Science.gov

Sample records for increase adherence south

  1. Strategies to increase adherence through diabetes technology.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Robert A; Durdock, Kendra

    2010-05-01

    A variety of new technologies have been developed to assist patients with self-managing their diabetes and yet hemoglobin A1c has not changed dramatically over the last decade. Although more data available from these new diabetes technologies can be helpful, it is clear that an informed, motivated, and adherent patient is the key to success. This article focuses on increasing patient adherence through the use of motivational interviewing, an evidence-based behavior change counseling technique. Specific skills of motivational interviewing may help the provider assess what the patient already knows about the technology, explore the patient's motivation for using the technology, and, finally, assess the patient's barriers, importance, and confidence in using the technology, leading to better adherence. (c) 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  2. Cardiac medication prescribing and adherence after acute myocardial infarction in Chinese and South Asian Canadian patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Emily J; Grubisic, Maja; Palepu, Anita; Quan, Hude; King, Kathryn M; Khan, Nadia A

    2011-09-18

    Failure to adhere to cardiac medications after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is associated with increased mortality. Language barriers and preference for traditional medications may predispose certain ethnic groups at high risk for non-adherence. We compared prescribing and adherence to ACE-inhibitors (ACEI), beta-blockers (BB), and statins following AMI among elderly Chinese, South Asian, and Non-Asian patients. Retrospective-cohort study of elderly AMI survivors (1995-2002) using administrative data from British Columbia. AMI cases and ethnicity were identified using validated ICD-9/10 coding and surname algorithms, respectively. Medication adherence was assessed using the 'proportion of days covered' (PDC) metric with a PDC ≥ 0.80 indicating optimal adherence. The independent effect of ethnicity on adherence was assessed using multivariable modeling, adjusting for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. There were 9926 elderly AMI survivors (258 Chinese, 511 South Asian patients). More Chinese patients were prescribed BBs (79.7% vs. 73.1%, p = 0.04) and more South Asian patients were prescribed statins (73.5% vs. 65.2%, p = 0.001). Both Chinese (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.53; 95%CI, 0.39-0.73; p < 0.0001) and South Asian (OR 0.78; 95%CI, 0.61-0.99; p = 0.04) patients were less adherent to ACEI compared to Non-Asian patients. South Asian patients were more adherent to BBs (OR 1.3; 95%CI, 1.04-1.62; p = 0.02). There was no difference in prescribing of ACEI, nor adherence to statins among the ethnicities. Despite a higher likelihood of being prescribed evidence-based therapies following AMI, Chinese and South Asian patients were less likely to adhere to ACEI compared to their Non-Asian counterparts.

  3. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alexander, Tiffany M; Nadkarni, Anish; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. PMID:27784999

  4. Effect of caregivers' depression and alcohol use on child antiretroviral adherence in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jaspan, Heather B; Mueller, Alexandra D; Myer, Landon; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Orrell, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Pediatric antiretroviral adherence is difficult to assess, and subjective measures are affected by reporting bias, which in turn may depend on psychosocial factors such as alcohol use and depression. We enrolled 56 child-caregiver dyads from Cape Town, South Africa and followed their adherence over 1 month via various methods. The Alcohol Use Disorder Inventory Tool and Beck Depression Inventory 1 were used to assess these factors and their affect on pediatric adherence. The median age of the children was 4 years, and median time on antiretrovirals was 20 months. Increased time on ART was associated with poorer adherence via 3-day recall (3DR; p=0.03). Ethanol use was inversely associated with adherence by both subjective measures, 3DR and visual analogue scale (VAS) (both p<0.01), and with Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) adherence as a continuous variable. In a multivariate analysis predicting MEMS adherence greater than 95%, including variables that were associated with adherence in univariate analyses, having a mother as a caregiver and shorter time on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were significantly associated with adherence (odds ratio [OR] 19.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-327 and 0.9; 95% CI 0.9-0.99). Pediatric adherence is affected by caregiver alcohol use, but caregiver relationship to the child is most important. This small study suggests that interventions should aim to keep mothers healthy and alive, as well as alcohol-free.

  5. The Role of Theory in Increasing Adherence to Prescribed Practice

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Julie; Wishart, Laurie; Hanna, Steven

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this article is to apply theoretical frameworks to adherence behaviour and to guide the development of an intervention to increase adherence to prescribed home programmes. Summary of Key Points: Delivering an effective intervention requires establishing one that is evidence based and of adequate dosage. Two-thirds of patients who receive home exercise prescriptions do not adhere to their home programme, which may contribute to their physiotherapy's being ineffective. The mediating concepts of self-efficacy (SE) and outcome expectations (OE) are common to the five relevant theories used to explain adherence to exercise: the health belief model, protection motivation theory, theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behaviour, and social cognitive theory. Conclusion/Recommendations: Few intervention studies with any theoretical underpinning have examined adherence to exercise. Even fewer have been designed to affect and measure change in the theoretical mediators of SE and OE in patient populations. Physiotherapists must consider increasing adherence as a component of effective physiotherapy. Ongoing research is needed to increase our understanding of adherence to prescribed home programmes and to design interventions to affect theoretical mediators for increasing adherence. PMID:20190989

  6. Interventions to increase adherence to medications for tobacco dependence.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Gareth J; McDermott, Máirtín S; Lindson-Hawley, Nicola; Vogt, Florian; Farley, Amanda; Aveyard, Paul

    2015-02-23

    Pharmacological treatments for tobacco dependence, such as nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), have been shown to be safe and effective interventions for smoking cessation. Higher levels of adherence to these medications increase the likelihood of sustained smoking cessation, but many smokers use them at a lower dose and for less time than is optimal. It is therefore important to determine the effectiveness of interventions designed specifically to increase medication adherence. Such interventions may include further educating individuals about the value of taking medications and providing additional support to overcome problems with maintaining adherence. The primary objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of interventions to increase adherence to medications for smoking cessation, such as NRT, bupropion, nortriptyline and varenicline (and combination regimens). This was considered in comparison to a control group, typically representing standard care. Secondary objectives were to i) assess which intervention approaches are most effective; ii) determine the impact of interventions on potential precursors of adherence, such as understanding of the treatment and efficacy perceptions; and iii) evaluate key outcomes influenced by prior adherence, principally smoking cessation. We searched the following databases using keywords and medical subject headings: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OVID SP) (1946 to July Week 3 2014), EMBASE (OVID SP) (1980 to Week 29 2014), and PsycINFO (OVID SP) (1806 to July Week 4 2014). The Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register was searched on 9th July 2014. We conducted forward and backward citation searches. Randomised, cluster-randomised or quasi-randomised studies in which participants using active pharmacological treatment for smoking cessation are allocated to an intervention arm or a control arm. Eligible participants were adult (18+) smokers

  7. When weight management lasts. Lower perceived rule complexity increases adherence.

    PubMed

    Mata, Jutta; Todd, Peter M; Lippke, Sonia

    2010-02-01

    Maintaining behavior change is one of the major challenges in weight management and long-term weight loss. We investigated the impact of the cognitive complexity of eating rules on adherence to weight management programs. We studied whether popular weight management programs can fail if participants find the rules too complicated from a cognitive perspective, meaning that individuals are not able to recall or process all required information for deciding what to eat. The impact on program adherence of participants' perceptions of eating rule complexity and other behavioral factors known to influence adherence (including previous weight management, self-efficacy, and planning) was assessed via a longitudinal online questionnaire given to 390 participants on two different popular weight management regimens. As we show, the regimens, Weight Watchers and a popular German recipe diet (Brigitte), strongly differ in objective rule complexity and thus their cognitive demands on the dieter. Perceived rule complexity was the strongest factor associated with increased risk of quitting the cognitively demanding weight management program (Weight Watchers); it was not related to adherence length for the low cognitive demand program (Brigitte). Higher self-efficacy generally helped in maintaining a program. The results emphasize the importance of considering rule complexity to promote long-term weight management. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Associations between alcohol use, other psychosocial factors, structural factors and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among South African ART recipients.

    PubMed

    Morojele, Neo K; Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Nkosi, Sebenzile

    2014-03-01

    We examined whether alcohol use is associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence independently of structural and psychosocial factors among 304 male and female ART recipients in ART sites in Tshwane, South Africa. ART adherence was assessed by the CASE Adherence Index. Independent variables were demographic, structural, psycho-social, and alcohol use (AUDIT score) factors. In hierarchical multiple regression, demographic variables (Step 1) explained 4 % of variance in ART adherence (p ≤ 0.01). Variance explained increased to 16 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering structural variables (Step 2); 19 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering psychosocial variables (Step 3); and 24 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering AUDIT score (Step 4). Alcohol use is independently associated with ART adherence.

  9. Social Support and the Mediating Roles of Alcohol Use and Adherence Self-Efficacy on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence Among ART Recipients in Gauteng, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Jordaan, Esmé; Nkosi, Sebenzile; Morojele, Neo K

    2016-11-11

    We sought to (a) replicate and (b) extend (via the addition of alcohol use) Cha et al.'s cross-sectional multi-component model of ART adherence on the relationship between social support, depression, self-efficacy beliefs, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, among HIV patients in Tshwane, South Africa. Using purposive sampling, 304 male and female ART recipients were recruited. ART adherence was assessed using three manifest indicators: total adherence ratio, the CASE adherence index and 1-month adherence measure. Data were analysed using structural equation modeling. In our replicated model, social support had both direct and indirect relationships with ART adherence, and inclusion of alcohol use improved prediction of ART adherence. Direct and indirect effects of alcohol use on ART adherence emerged: adherence self-efficacy beliefs partially mediated the latter path. Findings highlight the importance of integrating into ART promotion interventions, the reduction of alcohol use, provision of social support, and enhancement of adherence self-efficacy beliefs.

  10. Adherence with isoniazid for prevention of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Szakacs, Tom A; Wilson, Douglas; Cameron, D William; Clark, Michael; Kocheleff, Paul; Muller, F James; McCarthy, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Isoniazid (INH) is recommended for treatment of latent TB infection, however non-adherence is common. The purpose of this study was to apply in-house prepared isoniazid (INH) urine test strips in a clinical setting, and identify predictors of positive test results in an adherence questionnaire in HIV-infected adults taking INH for prevention of TB. Methods Cross-sectional study of adherence using a questionnaire and urine test strips for detection of INH metabolites at two hospitals in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Participants were aged at least 18 years, HIV positive, and receiving INH for prevention of tuberculosis disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses are used to identify factors relevant to adherence. Results 301 consecutive patients were recruited. 28% of participants had negative urine tests. 32 (37.2%, 95% CI25.4, 45.0) of the 86 patients who received INH from peripheral pharmacies said the pharmacy had run out of INH at some time, compared with central hospital pharmacies (p = 0.0001). In univariate analysis, a negative test was associated with self-reported missed INH doses (p = 0.043). Each 12-hour increment since last reported dose increased the likelihood of a negative test by 34% (p = 0.0007). Belief in INH safety was associated with a positive test (p = 0.021). In multivariate analysis, patients who believed INH is important for prevention of TB disease were more likely to be negative (p = 0.0086). Conclusion Adequate drug availability at peripheral pharmacies remains an important intervention for TB prevention. Key questions may identify potentially non-adherent patients. In-house prepared urine tests strips are an effective and cheap method of objectively assessing INH adherence, and could be used an important tool in TB control programs. PMID:16772037

  11. Exploring antiretroviral treatment adherence in an urban setting in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Goudge, Jane; Ngoma, Bulelwa

    2011-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment requires high levels of adherence to be effective. This qualitative study explores the reasons for poor adherence among 22 purposively selected poor urban participants in South Africa. Over a 4-month period in 2009, we prospectively investigated experiences of HIV diagnosis and treatment, adherence, and withdrawal from treatment. Patients with no stable food sources faced significant barriers in adhering to treatment regimens and staying sufficiently healthy to search for, obtain or retain a job. The narratives also identify the influence on adherence of self-esteem and social support, vulnerability generated by ill health, gendered conflict, social inequities amplified by HIV, and exhaustion due to the social burden of the epidemic. Multi-dimensional, inter-sectoral programs that tackle the social determinants of health, such as food insecurity, poverty, gendered inequities, and treatment adherence are more likely to be successful, than single interventions to support adherence.

  12. Offering Financial Incentives to Increase Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication

    PubMed Central

    Highton-Williamson, Elizabeth; Barnicot, Kirsten; Kareem, Tarrannum; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Financial incentives for medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders are controversial. It is not yet known whether fears expressed by clinicians are borne out in reality. We aimed to explore community mental health clinicians’ experiences of the consequences of giving patients with psychotic disorders a financial incentive to take their depot medication. We implemented descriptive and thematic analyses of semistructured interviews with the clinicians of patients assigned to receive incentives within a randomized controlled trial. Fifty-nine clinicians were interviewed with regard to the effect of the incentives on 73 of the 78 patients allocated to receive incentives in the trial. Most commonly, the clinicians reported benefits for clinical management including improved adherence, contact, patient monitoring, communication, and trust (n = 52). Positive effects on symptoms, insight, or social functioning were reported for some (n = 33). Less commonly, problems for patient management were reported (n = 19) such as monetarization of the therapeutic relationship or negative consequences for the patient (n = 15) such as increased drug and alcohol use. Where requests for increased money occurred, they were rapidly resolved. It seems that, in most cases, the clinicians found that using incentives led to benefits for patient management and for patient health. However, in 33% of cases, some adverse effects were reported. It remains unclear whether certain clinical characteristics are associated with increased risk for adverse effects of financial incentives. The likelihood of benefit versus the smaller risk for adverse effects should be weighed up when deciding whether to offer incentives to individual patients. PMID:25692797

  13. Provider-Focused Intervention Increases Adherence-Related Dialogue, But Does Not Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Persons with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ira B.; Laws, M. Barton; Safren, Steven A.; Lee, Yoojin; Lu, Minyi; Coady, William; Skolnik, Paul R.; Rogers, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Physicians' limited knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence may reduce their ability to perform effective adherence counseling. Methods We conducted a randomized, cross-over study of an intervention to improve physicians' knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence. The intervention was a report given to the physician prior to a routine office visit that included data on: MEMS and self-reported data on antiretroviral adherence, patients' beliefs about antiretroviral therapy, reasons for missed doses, alcohol and drug use, and depression. We audio-recorded one intervention and one control visit for each patient to analyze differences in adherence related dialogue. Results 156 patients were randomized, and 106 completed all 5 study visits. Paired audio-recorded visits were available for 58 patients. Using a linear regression model that adjusted for site and baseline MEMS adherence, adherence following intervention visits did not differ significantly from control visits (2.0% higher, p=0.31, 95% CI -1.95% – 5.9%). There was a trend toward more total adherence-related utterances (median of 76 vs. 49.5, p=0.07) and a significant increase in utterances about the current regimen (median of 51.5 vs. 32.5, p=0.0002) in intervention compared with control visits. However less than 10% of adherence-related utterances were classified as “problem solving” in content, and one third of physicians' problem solving utterances were directive in nature. Conclusions Receipt of a detailed report prior to clinic visits containing data about adherence and other factors did not improve patients' antiretroviral adherence. Analyses of patient-provide dialogue suggests that providers who care for persons with HIV may benefit from training in adherence counseling techniques. PMID:20048680

  14. Barriers and facilitators to paediatric adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa: a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) contributes to the development of drug resistance. HIV-infected children, especially those 5 years and under, are dependent on a caregiver to adhere to ART. However, characteristics of the caregiver, child, regimen, clinic and social context affect clinic attendance and medication-taking, both of which constitute adherent behaviour. We conducted nine interviews and three focus groups to determine how doctors, nurses, counsellors, traditional healers and caregivers understood the barriers and facilitators to ART adherence among children residing in rural South Africa. The data were transcribed, translated into English from isiZulu where necessary, and coded using Atlas.ti version 7. Results were interpreted through the lens of Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory. We found that at the micro-level, palatability of medication and large volumes of medication were problematic for young children. Characteristics of the caregiver including absent mothers, grandmothers as caregivers and denial of HIV amongst fathers were themes related to the micro-system. Language barriers and inconsistent attendance of caregivers to monthly clinic visits were factors affecting adherence in the meso-system. Adherence counselling and training were the most problematic features in the exo-system. In the macro-system, the effects of food insecurity and the controversy surrounding the use of traditional medicines were most salient. Increased supervision and regular training amongst lay adherence counsellors are needed, as well as regular monitoring of the persons attending the clinic on the child's behalf.

  15. Barriers and facilitators to paediatric adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa: a multi-stakeholder perspective

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) contributes to the development of drug resistance. HIV-infected children, especially those 5 years and under, are dependent on a caregiver to adhere to ART. However, characteristics of the caregiver, child, regimen, clinic and social context affect clinic attendance and medication-taking, both of which constitute adherent behaviour. We conducted nine interviews and three focus groups to determine how doctors, nurses, counsellors, traditional healers and caregivers understood the barriers and facilitators to ART adherence among children residing in rural South Africa. The data were transcribed, translated into English from isiZulu where necessary, and coded using Atlas.ti version 7. Results were interpreted through the lens of Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory. We found that at the micro-level, palatability of medication and large volumes of medication were problematic for young children. Characteristics of the caregiver including absent mothers, grandmothers as caregivers and denial of HIV amongst fathers were themes related to the micro-system. Language barriers and inconsistent attendance of caregivers to monthly clinic visits were factors affecting adherence in the meso-system. Adherence counselling and training were the most problematic features in the exo-system. In the macro-system, the effects of food insecurity and the controversy surrounding the use of traditional medicines were most salient. Increased supervision and regular training amongst lay adherence counsellors are needed, as well as regular monitoring of the persons attending the clinic on the child's behalf. PMID:25355176

  16. Motivational Interviewing to Increase Cognitive Rehabilitation Adherence in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fiszdon, Joanna M.; Kurtz, Matthew M.; Choi, Jimmy; Bell, Morris D.; Martino, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to treatment in psychiatric populations is notoriously low. In this randomized, controlled, proof-of-concept study, we sought to examine whether motivational interviewing (MI) could be used to enhance motivation for, adherence to, and benefit obtained from cognitive rehabilitation. Dual diagnosis MI, developed specifically for individuals with psychotic symptoms and disorganization, was further adapted to focus on cognitive impairments and their impact. Sixty-four outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders completed baseline assessments and were randomized to receive either the 2-session MI focused on cognitive functioning or a 2-session sham control interview focused on assessment and feedback about preferred learning styles. Next, all participants were given 4 weeks during which they could attend up to 10 sessions of a computer-based math training program, which served as a brief analog for a full course of cognitive rehabilitation. As hypothesized, MI condition was associated with greater increases in task-specific motivation along with greater training program session attendance. Moreover, postinterview motivation level predicted session attendance. There were no significant differences in improvement on a measure of cognitive training content, which may have been due to the abbreviated nature of the training. While the literature on the efficacy of MI for individuals with psychosis has been mixed, we speculate that our positive findings may have been influenced by the adaptations made to MI as well as the focus on a nonpharmacological intervention. PMID:26420905

  17. Antiretroviral treatment adherence among HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Successful antiretroviral treatment is dependent on sustaining high rates of adherence. In the southern African context, only a handful of studies (both quantitative and qualitative) have looked at the determinants including a health behaviour theory of adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The aim of this study is to assess factors including the information, motivation and behavioural skills model (IMB) contributing to antiretroviral (ARV) adherence six months after commencing ARVs at three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Using systematic sampling, 735 HIV-positive patients were selected prior to commencing on ART from outpatient departments from three hospitals and followed-up at six months and interviewed with a questionnaire. Results A good proportion of patients were found to be adherent using both adherence instruments (visual analog scale = VAS 82.9%; Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group = AATCG 70.8%). After adjusting for significant socio-economic variables, both the VAS and the dose, schedule and food adherence indicator found levels of adherence amongst urban residents to be almost 3 times greater than that of rural residents. After adjusting for health-related variables, for both indicators better adherence was associated with low depression and poorer adherence was associated with poor environmental factors. Adjusted odds ratios for adherence when taking into account different behavioural variables were for both adherence indicators, discrimination experiences were associated with lower adherence, and higher scores in adherence information and behavioural skills were associated with higher adherence. For the VAS adherence indicator, higher social support scores were associated with higher adherence. For the dose, schedule and food adherence indicator, using herbal medicines for HIV was associated with lower adherence. Conclusion For the patients in this study, particularly those not living in urban areas, additional

  18. The relationship between depression, anxiety and medication adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, a small but growing body of literature on the associations between common mental disorders and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has emerged. The present study builds on the growing body of research by investigating associations between symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and adherence to ART. We studied a convenience sample of 101 South African ART users to determine the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their association with self-reported adherence to ART. Based on the standardised cut-off scores recorded using the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI II), 40.4% of participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of depression. Moreover, results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that 28.7% of the study participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Biserial correlations and logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and adherence. The results indicate that patients reporting non-perfect adherence were approximately three times more likely (OR=2.73; CI=1.09-6.82) to have moderate to severe symptoms of depression than those reporting perfect adherence. The present findings are in keeping with those of previous studies, suggesting that depression may act as a barrier to ART adherence.

  19. A Qualitative Study of Patient Motivation to Adhere to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Debra; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Kunene, Pinky; Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grant, Alison D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Taken as prescribed, that is, with high adherence, combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV infection and disease from being a sure predictor of death to a manageable chronic illness. Adherence, however, is difficult to achieve and maintain. The CAPRISA 058 study was conducted between 2007 and 2009 to test the efficacy of individualized motivational counselling to enhance ART adherence in South Africa. As part of the overall trial, a qualitative sub-study was conducted, including 30 individual interviews and four focus group discussions with patients in the first 9 months of ART initiation. Data were inductively analyzed, using thematic analysis, to identify themes central to ART adherence in this context. Four themes emerged that characterize the participants' experiences and high motivation to adhere to ART. Participants in this study were highly motivated to adhere, as they acknowledged that ART was ‘life-giving’, in the face of a large amount of morbidity and mortality. They were further supported by techniques of routine remembering, and highlighted the importance of good social support and access to supportive healthcare workers, to their continued success in negotiating their treatment. Participants in the current study told us that their adherence motivation is enhanced by free accessible care, approachable and supportive healthcare workers, broad social acceptance of ART, and past first-hand experiences with AIDS-related co-morbidity and mortality. Programs that include specific attention to these aspects of care will likely be successful in the long term. PMID:25692575

  20. Interventions to Increase Treatment Adherence in Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Alexandria M.; Anderson, Kathryn L.; Feldman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a major factor limiting treatment outcomes in patients with atopic dermatitis. The purpose of our systematic review is to identify techniques that have been tested to increase treatment adherence in atopic dermatitis. A MEDLINE search was performed for clinical trials focusing on interventions used to increase adherence in atopic dermatitis. Four articles were retrieved. References of these studies were analyzed yielding three more trials. The seven results were evaluated by comparing the intervention used to improve adherence, how adherence was assessed, and the outcome of the intervention tested. Different approaches to increase adherence such as written eczema action plans, educational workshops, extra office visits, and use of an atopic dermatitis educator were evaluated. All interventions increased adherence rates or decreased severity in patients, except for two. The MEDLINE search yielded limited results due to a lack of studies conducted specifically for atopic dermatitis and adherence was measured using different methods making the studies difficult to compare. Interventions including patient education, eczema action plans, and a quick return for a follow-up visit improve adherence, but based on the lack of clinical trials, developing new techniques to improve adherence could be as valuable as developing new treatments. PMID:26239125

  1. Evaluating Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Using Pharmacy Refill Records in a Rural Treatment Site in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gachara, George; Mavhandu, Lufuno G.; Rogawski, Elizabeth T.; Manhaeve, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Optimal adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is critical to maintain virologic suppression, thereby ensuring the global success of HIV treatment. We evaluated adherence to cART using pharmacy refill records and determined the adherence threshold resulting in >90% virologic suppression in a community run treatment site in South Africa. Additionally, we analysed factors associated with adherence using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Logistic regression was also performed to determine the relationship between adherence and virologic suppression and the adherence threshold resulting in <10% virologic failure. The overall median (interquartile range) adherence was 95% (88.6–98.4%). Out of the study participants, 210/401 (52.4%) had optimal (≥95%) adherence while only 37/401 (9.2%) had poor (≤80%) adherence. The majority (90.5%) of patients with optimal adherence had virologic suppression. Having TB at registration into care was found to be negatively associated with adherence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.382; p ≤ .05). Compared to nonadherent individuals, optimally adherent participants were more likely to achieve virologic suppression (OR 2.92; 95% CI: 1.63–5.22). Only adherence rates above 95% were observed to lead to <10% virologic failure. cART adherence measured by pharmacy refill records could serve as a useful predictor of virologic failure; adherence rates >95% are needed to maintain optimal virologic suppression. PMID:28255456

  2. SMS messages increase adherence to rapid diagnostic test results among malaria patients: results from a pilot study in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization now recommends parasitological confirmation for malaria case management. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are an accurate and simple diagnostic to confirm parasite presence in blood. However, where they have been deployed, adherence to RDT results has been poor, especially when the test result is negative. Few studies have examined adherence to RDTs distributed or purchased through the private sector. Methods The Rapid Examination of Malaria and Evaluation of Diagnostic Information (REMEDI) study assessed the acceptability of and adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care from private sector drug retailers in two cities in Oyo State in south-west Nigeria. In total, 465 adult participants were enrolled upon exit from a participating drug shop having purchased anti-malaria drugs for themselves. Participants were given a free RDT and the appropriate treatment advice based on their RDT result. Short Message Service (SMS) text messages reiterating the treatment advice were sent to a randomly selected half of the participants one day after being tested. Participants were contacted via phone four days after the RDT was conducted to assess adherence to the RDT information and treatment advice. Results Adherence to RDT results was 14.3 percentage points (P-val <0.001) higher in the treatment group who were sent the SMS. The higher adherence in the treatment group was robust to several specification tests and the estimated difference in adherence ranged from 9.7 to 16.1 percentage points. Further, the higher adherence to the treatment advice was specific to the treatment advice for anti-malarial drugs and not other drugs purchased to treat malaria symptoms in the RDT-negative participants who bought both anti-malarial and symptom drugs. There was no difference in adherence for the RDT-positive participants who were sent the SMS. Conclusions SMS text messages substantially increased adherence to RDT results for

  3. Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence: Knowledge and Experiences among Adolescents and Young Adults in Soweto, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Celokuhle; Laher, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) management of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is particularly pertinent to sub-Saharan Africa, where the pediatric HIV burden is marked. Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence is a major challenge for AYAs. This qualitative study explored knowledge and experiences of adherence amongst AYAs attending treatment at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit (PHRU), Soweto, South Africa. Four focus group discussions (FGDs) and eight in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with HIV-infected 15–25-year-old ART recipients. Transcripts were coded thematically. Participants (n = 26) were aged median 18.5 years, 59.1% female and 69.2% virally suppressed <400 cp/ml. Three main themes emerged during FGDs and IDIs: (i) correct knowledge about how to be adherent, benefits, and nonadherence consequences, (ii) social, personal, and medication-related barriers to adherence, and (iii) reminder, concealment, and motivational strategies to optimize adherence. Interventions to improve AYA adherence could focus on practical strategies, including status disclosure and medication concealment. PMID:28409026

  4. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, L. D.; Toska, E.; Orkin, F. M.; Meinck, F.; Hodes, R.; Yakubovich, A. R.; Sherr, L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10–19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa’s Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014–2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were “cash/cash in kind”: government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and “care”: HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1–3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42–.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40–.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43–.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39–41%, with any two social protections, 27–28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions

  5. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Orkin, F M; Meinck, F; Hodes, R; Yakubovich, A R; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10-19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa's Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014-2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were "cash/cash in kind": government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and "care": HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1-3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42-.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40-.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43-.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39-41%, with any two social protections, 27-28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions, particularly combinations of "cash

  6. Adherence barriers and facilitators for cervical screening amongst currently disadvantaged women in the greater Cape Town region of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    De Abreu, Chantelle; Horsfall, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In South Africa cervical cancer is the second most commonly occurring cancer amongst women, and black African women have the highest risk of developing this disease. Unfortunately, the majority of South African women do not adhere to recommended regular cervical screening. Objectives The purpose of this research was to explore the perceptions, experiences and knowledge regarding cervical screening of disadvantaged women in two informal settlements in South African urban areas. Method The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided a theoretical framework for this study. Four focus groups (n = 21) were conducted, using questions derived from the HBM, and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. The ages of the women who participated ranged from 21 to 53 years. Results The analysis revealed lack of knowledge about screening as a key structural barrier to treatment. Other structural barriers were: time, age at which free screening is available, and health education. The psychosocial barriers that were identified included: fear of the screening procedure and of the stigmatisation in attending screening. The presence of physical symptoms, the perception that screening provides symptom relief, HIV status, and the desire to know one's physical health status were identified as facilitators of cervical screening adherence. Conclusion This knowledge has the potential to inform healthcare policy and services in South Africa. As globalisation persists and individuals continue to immigrate or seek refugee status in foreign countries, increased understanding and knowledge is required for successful acculturation and integration. Developed countries may therefore also benefit from research findings in developing countries.

