charges (5.5%), but much shorter length of stay (-14%). Several structural factors, such as occupancy rate, bed size, number of outpatients and nurses were positively associated with both inpatient charges and length of stay. However, number of specialists was positively associated with inpatient charges, but negatively associated with length of stay. In sum, this study found that specialty hospitals treating joint diseases tend to incur higher charges but produce shorter length of stay, compared to their counterparts. Specialty hospitals' overcharging behaviors, although shorter length of stay, suggest that policy makers could introduce bundled payments for the joint procedures. To promote a successful

  4. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part one: diagnosis and testing

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J.; Jimbo, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. This review article addresses its prevalence, risk factors, cost, the various types of incontinence, as well as how to diagnose them. The US Preventive Services Task Force, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Incontinence is a common problem with a high societal cost. It is frequently underreported by patients so it is appropriate for primary-care providers to screen all women and older men during visits. A thorough history and physical examination combined with easy office-based tests can often yield a clear diagnosis and rule out other transient illnesses contributing to the incontinence. Specialist referral is occasionally needed in specific situations before embarking on a treatment plan. PMID:23904857

  5. Acupuncture for the treatment of urinary incontinence: A review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    PAIK, SUN-HO; HAN, SU-RYUN; KWON, OH-JUN; AHN, YOUNG-MIN; LEE, BYUNG-CHEOL; AHN, SE-YOUNG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of acupuncture on urinary incontinence and to discuss why these acupoints were selected. Seven databases were searched for any randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the use of acupuncture or acupressure as a treatment for urinary incontinence, and the Cochrane risk of bias tool was utilized to evaluate the risk of bias in each study. Four RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. The results from the selected RCTs failed to demonstrate any statistically significant improvements in urinary incontinence, although acupuncture or acupressure did exhibit favorable effects on overactive bladder symptoms and quality of life, in comparison with other conventional therapies. There have been limited results supporting acupuncture or acupressure as an effective treatment method for urinary incontinence; therefore, further RCTs are required to confirm the effectiveness of acupuncture or acupressure in the treatment of urinary incontinence. PMID:24137264

  6. Abdominal obesity is associated with stress urinary incontinence in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Han, Myung Ok; Lee, Nan Young; Park, Hye Soon

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between abdominal obesity and stress urinary incontinence in Korean women. Women aged 30 and over, who visited the Department of Family Medicine of Asan Medical Center were recruited to participate in this study. Anthropometric measurements including body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were taken, and associated factors of stress urinary incontinence was assessed by questionnaire. Stress urinary incontinence was significantly associated with physical work, vaginal delivery, and high waist circumference. In comparison with women in the lowest quartile of waist circumference, the odds ratios (OR) for stress urinary incontinence in women in the second, third, and fourth quartiles were increased significantly (1.79, 95% CI 1.07-2.98; 3.50, 95% CI 2.02-6.07; and 6.07, 95% CI 3.23-11.40, respectively). Our results indicate that high waist circumference may be a risk factor associated with stress urinary incontinence in women.

  7. Recent developments in technology for the assessment and management of incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hillary, Christopher J; Slovak, Martin; McCarthy, Avril; Hashim, Hashim; Chapple, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, the leakage of urine, is a common condition, which can have a significant impact on a patient's quality-of-life. Incontinence may arise as a consequence of a weakness of the urinary sphincter or bladder dysfunction, usually over-activity. Incontinence therapies occupy a large proportion of the healthcare budget. As no single device to manage incontinence is appropriate for all situations, a diverse range of products are available on the market and the development of improved products based on fundamental designs has been slow. This review highlights some of the key issues of continence care and describes the current technology and recent developments involved in the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of incontinence, along with the strengths and limitations of these methods. These issues are imperative to address if improved technology is to be developed.

  8. Factors affecting staff morale on inpatient mental health wards in England: a qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Good morale among staff on inpatient psychiatric wards is an important requirement for the maintenance of strong therapeutic alliances and positive patient experiences, and for the successful implementation of initiatives to improve care. More understanding is needed of mechanisms underlying good and poor morale. Method We conducted individual and group interviews with staff of a full range of disciplines and levels of seniority on seven NHS in-patient wards of varying types in England. Results Inpatient staff feel sustained in their potentially stressful roles by mutual loyalty and trust within cohesive ward teams. Clear roles, supportive ward managers and well designed organisational procedures and structures maintain good morale. Perceived threats to good morale include staffing levels that are insufficient for staff to feel safe and able to spend time with patients, the high risk of violence, and lack of voice in the wider organisation. Conclusions Increasing employee voice, designing jobs so as to maximise autonomy within clear and well-structured operational protocols, promoting greater staff-patient contact and improving responses to violence may contribute more to inpatient staff morale than formal support mechanisms. PMID:21510852

  9. Subject-Controlled, On-demand, Dorsal Genital Nerve Stimulation to Treat Urgency Urinary Incontinence; a Pilot

    PubMed Central

    van Breda, Hendrikje M. K.; Farag, Fawzy F.; Martens, Frank M. J.; Heesakkers, John P. F. A.; Rijkhoff, Nico J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve (DGN) stimulation on non-neurogenic urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) in a domestic setting. Materials and Methods:Non-neurogenic patients >18 years with overactive bladder symptoms and UUI were included. Exclusion criteria were mainly stress urinary incontinence. Patients underwent 1 week of subject-controlled, on-demand, DGN stimulation, delivered by a percutaneously placed electrode near the DGN connected to an external stimulator (pulse-rate 20 Hz, pulse-width 300 μs). Patients activated the stimulator when feeling the urge to void and stimulated for 30 s. The amplitude was set at the highest tolerable level. A bladder diary including a severity score of the UUI episodes/void (scores: 0 = none, 1 = drops, 2 = dashes, 3 = soaks) and a padtest was kept 3 days prior to, during, and 3 days after the test period. The subjective improvement was also scored. Results: Seven patients (4 males/3 females) were enrolled, the mean age was 55 years (range 23–73). Six completed the test week. In the remaining patient the electrode migrated and was removed. 5/6 finalized the complete bladder diary, 1/6 recorded only the heavy incontinence episodes (score = 3). 4/6 completed the padtest. In all patients who finalized the bladder diary the number of UUI episodes decreased, in 3/5 with ≥60%. The heavy incontinence episodes (score = 3) were resolved in 2/6 patients, and improved ≥80% in the other 4. The severity score of the UUI episodes/void was improved with ≥ 60% in 3/5 patients. The mean subjective improvement was 73%. Conclusion: This feasibility study indicates that subject-controlled, on-demand DGN stimulation using a percutaneously placed electrode is possible over a longer time period, in a home setting, with a positive effect on non-neurogenic overactive bladder symptoms with UUI. Although the placement is an easy procedure, it is difficult to fixate the electrode to keep

  10. Stress Urinary Incontinence in Women With Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the prevalence and risk factors of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and the prevalence of intrinsic sphincter deficiency in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We conducted a retrospective study. Female patients with MS, followed for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) during a 15-year period were included. Demographic data, MS history, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score at the urodynamic visit, obstetrical past, birth weight, LUTS, and urodynamic findings were collected. SUI was defined as incontinence during cough, or any effort. A maximum urethral closure pressure less than 30 cm H2O defined intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Results We included 363 women with a mean age of 46.7±10.8 years and a mean disease duration of 12.9±8.7 years. The incidence of relapsing remitting MS, a secondary progressive form, and a primary progressive form was 60.6%, 32.8%, and 6.6%, respectively. The prevalence of SUI was 31.4%. The prevalence of intrinsic sphincter deficiency was 1.4% and 0.8% of these patients had a SUI (P=0.300). In a multivariate analysis, women with a SUI had significantly higher birth weight (P=0.030), a pelvic organ prolapse (P=0.021), urgent urinary incontinence (P=0.006), a lower EDSS score (P=0.019), and a weaker containing effort (P<0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of SUI in women with MS was 31.4%. This symptom could affect the quality of life of women with MS. PMID:27706005

  11. TVT-Secur mini-sling for stress urinary incontinence: a review of outcomes at 12 months.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Colin A

    2011-09-01

    • Synthetic mid-urethral slings (MUSs) are considered the first choice surgical procedure for stress urinary incontinence. Recent publications have raised concerns about the efficacy of third generation single-incision mini-slings. The present paper is a systematic review of studies reporting 12-month outcomes after the TVT-Secur (TVT-S) procedure. • Pubmed/Medline online databases, abstracts from recent International Continence Society and International Urogynecological Association annual scientific meetings and the Clinicaltrials.gov and Controlled-trials.com online trial registries were searched for English-language articles containing the terms 'TVT-Secur', 'TVT Secur' or 'mini-sling'. The primary outcomes were objective and subjective cure rates at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included peri-operative (vaginal perforation, urinary retention, urinary tract infection [UTI]) and postoperative (mesh exposure, de novo overactive bladder (OAB), dyspareunia and return to theatre) complication rates. • Among 1178 women undergoing the TVT-S procedure, from 10 studies, both objective and subjective cure rate at 12 months was 76%, with objective cure significantly higher in women undergoing the 'U-type' approach. Vaginal perforation was a complication in 1.5% of cases, with a 2.4% incidence of mesh exposure in the first year. The incidence of de novo OAB symptoms was 10%. Rates of urinary retention (2.3%), UTI (4.4%), dyspareunia (1%) and return to theatre for complications (0.8%) were low. In the first year after a TVT-S procedure 5% of women required repeat continence surgery. • Longer-term studies and randomized comparisons with more established MUSs are required before TVT-S should be routinely used in the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

  12. Urinary Incontinence and Urosepsis due to Forgotten Ureteral Stent.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Diego Martin; Losada, Johanna Belén; Montiel, Francisco Castro; Lafos, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Case report of a patient who, while being under study due to total urinary incontinence and multiple urinary tract infections, interoccurs with urosepsis due to a forgotten and encrusted double-J stent. An open surgery is performed with two surgical approaches, suprapubic and minimal lumbotomy, in which a nephrectomy of the atrophic kidney, a resection of the urether with a calcified double-J in its interior and a cystolithotomy were conducted with the resulting favorable resolution of the pathology.

  13. Functional disability among older women with fecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    EREKSON, Elisabeth A.; CIARLEGLIO, Maria M.; HANISSIAN, Paul D.; STROHBEHN, Kris; BYNUM, Julie P.W.; FRIED, Terri R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of functional disability for basic activities of daily living (ADLs) in older women with fecal incontinence (FI) is not well characterized. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of functional disability among in community-dwelling older women with fecal incontinence. Study Design We conducted a secondary database analysis of the 2005–06 National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP), a cross-sectional study of community-dwelling older adults conducted by single in-home interviews. FI was defined an affirmative answer to the question, “Have you lost control of your bowels (stool incontinence or anal incontinence)?” with a frequency of “at least monthly”. We then examined functional status. Women were asked about seven basic ADLs. Statistical analyses with percentage estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. Results 1,412 women were included in our analysis. FI, at least monthly, was reported by 5.5% (n=77) of community-dwelling older women. 63.2% (95% CI 50.1, 76.4) of women with FI reported difficulty or dependence with ≥1 ADLs and 31.2% (95% CI 18.9, 43.6) specifically reported difficulty or dependence with using the toilet. After adjusting for age category, race/ethnicity, education level, women with FI had 2.6 increased odds (95% CI 1.26, 5.35) of difficulty or dependence compared with women with no FI. Other significant risk factors for increased functional difficulty/dependence included obesity (body mass index ≥30kg/m2) and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Consistent with other large epidemiologic studies, we found monthly FI was reported by 5.5% (n/N=77/1,412) of older women. Over 60% of community-dwelling older women with FI report functional difficulty or dependence with ≥1 ADL and specifically, over 30% of women with FI report difficulty or dependence using/reaching the toilet. Due to the high prevalence of functional disability in older women with FI, we purpose that initial

  14. Engineered structures for use in disposable incontinence products.

    PubMed

    White, C F

    2003-01-01

    The background and evolution of absorbent disposable hygiene products is discussed. The current technology used to produce disposable hygiene products such as baby diapers, feminine hygiene products and adult incontinence management products is shown to have a number of manufacturing and in-use problems. Alternative technologies, such as multilayer composite webs offer the opportunity to achieve better product weight control, and therefore better control over the other related properties, reduced raw material waste and improved functional characteristics. There are still problems to be resolved when using such composite materials, but the potential of these new technologies has now been established.

  15. A methodology to estimate the potential to move inpatient to one day surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gilliard, Nicolas; Eggli, Yves; Halfon, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Background The proportion of surgery performed as a day case varies greatly between countries. Low rates suggest a large growth potential in many countries. Measuring the potential development of one day surgery should be grounded on a comprehensive list of eligible procedures, based on a priori criteria, independent of local practices. We propose an algorithmic method, using only routinely available hospital data to identify surgical hospitalizations that could have been performed as one day treatment. Methods Moving inpatient surgery to one day surgery was considered feasible if at least one surgical intervention was eligible for one day surgery and if none of the following criteria were present: intervention or affection requiring an inpatient stay, patient transferred or died, and length of stay greater than four days. The eligibility of a procedure to be treated as a day case was mainly established on three a priori criteria: surgical access (endoscopic or not), the invasiveness of the procedure and the size of the operated organ. Few overrides of these criteria occurred when procedures were associated with risk of immediate complications, slow physiological recovery or pain treatment requiring hospital infrastructure. The algorithm was applied to a random sample of one million inpatient US stays and more than 600 thousand Swiss inpatient stays, in the year 2002. Results The validity of our method was demonstrated by the few discrepancies between the a priori criteria based list of eligible procedures, and a state list used for reimbursement purposes, the low proportion of hospitalizations eligible for one day care found in the US sample (4.9 versus 19.4% in the Swiss sample), and the distribution of the elective procedures found eligible in Swiss hospitals, well supported by the literature. There were large variations of the proportion of candidates for one day surgery among elective surgical hospitalizations between Swiss hospitals (3 to 45.3%). Conclusion

  16. Nursing workload in an inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Ana Paula; Guirardello, Edinêis de Brito

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the nursing workload in an inpatient unit of a university hospital. This descriptive study applied the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) over the course of 30 consecutive days. A total of 1,080 observations were obtained from the medical files of 156 patients. The average scored obtained in the NAS instrument was 47.31%. Considering that each single NAS score corresponds to 0.24 hours, an average of 11.35 hours of nursing care was required. This amount of hours correspond to the profile of inpatients demanding semi-intensive and intensive care, suggesting that the NAS can be used to evaluate the workload of the nursing staff in this unit.

  17. Dissociative disorders among alcohol-dependent inpatients.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Karadag, Figen; Tamar Gurol, Defne; Karagoz, Mustafa

    2007-08-30

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among inpatients with alcohol dependency. The Dissociative Experiences Scale was used to screen 111 alcohol-dependent patients consecutively admitted to the inpatient unit of a dependency treatment center. Subgroups of 29 patients who scored 30.0 or above and 25 patients who scored below 10.0 were then evaluated with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. The interviewers were blind to the Dissociative Experiences Scale scores. Of the 54 patients evaluated, 10 (9.0% of the original 111) patients had a dissociative disorder. A considerable number of the remaining patients reported a high level of dissociative experiences. Among the dissociative disorder group, nine patients had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified and one patient had depersonalization disorder. Female gender, younger age, history of suicide attempt, childhood emotional and sexual abuse, and neglect were more frequent in the dissociative disorder group than among non-dissociative patients. The dissociative disorder group also had somatization disorder, borderline personality disorder, and lifetime major depression more frequently. For 9 of the 10 dissociative patients, dissociative symptoms started before the onset of alcohol use. Although the probability of having a comorbid dissociative disorder was not higher among alcohol-dependent inpatients than among the general psychiatric inpatients, the dissociative subgroup had distinct features. Many patients without a dissociative disorder diagnosis (predominantly men) provided hints of subtle dissociative psychopathology. Implications of comorbid dissociative disorders and dissociative experiences on prevention and treatment of alcohol dependency and the importance of gender-specific characteristics in this relationship require further study.

  18. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ainur B.; Izekenova, Aigulsum; Abikulova, Akmaral

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results: Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level. PMID:24516484

  19. Bridging the Gap: Determinants of Undiagnosed or Untreated Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    DURALDE, Erin R.; WALTER, Louise C.; VAN DEN EEDEN, Stephen K.; NAKAGAWA, Sanae; SUBAK, Leslee L.; BROWN, Jeanette S.; THOM, David H.; HUANG, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over a third of middle-aged or older women suffer from urinary incontinence, but less than half undergo evaluation or treatment for this burdensome condition. With national organizations now including assessment of incontinence as a quality performance measure, providers and healthcare organizations have a growing incentive to identify and engage these women who are undiagnosed and untreated. Objective We sought to identify clinical and sociodemographic determinants of patient-provider discussion and treatment of incontinence among ethnically diverse, community-dwelling women. Study Design We conducted an observational cohort study from 2003-2012 of 969 women 40 years and older enrolled in a Northern California integrated healthcare delivery system, who reported at least weekly incontinence. Clinical severity, type, treatment, and discussion of incontinence were assessed by structured questionnaires. Multivariable regression evaluated predictors of discussion and treatment. Results Mean age of the 969 participants was 59.9 (±9.7) years, and 55% were racial/ethnic minorities (171 Black, 233 Latina, 133 Asian or Native American). Fifty-five percent reported discussing their incontinence with a healthcare provider, 36% within one year of symptom onset, and with only 3% indicating that their provider initiated the discussion. Over half (52%) reported being at least moderately bothered by their incontinence. Of these women, 324 (65%) discussed their incontinence with a clinician, with 200 (40%) doing so within 1 year of symptom onset. In multivariable analysis, women were less likely to have discussed their incontinence if they had a household income <$30,000/year versus ≥$120,000/year (AOR=0.49, CI=0.28-0.86), or were diabetic (AOR=0.71, CI=0.51-0.99). They were more likely to have discussed incontinence if they had clinically severe incontinence (AOR=3.09, CI=1.89-5.07), depression (AOR=1.71, CI=1.20-2.44), pelvic organ prolapse (AOR= 1.98, CI=1

  20. Injectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents.

    PubMed

    Davis, Niall F; Kheradmand, F; Creagh, T

    2013-06-01

    Injectable urethral bulking agents composed of synthetic and biological biomaterials are minimally invasive treatment options for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The development of an ideal urethral bulking agent remains challenging because of clinical concerns over biocompatibility and durability. Herein, the mechanical and biological features of injectable urethral biomaterials are investigated, with particular emphasis on their future potential as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. A literature search for English language publications using the two online databases was performed. Keywords included "stress urinary incontinence", "urethral bulking agent" and "injectable biomaterial". A total of 98 articles were analysed, of which 45 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. Injectable biomaterials are associated with a lower cure rate and fewer postoperative complications than open surgery for SUI. They are frequently reserved as secondary treatment options for patients unwilling or medically unfit to undergo surgery. Glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine collagen remains the most commonly injected biomaterial and has a cure rate of up to 53 %. Important clinical features of an injectable biomaterial are durability, biocompatibility and ease of administration, but achieving these requirements is challenging. In carefully selected patients, injectable biomaterials are feasible alternatives to open surgical procedures as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. In future, higher cure rates may be feasible as researchers investigate alternative biomaterials and more targeted injection techniques for treating SUI.

  1. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gräf, Charlotte M; Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar; Goecke, Tamme W; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Najjari, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure.

  2. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure. PMID:27610378

  3. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal.

  4. Impact of fecal incontinence on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Lynne; Nowak, Madeleine; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore the impact of fecal incontinence (FI) on quality of life (QOL) of patients attending urogynecology and colorectal clinics (CCs). METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 154 patients (27 male) with FI, who attended the clinics at a regional hospital in North Queensland, Australia in 2003 and 2004, and completed the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale (FIQL: 1 = very affected; 4 = not affected). RESULTS: More than 22% of patients had their QOL affected severely by FI. Patients reported that they had not previously been asked about FI by a medical practitioner nor did they voluntarily disclose its presence. The median FIQL scores for all participants were: lifestyle = 3.24; coping = 2.23; depression = 2.42; and embarrassment = 2.33. Increasing frequency of soiling had a negative effect on all four FIQL scales (P < 0.001) as did the quantity of soiling (P < 0.01). Female CC patients had poorer FIQL scores than urogynecology clinic patients for lifestyle (P = 0.015), coping (P = 0.004) and embarrassment (P = 0.009), but not depression (P = 0.062), despite having experienced FI for a shorter period. CONCLUSION: Failure to seek treatment for FI degrades the quality of patients’ lives over time. FI assessment tools should incorporate the quantity of fecal loss. PMID:19598304

  5. Meta-analysis of four different surgical treatments for stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Serels, Scott; Stein, Mark

    1997-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multiple surgical approaches for the correction of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) have been described. In an attempt to determine which procedure may be superior, we performed a meta-analysis comparing the needle suspensions (i.e. Gittes, Stamey), Raz, Burch/MMK colposuspension, and urethral sling. METHODS: The most complete 87 of 310 articles relating to the surgical therapy for SUI published between 1982 and 1995 were selected by Medline search for review. These articles incorporated patients operated on from 1965 to 1995. Fixed effects Baysian and variance weighted models were applied to derive estimates and confidence intervals. Bonferroni multiple comparison procedures wee also incorporated. RESULTS: The mean reported success rates were 81% for the needle suspensions, 84% for the Raz, 85% for the colposuspension, and 85% for the sling. There was a significant difference between the sling and needle suspension as well as between the colposuspension and needle suspension (P<0.05). There was no correlation between length of follow-up and the success rate (P>.05). CONCLUSION: There is currently a general impression among urologists that the sling has the best success rates for the treatment of SUI and that the Raz and colposuspension are clinically superior to the needle suspension. Recent literature also indicates a significant increase in the failure rate over time. Our meta-analysis of the best 25% of SUI papers does not support either view entirely. This may be due to publication bias and incomplete reporting by the authors. Prior to developing ever "improved" procedures, urologist must start to report their results in a consistent fashion to allow meaningful conclusions concerning the risks and benefits of our existing procedures.

  6. Urinary Incontinence and Levels of Regular Physical Exercise in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Da Roza, T; Brandão, S; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R N; Duarte, J A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different levels of regular physical exercise on the frequency of urinary incontinence in young nulliparous women from the northern region of Portugal. Participants (n=386) self-reported demographic variables, frequency, and time spent practicing organized exercise per week, as well as completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. The level of exercise was calculated based on the time (in minutes) usually spent per week in organized exercise. 19.9% of Portuguese nulliparous women reported incontinence symptoms. Considering the distribution of urinary incontinence among the different quartiles of organized exercise, women from the 4(th)quartile (those who train for competitive purposes) demonstrated highest relative frequency (p=0.000) and a 2.53 greater relative risk to develop (95% CIs,1.3-2.7) incontinence compared to women from the 1(st) quartile (inactive). Women who practice exercise for recreational purposes (2(nd) and 3(rd) quartiles) did not show significant differences in the urinary incontinence prevalence and relative risk of developing it compared to women from the 1(st) quartile. The results showed that women participating in organized exercise involving high volume training for competition are potentially at risk of developing urinary incontinence, although organized exercise undertaken without the intent to compete seems to be safe for maintaining urinary continence.

  7. [Guideline 'Incontinence urine and feces' of the Dutch Preventive Youth Health Care].

    PubMed

    Beltman, Maaike; Deurloo, Jacqueline A; van Leerdam, Frank J M; Wierenga-van der Hoeven, Catelijne J; Bulk-Bunschoten, Anneke M W; Kamphuis, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    Continence problems can occur during childhood. This guideline is for the Dutch Youth Health Care (JGZ) and gives recommendations for the prevention, early detection and treatment of these problems. As a preventative measure advices for potty training should be started in children aged 18-24 months. If incontinence is present, it is important to take a history and carry out physical examination. In children over the age of 5 who are incontinent of urine the following are recommended: taking child out of bed, calendar with reward system, bedwetting alarm or voiding diary; children over the age of 8 can follow dry bed training. Faecal incontinence is often associated with constipation. Incontinent children with constipation are given advice about normal eating and exercise patterns. If this is not successful then laxatives are prescribed. The JGZ should refer further if there are indications of an underlying condition; if children over the age of 5 are wet during the day; if children are incontinent of faeces at night; if children are incontinent of faeces but not constipated; if children persistently wet the bed; if there is faecal incontinence despite counselling, and if medication needs to be prescribed.

  8. A comparison of cost and efficacy of three incontinence skin barrier products.

    PubMed

    Zehrer, Cindy L; Lutz, James B; Hedblom, Edwin C; Ding, Li

    2004-12-01

    Maintaining healthy, intact perineal skin in nursing home residents with incontinence is a challenge. Their condition puts them at risk for developing incontinence dermatitis, possibly predisposing them to develop pressure ulcers. To examine the cost-effectiveness of three perineal skin barriers (a polymer-based barrier film and two petrolatum ointments) used to prevent incontinence dermatitis, a 6-month descriptive study was conducted among residents (N = 250) from four long-term care facilities (nursing homes) in the upper Midwestern US. All residents were incontinent and had intact perineal skin when they enrolled in the study. An economic analysis was performed using time-motion data from a convenience sample of enrolled residents and their caregivers. Residents had an average of 4.1 (+/-2.307) incontinent episodes per day, the occurrence of incontinence dermatitis was 3.3 % and not significantly different between the different protocols of care (P = 0.4448). Results of the economic analysis showed that daily barrier application costs ranged from $0.17 for the barrier film to $0.76 for the ointments evaluated. With labor included in the analysis, costs were also lower for the barrier film that required the least frequent application ($0.26) compared to ointments that required more frequent application ($1.40). Results of this study suggest that the daily or three times weekly barrier film protocols are affordable alternatives to using petrolatum ointments in the prevention of incontinence dermatitis.

  9. A Qualitative Study of Family Caregiver Experiences of Managing Incontinence in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chien-Ning; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Yu, Po-Jui; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Incontinence is a common problem faced by family caregivers that is recognized as a major burden and predictor of institutionalization. However, few studies have evaluated the experiences of family caregivers caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. Purpose To describe experiences of caregivers managing incontinence in stroke survivors. Design This qualitative descriptive study employed a grounded-theory approach. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten family caregivers of stroke survivors with incontinence were conducted during 2011. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Findings Data analysis identified four themes: chaos, hypervigilance, exhaustion, and creating a new life. There were nine related subcategories: fluster, dirtiness, urgency, fear of potential health-hazard, physically demanding and time-consuming, mentally draining, financial burden, learning by doing, and attitude adjustment. Together, these described a process of struggling to cope with the care of stroke survivors with urinary/fecal incontinence. Of the four categories, “creating a new life” developed gradually over time to orient caregivers to their new life, while the other three categories occurred in a chronological order. Conclusion The research highlighted unique caring experiences of family caregivers of stroke patients, which focused solely on the ‘incontinence issue’. Understanding these experiences may help nurses provide better support and resources for family caregivers when caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. PMID:26066345

  10. Hidden female urinary incontinence in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics in Turkey: what are the determinants of bothersome urinary incontinence and help-seeking behavior?

    PubMed

    Cetinel, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Tarcan, Tufan; Yalcin, Onay; Kocak, Taner; Senocak, Mustafa; Itil, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of female urinary incontinence (UI) and risk factors of bothersomeness and help-seeking behavior of hidden female UI in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics. This multicentric and cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the Turkish Overactive Bladder Study. Female patients (n = 5,565) who were referred with complaints other than UI and overactive bladder symptoms were surveyed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) with supplementation of five more questions. The crude prevalence of UI was found to be 35.7%. The prevalence of frequent and severe incontinence was 8.2 and 6.8%, respectively. The mean age of incontinent patients was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed UI was 39.8, 24.8, and 28.9%, respectively. More than half (53%) of incontinent patients were not bothered by UI, and only 12% of incontinent patients had previously sought medical help for their problem. Frequency, severity, and type of UI were independent factors for predicting bothersome UI, while only bothersomeness increased help-seeking behavior. The ICIQ-SF score of 8 has been found to be the best cutoff value to delineate the bothersome UI. Although the crude prevalence of female UI was found to be high, bothersome UI was not so common. The majority of incontinent female patients did not seek medical help. Frequency, severity, and mixed type of UI were found to be the determinants of bothersome UI for which the ICIQ-SF cutoff score of 8 was obtained.

  11. Portrait representation of postmenopausal women's experiences of living with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Pakgohar, Minoo; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Vahid-Dastjerdi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the meaning of the experiences of community-dwelling postmenopausal women who were born and grew up in a Muslim country when drawing a picture about their lived experiences of urinary incontinence. Hermeneutic phenomenology underpinned the study's interpretive research approach. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted in two sessions with nine postmenopausal women. The participants were asked to draw a picture about their lived experiences of urinary incontinence in a self-portrait. Three themes emerged to illuminate the meaning of urinary incontinence, including "disruption of normal functioning," "self-imposed restrictions," and "feeling of despair." Discussion of these themes was presented, and practice and research implications were suggested.

  12. Revisiting the O complex: urinary incontinence, delirium and polypharmacy in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D B

    1997-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, delirium and polypharmacy are common, challenging problems encountered in elderly patients. Review of the literature shows that these conditions are interrelated. For example, polypharmacy can lead to delirium, which, in turn, can lead to urinary incontinence. The drugs prescribed for urinary incontinence can precipitate delirium or contribute to polypharmacy. The underlying causes for these problems in elderly patients are frequently complex, and management in turn must often be multifactorial. The occurrence of these problems should lead to careful evaluation followed by thoughtful, responsive treatment. Brief updates are given with recommendations for management directed at primary care physicians. PMID:9347778

  13. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in octogenarians: A population-based study using the nationwide inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Clancy J.; Coe, Adam; Fino, Nora F.; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In the elderly population, there is a growing demand for minimally invasive procedures as the incidence of pancreaticobiliary disease increases with age. Patients with advanced age offer unique challenges for any procedure because they also tend to have a higher rate of baseline comorbidities and malignancy. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mortality and length of stay of octogenarians undergoing inpatient endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Patients and methods: Using the 2007 – 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), we performed a retrospective analysis of health-related outcomes among 80- to 89-year-old patients undergoing inpatient ERCP. Surgical patients were excluded. Results: An estimated 61,322 octogenarians underwent inpatient ERCP in the United States from 2007 to 2010. The mean age was 84.2 (SE 0.02) with 59.5 % (n = 36,460) of the patients being female. A large majority of the patients were white (79. %, n = 41,144) and 63.5 % (n = 38,940) had a comorbidity index of at least 2. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days (SE 0.08) with an in-hospital mortality of 3.1 % (n = 1,919). The primary discharge diagnosis was most often biliary stone disease (55.9 %, n = 34,263). A diagnosis of any infection was recorded in 45.0 % (n = 27,609) of patients. Infection was associated with a significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 3.3, 95 % CI 2.6 – 4.2, P < 0.001). Conclusions: ERCP is now routinely being performed during inpatient admissions for octogenarians with diseases of the biliary tract. The mortality of octogenarians undergoing inpatient ERCP is higher than previous reports and is likely due to superimposed infection during the same admission. PMID:27556068

  14. Impact of incontinence on the quality of life of caregivers of older persons with incontinence: A qualitative study in four European countries.

    PubMed

    Santini, Sara; Andersson, Gunnel; Lamura, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of incontinence management on informal caregivers of older persons with incontinence. In order to investigate this phenomenon in different welfare systems via qualitative interviews and a content analysis methodology, the study was carried out in four European countries (Italy, the Netherlands, Slovak Republic and Sweden). To this purpose, 50 semi-structured interviews were conducted with spouses and children of older people receiving their help to manage the consequences of involuntary urinary and/or faecal leakage. Findings show that incontinence has a remarkably strong effect on caregivers' quality of life, because it results in progressive social isolation, causing them financial problems as well as psychological and physical exhaustion. The lack of appropriate support and the general silence regarding the problem, which is still considered a taboo by many, aggravate the caregivers' situation. It is therefore crucial that caregivers can count on a strong public and private support network, appropriate information and suitable incontinent products, in order to better handle incontinence and care tasks in general.

  15. [The surgical treatment of urinary stress incontinence in women by using a tube flap from the vagina].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Pushkar', D Iu; Labazanov, G A

    1996-01-01

    According to statistical estimates, incidence of urinary stress incontinence (USI) in females ranges from 3 to 20%. Operative correction of USI is feasible by 200 methods. The authors propose one more procedure which implies cutting out of tube graft from the anterior vaginal wall followed by the graft fixation in the bladder cervical region and placing prolen supporting ligatures into the suprapubic area with a special needle. In 1992-1995 such operation was performed in 55 USI females with positive effect in 48 (89%) patients. The technique provides enhanced mobilization of the bladder posterior wall and paraurethral space performing plastic reconstruction of cystocele. Moreover, creation of vaginal tube graft in the zone of urethrovesical segment contributes to reconstruction of normal anatomy. Thus, sling operations are method of choice in the treatment of patients with type 3 USI.

  16. Management of the devastated posterior urethra and bladder neck: refractory incontinence and stenosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kirk M; Higuchi, Ty T; Flynn, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Stricture of the proximal urethra following treatment for prostate cancer occurs in an estimated 1-8% of patients. Following prostatectomy, urethral reconstruction is feasible in many patients. However, in those patients with prior radiation therapy (RT), failed reconstruction, refractory incontinence or multiple comorbidities, reconstruction may not be feasible. The purpose of this article is to review the evaluation and management options for patients who are not candidates for reconstruction of the posterior urethra and require urinary diversion. Patient evaluation should result in the decision whether reconstruction is feasible. In our experience, risk factors for failed reconstruction include prior radiation and multiple failed endoscopic treatments. Pre-operative cystoscopy is an essential part of the evaluations to identify tissue necrosis, dystrophic calcification, or tumor in the urethra, prostate and/or bladder. If urethral reconstruction is not feasible it is imperative to discuss options for urine diversion with the patient. Treatment options include simple catheter diversion, urethral ligation, and both bladder preserving and non-preserving diversion. Surgical management should address both the bladder and the bladder outlet. This can be accomplished from a perineal, abdominal or abdomino-perineal approach. The devastated bladder outlet is a challenging problem to treat. Typically, patients undergo multiple procedures in an attempt to restore urethral continuity and continence. For the small subset who fails reconstruction, urinary diversion provides a definitive, "end-stage" treatment resulting in improved quality of life.

  17. Evaluating and managing urinary incontinence after prostatectomy: beyond pads and diapers.

    PubMed

    Atiemo, Humphrey O; Moy, Louis; Vasavada, Sandip; Rackley, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Men who become persistently incontinent after undergoing prostatectomy have a variety of options for regaining control, ranging from behavioral changes to surgery. To determine the best therapy, one should define the problem with a thorough urologic evaluation.

  18. Urethral duplication: a rare cause of urinary incontinence in a female child

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Tiwari, Rajesh; Kumar, Vijoy; Singh, Mahendra

    2012-01-01

    Female urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of complete urethral duplication along with horseshoe kidney in a four-years-old female child presenting with incontinence since childhood. PMID:24578937

  19. Incontinence pads: recommending the best product-based wetback performance and price.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Meyer, Sara A; Melick, Clifford; McLennan, Mary T

    2008-10-01

    Incontinence pads are available in the USA without a prescription and are commonly the first treatment option a patient with incontinence uses. The goal of this study was to examine the difference in the performance and cost of commercially available incontinence pads with the intention of providing recommendations to women. Ten different urinary incontinence products were selected. A modified wetback test was used to test product performance. For the small volume leaks, the Walgreen's Extra pad generally performed worse on the wetback test than the three other pads tested (p = 0.001-0.012), but four tests were not statistically significant. At larger leak volumes, the Walgreen's underwear generally performed worse than other products (p < or = 0.001-0.046), with some exceptions. Brand name products generally performed better than generic products, but cost more. Undergarments and underwear do the worst job of keeping moisture inside the pad.

  20. The Pathophysiology of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, Geoffrey W

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a historical perspective on the evolution of theories regarding the pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The progression of these theories has followed the development of the diagnostic technologies that have provided insight into different aspects of urethral dysfunction. The earliest theories tied SUI to anatomic failure of urethral support. Recognition that anatomic failure impacted the interplay of intra-abdominal pressure and the bladder and urethra led to theories focused on the dynamic interaction between the bladder and urethral pressures. Investigators then began to recognize the importance of urethral sphincteric dysfunction. More recently, investigators have attempted to combine the anatomic and functional etiologies into a consolidated theory. These efforts point to a multi-factorial etiology of SUI. Continuing research has provided new insight into the neurophysiology of urethral function, opening new avenues for tailoring therapy for SUI. PMID:16985860

  1. The science behind biomaterials in female stress urinary incontinence surgery.

    PubMed

    Amrute, Kaytan V; Badlani, Gopal H

    2009-01-18

    Female stress urinary incontinence, while not life threatening, can present with various social and economic implications. Biomaterials, primarily synthetic, are often utilized to augment surgical correction. Repair with biomaterials involves midurethral support to function against weakened connective tissue caused by injury, abnormal collagen metabolism, or genetic predisposition. Even though efficacy rates are high, the potential for complications, such as erosion, are great without comprehension of inherent characteristics of each graft material. Low-weight, macroporous, monofilament synthetic grafts and noncross-linked biologic grafts are examples of biomaterials that implant reasonably well with host tissue. This paper reviews the justification for biomaterial use, host reaction, and the various parameters of natural and synthetic grafts.

  2. Incontinence-associated dermatitis in the elderly: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Eleanor; Woodward, Sue

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common problem in older people. However, it is frequently misdiagnosed and poorly treated. There is often uncertainty about which product to use to prevent and treat IAD; the different types, brands and how to apply them. This literature review looks specifically at the use of barrier products in the prevention and treatment of IAD. A systematic search found six primary research papers that analysed the effectiveness of various barrier products; they will be compared and contrasted in this review. There is a lack of evidence to recommend any one barrier product over another for use in a standardised skin care protocol such as the regimen suggested by Gray et al (2012). More research needs to be conducted to establish the most effective barrier products on the market. More research is also needed on the efficacy of barrier products in the prevention and treatment solely of IAD rather than combined studies looking at IAD with pressure ulcers.

  3. New frontiers in the treatment of overactive bladder and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael B

    2002-01-01

    In this article the author tries to forecast how urologists will treat the overactive bladder (OAB) in the next decade. He reviews drugs currently under development and also logical and exciting pharmacological targets that would be suitable targets for treating OAB in the future. The author also discusses intravesical therapy and alternative drug delivery methods, such as intravesical capsaicin and botulinum toxin. There are many advantages to advanced drug delivery systems, including the achievement of long-term therapeutic efficacy, decreased incidence and severity of side effects, and improved patient compliance. Special emphasis is placed on approaches to modulating bladder afferent nerve function to prevent OAB. Speculation on future techniques such as gene therapy can also be considered for treating OAB, because they may make it possible to access all of the genitourinary organs via minimally invasive techniques. Traditional anticholinergic therapies are limited in their effectiveness. There is great hope for future research and therapy for OAB and urinary incontinence.

  4. Dietary fiber supplementation for fecal incontinence: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Donna Z; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann; Sheng, Xiaoyan

    2014-10-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appears related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals incontinent of loose/liquid feces. The primary outcome was FI frequency; secondary outcomes included FI amount and consistency, supplement intolerance, and quality of life (QoL). Possible mechanisms underlying supplement effects were also examined. After a 14-day baseline, 189 subjects consumed a placebo or 16 g total fiber/day of one of the fiber supplements for 32 days. FI frequency significantly decreased after psyllium supplementation versus placebo, in both intent-to-treat and per-protocol mixed model analyses. CMC increased FI frequency. In intent-to-treat analysis, the number of FI episodes/week after supplementation was estimated to be 5.5 for Placebo, 2.5 for Psyllium, 4.3 for GA, and 6.2 for CMC. Only psyllium consumption resulted in a gel in feces. Supplement intolerance was low. QoL scores did not differ among groups. Patients with FI may experience a reduction in FI frequency after psyllium supplementation, and decreased FI frequency has been shown to be an important personal goal of treatment for patients with FI. Formation of a gel in feces appears to be a mechanism by which residual psyllium improved FI.

  5. Client preferences for HIV inpatient care delivery.

    PubMed

    McDonald, R; Free, D; Ross, F; Mitchell, P

    1998-06-01

    This study was concerned with preferences for inpatient models of care by the HIV/AIDS client group, in particular the difference between gay white men (European) and black heterosexuals of African/Caribbean origin. Satisfaction with the care currently provided was also an area of interest. Thirteen per cent (n = 79) of the were surveyed. Seventy per cent (n = 56) of the HIV/AIDS client group indicated a preference for a dedicated care model. Significant results were obtained demonstrating differences in the care model preferred by gay white men and black heterosexuals (p < 0.01). Gay white men were much more likely to state they would leave the trust to receive dedicated care (p < 0.01). Black heterosexuals were more likely to state that they would change treatment areas to avoid dedicated care (p < 0.01) Differences in concern about confidentiality were noted between the two groups. Confidentiality may be one of a number of factors influencing preference of care for African/Caribbeans and this needs to be studied further. The clients surveyed were not universally satisfied with the care they had been receiving. Following the results of the survey radical changes in the management of HIV inpatient care were made.

  6. [Epidemiology and treatment for urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women].

    PubMed

    Starczewski, Andrzej; Brodowska, Agnieszka; Brodowski, Jacek

    2008-07-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is defined as uncontrolled urine leakage through an urethra. At present, the following types of UI can be specified: stress incontinence (SI), urge incontinence (UI), mixed incontinence (MI), overflow incontinence (OI) in which the bladder becomes too full because it cannot be fully emptied, and functional incontinence (FI). Incontinence is one of the most common chronic diseases in women and is found in 17-60% of the whole population. In most patients, SI is combined with pelvic organ prolapse. The basic risk factors mentioned as contributing to these two conditions are obstetrical past and gynaecological history and atrophic changes in the urogenital area. There are also a number of diseases related to the increase in intra-abdominal pressure, such as obesity chronic constipation and diseases associated with persistent cough. Other factors leading to pelvic organ prolapse include hard physical work, some professional sports, connective tissue disorders, neuropathy and disturbed innervation of the pelvic floor. To deal with stress incontinence (SI), conservative and surgical treatment is employed. In the first degree intensity, it is mainly physiotherapy, electrical stimulation of the pelvic floor muscles, lifestyle modification and reduction of body mass. When the SI symptoms are more severe, surgical treatment is usually preferred. From among many methods, these presently used are Burch and sling operations. On the other hand, surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse involves colpoperineoplasty with the use of polypropylene mesh (Prolift), colporrhaphy by double TOT approach method, median colporrhaphy, Cooper's ligament or sacrospinous ligament colpopexy, and attachment of the uterus to the sacrum. The results of surgical treatment depend on co-occurrence of risk factors, the surgical method chosen, the lapse of time from the surgery and the type of the applied biomedical material.

  7. Symptoms of Combined Prolapse and Urinary Incontinence in Large Surgical Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, L.; Rickey, L.; Xu, Y.; Markland, A.; Lemack, G.; Ghetti, C.; Kahn, M.; Nagaraju, P.; Norton, P.; Chang, T. D.; Stoddard, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To estimate whether prolapse severity is a major contributor to urinary incontinence severity, as measured by validated incontinence questionnaires. Methods We analyzed data from two large female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgical cohorts: the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial (SISTEr) study (N=655) and the subsequent Trial of Mid-Urethral Slings (TOMUS) study (N=597). All participants completed a standardized baseline assessment including validated measures of symptom severity, quality of life, objective measures of urine loss [Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI), Medical, Epidemiologic, and Social Aspects of Aging questionnaire (MESA), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ) and pad test], as well as the Pelvic Organ Prolapse – Quantification (POP-Q) assessment. Groups were compared using the χ2 test (categorical measures) or the one-way analysis of variance (continuous measures). Statistical significance was defined at p-value <0.05. Results The SISTEr and TOMUS samples were similar for many variables including age (52 vs. 53 years, respectively), nulliparity (9 vs. 12%), prior UI surgery (14 vs. 13%), and prior hysterectomy (31 vs 28%), but other differences necessitated separate analysis of the two cohorts. There was not a statistically significant difference in UDI scores according to prolapse stage in either study population. Patients with prior surgery for POP and SUI had more incontinence symptoms and were more bothered by their UI, regardless of prolapse stage. Conclusions Prolapse stage is not strongly or consistently associated with incontinence severity in women who select surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Prior POP and UI surgery is associated with worse UI severity and bother. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00064662 and NCT00325039. PMID:20093904

  8. Prevalence and Trends of Urinary Incontinence in Adults in the United States, 2001 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Markland, Alayne D.; Richter, Holly E.; Fwu, Chyng-Wen; Eggers, Paul; Kusek, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We estimate trends in the prevalence of urinary incontinence in the adult population of the United States from 2001 through 2008 before and after adjusting for other potential associated factors. Materials and Methods We analyzed data on 17,850 adults 20 years old or older who participated in the 2001 to 2008 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Any urinary incontinence was defined as a positive response to questions on urine leakage during physical activity, before reaching the toilet and during nonphysical activity. During this period changes in demographic and clinical factors associated with urinary incontinence included age, race/ethnicity, obesity, diabetes and chronic medical conditions (prostate disease in men). Age standardized prevalence estimates and prevalence ORs of urinary incontinence trends were determined using adjusted multivariate models with appropriate sampling weights. Results The age standardized prevalence of urinary incontinence in the combined surveys was 51.1% in women and 13.9% in men. Prevalence in women increased from 49.5% in 2001 to 2002, to 53.4% in 2007 to 2008 (Ptrend = 0.01) and in men from 11.5% to 15.1%, respectively (Ptrend = 0.01). In women increased prevalence was partially explained by differences in age, race/ethnicity, obesity, diabetes and select chronic diseases across the survey periods. After adjustment the prevalence OR for 2007 to 2008 vs 2001 to 2002 decreased from 1.22 (95% CI 1.03–1.45) to 1.16 (95% CI 0.99–1.37). in men adjustment for potentially associated factors did not explain the increasing prevalence of urinary incontinence. Conclusions The age standardized prevalence of urinary incontinence increased in men and women from 2001 through 2008. Decreasing obesity and diabetes may lessen the burden of urinary incontinence, especially in women. PMID:21684555

  9. Multifaceted Inpatient Psychiatry Approach to Reducing Readmissions: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Timothy P.; Rohrer, James E.; Rioux, Pierre A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Access to psychiatric services, particularly inpatient psychiatric care, is limited and lacks comprehensiveness in rural areas. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact on readmission rates of a multifaceted inpatient psychiatry approach (MIPA) offered in a rural hospital. Methods: Readmissions within 30 days of…

  10. Behavioral medicine rounds: using a biopsychosocial approach for inpatient teaching.

    PubMed

    Berolzheimer, N; Haggerty, J J; Cassata, D M

    1986-01-01

    The inpatient setting is commonly used to teach residents various aspects of the practice of medicine. This paper describes how inpatient teaching rounds can be expanded to teach the biopsychosocial approach to patient care. The background and early development, the structure of the teaching, and specific case examples of behavioral medicine rounds are described.