  7. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet among employees in South West England: Formative research to inform a web-based, work-place nutrition intervention.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Wood, Lesley; Sebire, Simon J; Jago, Russell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess internet usage patterns and adherence to the Mediterranean diet among employees in South West England, UK and their differences by personal characteristics. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 among 590 adults (428 women, 162 men, mean age 43.8 years), employees of four work-place settings. Mediterranean diet adherence was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Adherence differences were assessed by gender, marital status, education, number of children and food shopping and preparation responsibility. On average, participants reported moderate adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Higher adherence was reported for alcohol, vegetables, cereals and fruit. Few participants achieved high adherence to the Mediterranean diet recommendations for legumes (5.3%), fish (3.2%), dairy products (4.8%), red meat (11.9%), poultry (11.1%) and olive oil (18.2%). A higher Mediterranean diet score was reported among participants who were married/cohabiting, those with higher education attainment and shared responsibility for food preparation. Improvement in the consumption of several Mediterranean diet components is needed to increase adherence in this sample of adults. The findings have the potential to inform the development of a web-based intervention that will focus on these foods to promote the Mediterranean diet in work-place settings in South West England.

  8. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet among employees in South West England: Formative research to inform a web-based, work-place nutrition intervention

    PubMed Central

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Wood, Lesley; Sebire, Simon J.; Jago, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to assess internet usage patterns and adherence to the Mediterranean diet among employees in South West England, UK and their differences by personal characteristics. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 among 590 adults (428 women, 162 men, mean age 43.8 years), employees of four work-place settings. Mediterranean diet adherence was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Adherence differences were assessed by gender, marital status, education, number of children and food shopping and preparation responsibility. Results On average, participants reported moderate adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Higher adherence was reported for alcohol, vegetables, cereals and fruit. Few participants achieved high adherence to the Mediterranean diet recommendations for legumes (5.3%), fish (3.2%), dairy products (4.8%), red meat (11.9%), poultry (11.1%) and olive oil (18.2%). A higher Mediterranean diet score was reported among participants who were married/cohabiting, those with higher education attainment and shared responsibility for food preparation. Conclusion Improvement in the consumption of several Mediterranean diet components is needed to increase adherence in this sample of adults. The findings have the potential to inform the development of a web-based intervention that will focus on these foods to promote the Mediterranean diet in work-place settings in South West England. PMID:26844075

  9. INCREASED ADHERENCE TO CFF PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR PULMONARY MEDICATIONS CORRELATES WITH IMPROVED FEV1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brooke M.; Laguna, Theresa A.; Liu, Meixia; McNamara, John J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CFF practice guidelines recommend patients ≥ age 6 use dornasealfa and hypertonic saline daily, and those ≥ age 6 colonized with P. aeruginosa use inhaled tobramycin and oral azithromycin to improve lung function and reduce pulmonary exacerbations. A decline in FEV1 was noted in our 2008 CF Center Report. We hypothesized that increasing adherence to prescribing guidelines for these pulmonary medications would improve mean FEV1. METHODS This was a quality improvement project completed at a US CF center. CFF practice guidelines were reviewed with the center physicians. Patients were identified that were eligible to receive recommended therapies and it was determined whether they were prescribed the therapies. Baseline FEV1 data was collected. Adherence rates and FEV1 were followed quarterly for 1 year. Providers received a quarterly report card with adherence rates, mean FEV1 compared to colleagues, and a list of eligible patients that were not prescribed recommended therapies. RESULTS 92 patients were included. At baseline, the overall adherence rate was 59%. Overall adherence increased quarterly (p=<0.001). Each quarter there was improvement in adherence to prescribing for each medication (p<0.001). Except in quarter 1, FEV1 increased quarterly (p=0.092). There was moderate correlation (r=0.533) between improved adherence and improved FEV1. CONCLUSIONS Educating clinicians about guidelines, providing feedback on adherence to guidelines, and monitoring prescribing patterns improves prescribing adherence. FEV1 showed improvement after months of sustained adherence, trending towards significance. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if improved prescribing adherence translates into improved FEV1 or slows rate of decline in FEV1. PMID:22997186

  10. Does increased adherence to medications change health care financial burdens for adults with diabetes?

    PubMed

    Miller, G Edward; Sarpong, Eric M; Hill, Steven C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate increased out-of-pocket drug costs and financial burdens of achieving adherence to oral antidiabetic medications and medications for prevalent comorbidities. Concurrent adherence to medications, out-of-pocket drug costs, and financial burdens were measured among non-elderly adults with diabetes in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. "Financial burden" was defined as spending on health care exceeding 10% of family income. This study simulated the increased out-of-pocket drug costs and financial burdens that would result if non-adherent adults in our sample had obtained sufficient medications to be adherent. For each adult, for all therapeutic classes in which they were non-adherent, we calculated the additional days supplied required to become adherent, as well as out-of-pocket spending on these additional days supplied. Approximately one-quarter adhered to all required medications. Among non-adherent adults with employer-sponsored insurance and public insurance, the mean annual out-of-pocket drug costs of achieving adherence were US$171 and US$68, respectively, which was generally affordable. However, 35.6% of the uninsured lived in families that spent 10% or more of their income on health care. Mean simulated additional out-of-pocket drug costs of achieving adherence were US$310 for the uninsured. These additional drug costs would increase those spending 10% or more of income to 39.6% of the uninsured. Efforts to reduce the costs faced by the uninsured and insured will make adherence more affordable and, therefore, more attainable for some adults with diabetes. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Gravity increase at the south pole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.

    1967-01-01

    Abstract. Measurements made between December 1957 and January 1966 of the gravity difference between the McMurdo Sound pendulum station, which is on bedrock, and the South Pole station, which is on the Antarctic ice sheet, show a gravity increase at the South Pole of 0.11 milligals per year. The most likely hypothesis for the increase is that it was caused by ice flowing downslope across a gravity gradient and by the sinking of the South Pole station as a result of accumulation of ice. An alternate hypothesis that the gravity increase was caused by a decrease in ice thickness, of about 40 centimeters per year, is theoretically possible but is not supported by direct evidence.

  12. Development and assessment of an innovative culturally sensitive educational videotape to improve adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Soweto, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ilene Y; Lawrence, Nicholas V; Struthers, Helen; McIntyre, James; Friedland, Gerald H

    2006-12-01

    The increasing availability of antiretroviral medication (ARV) therapy in the face of limited chronic medication-taking experience among resource-poor South Africans has raised concerns about adequate adherence to these medications. We hypothesized that a culturally sensitive audiovisual patient education program would be of substantial and measurable benefit in increasing patient understanding of the concepts of ARV resistance risk and medication-taking skills. To identify potential barriers to adherence and successful strategies to promote adherence, 6 focus groups with health care providers and HIV-positive adherence counselors were held, resulting in the production of a 17-minute culturally sensitive educational videotape. Basic drug-taking concepts and practical advice on how to improve adherence were presented in the videotape. Thirty-four HIV-positive patients (including 11 ARV-naive patients and 23 ARV-experienced patients) were shown the educational videotape, and their knowledge about medication taking was evaluated by a 24-point pre- and postvideotape questionnaire. On average, the 34 patients gained 2.2 knowledge points (P = 0.021). ARV-naive patients had an average improvement of 3.0 points (P = 0.0028), with most significant gains in the areas of understanding medication-taking strategies and side effects. These preliminary findings indicate that a culturally sensitive educational videotape can improve medication-taking knowledge in South Africa and that further study of the potential efficacy of using media technology to improve individuals' adherence to ARV therapy is warranted.

  13. Adherence to cardiovascular medications in the South Asian population: A systematic review of current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Julia M; Chan, Winston J; Kamal, Ayeesha K; Palaniappan, Latha; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review methods of assessing adherence and strategies to improve adherence to cardiovascular disease (CVD) medications, among South Asian CVD patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of English language studies that examined CVD medication adherence in South Asian populations from 1966 to April 1, 2015 in SCOPUS and PubMed. Working in duplicate, we identified 61 studies. After exclusions, 26 studies were selected for full text review. Of these, 17 studies were included in the final review. We abstracted data on several factors including study design, study population, method of assessing adherence and adherence rate. RESULTS: These studies were conducted in India (n = 11), Pakistan (n = 3), Bangladesh (n = 1), Nepal (n = 1) and Sri Lanka (n = 1). Adherence rates ranged from 32%-95% across studies. Of the 17 total publications included, 10 focused on assessing adherence to CVD medications and 7 focused on assessing the impact of interventions on medication adherence. The validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used as the primary method of assessing adherence in five studies. Three studies used validated questionnaires similar to the MMAS, and one study utilized Medication Event Monitoring System caps, with the remainder of the studies utilizing pill count and self-report measures. As expected, studies using non-validated self-report measures described higher rates of adherence than studies using validated scale measurements and pill count. The included intervention studies examined the use of polypill therapy, provider education and patient counseling to improve medication adherence. CONCLUSION: The overall medication adherence rates were low in the region, which suggest a growing need for future interventions to improve adherence. PMID:26730300

  14. The polypill: An effective approach to increasing adherence and reducing cardiovascular event risk.

    PubMed

    Bramlage, Peter; Sims, Helen; Minguet, Joan; Ferrero, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    Background Despite a wide range of medications being available for the prevention of cardiovascular events such as stroke, myocardial infarction and mortality in both a primary and secondary setting, patient adherence to complex therapy regimens involving different drug classes remains low worldwide. Combining antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering and potentially further drugs into one 'polypill' has the potential to increase adherence, thereby reducing risk factors to a greater extent and for a longer duration. The World Health Organization has recently highlighted increased adherence as a key development need for reducing cardiovascular disease. Methods Recent clinical trial data regarding adherence, reductions in cardiovascular risk and outcomes, safety and tolerability and the cost-effectiveness of the polypill approach are summarised and reviewed. In addition, ongoing trials and the questions they intend to answer are considered. References were retrieved from a PubMed literature search (date range 1990-2016) using the terms 'polypill', 'cardiovascular events' and 'adherence', and selected based on relevance. The website www.clinicaltrials.gov was also consulted for the identification of ongoing trials. Conclusions To date, the polypill approach has been conclusively shown to increase adherence relative to usual care in all patients, with those in a primary care setting or with poor baseline adherence potentially standing to benefit most. Concomitant risk factor reductions have also been suggested. However, whether this translates into a reduction in cardiovascular events and generates good cost-effectiveness in a given healthcare environment is currently under further investigation.

  15. A performance improvement plan to increase nurse adherence to use of medication safety software.

    PubMed

    Gavriloff, Carrie

    2012-08-01

    Nurses can protect patients receiving intravenous (IV) medication by using medication safety software to program "smart" pumps to administer IV medications. After a patient safety event identified inconsistent use of medication safety software by nurses, a performance improvement team implemented the Deming Cycle performance improvement methodology. The combined use of improved direct care nurse communication, programming strategies, staff education, medication safety champions, adherence monitoring, and technology acquisition resulted in a statistically significant (p < .001) increase in nurse adherence to using medication safety software from 28% to above 85%, exceeding national benchmark adherence rates (Cohen, Cooke, Husch & Woodley, 2007; Carefusion, 2011).

  16. Low adherence to antidepressants is associated with increased mortality in Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shoval, Gal; Stubbs, Brendon; Balicer, Ran D; Feldman, Becca; Hoshen, Moshe; Zalsman, Gil; Sagy, Roi; Hochman, Eldar; Weizman, Abraham; Krivoy, Amir

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adherence to antidepressants (AD) and all-cause mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). From a database of more than 4 million people, 8553 patients with PD who purchased an AD at least once between the years 2008-2011 were retrospectively followed for all-cause mortality over 4-years. Adherence was measured as a ratio between dispensed and prescribed durations and was modeled as: non-adherence (<20%, n = 1566), poor (20%-50%, n = 1184), moderate (50%-80%, n = 1584), and good (>80%, n = 4219) adherence. Multivariable survival analyses adjusted for demographic and clinical variables including physical comorbidities known to influence mortality were conducted, however there was no adjustment for other psychiatric disorders and medications. Unadjusted mortality rates were 20.4%, 25.1%, 23.4% and 25.6% in those classified as non-adherent, poor, moderate and good adherence respectively (χ2 = 18.45, p < 0.0001). The non-adherent and poor adherence groups had significantly increased adjusted mortality hazard ratios (HR) of 1.43 (CI: 1.26-1.62) and 1.26 (CI: 1.1-1.44) respectively compared to the good adherence group. Using the same model, the adjusted HR for death among males was 1.49 [95% CI: 1.36-1.62] compared to females. People with PD and Charslon's Comorbidity Index score of 3-4 (HR 1.3, P < 0.001) and 5+ (HR 1.78, P < 0.001) were more likely to die than those with 0-2 comorbidities. Our findings suggest that poor adherence to AD is associated with increased all-cause mortality in people with PD. Given the high prevalence of depression and AD effectiveness, efforts to promote adherence should be prioritized in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Educational opportunities in bladder cancer: increasing cystoscopic adherence and the availability of smoking-cessation programs.

    PubMed

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Petersen, Nancy J; Amiel, Gilad E; Lerner, Seth P; Latini, David M

    2014-12-01

    Cancer survivors who continue to smoke following diagnosis are at increased risk for recurrence. Yet, smoking prevalence among survivors is similar to the general population. Adherence to cystoscopic surveillance is an important disease-management strategy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) survivors, but data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER) suggest current adherence levels are insufficient to identify recurrences at critically early stages. This study was conducted to identify actionable targets for educational intervention to increase adherence to cystoscopic monitoring for disease recurrence or progression. NMIBC survivors (n = 109) completed telephone-based surveys. Adherence was determined by measuring time from diagnosis to interview date; cystoscopies received were then compared to American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests for univariate and logistic regression for multivariable analyses. Participants averaged 65 years (SD = 9.3) and were primarily white (95 %), male (75 %), married (75 %), and non-smokers (84 %). Eighty-three percent reported either Ta- or T1-stage bladder tumors. Forty-five percent met AUA guidelines for adherence. Compared to non-smokers, current smokers reported increased fear of recurrence and psychological distress (p < 0.05). In regression analyses, non-adherence was associated with smoking (OR = 33.91, p < 0.01), providing a behavioral marker to describe a survivor group with unmet needs that may contribute to low cystoscopic adherence. Research assessing survivorship needs and designing and evaluating educational programs for NMIBC survivors should be a high priority. Identifying unmet needs among NMIBC survivors and developing programs to address these needs may increase compliance with cystoscopic monitoring, improve outcomes, and enhance quality of life.

  18. The adherence paradox: guideline deviations contribute to the increased 5-year survival of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jacke, Christian O; Albert, Ute S; Kalder, Matthias

    2015-10-19

    In German breast cancer care, the S1-guidelines of the 1990s were substituted by national S3-guidelines in 2003. The application of guidelines became mandatory for certified breast cancer centers. The aim of the study was to assess guideline adherence according to time intervals and its impact on survival. Women with primary breast cancer treated in three rural hospitals of one German geographical district were included. A cohort study design encompassed women from 1996-97 (N = 389) and from 2003-04 (N = 488). Quality indicators were defined along inpatient therapy sequences for each time interval and distinguished as guideline-adherent and guideline-divergent medical decisions. Based on all of the quality indicators, a binary overall adherence index was defined and served as a group indicator in multivariate Cox-regression models. A corrected group analysis estimated adjusted 5-year survival curves. From a total of 877 patients, 743 (85 %) and 504 (58 %) were included to assess 104 developed quality indicators and the resuming binary overall adherence index. The latter significantly increased from 13-15 % (1996-97) up to 33-35 % (2003-04). Within each time interval, no significant survival differences of guideline-adherent and -divergent treated patients were detected. Across time intervals and within the group of guideline-adherent treated patients only, survival increased but did not significantly differ between time intervals. Across time intervals and within the group of guideline-divergent treated patients only, survival increased and significantly differed between time intervals. Infrastructural efforts contributed to the increase of process quality of the examined certified breast cancer center. Paradoxically, a systematic impact on 5-year survival has been observed for patients treated divergently from the guideline recommendations. This is an indicator for the appropriate application of guidelines. A maximization of guideline-based decisions instead of

  19. Packaging interventions to increase medication adherence: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Ruppar, Todd M; Chan, Keith C; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Pepper, Ginette A; De Geest, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate medication adherence is a widespread problem that contributes to increased chronic disease complications and health care expenditures. Packaging interventions using pill boxes and blister packs have been widely recommended to address the medication adherence issue. This meta-analysis review determined the overall effect of packaging interventions on medication adherence and health outcomes. In addition, we tested whether effects vary depending on intervention, sample, and design characteristics. Extensive literature search strategies included examination of 13 computerized databases and 19 research registries, hand searches of 57 journals, and author and ancestry searches. Eligible studies included either pill boxes or blister packaging interventions to increase medication adherence. Primary study characteristics and outcomes were reliably coded. Random-effects analyses were used to calculate overall effect sizes and conduct moderator analyses. Data were synthesized across 22,858 subjects from 52 reports. The overall mean weighted standardized difference effect size for two-group comparisons was 0.593 (favoring treatment over control), which is consistent with the mean of 71% adherence for treatment subjects compared to 63% among control subjects. We found using moderator analyses that interventions were most effective when they used blister packs and were delivered in pharmacies, while interventions were less effective when studies included older subjects and those with cognitive impairment. Methodological moderator analyses revealed significantly larger effect sizes in studies reporting continuous data outcomes instead of dichotomous results and in studies using pharmacy refill medication adherence measures compared with studies with self-report measures. Overall, meta-analysis findings support the use of packaging interventions to effectively increase medication adherence. Limitations of the study include the exclusion of packaging interventions other

  20. Packaging interventions to increase medication adherence: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Chan, Keith C.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Pepper, Ginette A.; De Geest, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inadequate medication adherence is a widespread problem that contributes to increase chronic disease complications and health care expenditures. Packaging interventions using pill boxes and blister packs have been widely recommended to address the medication adherence issue. This meta-analysis review determined the overall effect of packaging interventions on medication adherence and health outcomes. In addition, we tested whether effects vary depending on intervention, sample, and design characteristics. Research design and methods Extensive literature search strategies included examination of 13 computerized databases and 19 research registries, hand searches of 57 journal, and author and ancestry searches. Eligible studies included either pill-boxes or blister packaging interventions to increase medication adherence. Primary study characteristics and outcomes were reliably coded. Random-effects analyses were used to calculate overall effect sizes and conduct moderator analyses. Results Data were synthesized across 22,858 subjects from 52 reports. The overall mean weighted standardized difference effect size for two-group comparisons was 0.593 (favoring treatment over control), which is consistent with the mean of 71% adherence for treatment subjects compared to 63% among control subjects. We found using moderator analyses that interventions were most effective when they used blister packs and were delivered in pharmacies, while interventions were less effective when studies included older subjects and those with cognitive impairment. Methodological moderator analyses revealed significantly larger effect sizes in studies reporting continuous data outcomes instead of dichotomous results and in studies using pharmacy refill medication adherence measures as compared to studies with self-report measures. Conclusions Overall, meta-analysis findings support the use of packaging interventions to effectively increase medication adherence. Limitations of the

  1. Factors Predicting Adherence to Risk Management Behaviors of Women at Increased Risk for Developing Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kerry A.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Roussi, Pagona; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lymphedema affects 20-30% of women following breast cancer treatment. However, even when women are informed, they do not necessarily adhere to recommended lymphedema self-management regimens. Utilizing the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework, we assessed cognitive and emotional factors influencing adherence to lymphedema risk management. Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone breast and lymph node surgery were recruited through the Fox Chase Cancer Centre breast clinic. Participants (N=103) completed measures of lymphedema-related perceived risk, beliefs and expectancies, distress, self-regulatory ability to manage distress, knowledge, and adherence to risk management behaviors. They then received the American Cancer Society publication “Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know”. Cognitive and affective variables were reassessed at 6- and 12-months post-baseline. Results Maximum likelihood multilevel model analyses indicated that overall adherence increased over time, with significant differences between baseline and 6- and 12- month assessments. Adherence to wearing gloves was significantly lower than that for all other behaviors except electric razor use. Distress significantly decreased, and knowledge significantly increased, over time. Greater knowledge, higher self-efficacy to enact behaviors, lower distress, and higher self-regulatory ability to manage distress were associated with increased adherence. Conclusions Women who understand lymphedema risk management and feel confident in managing this risk are more likely to adhere to recommended strategies. These factors should be rigorously assessed as part of routine care to ensure that women have the self-efficacy to seek treatment and the self-regulatory skills to manage distress, which may undermine attempts to seek medical assistance. PMID:24970542

  2. Evaluation of an integrated adherence program aimed to increase Medicare Part D star rating measures.

    PubMed

    Leslie, R Scott; Tirado, Breanne; Patel, Bimal V; Rein, Philip J

    2014-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services (CMS) Plan Quality and Performance Program, or Star Ratings Program, allows Medicare beneficiaries to compare quality of care among available Medicare Advantage prescription drug (MA-PD) plans and stand-alone prescription drug plans (PDPs). Health plans have increased intervention efforts and applied existing care management infrastructure as an approach to improving member medication adherence and subsequent Part D star rating performance. Independent Care Health Plan (iCare), an MA-PD plan; MedImpact Healthcare Systems, Inc. (MedImpact), a pharmacy benefits manager; and US MED, a mail order pharmacy, partnered to engage and enroll iCare's dual-eligible special needs population in an intervention designed to improve patient medication adherence and health plan performance for 3 Part D patient safety outcome measures: Medication Adherence for Oral Diabetes Medications (ODM), Medication Adherence for Hypertension (HTN), and Medication Adherence for Cholesterol (CHOL). To (a) assess the effectiveness of a coordinated member-directed medication adherence intervention and (b) determine the overall impact of the intervention on adherence rates and CMS Part D star rating adherence measures.  Administrative pharmacy claims and health plan eligibility data from MedImpact's databases were used to identify members using 3 target medication classes. Adherence was estimated by the proportion of days covered (PDC) for all members. Those members considered at high risk for nonadherence were prioritized for care management services. Risk factors were based on members' use of more than 1 target medication class, newly started therapy, and suboptimal adherence (PDC  less than  80%) in the most recent 6-month period. Data files listing member adherence rates and contact information were formatted and loaded monthly into iCare's care management system, which triggered an alert for care coordinators to counsel members on the importance

  3. An adapted education program to increase adherence to the dietary guidelines for Americans: a feasibility study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition) was culturally tailored in order to increase adherence to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, as the vehicle for preventing childhood overweight and obesity in Louisiana families. We Can! Louisiana ...