  11. Improving Inpatients' Identification of Their Doctors: Use of FACE™ Cards

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vineet M.; Schaninger, Caitlin; D'Arcy, Michael; Johnson, Julie K.; Humphrey, Holly J.; Woodruff, James N.; Meltzer, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Improving patients' ability to identify their inpatient physicians and understand their roles is vital to safe patient care. We designed picture cards to facilitate physician introductions. We assessed the effect of Feedback Care and Evaluation (FACE™) cards on patient: (1) ability to correctly identify their inpatient physicians, and (2) understanding of their roles. Methods In October 2006, team members introduced themselves with FACE™ cards, which included a photo and an explanation of their roles. During an inpatient interview research assistants asked patients to name their inpatient physicians and trainees, and rate their understanding of their physicians' roles. Results 1686 (80%) patients in the baseline period and 857 (67%) in the intervention period participated in the evaluation. With the FACE™ intervention, patients were significantly more likely to correctly identify at least one inpatient physician (attending, resident, or intern) [baseline 12.5% vs. intervention 21.1%; p<0.001]. Of the 181 patients who were able to correctly identify at least one inpatient physician in the intervention period, research assistants noted that 59% (n=107) had FACE™ cards visible in their rooms. Surprisingly, fewer patients rated their understanding of their physicians' roles as excellent or very good in the intervention period (45.6%) compared to the baseline period (55.3%) (p<0.001). Conclusions Although FACE™ cards improved patients' ability to identify their inpatient physicians, many patients still cannot identify their inpatient doctors. The FACE™ cards also served to highlight patients' misunderstanding of their physicians' roles. PMID:20043501

  12. Systematic screening for urinary incontinence in older women: Who could benefit from it?

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Els; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Meijerink, Marije; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Dekker, Janny H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify women who are suffering from urinary incontinence but do not consult a physician and to identify reasons for this. Design Survey study as part of a randomized controlled trial that investigates the effects of a standardized assessment and evidence-based treatment on urinary incontinence in older women, the URINO project. Setting Female patients from general practices in the Northern part of the Netherlands. Patients A total of 225 women of 55 years and older suffering from urinary incontinence. Main outcome measures Number of patients with urinary incontinence who are not registered by their GP as suffering from this, factors associated with help-seeking behaviour, and reasons for not seeking help. Results Of the 225 patients, 143 (64%) were not registered by their GP as suffering from urinary incontinence. These women were more often younger and had lower levels of distress due to their urogynaecological symptoms. The most common reason for not consulting a GP was that patients considered their symptoms not to be serious enough. Conclusion The prevalence of older women with urinary incontinence who do not seek help is high. Help-seeking behaviour is associated with increasing age and higher levels of distress caused by the symptoms. Younger patients more often hesitate to consult their GP if they perceive their symptoms to be relatively mild. PMID:22324458

  13. [First case of sacral neuromodulation for treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence in Mexico. Case report.].

    PubMed

    Sucar-Romero, S; Decanini-Terán, C; Ruiz-Galindo, G H

    2009-01-01

    Sacral neuromodulation is a new treatment for urinary and fecal incontinence that has demonstrated good therapeutic results. This treatment modality has shown not only to reduce urinary dysfunction symptoms and urinary and fecal incontinence but improve quality of life scores as well. We present a 73 years old female patient with severe fecal and urinary incontinence with major quality of life impact. She was referred after failure of different surgical and conservative therapeutic approaches. Her evaluation met inclusion criteria for sacral neuromodulation treatment. Acute sacral nerve evaluation (PNE) proved to be therapeutic in the patient as measured by at least a 50 percent improvement in her symptoms so a permanent implant (Medtronic InterStim System) was placed. After the implant there was a significant improvement in urinary and fecal functional scores. Fecal Incontinence Severity Index improved from 34 to 8 and Urinary Sandvik's Severity Index from very severe urinary incontinence to minor urinary incontinence after the placement of the implant. Using standard quality of life questionnaires, she improved in the areas of lifestyle,coping and behavior and her experience with depression and self-perception.

  14. Incontinence pad absorption and skin barrier creams: a non-patient study.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Peter; Bradbury, Sarah

    2016-12-08

    Exposure of the skin to excessive moisture, such as in cases of incontinence, can damage its natural barrier function and lead to tissue damage and breakdown. Common methods for managing incontinence and preventing related skin damage include the use of incontinence pads and the application of skin barrier creams to reduce exposure to moisture and irritants. Previous reports have indicated that barrier creams can transfer onto incontinence pads from the skin and reduce their absorbency, and thus the efficacy of both products. This study, using non-patient volunteers, investigated the effect on incontinence pad absorbency of Medi Derma-S and Medi Derma-Pro; two products from the Medi Skin Protection range, in comparison with other market-leading products. Results indicated that, while there was a small degree of product transfer onto the incontinence pads, this did not have a major impact on the absorption of synthetic urine. Medi Derma-S and Medi Derma-Pro performed consistently with other similar market-leading products.

  15. [Current diagnostics and therapy of the overactive bladder and urge incontinence].

    PubMed

    Badawi, J K; Langbein, S

    2005-06-17

    Urinary incontinence affects millions of people worldwide and also represents a social problem. Costs of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder are very high. Urge incontinence is the involuntary loss of urine associated with a strong desire or urge to urinate. There are two types of urge incontinence: One is associated with involuntary detrusor contractions leading to a loss of urine, the other is characterized by a hypersensitive bladder in which micturition reflexes are induced due to an increased afferent activity. It is important to distinguish between an idiopathic type of urge incontinence and a symptomatic type possibly caused by infections, tumours, bladder stones or foreign bodies. Diagnostics is based on a careful medical history, clinical examination and urodynamic evaluation. The use of a voiding diary is necessary. Current agents for drug therapy rely upon their anticholinergic properties. Their use is limited by side effects such as blurred vision, dizziness, constipation and dryness of the mouth. Additionally, patients refractory to anticholinergic medication can be treated by endoscopic direct injection of botulinum toxin into the detrusor muscle. These patients can also be treated by intravesical application of vanilloid derivatives in the bladder leading to a desensitization of bladder sensory fibers. In some cases of refractory urge incontinence, electrical neuromodulation is effective. Other pharmacological approaches could be selective b-adrenoceptor agonists, calcium antagonists and potassium channel openers, but these substances are not yet available for clinical use.

  16. Rare complication of needleless mini-sling procedure: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Karalar, Mustafa; Keles, Ibrahim; Unlu, Serdar; Sarici, Hasmet; Kose, Mesut; Ay, Cemil

    2017-01-01

    The mini-sling procedure is a widely used, minimally invasive treatment for stress urinary incontinence. While bladder perforation and stone formation over the mesh is not an expected complication of the mini-sling procedure, in this case, we report on the management of bladder calculi formed over the mesh, which was passed through the bladder while applying the mini-sling procedure, and was eventually removed using holmium laser. Performing cystoscopy in patients with irritative and obstructive symptoms after the sling procedure will help confirm bladder perforation, and an endoscopic approach using holmium laser is an effective treatment. PMID:28360958

  17. Adjustment of inpatient care reimbursement for nursing intensity.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Zone-Smith, Laurie; Fischer, Mary H

    2006-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has begun an ambitious recalibration of the inpatient prospective payment system, the first since its introduction in 1983. Unfortunately, inpatient nursing care has been overlooked in the new payment system and continues to be treated as a fixed cost and billed at a set per-diem "room and board" fee despite the known variability of nursing intensity across different care settings and diagnoses. This article outlines the historical influences regarding costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care and provides contemporary evidence about the variability of nursing intensity and costs at acute care hospitals in the United States. A remedy is proposed to overcome the existing limitations of the Inpatient Prospective Payment System by creating a new nursing cost center and nursing intensity adjustment by DRG for each routine-and intensive-care day of stay to allow independent costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care.

  18. Cost Effectiveness of Alcoholism Treatment in Partial Hospital versus Inpatient Settings After Brief Inpatient Treatment: 12-Month Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrady, Barbara; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Alcoholics (N=174) were randomly assigned to partial hospital treatment (PHT) or extended inpatient (EIP) rehabilitation after inpatient evaluation and/or detoxification. There were few differences in clinical outcomes between the PHT and EIP groups. Subjects showed significant improvements in psychological well-being and social behavior.…

  19. 42 CFR 409.68 - Guarantee of payment for inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services furnished before...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guarantee of payment for inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services furnished before notification of exhaustion of benefits. 409.68 Section 409.68 Public... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.68 Guarantee of payment...

  20. Mini–slings – an option in stress urinary incontinence treatment. Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Michał; Kliś, Rafał; Różański, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a social disease caused by numerous contributing factors such as natural childbirth, obesity, hormonal deficiencies and changes in collagen fibers, to name a few. Currently, mini–slings, among all the surgical treatment methods, have gained significance. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of this method. Material and methods From 2008 to 2012, one hundred sixty women suffering from SUI underwent surgical procedures to implant mini–slings under the middle part of the urethra and 140 (87.5%) of them remained under observation. In 65 cases, Johnson & Johnson's TVT–Secur was used; in 70 cases, BARD's Adjust mini–sling was used; and in 5 cases, AMS Mini–Arc mini–sling was used. The average period of hospitalization was 3 days per admission, operation and discharge day. Results In 82 cases, patients urinated well after the removal of the catheter, and had full urine continence. Fourteen patients showed great improvement, and in four cases temporary urine retention was observed. In two cases vaginal bleeding was observed, yet there was no need for wound revision. Evaluation of the ‘quality of life improvement’ was done using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Conclusions The obtained results allowed the conclusion that the implantation of mini–slings is a low invasive, relatively safe and effective procedure for the treatment of SUI even in cases of recurrence. Almost full recovery was achieved in all the cases of this study. The mini–sling has become an important element in modern urogynecology. PMID:25914841

  1. Behavior Therapy to Enable Drug Discontinuation in the Treatment of Urge Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Menefee, Shawn; Borello-France, Diane; Corton, Marlene; Johnson, Harry W.; Mallett, Veronica; Norton, Peggy; FitzGerald, Mary P.; Dandreo, Kimberly J.; Richter, Holly E.; Rozanski, Thomas; Albo, Michael; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Lemack, Gary E.; Chai, Toby C.; Khandwala, Salil; Baker, Jan; Brubaker, Linda; Stoddard, Anne M.; Goode, Patricia S.; Nielsen-Omeis, Betsy; Nager, Charles W.; Kenton, Kimberly; Tennstedt, Sharon L.; Kusek, John W.; Chang, T. Debuene; Nyberg, Leroy M.; Steers, William

    2010-01-01

    Background Women with urge urinary incontinence are commonly treated with antimuscarinic medications, but many discontinue therapy. Objective To determine whether combining antimuscarinic drug therapy with supervised behavioral training, compared to drug therapy alone, improves the ability of women with urge incontinence to achieve clinically important reductions in incontinence episodes and to and sustain these improvements after discontinuing medication. Design Two-stage, multi-center, randomized clinical trial (BE-DRI trial) (July 2004 – January 2006). Setting Nine university-affiliated outpatient clinics. Patients 307 women with urge predominant incontinence. Interventions Ten weeks of open-label, extended-release tolterodine alone (N = 153) or combined with behavioral training (N = 154) (Stage 1), followed by discontinuation of therapy and follow-up at 8 months (Stage 2); 237 participants completed the trial. Measurements The primary outcome, measured at 8 months, was defined as not taking drug or receiving any other therapy for urge incontinence and ≥70% reduction in frequency of incontinence episodes. Secondary outcomes were reduction in incontinence, self-reported satisfaction and improvement, and scores on validated questionnaires measuring symptom distress/bother and health-related quality-of-life. Study staff who performed outcome evaluations were blinded to group assignment, but participants and interventionists were not. Results At 8 months, there was no difference in successful discontinuation of drug therapy between combined therapy and drug alone (41% in both groups, 95% confidence interval on difference: -12% to +12%). A higher proportion of patients in combined therapy achieved ≥70% reduction of incontinence than in drug therapy alone at 10 weeks (69% vs. 58%; difference = 11%; 95% confidence interval: -0.3 to +22.1). Combined therapy yielded better outcomes over time on the Urogenital Distress Inventory and Overactive Bladder Questionnaire

  2. Adaptation and validation of the Michigan Incontinence Severity Index in a Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Ergun, Emrah; Akca, Gizem; Tug, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To translate and validate the Michigan Incontinence Severity Index (M-ISI) for its use in Turkish-speaking women with urinary incontinence. Methods The translation and cross-cultural adaptation were based on international guidelines. Content validity by content validity ratio/content validity index, internal consistency by Cronbach’s alpha, test–retest reliability by Pearson’s correlation, and construct validity by using Spearman rank correlations to show the relationship between individual items and the relevant domains and subdomains were analyzed in 100 female participants with a chief complaint of urinary incontinence. Correlations between the relevant scores of M-ISI and The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form scores were analyzed to indicate convergent validity. The Varimax rotation method was used to conduct exploratory factor analysis in order to investigate the factor structures/distribution of M-ISI items. Results Content validity index and content validity ratio values increased to 0.97 and 1.00, respectively, showing sufficient content validity of the Turkish version of the M-ISI. The analysis formed three factors which was slightly different from original developers. In our proposed three-factor construct, all of the ten items demonstrated high correlations with their subdomains and lower correlations with the other domains, indicating good construct validity. Correlations between stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence (UUI) scores and The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form scores were found high, which indicated convergent validity (r: 0.953, P<0.001). Good internal consistency of the scores for each subdomain was observed (stress urinary incontinence, 0.787; UUI, 0.862; pad usage and bother, 0.832). Test–retest reliability was shown for each subdomain (stress urinary incontinence, 0.973; UUI, 0.973; pad usage and bother, 0.979). Conclusion

  3. Urinary Incontinence Surgery: When Other Treatments Aren't Enough

    MedlinePlus

    ... two main categories: sling procedures and bladder neck suspension procedures. For a sling procedure, your surgeon uses ... after surgery while you heal. A bladder neck suspension reinforces the urethra and bladder neck so that ...

  4. Accuracy and Calibration of Computational Approaches for Inpatient Mortality Predictive Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Nakas, Christos T.; Schütz, Narayan; Werners, Marcus; Leichtle, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) data can be a key resource for decision-making support in clinical practice in the “big data” era. The complete database from early 2012 to late 2015 involving hospital admissions to Inselspital Bern, the largest Swiss University Hospital, was used in this study, involving over 100,000 admissions. Age, sex, and initial laboratory test results were the features/variables of interest for each admission, the outcome being inpatient mortality. Computational decision support systems were utilized for the calculation of the risk of inpatient mortality. We assessed the recently proposed Acute Laboratory Risk of Mortality Score (ALaRMS) model, and further built generalized linear models, generalized estimating equations, artificial neural networks, and decision tree systems for the predictive modeling of the risk of inpatient mortality. The Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) for ALaRMS marginally corresponded to the anticipated accuracy (AUC = 0.858). Penalized logistic regression methodology provided a better result (AUC = 0.872). Decision tree and neural network-based methodology provided even higher predictive performance (up to AUC = 0.912 and 0.906, respectively). Additionally, decision tree-based methods can efficiently handle Electronic Health Record (EHR) data that have a significant amount of missing records (in up to >50% of the studied features) eliminating the need for imputation in order to have complete data. In conclusion, we show that statistical learning methodology can provide superior predictive performance in comparison to existing methods and can also be production ready. Statistical modeling procedures provided unbiased, well-calibrated models that can be efficient decision support tools for predicting inpatient mortality and assigning preventive measures. PMID:27414408

  5. Utilization trends in inpatient endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP): A cross-sectional US experience

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Moiz; Kanotra, Ritesh; Savani, Ghanshyambhai T.; Kotadiya, Fenilkumar; Patel, Nileshkumar; Tareen, Sarah; Fasullo, Matthew J.; Kesavan, Mayurathan; Kahn, Ahsan; Nalluri, Nikhil; Khan, Hafiz M.; Pau, Dhaval; Abergel, Jeffrey; Deeb, Liliane; Andrawes, Sherif; Das, Ananya

    2017-01-01

    Study aims The goal of our study was to determine the current trends for inpatient utilization for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and its economic impact in the United States between 2002 and 2013. Patients and methods A Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2002 through 2013 was examined. We identified ERCPs using International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) codes; Procedure codes 51.10, 51.11, 52.13, 51.14, 51.15, 52.14 and 52.92 for diagnostic and 51.84, 51.86, 52.97 were studied. Rate of inpatient ERCP was calculated. The trends for therapeutic ERCPs were compared to the diagnostic ones. We analyzed patient and hospital characteristics, length of hospital stay, and cost of care after adjusting for weighted samples. We used the Cochran-Armitage test for categorical variables and linear regression for continuous variables. Results A total of 411,409 ERCPs were performed from 2002 to 2013. The mean age was 59 ± 19 years; 61 % were female and 57 % were white. The total numbers of ERCPS increased by 12 % from 2002 to 2011, which was followed by a 10 % decrease in the number of ERCPs between 2011 and 2013. There was a significant increase in therapeutic ERCPs by 37 %, and a decrease in diagnostic ERCPs by 57 % from 2002 to 2013. Mean length of stay was 7 days (SE = 0.01) and the mean cost of hospitalization was $20,022 (SE = 41). Conclusions Our large cross-sectional study shows a significant shift in ERCPs towards therapeutic indications and a decline in its conventional diagnostic utility. Overall there has been a reduction in inpatient ERCPs. PMID:28382324

  6. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner’s Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min–max: 153–176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m2(min–max: 22.4–50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features

  7. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Demircan, Nejat; Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner's Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min-max: 153-176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m(2)(min-max: 22.4-50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features favored

  8. Sexual function before and after non-surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Whitcomb, Emily; Weidner, Alison C.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Brubaker, Linda; Bradley, Catherine S.; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Schaffer, Joseph; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Zhang, Min; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives (1) to describe sexual function in women seeking treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI); (2) to compare the impact on sexual function of three SUI treatments; and (3) to investigate whether non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improved sexual function. Methods Women with SUI were randomized to continence pessary, behavioral therapy (pelvic floor muscle training and continence strategies), or combination therapy. Sexual function was assessed at baseline and 3-months using short forms of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ-12) and the Personal Experiences Questionnaire (SPEQ). Successful treatment of SUI was assessed with a patient global impression of improvement. ANOVA was used to compare scores between groups. Results At baseline, sexual function was worse among women with mixed incontinence compared to those with pure SUI. After therapy, successful treatment of SUI was associated with greater improvement in PISQ-12 score (2.26 ± 3.24 versus 0.48 ± 3.76, p=0.0007), greater improvement in incontinence with sexual activity (0.45 ± 0.84 versus 0.01 ± 0.71, p=0.0002), and greater reduction in restriction in sexual activity related to fear of incontinence (0.32 ± 0.76 versus −0.06 ± 0.78, p=0.0008). Among those successfully treated for SUI, improvement in continence during sexual activity was greater in both the combined therapy group (p=0.019) and the behavioral group (p=0.02) compared to the pessary group. Conclusions Successful non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improvements in incontinence-specific measures of sexual function. Behavioral therapy may be preferred to pessary for treatment of SUI among women whose incontinence interferes with sexual function. PMID:21572534

  9. Factors Associated With Quality Of Life In Women Undergoing Surgery For Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sirls, Larry T.; Tennstedt, Sharon; Albo, Mike; Chai, Toby; Kenton, Kim; Huang, Liyuan; Stoddard, Anne M; Arisco, Amy; Gormley, E. Ann

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association of clinicodemographic factors with urinary incontinence (UI) related quality of life (QoL) in women having surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and to compare the incontinence-specific IIQ (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire) and the ICIQ (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire). Secondary objectives evaluated the contributions of incontinence severity and sexual function to QoL. Materials and Methods Baseline data from 597 women in the Trial of Mid Urethral Slings (TOMUS). Correlates of QoL tested included health status and history, type, severity and bother of UI, and sexual function. Results Lower QoL by both the IIQ and ICIQ included younger age, higher BMI, more SUI symptoms, and more severe and bothersome UI symptoms. Each measure identified factors associated with lower QoL not identified by the other (IIQ; Hispanic ethnicity, poor health status and more urge UI symptoms, and ICIQ; prior UI treatment and more UI episodes per day). Sexually active women had similar QoL but also increased incontinence episodes (IIQ and ICIQ) and more sexual dysfunction (IIQ only). Conclusion In women planning SUI surgery, QoL is associated with non-UI factors as well as with the type, severity and degree of bother from UI symptoms. Many factors are associated with QoL as measured by both IIQ and ICIQ. However more non-UI factors were associated with QoL when measured by the IIQ than by the ICIQ. More than one scale may be needed to evaluate QoL after SUI treatment. PMID:20952014

  10. Do Physical Therapy Interventions Affect Urinary Incontinence and Quality of Life in People with Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Monica; Melnick, Marsha; Allen, Diane D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) presents with many debilitating symptoms, including urinary incontinence (UI), that physical therapy (PT) may address; UI is widely prevalent, but PT management of symptoms lacks consensus. A meta-analysis of long-term nonsurgical and nonpharmaceutical treatment options may supply this deficiency. We analyzed the current evidence for effectiveness of PT to decrease UI and improve quality of life (QOL) in people with MS. Methods: An electronic search conducted through November 26, 2013, included the following search terms: incontinence, bladder dysfunction, urinary incontinence, multiple sclerosis, MS, physical therapy, physiotherapy, therapy, and rehabilitation. Criteria for inclusion were as follows: MS diagnosis, intervention involved PT for UI or bladder dysfunction, outcomes assessed QOL or UI, and at least a 4 of 10 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale or a 2b level of evidence. Outcomes were combined across studies, and effect sizes are depicted in forest plots. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Between-group analysis revealed statistically significant differences in incontinence episodes and QOL, but did not reach significance for functional control mechanisms (eg, electromyography data on strength of contraction, relaxation, and endurance). Incontinence leakage episodes and QOL participation improved within groups. Conclusions: Meta-analysis indicates support for PT for minimizing incontinence compared with pretreatment and affecting incontinence and QOL more than control in people with MS. Protocols were heterogeneous regarding duration and type of PT intervention and were applied in different types of MS. Further research may reveal the most effective combination and variety of PT interventions for people with MS. PMID:26300703

  11. Standard Compared With Mnemonic Counseling for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B; Dunivan, Gena C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Murrietta, Ambroshia M; Komesu, Yuko M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate whether women who underwent mnemonic counseling had better recall of fecal incontinence therapies at 2 months and if mnemonic counseling resulted in greater satisfaction with physician counseling and improvement in quality of life when compared to a group who underwent standard counseling. Methods Counseling naive women with fecal incontinence were recruited from an academic Urogynecology clinic. Women underwent physical examinations, completed the Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction, recorded fecal incontinence treatment options they recalled, and completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index and Manchester Health Questionnaire immediately after counseling and again at 2 months. Results Ninety women consented to participate, were randomized and completed baseline questionnaires. At baseline women did not differ in age, ethnicity, education, fecal incontinence severity index or Manchester Health Questionnaire scores. After counseling the mnemonic group reported higher satisfaction on Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction (66.4± 6.5 vs 62.2 ± 10.7, p=0.03). Ninety percent (81/90) of women followed-up at 2 months. Our primary endpoint, two month recall of fecal incontinence treatments was not different between groups (2.3 ± 1.6 mnemonic counseling vs 1.8 ± 1.0 standard counseling; p=0.08). Secondary endpoints the mnemonic group reported greater improvement on total Manchester Health Questionnaire (p=0.02), emotional (p=0.03), sleep (0.045), role limitations (<0.01), and physical limitations (p=0.04) when compared to the standard group. Conclusions Fecal incontinence counseling with a mnemonic aid did not improve recall at 2 months but improved patient satisfaction and quality of life at 2 months. PMID:25932833

  12. Inpatient allergy/immunology consultations in a tertiary care setting.

    PubMed

    Otto, Hans F; England, Ronald W; Quinn, James M

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined inpatient referral patterns for fellowship training programs and none for allergy/immunology (AI) since 2003. The primary end point was the reason for consultation, and secondary end points included the AI diagnosis made and outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed all inpatient AI consultations from July 1, 2001 through June 30, 2007. These 6 years of data were combined with 14 years of data examining the reason for consult from a previous study. The data were analyzed for trends and changes over the entire 20-year period. A total of 254 AI inpatient consults were reviewed over the 6 years studied. Thirty-six percent (92/254) of inpatient consults were for evaluation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), 22% (55/254) miscellaneous reasons, 17% (43/254) urticaria/angioedema, 13% (32/254) for possible immunodeficiency, 9% (23/254) for anaphylaxis, and 3% (8/254) for asthma. AI inpatient consults show a significant decline over the recent 6-year period (p = 0.0023) despite stable total hospital admissions since 1998. Over the last 20 years, an 85% decrease (p < 0.00001) in inpatient asthma consults and increases (p < 0.05) in immunodeficiency, rash, and urticaria/angioedema evaluations have been observed. Not following AI recommendations resulted in a 16.6 odds ratio (95% CI, 5.55-49.93) that a patient's clinical status would be worse or unchanged. Inpatient AI consults have declined with associated reduction in asthma inpatient consults. Although ADRs and anaphylaxis consults have been stable, evaluations for immunodeficiency, rash, and urticaria/angioedema have increased. Following inpatient AI recommendations is associated with improved patient outcomes.

  13. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT) in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). Methods This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure or transobturator tape (TOT) procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) < 60 cmH2O in a urodynamic study. Cases of neurogenic bladder, previous SUI surgery, and concomitant cystocele repair were excluded. The primary outcome was treatment success at 12 months, defined by self-reported absence of symptoms, no leakage episodes recorded, and no retreatment. Results Among the 157 women who were included in the final analysis, 105 patients received TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°), were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009). On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223–12.582, p = 0.022) was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment. Conclusion TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD. PMID:27228092

  14. Improving diaper design to address incontinence associated dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) is an inflammatory skin disease mainly triggered by prolonged skin contact with urine, feces but also liberal detergent use when cleansing the skin. To minimize the epidermal barrier challenge we optimized the design of adult incontinence briefs. In the fluid absorption area we interposed a special type of acidic, curled-type of cellulose between the top sheet in contact with the skin and the absorption core beneath containing the polyacrylate superabsorber. The intention was to minimize disturbance of the already weak acid mantle of aged skin. We also employed air-permeable side panels to minimize skin occlusion and swelling of the stratum corneum. Methods The surface pH of diapers was measured after repeated wetting with a urine substitute fluid at the level of the top sheet. Occlusive effects and hydration of the stratum corneum were measured after a 4 hour application of different side panel materials by corneometry on human volunteers. Finally, we evaluated skin symptoms in 12 patients with preexisting IAD for 21 days following the institutional switch to the optimized diaper design. Local skin care protocols remained in place unchanged. Results The improved design created a surface pH of 4.6 which was stable even after repeated wetting throughout a 5 hour period. The "standard design" briefs had values of 7.1, which is alkaline compared to the acidic surface of normal skin. Side panels made from non-woven material with an air-permeability of more than 1200 l/m2/s avoided excessive hydration of the stratum corneum when compared to the commonly employed air-impermeable plastic films. Resolution of pre-existing IAD skin lesions was noted in 8 out of 12 patients after the switch to the optimized brief design. Conclusions An improved design of adult-type briefs can create an acidic pH on the surface and breathable side panels avoid over-hydration of the stratum corneum and occlusion. This may support the

  15. [Health education and group work during in-patient rehabilitation following myocardial infarction (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; König, K; Maas, A; Neufert, R

    1982-02-01

    Starting from the usual in-patient rehabilitation measures for myocardial infarction patients and based on the authors' clinical experiences, a working model is presented concerning the health educational care of patients undergoing rehabilitation procedures immediately following infarction or bypass operation. The new concept is based on a psychosomatic view of the cardiovascular diseases, and uses group-dynamic elements in its methodological approach. The rehabilitational tasks of health education are understood as therapeutic strategies and are aimed at achieving changes on the attitudinal and behavioural level.

  16. Race and Ethnicity Do Not Contribute to Differences in Pre-operative Urinary Incontinence Severity or Symptom Bother In Women Undergoing Stress Incontinence Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Stephen R.; Markland, Alayne; Chai, Toby C.; Stoddard, Anne; FitzGerald, Mary Pat; Leng, Wendy; Mallett, Veronica; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    Aims To determine whether race/ethnicity affects urinary incontinence (UI) severity and bother, in women undergoing surgery for stress incontinence. Methods We used baseline data from participants in the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy trial. UI severity was measured by the number of leakage episodes during a 3-day urinary diary and by urodynamic evaluation. UI bother was measured using the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI). Race/ethnicity classification was based on self report. Results Of the 654 women, 72(11%) were Hispanic, 480(73%) non-Hispanic White, 44 (6.7%) non-Hispanic Black and 58 (8.9%) ‘Other’. No differences were seen in any UI severity measures. Non-Hispanic Whites had lowest UDI scores on bivariate analysis, explained by socioeconomic status, BMI and age on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Factors other than racial/ethnic differences underlie variations in UI symptoms and bother in this group of women seeking surgery for stress incontinence. PMID:17618773

  17. Day-care versus inpatient pediatric surgery: a comparison of costs incurred by parents.

    PubMed Central

    Stanwick, R S; Horne, J M; Peabody, D M; Postuma, R

    1987-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness for parents of day-care pediatric surgery was assessed by comparing time and financial costs associated with two surgical procedures, one (squint repair) performed exclusively as a day-care procedure, the other (adenoidectomy) performed exclusively as an inpatient procedure. All but 1 of 165 eligible families participated. The children underwent surgery between February and July 1981. The day-care surgery group (59 families) incurred average total time costs of 16.1 hours, compared with 37.1 hours for the inpatient surgery group (105 families), as parents in the latter group remained with their child during the longer hospital stay. Parents from out of town incurred the greater time and financial costs. In both groups parents of younger children tended to spend more time at the hospital than parents of older children. Type of surgical management was not a significant factor in out-of-pocket expenses. Loss of income was associated with employment of the mother as a professional or a manager and may reflect inequalities in access to compassionate leave between men and women in equivalent positions. Opening day-care surgery facilities on weekends might reduce the financial burden on working mothers. Overall, day-care surgery was found to be cost-effective for families. PMID:3594330

  18. The effectiveness of inpatient case management. Fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Cook, T H

    1998-04-01

    Production processes and service delivery in acute care hospitals can be fragmented. Inpatient case management has the potential to improve both processes and outcomes of hospital care. The author reports on 18 research studies that used inpatient case management as the treatment variable. These outcome studies, using case management, did not provide the evidence needed to address deficiencies in inpatient settings. However, these studies do provide clear direction for nurse administrators and nurse researchers to take concerning the next steps needed to address this critical issue.

  19. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  20. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  1. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  2. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  3. The University of Michigan Incontinence Symptom Index (M-ISI): a Clinical Measure for Type, Severity, and Bother related to Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Anne M.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Morgan, Daniel M.; DeLancey, John O.L.; McGuire, Edward J.; Wei, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To develop a clinically relevant, easy to use, and validated instrument for assessing severity and bother related to urinary incontinence. Methods Survey items were piloted and refined following psychometric principles in five separate patient cohorts. Patient and expert endorsement of items, factor analyses, Spearman rank correlations and response distributions were employed for item selection. Formal reliability and validity evaluation were conducted for the final questionnaire items. Results Expert physicians and patient focus groups confirmed face and content validity for the measure. A 10-item measure called the Michigan Incontinence Symptom Index (M-ISI) was developed with two domains: a Total M-ISI Domain consisting of subdomains for stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence, and pad use, and a Bother Domain. High construct validity was demonstrated with a Cronbach’s alpha for the Total M-ISI Domain (items 1–8) of 0.90 and for the Bother Domain (items 9–10) of 0.82. Cronbach’s alpha for the subdomains were all > 0.85. Construct validity, convergent and divergent validity, internal discriminant validity, and predictive validity were all robust. The minimally important difference for the measure was determined to be 4 points (out of 32) for the Total M-ISI Severity Domain, and 1–2 points (out of 8–12) for the individual subdomains. Conclusions The M-ISI is a parsimonious measure that has established reliability and validity on several levels and complements current clinical evaluative methods for patients with urinary incontinence. PMID:23945994

  4. Temporal trends in the use of diagnostic imaging for inpatients with pancreatic conditions: How much ionizing radiation are we using?

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K.; Ouellet, Jean-Francois; Tanyingoh, Divine; Dixon, Elijah; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Grondin, Sean C.; Myers, Robert P.; Mohamed, Rachid; Ball, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging has been indirectly linked with subsequent cancer and increased costs. Computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for defining pancreatic anatomy and complications. Our primary goal was to identify the temporal trends associated with diagnostic imaging for inpatients with pancreatic diseases. Methods Data were extracted from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2008. Pancreas-related ICD-9 diagnostic codes were matched to all relevant imaging modalities. Results Between 2000 and 2008, a significant increase in admissions (p < 0.001), but decrease in overall imaging procedures (p = 0.032), for all pancreatic disorders was observed. This was primarily a result of a reduction in the number of CT and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography examinations (i.e., reduced radiation exposure, p = 0.008). A concurrent increase in the number of inpatient magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography/magnetic resonance imaging performed was observed (p = 0.040). Intraoperative cholangiography and CT remained the dominant imaging modality of choice overall (p = 0.027). Conclusion Inpatients with pancreatic diseases often require diagnostic imaging during their stay. This results in substantial exposure to ionizing radiation. The observed decrease in the use of CT may reflect an improved awareness of potential stochastic risks. PMID:27240285

  5. Treatment of stress urinary incontinence by ginsenoside Rh2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Yu-Ning; Chen, Wen-Chi; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common disorder in middle-aged women and the elderly. Although surgical treatment of SUI has progressed, there are no effective pharmacological therapies without a side effect. We studied the effect of ginsenoside Rh2 against SUI. Here, we studied the effect of ginsenoside Rh2 on the contractile force of the urethra and blood vessels in an ex vivo organ bath assay. We further investigated the mechanisms and effects of Rh2 in cell culture and animal models. Ginsenoside Rh2 dose-dependently reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in RAW 264.7 cells. In the vaginal distension (VD)-induced SUI mouse model, ginsenoside Rh2 significantly reversed the VD-induced SUI physical signs and reduced blood pressure. The modulation of several SUI-related proteins, including myosin, survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, α-adrenergic receptor 1a (AdR1a), and superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3), may play some crucial roles in the therapeutic approaches against SUI. In conclusion, the ginsenoside Rh2 may offer therapeutic potential against SUI.

  6. A Wireless Self-Powered Urinary Incontinence Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ami; Utsunomiya, Fumiyasu; Douseki, Takakuni

    A self-powered urinary incontinence sensor system consisting of a urine-activated coin battery and a wireless transmitter has been developed as an application for wireless biosensor networks. The urine-activated battery makes possible both the sensing of urine leakage and self-powered operation. An intermittent power-supply circuit that uses an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) with a small internal resistance suppresses the supply voltage drop due to the large internal resistance of the battery. This circuit and a 1-V surface acoustic wave (SAW) oscillator reduce the power dissipation of a wireless transmitter. The SAW oscillator quickly responds to the on-off control of the power supply, which is suitable for intermittent operation. To verify the effectiveness of the circuit scheme, the authors fabricated a prototype sensor system. When the volume of urine is 0.2 ml, the battery outputs a voltage of over 1.3 V; and the sensor system can transmit signals over a distance of 5 m.

  7. Urinary incontinence among patients with arthritis--a neglected disability.

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Stokes, L; Frank, A O

    1992-01-01

    Urinary tract pathology may be no more common in patients with arthritis than among the general population, but its impact may be enhanced by disability. In this survey of 247 patients, as many as 38% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 47% of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and even 34% of patients with soft tissue rheumatism (STR) reported difficulty controlling their urine, confirming that incontinence is a widespread and often under-reported problem. More detailed enquiry in a sample of 90 patients with OA or RA did not suggest specific urinary tract pathology related to the underlying arthritis. Those who reported problems with urinary control were more disabled, and took longer to get to the toilet in their own environment than those without control problems. Twenty-seven per cent of patients felt that their problems would be solved by provision of a downstairs toilet. Timing of tasks performed by patients within their home is suggested as a method for assessing functional ability which encompasses both patient disability and environmental factors. PMID:1629846

  8. A study of transobturator tape in stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Mayekar, Rahul Vishwanath; Bhosale, Archana Anilkumar; Kandhari, Khushboo Vikram; Nandanwar, Yogeshwar Sadashiv; Shaikh, Sadaf Sadique

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is commonly encountered in gynecological practice. Nowadays, midurethral sling surgeries in the form of transobturator tape (TOT) surgery are recommended in its treatment. Aims and Objectives: To assess the outcome and patient satisfaction of TOT surgery in the treatment of SUI. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken for patients of SUI who underwent TOT surgery by the outside in method and followed up for 5 years. The patients were assessed clinically and by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) preoperatively and at postoperative day 3, discharge and 3 months follow-up. Results: Successful surgical treatment with TOT was seen in all patients at the time of discharge. There was no recurrence of SUI seen up to 1 year, but at 5-year follow-up two patients had a recurrence of SUI on examination though they did not complain of SUI. Urinary retention, tape extrusion, and groin stitch infection were the commonly seen complications following surgery. On subjective assessment, 61 patients were completely satisfied at day 3, and all patients were completely satisfied at discharge and 3 months follow-up as per the PGI-I score. Conclusion: TOT gives an excellent outcome in the treatment of SUI. PMID:28216921

  9. Preventing urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum: a review.

    PubMed

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common condition in association with pregnancy. Incident UI in pregnancy or postpartum are significant risk factors for UI later in life. Epidemiological studies on UI during pregnancy and postpartum list numerous variables associated with UI. For women, the main focus is on pelvic floor muscle training to prevent UI. However, several other modifiable risk factors are likely to contribute to prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum. This review investigated modifiable risk factors for UI during pregnancy and postpartum and also reviewed randomized controlled trials on prevention of UI in association with pregnancy. Systematic searches for publications until September 2012 on prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum were performed. Based on available evidence, the following recommendations to prevent UI during pregnancy and postpartum were made: women should be advised not to smoke before or during pregnancy (grade B), aim at normal weight before pregnancy (grade B), and aim at regaining prepregnancy weight postpartum (grade B). Occasional low-intensity training should be advocated (grade B), and constipation should be avoided during pregnancy (grade B) and postpartum (grade C). Women should be advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy and postpartum (grade A) and to use perineal warm packs during delivery (grade B). Cesarean section to prevent UI cannot be recommended (grade D). If lifestyle recommendations are addressed in association with pregnancy, incidence of UI during pregnancy and postpartum is likely to decrease.

  10. Effects of coffee and tea consumption on urinary incontinence in female twins

    PubMed Central

    Tettamanti, G; Altman, D; Pedersen, NL; Bellocco, R; Milsom, I; Iliadou, AN

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of coffee and tea consumption on symptoms of urinary incontinence. Design Population based study Setting The Swedish Twin Register Population In 2005, all twins born between 1959–1985 in Sweden (n = 42 852) were invited to participate in a web-based survey to screen for common complex diseases and common exposures. The present study was limited to female twins with information about at least one urinary symptoms and coffee and tea consumption (n = 14 031). Main outcome measure The association between coffe and tea consumption and urinary incontinence, as well as, nocturia was estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Women with a high coffee intake were at lower risk of any urinary incontinence (OR 0.78, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.64-0.98) compared to women not drinking coffee. Coffee intake and incontinence subtypes showed no significant associations whereas high tea consumption was specifically associated with a risk for overactive bladder (OR 1.34, 95% CI 11.07-1.67) and nocturia (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38). Results from co-twin control analysis suggested that the associations observed in logistic regression were mainly due to familial effects. Conclusions This study suggests that coffee and tea consumption has a limited effect on urinary incontinence symptoms. Familial and genetic effects may have confounded the associations observed in previous studies. PMID:21401855

  11. Association between urinary incontinence and depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women

    PubMed Central

    SUNG, Vivian W.; WEST, Delia S.; HERNANDEZ, Alexandra L.; WHEELER, Thomas L.; MYERS, Deborah L.; SUBAK, Leslee L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine the association between urinary incontinence (UI) and depressive symptoms. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study of 338 incontinent and overweight women at baseline in the Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise trial. Depressive symptoms were defined as a Beck Depression Inventory score ≥ 10. UI frequency was determined by 7-day voiding diary. Symptom bother and quality of life were determined using the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Multivariable regression was used to estimate the association between UI and depressive symptoms. RESULTS Women with depressive symptoms (N=101) reported a higher mean number of UI episodes per week (28 vs. 23, P=.005) and higher (worse) mean scores on the UDI (176 vs. 162, P=.02) and IIQ (136 vs. 97, P<.001) compared to women without depressive symptoms. The risk of having depressive symptoms increased with each 7-episode increase in UI per week (AOR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01–1.21), each 50-point increase in UDI (AOR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01–1.60) and each 50-point increase in IIQ (AOR 1.44, 95% CI 1.22–1.71). CONCLUSIONS Urinary incontinence frequency, symptom bother, and quality of life are independently associated with depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women. PMID:19236869

  12. [Towards early functional treatment of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Moulonguet, A; Verges, J; Delmas, V

    1981-01-01

    The authors report their striking experience of the effectiveness of early functional treatment of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. This experience is based upon 50 cases collected over a period of 10 years. Treatment is based upon stimulation of the perineal musculature by faradic current, ano-perineal exercises, and mictional rehabilitation. Results, in 50 cases, showed a marked improvement in 43 (86%), including 15 complete cures (30%). Such a favourable result was obtained with six weeks' treatment. It would appear that the result is all the better when treatment is started earlier, whether in a case of arrhythmic incontinence dominated by urgency, or isolated nocturnal incontinence. The results, once acquired, generally persist. A relapse of incontinence often responds adequately to a new series of sessions of functional treatment. It would appear that the mode of action of this functional therapy is based upon a decrease in bladder instability, and an increase in urethra resistance. The authors show that, with their treatment, improvements and cures in urinary incontinence after prostatectomy occur much earlier with the aid of functional treatment than spontaneously. Thus, treatment is worthwhile undertaking.

  13. Detection of intracellular bacteria in exfoliated urothelial cells from women with urge incontinence.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuoran; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Mukerjee, Chinmoy; Varettas, Kerry; Mansfield, Kylie J; Schembri, Mark A; Moore, Kate H

    2016-10-01

    The role of subclinical infection in patients with urge incontinence has been largely ignored. The aim of this study was to test for the presence of intracellular bacteria in exfoliated urothelial cells obtained from the urine of patients with detrusor overactivity or mixed incontinence +/- a history of UTI, and compare this to a control group of patients with stress incontinence and no history of infection. Bacterial cystitis was assessed by routine microbiology and compared to microscopic analysis of urine by Wright staining. Subsequent analysis of urothelial cells by confocal microscopy was performed to determine the existence of intracellular bacteria. Bacterial cystitis was seen in 13% of patients based on routine microbiology. Wright staining of concentrated urothelial cells demonstrated the presence of bacteria in 72% of samples. Filamentous bacterial cells were observed in 51% of patients and were significantly more common in patients with detrusor overactivity. Intracellular Escherichia coli were observed by confocal microscopy. This study supports the possibility that a subset of patients with urge incontinence may have unrecognised chronic bacterial colonisation, maintained via an intracellular reservoir. In patients with negative routine microbiology, application of the techniques used in this study revealed evidence of infection, providing further insights into the aetiology of urge incontinence.

  14. Urinary incontinence in women treated by ischemic compression over the bladder area: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hains, Guy; Hains, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Bussières, André

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if ischemic compression therapy over the bladder area results in clinically important changes among female patients with stress and mixed (stress and urge) incontinence. Methods One group of patients (n = 24) received ischemic compression therapy directed over the bladder area (experimental group). The control group (n = 9) received ischemic compression therapy directed toward structures of the hip joint. Changes in urinary incontinence symptoms were monitored using a 2-part questionnaire: the urogenital distress inventory and the incontinence impact questionnaire. Patients' perceived amelioration (improvement) was quantified using a scale divided from 0% to 100%. Results Mean scores for the first questionnaire (urogenital distress inventory + incontinence impact questionnaire, 19 questions) were 23.3 vs 25.3 at baseline and 10.2 vs 22.2 after 15 treatments for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 6.9 at 30 days after the last treatment and 11.3 at the 6-month follow-up. The perceived percentages of amelioration after 15 treatments were 69% vs 32% for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 73% at 30 days after the last treatment and 60% at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions In this study, ischemic compression directed toward elicited trigger points over bladder area was found to be an effective treatment of patients presenting symptoms of urinary incontinence. Improvement in symptoms was still present in follow-up at 6 months. PMID:19674707

  15. Ethnic and clinical characteristics of a Portuguese psychiatric inpatient population.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Joana; Ribeiro, Raquel; Cardoso, Graça

    2010-04-01

    The present study examined the association between ethnicity and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit in Portugal. The only ethnicity-related terms routinely recorded in the medical records were "Black" (mainly from the African Portuguese-speaking countries of Cape Verde, Angola, Guinea, Sao Tome and Mozambique) and "White." Black immigrants appeared to be over-represented, comprising 19.6% of inpatients; and were younger and more frequently male when compared with White inpatients. They were more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia and acute or transient psychosis, and less frequently diagnosed with delusional and personality disorders than White inpatients. These results are consistent with previous studies in the US and UK, and highlight the need for more culturally sensitive care in mental health services.

  16. Aggression in Inpatient Adolescents: The Effects of Gender and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Michele; Carey, Michael; Kim, Wun Jung

    2003-01-01

    Examined differences in aggressive behavior among predominantly white adolescent inpatients with and without depression. Survey data indicated that depression and gender interacted significantly. Depressed females demonstrated more physical aggression than nondepressed females, and depressed males demonstrated less aggression than nondepressed…

  17. Shrinking inpatient psychiatric capacity: cause for celebration or concern?

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Eileen; Loftis, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    This issue brief examines reported capacity constraints in inpatient psychiatric services and describes how these services fit within the continuum of care for mental health treatment. The paper summarizes the type and range of acute care services used to intervene in mental health crises, including both traditional hospital-based services and alternative crisis interventions, such as mobile response teams. It reviews historical trends in the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds and explores the anticipated influence of prospective payment for inpatient psychiatric services under Medicare. The paper also considers other forces that may affect the need for and supply of acute mental health services, including key factors that could improve the quality and efficiency of inpatient psychiatric care.