  4. What factors increase Dutch child health care professionals' adherence to a national guideline on preventing child abuse and neglect?

    PubMed

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Fleuren, Margot A H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2016-03-01

    Guidelines to support health care professionals in early detection of, and responses to, suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) have become increasingly widely available. Yet little is known about professionals' adherence to these guidelines or the determinants that affect their uptake. This study used a cross-sectional design to assess the adherence of Dutch Child Health Care (CHC) professionals to seven key activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN. This study also examined the presence and strengths of determinants of guideline adherence. Online questionnaires were filled in between May and July 2013 by 164 CHC professionals. Adherence was defined as the extent to which professionals performed each of seven key activities when they suspected CAN. Thirty-three determinants were measured in relation to the guideline, the health professional, the organisational context and the socio-political context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses tested associations between determinants and guideline adherence. Most of the responding CHC professionals were aware of the guideline and its content (83.7%). Self-reported rates of full adherence varied between 19.5% and 42.7%. Stronger habit to use the guideline was the only determinant associated with higher adherence rates in the multivariate analysis. Understanding guideline adherence and associated determinants is essential for developing implementation strategies that can stimulate adherence. Although CHC professionals in this sample were aware of the guideline, they did not always adhere to its key recommended activities. To increase adherence, tailored interventions should primarily focus on enhancing habit strength.

  5. Evaluation of increasing antecedent specificity in goal statements on adherence to positive behavior-management strategies.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, Corey M; Shriver, Mark D; Burke, Raymond V; Allen, Keith D

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated the impact of antecedent specificity in goal statements on adherence to positive behavior-management strategies. Teaching staff were recruited from 2 different school settings where there were routine expectations to use behavior-specific praise in the classroom, but adherence was poor. In a concurrent multiple baseline design, the use of behavior-specific praise by 4 participants was found to be unaffected by goal statements that increasingly specified the behavior to be used and the conditions under which the behavior should occur. However, adherence by 3 of the 4 participants did change when goal statements included teacher-specified frequencies with which the behavior should occur. Results were systematically replicated in a second study in which, in a concurrent multiple baseline design, 3 participants showed marked increases in adherence when goal statements specified the target behavior, the conditions under which it should occur, and the frequency with which it should occur. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  6. Increasing Equity in Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RTI International, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The South African government has made significant efforts to overcome the legacy of apartheid education, committing itself to the dual goals of achieving high-quality education with more equitable access for all South Africans. Substantial investments have been made to achieve this vision, however, translating policies into improved school-level…

  7. Increased neurocognitive intra-individual variability is associated with declines in medication adherence in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Nicholas S.; Sayegh, Philip; Arentoft, Alyssa; Thames, April D.; Castellon, Steven A.; Hinkin, Charlie H.

    2015-01-01

    There is cross-sectional evidence that neurocognitive intra-individual variability (IIV), or dispersion, is elevated in HIV disease and is associated with declines in activities of daily living, including medication adherence. This longitudinal study extends this literature by examining whether increased neurocognitive IIV in HIV+ persons over time predicts declines in medication adherence above and beyond changes in mean level of performance over a six-month observation. After controlling for drug use, declines in mean performance, and changes in depressive symptoms, results confirmed that increases in IIV were associated with overall poorer antiretroviral medication adherence. HIV+ individuals with the greatest increases in dispersion demonstrated marked reductions in adherence by the third month that exceed that observed in less variable individuals. Our results indicate that increases in dispersion are associated with poorer declines in medication adherence in HIV disease, which may have implications for the early detection and remediation of suboptimal antiretroviral adherence. PMID:25730729

  8. Increased adherence to cardiac standards of care during participation in cardiac disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Coberley, Carter; Morrow, Greg; McGinnis, Matthew; Wells, Aaron; Coberley, Sadie; Orr, Patty; Shurney, Dexter

    2008-04-01

    Adherence to cardiovascular disease standards of care is critically important for minimizing the risk of mortality and morbidity for individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) and heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of cardiac disease management (DM) programs to assist members with their adherence to evidence-based medicine for cardiovascular diseases. A total of 20,202 members with CHD and/or HF were evaluated 12 months prior to the start of DM programs and during their first 12 months of participation in the programs. Members were assessed for their adherence to appropriate cardiac medications. In addition, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) testing rates and clinical control of LDL values (defined as <100 mg/dL) were measured. The association between LDL control and use of lipid-lowering statins also was assessed. During participation in the cardiac programs, members achieved significant improvement in their adherence to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and beta-blockers (P < 0.0001). The cardiac population also achieved a significant increase in LDL testing rates and statin use (P < 0.0001). More members attained appropriate LDL control in year 1 compared to baseline (36% relative increase), and this improvement was associated with a 40% relative increase in statin use. In summary, participation in these cardiac DM programs assisted members to improve their adherence to cardiac medications and standards of care guidelines. Such improvements in cardiovascular disease care are likely associated with improved quality of life and reduced risk for mortality.

  9. Adherence to Concurrent Tuberculosis Treatment and Antiretroviral Treatment among Co-Infected Persons in South Africa, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Webb Mazinyo, Ernesha; Kim, Lindsay; Masuku, Sikhethiwe; Lancaster, Joey L.; Odendaal, Ronel; Uys, Margot; Podewils, Laura Jean; Van der Walt, Martie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces morbidity and mortality among persons co-infected with TB/HIV. We measured adherence and determined factors associated with non-adherence to concurrent TB treatment and ART among co-infected persons in two provinces in South Africa. Methods A convenience sample of 35 clinics providing integrated TB/HIV care was included due to financial and logistic considerations. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted among persons who received concurrent TB treatment and ART and who had a TB treatment outcome recorded during 1 January 2008–31 December 2010. Adherence to concurrent TB and HIV treatment was defined as: (1) taking ≥80% of TB prescribed doses by directly observed therapy (DOT) as noted in the patient card; and (2) taking >90% ART doses as documented in the ART medical record during the concurrent treatment period (period of time when the patient was prescribed both TB treatment and ART). Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to identify factors associated with non-adherence. Results Of the 1,252 persons receiving concurrent treatment, 138 (11.0%) were not adherent. Non-adherent persons were more likely to have extrapulmonary TB (RR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.60) and had not disclosed their HIV status (RR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.76). Conclusions The majority of persons with TB/HIV were adherent to concurrent treatment. Close monitoring and support of persons with extrapulmonary TB and for persons who have not disclosed their HIV status may further improve adherence to concurrent TB and antiretroviral treatment. PMID:27442440

  10. Do implementation strategies increase adherence to pain assessment in hospitals? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ista, Erwin; van Dijk, Monique; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-04-01

    Pain assessment and reassessment is an essential part of the treatment of hospitalised patients and must be integrated in pain management protocols. Yet nurses' adherence to pain assessment recommendations is problematic. We sought to review the comparative evidence for implementation strategies aiming to improve nurses' adherence to pain assessment recommendations in hospitalised patients. Systematic review using the narrative method. PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL, Cochrane library and hand searching. Studies published since 1990, reporting implementation strategies that aimed to improve nurses' adherence to pain assessment recommendations in hospitalised patients were included. According to the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care group (EPOC) classification system, strategies were categorized as directed at: health professionals, organizations, financing, or regulations. Given the heterogeneity in strategies, samples, outcomes and settings, evidence from the studies was synthesized using a narrative approach. From 743 initial citations, 23 studies were included. They reported a variety of implementation strategies, but only directed at health professionals and/or organizations. In seven studies, a single strategy was applied (e.g. education or feedback). The remaining 16 studies used multifaceted approaches. The effectiveness of the implementation strategies varied. In all studies but one, adherence rates had improved after implementation compared to the before measurement, by 9% up to 49%. These effects were measured at different time points after completion of the implementation, ranging from 2 weeks to 6 months. Half of the reviewed studies reported an adherence rate of 80% or higher after implementation activities; other reported rates ranging from 24 to 80%. In two controlled studies the adherence to pain assessment recommendations increased significantly when feedback was provided compared to no feedback. Sustained effects were reported in three

  11. Increased resistance to detachment of adherent microspheres and Bacillus spores subjected to a drying step.

    PubMed

    Faille, Christine; Bihi, Ilyesse; Ronse, Annette; Ronse, Gilles; Baudoin, Michael; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam

    2016-07-01

    In various environments, including that of food processing, adherent bacteria are often subjected to drying conditions. These conditions have been shown to result in changes in the ability of biofilms to cross-contaminate food in contact with them. In this study, we investigated the consequences of a drying step on the further ability of adherent bacterial spores to resist detachment. An initial series of experiment was set up with latex microspheres as a model. A microsphere suspension was deposited on a glass slide and incubated at 25, 35 and 50°C for times ranging from 1h to 48h. By subjecting the dried slides to increasing water flow rates, we showed that both time and temperature affected the ease of microsphere detachment. Similar observations were made for three Bacillus spores despite differences in their surface properties, especially regarding their surface physicochemistry. The differences in ease of adherent spore detachment could not be clearly linked to the minor changes in spore morphology, observed after drying in various environmental conditions. In order to explain the increased interaction between spheres or spores and glass slides, the authors made several assumptions regarding the possible underlying mechanisms: the shape of the liquid bridge between the sphere and the substratum, which is greatly influenced by the hydrophilic/hydrophobic characters of both surfaces; the accumulation of soil at the liquid/air interface; the presence of trapped nano-bubbles around and/or under the sphere.

  12. AVAPROMISE: A randomized clinical trial for increasing adherence through behavioural modification in essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hamet, Pavel; Campbell, Norman; Curnew, Greg; Eastwood, Clive; Pradhan, Ashish

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hypertension often do not adhere to their medications. OBJECTIVE: To improve medication adherence in patients with essential hypertension by modifying their behaviours. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From general practice settings, 4864 patients with essential hypertension were recruited and randomly assigned to receive the angiotensin receptor blocker irbesartan (Avapro) with (intervention group) or without (nonintervention group) a behavioural modification program (Avapromise) based on a model of change. Patients were followed up for 12 months. Patients were subgrouped based on their stage of change in the behavioural change continuum, and the intervention was tailored to address the needs of the particular subgroup. The primary efficacy measure was rate and time to discontinuation with irbesartan. RESULTS: At the end of the study, there was no significant difference in the discontinuation rates between the intervention (25.4%, 95% CI 23.7 to 27.2) and nonintervention (25.5%, 95% CI 23.8 to 27.3) groups (P=0.94). The time to discontinuation (P=0.87) and the extrapolated rate of discontinuation estimated from the Kaplan-Meir curve (intervention 23.1%, 95% CI 21.3 to 24.8; nonintervention 23.5%, 95% CI 21.8 to 25.3) were not different between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: This behavioural modification intervention based on a model of change was not efficacious at increasing rates of adherence in patients with essential hypertension in this setting. More individualized interventions may be required to increase adherence in this population. PMID:19644587

  13. A peer adherence support intervention to improve the antiretroviral treatment outcomes of HIV patients in South Africa: the moderating role of family dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Edwin; Masquillier, Caroline; Ponnet, Koen; le Roux Booysen, Frederik

    2014-07-01

    Given the severe shortage of human resources in the healthcare sector in many countries with high HIV prevalence, community-based peer adherence support is being increasingly cited as an integral part of a sustainable antiretroviral treatment (ART) strategy. However, the available scientific evidence on this topic reports discrepant findings on the effectiveness of peer adherence support programmes. These conflicting findings to some extent can be attributed to the lack of attention to the social contexts in which peer adherence support programmes are implemented. This study explores the potential moderating role of family dynamics by assessing the differential impact of peer adherence support in different types of families, based on the theoretical underpinnings of the family functioning framework. These relationships were explored with the aid of multivariate statistical analysis of cross-sectional, post-trial data for a sample of 340 patients interviewed as part of the Effectiveness of Aids Treatment and Support in the Free State (FEATS) study conducted in the public-sector ART programme of the Free State Province of South Africa. The analysis reveals no significant overall differences in CD4 cell count between the intervention group accessing additional peer adherence support and the control group receiving standard care. When controlling for the potential moderating role of family dynamics, however, the outcomes clearly reveal a significant interaction effect between the adherence intervention and the level of family functioning with regard to treatment outcomes. Multi-group analysis demonstrates that peer adherence support has a positive effect on immunological restoration in well-functioning families, while having a negative effect in dysfunctional families. The study outcomes stress the need for peer adherence interventions that are sensitive to the suboptimal contexts in which they are often implemented. Generic, broad-based interventions do not

  14. Satisfaction and adherence of patients with amputations to physiotherapy service at public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Verusia, Chetty; Tanuja, Dunpath; Simira, Meghnath; Sarisha, Mothalal; Varuna, Sewmungal; Ursula, Kunene; Thalente, Ntshakala

    2015-06-01

    Individuals who have undergone a lower limb amputation require comprehensive rehabilitation from the multidisciplinary team to ensure optimal treatment outcomes and social integration. Physiotherapists play a pivotal role within the multidisciplinary team and offer patients physical and psychosocial rehabilitative care. Determining patients' satisfaction levels and exploring factors affecting adherence to physiotherapy interventions can inform practice and improve service delivery of rehabilitation within resource poor settings such as South Africa. To determine the level of satisfaction with physiotherapy services rendered to acute and sub-acute in-patients with lower limb amputations and to explore factors affecting adherence to physiotherapy intervention. A prospective survey of 35 patients with lower limb amputations from four public hospitals in South Africa was undertaken. A modified version of the Hampstead rehabilitation centre patient satisfaction questionnaire was utilised. Majority of participants were satisfied with the physiotherapy services whilst a few reported dissatisfaction. Three themes emerged whilst exploring the patients' experience relating to adherence to physiotherapy programmes. Themes included service delivery, patient-therapist interaction and participation barriers and facilitators. Recommendations aimed to improve quality of care and healthcare outcomes thereby enhancing the participants' adherence to the physiotherapy programme.

  15. Intensive adherence counselling for HIV-infected individuals failing second-line antiretroviral therapy in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fox, Matthew P; Berhanu, Rebecca; Steegen, Kim; Firnhaber, Cindy; Ive, Prudence; Spencer, David; Mashamaite, Sello; Sheik, Sadiyya; Jonker, Ingrid; Howell, Pauline; Long, Lawrence; Evans, Denise

    2016-09-01

    In resource-limited settings, where genotypic drug resistance testing is rarely performed and poor adherence is the most common reason for treatment failure, programmatic approaches to handling treatment failure are essential. This study was performed to describe one such approach to adherence optimisation. This was a single-arm study of patients on second-line protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) with a HIV-1 RNA ≥400 copies/ml in Johannesburg, South Africa, between 1 March 2012 and 1 December 2013. Patients underwent enhanced adherence counselling. Those with improved adherence and a repeat viral load of >1000 copies/ml underwent HIV-1 drug resistance testing. We describe results using simple proportions and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 400 patients who underwent targeted adherence counselling after an elevated viral load on second-line ART, 388 (97%) underwent repeat viral load testing. Most of these (n = 249; 64%, 95% CI 59-69) resuppressed (<400 copies/ml) on second line. By the end of follow-up (1 March 2014), among the 139 (36%, 95% CI: 31-41%), who did not initially resuppress after being targeted, 106 had a viral load >400 copies/ml, 11 switched to third line, 5 were awaiting third line, 4 had died and 13 were lost to follow-up. Among the unsuppressed, 48 successfully underwent resistance testing with some resistance detected in most (41/48). Most (64%) second-line treatment failure in this clinic is related to adherence and can be overcome with careful adherence support. Controlled interventions are needed to determine what the optimal approach is to improving second-line outcomes and reducing the need for third-line ART. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Primary non-adherence to prescribed medication in general practice: lack of influence of moderate increases in patient copayment.

    PubMed

    Linnet, Kristján; Halldórsson, Matthías; Thengilsdóttir, Gudrún; Einarsson, Ólafur B; Jónsson, Kristinn; Almarsdóttir, Anna B

    2013-02-01

    Primary non-adherence refers to the patient not redeeming a prescribed medication at some point during drug therapy. Research has mainly focused on secondary non-adherence. Prior to this study, the overall rate of primary non-adherence in general practice in Iceland was not known. To determine the prevalence of primary non-adherence, test whether it is influenced by a moderate increase in patient copayment implemented in 2010 and examine the difference between copayment groups (general versus concession patients). A population-based data linkage study, wherein prescriptions issued electronically by 140 physicians at 16 primary health care centres in the Reykjavik capital area during two periods before and after increases in copayment were matched with those dispensed in pharmacies, the difference constituting primary non-adherence (population: 200 000; patients: 21 571; prescriptions: 22 991). Eight drug classes were selected to reflect symptom relief and degree of copayment. Two-tailed chi-square test and odds ratios for non-adherence by patient copayment groups were calculated. The rate of primary non-adherence was 6.2%. It was lower after the increased copayment, reaching statistical significance for hypertensive agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antipsychotics. Generally, primary non-adherence, except for antibacterials and NSAIDs, was highest in old-age pensioners. Primary non-adherence in Icelandic general practice was within the range of prior studies undertaken in other countries and was not adversely affected by the moderate increase in patient copayment. Older patients showed a different pattern of primary non-adherence. This may possibly be explained by higher prevalence of medicine use.

  17. Preceding human metapneumovirus infection increases adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and severity of murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shen-Hao; Liao, Sui-Ling; Wong, Kin-Sun; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2016-04-01

    Coinfection with respiratory virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae has been frequently reported in several epidemiologic studies. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of preceding human metapneumovirus (hMPV) inoculation on subsequent pneumococcal infection. Hep-2 and A549 cells were infected with hMPV then inoculated with S. pneumoniae. Bacterial adhesion was measured using colony forming unit and cytometric-fluorescence assays. In vivo bacterial adhesion was examined in hMPV-infected mice after inoculation of fluorescence-conjugated S. pneumoniae. Pulmonary inflammation (bacterial titers, cytokine levels, and histopathology) of hMPV-infected mice was investigated after inoculation with S. pneumoniae. In vitro results of bacterial infection with S. pneumoniae on A549 and Hep-2 monolayer cells showed that even though cellular adherence was variable among different serotypes, there was significantly enhanced bacterial adherence in A549 cells with preceding hMPV infection. In addition, in vivo study of hMPV-infected mice showed increased adhesion of S. pneumoniae on the bronchial epithelium with delayed bacterial clearance and exacerbated histopathology. Furthermore, mice with preceding hMPV infection showed repressed recruitment of airway neutrophils with decreased expression of neutrophil chemoattractants during pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that hMPV-infected airway cells, especially the lower airway epithelium, express increased adherence with S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, hMPV-infected mice showed impaired recruitment of airway neutrophils, possibly leading to delayed bacterial clearance and exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, after secondary infection with pneumococcal isolates. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Offering financial incentives to increase adherence to antipsychotic medication: the clinician experience.

    PubMed

    Highton-Williamson, Elizabeth; Barnicot, Kirsten; Kareem, Tarrannum; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Financial incentives for medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders are controversial. It is not yet known whether fears expressed by clinicians are borne out in reality. We aimed to explore community mental health clinicians' experiences of the consequences of giving patients with psychotic disorders a financial incentive to take their depot medication. We implemented descriptive and thematic analyses of semistructured interviews with the clinicians of patients assigned to receive incentives within a randomized controlled trial. Fifty-nine clinicians were interviewed with regard to the effect of the incentives on 73 of the 78 patients allocated to receive incentives in the trial. Most commonly, the clinicians reported benefits for clinical management including improved adherence, contact, patient monitoring, communication, and trust (n = 52). Positive effects on symptoms, insight, or social functioning were reported for some (n = 33). Less commonly, problems for patient management were reported (n = 19) such as monetarization of the therapeutic relationship or negative consequences for the patient (n = 15) such as increased drug and alcohol use. Where requests for increased money occurred, they were rapidly resolved. It seems that, in most cases, the clinicians found that using incentives led to benefits for patient management and for patient health. However, in 33% of cases, some adverse effects were reported. It remains unclear whether certain clinical characteristics are associated with increased risk for adverse effects of financial incentives. The likelihood of benefit versus the smaller risk for adverse effects should be weighed up when deciding whether to offer incentives to individual patients.

  19. Increased Expression of Type-1 Fimbriae by Nonpathogenic Escherichia coli 83972 Results in an Increased Capacity for Catheter Adherence and Bacterial Interference

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Cevallos, Manuel E.; Li, Huaiguang; Riosa, Sarah; Hull, Richard A.; Hull, Sheila I.; Tweardy, David J.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Background In vitro, urinary catheter colonization by avirulent Escherichia coli 83972 impedes subsequent catheter colonization by a variety of uropathogenic organisms. However, E. coli 83972 shows a low efficacy of adherence to silicone urinary catheter material, possibly because the fim operon encoding adhesive type 1 fimbriae is incomplete. We hypothesized that improving the catheter adherence of E. coli 83972 would improve its bacterial interference properties. Methods We created adhesive mutants by transforming wild-type E. coli 83972 with fim+ plasmids. Adherence to urinary catheters and ability to prevent uropathogenic E. coli from colonizing urinary catheters were studied by use of a sonication assay. Results The addition of a single-copy fim+ plasmid increased adherence to urinary catheters 10-fold, and addition of an 18-copy fim+ plasmid increased adherence 100-fold. The more adherent 18-copy fim+ plasmid strain was more effective at blocking catheter colonization by pathogenic E. coli than was the wild-type parental strain. Neither Δfim nor fim+ E. coli 83972 adhered to shed urinary epithelial cells. Conclusions Our results indicate that improving urinary catheter adherence augments the bacterial interference capabilities of benign E. coli 83972. Increased expression of type-1 fimbriae may enhance bacterial interference without conferring virulence on E. coli 83972. PMID:18643750

  20. It's complicated: why do tuberculosis patients not initiate or stay adherent to treatment? A qualitative study from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Donald; Claassens, Mareli

    2016-11-25

    Individuals who test positive for active tuberculosis (TB) but do not initiate treatment present a challenge to TB programmes because they contribute to ongoing transmission within communities. To better understand why individuals do not initiate treatment, or are adherent after initiating treatment, South African respondents were approached to obtain insights as to which factors enabled and inhibited the treatment process. This qualitative work was nested in a larger study investigating initial loss to follow-up (LTFU) amongst new smear positive TB patients across five provinces of South Africa. In-depth interviews were done with 41 adherent and initial LTFU respondents. Key issues contributing to initial LTFU appeared to be a poor knowledge, or low awareness of TB treatment; stigma around TB including its connection to HIV; immediate problems in the respondents' lives particularly poverty, lack of access to transport and the need to continue working; and problems in the healthcare facilities including under resourced facilities, poor functioning health systems and negative staff attitudes. In contrast the reasons given for being adherent related to the level of illness, support received at home and healthcare facilities, a belief in the health system and positive experiences in the health service including positive attitudes from staff. Key changes need to be made to the healthcare system to enable patients to initiate treatment and remain adherent, but the six month regimen of daily observed treatment presents real practical and personal challenges to patients. Alternative strategies to DOTS at facility level should be investigated to bring services closer to communities to encourage patients to access care, initiate and adhere to treatment.

  1. How to Increase Reach and Adherence of Web-Based Interventions: A Design Research Viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Ludden, Geke D S; van Rompay, Thomas J L; Kelders, Saskia M; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C

    2015-07-10

    Nowadays, technology is increasingly used to increase people's well-being. For example, many mobile and Web-based apps have been developed that can support people to become mentally fit or to manage their daily diet. However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds. In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential. We propose looking at design research as a source of inspiration for new (to the field) design approaches. The paper goes on to specify and discuss three of these approaches: personalization, ambient information, and use of metaphors. Central to our viewpoint is the role of positive affect triggered by well-designed persuasive features to boost adherence and well-being. Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research.