  18. Knowledge and Attitudes of Nursing Home Staff and Surveyors about the Revised Federal Guidance for Incontinence Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBeau, Catherine E.; Ouslander, Joseph G.; Palmer, Mary H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed nursing home staff and state nursing home surveyors regarding their knowledge and attitudes about urinary incontinence, its management, and the revised federal Tag F315 guidance for urinary incontinence. Design and Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey of a convenience sample of nursing home staff and state nursing home…

  19. Group treatment of adult male inpatients abused as children.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, L Y

    1994-10-01

    Recent research indicates that childhood abuse experiences characterize a large subset of psychiatric inpatients. This paper presents a time-limited pilot group developed for adult male abuse survivors in an inpatient setting using: (1) techniques adapted from the existing literature on treatment of abuse survivors; and (2) approaches deriving from the interface of theory and current manifestations of distress. The eclectic therapeutic approach incorporated psychoeducational, cognitive, behavioral, and art therapy techniques presented below in a session-by-session format.

  20. Cutaneous malignancies identified on an inpatient Dermatology consult service.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Scott, J F; Keller, J J; Gerstenblith, M R

    2017-02-23

    The role of inpatient Dermatology consultation and biopsy in evaluating suspicious cutaneous lesions is unknown.(1-3) Previous studies analyzed the diagnostic accuracy and utility of consultations for common rashes and infectious diseases, without considering suspicious lesions.(4-6) We sought to describe the frequency, clinicopathologic characteristics, and outcomes of suspicious lesions biopsied on an inpatient Dermatology consult service This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. How to prevent mesh erosion in transobturator Tension-Free Incontinence Cystocoele Treatment (TICT): a comparative survey

    PubMed Central

    LEANZA, V.; ZANGHÌ, G.; VECCHIO, R.; LEANZA, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tension-Free Incontinence Cystocoele Treatment (TICT) was introduced by Leanza-Gasbarro-Caschetto in 2001, on the basis of experimental and clinical investigations to obtain a physiologic mechanism of closure and opening of the urethra in the event of genuine stress urinary incontinence (S.U.I.) and cistocoele. TICT took origin from the previous retropubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) based on the integral theory according which mid-urethra has a main role for urinary continence but differs in that the former restores the anatomy and physiology of the entire anterior compartment. Simultaneously Delorme in 2001 spread the TOT (Trans-Obturator Tape) technique, emphasizing the needle passage across the obturator foramen which represents a new and less invasive route in comparison with the retropubic one. Transobturator TICT exploits the advantages of TOT, adding the anatomical repair of bladder prolapse. Introduction of mesh for treatment of pelvic defects gives a lower rate of recurrence, but introduces new complications due to the extraneous materials, among which the most common is represented by mesh erosion. At present the rate of mesh erosion reported is 4.7% in the TOT. Aim of our survey was to verify a technique allowing post-operative erosion prevention. Patients and methods 230 women with urodynamic stress incontinence and cystocoele after diagnostic phase were allocated to 2 treatment groups (A end B-group), with open alternative method. A-group women underwent transobturator TICT procedure after preparation of anterior compartment by means of a transversal incision taking care to preserve the integrity of the vaginal skin in the site where the mesh would be allocated. Conversely, B-group transobturator TICT was carried out in a classical way, through a longitudinal incision of anterior vaginal skin and suturing after placing the mesh. Each of the two groups was initially constituted by 115 subjects. There were 14 preoperative dropouts among

  2. Reducing unnecessary inpatient laboratory testing in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    May, Todd A; Clancy, Mary; Critchfield, Jeff; Ebeling, Fern; Enriquez, Anita; Gallagher, Carmel; Genevro, Jim; Kloo, Jay; Lewis, Paul; Smith, Rita; Ng, Valerie L

    2006-08-01

    After an inpatient phlebotomy-laboratory test request audit for 2 general inpatient wards identified 5 tests commonly ordered on a recurring basis, a multidisciplinary committee developed a proposal to minimize unnecessary phlebotomies and laboratory tests by reconfiguring the electronic order function to limit phlebotomy-laboratory test requests to occur singly or to recur within one 24-hour window. The proposal was implemented in June 2003. Comparison of fiscal year volume data from before (2002-2003) and after (2003-2004) implementation revealed 72,639 (12.0%) fewer inpatient tests, of which 41,765 (57.5%) were related directly to decreases in the 5 tests frequently ordered on a recurring basis. Because the electronic order function changes did not completely eliminate unnecessary testing, we concluded that the decrease in inpatient testing represented a minimum amount of unnecessary inpatient laboratory tests. We also observed 17,207 (21.4%) fewer inpatient phlebotomies, a decrease sustained in fiscal year 20042005. Labor savings allowed us to redirect phlebotomists to our understaffed outpatient phlebotomy service.

  3. Impact of clozapine prescription on inpatient resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Sernyak, M J; Rosenheck, R; Desai, R; Stolar, M; Ripper, G

    2001-11-01

    Although clozapine has been demonstrated to be clinically superior to typical neuroleptics in refractory schizophrenia, it is also more expensive. It had been hoped that the increased costs associated with its use would be offset by decreases in the utilization of other expensive resources, especially inpatient care. All patients who had clozapine initiated during an inpatient hospitalization within the VA for schizophrenia over a 4-year period (N = 1415) were matched with a comparison group (N = 2,830) on key service utilization variables and other possible confounding demographic and clinical variables using propensity scoring-an accepted statistical method, although still relatively little used in psychiatry. By using centralized VA databases, subsequent inpatient resource utilization for the 3 years after index discharge was examined. Veterans exposed to clozapine while inpatients recorded 33 (36%) more inpatient days in the subsequent 3 years after discharge than the comparison group (124 +/- 190 days vs. 91 +/- 181 days, p = .0002). When all patients exposed to clozapine were divided according to whether they had received 1 year of clozapine treatment after discharge, those that received less than 1 year's treatment recorded significantly more inpatient days than either those maintained on clozapine or controls. These results suggest that in actual practice clozapine treatment may cost substantially more than treatment with conventional neuroleptics.

  4. Two RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Chung; Lo, Nai-Wei; Wu, Tzong-Chen

    2012-10-01

    Medication error can easily cause serious health damage to inpatients in hospital. Consequently, the whole society has to spend huge amount of extra resources for additional therapies and medication on those affected inpatients. In order to prevent medication errors, secure inpatient medication administration system is required in a hospital. Using RFID technology, such administration system provides automated medication verification for inpatient's medicine doses and generates corresponding medication evidence, which may be audited later for medical dispute. Recently, Peris-Lopez et al. (Int. J. Med. Inform., 2011) proposed an IS-RFID system to enhance inpatient medication safety. Nevertheless, IS-RFID system does not detect the denial of proof attack efficiently and the generated medication evidence cannot defend against counterfeit evidence generated from the hospital. That is, the hospital possesses enough privilege from the design of IS-RFID system to modify generated medication evidence whenever it is necessary. Hence, we design two lightweight RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration, one for online verification environment and the other for offline validation situation, to achieve system security on evidence generation and provide early detection on denial of proof attack.

  5. Gracilis muscle transposition as a workhorse flap for anal incontinence: Quality of life and functional outcome in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Guru Dayal Singh; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Shende, Kaustubh Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Anal incontinence is one of the most psychologically and socially debilitating conditions in an otherwise healthy individual. It can lead to social isolation, loss of self-esteem, self-confidence and depression. This study is devoted to the problem of anal incontinence in the adult patients. The aim of our study is to analyse the results of gracilis muscle transposition for anal incontinence and improvement in quality of life (QOL) of patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 18 patients with complaint of anal incontinence were enrolled in this study. All patients were treated with gracilis muscle transposition. Results: All patients are continent, and there is an improvement in their QOL. Conclusion: Gracilis muscle transposition is a good option for patients of anal incontinence who are not treated by non-surgical means. PMID:28216815

  6. Psychosomatic inpatient rehabilitation: the German model.

    PubMed

    Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The term 'psychosomatic' has many connotations, be it in the sense of a general biopsychosocial concept in medicine as outlined in the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) of the World Health Organization, a holistic and person-centered view of the patient beyond the illness, the treatment of somatoform or somatic disorders, or special psychotherapeutic approaches. In Germany, there are also about 25,000 inpatient beds in 'psychosomatic rehabilitation hospitals', which treat approximately 5/1,000 inhabitants in the working age population per year. These institutions give an example of how to translate the theoretical concepts of psychosomatic medicine and of the ICF into clinical practice. 'Psychosomatic rehabilitation' aims at the prevention, treatment and compensation of chronic illness by a biopsychosocial approach. This includes a multilevel psychosomatic assessment and a multidimensional treatment focus including the reduction of symptoms, the training of capacities, the coping with chronic illness and impairment, the restoration of well-being and normal life, and the occupational reintegration including the search for a workplace, which allows work in spite of impairment. Scientific studies have shown that the psychological status, the motivation to work, the number of days on sickness leave and occupational reintegration can be improved, and that the system pays for the patients themselves, but also pension and health insurance companies.

  7. Spectrum of autoantibodies in Tunisian psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sidhom, Oussama; Laadhar, Lilia; Zitouni, Mondher; Ben Alaya, Nissaf; Rafrafi, Rym; Kallel-Sellami, Marayam; Lahmar, Houria; El Hechmi, Zouhair; Makni, Sondes

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and three psychiatric inpatients (74 men) were assessed for a wide spectrum of autoantibodies including antinuclear, antismooth muscle, antimitochondrial, antiDNA, anti-phospholipid, anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, antikeratin, rheumatoid factor, antithyroperoxydase, antigliadin IgA and IgG, antitransgutaminase, and antiendomysium antibodies. Four groups of patients were considered separately, including 47 with schizophrenia, 23 with schizoaffective disorder, 16 with bipolar disorder and 17 patients with other different psychiatric diagnosis. Forty one healthy, age- and sex-matched blood donors were used as a control group. There were no significant difference in the prevalence of the different autoantibodies between patients (N = 103) and controls except for antigliadin IgG (30.1 vs 9.8 respectively, p = 0.01). Presence of autoantibodies was influenced by age but not by sex or treatment. As for diagnosis categories, patients with bipolar disorder presented significantly more autoantibodies than the three other categories and controls. These results point out a possible autoimmune activation in at least a subgroup of psychiatric patients especially amongst those suffering from bipolar disorder.

  8. Pediatric Inpatient Headache Therapy: What is Available.

    PubMed

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Status migrainosus is defined by the international classification of headache disorders (ICHD) criteria as a debilitating migraine lasting more then 72 hours. The epidemiology of status migrainosus is still unknown in adult and children, and frequently underdiagnosed. Children and adolescents often end up in the emergency room with an intractable headache that failed outpatient therapy. Six to seven percent of these children do not respond to acute infusion therapy and require hospitalization. It is imperative that more aggressive therapy is considered when patients are affected by a severe intractable headache to prevent further disability and returning the child to baseline activity. Multiple therapies are available for adults and children. Studies for acute therapy in the emergency room are available in adults and pediatric groups. Small studies are available for inpatient therapy in children and, along with available therapies for children and adolescents, are described in this review. A review of the literature shows growing evidence regarding the use of dihydroergotamine intravenously once patients are hospitalized. Effectiveness and safety have been proven in the last decades in adults and small studies in the pediatric populations.

  9. Treatment - mother-infant inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Glangeaud-Freudenthal, Nine M C; Howard, Louise M; Sutter-Dallay, Anne-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Infants of parents with psychiatric disorders may be particularly vulnerable and have a higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Until the second half of the 20th century, women and infants were cared for separately. Today, hospitalisation of women with their babies in psychiatric mother-baby units enables psychiatric care of women and promotion of parent-infant interactions and child development. The distribution of psychiatric mother-baby units around the world, as well as within countries, varies strongly. Reasons for this may be related to the absence of national perinatal mental health policies related to psychiatric mother-baby unit location, differences in sources of referral for admission, and criteria for psychiatric mother-baby unit admission. Two principal national epidemiologic studies, in England and in France and Belgium, have described issues related to discharge from such care, as have smaller local studies, but no epidemiologic studies have yet demonstrated that joint inpatient psychiatric mother-baby unit care is cost-effective compared with separate care.

  10. Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence: Burch colposuspension, modified Pereyra and Stamey bladder neck suspension, and collagen injection--Toa Payoh Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Tay, K P; Lim, P H; Chng, H C

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 34 female patients who underwent corrective surgery for stress urinary incontinence over a 4-year period at the Toa Payoh Hospital. These patients were offered surgery only after an adequate trial of medical therapy, pelvic floor exercises and weight reduction. Bladder neck suspension operations were performed via the Burch, Stamey and modified Pereyra techniques. Towards the later part of this study, endoscopic injection of Collagen was performed as a salvage procedure in 2 patients. The Burch colposuspension gave uniformly good results, with all patients being completely dry. Seventy percent and sixty percent complete continence were achieved via the modified Pereyra and Stamey techniques respectively. Three patients required additional surgical procedures. Using these techniques, the overall results showed that 27 patients (79.4%) had complete urinary continence following surgery, while the remaining 7 patients (20.6%) experienced significant improvement of symptoms.

  11. Management of female urinary incontinence: A survey of urogynaecologists' view on the NICE guideline.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, A; Monga, A; Duckett, J

    2016-05-01

    We conducted a survey to obtain the opinions of urogynaecologists regarding the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence or NICE 2013 urinary incontinence guideline and whether it would change their current practice. A closed format questionnaire was sent electronically to all members of the British Society of Urogynaecology or BSUG between January and March 2014. There were three major areas of disagreement. First, 70.2% of respondents disagreed that a multidisciplinary team review was necessary before invasive treatment for urinary incontinence. Second, 53.8% of respondents disagreed that preoperative urodynamic studies were not required in stress urinary incontinence diagnosed clinically. Third, 58.6% of respondents disagreed that oxybutynin, tolterodine and darifenacin should be used as first-line drug therapy for overactive bladder. The questionnaire demonstrates that there are significant concerns leading to more than a third of respondents not altering their current practice in line with the entire guideline.

  12. Late Fecal Incontinence After High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Better Prediction Using Longitudinal Definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Fellin, Gianni; Vavassori, Vittorio; Cagna, Emanuela; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Girelli, Giuseppe; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo Filippo; Tortoreto, Francesca; Delle Canne, Stefania; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To model late fecal incontinence after high-dose prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) in patients accrued in the AIROPROS (prostate working group of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) 0102 trial using different endpoint definitions. Methods and Materials: The self-reported questionnaires (before RT, 1 month after RT, and every 6 months for {<=}3 years after RT) of 586 patients were available. The peak incontinence (P{sub I}NC) and two longitudinal definitions (chronic incontinence [C{sub I}NC], defined as the persistence of Grade 1 or greater incontinence after any Grade 2-3 event; and mean incontinence score [M{sub I}NC], defined as the average score during the 3-year period after RT) were considered. The correlation between the clinical/dosimetric parameters (including rectal dose-volume histograms) and P{sub I}NC (Grade 2 or greater), C{sub I}NC, and M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 were investigated using multivariate logistic analyses. Receiver operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve were used to assess the predictive value of the different multivariate models. Results: Of the 586 patients, 36 with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score before RT were not included in the present analysis. Of the 550 included patients, 197 (35.8%) had at least one control with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score (M{sub I}NC >0). Of these 197 patients, 37 (6.7%), 22 (4.0%), and 17 (3.1%) were scored as having P{sub I}NC, M{sub I}NC {>=}1, and C{sub I}NC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater acute incontinence was the only predictor of P{sub I}NC (odds ratio [OR], 5.9; p = .0009). Grade 3 acute incontinence was predictive of C{sub I}NC (OR, 9.4; p = .02), and percentage of the rectal volume receiving >40 Gy of {>=}80% was predictive of a M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 (OR, 3.8; p = .008) and of C{sub I}NC (OR, 3.6; p = .03). Previous bowel disease, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery, and the use of antihypertensive (protective factor

  13. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  14. [Incontinence--a common issue for people with Parkinson's disease. A systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Siegl, Eva; Lassen, Britta; Saxer, Susi

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is among the most common neurological diseases. About 4.1 million people are attected worldwide. The course of Parkinson's disease is chronically progressive. With L-Dopa therapy the life expectancy of people being affected by Parkinon's disease is not shortened compared with people who are not affected. Therefore people with Parkinson's disease often suffer from the serious effects for decades which include motor symptoms as well as vegetative disturbance, which concerns bladder function and functions of the gastrointestinal tract. Urinary and fecal incontinence involve severe impairment of quality of life. In this review the occurence of urinary and fecal incontinence should be determined in order to be able to describe its extent. There are different measures for treatment or improvement. These are reviewed based on the following research question: Which effects do interventions have in improving urinary and fecal incontinence in persons with Parkinson's disease compared to usual care? In order to answer the questions a systematic review was conducted. The literature search occured in the electronic databases Cochrane database, PubMed and CINAHL. Three studies investigating the prevalence with a total sample size of n = 1077 and for the evaluation of interventions four studies with a total sample size of n = 48 have been included. 25 percent of the women with Parkinson's disease suffer from urgency incontinence compared to seven percent of the women without Parkinson's disease (p < 0.01). Among men with Parkison's disease 28 percent are affected and six percent among men without Parkinson's disease (p < 0.01). In respect to stress and fecal incontinence there were no significant differences between people affected and people not affected by Parkinson's disease. With pelvic floor muscle exercises and accompanying measures as well as with injections of botulinum toxin A a reduction of urinary incontinence seems to be possible. Due to

  15. Incontinence-associated skin damage in nursing home residents: a secondary analysis of a prospective, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Zimmaro Bliss, Donna; Zehrer, Cindy; Savik, Kay; Thayer, Debra; Smith, Graham

    2006-12-01

    More than half of the nursing home population is incontinent of urine or feces, presenting challenges to perineal skin health. To determine the occurrence and severity of skin damage in nursing home residents with incontinence, a secondary analysis of data collected from a multisite, open-label, quasi-experimental study of cost and efficacy of four regimens for preventing incontinence-associated dermatitis in nursing home residents was performed. Sixteen randomly selected nursing homes from across the US were included in the study. Participating nursing home residents were incontinent of urine and/or feces and free of skin damage. Of the 1,918 persons screened, 51% (n = 981) qualified for prospective surveillance. Perineal skin was assessed over a 6-week period; frequency, type, and severity of skin damage were observed. Skin damage developed after a median of 13 (range 6 to 42) days in 45 out of 981 residents (4.6%), of which 3.4% was determined to be incontinence-associated dermatitis. Some residents (14 out of 45, 31%) had incontinence-associated dermatitis of other skin damage in more than one area. This study is one of the first to report the characteristics of incontinence-associated dermatitis in a large sample of nursing home residents. The sample size and random selection of nursing homes impart generalizability to the findings. Incontinence-associated dermatitis is a risk in nursing home residents, especially those with fecal incontinence. These findings suggest that the rate and severity of incontinence-associated dermatitis are low with close monitoring and use of a defined skin care regimen that includes a pH-balanced cleanser and moisture barrier.

  16. Urinary incontinence and risk of functional decline in older women: data from the Norwegian HUNT-study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The main objective of the present study was to determine whether UI is an independent predictor of ADL decline and IADL decline in elderly women. We also aimed to find out whether incontinent subjects were at higher risk of needing help from formal home care or home nursing care during 11 year follow-up. Methods A prospective cohort study conducted as part of the North-Trøndelag Health Study 2 and 3. Women aged 70–80 years when participating in the HUNT 2 study, who also participated in the HUNT 3 study, were included in this study. Analyses on self-reported urinary incontinence at baseline and functional decline during a11-year period were performed for incontinent and continent subjects. Results Baseline prevalence of urinary incontinence was 24%. At on average eleven year follow up, logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between incontinence and decline in activities of daily living (ADL) (OR =2.37, 95% CI =1.01-5.58) (P=0.04). No association between urinary incontinence and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in incontinent women compared with continent women was found (OR=1.18, CI=.75-1.86) (P=.46). Data were adjusted for ADL, IADL and co morbid conditions at baseline. No significant differences in need of more help from formal home care and home nursing care between continent and incontinent women were found after 11 years of follow-up. Conclusions Urinary incontinence is an important factor associated with functional decline in women aged 70–80 years living in their own homes. At eleven years of follow up, no significant differences in need of more help from formal home care and home nursing care between continent and incontinent women were found. PMID:23678851

  17. National trends in inpatient admissions following stereotactic radiosurgery and the in-hospital patient outcomes in the United States from 1998 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen L.; Li, Alexander Y.; Sussman, Eric S.; Pendharkar, Arjun V.; Iyer, Aditya; Thompson, Patricia A.; Tayag, Armine T.; Chang, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to examine trends in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and in-hospital patient outcomes on a national level by utilizing national administrative data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Methods and materials Using the NIS database, all discharges where patients underwent inpatient SRS were included in our study from 1998 – 2011 as designated by the ICD9-CM procedural codes. Trends in the utilization of primary and adjuvant SRS, in-hospital complications and mortality, and resource utilization were identified and analyzed. Results Our study included over 11,000 hospital discharges following admission for primary SRS or for adjuvant SRS following admission for surgery or other indication. The most popular indication for SRS continues to be treatment of intracranial metastatic disease (36.7%), but expansion to primary CNS lesions and other non-malignant pathology beyond trigeminal neuralgia has occurred over the past decade. Second, inpatient admissions for primary SRS have declined by 65.9% over this same period of time. Finally, as inpatient admissions for SRS become less frequent, the complexity and severity of illness seen in admitted patients has increased over time with an increase in the average comorbidity score from 1.25 in the year 2002 to 2.29 in 2011, and an increase in over-all in-hospital complication rate of 2.8 times over the entire study period. Conclusions As the practice of SRS continues to evolve, we have seen several trends in associated hospital admissions. Overall, the number of inpatient admissions for primary SRS has declined while adjuvant applications have remained stable. Over the same period, there has been associated increase in complication rate, length of stay, and mortality in inpatients. These associations may be explained by an increase in the comorbidity-load of admitted patients as more high-risk patients are selected for admission at inpatient centers while more stable patients are

  18. Urinary incontinence: economic burden and new choices in pharmaceutical treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard; Muller, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In the year 2000, an estimated 17 million community-dwelling adults in the United States had daily urinary incontinence (UI), and an additional 33 million suffered from the overlapping condition, overactive bladder. Estimates of the total annual cost of these conditions range up to 32 billion US dollar; the largest components are management costs and the expenses associated with nursing home admissions attributable to UI. In most cases, patients with UI can be treated with pharmaceutical agents, in addition to behavioral therapy. Until recently, pharmaceutical therapy for UI has been limited, especially because the adverse effects of available agents resulted in poor adherence to treatment regimens. Recent innovations in molecular design and new dosage forms of UI medications offer the promise of fewer and less severe adverse effects and, thus, better treatment outcomes for patients. Additionally, the availability of multiple agents within a therapeutic class offers health care providers a spectrum of choices with which to personalize treatment for each individual patient. New pharmacologic treatment options for UI have the potential to allow greater independence for older persons who reside at home and to delay or avoid the costs of admission to long-term care facilities. Alternate dosage forms, which include patches and sustained-release formulations, may benefit patients who have difficulty chewing, swallowing, or remembering to take medications. Although these newer products are generally more expensive than older forms of therapy, they typically have more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios. Access to these new medications for patients enrolled in public and private health care plans may help to reduce the economic and social burden of UI care.

  19. Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Grzeda, Mariusz T; Heron, Jon; von Gontard, Alexander; Joinson, Carol

    2016-12-10

    To examine whether daytime wetting and bedwetting urinary incontinence (UI) in childhood and adolescence are associated with psychosocial problems in adolescence. We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to examine the association between trajectories of UI from 4 to 9 years and self-reported psychosocial problems in adolescence (13-14 years) including depressive symptoms, peer victimisation, poor self-image and school experiences (negative perception of school and teachers, problems with peer relationships). Sample sizes ranged from 5162 (perception of teachers) to 5887 (self-image). We also examined associations between self-reported UI at 14 years and psychosocial problems. Relative to normative development, adolescents who experienced delayed development of bladder control had poorer self-image [standardised mean difference = 0.18 (95% CI 0.04, 0.32)], more negative perceptions of school [0.18 (0.02, 0.34)] and more problems with peer relationships at school [0.25 (0.10, 0.40)]. Persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting) in childhood was associated with increased problems with peer relationships in adolescence [0.19 (0.03, 0.34)]. The strongest associations between adolescent UI and psychosocial problems were found for daytime wetting (reference = no UI at 14 years): depressive symptoms [OR = 3.04 (95% CI 1.91-4.84)], peer victimisation [2.14 (1.48-3.10)], poor self-image (t = -8.49, p < 0.001) and problems with peer relationships (t = -4.69, p < 0.001). Children with delayed development of bladder control and persistent wetting have increased psychosocial problems in adolescence. Adolescents with UI reported a range of psychosocial problems and clinicians should be aware that they might require support from psychological services.

  20. Macular posterior pigmentary incontinence: its relation to macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Westermark, P; Ridderström, E; Vahlquist, A

    1996-07-01

    Patients with clinical features of dorsal macular amyloidosis but without subepidermal amyloid deposits were followed for 2-11 years. The clinical appearance was fairly stable during this period of time, with little tendency of healing. Only 2 of the patients developed typical macular amyloidosis during the follow-up. It is concluded that a condition strongly resembling macular amyloidosis but without amyloid is an entity, and the designation "macular posterior pigmentary incontinence" is proposed. The relationship between macular posterior pigmentary incontinence and the two conditions macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica is discussed.

  1. Gastrointestinal transit and prolonged ambulatory colonic motility in health and faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, F; Kamm, M; Morris, G; Britton, K; Woloszko, J; Nicholls, R

    1997-01-01

    Background—Colonic motor function has not been studied in the ambulatory setting over a prolonged period in the unprepared state. Furthermore, the disturbance of this function in patients with faecal incontinence is unknown. 
Aim—To study colonic function over two to three days in the ambulatory, unprepared state in health and in patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence. 
Methods—Six healthy women and six women with faecal incontinence and a structurally intact anal sphincter ingested a dual radioisotope meal, and had a six sensor, solid state manometric probe colonoscopically inserted into the left colon. Scanning was performed until radioisotope left the gut and pressure was recorded for a median of 44hours. 
Results—Three of six patients showed abnormal gastric emptying. Patients showed no disturbance of colonic radioisotope transit. Controls had a median of 12, whereas patients had a median of 16, high amplitude propagated waves per 24 hours. In three patients urge incontinence was associated with high amplitude (up to 500 cm water) propagated waves which often reached the rectum. These high pressure waves were identical to those occuring in healthy subjects, the only difference being the lack of adequate sphincter response. Passive incontinence was not associated with colonic motor activity. Defaecation in all subjects was associated with identical propagated waves, and distal movement of 13% (median) of right colonic content and excretion of 32% from the left colon and rectum. The urge to defaecate was associated with either propagated waves (45%) or non-propagated contractions (55%). Rectal motor complexes were recorded in both groups of subjects, but similar rhythmic activity was also recorded in the sigmoid and descending colon. 
Conclusions—Normal colonic function consists of frequent high pressure propagated waves. Rhythmic activity occurs both proximal to and in the rectum. Defaecation is characterised by high pressure propagated

  2. Urinary Incontinence due to Overactive Detrusor Muscle: A Rare Side Effect of Venlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vithyalakshmi; Gunasekar, Palanikumar; Kumar, Suneel; Alsakaf, Imad

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reemergence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) after starting treatment with venlafaxine who was stabilized on tamsulosin and finasteride for about 6 years. A 66-year-old Caucasian male with prior history of major depressive disorder developed UI within a week of starting venlafaxine 75 mg per day. He described symptoms in the form of involuntary leakage of urine both during the day and at night. His symptoms of UI resolved after stopping the venlafaxine. To the best of our knowledge, there are only four case reports of venlafaxine induced urinary incontinence which have been published. PMID:26491599

  3. The Role of Geriatricians and Family Practitioners in the Treatment of Overactive Bladder and Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Voytas, John

    2002-01-01

    Although the prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) and that of its symptoms (urinary urge incontinence, urgency, and frequency) increase with age, these conditions are not necessarily normal consequences of aging. Patients who present with urinary symptoms should be evaluated and treated, whether they are living on their own or in a residential, assisted-care, or long-term-care environment. Effective treatment for OAB and urinary incontinence (UI) is available and improves quality of life for the elderly. The primary care physician and geriatrician can accomplish a basic evaluation for UI using a systematic approach, as detailed in the following pages. PMID:16986021

  4. Management of tissue excoriation in older patients with urinary or faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Copson, Dale

    This article discusses good skin care in relation to the management of incontinence. It outlines the structure and functions of the skin and describes how the skin changes as we age. It examines how incontinence can damage the skin and provides an overview of the current management methods that are used to prevent tissue excoriation. It also suggests an effective alternative that could be used if previous strategies have failed and the skin begins to breakdown, that is, the use of a silver regimen.

  5. Prevalence of urinary incontinence among community-dwelling adults receiving home care.

    PubMed

    Du Moulin, M F M T; Hamers, J P H; Ambergen, A W; Janssen, M A P; Halfens, R J G

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2005 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) in adults receiving home care. Of the 2,866 patients surveyed, 46% suffered from UI; 6.5% had stress, 16.6% had urge, 9% had mixed, and 17.6% had functional incontinence. No diagnosis regarding type of UI had been established in 50.2%. Factors associated with UI were advanced age, higher body mass index, and impaired mobility. UI is prevalent in older persons receiving home care, but the lack of diagnosis of type of UI in half of the participants surveyed impedes management of UI.

  6. Concomitant Laparoscopic Burch Urethropexy and Combined Vaginal-Laparoscopic Mesh Sling Removal (x2) for Pain and Persistent Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap-Wright, LaChanda; Miklos, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Although midurethral mesh tape slings are considered the standard of care in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), complications such as pain, dyspareunia, or erosion are known to occur in addition to persistent incontinence. The management of these types of mesh sling complications can be very complex, especially when the pain is not just isolated to the vagina but extends into other areas, such as the abdomen which requires a much more extensive dissection. Additionally, if a mesh sling needs to be removed, the patient will most likely have a return of her SUI that often necessitates subsequent treatment. Vaginal and/or laparoscopic removal or revision of mesh tape slings should be considered in patients presenting with complications such as vaginal pain, abdominal pain, dyspareunia, or urinary obstructive symptoms. In those patients who demonstrate persistent SUI, concomitant laparoscopic Burch urethropexy can be considered and can safely be performed at the time mesh removal. In this case report we present a patient who required a dual-approach removal of two painful midurethral slings in addition to concomitant treatment of persistent SUI with a laparoscopic Burch urethropexy procedure. PMID:27872788

  7. Frequency, Characteristics and Management of Adolescent Inpatient Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Immaculada; Saito, Ema; Amanbekova, Dinara; Ramani, Meena; Kapoor, Sandeep; Chekuri, Raja; De Hert, Marc; Carbon, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inpatient aggression is a serious challenge in pediatric psychiatry. Methods A chart review study in adolescent psychiatric inpatients consecutively admitted over 24 months was conducted, to describe aggressive events requiring an intervention (AERI) and to characterize their management. AERIs were identified based on specific institutional event forms and/or documentation of as-needed (STAT/PRN) medication administration for aggression, both recorded by nursing staff. Results Among 408 adolescent inpatients (age: 15.2±1.6 years, 43.9% male), 1349 AERIs were recorded, with ≥1 AERI occurring in 28.4% (n=116; AERI+). However, the frequency of AERIs was highly skewed (median 4, range: 1–258). In a logistical regression model, the primary diagnosis at discharge of disruptive behavior disorders and bipolar disorders, history of previous inpatient treatment, length of hospitalization, and absence of a specific precipitant prior to admission were significantly associated with AERIs (R2=0.32; p<0.0001). The first line treatment of patients with AERIs (AERI+) was pharmacological in nature (95.6%). Seclusion or restraint (SRU) was used at least once in 59.4% of the AERI+ subgroup (i.e., in 16.9% of all patients; median within-group SRU frequency: 3). Treatment and discharge characteristics indicated a poorer prognosis in the AERI+ (discharge to residential care AERI+: 22.8%, AERI−: 5.6%, p<0.001) and a greater need for psychotropic polypharmacy (median number of psychotropic medications AERI+: 2; AERI−: 1, p<0.001). Conclusions Despite high rates of pharmacological interventions, SRU continue to be used in adolescent inpatient care. As both of these approaches lack a clear evidence base, and as adolescents with clinically significant inpatient aggression have increased illness acuity/severity and service needs, structured research into the most appropriate inpatient aggression management is sorely needed. PMID:23647136

  8. Acute inpatient palliative medicine in a cancer center: clinical problems and medical interventions--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Rivera, Nilo; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan; Davis, Mellar P

    2007-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and medical interventions of the 100 consecutive cancer admissions to the acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit at the Cleveland Clinic for 2 months are described. Median age was 62 years (range, 31 to 92 years). The male-female ratio was 1:1. Most admissions were referred by hematology-oncology and had prior antineoplastic therapy. Reasons for admission were symptom control and cancer-related complications. Patients underwent invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, hydration, transfusions, radiation, or chemotherapy, or a combination, during their admission. Most were discharged home with hospice care or had outpatient clinic follow-up. The mortality rate was 20%. Aggressive multidisciplinary management of symptoms, disease complications, comorbid conditions, and psychosocial problems were provided. Palliative medicine physicians provided continuity of care in the outpatient clinic and at home. An acute inpatient palliative medicine unit within a tertiary level medical center has a definable and important role in comprehensive cancer care.

  9. Female stress urinary incontinence: clinical efficacy and satisfaction after transobturator adjustable tape sling. An observational longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Dall'Asta, Andrea; Musarò, Andrea; Faioli, Raffaele; Zanni, Giuliano Carlo; Piantelli, Giovanni; Lukanovic, Adolf; Bacchi Modena, Alberto; Berretta, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    We performed an observational longitudinal cohort study on patients affected by stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and surgically treated with a transobturator adjustable tape sling (TOA) in order to evaluate this surgical procedure in terms of efficacy, safety, quality of life (QoL) improvement, and patient satisfaction. For all patients, we recorded: general features, preoperative SUI risk factors, obstetrics history, preoperative urodynamic tests, intraoperative/postoperative complications, number of postoperative sling regulations, postmicturition residue, and hospital stay. All patients were asked to complete the validated short version of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) questionnaire 18 months after discharge to evaluate the efficacy of the TOA system. We added 2 adjunctive items to the UDI-6 in order to evaluate patient satisfaction and QoL. All 77 surgical procedures were performed under locoregional anesthesia without complications. Postoperative TOA regulations were performed in 46.8% of patients immediately after the procedure and in 14.3% during hospitalization. Before discharge, postmicturition residue was negative in 67 cases and less than 50 cc in 10 cases. Mean hospital stay was 2.18 days. From the questionnaire evaluation, we found that after the procedure, 90.9% of patients showed a complete regression of urinary symptoms, 1.3% obtained considerable relief from preoperative symptoms, and 6.6% reported poor or absent symptom improvements; 75.3% of patients were totally satisfied and 5.2% totally disappointed. The possibility of modulating postoperative sling tension and reusing the surgical materials in association with short hospitalization as well as high patient satisfaction render TOA a safe, effective, and low-cost technique for the treatment of female SUI.

  10. Patient engagement in the inpatient setting: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prey, Jennifer E; Woollen, Janet; Wilcox, Lauren; Sackeim, Alexander D; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Restaino, Susan; Feiner, Steven; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically review existing literature regarding patient engagement technologies used in the inpatient setting. Methods PubMed, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Digital Library, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Xplore, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies that discussed patient engagement (‘self-efficacy’, ‘patient empowerment’, ‘patient activation’, or ‘patient engagement’), (2) involved health information technology (‘technology’, ‘games’, ‘electronic health record’, ‘electronic medical record’, or ‘personal health record’), and (3) took place in the inpatient setting (‘inpatient’ or ‘hospital’). Only English language studies were reviewed. Results 17 articles were identified describing the topic of inpatient patient engagement. A few articles identified design requirements for inpatient engagement technology. The remainder described interventions, which we grouped into five categories: entertainment, generic health information delivery, patient-specific information delivery, advanced communication tools, and personalized decision support. Conclusions Examination of the current literature shows there are considerable gaps in knowledge regarding patient engagement in the hospital setting and inconsistent use of terminology regarding patient engagement overall. Research on inpatient engagement technologies has been limited, especially concerning the impact on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. PMID:24272163

  11. Hyponatraemia in cancer patients on an inpatient rehabilitation unit.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M; Palmer, J L; Fu, J; Williams, J L; Yadav, R; Guo, Y

    2014-05-01

    This study identifies the incidence of hyponatraemia in cancer patients on an inpatient rehabilitation unit and examines the association between admission hyponatraemia and rehabilitation length of stay (LOS), functional outcome, and survival. After institutional review committee's approval, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of 295 consecutive patients who were admitted to this inpatient cancer rehabilitation unit between 27 January 2009 through 31 July 2010 in a tertiary cancer centre. The incidence of hyponatraemia in cancer patients admitted to our inpatient rehabilitation unit was 41.4%. Median rehabilitation LOS for patients with mild (Na 130-134 mEq/L) and moderate-severe (Na < 130 mEq/L) hyponatraemia was 11 and 15 days, respectively, which was significantly longer than patients with eunatraemia (10 days; P = 0.03). Functional Independence Measure gain for ambulation and transfers during inpatient rehabilitation stay was not significantly different between three different patient groups. We concluded that large portion of patients who require acute inpatient rehabilitation presented with hyponatraemia, which is associated with prolonged rehabilitation LOS. Whether aggressive management of hyponatraemia will shorten rehabilitation stay needs further study.

  12. Assessing inpatient glycemic control: what are the next steps?

    PubMed

    Cook, Curtiss B; Wellik, Kay E; Kongable, Gail L; Shu, Jianfen

    2012-03-01

    Despite the emergence of glucometrics (i.e., systematic analysis of data on blood glucose levels of inpatients) as a subject of high interest, there remains a lack of standardization on how glucose parameters are measured and reported. This dilemma must be resolved before a national benchmarking process can be developed that will allow institutions to track and compare inpatient glucose control performance against established guidelines and that can also be supported by quality care organizations. In this article, we review some of the questions that need to be resolved through consensus and review of the evidence, and discuss some of the limitations in analyzing and reporting inpatient glucose data that must be addressed (or at least accepted as limitations) before hospitals can commit resources to gathering, compiling, and presenting inpatient glucose statistics as a health care quality measure. Standards must include consensus on which measures to report, the unit of analysis, definitions of targets for hyperglycemia treatment, a definition of hypoglycemia, determination of how data should be gathered (from chart review or from laboratory information systems), and which type of sample (blood or point of care) should be used for analysis of glycemic control. Hospitals and/or their representatives should be included in the discussion. For inpatient glucose control to remain a focus of interest, further dialogue and consensus on the topic are needed.

  13. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  14. The ED-inpatient dashboard: Uniting emergency and inpatient clinicians to improve the efficiency and quality of care for patients requiring emergency admission to hospital.

    PubMed

    Staib, Andrew; Sullivan, Clair; Jones, Matt; Griffin, Bronwyn; Bell, Anthony; Scott, Ian

    2016-09-04

    Patients who require emergency admission to hospital require complex care that can be fragmented, occurring in the ED, across the ED-inpatient interface (EDii) and subsequently, in their destination inpatient ward. Our hospital had poor process efficiency with slow transit times for patients requiring emergency care. ED clinicians alone were able to improve the processes and length of stay for the patients discharged directly from the ED. However, improving the efficiency of care for patients requiring emergency admission to true inpatient wards required collaboration with reluctant inpatient clinicians. The inpatient teams were uninterested in improving time-based measures of care in isolation, but they were motivated by improving patient outcomes. We developed a dashboard showing process measures such as 4 h rule compliance rate coupled with clinically important outcome measures such as inpatient mortality. The EDii dashboard helped unite both ED and inpatient teams in clinical redesign to improve both efficiencies of care and patient outcomes.

  15. Urinary incontinence and vaginal squeeze pressure two years post-cesarean delivery in primiparous women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Angélica Mércia Pascon; Dias, Adriano; Marini, Gabriela; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Witkin, Steven; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence and associated vaginal squeeze pressure in primiparous women with and without previous gestational diabetes mellitus two years post-cesarean delivery. METHODS: Primiparous women who delivered by cesarean two years previously were interviewed about the delivery and the occurrence of incontinence. Incontinence was reported by the women and vaginal pressure evaluated by a Perina perineometer. Sixty-three women with gestational diabetes and 98 women without the disease were screened for incontinence and vaginal pressure. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effects of gestational diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of gestational incontinence was higher among women with gestational diabetes during their pregnancies (50.8% vs. 31.6%) and two years after a cesarean (44.8% vs. 18.4%). Decreased vaginal pressure was also significantly higher among women with gestational diabetes (53.9% vs. 37.8%). Maternal weight gain and newborn weight were risk factors for decreased vaginal pressure. Maternal age, gestational incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure were risk factors for incontinence two years after a cesarean. In a multivariate logistic model, gestational diabetes was an independent risk factor for gestational incontinence. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean were elevated among women with gestational diabetes compared to women who were normoglycemic during pregnancy. We confirmed an association between gestational diabetes mellitus and a subsequent decrease of vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean. These results may warrant more comprehensive prospective and translational studies. PMID:21915481

  16. Prevalence of commonly prescribed medications potentially contributing to urinary symptoms in a cohort of older patients seeking care for incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several medication classes may contribute to urinary symptoms in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of use of these medications in a clinical cohort of incontinent patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 390 new patients aged 60 years and older seeking care for incontinence in specialized outpatient geriatric incontinence clinics in Quebec, Canada. The use of oral estrogens, alpha-blocking agents, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, ACE inhibitors, loop diuretics, NSAIDs, narcotics and calcium channel blockers was recorded from each patient’s medication profile. Lower urinary tract symptoms and the severity of incontinence were measured using standardized questionnaires including the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. The type of incontinence was determined clinically by a physician specialized in incontinence. Co-morbidities were ascertained by self-report. Logistic regression analyses were used to detect factors associated with medication use, as well as relationships between specific medication classes and the type and severity of urinary symptoms. Results The prevalence of medications potentially contributing to lower urinary tract symptoms was 60.5%. Calcium channel blockers (21.8%), benzodiazepines (17.4%), other centrally active agents (16.4%), ACE inhibitors (14.4%) and estrogens (12.8%) were most frequently consumed. Only polypharmacy (OR = 4.9, 95% CI = 3.1-7.9), was associated with medication use contributing to incontinence in analyses adjusted for age, sex, and multimorbidity. No associations were detected between specific medication classes and the type or severity of urinary symptoms in this cohort. Conclusion The prevalence of use of medications potentially causing urinary symptoms is high among incontinent older adults. More research is needed to determine whether de-prescribing these medications results in improved urinary symptoms

  17. Cost effectiveness of training incontinent elderly in nursing homes: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, T W; Kaltreider, D L; Igou, J F; Yu, L C; Rohner, T J

    1990-01-01

    This study used a randomized clinical trial with 133 incontinent elderly in seven nursing homes to evaluate the effectiveness of a behavioral training therapy and its cost implications. The training program lasted three months, and a 22-week follow-up period examined the durability of the treatment effect. The therapy became effective after six weeks of training. By the final months of training, the treatment participants' wet episodes had been reduced by 0.6 episode per day, or a 26 percent reduction over baseline, and improvement was maintained during the follow-up period. Trainees with a high frequency of incontinence during baseline, relatively more cognitive residents, and residents with a normal bladder capacity responded better to this behavioral program. The cost of training was the equivalent of about one hour of nursing aide time per patient day. The reduction in incontinence during the follow-up period resulted in some small savings in laundry costs and supplies used, and some quantitatively unmeasurable but detectable improvement in psychosocial well-being among the trainees. Since the central figure in implementing this training protocol is the nursing aide, it is important to find an organizational management scheme that will stimulate nursing aides to reduce incontinence among nursing home residents. PMID:2116385

  18. Impact of anal incontinence on psychosocial function and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Michael D; Schettler, V Ann; Lacy, Brian E; Lunsford, Tisha N; Harris, Lucinda A; DiBaise, John K; Jones, Michael P

    2007-07-01

    The relationship among the frequency of anal incontinence (AI), psychosocial factors, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was evaluated. Consecutive patients (n=280) completed a bowel symptom questionnaire, the Symptom Checklist 90 -- Revised (SCL 90-R), and an assessment of HRQOL. Group 1 had no incontinence, Group 2 had AI less than once per week, and Group 3 experienced AI more than once per week. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the relationship among symptoms, the SCL-90-R subscales, and HRQOL. Group 3 reported more frequent stools than the other groups. Significant psychological distress was present in both incontinent groups compared to Group 1 (P=0.002). A reduction in overall HRQOL was also seen in the incontinent groups. Depression was inversely correlated with QOL-Satisfaction and QOL-Ratings and positively correlated with QOL-Interference. AI was associated with impaired psychosocial function and decreased HRQOL. The frequency of AI was associated with increased HRQOL-Interference, but minimally with the degree of psychosocial impairment.

  19. Evaluation of a patient education tool to reduce the incidence of incontinence post-prostate surgery.

    PubMed

    Ip, Virginia

    2004-10-01

    A pelvic floor muscle exercise program can reduce the incidence of incontinence post-prostate surgery. The purpose of this study was to validate a new education tool, a refrigerator magnet, in comparison to a paper copy with the same information, to determine if patient compliance with the exercises increased.

  20. In Search of Dignity: One Family Caring for Their Child's Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This article shares a story of a family with a child who has a spastic quadriplegia cerebral palsy, a form of cerebral palsy (CP) that affects all four limbs and torso with debilitating muscle dysfunction. It describes how the family cares for their child's incontinence. It also shares the experience of the child's mother, Kathy, who attributes…

  1. Assessment of sexual functions in partners of women with complaints of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Keles, Muzaffer Oguz; Caliskan, Selahattin; Gokce, Ali Murat; Gunes, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Investigation of the erectile functions in partners of women with urinary incontinence problems. Materials and Methods: Sexually active female patients over the age of 18 years with complaints of urinary incontinence (n=30) (Group-1), and without urinary incontinence (n=30) (Group-2, controls) were included this study. Evaluation of the patients were done at Erzincan Mengücek Gazi Training and Research Hospital's urology outpatient clinic between June 2012 and January 2013. Partners of group-1 and group-2 were asked to fill in the 5-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire, and then the scores of the two groups were compared for statistically significant differences. Results: Among the partners of the group-1 patients, 15 (50%) had mild erectile dysfunction (ED), 11 (36.6%) had moderate ED, 1 (3.4%) had severe ED, and erectile function was normal in the remaining 3 (10%). Among the partners of group-2 patients, 15 (50%) had mild ED, 7 had moderate ED, 1 (3.4%) had severe ED, and 7 (23.3%) had normal erectile function. Compared to the spouses of group-2 patients, ED was more prevalent among the spouses of group-1 patients. Conclusion: Erectile function in the partners of women with urinary incontinence may be adversely affected by the UI of their partners. PMID:27532113

  2. Urethro-urethral fistula: A rare cause of post-TURP incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, H. Krishna; Pillai, Biju S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic abscess rarely follows acute prostatitis and can sometimes lead to a fistula by breaking into the prostatic urethra, peri-rectal tissues, the perineum, or the rectum. We report a case of a prostatic abscess tracking into the bulbar urethra after a transurethral resection of the prostate. This created a fistula, mimicking a urethral duplication and leading to urinary incontinence. PMID:25553167

  3. Bladder and rectal incontinence without paraplegia or paraparesis after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Naritomo; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Ryushi; Ujihira, Kosuke; Iba, Yutaka; Hatta, Eiichiro; Yamada, Akira; Nakanishi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a well-known potential complication of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it is usually manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis. We describe a case in which spinal cord ischemia after EVAR presented by isolated bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological deficits. A 63-year-old woman presented with intermittent claudication secondary to an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and a left common iliac artery obstruction, for which she underwent EVAR using an aorto-uniiliac (AUI) device and ilio-femoral artery bypass. On postoperative day 3, she developed urinary and fecal incontinence without signs of paraplegia or paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hyper-intense signal in the spinal cord. She received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy and was discharged after 18 days when her urinary and fecal incontinence were almost resolved. This report suggests that spinal cord ischemia after EVAR for aortoiliac occlusive disease might present as bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological manifestations.