  2. How to Increase Reach and Adherence of Web-Based Interventions: A Design Research Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, technology is increasingly used to increase people’s well-being. For example, many mobile and Web-based apps have been developed that can support people to become mentally fit or to manage their daily diet. However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds. In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential. We propose looking at design research as a source of inspiration for new (to the field) design approaches. The paper goes on to specify and discuss three of these approaches: personalization, ambient information, and use of metaphors. Central to our viewpoint is the role of positive affect triggered by well-designed persuasive features to boost adherence and well-being. Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research. PMID:26163456

  3. Does mHealth increase adherence to medication? Results of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Anglada-Martinez, H; Riu-Viladoms, G; Martin-Conde, M; Rovira-Illamola, M; Sotoca-Momblona, J M; Codina-Jane, C

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to medication is a major problem that affects 50-60% of chronically ill patients. As mobile phone use spreads rapidly, a new model of remote health delivery via mobile phone – mHealth – is increasingly used. The objective of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of how mHealth can be used to improve adherence to medication. A systematic literature review was conducted using four databases (CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus and PsycARTICLES). Eligible articles available on March 2014 had to be written in English or Spanish and have a comparative design. Articles were reviewed by two authors independently. A Cochrane Collaboration tool was used to assess the studies based on their internal validity. Of the 1504 articles found, 20 fulfilled the inclusion criteria [13 randomised clinical trials (RCT), one quasi-RCT, one non-randomised parallel group study and five studies with a pre-post design]. Nearly all the trials were conducted in high-income countries (80.0%). Articles were categorised depending on the target population into three different groups: (i) HIV-infected patients, n = 5; (ii) patients with other chronic diseases (asthma, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, infectious diseases, transplant recipients and psoriasis), n = 11; and (iii) healthy individuals, n = 4. Adherence improved in four of the studies on HIV-infected patients, in eight of the studies on patients with other chronic diseases, and in 1 study performed in healthy individuals. All studies reported sending SMS as medication reminders, healthy lifestyle reminders, or both. Only one trial (HIV-infected patients) had a low risk of bias. Our results showed mixed evidence regarding the benefits of interventions because of the variety of the study designs and the results found. Nevertheless, the interventions do seem to have been beneficial, as 65% of the studies had positive outcomes. Therefore, more high-quality studies should be conducted. © 2014 John Wiley

  4. Predictors of poor adherence among people on antiretroviral treatment in Cape Town, South Africa: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Dewing, Sarah F; Mathews, Cathy; Lurie, Mark; Kagee, Ashraf; Padayachee, Trishanta; Lombard, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to describe the frequency with which structural- and individual-level barriers to adherence are experienced by people receiving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment and to determine predictors of nonadherence. Three hundred adherent and 300 non-adherent patients from 6 clinics in Cape Town completed the LifeWindows Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills ART Adherence Questionnaire, the Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Symptoms Screener and the Structural Barriers to Clinic Attendance (SBCA) and Medication-taking (SBMT) scales. Overall, information-related barriers were reported most frequently followed by motivation and behaviour skill defects. Structural barriers were reported least frequently. Logistic regression analyses revealed that gender, behaviour skill deficit scores, SBCA scores and SBMT scores predicted non-adherence. Despite the experience of structural barriers being reported least frequently, structural barriers to medication-taking had the greatest impact on adherence (OR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.73 to 3.12), followed by structural barriers to clinic attendance (OR: 2.06, 95% CI: 1.58 to 2.69) and behaviour skill deficits (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.71). Our data indicate the need for policy directed at the creation of a health-enabling environment that would enhance the likelihood of adherence among antiretroviral therapy users. Specifically, patient empowerment strategies aimed at increasing treatment literacy and management skills should be strengthened. Attempts to reduce structural barriers to antiretroviral treatment adherence should be expanded to include increased access to mental health care services and nutrition support. PMID:25559444

  5. Challenges in PMTCT antiretroviral adherence in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mepham, S; Zondi, Z; Mbuyazi, A; Mkhwanazi, N; Newell, M L

    2011-06-01

    Women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa face significant challenges in accessing HIV care and adhering to antiretroviral therapy. Most reports have focused on issues relating to long-term adherence such as those surrounding stigma and disclosure, hunger, cultural factors, lack of accurate health information, lack of social support, medication side effects and overcrowded health systems. Information related to the challenges facing pregnant women when taking antiretrovirals for prophylactic purposes is limited. The "Kesho Bora Study" is a multicentre prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) trial in sub-Saharan Africa evaluating the PMTCT efficacy of triple therapy until cessation of breast feeding compared to short course zidovudine monotherapy in a predominantly breast feeding population. Following unexplained discrepancies during objective adherence assessments, a sub-study was conducted at one site to examine the underlying adherence issues. The counselling and clinical notes of all 100 enrolled Zulu women were examined. Extracted information was supplemented by unstructured, free-ranging interviews conducted by trained adherence counsellors on 43 consecutive women attending the trial clinic over a two-week period. Adherence was defined as good (>95% adherence), or poor (<95% adherence). Reasons provided for sub-optimal adherence included therapy misconceptions/misunderstandings, antiretroviral use by relatives, domestic violence, poverty and issues relating to disclosure and stigma. About 61% (57/94) of antenatal women had good adherence with their PMTCT prophylaxis, with no significant difference shown between those taking the long and short course. Antenatal women in northern rural KwaZulu-Natal face significant challenges in taking antiretroviral PMTCT prophylaxis.

  6. Antiretroviral therapy adherence measurement in non-clinical settings in South India.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Nora J; Manhart, Lisa E; Mohanraj, Rani; Kumar, Shuba; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan; Rao, Deepa; Simoni, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is key to viral suppression, but may be impeded by psychosocial consequences of HIV-infection such as stigma and depression. Measures of adherence in India have been examined in clinic populations, but little is known about the performance of these measures outside clinical settings. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 151 Tamil-speaking people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) in India recruited through HIV support networks and compared single item measures from the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG) scale, a visual analog scale (VAS), and a question on timing of last missed dose. Depression was measured using the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and HIV-related stigma was measured using an adaptation of the Berger Stigma Scale. Mean age was 35.6 years (SD ± 5.9); 55.6% were male; mean MDI score was 11.9 (SD ± 9.1); and mean stigma score was 67.3 (SD ± 12.0). Self-reported perfect adherence (no missed doses) was 93.3% using the AACTG item, 87.1% using last missed dose, and 83.8% using the VAS. The measures had moderate agreement with each other (kappa 0.45-0.57). Depression was associated with lower adherence irrespective of adherence measure used, and remained significantly associated in multivariable analyses adjusting for age and marital status. Stigma was not associated with adherence irrespective of the measure used. The VAS captured the greatest number of potentially non-adherent individuals and may be useful for identifying PLHA in need of adherence support. Given the consistent and strong association between poorer adherence and depression, programs that jointly address adherence and mental health for PLHA in India may be more effective than programs targeting only one.

  7. Prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV in a tertiary health facility in south-south Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oku, Afiong O; Owoaje, Eme T; Ige, Olusimbo K; Oyo-Ita, Angela

    2013-08-30

    Adherence to Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a major predictor of the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Good adherence to HAART is necessary to achieve the best virologic response, lower the risk of drug resistance and reduce morbidity and mortality. This study therefore aimed to determine the prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV accessing treatment in a tertiary location in Cross River State, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients on HAART attending the Presidential Emergency plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR) clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital between October-December 2011. A total of 411 PLHIV visiting the study site during the study period were interviewed. PLHIV who met the inclusion criteria were consecutively recruited into the study till the desired sample size was attained. Information was obtained from participants using a semi-structured, pretested, interviewer administered questionnaire. Adherence was measured via patients self report and were termed adherent if they took at least 95% of prescribed medication in the previous week prior to the study. Data were summarized using proportions, and χ2 test was used to explore associations between categorical variables. Predictors of adherence to HAART were determined by binary logistic regression. Level of significance was set at p < 0.05. The mean age of PLHIV who accessed treatment was 35.7 ± 9.32 years. Females constituted 68.6% of all participants. The self reported adherence rate based on a one week recall prior to the study was 59.9%. The major reasons cited by respondents for skipping doses were operating a busy schedule, simply forgot medications, felt depressed, and travelling out of town. On logistic regression analysis, perceived improved health status [OR 3.11; CI: 1.58-6.11], reduced pill load [OR 1.25; 95% CI: 0.46-2.72] and non-use of herbal remedies [OR 1.83; 95% CI: 1.22-2.72] were the major predictors for

  8. A pilot study of a nurse-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy intervention (Ziphamandla) for adherence and depression in HIV in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lena S; Magidson, Jessica F; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Remmert, Jessica E; Kagee, Ashraf; Leaver, Matthew; Stein, Dan J; Safren, Steven A; Joska, John

    2016-04-26

    Depression is prevalent among people living with HIV in South Africa and interferes with adherence to antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated a nurse-delivered, cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for adherence and depression among antiretroviral therapy users with depression in South Africa (n = 14). Primary outcomes were depression, antiretroviral therapy adherence, feasibility, and acceptability. Findings support robust improvements in mood through a 3-month follow up. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was maintained during the intervention period. Participant retention supports acceptability; however, modest provider fidelity despite intensive supervision warrants additional attention to feasibility. Future effectiveness research is needed to evaluate this nurse-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for adherence and depression in this context.

  9. Expansion of the Adherence Club model for stable antiretroviral therapy patients in the Cape Metro, South Africa 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Lynne; Harley, Beth; Sharp, Joseph; Solomon, Suhair; Jacobs, Shahieda; Cragg, Carol; Kriel, Ebrahim; Peton, Neshaan; Jennings, Karen; Grimsrud, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The ambitious '90-90-90' treatment targets require innovative models of care to support quality antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery. While evidence for differentiated models of ART delivery is growing, there are few data on the feasibility of scale-up. We describe the implementation of the Adherence Club (AC) model across the Cape Metro health district in Cape Town, South Africa, between January 2011 and March 2015. Using data from monthly aggregate AC monitoring reports and electronic monitoring systems for the district cohort, we report on the number of facilities offering ACs and the number of patients receiving ART care in the AC model. Between January 2011 and March 2015, the AC programme expanded to reach 32 425 patients in 1308 ACs at 55 facilities. The proportion of the total ART cohort retained in an AC increased from 7.3% at the end of 2011 to 25.2% by March 2015. The number of facilities offering ACs also increased and by the end of the study period, 92.3% of patients were receiving ART at a facility that offered ACs. During this time, the overall ART cohort doubled from 66 616 to 128 697 patients. The implementation of the AC programme offset this increase by 51%. ACs now provide ART care to more than 30 000 patients. Further expansion of the model will require additional resources and support. More research is necessary to determine the outcomes and quality of care provided in ACs and other differentiated models of ART delivery, especially when implemented at scale. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in White British and South Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanta; Raza, Karim; Nightingale, Peter; Horne, Robert; Chapman, Sarah; Greenfield, Sheila; Gill, Paramjit

    2015-12-29

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory disease causing joint damage, disability, and reduced life expectancy. Highly effective drugs are now available for the treatment of RA. However, poor adherence to drug regimens remains a significant barrier to improving clinical outcomes in RA. Poor adherence has been shown to be linked to patients' beliefs about medicines with a potential impact on adherence. These beliefs are reported to be different between ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to identify potential determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) including an assessment of the influence of beliefs about medicines and satisfaction with information provided about DMARDs and compare determinants of adherence between RA patients of White British and South Asian. RA patients of either White British (n = 91) or South Asian (n = 89) origin were recruited from secondary care. Data were collected via questionnaires on patients': (1) self-reported adherence (Medication Adherence Report Scale-MARS); (2) beliefs about medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-BMQ); (3) illness perceptions (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-IPQ) and (4) satisfaction with information about DMARDs (Satisfaction with Information about Medicines questionnaire-SIMS). In addition, clinical and demographic data were collected. The results revealed that socio-demographic factors only explained a small amount of variance in adherence whereas illness representations and treatment beliefs were more substantial in explaining non-adherence to DMARDs. Patients' self-reported adherence was higher in White British than South Asian patients (median 28 (interquartile range 26-30) vs median 26 (interquartile range 23-30) respectively; P = 0.013, Mann-Whitney test). Patients who reported lower adherence were more dissatisfied with the information they had received about their DMARDs (P < 0.001, Spearman correlation, SIMS action and usage

  11. Adherence clubs for long-term provision of antiretroviral therapy: cost-effectiveness and access analysis from Khayelitsha, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bango, Funeka; Ashmore, John; Wilkinson, Lynne; van Cutsem, Gilles; Cleary, Susan

    2016-09-01

    As the scale of the South African HIV epidemic calls for innovative models of care that improve accessibility for patients while overcoming chronic human resource shortages, we (i) assess the cost-effectiveness of lay health worker-led group adherence clubs, in comparison with a nurse-driven 'standard of care' and (ii) describe and evaluate the associated patient cost and accessibility differences. Our cost-effectiveness analysis compares an 'adherence club' innovation to conventional nurse-driven care within a busy primary healthcare setting in Khayelitsha, South Africa. In each alternative, we calculate provider costs and estimate rates of retention in care and viral suppression as key measures of programme effectiveness. All results are presented on an annual or per patient-year basis. In the same setting, a smaller sample of patients was interviewed to understand the direct and indirect non-healthcare cost and access implications of the alternatives. Access was measured using McIntyre and colleagues' 2009 framework. Adherence clubs were the more cost-effective model of care, with a cost per patient-year of $300 vs. $374 and retention in care at 1 year of 98.03% (95% CI 97.67-98.33) for clubs vs. 95.49% (95% CI 95.01-95.94) for standard of care. Viral suppression in clubs was 99.06% (95% CI 98.82-99.27) for clubs vs. 97.20% (95% CI 96.81-97.56) for standard of care. When interviewed, club patients reported fewer missed visits, shorter waiting times and higher acceptability of services compared to standard of care. Adherence clubs offer the potential to enhance healthcare efficiency and patient accessibility. Their scale-up should be supported. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors.

  13. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors. PMID:27392000

  14. Adherence of doctors to a clinical guideline for hypertension in Bojanala district, North-West Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Adedeji, Asafa R; Tumbo, John; Govender, Indiran

    2015-04-13

    Clinical guidelines are systematically developed statements that assist practitioners and patients to make healthcare decisions for specific clinical circumstances. Non-adherence of doctors to guidelines is thought to contribute significantly to poor delivery of clinical care, resulting in poor clinical outcomes. To investigate adherence of doctors in rural district hospitals to clinical guidelines using the South African Hypertension Guideline 2006 as an example. Four district hospitals in Bojanala district of North-West Province, South Africa. A cross-sectional study determined adherence practices of doctors from records of patients with established hypertension seen at the four district hospitals. Of the 490 total records documented by 29 doctors, screening for co-morbidity or associated factors was carried out as follows: diabetes mellitus 99.2%, obesity 6.1%, smoking 53.5%, dyslipidaemia 36.9%, abdominal circumference 3.3%; organ damage: eye 0, kidney 82%, heart 43.5%, chronic kidney disease 38.2%, stroke/transient ischaemic attack 15.9%, heart failure 23.5%, advanced retinopathy 0.2%, coronary heart disease 23.7%, peripheral arterial disease 13.9%. Critical tests/measurements were documented in the following proportions: blood pressure 99.8%, weight 85.3%, height 65.7%, body mass index 3.1%, urinalysis 74.5%, lipogram 76.1%, urea/creatinine 80.4%, electrocardiogram 42.9%, blood glucose 100%; risk determination and grading: diagnosis by hypertension severity 19%, low added risk 57.1%, moderate added risk 64.7%, high added risk 89.6%, very high added risk 89.2%. Adherence to therapies was as follows: first-line guideline drugs 69.4%, second line 84.7%, third line 87.8% and fourth-line 89.6%. Overall adherence of doctors to treatment guidelines for hypertension was found to be low (51.9%). Low adherence rates were related to age (older doctors) and less clinical experience, and differed with regard to various aspects of the guidelines.

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Strategies to Increase the Adherence to Exercise in the Management of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; Centis, Elena; El Ghoch, Marwan; Marchesini, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity plays a major role in the development and management of obesity. High levels of physical activity provide an advantage in maintaining energy balance at a healthy weight, but the amount of exercise needed to produce weight loss and weight loss maintenance may be difficult to achieve in obese subjects. Barriers to physical activity may hardly be overcome in individual cases, and group support may make the difference. The key role of cognitive processes in the failure/success of weight management suggests that new cognitive procedures and strategies should be included in the traditional behavioral treatment of obesity, in order to help patients build a mindset of long-term weight control. We reviewed the role of physical activity in the management of obesity, and the principal cognitive-behavioral strategies to increase adherence to exercise. Also in this area, we need to move from the traditional prescriptive approach towards a multidisciplinary intervention. PMID:21052533

  16. Can Short-Term Use of Electronic Patient Adherence Monitoring Devices Improve Adherence in Patients Failing Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy? Evidence from a Pilot Study in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Evans, Denise; Berhanu, Rebecca; Moyo, Faith; Nguweneza, Arthemon; Long, Lawrence; Fox, Matthew P

    2016-11-01

    High levels of adherence are required to achieve the full benefit of ART. We assess the effectiveness of electronic adherence monitoring devices among patients failing second-line ART, as measured by viral load suppression. Cohort study of Wisepill™ real-time adherence monitoring in addition to intensified adherence counselling over 3 months in adults with a viral load ≥400 copies/ml on second-line ART in Johannesburg, South Africa between August 2013 and January 2014. Patients were sent SMS reminders upon missing a scheduled dose. We compared outcomes to earlier historical cohorts receiving either intensified adherence counselling or adherence counselling alone. Overall, 63 % of the participants (31/49) took >80 % of their prescribed medication; this dropped from 76 to 53 and 49 % at 1, 2 and 3 months post-enrolment respectively. Compared to those with good adherence (>80 %), participants with poor adherence (≤80 %) had a higher risk for a subsequently elevated viral load ≥400 copies/ml (relative risk (RR) 1.47 95 % CI 0.97-2.23). Participants found the intervention "acceptable and useful" but by 6 months after eligibility they were only slightly more likely to be alive, in care and virally suppressed compared to those who received intensified adherence counselling (44.9 vs. 38.5 %; RR 1.19; 95 % CI 0.85-1.67) or adherence counselling alone (44.9 vs. 40.9 %; RR 1.12; 95 % CI 0.81-1.56). In patients with an elevated viral load on second-line ART electronic adherence monitoring was associated with a modest, but not significant, improvement in viral suppression.

  17. Prescribing patterns and adherence to medication among South-Asian, Chinese and white people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chong, E; Wang, H; King-Shier, K M; Quan, H; Rabi, D M; Khan, N A

    2014-12-01

    To determine the prescribing of and adherence to oral hypoglycaemic agents, insulin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers and statin therapy among South-Asian, Chinese and white people with newly diagnosed diabetes. The present study was a population-based cohort study using administrative and pharmacy databases to include all South-Asian, Chinese and white people aged ≥ 35 years with diabetes living in British Columbia, Canada (1997-2006). Adherence to each class of medication was measured using proportion of days covered over 1 year with optimum adherence defined as ≥ 80%. The study population included 9529 South-Asian, 14 084 Chinese and 143 630 white people with diabetes. The proportion of people who were prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statin or oral hypoglycaemic agents was ≤ 50% for all groups. South-Asian and Chinese people had significantly lower adherence for all medications than white people, with the lowest adherence to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment (South-Asian people: adjusted odds ratio 0.37, 95% CI 0.34-0.39; P<0.0001; Chinese people: adjusted odds ratio 0.50, 95% CI 0.47-0.54; P<0.0001) and statin therapy (South-Asian people: adjusted odds ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.41 - 0.53, P < 0.0001; Chinese people: adjusted odds ratio 0.72, 95% CI 0.67 - 0.77; P<0.0001) compared with white people. Adherence to evidence-based pharmacotherapy was substantially worse among the South-Asian and Chinese populations. Care providers need to be alerted to the high levels of non-adherence in these groups and the underlying causes need to be investigated. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  18. Determinants of Patient's Adherence to Hypertension Medications in a Rural Population of Kancheepuram District in Tamil Nadu, South India

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, J.; Abrahm, Sherin Billy; Singh, Zile; Stalin, P.; Sathya, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases, no longer a disease of the rich, impose a great threat in the developing nations due to demographic and epidemiological transition. This increasing burden of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors is worrisome. Adherence to hypertension (HT) medication is very important for improving the quality of life and preventing complications of HT. Aim: To study the factors determining adherence to HT medication. Settings and Design: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural area of Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu, with a total population of around 16,005. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out over a period of 6 months (February-July) using a pre-structured and validated questionnaire. All eligible participants were selected by house-to-house survey and individuals not available on three consecutive visits were excluded from the study. The questionnaire included information on demographic characteristics, lifestyle habits, adherence to HT medication, blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI). Caste was classified based on Tamil Nadu Public Service commission. Statistical Analysis: Data were entered in MS Excel and analyzed in SPSS version 16. P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Ethical Consideration: Informed verbal consent was obtained prior to data collection. The patient's adherence to HT medication was assessed using the Morisky 4-Item Self-Report Measure of Medication-taking Behavior [MMAS-4]. Results: We studied 473 hypertensive patients of which 226 were males and 247 were females. The prevalence of adherence was 24.1% (n = 114) in the study population. Respondents with regular physical activity, non-smokers and non-alcoholics were more adherent to HT medication as compared with respondents with sedentary lifestyle, smoking and alcohol intake (P < 0.005). Based on health belief model, the respondents who perceived high susceptibility, severity, benefit had better

  19. Evaluation of Increasing Antecedent Specificity in Goal Statements on Adherence to Positive Behavior-Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohrs, Corey M.; Shriver, Mark D.; Burke, Raymond V.; Allen, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of antecedent specificity in goal statements on adherence to positive behavior-management strategies. Teaching staff were recruited from 2 different school settings where there were routine expectations to use behavior-specific praise in the classroom, but adherence was poor. In a concurrent multiple baseline design, the…

  20. Evaluation of Increasing Antecedent Specificity in Goal Statements on Adherence to Positive Behavior-Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohrs, Corey M.; Shriver, Mark D.; Burke, Raymond V.; Allen, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of antecedent specificity in goal statements on adherence to positive behavior-management strategies. Teaching staff were recruited from 2 different school settings where there were routine expectations to use behavior-specific praise in the classroom, but adherence was poor. In a concurrent multiple baseline design, the…

  1. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  2. Strategies for increasing adherence to an online smoking cessation intervention for college students.

    PubMed

    An, Lawrence C; Perry, Cheryl L; Lein, Emily B; Klatt, Colleen; Farley, Dana M; Bliss, Robin L; Hennrikus, Deborah J; Pallonen, Unto E; Lando, Harry A; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Ehlinger, Edward P

    2006-12-01

    High rates of Internet use among young adults make online intervention with this population particularly attractive. However, low adherence rates limit the exposure to and the potential effectiveness of these programs. This study identifies strategies for increasing adherence by examining the rates of participation for a 5-week beta (pilot) version and final version of the RealU Web site, an online intervention for college smokers. Three modifications from the beta to the RealU Web site were (a) changing format from a smoking cessation Web site to an online college life magazine, (b) providing proactive peer e-mail support, and (c) adopting a more linear site structure. Participants were recruited via Internet health screening and received US$10 for completing weekly study activities. Enrollment among eligible smokers was higher for the beta compared with the RealU intervention (47/69, 68.1% vs. 517/1618, 32.0%, p<.001), but participants did not differ in terms of age, gender, or past 30-day cigarette or alcohol use. Participation fell sharply during the beta test (53% in week 1 to 26% by week 5) compared with the RealU average of 95% (range 89% to 98%). Participation during each study's final week was much higher in the RealU (93% week 20) compared with the beta (26% week 5, p<.001). After 5 weeks, self-reported 30-day abstinence was higher for RealU intervention participants (16.0%) compared with the beta participants (4.3%, p=.03). The modifications from the beta to RealU Web site described above resulted in high rates of sustained participation over 20 weeks.

  3. Masivukeni: Development of a Multimedia Based Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Intervention for Counselors and Patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Remien, Robert H; Mellins, Claude A.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Kelsey, Ryan; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Chowdhury, Jenifar; Lalkhen, Nuruneesa; Hoppe, Lara; Abrams, Elaine J.; El-Bassel, Nabila; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective medical treatment for HIV/AIDS requires patients’ optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). In resource-constrained settings, lack of adequate standardized counseling for patients on ART remains a significant barrier to adherence. Masivukeni (“Lets Wake Up” in Xhosa) is an innovative multimedia-based intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve and maintain high levels of ART adherence. Adapted from a couples-based intervention tested in the United States (US), Masivukeni was developed through community-based participatory research with US and South African partners and informed by Ewart’s Social Action Theory. Innovative computer-based multimedia strategies were used to translate a labor- and training-intensive intervention into one that could be readily and widely used by lay counselors with relatively little training with low-literacy patients. In this paper, we describe the foundations of this new intervention, the process of its development, and the evidence of its high acceptability and feasibility. PMID:23468079

  4. Masivukeni: development of a multimedia based antiretroviral therapy adherence intervention for counselors and patients in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Remien, Robert H; Mellins, Claude A; Robbins, Reuben N; Kelsey, Ryan; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Chowdhury, Jenifar; Lalkhen, Nuruneesa; Hoppe, Lara; Abrams, Elaine J; El-Bassel, Nabila; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J

    2013-07-01

    Effective medical treatment for HIV/AIDS requires patients' optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). In resource-constrained settings, lack of adequate standardized counseling for patients on ART remains a significant barrier to adherence. Masivukeni ("Let's Wake Up" in Xhosa) is an innovative multimedia-based intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve and maintain high levels of ART adherence. Adapted from a couples-based intervention tested in the United States (US), Masivukeni was developed through community-based participatory research with US and South African partners and informed by Ewart's Social Action Theory. Innovative computer-based multimedia strategies were used to translate a labor- and training-intensive intervention into one that could be readily and widely used by lay counselors with relatively little training with low-literacy patients. In this paper, we describe the foundations of this new intervention, the process of its development, and the evidence of its high acceptability and feasibility.

  5. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and its associated factors among children at South Wollo Zone Hospitals, Northeast Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy negatively affects the suppression of viral replication. It increases risks of drug resistance, treatment failure, Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)-related morbidity and mortality among children. This study assessed the level of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and its associated factors among children at hospitals in South Wollo Zone, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected children in April 2013. A total of 464 children who were taking Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in the hospitals were included. Data were collected using pretested and structured questionnaires using a face-to-face interview method. Descriptive and summary statistics were employed. Bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were computed. Odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were computed to determine the level of significance. Results Of the 464 study samples, 440 children with their caregivers were included in the final analysis. A total of 78.6% of the caregivers reported that their children were adherent to antiretroviral therapy in the month prior to the interview. Caregivers' knowledge about antiretroviral treatment [AOR = 2.72(95% CI: 1.82, 5.39)], no current substance use of the caregivers [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.21(95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.34, 7.13)], proximity to the health care facility [AOR = 2.31(95% CI: 1.94, 4.63)], if the child knows HIV-positive status [AOR = 3.47(95% CI: 2.10, 6.81)] and caregiver’s educational status [AOR = 0.59(95% CI: 0.21, 0.82)] were significantly and independently associated with adherence of children to antiretroviral therapy. Conclusion Adherence of antiretroviral therapy in this study was comparable to other studies conducted in developing countries. Caregiver’s knowledge about antiretroviral therapy, no current use of substances, close proximity to

  6. Explanatory Models and Medication Adherence in Patients with Depression in South India

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Adarsh Lakkur; Raman, Rajesh; Hattur, Basavana Gowdappa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Conceptualization of depression may have bearing on treatment seeking. It may affect adherence behaviour of the patients. Aim To find out the explanatory models and their relationship with socio-demographic variables and medication adherence in patients with depression. Materials and Methods Fifty-eight consecutive patients with depression in remission were recruited as per selection criteria. Socio-demographic details were collected. Patients were assessed using Mental Distress Explanatory Model Questionnaire (MDEMQ) and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Results Significant scores were observed in all dimensions of explanatory models. In the Mann-Whitney U test the patient’s marital status (MU=113.500, p=0.05, sig≤0.05, 2-tailed), and family history of mental illness (MU=165.5, p=0.03, sig≤0.05, 2-tailed) had a statistically significant group difference in the score of MDEMQ. In linear regression analysis, four predictors (MDEMQ subscales Stress, Western physiology, Non-Western physiology and Supernatural) had significantly predicted the value of MMAS (R2=0.937, f=153.558, p<0.001). Conclusion Findings of this study suggested that patients with depression harbor multidimensional explanatory model. The levels of explanatory models are inversely associated with levels of medication adherence. PMID:28274025

  7. Motivational Interviewing to Increase Postdischarge Antibiotic Adherence in Older Adults with Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Rachel; Shvets, Kristina; Blakely, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a pharmacist-led, motivational interviewing on antibiotic adherence following discharge in older adults with pneumonia. Inpatient medical wards in a large tertiary academic medical center. Older adults diagnosed with pneumonia were enrolled from December 1, 2013, to August 1, 2014, at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Motivational interviewing-a patient-centered method of communication-has gained recognition as a tool that can aid pharmacists in addressing negative health behaviors (e.g., medication adherence, health screenings, substance abuse during counseling sessions). However, the potential role of motivational interviewing in older adults to improve medication adherence during transitions of care is not clear. In this study, in addition to standard discharge care, older adults hospitalized with pneumonia who were randomized to the intervention group received enhanced care: pharmacist-led motivational interviewing. Evaluation of adherence to prescribed antibiotic regimens and patient satisfaction with the motivational interviewing, enhanced-care session. Ultimately, 87% of patients in the intervention group (n = 16) compared with 64% of patients in the control group (n = 14) were adherent to their antibiotic regimens. Patient satisfaction with the motivational interviewing intervention was high. Pharmacist-led motivational interviewing sessions have the potential to positively influence antibiotic adherence rates and patient satisfaction.

  8. Strategies for improving adherence to second-generation antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia by increasing ease of use.

    PubMed

    Burton, Simon C

    2005-11-01

    Despite the advances in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia that have occurred since the introduction of the second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic agents, a leading cause of suboptimal outcome is poor patient adherence to oral medication. Partial adherence can be attributed to a number of factors, including lack of insight, cognitive dysfunction, a complicated treatment regimen, drug-related side effects, patient attitude, lack of patient education, and cultural factors. A number of strategies, including psychosocial interventions, cognitive-behavioral techniques, strategies that minimize side effects, and pharmacological approaches that increase ease of medication use, can be employed to support adherence and improve long-term outcomes. This article focuses on strategies for increasing ease of use of antipsychotics in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. These strategies include using monotherapy rather than polypharmacy, simplifying the medication regimen, and using a long-acting antipsychotic formulation. The goal of these strategies is to improve adherence and help prevent relapse by ensuring continuous antipsychotic coverage. Strategies that optimize ease of use of medication treatment for schizophrenia and thus improve adherence to treatment are likely to promote the attainment of new treatment goals and improved patient outcomes.

  9. Improving medication adherence for severely mentally ill adults by decreasing coercion and increasing cooperation.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Graham; Rieger, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Severe mental illnesses, mainly schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, often go untreated until the afflicted persons become dangerous to themselves or others. In such states, they must be hospitalized and medicated, often involuntarily due to the stigma and low insight into need for treatment that can be considered characteristic of severe illnesses. Hospitalization and medications can help the mentally ill stabilize. But these options also can have a demoralizing effect on future engagement with providers. Accordingly, the process of involuntary hospitalization and medication treatment must be maximally dignified and respectful of patient autonomy, within the limits of manifest illnesses. Literature that was reviewed and synthesized suggests best practice strategies for helping involuntary mentally ill patients grow into voluntary consumers of medication. In turn, risk of relapse is lowered and quality of life is enhanced. Best practice strategies included decreasing usage of coercive tactics, helping patients cope with medication side effects, and emphasizing the necessity of family involvement. The authors conclude with a review of the limitations of arguing for involuntary hospitalization and treatment as restoring patient autonomy, along with implications for future practice focusing on increasing the medication adherence of severely mentally ill populations.

  10. Increasing Prescription Length Could Cut Cardiovascular Disease Burden And Produce Savings In South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gaziano, Thomas; Cho, Sylvia; Sy, Stephen; Pandya, Ankur; Levitt, Naomi S; Steyn, Krisela

    2015-09-01

    South Africa's rates of statin use are among the world's lowest, despite statins' demonstrated effectiveness for people with a high blood cholesterol level or history of cardiovascular disease. Almost 5 percent of the country's total mortality has been attributed to high cholesterol levels, fueled in part by low levels of statin adherence. Drawing upon experience elsewhere, we used a microsimulation model of cardiovascular disease to investigate the health and economic impacts of increasing prescription length from the standard thirty days to either sixty or ninety days, for South African adults on a stable statin regimen. Increasing prescription length to sixty or ninety days could save 1,694 or 2,553 lives per million adults, respectively. In addition, annual per patient costs related to cardiovascular disease would decrease by $152.41 and $210.29, respectively. Savings would largely accrue to patients in the form of time savings and reduced transportation costs, as a result of less frequent trips to the pharmacy. Increasing statin prescription length would both save resources and improve health outcomes in South Africa. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Increasing Prescription Length Could Cut Cardiovascular Disease Burden And Produce Savings In South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, Thomas; Cho, Sylvia; Sy, Stephen; Pandya, Ankur; Levitt, Naomi S.; Steyn, Krisela

    2016-01-01

    South Africa's rates of statin use are among the world's lowest, despite statins’ demonstrated effectiveness for people with a high blood cholesterol level or history of cardiovascular disease. Almost 5 percent of the country's total mortality has been attributed to high cholesterol levels, fueled in part by low levels of statin adherence. Drawing upon experience elsewhere, we used a microsimulation model of cardiovascular disease to investigate the health and economic impacts of increasing prescription length from the standard thirty days to either sixty or ninety days, for South African adults on a stable statin regimen. Increasing prescription length to sixty or ninety days could save 1,694 or 2,553 lives per million adults, respectively. In addition, annual per patient costs related to cardiovascular disease would decrease by $152.41 and $210.29, respectively. Savings would largely accrue to patients in the form of time savings and reduced transportation costs, as a result of less frequent trips to the pharmacy. Increasing statin prescription length would both save resources and improve health outcomes in South Africa. PMID:26355061

  12. Reducing time and increasing sensitivity in sample preparation for adherent mammalian cell metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Matthew A; Burant, Charles F; Kennedy, Robert T

    2011-05-01

    A simple, fast, and reproducible sample preparation procedure was developed for relative quantification of metabolites in adherent mammalian cells using the clonal β-cell line INS-1 as a model sample. The method was developed by evaluating the effect of different sample preparation procedures on high performance liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry quantification of 27 metabolites involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle on a directed basis as well as for all detectable chromatographic features on an undirected basis. We demonstrate that a rapid water rinse step prior to quenching of metabolism reduces components that suppress electrospray ionization thereby increasing signal for 26 of 27 targeted metabolites and increasing total number of detected features from 237 to 452 with no detectable change of metabolite content. A novel quenching technique is employed which involves addition of liquid nitrogen directly to the culture dish and allows for samples to be stored at -80 °C for at least 7 d before extraction. Separation of quenching and extraction steps provides the benefit of increased experimental convenience and sample stability while maintaining metabolite content similar to techniques that employ simultaneous quenching and extraction with cold organic solvent. The extraction solvent 9:1 methanol: chloroform was found to provide superior performance over acetonitrile, ethanol, and methanol with respect to metabolite recovery and extract stability. Maximal recovery was achieved using a single rapid (∼1 min) extraction step. The utility of this rapid preparation method (∼5 min) was demonstrated through precise metabolite measurements (11% average relative standard deviation without internal standards) associated with step changes in glucose concentration that evoke insulin secretion in the clonal β-cell line INS-1.

  13. Supporting patient adherence to antiretrovirals using mobile phone reminders: patient responses from South India.

    PubMed

    Sidney, Kristi; Antony, Jimmy; Rodrigues, Rashmi; Arumugam, Karthika; Krishnamurthy, Shubha; D'souza, George; De Costa, Ayesha; Shet, Anita

    2012-01-01

    There has been exponential growth in the use of mobile phones in India over the last few years, and their potential benefits as a healthcare tool has raised tremendous interest. We used mobile phone reminders to help support adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients at an infectious disease clinic in a tertiary hospital in Bangalore. Between March and June 2010, 139 adult HIV patients taking regular ART for at least a month received weekly reminders to support adherence. These reminders consisted of a weekly interactive call and a non-interactive neutral pictorial short message service (SMS). After four weeks of the intervention, participants were interviewed to study perceptions on preference, usefulness, potential stigma and privacy concerns associated with this intervention. Majority of the participants were urban (89%), and had at least a secondary education (85%). A total of 744 calls were made, 545 (76%) of which were received by the participants. In addition, all participants received the weekly pictorial SMS reminder. A month later, 90% of participants reported the intervention as being helpful as medication reminders, and did not feel their privacy was intruded. Participants (87%) reported that they preferred the call as reminders, just 11% favoured SMS reminders alone. Only 59% of participants viewed all the SMSs that were delivered, while 15% never viewed any at all. Participants also denied any discomfort or stigma despite 20% and 13%, respectively, reporting that another person had inadvertently received their reminder call or SMS. Mobile phone interventions are an acceptable way of supporting adherence in this setting. Voice calls rather than SMSs alone seem to be preferred as reminders. Further research to study the influence of this intervention on adherence and health maintenance is warranted.

  14. Does Short Message Service Increase Adherence to Smoking Cessation Clinic Appointments and Quitting Smoking?

    PubMed Central

    Önür, Seda Tural; Uysal, Mehmet Atilla; İliaz, Sinem; Yurt, Sibel; Bahadır, Ayşe; Hattatoğlu, Didem Görgün; Ortaköylü, Mediha Gönenç; Bağcı, Belma Akbaba; Chousein, Efsun Gonca Uğur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Using innovative and scientific methods increases the rate of quitting in smokers. Short message service (SMS) is a communication tool widely used and well integrated in many people’s daily lives. To increase adherence to appointments in smoking cessation clinics (SCC), it is thought that increased compliance could be achieved by falling outside the traditional methods. SMS has been shown to increase the compliance of patients with SCC appointments. Aims: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of SMS in the compliance of patients with SCC follow-up visits and smoking cessation success. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Our study was a controlled, open, prospective study. We enrolled 436 cases applied to SCC of Yedikule Training and Research Hospital between 01.10.2013–30.06.2014 and agreed to follow-up with SMS. SMS was sent to the patients to remind them of appointments at the SCC and to query their smoking state. Results: Two hundred-and-eighty seven (65.8%) of the patients were male and 149 (34.2%) were female. The mean age was 45±12 years. In this study, 296 (67.9%) patients had graduated from primary school. Our patients’ smoking state was queried by telephone at the 6-month follow-up and we contacted 348 patients. According to this, 88 (25.3%) patients were not smoking, and 260 (74.7%) patients were smokers. Therefore, the smoking cessation rate was 24% (n=60) in patients who did not respond to SMS reminders at all, and 28.6% (n=28) in patients answering any SMS at least once (p=0.377). Smoking cessation rate of the patients invited by SMS but who did not attend any control visits was 19.1%, and it was 34.5% in patients coming to a control visit at least once. This difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). Conclusion: In our study, there was increased success of smoking cessation in patients coming to control visits. We think that this may result from the possibly increased compliance to SCC appointments following

  15. Pharmacogenetic-guided psychiatric intervention associated with increased adherence and cost savings.

    PubMed

    Fagerness, Jesen; Fonseca, Eileen; Hess, Gregory P; Scott, Rachel; Gardner, Kathryn R; Koffler, Michael; Fava, Maurizio; Perlis, Roy H; Brennan, Francis X; Lombard, Jay

    2014-05-01

    Pharmacogenetic testing as a means of guiding treatment decisions is beginning to see wider clinical use in psychiatry. The utility of this genetic information as it pertains to clinical decision making, treatment effectiveness, cost savings, and patient perception has not been fully characterized. In this retrospective study, we examined health claims data in order to assess medication adherence rates and healthcare costs for psychiatric patients. Individuals for whom pharmacogenetic testing was ordered (cases) were contrasted with those who did not undergo such testing (controls). Cases and controls were propensity score matched in order to minimize risk of confounding in this nonrandomized study. An initial analysis of 111 cases and 222 controls examined both adherence and healthcare costs. A replication study of 116 cases and 232 controls examined adherence alone, as cost data was not available for this latter cohort. Overall, individuals with assay-guided treatment were significantly more medication adherent (P = 1.56 3 10–3; Cohen’s d = 0.511) than patients with standard treatment and demonstrated a relative cost savings of 9.5% in outpatient costs over a 4-month follow-up period, or $562 in total savings. The data show the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in everyday psychiatric clinical practice, as it can lead to improved patient adherence and decreased healthcare costs.

  16. "It's important to take your medication everyday okay?" An evaluation of counselling by lay counsellors for ARV adherence support in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dewing, S; Mathews, C; Schaay, N; Cloete, A; Louw, J; Simbayi, L

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in standard care programmes for antiretroviral (ARV) adherence support. In South Africa, individual counselling following ARV initiation is a main strategy for supporting adherence in the public sector. Egan's client-centred "Skilled Helper" counselling model is the predominant model used in HIV counselling in this context. This study evaluated counselling delivered by lay ARV adherence counsellors in Cape Town in terms of adherence to Egan's model. Thirty-eight transcripts of counselling sessions with non-adherent patients were analysed based on the methods of content analysis. These sessions were conducted by 30 counsellors. Generally counsellors' practice adhered neither to Egan's model nor a client-centred approach. Inconsistent with evidence-based approaches to counselling for ARV adherence support, counsellors mainly used information-giving and advice as strategies for addressing clients' non-adherence. Recommendations for improving practice are made. The question as to how appropriate strategies from developed countries are for this setting is also raised.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Patient Navigation to Increase Adherence with Screening Colonoscopy Among Minority Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ladabaum, Uri; Mannalithara, Ajitha; Jandorf, Lina; Itzkowitz, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is underutilized by minority populations. Patient navigation increases adherence with screening colonoscopy. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of navigation for screening colonoscopy from the perspective of a payer seeking to improve population health. Methods We informed our validated model of CRC screening with inputs from navigation studies in New York City (population 43% African American, 49% Hispanic, 4% White, 4% Other; base case screening 40% without and 65% with navigation, navigation costs $29/colonoscopy completer, $21/non-completer, $3/non-navigated). We compared: 1) navigation vs. no navigation for one-time screening colonoscopy in unscreened persons age ≥50; 2) programs of colonoscopy with vs. without navigation, vs. fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) or immunochemical testing (FIT) for ages 50-80. Results In the base case: 1) one-time navigation gained quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and decreased costs; 2) longitudinal navigation cost $9,800/QALY gained vs. no navigation, and assuming comparable uptake rates, it cost $118,700/QALY gained vs. FOBT, but was less effective and more costly than FIT. Results were most dependent on screening participation rates and navigation costs: 1) assuming a 5% increase in screening uptake with navigation and navigation cost of $150/completer, one-time navigation cost $26,400/QALY gained; 2) longitudinal navigation with 75% colonoscopy uptake cost <$25,000/QALY gained vs. FIT when FIT uptake was <50%. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses did not alter the conclusions. Conclusions Navigation for screening colonoscopy appears to be cost-effective, and one-time navigation may be cost-saving. In emerging healthcare models that reward outcomes, payers should consider covering the costs of navigation for screening colonoscopy. PMID:25492455

  18. Blister Packaging Medication to Increase Treatment Adherence and Clinical Response: Impact on Suicide-related Morbidity and Mortality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    AD _ Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0723 TITLE: Blister Packaging Medication to Increase Treatment Adherence and Clinical Response: Impact on Suicide...YYYY) , 2. REPORT TYPE December 2014 Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 29Sept2009 - 28 Sept2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Blister Packaging

  19. Increasing Teachers' Adherence to a Classwide Intervention through Performance Feedback Provided by a School-Based Consultant: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Fallon, Lindsay M.; Jaffrey, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Performance feedback (PF) is an empirically supported method of increasing teachers' treatment adherence. In the evaluations of PF to date, however, PF was delivered by someone external to the school. The primary purpose of this case study was to provide an exploratory evaluation of the effectiveness and feasibility of PF when delivered by a…

  20. Adherence to Surgical Antibiotic Prophylaxis Guidelines in New South Wales, Australia: Identifying Deficiencies and Regression Analysis of Contributing Factors.

    PubMed

    Knox, Matthew C; Edye, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is frequently reported in the literature to be suboptimal, a finding having both clinical and public health implications. This study aimed to calculate rates and patterns of adherence to guidelines at two sites and identify extrinsic contributing factors. A retrospective analysis was conducted over two 12-mo periods during 2013-2014 at the metropolitan Blacktown Hospital and regional Lismore Base Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. A group of 400 patients undergoing abdominal general surgery was selected via simple random sampling (n = 200 per site). Medical records were reviewed, and prophylactic antibiotic regimens were compared with the Australian guideline, Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic (v. 14) with respect to drug choice, dosage, timing of administration, and duration of administration. The overall rate of adherence to the guidelines was 16.5% at Blacktown Hospital and 19.5% at Lismore Base Hospital. At each site, prophylaxis was administered to more than 95% of patients and was inappropriately withheld in 4%. Drug choice was the most frequent error type, specifically involving inappropriate omission of metronidazole and use of newer-generation cephalosporins. Errors in the timing of administration also were frequent, with prophylaxis typically occurring excessively early. Logistic regression identified emergency surgery as independently associated with prophylactic errors in both the Blacktown Hospital (p < 0.001) and the Lismore Base Hospital cohorts (p = 0.020). Adherence to antibiotic prophylactic guidelines was poor at both the metropolitan and regional sites. Choice of antibiotic and timing of administration were identified as major error types. Consideration should be given to multidisciplinary involvement of anesthetists, implementation of focused interventions with an emphasis on emergency settings, and further research correlating antibiotic use with clinical significance.

  1. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N; Fielding, Katherine; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n = 150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n = 147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1 % male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119,000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at 9 months was achieved in 89.8 % of didactic and 87.9 % of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p = 0.62). 82.9 % of didactic and 79.5 % of motivational counselling participants achieved >95 % adherence by pill count at 6 months (RR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.85-1.09, p = 0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting.

  2. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: Findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Fielding, Katherine; Karim, Salim S. Abdool

    2014-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n=150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n=147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1% male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119 000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at nine months was achieved in 89.8% of didactic and 87.9% of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p=0.62). 82.9% of didactic and 79.5% of motivational counselling participants achieved >95% adherence by pill count at six months (RR 0.96, 95%CI 0.85-1.09, p=0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting. PMID:24696226

  3. Does treatment collection and observation each day keep the patient away? An analysis of the determinants of adherence among patients with Tuberculosis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Birch, Stephen; Govender, Veloshnee; Fried, Jana; Eyles, John; Daries, Vanessa; Moshabela, Mosa; Cleary, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) has been the recommended strategy for Tuberculosis (TB) control since 1995. Developed as an alternative to inpatient treatment, it involves observation of patients' medication intake to promote adherence. However, the burden of daily clinic visits may affect access to care. Using a mixed methods approach, we consider whether (1) non-adherence differs systematically between patients required to make daily clinic visits and patients cared for under less frequent clinic visits and (2) the association between frequency of required clinic visits and adherence depends on affordability and acceptability of care. Data were collected in facility exit interviews with 1200 TB patients in two rural and two urban sub-districts in South Africa. Additionally, 17 in-depth interviews were completed with TB patients. After controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors, patient type (new or retreatment) and treatment duration, regression analyses showed that daily attending patients were over twice as likely to report a missed clinic visit (P < 0.001) or a missed dose of treatment (P = 0.002) compared with patients required to attend clinics for treatment collection less frequently. Missed visits increased with treatment duration (P = 0.01). The significant interaction between clinic visit frequency and treatment duration indicated that sustaining daily visits over time may become increasingly difficult over the course of treatment. The qualitative analysis identified treatment cost and duration, patients' physical condition and varying social contexts (family, community and work) as important influences on adherence. These findings suggest that strategies involving daily clinic visits may require reconsideration if resources for TB care are to be used efficiently. The adoption of approaches that place patient interests at the centre of TB treatment delivery would appear to be of high priority, particularly in

  4. Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India - the HIVIND study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has been a public health challenge associated with the treatment of HIV. Although different adherence-supporting interventions have been reported, their long term feasibility in low income settings remains uncertain. Thus, there is a need to explore sustainable contextual adherence aids in such settings, and to test these using rigorous scientific designs. The current ubiquity of mobile phones in many resource-constrained settings, make it a contextually appropriate and relatively low cost means of supporting adherence. In India, mobile phones have wide usage and acceptability and are potentially feasible tools for enhancing adherence to medications. This paper presents the study protocol for a trial, to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first-line antiretroviral treatment in South India. Methods/Design 600 treatment naïve patients eligible for first-line treatment as per the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines will be recruited into the trial at two clinics in South India. Patients will be randomized into control and intervention arms. The control arm will receive the standard of care; the intervention arm will receive the standard of care plus mobile phone reminders. Each reminder will take the form of an automated call and a picture message. Reminders will be delivered once a week, at a time chosen by the patient. Patients will be followed up for 24 months or till the primary outcome i.e. virological failure, is reached, whichever is earlier. Self-reported adherence is a secondary outcome. Analysis is by intention-to-treat. A cost-effectiveness study of the intervention will also be carried out. Discussion Stepping up telecommunications technology in resource-limited healthcare settings is a priority of the World Health Organization. The trial will evaluate if the use of mobile phone reminders can influence adherence to first-line antiretrovirals in an Indian context

  5. Late 20th Century increase in South Pole snow accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosley-Thompson, E.; Paskievitch, J.F.; Gow, A.J.; Thompson, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A compilation of the 37-year history of net accumulation at the South Pole [Mosley-Thompson et al., 1995] suggests an increase in net annual accumulation since 1965. This record is sporadic and its quality is compromised by spatially restricted observations and nonsystematic measurement procedures. Results from a new, spatially extensive network of 236 accumulation poles document that the current 5-year (1992-1997) average annual net accumulation at the South Pole is 84.5??8.9 mm water equivalent (w.e.). This accumulation rate reflects a 30% increase since the 1960s when the best, although not optimal, records indicate that it was 65 mm w.e. Identification of two prominent beta radioactivity horizons (1954/1955 and 1964/1965) in six firn cores confirms an increase in accumulation since 1965. Viewed from a longer perspective of accumulation provided by ice cores and a snow mine study, the net accumulation of the 30-year period, 1965-1994, is the highest 30-year average of this millennium. Limited data suggest this recent accumulation increase extends beyond the South Pole region and may be characteristic of the high East Antarctic Plateau. Enhanced accumulation over the polar ice sheets has been identified as a potential early indicator of warmer sea surface temperatures and may offset a portion of the current rise in global sea level. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in young children in Cape Town, South Africa, measured by medication return and caregiver self-report: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Mary-Ann; Boulle, Andrew; Fakir, Tanzeem; Nuttall, James; Eley, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) dramatically improves outcomes for children in Africa; however excellent adherence is required for treatment success. This study describes the utility of different measures of adherence in detecting lapses in infants and young children in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods In a prospective cohort of 122 HIV-infected children commenced on ART, adherence was measured monthly during the first year of treatment by medication return (MR) for both syrups and tablets/capsules. A questionnaire was administered to caregivers after 3 months of treatment to assess experience with giving medication and self-reported adherence. Viral and immune response to treatment were assessed at the end of one year and associations with measured adherence determined. Results Medication was returned for 115/122 (94%) children with median age (IQR) of 37 (16 – 61) months. Ninety-one (79%) children achieved annual average MR adherence ≥ 90%. This was an important covariate associated with viral suppression after adjustment for disease severity (OR = 5.5 [95%CI: 0.8–35.6], p = 0.075), however was not associated with immunological response to ART. By 3 months on ART, 13 (10%) children had deceased and 11 (10%) were lost to follow-up. Questionnaires were completed by 87/98 (90%) of caregivers of those who remained in care. Sensitivity of poor reported adherence (missing ≥ 1 dose in the previous 3 days) for MR adherence <90% was only 31.8% (95% CI: 10.7% – 53.0%). Caregivers of 33/87 (38.4%) children reported difficulties with giving medication, most commonly poor palatability (21.8%). Independent socio-demographic predictors of MR adherence ≥ 90% were secondary education of caregivers (OR = 4.49; 95%CI: 1.10 – 18.24) and access to water and electricity (OR = 2.65; 95%CI: 0.93 – 7.55). Taking ritonavir was negatively associated with MR adherence ≥ 90% (OR = 0.37; 95%CI: 0.13 – 1.02). Conclusion Excellent adherence to ART is possible in

  7. The percentage of DHA in erythrocytes can detect non-adherence to advice to increase EPA and DHA intakes.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Ashley C; Metherel, Adam H; Hanning, Rhona M; Stark, Ken D

    2014-01-28

    Characterisation of long-term adherence to EPA and DHA intakes through biomarkers and dietary assessments has implications for interpreting the findings of long-term intervention studies. Adherence to dietary advice targeting an EPA+DHA intake of 1 g/d was examined over 1 year. Men and women (n 45) received dietary advice to increase EPA and DHA intakes from seafood, nutraceutical (fish oil) or functional food sources, while a fourth group received combined advice. Blood biomarkers and dietary intakes of EPA and DHA were evaluated at baseline and post-intervention at weeks 4, 8, 12, 24 and 52. Assessment by 3 d diet records indicated that EPA+DHA intakes increased relative to baseline in weeks 4-52 following the seafood, nutraceutical and combined advice (advice group × time effect, P= 0·03). The percentage of DHA in plasma and whole blood and the percentage of EPA in erythrocytes, plasma and whole blood were higher in weeks 4-52 when compared with the corresponding baseline measurement. In contrast, the percentage of DHA in erythrocytes increased to a maximum at week 12 and returned to baseline levels in weeks 24 and 52 (time effect, P< 0·01). Measurement of the percentage of DHA in erythrocytes indicates that adherence was sustained during the first 12 weeks following the dietary advice, while other blood measurements of the percentage of EPA and DHA and dietary assessment suggest short-term increases in EPA+DHA intakes immediately before weeks 24 and 52. The percentage of DHA in erythrocytes characterises adherence to EPA and DHA intakes in long-term interventions.