  4. Symptoms associated with dietary fiber supplementation over time in individuals with fecal incontinence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the severity of adverse gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during supplementation with dietary fiber or placebo over time in adults with fecal incontinence. Secondary aims were to determine the relationship between symptom severity and upset and their association...

  5. Absenteeism, Educational Plans, and Anxiety among Children with Incontinence and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filce, Hollie G.; LaVergne, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with incontinence have more absenteeism, poorer academic performance, and potential social difficulties during the school years. These children and their parents are at risk for illness-related anxiety. Whereas educational plans are designed to remediate educational, medical, and social-emotional barriers at school, little…

  6. Outcomes of Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence in the Older Woman

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, David R.; Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Richter, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis As population demographics continue to evolve, specifics on age-related outcomes of stress urinary incontinence interventions will be critical to patient counseling and management planning. Understanding medical factors unique to older woman and their lower urinary tract condition will allow caregivers to optimize surgical outcomes, both physical and functional, and minimize complications within this population. PMID:26476111

  7. Behavioral Intervention to Eliminate Socially Mediated Urinary Incontinence in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardi, Joseph N.; Luiselli, James K.

    2003-01-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with autism who demonstrated urinary incontinence that appeared to be maintained by social contingencies (adult attention and escape from activity "demands"). Although he wet himself frequently, he also used the bathroom appropriately and made many self-initiated toileting requests. Intervention was…

  8. Beyond "diaper rash": Incontinence-associated dermatitis: does it have you seeing red?

    PubMed

    Junkin, Joan; Selekof, Joan Lerner

    2008-11-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) results from frequent exposure to urine or feces. Consistent preventive skin care or treatment may reduce the incidence of IAD. The authors propose using an IAD classification and intervention tool (IADIT) to make detecting and treating IAD easier and more consistent.

  9. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  10. Distance Learning: A Strategy for Improving Incontinence Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Schnelle, John F.; Yamashita, Takashi; Patry, Gail; Prasauskas, Ruta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes a distance learning model designed to help nursing homes implement incontinence management best practices. A basic premise is that translating research into practice requires both a feasible intervention and a dissemination strategy responsive to the target audience's needs. Design and Methods: Over 8 months, nurse…

  11. Managing therapeutic competition in patients with heart failure, lower urinary tract symptoms and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Johnell, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    Up to 50% of heart failure patients suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms. Urinary incontinence has been associated with worse functional status in patients with heart failure, occurring three times more frequently in patients with New York Heart Association Class III and IV symptoms compared with those with milder disease. The association between heart failure and urinary symptoms may be directly attributable to worsening heart failure pathophysiology; however, medications used to treat heart failure may also indirectly provoke or exacerbate urinary symptoms. This type of drug-disease interaction, in which the treatment for heart failure precipitates incontinence, and removal of medications to relieve incontinence worsens heart failure, can be termed therapeutic competition. The mechanisms by which heart failure medication such as diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and β-blockers aggravate lower urinary tract symptoms are discussed. Initiation of a prescribing cascade, whereby antimuscarinic agents or β3-agonists are added to treat symptoms of urinary urgency and incontinence, is best avoided. Recommendations and practical tips are provided that outline more judicious management of heart failure patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Compelling strategies to improve urinary outcomes include titrating diuretics, switching ACE inhibitors, treating lower urinary tract infections, appropriate fluid management, daily weighing, and uptake of pelvic floor muscle exercises.

  12. Perineal Rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier Procedure) as Treatment of Strangulated Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cernuda, Ricardo Baldonedo; Ángel, Janet Pagnozzi; Fernández, Nuria Truan; Sánchez-Farpón, José Herminio; Pérez, Jose Antonio Álvarez

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration of a rectal prolapse is an unusual entity that represents a surgical emergency. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, requiring emergency surgery. When surgery becomes inevitable, the choice of procedure varies. A 57-year-old man who presented with strangulated rectal prolapse is described. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. After a 6-month follow-up, there was no recurrence, but the patient continued with fecal incontinence. This case underlines the importance of the Altemeier procedure as treatment in the patient with a strangulated prolapsed rectal segment.

  13. Prevalence and correlates of fecal incontinence among nursing home residents: a population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fecal incontinence is highly prevalent among nursing home residents. Previous nursing home studies have identified co-morbidity associated with fecal incontinence, but as this population is increasingly old and frail, we wanted to see if the rate of fecal incontinence had increased and to investigate correlates of fecal incontinence further. Methods Cross-sectional study of the entire nursing home population in one Norwegian municipality. Registered nurses filled in a questionnaire for all residents in the municipality (980 residents aged ≥65). Statistical methods used are descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression and multivariable logistic regression. Results The response rate of the study was 90.3%. The prevalence of fecal incontinence was 42.3%. In multivariable analysis of FI, residents with diarrhea (OR 7.33, CI 4.39-12.24), urinary incontinence (OR 2.77, CI 1.73-4.42) and dementia (OR 2.17, CI 1.28-3.68) had higher odds of having fecal incontinence compared to those without the condition. Residents residing in a nursing home between 4–5 years had higher odds of having fecal incontinence compared to residents who had stayed under a year (OR 2.65, CI 1.20-5.85). Residents with deficiency in feeding (2.17, CI 1.26-3.71), dressing (OR 4.03, CI 1.39-11.65), toilet use (OR 7.37, CI 2.65-20.44) and mobility (OR 2.54, CI 1.07-6.00) had higher odds of having fecal incontinence compared to residents without deficiencies in activities of daily living (ADL). Needing help for transfer between bed and chair was a protective factor for fecal incontinence compared to residents who transferred independently (OR 0.49, CI 0.26-0.91). Conclusions Fecal incontinence is a prevalent condition in the nursing home population and is associated with ADL decline, frailty, diarrhea and quality of care. This knowledge is important for staff in nursing home in order to provide the best treatment and care for residents with fecal incontinence. PMID:24119057

  14. Assessment of symptoms of urinary incontinence in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Montezuma, Thais; Antônio, Flávia Ignácio; de Sá Rosa e Silva, Ana Carolina Japur; de Sá, Marcos Felipe Silva; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The pelvic floor muscles are sensitive to androgens, and due to hyperandrogenism, women with polycystic ovary syndrome can have increased mass in these muscles compared to controls. The aim of this study is to compare reports of urine leakage and quality of life between women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome. METHODS: One hundred thirteen 18- to 40-year-old nulliparous women with polycystic ovary syndrome or without the disease (controls) were recruited at the University Hospital of School Medicine of São Paulo University at Ribeirão Preto City, Brazil. The subjects were not taking any hormonal medication, had not undergone previous pelvic surgery and did not exercise their pelvic floor muscles. The women were divided into the following four groups: I- polycystic ovary syndrome with normal body mass index (n = 18), II- polycystic ovary syndrome with body mass index ≥25 (n = 32), III- controls with normal body mass index (n = 29), and IV- controls with Body Mass Index ≥25 (n = 34). Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire, and the subjects with urinary complaints also completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form to evaluate the severity of their urinary incontinence. RESULTS: The replies to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form revealed a significant difference in urinary function between groups, with 24% of the subjects in group IV reporting urinary incontinence. The mean scores for the SF-36 questionnaire revealed that group II had the lowest quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: The control obese group (IV) reported a higher prevalence of urinary incontinence. There was no difference in the reported frequency of urine loss between the polycystic ovary syndrome and control groups with normal body mass index or between the polycystic ovary syndrome and control groups with body mass index ≥25. PMID:22086521

  15. Access to inpatient dermatology care in Pennsylvania hospitals.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Elizabeth; Kovarik, Carrie L; Lipoff, Jules B

    2016-01-01

    Access to care is a known issue in dermatology, and many patients may experience long waiting periods to see a physician. In this study, an anonymous online survey was sent to all 274 Pennsylvania hospitals licensed by the US Department of Health in order to evaluate current levels of access to inpatient dermatology services. Although the response rate to this survey was limited, the data suggest that access to inpatient dermatology services is limited and may be problematic in hospitals across the United States. Innovation efforts and further studies are needed to address this gap in access to care.

  16. Top 10 Facts to Know About Inpatient Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Horton, William B; Subauste, Jose S

    2016-02-01

    Uncontrolled hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with or without a previous diagnosis of diabetes is associated with adverse outcomes and longer lengths of hospital stay. It is estimated that one-third of hospitalized patients will experience significant hyperglycemia, and the cost associated with hospitalization for patients with diabetes accounts for half of all health care expenditures for this disease. Optimizing glycemic control should be a priority for all health care providers in the inpatient setting. Appropriate management strategies should include identification of appropriate glycemic targets, prevention of hypoglycemia, initiation of appropriate basal-plus-bolus insulin regimens, and planning for the transition from inpatient to outpatient therapy before hospital discharge.

  17. 42 CFR 418.108 - Condition of participation: Short-term inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Inpatient care must be available for pain control, symptom management, and respite purposes, and must be... management and pain control. Inpatient care for pain control and symptom management must be provided in...

  18. 78 FR 46733 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2013 through September 30,...

  19. 77 FR 47223 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2012 through September 30,...

  20. The discriminating characteristics of for-profit versus not-for-profit freestanding psychiatric inpatient facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, D P; Hadley, T R

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics that discriminate between ownership types among private, freestanding psychiatric inpatient facilities in the United States. Use of data from the Inventory of Mental Health Organizations (National Institute of Mental Health 1983, 1986), revealed that not-for-profits provide more services and serve more of the underinsured, while for-profits serve the better insured, concentrate primarily on inpatient services, and serve more children, adolescents, and substance abusers. A surplus bed capacity among for-profit psychiatric hospitals is presumed to contribute to lower occupancy rates and less turnover in the for-profit sector. Not-for-profit psychiatric facilities are also found to be more involved in professional training and to be more accessible through emergency services. However, the misclassification test in the discriminant procedure reveals that a significant group of not-for-profit facilities looks more like its for-profit counterpart group than like other not-for-profits. Study findings are interpreted both in terms of debates over the tax-exempt status of not-for-profit hospitals and the potential negative service effects of proprietization. PMID:1592604

  1. Epidemiology of inpatient stay in Parkinson's disease in the United States: Insights from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Balakrishnan, Poojitha; Patel, Achint; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Nistal, Dominic; Annapureddy, Narender; Poojary, Priti; Nadkarni, Girish N; Sidiropoulos, Christos

    2016-09-01

    The total number of people living with Parkinson's disease (PD) worldwide is expected to double by 2030. The risk factors for emergency department visits in PD patients have been described before, however, there is limited data on inpatient hospitalizations of PD patients. We derived our study cohort from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2002-2011. The NIS is a stratified 20% sample of discharges from all U.S. hospitals. We extracted causes of hospitalization using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and calculated inpatient mortality, length of stay and cost. Further, the significance of trends over 10 years was assessed. A total of 3,015,645 (weighted) admissions of PD patients were documented from 2002-2011. Pneumonia, urinary tract infection (UTI), septicemia and aspiration pneumonitis were the most common causes of admission, of which incidence of sepsis and UTI was trending up. Of all causes, 3.9% of the admissions resulted in inpatient mortality. Inpatient mortality for PD patients decreased from 4.9% in 2002 to 3.3% in 2011 (p<0.001). The median length of stay has also steadily declined from 3.6days in 2002 to 2.3days in 2011. However, the inflation-adjusted cost of care has been steadily rising, from $22,250 per hospitalization in 2002 to $37,942 in 2011. We conclude that the epidemiology of inpatient admissions in PD has changed significantly over the last decade. Our study underscores the need for future, in-depth prospective studies to explore this changing disease spectrum to design preventive measures and targeted interventions.

  2. Use of hollow microneedles for targeted delivery of phenylephrine to treat fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyesun; Han, Mee-Ree; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-06-10

    A hollow microneedle (HM) was prepared to deliver a phenylephrine (PE) solution into the anal sphincter muscle as a method for treating fecal incontinence. The goal of this study was the local targeted delivery of PE into the sphincter muscle through the perianal skin with minimal pain using hollow microneedles, resulting in the increase of resting anal sphincter pressure. PE was administered on the left and the right sides of the anus of a rat through the perianal skin using 1.5mm long HM. An in vivo imaging system study was conducted after injection of Rhodamine B, and a histological study was performed after injection of gentian violet. The resting anal sphincter pressure in response to various drug doses was measured by using an air-charged catheter. Anal pressure change produced by HM administration was compared with change produced by intravenous injection (IV), subcutaneous (SC) injection and intramuscular (IM) injection. The change in mean blood pressure produced by HM administration as a function of PE dose was compared with change produced by PBS injection. A pharmacokinetic study of the new HM administration method was performed. A model drug solution was localized in the muscle layer under the perianal skin at the injection site and then diffused out over time. HM administration of PE induced significant contraction of internal anal sphincter pressure over 12h after injection, and the maximum anal pressure was obtained between 5 and 6h. Compared to IV, SC and IM treatments, HM treatment produced greater anal pressure. There was no increase in blood pressure after HM administration of PE within the range of predetermined concentration. Administration of 800μg/kg of PE using HM produced 0.81±0.38h of tmax. Our study suggests that HM administration enables local delivery of a therapeutic dose of PE to the anal sphincter muscle layer with less pain. This new treatment has great potential as a clinical application because of the ease of the procedure

  3. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. “Inpatient psychiatric... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. 440.160 Section 440.160 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES,...

  4. 42 CFR 447.325 - Other inpatient and outpatient facility services: Upper limits of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other inpatient and outpatient facility services... Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Other Inpatient and Outpatient Facilities § 447.325 Other inpatient and outpatient facility services: Upper limits of payment. The agency may...

  5. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facility prospective payment system. 412.432 Section 412.432 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  6. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  7. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  8. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  9. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  10. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  11. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  12. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  13. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  14. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  15. A patient-preference cohort study of office versus inpatient uterine polyp treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Natalie A M; Middleton, Lee; Smith, Paul; Denny, Elaine; Stobert, Lynda; Daniels, Jane; Clark, T Justin

    2016-01-01

    Uterine polyps can cause abnormal bleeding in women. Conventional practise is to remove them under general anaesthesia but advances in technology have made it possible to perform polypectomy in the office setting. We conducted a patient-preference study to explore women's preferences for treatment setting and to evaluate the effectiveness and treatment experience of women undergoing uterine polypectomy. Three hundred ninety-nine women with abnormal uterine bleeding who were found to have uterine polyps at diagnostic hysteroscopy were recruited. Office polypectomies were performed in office hysteroscopy clinics, and inpatient procedures were undertaken in operating theatres. Three hundred twenty-four of 399 (81 %) expressed a preference for office treatment. There was no difference found between office treatment and inpatient treatment in terms of alleviating abnormal uterine bleeding as assessed by patients and in improving disease-specific quality of life. Acceptability was lower and patient pain scores were significantly higher in the office group. When offered a choice of treatment setting for uterine polypectomy, patients have a preference for office over inpatient treatment. Ambulatory gynaecology services should be available within healthcare systems to meet patient demand.

  16. Sacral neuromodulation and peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with anal incontinence: an overview of techniques, complications and troubleshooting

    PubMed Central

    Zbar, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) therapy has revolutionized the management of many forms of anal incontinence, with an expanded use and a medium-term efficacy of 75% overall. This review discusses the technique of SNM therapy, along with its complications and troubleshooting and a discussion of the early data pertaining to peripheral posterior tibial nerve stimulation in incontinent patients. Future work needs to define the predictive factors for neurostimulatory success, along with the likely mechanisms of action of their therapeutic action. PMID:24759349

  17. Elective cesarean section to prevent anal incontinence and brachial plexus injuries associated with macrosomia--a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Patrick J; Myers, John A; Goldberg, Roger P; Blackwell, Linda; Gohmann, Stephan F; Abell, Troy D

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the cost-effectiveness of a policy of elective C-section for macrosomic infants to prevent maternal anal incontinence, urinary incontinence, and newborn brachial plexus injuries. We used a decision analytic model to compare the standard of care with a policy whereby all primigravid patients in the United States would undergo an ultrasound at 39 weeks gestation, followed by an elective C-section for any fetus estimated at > or =4500 g. The following clinical consequences were considered crucial to the analysis: brachial plexus injury to the newborn; maternal anal and urinary incontinence; emergency hysterectomy; hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion; and maternal mortality. Our outcome measures included (1) number of brachial plexus injuries or cases of incontinence averted, (2) incremental monetary cost per 100,000 deliveries, (3) expected quality of life of the mother and her child, and (4) "quality-adjusted life years" (QALY) associated with the two policies. For every 100,000 deliveries, the policy of elective C-section resulted in 16.6 fewer permanent brachial plexus injuries, 185.7 fewer cases of anal incontinence, and cost savings of $3,211,000. Therefore, this policy would prevent one case of anal incontinence for every 539 elective C-sections performed. The expected quality of life associated with the elective C-section policy was also greater (quality of life score 0.923 vs 0.917 on a scale from 0.0 to 1.0 and 53.6 QALY vs 53.2). A policy whereby primigravid patients in the United States have a 39 week ultrasound-estimated fetal weight followed by C-section for any fetuses > or =4500 g appears cost effective. However, the monetary costs in our analysis were sensitive to the probability estimates of urinary incontinence following C-section and vaginal delivery and the cost estimates for urinary incontinence, vaginal delivery, and C-section.

  18. Negotiating Time: The Significance of Timing in Ending Inpatient Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah Gustavus

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses work with young people during their stay on an NHS psychiatric inpatient unit, especially focusing on the end of treatment and the appropriate timing of discharge into the community. When approaching the end of an admission, various factors are considered that seem particularly relevant to the decision of when a young person…

  19. Managing Bipolar Youths in a Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Mucci, Maria; Pias, Paola; Muratori, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Among the youths referred to our Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service, we focused on bipolar disorder (BD), to explore predictive elements for the outcome. Fifty-one patients (30 males, 21 females, age range 8-18 years, mean age 14.2 plus or minus 3.1 years) received a diagnosis of BD, according to historical information, prolonged…

  20. Reducing Psychiatric Inpatient Violence through Solution-Focused Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Violent behaviors increasingly provide the basis for psychiatric hospitalization. This study targeted a group of high-risk psychiatric inpatients with a recent history of violence. A solution-focused treatment approach was used in conducting two ongoing weekly therapy groups. Patients were encouraged to reflect upon occasions where they…

  1. Predictors of Inpatient Utilization among Veterans with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Kyler M.; Morgan, Robert O.; Walder, Annette; Bass, David M.; Judge, Katherine S.; Wilson, Nancy; Snow, A. Lynn; Kunik, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is prevalent and costly, yet the predictors of inpatient hospitalization are not well understood. Logistic and negative binomial regressions were used to identify predictors of inpatient hospital utilization and the frequency of inpatient hospital utilization, respectively, among veterans. Variables significant at the P < 0.15 level were subsequently analyzed in a multivariate regression. This study of veterans with a diagnosis of dementia (n = 296) and their caregivers found marital status to predict hospitalization in the multivariate logistic model (B = 0.493, P = 0.029) and personal-care dependency to predict hospitalization and readmission in the multivariate logistic model and the multivariate negative binomial model (B = 1.048, P = 0.007, B = 0.040, and P = 0.035, resp.). Persons with dementia with personal-care dependency and spousal caregivers have more inpatient admissions; appropriate care environments should receive special care to reduce hospitalization. This study was part of a larger clinical trial; this trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00291161. PMID:24982674

  2. Methodological Quality of National Guidelines for Pediatric Inpatient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Gabrielle; Nelson, Katherine; Mahant, Sanjay; Eresuma, Emily; Keren, Ron; Srivastava, Rajendu

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines help inform standardization of care for quality improvement (QI). The Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network published a prioritization list of inpatient conditions with high prevalence, cost, and variation in resource utilization across children’s hospitals. The methodological quality of guidelines for priority conditions is unknown. Objective To rate the methodological quality of national guidelines for 20 priority pediatric inpatient conditions. Design We searched sources including PubMed for national guidelines published 2002–2012. Guidelines specific to one organism, test or treatment, or institution were excluded. Guidelines were rated by two raters using a validated tool (AGREE II) with an overall rating on a 7-point scale (7–highest). Inter-rater reliability was measured with a weighted kappa coefficient. Results 17 guidelines met inclusion criteria for 13 conditions, 7 conditions yielded no relevant national guidelines. The highest methodological quality guidelines were for asthma, tonsillectomy, and bronchiolitis (mean overall rating 7, 6.5 and 6.5 respectively); the lowest were for sickle cell disease (2 guidelines) and dental caries (mean overall rating 4, 3.5, and 3 respectively). The overall weighted kappa was 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.78–0.87). Conclusions We identified a group of moderate to high methodological quality national guidelines for priority pediatric inpatient conditions. Hospitals should consider these guidelines to inform QI initiatives. PMID:24677729

  3. Psychosocial Correlates of Suicidal Ideation in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Geetha; Steer, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) was administered to 121 adolescent inpatients. Twelve characteristics found to be associated with adolescent suicide ideation were entered into multiple regression to estimate BSI scores, along with Beck inventories for anxiety, depression (BDI), and hopelessness (BHS), and Youth Self Report. BHS and BDI were…

  4. Proactive and Reactive Aggression in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2009-01-01

    This study examined relations between proactive and reactive aggression and indicators of antisocial behavior (callous/unemotional traits and behavioral consequences) and negative affect (depression and suicidal behavior) in a sample of 105 children admitted to an acute child psychiatric inpatient unit. The majority of the children were male (69%)…

  5. Feasibility of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Laurence Y.; Cox, Brian J.; Gunasekara, Shiny; Miller, Alec L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) implementation in a general child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit and to provide preliminary effectiveness data on DBT versus treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Sixty-two adolescents with suicide attempts or suicidal ideation were admitted to one of two…

  6. Tailoring Inpatient Group Psychotherapy to Patients' Needs: Size Matters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Today's publicly funded psychiatric inpatient institutions focus increasingly in stabilization and relapse prevention, readying patients for community reentry. An increasing emphasis on consumer satisfaction and professionals' accountability for efficient outcomes has coincided with growing cost-consciousness. Therapists must strive to tailor…

  7. Predictors of Specialized Inpatient Admissions for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modi, Miti; McMorris, Carly; Palucka, Anna; Raina, Poonam; Lunsky, Yona

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have complex mental health needs and may seek specialized ID psychiatric services. This study reports on predictors of specialized inpatient admissions for 234 individuals with ID who received outpatient services at a psychiatric hospital. Overall, from 2007-2012, 55 of the 234 outpatients were triaged…

  8. Domains of Chronic Stress and Suicidal Behaviors among Inpatient Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Jeremy W.; Green, Kelly L.; Grover, Kelly E.; Schatte, Dawnelle J.; Morgan, Sharon T.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chronic stress in youth suicidal behaviors. This study examined the relations between specific domains of chronic stress and suicidal behaviors among 131 inpatient youth (M age = 15.02 years) who completed measures of stress, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and suicide intent. After controlling for…

  9. Group Psychotherapy for a Heterogeneous Short-Term Inpatient Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Janet E.