  8. Impact of a clinical program using weekly Short Message Service (SMS) on antiretroviral therapy adherence support in South Africa: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Georgette, Nathan; Siedner, Mark J; Petty, Carter R; Zanoni, Brian C; Carpenter, Stephen; Haberer, Jessica E

    2017-02-20

    In randomized controlled trials, short message service (SMS) programs have improved adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART). In response, the World Health Organization recommended use of SMS programs to support ART. However, there is limited data on real-world implementations of SMS programs. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of an SMS program to improve ART adherence in a government-run HIV clinic in rural South Africa. We analyzed data from all adult patients who 1) enrolled at the clinic before the observation period (July 2013 through June 2014), 2) had ≥1 ART prescriptions in the observation period, and 3) had data on phone number availability (N = 2255). Our main outcome measure was prescription coverage, defined as the presence of a valid ART prescription for each day observed. We fit generalized linear mixed models adjusted for pre-program prescription coverage, demographics, and ART duration, dosing, and regimen. Exposure to the SMS program was independently associated with greater prescription coverage (AOR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.13-1.34, P < 0.001) compared with non-exposure, although the absolute increase in prescription coverage was small (4.7 days of ART prescription coverage per average patient per year). Among a subset of patients (n = 725) whose pre-program prescription coverage was <100%, the corresponding mean expected absolute increase in prescription coverage was 8.2 days per year. Our primary finding was that an SMS reminder program implemented in routine clinical care was associated with a small increase in prescription coverage of uncertain clinical significance.

  9. How to Evaluate Health-Related Quality of Life and Its Association with Medication Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis – Designing a Prospective Observational Study in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kastien-Hilka, Tanja; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Bennett, Bryan; Sinanovic, Edina; Schwenkglenks, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important measure to identify and shape effective and patient-relevant healthcare interventions innovations through outcomes. Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is a public health concern. The main objective of this research is to develop a study design for evaluation of HRQOL and its association with medication adherence in TB in South Africa. Methodology: A conceptual framework for HRQOL in TB has been developed to identify Patient-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Database (PROQOLID), (n.d.) measures for HRQOL and adherence and to generate an endpoint model. Two generic (SF-12 and EQ-5D-5L), one disease-specific (St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire) and one condition-specific (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) measure for HRQOL and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale for adherence assessment were identified. All measures are applied in a longitudinal multi-center study at five data collection time points during standard TB treatment. Statistical analysis includes multivariable analysis. Change over time in the physical component score of SF-12 is defined as primary endpoint. Sample size estimation based thereupon has led to a recruitment target of 96 patients. This study is on-going. Discussion: This is the first longitudinal study in South Africa which evaluates HRQOL and its association with medication adherence in TB in a comprehensive manner. Results will help to improve current treatment programs and medication adherence and will support the identification of sustainable health innovations in TB, determining the value of new products, and supporting decision making with regard to health policy and pricing. PMID:27303294

  10. Realist evaluation of the antiretroviral treatment adherence club programme in selected primary healthcare facilities in the metropolitan area of Western Cape Province, South Africa: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C; Van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; Van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Suboptimal retention in care and poor treatment adherence are key challenges to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Community-based approaches to HIV service delivery are recommended to improve patient retention in care and ART adherence. The implementation of the adherence clubs in the Western Cape province of South Africa was with variable success in terms of implementation and outcomes. The need for operational guidelines for its implementation has been identified. Therefore, understanding the contexts and mechanisms for successful implementation of the adherence clubs is crucial to inform the roll-out to the rest of South Africa. The protocol outlines an evaluation of adherence club intervention in selected primary healthcare facilities in the metropolitan area of the Western Cape Province, using the realist approach. Methods and analysis In the first phase, an exploratory study design will be used. Document review and key informant interviews will be used to elicit the programme theory. In phase two, a multiple case study design will be used to describe the adherence clubs in five contrastive sites. Semistructured interviews will be conducted with purposively selected programme implementers and members of the clubs to assess the context and mechanisms of the adherence clubs. For the programme's primary outcomes, a longitudinal retrospective cohort analysis will be conducted using routine patient data. Data analysis will involve classifying emerging themes using the context-mechanism-outcome (CMO) configuration, and refining the primary CMO configurations to conjectured CMO configurations. Finally, we will compare the conjectured CMO configurations from the cases with the initial programme theory. The final CMOs obtained will be translated into middle range theories. Ethics and dissemination The study will be conducted according to the principles of the declaration of Helsinki (1964). Ethics clearance was obtained from the

  11. Interventions targeting absences increase adherence and reduce abandonment of childhood cancer treatment in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Carmen; Rossell, Nuria; Hernandez, Angelica; Fuentes Alabi, Soad; Vasquez, Roberto; Bonilla, Miguel; Lam, Catherine G; Ribeiro, Raul C

    2015-09-01

    In El Salvador, about 200 new cases of pediatric cancer are diagnosed each year, and survival rates approach 70%. Although treatment is available at no cost, abandonment of therapy has remained at a steady yearly rate of 13% during the past decade. A time sensitive adherence tracking procedure (TS-ATP) was recently implemented to detect missed appointments, identify their causes, and intervene promptly. Procedure The study team was informed daily of patient/family failure to attend medical appointments in the pediatric oncology unit; the families were contacted and interviewed to ascertain and address the reasons. Patients who did not return after this initial contact were contacted again through local health clinics and municipalities. Law enforcement was a last resort for patients undergoing frontline treatment with a good prognosis., The system was adapted to clinical urgency: families of patients undergoing induction therapy were contacted within 24 hr, those in other therapy phases, within 48 hr, and those who had completed treatment, within one week. Reasons for absence were obtained by telephone or in person. The annual rate of abandonment was reduced from 13-3% during the 2 years period. There were 1,111 absences reported and 1,472 contacts with caregivers and institutions. The three main reasons for absences were financial needs (165, 23%), unforeseen barriers (116, 16%), and domestic needs (86, 12%). Use of the treatment adherence tracking system to locate and communicate with patients/families after missed appointments and the allocated aid stemming from these interviews substantially reduced abandonment and non-adherence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. INTERVENTIONS TARGETING ABSENCES INCREASE ADHERENCE AND REDUCE ABANDONMENT OF CHILDHOOD CANCER TREATMENT IN EL SALVADOR

    PubMed Central

    Salaverria, Carmen; Rossell, Nuria; Hernandez, Angelica; Alabi, Soad Fuentes; Vasquez, Roberto; Bonilla, Miguel; Lam, Catherine G.; Ribeiro, Raul C.

    2015-01-01

    Background In El Salvador, about 200 new cases of pediatric cancer are diagnosed each year, and survival rates approach 70%. Although treatment is available at no cost, abandonment of therapy has remained at a steady yearly rate of 13% during the past decade. A time sensitive adherence tracking procedure (TS-ATP) was recently implemented to detect missed appointments, identify their causes, and intervene promptly. Procedure The study team was informed daily of patient/family failure to attend medical appointments in the pediatric oncology unit; the families were contacted and interviewed to ascertain and address the reasons. Patients who did not return after this initial contact were contacted again through local health clinics and municipalities. Law enforcement was a last resort for patients undergoing frontline treatment with a good prognosis., The system was adapted to clinical urgency: families of patients undergoing induction therapy were contacted within 24 hours, those in other therapy phases, within 48 hours, and those who had completed treatment, within one week. Reasons for absence were obtained by telephone or in person. Results The annual rate of abandonment was reduced from 13% to 3% during the 2-year period. There were 1111 absences reported and 1472 contacts with caregivers and institutions. The three main reasons for absences were financial needs (165, 23%), unforeseen barriers (116, 16%), and domestic needs (86, 12%). Conclusions Use of the treatment adherence tracking system to locate and communicate with patients/families after missed appointments and the allocated aid stemming from these interviews substantially reduced abandonment and non-adherence. PMID:25925227

  13. Text Message Reminders Increase Appointment Adherence in a Pediatric Clinic: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Nila; Boneh, Jordana; Li, Hong; Lazebnik, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Background. High no-show rates can burden clinic productivity and affect patient care. Although multiple studies have shown that text messages improve appointment adherence, very little research has focused on low-income and predominantly African American populations in resident clinic settings. Objectives. To determine whether incorporating a text message reminder reduces the no-show rate at an urban, pediatric resident clinic. Methods. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at a tertiary level ambulatory pediatric practice between August 2014 and February 2015. Following a demographic survey, 170 patients were enrolled. Patients were randomized into control or intervention groups. All patients received the standard voice message appointment reminder, but the intervention group additionally received a text message reminder. The primary outcome was no-show rate. Results. 95.3% of the participants were African American, and the overall no-show rate was 30.8%. No-show rate was significantly lower in the intervention group (23.5%) than the control group (38.1%) representing a difference of 14.6% (p = 0.04). No demographic factors were found to alter the association between no-show rate and text message intervention. Conclusions. Text message reminders effectively improve show rates at a resident pediatric practice with high no-show rates, representing a promising approach to improving appointment adherence. PMID:28127311

  14. Understanding the rapid increase in life expectancy in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seungmi; Khang, Young-Ho; Harper, Sam; Davey Smith, George; Leon, David A; Lynch, John

    2010-05-01

    We assessed life expectancy increases in the past several decades in South Korea by age and specific causes of death. We applied Arriaga's decomposition method to life table data (1970-2005) and mortality statistics (1983-2005) to estimate age- and cause-specific contributions to changes in life expectancy. Reductions in infant mortality made the largest age-group contribution to the life expectancy increase. Reductions in cardiovascular diseases (particularly stroke and hypertensive diseases) contributed most to longer life expectancy between 1983 and 2005 (30% in males and 28% in females). Lower rates of stomach cancer, liver disease, tuberculosis, and external-cause mortality accounted for 30% of the male and 20% of the female increase in longevity. However, higher mortality from ischemic heart disease, lung and bronchial cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, diabetes, and suicide offset gains by 10% in both genders. Rapid increases in life expectancy in South Korea were mostly achieved by reductions in infant mortality and in diseases related to infections and blood pressure.

  15. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Treffry-Goatley, Astrid; Lessells, Richard; Sykes, Pam; Bärnighausen, Till; de Oliveira, Tulio; Moletsane, Relebohile; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to provide a sense of

  16. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  17. Increased adherence to prenatal group B streptococcal screening guidelines through a paired electronic reminder and education intervention.

    PubMed

    Maclaughlin, Kathy L; Garrison, Gregory M; Matthews, Marc R; O'Brien, Marcia L; Westby, Elizabeth; Targonski, Paul V

    2014-01-01

    The 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) update on perinatal group B streptococcal (GBS) prevention advises universal vaginal-rectal GBS screening of pregnant women in the 35th through 37th week of gestation. Because GBS colonization is transient, a test performed more than 5 weeks before delivery may not have sufficient negative predictive value to be clinically useful. Our objective was to increase rates of quality-improved, CDC-adherent GBS screening and decrease repeat screening. A reminder for maternal vaginal-rectal GBS testing was added to the physicians' electronic ordering screen, and family medicine physicians and residents were educated about screening guidelines through standardized, in-person presentations. Retrospective chart review was performed before and after these interventions. Univariate or bivariate analysis was performed for demographic factors, timing of first screen, rates of CDC-adherent screening (the newly defined quality-improved screen and the usual screen), and rates of repeat and unnecessary screens. Multivariate analysis was performed with quality-improved and usual screening as dependent variables. Bivariate analysis showed that post-intervention rates of quality-improved screening increased from 30 to 62 % (P < .001), usual screening increased from 69 to 84 % (P = .005), and repeat GBS screening decreased from 20 to 8 % (P = .007). Multivariate analysis showed increased post-intervention odds of quality-improved screening [odds ratio (OR) 3.59; 95 % CI 2.07-6.34] and usual screening (OR 2.67; 95 % CI 1.40-5.25). Low-cost, reproducible quality improvement interventions (electronic order reminder, educational sessions) have the potential to increase guideline adherence for GBS screening in pregnant women and decrease repeat screening.

  18. Increased cardiovascular risk in South African patients with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, I L; Bergthorsdottir, R; Levitt, N S; Schatz, D A; Johannsson, G; Marais, A D

    2013-11-01

    Patients with Addison's disease (AD) are believed to be at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). South Africa, like the rest of the developing world is experiencing an increase in CVD and patients with AD may be at double the risk of their peers. We wished to explore AD patients' CVD risk factors. A cross-sectional nationwide study in South Africa of patients with AD was conducted. A cohort of 147 patients with AD and 147 healthy control subjects were matched by age, gender, ethnicity, and BMI as far as was possible. Lipoproteins and highly-sensitive C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP) were the main outcome measures. AD patients had significantly higher triglycerides; (p=0.001), lower HDLC (p<0.001), higher hs-CRP (p<0.001), and more small dense LDL; (p=0.002) than controls. Nonesterified fatty acids were lower in patients (p<0.001). Approximately 65% [95% confidence interval (CI 55.6-72.4%)] had hypercholesterolaemia, 75% (CI 64.8-81.2%) had low HDLC, and 75% (CI 68.0-84.1%) had a higher LDLC. Thirteen percent of AD patients had diabetes mellitus, but none of the risk factors differed from the nondiabetics. Only HDLC correlated positively with daily hydrocortisone dose (r=0.32; p=0.005). In conclusion dyslipidaemia is common in South African AD patients; CVD risk assessment and intervention are probably warranted in the management of these patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Levels of adherence and factors associated with adherence to option B+ prevention of mother-to-child transmission among pregnant and lactating mothers in selected government health facilities of South Wollo Zone, Amhara Region, northeast Ethiopia, 2016

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to measure the levels of adherence and to identify factors associated with adherence to option B+ prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) among pregnant and lactating mothers in selected government health facilities of South Wollo Zone, Amhara Region, northeast Ethiopia. METHODS An institution-based cross-sectional quantitative study design was employed from March 1, 2016 to April 14, 2016, using a standard structured data collection instrument. A sample of 191 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive pregnant and lactating mothers who were receiving PMTCT follow-up in the selected health facilities participated in the study. The data were entered using EpiData 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 21. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed to identify factors associated with adherence. The p-values <0.05 and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to identify associations between independent predictors and the outcome variable. RESULTS The level of adherence to option B+ PMTCT drugs was 87.9%. Women who received in-hospital treatment, who lived in rural areas, and faced challenges in initiating lifelong option B+ treatment on the same-day that they were diagnosed with HIV were less likely to adhere to the treatment (adjusted odds ratios [95% CI] of 0.3 [0.11 to 0.82], 0.26 [0.1 to 0.73], and 0.08 [0.02 to 0.37], respectively). CONCLUSIONS Collaborative efforts of zonal health departments with health facility administrators and counselors are recommended for effective and efficient interventions focusing on hospitals, rural areas, and patients who face challenges on the day of their diagnosis. PMID:27733034

  20. Adherence to Drug-Refill Is a Useful Early Warning Indicator of Virologic and Immunologic Failure among HIV Patients on First-Line ART in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    El-Khatib, Ziad; Katzenstein, David; Marrone, Gaetano; Laher, Fatima; Mohapi, Lerato; Petzold, Max; Morris, Lynn; Ekström, Anna Mia

    2011-01-01

    Background Affordable strategies to prevent treatment failure on first-line regimens among HIV patients are essential for the long-term success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. WHO recommends using routinely collected data such as adherence to drug-refill visits as early warning indicators. We examined the association between adherence to drug-refill visits and long-term virologic and immunologic failure among non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) recipients in South Africa. Methods In 2008, 456 patients on NNRTI-based ART for a median of 44 months (range 12–99 months; 1,510 person-years) were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study in Soweto. Charts were reviewed for clinical characteristics before and during ART. Multivariable logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis assessed associations with virologic (two repeated VL>50 copies/ml) and immunologic failure (as defined by WHO). Results After a median of 15 months on ART, 19% (n = 88) and 19% (n = 87) had failed virologically and immunologically respectively. A cumulative adherence of <95% to drug-refill visits was significantly associated with both virologic and immunologic failure (p<0.01). In the final multivariable model, risk factors for virologic failure were incomplete adherence (OR 2.8, 95%CI 1.2–6.7), and previous exposure to single-dose nevirapine or any other antiretrovirals (adj. OR 2.1, 95%CI 1.2–3.9), adjusted for age and sex. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, the virologic failure rate by month 48 was 19% vs. 37% among adherent and non-adherent patients respectively (logrank p value = 0.02). Conclusion One in five failed virologically after a median of 15 months on ART. Adherence to drug-refill visits works as an early warning indicator for both virologic and immunologic failure. PMID:21408071

  1. Retrospective cohort study of the South Tyneside Exercise Referral Scheme 2009-14: predictors of dropout and barriers to adherence.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michael C; Rae, Glen C; Walker, Diane; Partington, Sarah; Dodd-Reynolds, Caroline J; Caplan, Nick

    2016-11-29

    Exercise Referral Schemes (ERS) are a prevalent method of increasing physical activity levels. However, they suffer from participant dropout and research predicting dropout or barriers to adherence are limited. This study aimed to focus upon the effect of referral characteristics on dropout, dropout predictors and whether self-reported barriers to exercise predict dropout. ERS data from 2009 to 2014 were retrieved for analysis. Chi-squared and t-tests were used to investigate differences between referral characteristics, and logistic regression used to investigate dropout predictors. Of 6894 participants, 37.8% (n = 2608) dropped out within 6 weeks and 50.03% (n = 3449) by the final 12th week. More males adhered (P < 0.001) with dropouts being significantly younger (P < 0.001). Dropout predictors were smoking (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.29-1.93) or being a Tier 3 referral (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.25-1.73). Increasing age (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.98-0.99), drinking alcohol (OR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.71-0.95), secondary care referrals (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.90), having a lack of motivation (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.69-0.95) or a lack of childcare (OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50-0.95) decreased the likelihood of dropout. ERS dropout continues to be problematic. Smoking and having moderate-high comorbidities predicted dropout. Increasing age and patient-reported barriers of a lack of time or childcare decreased dropout risk. The reasons for dropout require further investigation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Fibrin monomer increases platelet adherence to tumor cells in a flowing system: a possible role in metastasis?

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N B; Meyer, T V; Amirkhosravi, A; Francis, J L

    1998-12-15

    Considerable evidence exists linking hemostasis and malignancy. Platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process. Plasma fibrinogen (Fg) and fibrin (Fn) monomer, increased in cancer, may play a role in tumor biology. Binding of Fn monomer to tumor cells and its effect on platelet-tumor cell adhesion in a flowing system were studied. Fn monomer was produced by adding thrombin (1 micro/mL) to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) amide. Fn monomer binding to live A375 cells was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Adherent cells were perfused for 1h with Fn monomer, washed and stained in situ with anti-human Fn (American Biogenetic Sciences, Inc.) followed by goat anti-mouse IgG(FITC). Platelet adherence to Fn monomer treated A375 cells was performed under flow conditions by passing platelets (5x10(4)/microl 0.25 mL/min; labeled with the carbocyanine dye DiI) over the tumor cells for 30 min. CLSM images were obtained after washing. There was considerable binding of Fn monomer, but not Fg alone. Platelets adhered relatively weakly to untreated A375 cells and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or thrombin. However, pre-treatment with Fn monomer resulted in extensive platelet binding to tumor cells, suggesting that coagulation activation and the subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread.

  3. Causes of COD increases in Gwangyang Bay, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2010-08-05

    Water quality, the carbon isotope ratio of particulate organic matter (POM) and sediment, and the nutrients limiting phytoplankton growth were investigated to determine the cause of organic matter increase and to determine an effective countermeasure for chemical oxygen demand (COD) increase in Gwangyang Bay, South Korea. The sources of most NO(3)-N and SiO(2)-Si entering Gwangyang Bay seem to be land-based, and the primary source of P appears to be industrial complex and/or domestic wastewater. The major cause of the COD increase in Gwangyang Bay was phytoplankton growth. Phytoplankton growth was limited by N at high salinity and by P at relatively low salinity. Phytoplankton growth was more limited by N in Gwangyang Bay than in similar bays because of a strong point source of P in Gwangyang Bay. In the rainy season, phytoplankton were able to massively grow in Gwangyang Bay after heavy rainfall events because of the high input of N from runoff, input of P and Si, and increasing sunlight after the rainy season. The peak chlorophyll a concentration observed in winter may have resulted from mixing N from the lower layer and because Eucampia grew well at low water temperatures. To improve COD levels in Gwangyang Bay, it is important to control the phytoplankton growth in the rainy season, particularly by limiting the input of NO(3)-N from outside the bay.

  4. How Presentation of Drug Detection Results Changed Reports of Product Adherence in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Musara, Petina; Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Mgodi, Nyaradzo M; Woeber, Kubashni; Akello, Carolyne A; Hartmann, Miriam; Cheng, Helen; Levy, Lisa; Katz, Ariana; Grossman, Cynthia I; Chirenje, Z Mike; van der Straten, Ariane; Mensch, Barbara

    2017-01-21

    Accurate estimates of study product use are critical to understanding and addressing adherence challenges in HIV prevention trials. The VOICE trial exposed a significant gap between self-reported adherence and drug detection. The VOICE-D qualitative study was designed to better understand non-adherence during VOICE, and was conducted in 2 stages: before (stage 1) and after (stage 2) drug detection results were provided to participants. Transcripts from 44 women who participated in both stages were analysed to understand the effect of presenting drug detection data on narratives of product use. Thirty-six women reported high adherence in stage 1, yet admitted non-use in stage 2, three reported high adherence in both stages (contrary to their drug detection results) and five had consistent responses across both stages and drug results. Presenting objective measures of use may facilitate more accurate product use reporting and should be evaluated in future prevention trials.

  5. Monitoring the Increase in Seismicity in South-Central Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, K.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Watney, W. L.

    2016-12-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in seismicity in the Midcontinent over the last five years, which appears to be linked to the injection of large volumes of wastewater from oilfield operations. Injection of fluids into deeper formations causes an increase in pore pressure, which can facilitate slip on existing faults oriented optimally to subsurface stress fields. Very little is known about the stresses within the shallow basement in Southern Kansas which has seen an increase in seismicity. The historical average of 21 M>3 earthquakes a year has increased to 188 M>3 reported earthquakes observed in 2011, in the US midcontinent. Earthquake focal mechanisms were analyzed for western Sumner County, south-central Kansas, from May of 2015 to July of 2016. The Kansas Geological Society (KGS) seismometer array in the Wellington Oil Field and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) portable array in southern Kansas were used to locate the earthquakes. These arrays generated a catalog of events from Mw .4 to Mw 3.5. Analyses of focal mechanisms for nearly 200 earthquakes larger than approximately Mw 2.0 were included in the inversion. Earthquakes of this magnitude were recorded on nearly all stations. The larger magnitude events tend to cluster in Northeast-Southwest and Northwest-Southeast lineations. These local, larger earthquakes provide a better understanding of the stresses that are causing the increased seismicity. The stress tensor was calculated for the region to the west of the city of Wellington, KS, in Sumner County. The primary horizontal stress direction is nearly east. This observation is in agreement with well data that estimates the maximum horizontal stress at approximately 75 degrees.

  6. Improving treatment adherence for blood pressure lowering via mobile phone SMS-messages in South Africa: a qualitative evaluation of the SMS-text Adherence SuppoRt (StAR) trial.

    PubMed

    Leon, Natalie; Surender, Rebecca; Bobrow, Kirsty; Muller, Jocelyn; Farmer, Andrew

    2015-07-03

    Effective use of proven treatments for high blood pressure, a preventable health risk, is challenging for many patients. Prompts via mobile phone SMS-text messaging may improve adherence to clinic visits and treatment, though more research is needed on impact and patient perceptions of such support interventions, especially in low-resource settings. An individually-randomised controlled trial in a primary care clinic in Cape Town (2012-14), tested the effect of an adherence support intervention delivered via SMS-texts, on blood pressure control and adherence to medication, for hypertensive patients. ( ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02019823). We report on a qualitative evaluation that explored the trial participants' experiences and responses to the SMS-text messages, and identified barriers and facilitators to delivering adherence support via patients' own mobile phones. Two focus groups and fifteen individual interviews were conducted. We used comparative and thematic analysis approaches to identify themes and triangulated our analysis amongst three researchers. Most participants were comfortable with the technology of using SMS-text messages. Messages were experienced as acceptable, relevant and useful to a broad range of participants. The SMS-content, the respectful tone and the delivery (timing of reminders and frequency) and the relational aspect of trial participation (feeling cared for) were all highly valued. A subgroup who benefitted the most, were those who had been struggling with adherence due to high levels of personal stress. The intervention appeared to coincide with their readiness for change, and provided practical and emotional support for improving adherence behaviour. Change may have been facilitated through increased acknowledgement of their health status and attitudinal change towards greater self-responsibility. Complex interaction of psycho-social stressors and health service problems were reported as broader challenges to adherence behaviours

  7. Endothelial Domes Encapsulate Adherent Neutrophils and Minimize Increases in Vascular Permeability in Paracellular and Transcellular Emigration

    PubMed Central

    Phillipson, Mia; Kaur, Jaswinder; Colarusso, Pina; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Kubes, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Local edema, a cardinal sign of inflammation associates closely with neutrophil emigration. Neutrophil emigration has been described to occur primarily through endothelial junctions (paracellular) and more rarely directly through endothelial cells (transcellular). Recently, we reported that unlike in wild-type (wt) mice, Mac-1-/- (CD11b) neutrophils predominantly emigrated transcellularly and was significantly delayed taking 20–30 min longer than the paracellular emigration (wt). In the present study we noted significant anatomical disruption of the endothelium and hypothesized that transcellular emigration would greatly increase vascular permeability. Surprisingly, despite profound disruption of the endothelial barrier as the neutrophils moved through the cells, the changes in vascular permeability during transcellular emigration (Mac-1-/-) were not increased more than in wt mice. Instead increased vascular permeability completely tracked the number of emigrated cells and as such, permeability changes were delayed in Mac-1-/- mice. However, by 60 min neutrophils from both sets of mice were emigrating in large numbers. Electron-microscopy and spinning disk multichannel fluorescence confocal microscopy revealed endothelial docking structures that progressed to dome-like structures completely covering wt and Mac-1-/- neutrophils. These domes completely enveloped the emigrating neutrophils in both wt and Mac-1-/- mice making the mode of emigration underneath these structures extraneous to barrier function. In conclusion, predominantly paracellular versus predominantly transcellular emigration does not affect vascular barrier integrity as endothelial dome-like structures retain barrier function. PMID:18297135

  8. Endothelial domes encapsulate adherent neutrophils and minimize increases in vascular permeability in paracellular and transcellular emigration.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, Mia; Kaur, Jaswinder; Colarusso, Pina; Ballantyne, Christie M; Kubes, Paul

    2008-02-20

    Local edema, a cardinal sign of inflammation associates closely with neutrophil emigration. Neutrophil emigration has been described to occur primarily through endothelial junctions (paracellular) and more rarely directly through endothelial cells (transcellular). Recently, we reported that unlike in wild-type (wt) mice, Mac-1-/- (CD11b) neutrophils predominantly emigrated transcellularly and was significantly delayed taking 20-30 min longer than the paracellular emigration (wt). In the present study we noted significant anatomical disruption of the endothelium and hypothesized that transcellular emigration would greatly increase vascular permeability. Surprisingly, despite profound disruption of the endothelial barrier as the neutrophils moved through the cells, the changes in vascular permeability during transcellular emigration (Mac-1-/-) were not increased more than in wt mice. Instead increased vascular permeability completely tracked the number of emigrated cells and as such, permeability changes were delayed in Mac-1-/- mice. However, by 60 min neutrophils from both sets of mice were emigrating in large numbers. Electron-microscopy and spinning disk multichannel fluorescence confocal microscopy revealed endothelial docking structures that progressed to dome-like structures completely covering wt and Mac-1-/- neutrophils. These domes completely enveloped the emigrating neutrophils in both wt and Mac-1-/- mice making the mode of emigration underneath these structures extraneous to barrier function. In conclusion, predominantly paracellular versus predominantly transcellular emigration does not affect vascular barrier integrity as endothelial dome-like structures retain barrier function.

  9. Predictors of adherence to screening guidelines for chronic diseases of lifestyle, cancers, and HIV in a health-insured population in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adonis, Leegale; Basu, Debashis; Luiz, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence to screening guidelines has been widely accepted to reduce morbidity, mortality, and cost outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of adherence to screening guidelines for chronic diseases of lifestyle (CDL), cancers, and HIV in a health-insured population in South Africa, some of whom voluntarily opt into a wellness program that incentivizes screening. Method A cross-sectional study for the period 2007–2011 was conducted using a random sample of 170,471 health insurance members from a single insurer. Adherence to screening guidelines was calculated from medical claims data. Results Adherence to screening guidelines ranged from 1.1% for colorectal cancer to 40.9% for cholesterol screening. Members of the wellness program were up to three times more likely to screen for diseases (odds ratio [OR]=3.2 for HIV screening, confidence interval [CI]=2.75–3.73). Plan type (full comprehensive plan) was most strongly associated with cholesterol screening (OR=3.53, CI=3.27–3.80), and most negatively associated (hospital-only core plan) with cervical cancer screening (OR= 0.44, CI=0.28–0.70). Gender was a negative predictor for glucose screening (OR=0.88, CI=0.82–0.96). Provincial residence was most strongly associated with cervical cancer screening (OR=1.89, CI=0.65–5.54). Conclusion Adherence to screening recommendations was <50%. Plan type, gender, provincial residence, and belonging to an incentivized wellness program were associated with disproportionate utilization of screening services, even with equal payment access. PMID:24647130

  10. An audit and feedback intervention study increased adherence to antibiotic prescribing guidelines at a Norwegian hospital.

    PubMed

    Høgli, June Utnes; Garcia, Beate Hennie; Skjold, Frode; Skogen, Vegard; Småbrekke, Lars

    2016-02-27

    Appropriate antibiotic prescribing is associated with favourable levels of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and clinical outcomes. Most intervention studies on antibiotic prescribing originate from settings with high level of AMR. In a Norwegian hospital setting with low level of AMR, the literature on interventions for promoting guideline-recommended antibiotic prescribing in hospital is scarce and requested. Preliminary studies have shown improvement potentials regarding antibiotic prescribing according to guidelines. We aimed to promote appropriate antibiotic prescribing in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) at a respiratory medicine department in a Norwegian University hospital. Our specific objectives were to increase prescribing of appropriate empirical antibiotics, reduce high-dose benzylpenicillin and reduce total treatment duration. We performed an audit and feedback intervention study, combined with distribution of a recently published pocket version of the national clinical practice guideline. We included patients discharged with CAP or AECOPD and prescribed antibiotics during hospital stay, and excluded those presenting with aspiration, nosocomial infection and co-infections. The pre- and post-intervention period was 9 and 6 months, respectively. Feedback was provided orally to the department physicians at an internal-educational meeting. To explore the effect of the intervention on appropriate empirical antibiotics and mean total treatment duration we applied before-after analysis (Student's t-test) and interrupted time series (ITS). We used Pearson's χ2 to compare dose changes. In the pre-and post-intervention period we included 253 and 155 patients, respectively. Following the intervention, overall mean prescribing of appropriate empirical antibiotics increased from 61.7 to 83.8 % (P < 0.001), overall mean total treatment duration decreased from 11.2 to 10.4 days

  11. Acceptance and adherence to chemoprevention among women at increased risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Roetzheim, Richard G; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William; Matos Gomez, Elizabeth; Clayton, Elissa; Tollin, Sharon; Khakpour, Nazanin; Laronga, Christine; Lee, Marie Catherine; Kiluk, John V

    2015-02-01

    Chemoprevention is an option for women who are at increased risk of breast cancer (five year risk ≥1.7%). It is uncertain, however, how often women accept and complete five years of therapy and whether clinical or demographic factors predict completion. Medical records were abstracted for 219 women whose five year risk of breast cancer was ≥1.7% and who were offered chemoprevention while attending a high risk breast clinic at the Moffitt Cancer Center. We examined the likelihood of accepting chemoprevention and completing five years of therapy, and potential clinical and demographic predictors of these outcomes, using multivariable logistic regression and survival analysis models. There were 118/219 women (54.4%) who accepted a recommendation for chemoprevention and began therapy. The likelihood of accepting chemoprevention was associated with lifetime breast cancer risk and was higher for women with specific high risk conditions (lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical ductal hyperplasia). Women with osteoporosis and those that consumed alcohol were also more likely to accept medication. There were 58/118 (49.2%) women who stopped medication at least temporarily after starting therapy. Based on survival curves, an estimated 60% of women who begin chemoprevention will complete five years of therapy. A substantial percentage of women at increased risk of breast cancer will decline chemoprevention and among those that accept therapy, approximately 40% will not be able to complete five years of therapy because of side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Randomized trial of DVD, telephone, and usual care for increasing mammography adherence.

    PubMed

    Champion, Victoria L; Rawl, Susan M; Bourff, Sara A; Champion, Kristen M; Smith, Lisa G; Buchanan, Adam H; Fish, Laura J; Monahan, Patrick O; Stump, Timothy E; Springston, Jeffery K; Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G; Skinner, Celette Sugg

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an intervention to increase mammography screening in women 51-75 years of age who had not received a mammogram in the last 15 months. A total of 1681 women were randomized to (1) a mailed tailored interactive DVD, (2) a computer-tailored telephone counseling, or (3) usual care. Women with income below US$75,000 who were in the interactive DVD group had significantly more mammograms than women in usual care. Women with income above US$75,000 had significantly fewer mammograms than women with income less than US$75,000 regardless of group. Further investigation is needed to understand why women with income above US$75,000 did not show the same benefit of the intervention.

  13. Randomized Trial of DVD, Telephone, and Usual Care for Increasing Mammography Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Victoria L.; Rawl, Susan M.; Bourff, Sara A.; Champion, Kristen M.; Smith, Lisa G.; Buchanan, Adam H.; Fish, Laura J.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Springston, Jeffery K.; Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G.; Skinner, Celette S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an intervention to increase mammography screening in women ages 51 to 75 who had not received a mammogram in the last 15 months. A total of 1681 women were randomized to: 1) a mailed tailored interactive DVD, 2) a computer-tailored telephone counseling, or 3) usual care. Women with incomes below $75,000 who were in the interactive DVD group had significantly more mammograms than women in usual care. Women with incomes above $75,000 had significantly fewer mammograms than women with incomes less than $75,000 regardless of group. Further investigation is needed to understand why women with incomes above $75,000 did not show the same benefit of the intervention. Clinical Trials number: NCT00287040 PMID:25070967

  14. Understanding adherence-related beliefs about medicine amongst patients of South Asian origin with diabetes and cardiovascular disease patients: a qualitative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanta; Greenfield, Sheila; Raza, Karim; Gill, Paramjit; Stack, Rebecca

    2016-05-26

    Prevalence of diabetes and cardiovascular (CVD) disease amongst UK South Asians is higher than in the general population. Non-adherence to medicines may lead to poor clinical outcomes for South Asian patients with diabetes and CVD. To understand the decision making processes associated with taking medicines, a qualitative systematic meta-synthesis exploring medicine taking behaviours, and beliefs was undertaken. Four databases (Medline, Embase, Science Citation Index and CINAHL) were searched to identify qualitative studies of South Asian patients taking diabetic medicines. Data were thematic coded and synthesised. The following themes were identified: [1] beliefs about the need for and efficacy of medicines; [2] toxicity of medicines and polypharmacy; [3] the necessity of traditional remedies versus "western medicines"; [4] stigma and social support; and [5] communication. South Asians described cultural social stigma associated with diabetes and reported fears about drug toxicity as barriers to taking medicines. Cultural beliefs about traditional remedies and interactions with healthcare professionals also appeared to play a role in the way people made decisions about medicines. Advice should be tailored provided to South Asian patients highlighting the long term consequences of diabetes and CVD.

  15. Does Assertive Community Treatment Increase Medication Adherence for People With Co-occurring Psychotic and Substance Use Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Jennifer I.; Covell, Nancy H.; Jackson, Carlos T.; Essock, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study analyzed data from a randomized trial to examine the impact on medication adherence of integrated treatment delivered via assertive community treatment (ACT) versus standard clinical case management (SCCM). METHOD Data from the original study included 198 study participants with co-occurring psychotic and substance use disorders who were randomly assigned to receive integrated treatment via ACT or SCCM and were followed for 3 years. We applied mixed-effects logistic regression to estimate group (ACT vs. SCCM) by time effects on a self-report measure of medication adherence. Adherence was dichotomized as 20% or more missed medication days (“poor adherence”) versus less than 20% missed medication days (“adequate adherence”). RESULTS Participants who were assigned to ACT reported significant improvement in medication adherence compared with those assigned to SCCM. CONCLUSIONS Integrated treatment delivered via ACT may benefit persons with co-occurring psychotic and substance use disorders who are poorly adherent to medications. PMID:21659294

  16. Predictors of warfarin non-adherence in younger adults after valve replacement surgery in the South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheyab, Nihaya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Globally, mechanical valves are predominant as replacements for adolescents and younger adults with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Mechanical valve implantation necessitates lifelong antithrombotic management (warfarin) and associated lifestyle modification, with event-free survival largely dependent on international normalised therapeutic ratios (INRs) remaining within the target therapeutic range. There is limited information on factors that may influence warfarin adherence among younger people or those in resource-limited settings. This study sought to identify predictors of warfarin adherence after valve replacement surgery for RHD in Fiji (n=127). Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. Results The sample had a mean age of 31.23 years (SD 13.34) and a mean time-since-surgery of 3.72 years (SD 3.95). Just over half were women (n=71, 56%) and almost two-thirds were indigenous (I-taukei, n=78, 61%). Most had an isolated valve procedure (n=94, 74%) and at the time of survey, they were in New York Heart Association Class I (n=97, 76%). A quarter (n=33, 26%) reported poor adherence with anticoagulation therapy and 13.38% (n=17) reported complete warfarin cessation. While younger age was significantly associated with non-adherence to warfarin therapy (p=0.008), the independent predictors of people who discontinue warfarin completely were those not understanding why warfarin was needed (OR=9.97, p=0.006); a history of forgetting to take warfarin (OR=8.64, p=0.0013) and travel time to heart clinic >1 hour (OR=5.80, p=0.039). Conclusions While medication adherence is complex and multifactorial, the consequences of warfarin non-adherence are potentially catastrophic. These results provide an important first step towards the development of country-specific and disease-specific strategies to improve warfarin adherence. PMID:27347009

  17. Comparing tailored and narrative worksite interventions at increasing colonoscopy adherence in adults 50-75: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Carcioppolo, Nick; Krakow, Melinda; Samadder, N Jewel; Morgan, Susan

    2014-03-01

    Research has identified several communication strategies that could increase adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. Two promising strategies are tailoring and narrative-based approaches. Tailoring is the personalization of information based on individual characteristics. Narrative-based approaches use stories about similar others to counter perceived barriers and cultivate self-efficacy. To compare these two approaches, a randomized controlled trial was carried out at 8 worksites in Indiana. Adults 50-75 (N = 209) received one of four messages about colorectal cancer screening: stock, narrative, tailored, tailored narrative. The primary outcome was whether participants filed a colonoscopy claim in the 18 months following the intervention. Individuals receiving narrative messages were 4 times more likely to screen than those not receiving narrative messages. Tailoring did not increase screening behavior overall. However, individuals with higher cancer information overload were 8 times more likely to screen if they received tailored messages. The results suggest that narrative-based approaches are more effective than tailoring at increasing colorectal cancer screening in worksite interventions. Tailoring may be valuable as a strategy for reaching individuals with high overload, perhaps as a follow-up effort to a larger communication campaign.

  18. Interventions to increase adherence to therapeutic exercise in older adults with low back pain and/or hip/knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, Philippa J A; Bennell, Kim L; Dobson, Fiona L; Van Ginckel, Ans; Holden, Melanie A; Hinman, Rana S

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate whether interventions aimed at increasing adherence to therapeutic exercise increase adherence greater than a contextually equivalent control among older adults with chronic low back pain and/or hip/knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Five databases (MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, SportDISCUS (EBSCO), Embase (Ovid) and Cochrane Library) were searched until 1 August 2016. Randomised controlled trials that isolated the effects of interventions aiming to improve adherence to therapeutic exercise among adults ≥45 years of age with chronic low back pain and/or hip/knee osteoarthritis were included. Of 3899 studies identified, nine studies (1045 participants) were eligible. Four studies, evaluating strategies that aimed to increase motivation or using behavioural graded exercise, reported significantly better exercise adherence (d=0.26-1.23). In contrast, behavioural counselling, action coping plans and/or audio/video exercise cues did not improve adherence significantly. Meta-analysis using a random effects model with the two studies evaluating booster sessions with a physiotherapist for people with osteoarthritis revealed a small to medium significant pooled effect in favour of booster sessions (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.39, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.72, z=2.26, p=0.02, I(2)=35%). Meta-analysis provides moderate-quality evidence that booster sessions with a physiotherapist assisted people with hip/knee osteoarthritis to better adhere to therapeutic exercise. Individual high-quality trials supported the use of motivational strategies in people with chronic low back pain and behavioural graded exercise in people with osteoarthritis to improve adherence to exercise. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients participating in a graduated cost recovery program at an HIV care center in South India.

    PubMed

    Batavia, Ashita S; Balaji, Kavitha; Houle, Elizabeth; Parisaboina, Sangeetha; Ganesh, A K; Mayer, Kenneth H; Solomon, Suniti

    2010-08-01

    In resource-constrained settings, the most frequently cited barrier to optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV-infected patients has been the cost of medications. In recent years many subsidized medication programs have been developed to improve ART affordability. A Graduated Cost Recovery program at the largest care center in South India has enrolled 839 eligible patients into four tiers based on an evaluation of their financial information and willingness to pay, of these patients 635 consented to participate in this study. Patients in Tier 1 receive first-line ART at no cost, whereas patients in Tiers 2, 3, and 4 pay 50, 75, and 100%, respectively of the cost of first-line medications based on an assessment of their means. Adherence rates of 95% or greater on 3-day recall were achieved by 84.6% of Tier 1 (n = 156), 71.6% of Tier 2 (n = 141), 72.3% of Tier 3 (n = 242), and 79.2% of Tier 4 (n = 96). These findings suggest patients are highly motivated and that the provision of no-cost ART can promote higher rates of optimal adherence.

  20. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV and AIDS patients at the Kwa-Thema clinic in Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Eyassu, Melaku A; Mothiba, Tebogo M; Mbambo-Kekana, Nonceba P

    2016-06-24

    Introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown reduction in HIV-related mortality and morbidity in people living with HIV and AIDS. Since high levels of adherence of more than 95.0% is required to achieve effective suppression of viral load, researchers found it important to establish whether people are pursuing what is expected of them. The study was aimed at determining adherence to ART among HIV and AIDS patients at the Kwa-Thema clinic in Gauteng Province. Quantitative cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Ethical clearance was sort from MEDUNSA Research Ethics Committee. Validity and reliability were maintained throughout the study. A non-probability systematic sampling was used. Data were collected using administered structured questionnaire, and a total of 290 respondents were involved. Data were analysed using SPSS software version 22. The findings indicated that the adherence to ART was 77.0%. Factors that were significantly associated with adherence were gender ( χ2 = 3.78, df = 1, p < 0.05), level of education ( χ2 = 3.52, df = 3, p = 0.032), co-treatment of HIV and other infections ( χ2 = 5.46, df = 4, p = 0.019), ability to follow ART ( χ2 = 12.82, df = 1, p = 0.000 < 0.05), and types of antiretroviral drugs. The study recommends intensification of health education campaign against stigma and gender discrimination. Providing feedback to patients regarding benefits of ART is important. The study concluded that adherence to ART at the Kwa-Thema clinic was suboptimal (less than 95%) at 77%, but comparable with the adherence levels in other developing countries.

  1. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV and AIDS patients at the Kwa-Thema clinic in Gauteng Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Eyassu, Melaku A.; Mbambo-Kekana, Nonceba P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown reduction in HIV-related mortality and morbidity in people living with HIV and AIDS. Since high levels of adherence of more than 95.0% is required to achieve effective suppression of viral load, researchers found it important to establish whether people are pursuing what is expected of them. Aim and setting The study was aimed at determining adherence to ART among HIV and AIDS patients at the Kwa-Thema clinic in Gauteng Province Methods Quantitative cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Ethical clearance was sort from MEDUNSA Research Ethics Committee. Validity and reliability were maintained throughout the study. A non-probability systematic sampling was used. Data were collected using administered structured questionnaire, and a total of 290 respondents were involved. Data were analysed using SPSS software version 22. Results The findings indicated that the adherence to ART was 77.0%. Factors that were significantly associated with adherence were gender (χ2 = 3.78, df = 1, p < 0.05), level of education (χ2 = 3.52, df = 3, p = 0.032), co-treatment of HIV and other infections (χ2 = 5.46, df = 4, p = 0.019), ability to follow ART (χ2 = 12.82, df = 1, p = 0.000 < 0.05), and types of antiretroviral drugs. Recommendation The study recommends intensification of health education campaign against stigma and gender discrimination. Providing feedback to patients regarding benefits of ART is important. Conclusion The study concluded that adherence to ART at the Kwa-Thema clinic was sub-optimal (less than 95%) at 77%, but comparable with the adherence levels in other developing countries. PMID:27380858

  2. What happens after a negative test for tuberculosis? Evaluating adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms in South African Primary Health Clinics.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, K; Grant, A D; Chihota, V; Ginindza, S; Mvusi, L; Churchyard, G; Fielding, K

    2015-11-25

    Diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) using sputum have suboptimal sensitivity among HIV-positive persons. We assessed health care worker adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms after negative sputum test result/s. The XTEND trial compared outcomes among people tested for TB in primary care clinics using Xpert MTB/RIF vs. smear microscopy as the initial test. We analysed data from XTEND participants who were HIV-positive or HIV status unknown, whose initial sputum Xpert MTB/RIF or microscopy result was negative. If chest radiography, sputum culture or hospital referral took place, the algorithm for TB diagnosis was considered followed. Analysis of intervention (Xpert MTB/RIF) effect on algorithm adherence used methods for cluster-randomised trials with small number of clusters. Amongst 4037 XTEND participants with initial negative test results, 2155 (53%) reported being or testing HIV positive and 540 (14%) had unknown HIV status. Amongst 2155 HIV-positive participants (684 [32%] male, mean age 37 years [range 18-79 years]), there was evidence of algorithm adherence amongst 515 (24%). Adherence was less likely among persons tested initially with Xpert MTB/RIF vs. smear (14% (142/1031) vs 32% (364/1122), adjusted risk ratio 0.34 (95% CI 0.17-0.65)) and for participants with unknown vs. positive HIV status (59/540 (11%) vs. 507/2155 (24%)). We observed poorer adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms amongst HIV-positive persons tested initially with Xpert MTB/RIF vs. microscopy. Poor adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms and incomplete coverage of HIV testing represents a missed opportunity to diagnose TB and HIV, and may contribute to TB mortality.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND), which permits downloading and sharing the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  3. Improvement of wear and adherence properties of composite coatings by a gradual increase in particle volume fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.M.; Merk, N.

    1997-09-01

    Electrodeposited composites (ECs) are thin composite deposits made of a base metal or alloy which is reinforced by second phase particles of ceramic, polymer or graphite. ECs are produced rather inexpensively at temperatures below 60 C, where no strong interfacial reaction may occur and residual thermal stresses are negligible. Electrodeposited composites play an important role in tailoring the surface properties of bulk materials. Indeed, ECs containing particle volume fractions (PVF) up to 30% of hard ceramic particles exhibit superior hardness and wear resistance compared with pure metallic deposits and are therefore used as wear-resistant coatings. However, as the inert particles are not adhesive to the substrates, an increase in PVF is often accompanied by a decrease in adherence of the coating to the substrate. Furthermore, a high PVF is often accompanied by a dramatic loss of functional property, gradient composite coatings having a lower PVF at the substrate side and a higher PVF at the surface side of ECs is produced. In this work the authors present the wear and adhesion behavior of such gradient coatings. The matrix was either Cu or Ni and the second phase particles were alumina and silicon carbide.

  4. 78 FR 8047 - Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 959 Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This rule would increase the assessment... the marketing order which regulates the handling of onions grown in South Texas. Assessments upon...

  5. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Eliandra M; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H; Tondo, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves' stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves.

  6. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Eliandra M.; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H.; Tondo, Eduardo C.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves’ stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves. PMID:26834727

  7. A model to increase rehabilitation adherence to home exercise programmes in patients with varying levels of self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Picha, Kelsey J; Howell, Dana M

    2017-04-12

    Patient adherence to rehabilitation programmes is frequently low - particularly adherence to home exercise programmes. Home exercise programmes have been identified as complementary to clinic-based physical therapy in an orthopaedic setting. Barriers to patient adherence have previously been identified within the literature. Low self-efficacy is a barrier to adherence that clinicians have the ability to have an impact on and improve. The theory of self-efficacy is defined as a person's confidence in their ability to perform a task. This theory examines the ability of a person to change through exerting control over inner processes of goal setting, self-monitoring, feedback, problem solving and self-evaluation. If clinicians are able to identify patients with low self-efficacy prior to the prescription of a home exercise programme, adjustments to individualized care can be implemented. Individualized care based on improving self-efficacy for home exercise programmes may improve patient adherence to these programmes. The purpose of this article was to use the theory of self-efficacy to direct clinicians in providing individualized programmes to patients with varying levels of self-efficacy.