    1989-01-01

    This article outlines considerations in planning inpatient groups for psychiatric patients and presents a model for group psychotherapy with a heterogeneous admission ward population. The model includes session plans based on objectives graded according to patients' levels of functioning. Also discussed are group rules and the therapist's role.…

  10. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry.

  11. Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Predictive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Amy; Newton, Jonathan; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick; Holt, Geraldine

    2005-01-01

    Information on admission to psychiatric inpatient units is lacking from the literature on contemporary services for people with intellectual disability and mental health needs. Here we report on predictors of admission for a cohort of 752 adults from this population living in community settings; 83 were admitted. We also report on two subsamples…

  12. Mental health inpatient experiences of adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Taua, Chris; Neville, Christine; Scott, Theresa

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents findings from a study exploring the mental health inpatient care of people with a dual disability of intellectual disability and mental health issues from the perspective of those people with the dual disability. A mixture of semi-structured interviews and focus group interviews were carried out with nine participants who had been admitted to an inpatient unit for mental health care exploring their experience of care. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using open coding and Leximancer (an online data mining tool) analysis to identify dominant themes in the discourse. Analysis revealed themes around 'Therapeutic and Meaningful Activity', 'Emotion Focussed Care', and 'Feeling Safe?' Participants were able to identify the aspects of inpatient care that worked for them in terms of coping with time in hospital. This research suggests that there are several factors that should be considered in providing effective mental health inpatient care for people with dual disability. A number of strategies and recommendations for responding to their needs are identified and discussed.

  13. Evaluation of a Pharmacy Resident Inpatient On-Call Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoum, Hind T.

    1993-01-01

    The 440 interventions completed by pharmacy residents in an inpatient on-call program were analyzed for their source (self-initiated, solicited by physician or staff pharmacist), type (selection of dosage, schedule, drug level monitoring, route of administration), impact on quality of care, cost of care, and clinical significance. (Author/MSE)

  14. Sampling the Experience of Chronically Aggressive Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Bradley M.

    1994-01-01

    Studies the application of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to chronically aggressive psychiatric inpatients. ESM allows for the sampling of behavior, thoughts, and feelings of persons across time and situations by signalling subjects to record these aspects using a questionnaire at random times. (JPS)

  15. Pediatric aspects of inpatient health information technology systems.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Christoph U

    2015-03-01

    In the past 3 years, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act accelerated the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) with providers and hospitals, who can claim incentive monies related to meaningful use. Despite the increase in adoption of commercial EHRs in pediatric settings, there has been little support for EHR tools and functionalities that promote pediatric quality improvement and patient safety, and children remain at higher risk than adults for medical errors in inpatient environments. Health information technology (HIT) tailored to the needs of pediatric health care providers can improve care by reducing the likelihood of errors through information assurance and minimizing the harm that results from errors. This technical report outlines pediatric-specific concepts, child health needs and their data elements, and required functionalities in inpatient clinical information systems that may be missing in adult-oriented HIT systems with negative consequences for pediatric inpatient care. It is imperative that inpatient (and outpatient) HIT systems be adapted to improve their ability to properly support safe health care delivery for children.

  16. A comprehensive RFID solution to enhance inpatient medication safety.

    PubMed

    Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Orfila, Agustin; Mitrokotsa, Aikaterini; van der Lubbe, Jan C A

    2011-01-01

    Errors involving medication administration can be costly, both in financial and in human terms. Indeed, there is much potential for errors due to the complexity of the medication administration process. Nurses are often singled out as the only responsible of these errors because they are in charge of drug administration. Nevertheless, the interventions of every actor involved in the process and the system design itself contribute to errors (Wakefield et al. (1998). Proper inpatient medication safety systems can help to reduce such errors in hospitals. In this paper, we review in depth two recent proposals (Chien et al. (2010); Huang and Ku (2009)) that pursue the aforementioned objective. Unfortunately, they fail in their attempt mainly due to their security faults but interesting ideas can be drawn from both. These security faults refer to impersonation and replay attacks that could produce the generation of a forged proof stating that certain medication was administered to an inpatient when it was not. We propose a leading-edge solution to enhance inpatient medication safety based on RFID technology that overcomes these weaknesses. Our solution, named Inpatient Safety RFID system (IS-RFID), takes into account the Information Technology (IT) infrastructure of a hospital and covers every phase of the drug administration process. From a practical perspective, our system can be easily integrated within hospital IT infrastructures, has a moderate cost, is very ease to use and deals with security aspects as a key point.

  17. Resigned Professionalism? Non-Acute Inpatients and Resident Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanstone, Meredith; Watling, Christopher; Goldszmidt, Mark; Weijer, Charles; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    A growing group of inpatients on acute clinical teaching units have non-acute needs, yet require attention by the team. While anecdotally, these patients have inspired frustration and resource pressures in clinical settings, little is known about the ways in which they influence physician perceptions of the learning environment. This qualitative…

  18. Inpatient Group Therapeutic Interventions for Patients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Vilash

    2015-01-01

    Group therapy can be an effective mode of therapy, used on an inpatient unit, as it can allow patients to become allies in their journey to understand and overcome their mental health needs. The therapeutic principles discussed by Dr Irvin Yalom illustrate the significance and importance of group therapy, which was strongly incorporated into…

  19. The Burden of Urinary Incontinence and Urinary Bother Among Elderly Prostate Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Ryan P.; Marshall, Lynn M.; Wang, Patty Y.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Parsons, J. Kellogg

    2014-01-01

    Background Data describing urinary health in elderly, community-dwelling prostate cancer (PCa) survivors are limited. Objective To elucidate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary bother, and incontinence in elderly PCa survivors compared with peers without PCa. Design, setting, and participants A cross-sectional analysis of 5990 participants in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Research Group, a cohort study of community-dwelling men ≥65 yr. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis We characterized urinary health using self-reported urinary incontinence and the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI). We compared urinary health measures according to type of PCa treatment in men with PCa and men without PCa using multivariate log-binomial regression to generate prevalence ratios (PRs). Results and limitations At baseline, 706 men (12%) reported a history of PCa, with a median time since diagnosis of 6.3 yr. Of these men, 426 (60%) reported urinary incontinence. In adjusted analyses, observation (PR: 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–3.21; p = 0.01), surgery (PR: 4.68; 95% CI, 4.11–5.32; p < 0.0001), radiation therapy (PR: 1.64; 95% CI, 1.20– 2.23; p = 0.002), and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) (PR: 2.01; 95% CI, 1.35–2.99; p = 0.0006) were each associated with daily incontinence. Daily incontinence risk increased with time since diagnosis independently of age. Observation (PR: 1.33; 95% CI, 1.00–1.78; p = 0.05), surgery (PR: 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10–1.42; p = 0.0008), and ADT (PR: 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26–1.79; p < 0.0001) were associated with increased AUA-SI bother scores. Cancer stage and use of adjuvant or salvage therapies were not available for analysis. Conclusions Compared with their peers without PCa, elderly PCa survivors had a two-fold to five-fold greater prevalence of urinary incontinence, which rose with increasing survivorship duration. Observation, surgery, and ADT were each associated with

  20. Effect of belly dancing on urinary incontinence-related muscles and vaginal pressure in middle-aged women

    PubMed Central

    An, So-Young; Kim, Seung-Suk; Han, Gunsoo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of belly dancing on the urinary incontinence-related muscles and vaginal pressure in middle-aged women to provide fundamental data for establishing an effective training program focusing on mitigating and preventing urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 24 middle-aged women, who have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, viz. the experimental group (N=12) and control group (N=12). The experimental group underwent a belly dancing program focusing on pelvis moves. [Results] In the experimental group, the urinary incontinence-related muscle strength and vaginal pressure were increased, while the control group showed no significant change. [Conclusion] Belly dancing focusing on pelvis moves had a positive effect on the urinary incontinence-related muscle strength and vaginal pressure, suggesting that a recreational dance program focusing on pelvic exercise can be used to prevent and relieve the symptoms of urinary incontinence as a non-surgical treatment. PMID:28356615

  1. [Static and dynamic physical loads in rehabilitation of inpatients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Nekorkina, O A

    2005-01-01

    Seventy five patients with ischemic heart disease (mean age 55.3 +/- 1.3 years) entered the trial of the effects of static-dynamic exercise (SDE) on central hemodynamics (CHD) and psychophysiological status under condition of hospital rehabilitation. The patients were divided into two groups: the study group (n = 50) performed SDE, control patients (n = 25) did standard dynamic exercise (SDE). SDE did not provoke anginal or ischemic responses on ECG. A single procedure of SDE had a positive effect on myocardial contractility. A course SDE had a greater positive effect on CHD, phase structure of the cardiac cycle, psychophysiological status of the patients. Thus, SDE is safe and can be used in inpatients and outpatients with coronary heart disease.

  2. 42 CFR 447.256 - Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State... for Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Payment Rates § 447.256 Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments. (a) Criteria for approval. (1) CMS approval action...

  3. 42 CFR 447.256 - Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State... for Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Payment Rates § 447.256 Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments. (a) Criteria for approval. (1) CMS approval action...

  4. 42 CFR 447.256 - Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State... for Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Payment Rates § 447.256 Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments. (a) Criteria for approval. (1) CMS approval action...

  5. 42 CFR 447.256 - Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State... for Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Payment Rates § 447.256 Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments. (a) Criteria for approval. (1) CMS approval action...

  6. 42 CFR 447.256 - Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State... for Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Payment Rates § 447.256 Procedures for CMS action on assurances and State plan amendments. (a) Criteria for approval. (1) CMS approval action...

  7. The pathogenesis of genitourinary prolapse and stress incontinence of urine. A histological and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A; Smith, A R; Warrell, D W

    1989-01-01

    Histological and histochemical analysis of biopsy samples of pubococcygeus muscle obtained from asymptomatic women and from women with stress incontinence of urine, with or without genitourinary prolapse, have been compared. In the asymptomatic women both age and parity appeared to be related to the morphological features of the samples and in particular those obtained from the posterior part of the pubococcygeus. In the symptomatic women there was a significant increase in the number of muscle fibres showing pathological damage which were obtained from the posterior part of the pelvic floor. The range of diameters of both Type I and Type II fibres obtained from this region was significantly different between symptomatic and asymptomatic women. These findings may be attributable to partial denervation of the pelvic floor in patients with urinary stress incontinence with or without genital tract prolapse.

  8. [Surgical management of urinary and fecal incontinence in neurological sphincter disorders of children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Lemelle, J L; Barthelme, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-01-01

    The management of urinary and fecal incontinence in children and adolescents with neurogenic disorders related to congenital or acquired conditions was frequently considered to be of secondary importance compared with orthopaedic complications. The improvement of artificial urinary sphincter and continent urinary diversion techniques allowed to establish for each case an individual plan considering overall, abilities and voiding dysfunction as well as renal complications. Antegrade colonic enema has greatly improved the quality of life of children with fecal incontinence or intractable constipation. Surgical management requires a large contribution by the patients and their closest relatives and complete information about goals, advantages and obligations of surgical management. Surgical principles for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and continent urinary diversion are presented and discussed according to data in the recent literature and the author's clinical experience.

  9. Prevention and management of incontinence-associated dermatitis using a barrier cream.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Sharon; Graham, Katriona

    2014-12-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common skin disorder affecting patients with urinary and/or faecal incontinence. Maintaining the skin's integrity is a challenge, particularly in the elderly and individuals with medical or surgical comorbidities. It is widely reported that the issue is complex and recognition is inconsistent, with symptoms often being confused with those of pressure ulcers. This article explores the causes of IAD, looking at the structure of healthy skin and the pathology that occurs during skin breakdown. It identifies risk factors and prevention and management strategies, including the use of barrier creams. The article then presents the results of a large product evaluation that took place with Cavilon Durable Barrier Cream (3M). The barrier cream was shown to be more effective in treating and managing patients with IAD than the previous product that patients had been using. A case study is also included to demonstrate the efficacy of the newest version of Cavilon Durable Barrier Cream.

  10. Medical Inpatient Journey Modeling and Clustering: A Bayesian Hidden Markov Model Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Wang, Fei; Duan, Huilong

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and clustering medical inpatient journeys is useful to healthcare organizations for a number of reasons including inpatient journey reorganization in a more convenient way for understanding and browsing, etc. In this study, we present a probabilistic model-based approach to model and cluster medical inpatient journeys. Specifically, we exploit a Bayesian Hidden Markov Model based approach to transform medical inpatient journeys into a probabilistic space, which can be seen as a richer representation of inpatient journeys to be clustered. Then, using hierarchical clustering on the matrix of similarities, inpatient journeys can be clustered into different categories w.r.t their clinical and temporal characteristics. We evaluated the proposed approach on a real clinical data set pertaining to the unstable angina treatment process. The experimental results reveal that our method can identify and model latent treatment topics underlying in personalized inpatient journeys, and yield impressive clustering quality. PMID:26958200

  11. Proceedings of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases International Symposium on Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeanette S; Nyberg, Leroy M; Kusek, John W; Burgio, Kathryn L; Diokno, Ananias C; Foldspang, Anders; Fultz, Nancy H; Herzog, A Regula; Hunskaar, Steinar; Milsom, Ian; Nygaard, Ingrid; Subak, Leslee L; Thom, David H

    2003-06-01

    The Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence: Current Databases and Future Collaborations Symposium included an international group of 29 investigators from 10 countries. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the current understanding and knowledge gaps of prevalence, incidence, associated risk factors, and treatment outcomes for incontinence in women. During the symposium, investigators identified existing large databases and ongoing studies that provide substantive information on specific incontinence research questions. The investigators were able to form an international collaborative research working group and identify potential collaborative projects to further research on the epidemiology of urinary incontinence and bladder dysfunction.

  12. Vaginal Calculus in a Woman With Mixed Urinary Incontinence and Vaginal Mesh Exposure.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, William D; Rabban, Joseph T; Korn, Abner P

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal calculi are extremely rare and are most commonly encountered in the setting of an urethrovaginal or vesicovaginal fistula. We present a case of a 72-year-old woman with mixed urinary incontinence and vaginal mesh exposure incidentally found to have a large vaginal calculus. We removed the calculus surgically and analyzed the components. Results demonstrated the presence of ammonium-magnesium phosphate hexahydrate and carbonate apatite.

  13. A short form of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Rebecca G; Coates, Kimberly W; Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy; Khalsa, Satkirin; Qualls, Clifford

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the short form of a condition-specific, reliable, validated and self-administered instrument to evaluate sexual function in women with pelvic organ prolapse and/or urinary incontinence. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire -12 (PISQ-12) was developed from the data of 99 of 182 women surveyed to create the long form (PISQ-31). An additional 46 patients were recruited for further validation. All subsets regression analysis identified 12 items likely to predict PISQ-31 scores. Short form scores underwent correlation analysis with long form, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire - 7 (IIQ-7), Sexual History Form -12 (SHF-12) and Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) scores. Test-retest reliability was checked with a subset of 20 patients. All subsets regression analysis with R>0.92 identified 12 items that predicted PISQ-31 scores. Short form scores were highly correlated with long form scores ( R=0.75-0.95). Correlations of the PISQ-12 with SHF-12 ( R=-0.66 and -0.68) and IIQ-7 ( R=-0.38 and -0.54) scores were similar to correlation of the PISQ-31 with these other measures. Reliability was moderate to high, with weighted kappa values from 0.56 to 0.93. PISQ-12 scores were lower in patients with low sexual function as measured on the SHF-12 ( P <0.001), and lower in women with depression as measured on the SQ ( P <0.001). The PISQ-12 is a validated and reliable short form that evaluates sexual function in women with urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse and predicts PISQ-31 scores. It is able to distinguish women with poor sexual function as measured on the SHF-12.

  14. [Guidelines for rehabilitation management of non-neurological urinary incontinence in women].

    PubMed

    Leriche, B; Conquy, S

    2010-02-01

    Pelvic floor rehabilitation is prescribed as first-line treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence, particularly in cases of urinary incontinence with no first-degree uterine prolapse, with poor-quality perineal testing results or inverted perineal command. Prescription of 15 sessions should suffice to evaluate the possibilities of improving the incontinence. The sessions can be continued if the patient feels she is progressing but has not reached sufficient results. With no progression despite properly conducted rehabilitation, the question of whether to continue the physical therapy arises. Currently, therapists determine the number of sessions. They are better apt to know whether sessions should be pursued and should relay a report to the prescribing physician. This type of rehabilitation is within the domain of physical therapists. Midwives can be responsible for postpartum rehabilitation. On the other hand, the importance of the patient's role in the results and their maintenance is well known. Occasionally a few sessions some time after the initial sessions can serve to verify the acquisitions and motivate the patient in her personal contribution to this rehabilitation. The work of the physical therapist cannot be substituted with Keat-type home electrostimulation. The physical therapist plays an important role in the overall management of this condition. Currently, in absence of demonstrated efficacy, self-administration of electrostimulation is not recommended. In urge incontinence, the rehabilitation approach will be used concomitantly with prescription of anticholergics with behavioral therapy and bladder biofeedback work. In addition, low-frequency electrostimulation can be done during the session. Starting with 10-12 sessions is sufficient. In all cases, rehabilitation should take a multidisciplinary approach and be integrated into a medical and/or surgical management plan.

  15. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria da Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices. PMID:28124538

  16. A new technique: prolene mesh sphincteroplasty for the treatment of fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Ayan, F; Zengin, K; Ulualp, K

    2008-08-01

    Although successful short-term results have been achieved with the use of overlapping sphincteroplasty and primary end-to- end repairs to treat fecal incontinence due to sphincteric injury, long-term failure rates may reach as high as 50%. This disadvantage associated with tension repairs may be overcome by utilizing a tension-free technique. Here the authors describe a new tension-free technique involving the use of prolene mesh.

  17. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares Dos; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  18. Predictors of Success and Satisfaction of Nonsurgical Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Joseph; Nager, Charles W.; Xiang, Fang; Borello-France, Diane; Bradley, Catherine S.; Wu, Jennifer M.; Mueller, Elizabeth; Norton, Peggy; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Zyczynski, Halina; Richter, Holly E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify factors that may predict success and satisfaction in women undergoing nonsurgical therapy for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of women participating in a multicenter randomized trial of pessary, behavioral, or combined therapy for SUI were evaluated for potential predictors of success and satisfaction. Success and satisfaction outcomes were assessed at 3 months and included the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I), stress incontinence subscale of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI), and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ). Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors, adjusting for treatment and other important clinical covariates. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and associated P-values are presented. Results Four hundred forty-six women were randomized. College education or higher and no previous UI surgery predicted success based on the stress subscale of the PFDI (AOR=1.61, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.55; p=0.04; AOR=3.15, 95% CI 1.04 to 9.53; p=0.04, respectively). Menopausal status predicted success using the PGI-I (AOR=2.52 postmenopausal vs premenopausal, 95% CI 1.29 to 4.95; AOR=1.32 unsure menopausal status vs pre-menopausal, 95% CI 0.65 to 2.66; p=0.03 across all three groups). Less than 14 incontinence episodes per week predicted satisfaction with the PSQ (AOR=1.97, 1.21 to 3.19; p=0.01). These predictors did not differ across the three treatment groups. Conclusions Menopause, higher education, no previous UI surgery and lower incontinence frequency were found to be predictors of success and satisfaction with nonsurgical therapy for SUI. This information may help better align provider and patient expectations with nonsurgical treatment outcomes. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00270998. PMID:22914396

  19. Quality of Life Differences in Female and Male Patients with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Mundet, Lluís; Ribas, Yolanda; Arco, Sandra; Clavé, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To explore and compare quality of life (QoL) differences in female and male patients with fecal incontinence. Methods Ninety-one patients with fecal incontinence (60 women, mean (SD) age 64.13 (9.72) years; 31 men, mean (SD) age 63.61 (13.33) years) were assessed for pathophysiology (anorectal manometry and ultrasound), clinical severity (Wexner and Vaizey scales), QoL (Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Score [FIQL]) and health status (EQ-5D). Results External and internal anal sphincter impairment rates were 96.5% and 70.2%, respectively, in women, compared to 30% and 43.3% respectively in men (P < 0.05). Clinical severity was similar in both sexes, with mean (SD) Wexner scores of 10.95 (4.35) for women and 9.81 (4.30) for men, and mean (SD) Vaizey scores of 13.27 (4.66) for women and 11.90 (5.22) for men. Scores for women were significantly lower for all FIQL depression and coping subscales (P < 0.001) and the EQ-5D depression subscale (P < 0.01). EQ-5D index was 0.687 (0.20) for women and 0.835 (0.15) for men (P < 0.001). QoL was negatively affected by female gender (−1.336), anxiety/depression (−1.324) and clinical severity (−0.302), whereas age had a positive impact (0.055 per year) (P < 0.01). Conclusions The pathophysiology of fecal incontinence differed between the sexes. For similar severity scores, impact on QoL was higher in women. Gender had the highest impact on QoL compared to other factors. QoL measurements should be part of assessment and treatment protocols. PMID:26486375

  20. [Acupoints selection rules analysis of ancient acupuncture for urinary incontinence based on data mining technology].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Zhigao; Cao, Juanshu; Gong, Houwu; Qin, Zuoai; Zhong, Feng; Cao, Yue; Wei, Yanrong

    2015-12-01

    Based on ancient literature of acupuncture in Canon of Chinese Medicine (4th edition), the articles regarding acupuncture for urinary incontinence were retrieved and collected to establish a database. By Weka data mining software, the multi-level association rules analysis method was applied to analyze the acupoints selection characteristics and rules of ancient acupuncture for treatment of urinary incontinence. Totally 356 articles of acupuncture for urinary incontinence were collected, involving 41 acupoints with a total frequency of 364. As a result, (1) the acupoints in the yin-meridian of hand and foot were highly valued, as the frequency of acupoints in yin-meridians was 2.6 times than that in yang-meridians, and the frequency of acupoints selected was the most in the liver meridian of foot-jueyin; (2) the acupoints in bladder meridian of foot-taiyang were also highly valued, and among three yang-meridians of foot, the frequency of acupoints in the bladder meridian of foot-taiyang was 54, accounting for 65.85% (54/82); (3) more acupoints selected were located in the lower limbs and abdomen; (4) specific acupoints in above meridians were mostly selected, presenting 73.2% (30/41) to the ratio of number and 79.4% (289/364) to the frequency, respectively; (5) Zhongji (CV 3), the front-mu point of bladder meridian, was seldom selected in the ancient acupuncture literature, which was different from modern literature reports. The results show that urinary incontinence belongs to external genitalia diseases, which should be treated from yin, indicating more yin-meridians be used and special acupoints be focused on. It is essential to focus inheritance and innovation in TCM clinical treatment, and applying data mining technology to ancient literature of acupuncture could provide classic theory basis for TCM clinical treatment.