  8. Early Warning Indicators for First-Line Virologic Failure Independent of Adherence Measures in a South African Urban Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baohua; Hampton, Jane; Ordóñez, Claudia E.; Johnson, Brent A.; Singh, Dinesh; John, Sally; Gordon, Michelle; Hare, Anna; Murphy, Richard; Nachega, Jean; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; del Rio, Carlos; Sunpath, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We sought to develop individual-level Early Warning Indicators (EWI) of virologic failure (VF) for clinicians to use during routine care complementing WHO population-level EWI. A case-control study was conducted at a Durban clinic. Patients after≥5 months of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) were defined as cases if they had VF [HIV-1 viral load (VL)>1000 copies/mL] and controls (2:1) if they had VL≤1000 copies/mL. Pharmacy refills and pill counts were used as adherence measures. Participants responded to a questionnaire including validated psychosocial and symptom scales. Data were also collected from the medical record. Multivariable logistic regression models of VF included factors associated with VF (p<0.05) in univariable analyses. We enrolled 158 cases and 300 controls. In the final multivariable model, male gender, not having an active religious faith, practicing unsafe sex, having a family member with HIV, not being pleased with the clinic experience, symptoms of depression, fatigue, or rash, low CD4 counts, family recommending HIV care, and using a TV/radio as ART reminders (compared to mobile phones) were associated with VF independent of adherence measures. In this setting, we identified several key individual-level EWI associated with VF including novel psychosocial factors independent of adherence measures. PMID:24320011

  9. Benchmarking Prehospital and Emergency Department Care for Argentine Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: For the South American Guideline Adherence Group

    PubMed Central

    Vavilala, Monica S.; Lujan, Silvia B.; Qiu, Qian; Petroni, Gustavo J.; Ballarini, Nicolás M.; Guadagnoli, Nahuel; Depetris, María Alejandra; Faguaga, Gabriela A.; Baggio, Gloria M.; Busso, Leonardo O.; García, Mirta E.; González Carrillo, Osvaldo R.; Medici, Paula L.; Sáenz, Silvia S.; Vanella, Elida E.; Fabio, Anthony; Bell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is little information on the type of early care provided to children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in low middle income countries. We benchmarked early prehospital [PH] and emergency department [ED] pediatric TBI care in Argentina. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients previously enrolled in a prospective seven center study of children with TBI. Eligible participants were patients 0–18 years, and had diagnosis of TBI (admission Glasgow Coma scale score [GCS] < 13 or with GCS 14–15 and abnormal head CT scan within 48 hours of admission, and head AIS > 0). Outcomes were transport type, transport time, PH and ED adherence to best practice, and discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall Performance category Scale (POPC). Results Of the 366 children, mean age was 8.7 (5.0) years, 58% were male, 90% had isolated TBI and 45.4% were transported by private vehicle. 50 (34.7%) of the 144 children with severe TBI (39.3% of all TBI patients) were transported by private vehicle. Most (267; 73%) patients received initial TBI care at an index hospital prior to study center admission, including children with severe (81.9%) TBI. Transport times were shorter for those patients who were directly transported by ambulance to study center than for the whole cohort (1.4 vs.5.5 hours). Ambulance blood pressure data were recorded in 30.9%. ED guideline adherence rate was higher than PH guideline adherence rate (84.8% vs. 26.4%). For patients directly transferred from scene to study trauma centers, longer transport time was associated with worse discharge outcome (PCPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18] and (POPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18]). There was no relationship between PH or ED TBI guideline adherence rate and discharge POPC and PCPC. Conclusion This study benchmarks early pediatric TBI care in Argentina and shows that many critically injured children with TBI do not receive timely or best practice PH care, that

  10. A Group-Based Mobile Application to Increase Adherence in Exercise and Nutrition Programs: A Factorial Design Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Youngblood, Gregory Michael; Ram, Ashwin; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Novel methods of promoting self-monitoring and social support are needed to ensure long-term maintenance of behavior change. In this paper, we directly investigate the effects of group support in an exercise and nutrition program delivered by an mHealth application called Fittle. Objective Our first specific study aim was to explore whether social support improved adherence in wellness programs. Our second specific study aim was to assess whether media types (ePaper vs mobile) were associated with different levels of compliance and adherence to wellness programs. The third aim was to assess whether the use of an mHealth application led to positive changes to participants’ eating behavior, physical activity, and stress level, compared to traditional paper-based programs. Methods A 2 × 2 (eg, Media: Mobile vs ePaper × Group Type: Team vs Solo) factorial design feasibility study was conducted. A sample of 124 volunteers who were interested in improving eating behavior, increasing physical activity, or reducing stress participated in this study. The study duration was 8 weeks. All groups were self-directed with no ongoing human input from the research team. Results Participants in ePaper conditions had higher attrition rates compared to participants in Mobile conditions, χ3 2=9.96, P=.02 (N=124). Participants in Mobile conditions reported their compliance with a much higher frequency closer to the time of challenge activity completion (2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test comparing distributions was highly significant—KS=0.33, P<.001 [N=63]). Participants in ePaper conditions had a much higher frequency of guessing while reporting as compared with those in Mobile conditions—χ1 2=25.25, P<.001 (N=63). Together, these findings suggest that the mobile app allowed a more accurate method to report and track health behaviors over a longer period than traditional ePaper-based diaries or log books. There was a significant difference in the overall compliance

  11. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C.; van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory—the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not). Methods We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective. Results We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase. Conclusion The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing

  12. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 ± 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 ± 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 ± 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 ± 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 ± 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease.

  13. Can Rapid Diagnostic Testing for Malaria Increase Adherence to Artemether-Lumefantrine?: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Saran, Indrani; Yavuz, Elif; Kasozi, Howard; Cohen, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with suspected malaria do not receive diagnostic confirmation before beginning antimalarial treatment. We investigated the extent to which uncertainty about malaria diagnosis contributes to patient nonadherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) treatment through a randomized controlled trial in central Uganda. Among 1,525 patients purchasing a course of AL at private drug shops, we randomly offered 37.6% a free malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and then assessed adherence through home visits 3 days later. Of these subjects, 68.4% tested positive for malaria and 65.8% adhered overall. Patients who tested positive did not have significantly higher odds of adherence than those who were not offered the test (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.734-1.57,P= 0.719). Patients who received a positive malaria test had 0.488 fewer pills remaining than those not offered the test (95% CI: -1.02 to 0.043,P= 0.072). We found that patients who felt relatively healthy by the second day of treatment had lower odds of completing treatment (adjusted OR: 0.532, 95% CI: 0.394-0.719,P< 0.001). Our results suggest that diagnostic testing may not improve artemisinin-based combination therapy adherence unless efforts are made to persuade patients to continue taking the full course of drugs even if symptoms have resolved.

  14. 78 FR 23671 - Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 959 Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural... for the South Texas Onion Committee (Committee) for the 2012-13 and subsequent fiscal periods from $0.025 to $0.03 per 50-pound equivalent of onions handled. The Committee locally administers the...

  15. The Acceptability and Perceived Usefulness of a Weekly Clinical SMS Program to Promote HIV Antiretroviral Medication Adherence in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Georgette, Nathan; Siedner, Mark J; Zanoni, Brian; Sibaya, Thobekile; Petty, Carter R; Carpenter, Stephen; Haberer, Jessica E

    2016-11-01

    Short message service (SMS) text messages have been used to remind and encourage patients to take ART in research studies. However, few studies have assessed the feasibility and acceptability of SMS in routine clinical practice. We report patient perspectives on a weekly SMS adherence support program after implementation into clinical care at an HIV clinic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We conducted structured interviews with a cross-sectional convenience sample of 100 adult patients who were invited to join the program, 88 of whom had received a program SMS. Of these respondents, 81 (92 %) would recommend the program to a friend. Sixty-eight (77 %) felt the program helped them remember clinic appointments, a response associated with male gender [odds ratio (OR) 5.88, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.52-23.26, P = 0.011] and HIV disclosure outside the home [OR 3.40, 95 %CI 1.00-11.60, P = 0.050]. This clinical SMS adherence program was found to have high patient-perceived usefulness.

  16. Increased protein secretion and adherence to HeLa cells by Shigella spp. following growth in the presence of bile salts.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, L M; Reed, K E; Payne, S M

    1995-01-01

    Growth of Shigella spp. in the presence of the bile salt deoxycholate or chenodeoxycholate enhanced the bacterial invasion of HeLa cells. Growth in the presence of other structurally similar bile salts or detergents had little or no effect. Deoxycholate-enhanced invasion was not observed when bacteria were exposed to deoxycholate at low temperatures or when chloramphenicol was added to the growth medium, indicating that bacterial growth and protein synthesis are required. Increased invasion is associated with the presence of an intact Shigella virulence plasmid and is correlated with increased secretion of a set of proteins, including the Ipa proteins, to the outer membrane and into the growth medium. The increased invasion induced by the bile salts appears to be due to increased adherence. The enhanced adherence was specific to Shigella spp., since the enteroinvasive Escherichia coli strains tested did not exhibit the effect in response to growth in bile salts. PMID:7642302

  17. Using protection motivation theory and formative research to guide an injury prevention intervention: increasing adherence to the North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Sato; Heaney, Catherine A; Kmet, Jennifer M; Wilkins, J R

    2011-05-01

    The North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) were developed to reduce childhood agricultural injuries by assisting adults in assigning appropriate chores and providing needed supervision and training. To develop an effective intervention to increase adherence to NAGCAT among farm parents, formative research (focus groups and pilot-testing) was conducted. Protection motivation theory (PMT) was used to guide this research and inform intervention development. Focus group results suggested how PMT constructs might be addressed to increase adherence. A home visit intervention, using a standardized presentation in POWERPoint™, was developed to (a) introduce NAGCAT, (b) increase motivation to use NAGCAT and enhance safe work behaviors, and (c) ultimately reduce agricultural work-related injuries among youth. Process evaluation data suggests that the intervention was well received by farm parents. Conducting theory-guided formative research identified motivational barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers that might not have been otherwise apparent.

  18. Increase in the Hydrophilicity and Lewis Acid-Base Properties of Solid Surfaces Achieved by Electric Gliding Discharge in Humid Air: Effects on Bacterial Adherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamgang, J. O.; Naitali, M.; Herry, J.-M.; Bellon-Fontaine, M.-N.; Brisset, J.-L.; Briandet, R.

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed the effects of treatment with gliding discharge plasma on the surface properties of solid materials, as well as the consequences concerning adherence of a model bacterium. As evaluated by contact angles with selected liquids, plasma treatment caused an increase in surface hydrophilicity and in the Lewis acid-base components of the surface energy of all materials tested. These modifications were more marked for low density polyethylene and stainless steel than for polytetrafluoroethylene. After treatment, the hydrophilicity of the materials remained relatively stable for at least 20 days. Moreover, analysis of the topography of the materials by atomic force microscopy revealed that the roughness of both polymers was reduced by glidarc plasma treatment. As a result of all these modifications, solid substrates were activated towards micro-organisms and the adherence of S. epidermidis, a negatively charged Lewis-base and mildly hydrophilic strain selected as the model, was increased in almost all the cases tested.

  19. Natural Variant of Collagen-Like Protein A in Serotype M3 Group A Streptococcus Increases Adherence and Decreases Invasive Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Brittany E.; Versalovic, Erika M.; Olsen, Randall J.; Bachert, Beth A.; Lukomski, Slawomir; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) predominantly exists as a colonizer of the human oropharynx that occasionally breaches epithelial barriers to cause invasive diseases. Despite the frequency of GAS carriage, few investigations into the contributory molecular mechanisms exist. To this end, we identified a naturally occurring polymorphism in the gene encoding the streptococcal collagen-like protein A (SclA) in GAS carrier strains. All previously sequenced invasive serotype M3 GAS possess a premature stop codon in the sclA gene truncating the protein. The carrier polymorphism is predicted to restore SclA function and was infrequently identified by targeted DNA sequencing in invasive strains of the same serotype. We demonstrate that a strain with the carrier sclA allele expressed a full-length SclA protein, while the strain with the invasive sclA allele expressed a truncated variant. An isoallelic mutant invasive strain with the carrier sclA allele exhibited decreased virulence in a mouse model of invasive disease and decreased multiplication in human blood. Further, the isoallelic invasive strain with the carrier sclA allele persisted in the mouse nasopharynx and had increased adherence to cultured epithelial cells. Repair of the premature stop codon in the invasive sclA allele restored the ability to bind the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and cellular fibronectin. These data demonstrate that a mutation in GAS carrier strains increases adherence and decreases virulence and suggest selection against increased adherence in GAS invasive isolates. PMID:25561712

  20. A Mixed Methods and Triangulation Model for Increasing the Accuracy of Adherence and Sexual Behaviour Data: The Microbicides Development Programme

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Robert; Montgomery, Catherine M.; Morar, Neetha S.; Mweemba, Oliver; Ssali, Agnes; Gafos, Mitzy; Lees, Shelley; Stadler, Jonathan; Crook, Angela; Nunn, Andrew; Hayes, Richard; McCormack, Sheena

    2010-01-01

    Background The collection of accurate data on adherence and sexual behaviour is crucial in microbicide (and other HIV-related) research. In the absence of a “gold standard” the collection of such data relies largely on participant self-reporting. After reviewing available methods, this paper describes a mixed method/triangulation model for generating more accurate data on adherence and sexual behaviour in a multi-centre vaginal microbicide clinical trial. In a companion paper some of the results from this model are presented [1]. Methodology/Principal Findings Data were collected from a random subsample of 725 women (7.7% of the trial population) using structured interviews, coital diaries, in-depth interviews, counting returned gel applicators, focus group discussions, and ethnography. The core of the model was a customised, semi-structured in-depth interview. There were two levels of triangulation: first, discrepancies between data from the questionnaires, diaries, in-depth interviews and applicator returns were identified, discussed with participants and, to a large extent, resolved; second, results from individual participants were related to more general data emerging from the focus group discussions and ethnography. A democratic and equitable collaboration between clinical trialists and qualitative social scientists facilitated the success of the model, as did the preparatory studies preceding the trial. The process revealed some of the underlying assumptions and routinised practices in “clinical trial culture” that are potentially detrimental to the collection of accurate data, as well as some of the shortcomings of large qualitative studies, and pointed to some potential solutions. Conclusions/Significance The integration of qualitative social science and the use of mixed methods and triangulation in clinical trials are feasible, and can reveal (and resolve) inaccuracies in data on adherence and sensitive behaviours, as well as illuminating aspects

  1. The Effects of Negative Reinforcement on Increasing Patient Adherence to Appointments at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alyahya, Mohammad; Hijazi, Heba H; Nusairat, Farid T

    2016-01-01

    Appointment nonadherence is a health behavior that represents a burden to health care systems. On March 1, 2015, a new negative reinforcement intervention involving "service fees" for a visit without appointment was implemented at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan. To evaluate the effect of this intervention in improving patient adherence to medical appointment, a retrospective preintervention and postintervention analysis was used, including all patients (n = 65 535) who had scheduled appointments at 39 outpatient clinics. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was first performed. Then, a multivariate linear regression model was used to identify factors that might predict individuals who are likely to attend or miss their appointments and those who have a greater tendency to visit the hospital with or without appointments. Although the average percentage of appointments attended was more than missed preintervention and postintervention, the decrease in percentage of missed appointments was more pronounced postintervention. Also, the average percentage of visits without appointments was less than visits with appointments in both times, but the decrease in the percentage of visits without appointments was more prominent after. The regression analysis revealed that younger, married and male patients were more likely to miss their appointment before and after the intervention. Also, younger patients had a tendency to attend without appointments. Conversely, patients with the lower copayment rate had a tendency to adhere to appointment times. In conclusion, negative reinforcement interventions could improve patient appointment adherence rates. Accordingly, interventions designed that consider evidence and are theory-based are needed to change patient behavior.

  2. Theory-Based Behavioral Intervention Increases Self-Reported Physical Activity in South African Men: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jemmott, John B.; Jemmott, Loretta S.; Ngwane, Zolani; Zhang, Jingwen; Heeren, G. Anita; Icard, Larry D.; O’Leary, Ann; Mtose, Xoliswa; Teitelman, Anne; Carty, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a health-promotion intervention increases South African men’s adherence to physical-activity guidelines. Method We utilized a cluster-randomized controlled trial design. Eligible clusters, residential neighborhoods near East London, South Africa, were matched in pairs. Within randomly selected pairs, neighborhoods were randomized to theory-based, culturally congruent health-promotion intervention encouraging physical activity or attention-matched HIV/STI risk-reduction control intervention. Men residing in the neighborhoods and reporting coitus in the previous 3 months were eligible. Primary outcome was self-reported individual-level adherence to physical-activity guidelines averaged over 6-month and 12-month post-intervention assessments. Data were collected in 2007–2010. Data collectors, but not facilitators or participants, were blind to group assignment. Results Primary outcome intention-to-treat analysis included 22 of 22 clusters and 537 of 572 men in the health-promotion intervention and 22 of 22 clusters and 569 of 609 men in the attention-control intervention. Model-estimated probability of meeting physical-activity guidelines was 51.0% in the health-promotion intervention and 44.7% in attention-matched control (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09–1.63), adjusting for baseline prevalence and clustering from 44 neighborhoods. Conclusion A theory-based culturally congruent intervention increased South African men’s self-reported physical activity, a key contributor to deaths from non-communicable diseases in South Africa. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01490359. PMID:24736094

  3. Theory-based behavioral intervention increases self-reported physical activity in South African men: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jemmott, John B; Jemmott, Loretta S; Ngwane, Zolani; Zhang, Jingwen; Heeren, G Anita; Icard, Larry D; O'Leary, Ann; Mtose, Xoliswa; Teitelman, Anne; Carty, Craig

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether a health-promotion intervention increases South African men's adherence to physical-activity guidelines. We utilized a cluster-randomized controlled trial design. Eligible clusters, residential neighborhoods near East London, South Africa, were matched in pairs. Within randomly selected pairs, neighborhoods were randomized to theory-based, culturally congruent health-promotion intervention encouraging physical activity or attention-matched HIV/STI risk-reduction control intervention. Men residing in the neighborhoods and reporting coitus in the previous 3 months were eligible. Primary outcome was self-reported individual-level adherence to physical-activity guidelines averaged over 6-month and 12-month post-intervention assessments. Data were collected in 2007-2010. Data collectors, but not facilitators or participants, were blind to group assignment. Primary outcome intention-to-treat analysis included 22 of 22 clusters and 537 of 572 men in the health-promotion intervention and 22 of 22 clusters and 569 of 609 men in the attention-control intervention. Model-estimated probability of meeting physical-activity guidelines was 51.0% in the health-promotion intervention and 44.7% in attention-matched control (OR=1.34; 95% CI, 1.09-1.63), adjusting for baseline prevalence and clustering from 44 neighborhoods. A theory-based culturally congruent intervention increased South African men's self-reported physical activity, a key contributor to deaths from non-communicable diseases in South Africa. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01490359. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring the patterns of use and the feasibility of using cellular phones for clinic appointment reminders and adherence messages in an antiretroviral treatment clinic, Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Corless, Inge B; Giddy, Janet; Nicholas, Patrice K; Eichbaum, Quentin; Butler, Lisa M

    2010-11-01

    In preparation for a proposed intervention at an antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic in Durban, South Africa, we explored the dynamics and patterns of cellular phone use among this population, in order to ascertain whether clinic contact via patients' cellular phones was a feasible and acceptable modality for appointment reminders and adherence messages. Adults, who were more than 18 years old, ambulatory, and who presented for treatment at the clinic between October-December 2007, were consecutively recruited until the sample size was reached (n = 300). A structured questionnaire was administered, including questions surrounding sociodemographics, cellular phone availability, patterns of use, and acceptability of clinic contact for the purpose of clinic appointment reminders and adherence support. Most respondents (n = 242; 81%) reported current ownership of a cellular phone with 95% utilizing a prepaid airtime service. Those participants who currently owned a cellular phone reported high cellular phone turnover due to theft or loss (n = 94, 39%) and/or damage (n = 68, 28%). More females than men switched their cell phones off during the day (p = 0.002) and were more likely to not take calls in certain social milieus (p ≤ 0.0001). Females were more likely to share their cell phone with others (p = 0.002) or leave it in a place where someone could access it (p = 0.005). Most respondents were willing to have clinic contact via their cellular phones, either verbally (99%) or via text messages (96%). The use of cellular phones for intervention purposes is feasible and should be further investigated. The findings highlight the value of gender-based analyses in informing interventions.

  5. Not at All Effective: Differences in Views on the Causes of Prescription Non-adherence Between North Korean Defectors and Medical Providers in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soo Jung

    2015-06-01

    By focusing on North Korean defectors' medical experiences in South Korea and their medical providers' experiences treating the defectors, this article considers the differences between the views of these two groups in regard to the causes of prescription non-adherence. The results suggest that (a) whereas the defectors tended to see their symptoms as being physical in nature, the medical providers often ascribed symptoms to psychological/socio-cultural influence; (b) whereas the defectors tended to trust in their ability to self-diagnose and in their belief systems established in North Korea, the medical providers tended not to place trust in these aspects; (c) whereas the defectors tended to view the available medical treatment as inappropriate for them, the medical providers often noted the presence of tolerant bacterial strains as causes of treatment failure; and (d) whereas the defectors felt that the treatment they received was slow and ineffective and attributed this to capitalism, the medical providers felt that the defectors failed to understand the concept of staged treatments. Based on the findings, some solutions are suggested to address the complex issue of North Korean defectors' prescription non-adherence in terms of subjective/objective health assessments and patient-centered care. North Korean defectors' established health beliefs/lack of medical knowledge based on their previous medical and cultural experiences gave rise to beliefs and practices associated with medicine that differ significantly from those of the health providers and that have the potential to severely compromise the defectors' health. Therefore, therapy negotiation and appropriate education are suggested as possible solutions, and as an agenda, the notion of civic friendship is addressed. Implications for medical practice, prevention, and intervention are also discussed.

  6. Counting the cost: the consequences of increased medical malpractice litigation in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, J

    2012-12-11

    We live in uncertain times. The recession in Europe and ongoing political instability in the Middle East are each examples of what could legally be termed a 'statement of fact'. The rising cost of healthcare in South Africa is another fact. This phenomenon is accompanied by an even more disturbing trend: a steep rise in medical malpractice litigation. An important question to consider is what effect this increase is having on healthcare provision in South Africa generally.

  7. An Ecosystem-Based Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk and Increase Medication Adherence Among Prisoners Being Released to the Community

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, Olga Grinstead; McCartney, Kathleen; Gregorich, Steven; Zack, Barry; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV+ prisoners reentering their communities are at increased risk for poor health outcomes and to transmit HIV. We report on a randomized trial comparing an ecosystem-based intervention and an individually-focused intervention for reducing HIV transmission risk and improving medication adherence. Reincarceration was considered as a secondary variable. Both groups decreased sexual risk behavior over the 12-month follow-up period. Unexpectedly, the ecosystem intervention group was less likely to be taking medication or to be adherent and more likely to have been reincarcerated. Failure to demonstrate a significant advantage of the ecosystem intervention may have resulted from the difficulty of engaging family and other ecosystem members in the intervention. Implications for developing and applying interventions for this population are discussed. PMID:23657796

  8. [Early drop-outs and retentions in substance abuse outpatient clinics: a cross-sectional comparative study of factors that increase or decrease adherence].

    PubMed

    Calvo, Fran; Carbonell, Xavier; Valero, Ramón; Costa, Jordi; Turró, Oriol; Giralt, Cristina; Ramírez, Marissa

    2017-08-23

    The aim of this study is to define the risk factors associated with early discharge in out-patients clinics. Cross-sectional and observational study. Substance abuse clinics in Girona (Catalonia, Spain). A total of 264 individuals were included in the sample, and 34.8% of them abandoned the process within two months of starting the therapy (n=92). Clinical and socio-demographic variables of the clinical history were compared between participants with/without adherence. The Student t test was used to measure the comparison, and the chi-squared test was used for the analysis of qualitative variables. A binary logistic regression model was adjusted, with adherence as the dependent variable. The results indicated that attending the appointments unaccompanied (OR=3.13), being female (OR=2.44), having cocaine related issues (OR=1.14), and being younger (OR=0.89) are the factors which increase the risk early abandonment. Contrarily, being referred to specialists from a Primary Health Centre reduces the risk (OR=0.28). It is concluded that special attention must be devoted to the patients' families, women, and young patients. Moreover, the appropriate coordination between specialist services and basic services increases adherence to treatment among drug users. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  10. Utilization Study of Antihypertensives in a South Indian Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital and Adherence to Standard Treatment Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Supratim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Hypertension represents a major health problem primarily because of its role in contributing to the initiation and progression of major cardiovascular diseases. Concerns pertaining to hypertension and its sequelae can be substantially addressed and consequent burden of disease reduced by early detection and appropriate therapy of elevated blood pressure. This cross-sectional observational study aims at analyzing the utilization pattern of antihypertensives used for the treatment of hypertension at a tertiary care hospital in perspective of standard treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods: Prescriptions were screened for antihypertensives at the medicine outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Medical records of the patients were scrutinized after which 286 prescriptions of patients suffering from hypertension were included. The collected data were sorted and analyzed on the basis of demographic characteristics and comorbidities. Results: The calcium channel blockers were the most frequently used antihypertensive class of drugs (72.3%). Amlodipine (55.6%) was the single most frequently prescribed antihypertensive agent. The utilization of thiazide diuretics was 9%. Adherence to the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEMs) was 65%. The combination therapy was used more frequently (51.5%) than monotherapy (48.8%). The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin 2 receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARB) was 41.4% in diabetes. Conclusions: The treatment pattern, in general, conformed to standard treatment guidelines. Few areas, however, need to be addressed such as the underutilization of thiazide diuretics, need for more awareness of drugs from the NLEMs and enhanced use of ACE-I/ARB in diabetic hypertensives. PMID:28104972

  11. Infrared measurements of increased CF2Cl2 (CFC-12) absorption above the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Levine, Joel S.; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, Frank J.; Murcray, Frank H.; Murcray, David G.

    1988-01-01

    An increase in the CF2Cl2 total vertical column above the South pole of 1.24 + or - 0.15 over a 6-year period from 1980 to 1986, corresponding to an average increase of 3.6 + or - 2.1 percent, is found by high-resolution, ground-based solar spectra analyzed in the nu(8) band Q branches at 1161/cm of CF2Cl. This rate of increase is lower than indicated by in situ measurements at the South Pole over the same period, but substantial agreement results when the rather large error margins of the spectral analysis results are considered.

  12. Cricothyrotomy training increases adherence to the ASA difficult airway algorithm in a simulated crisis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    You-Ten, Kong Eric; Bould, M Dylan; Friedman, Zeev; Riem, Nicole; Sydor, Devin; Boet, Sylvain

    2015-05-01

    Non-adherence to airway guidelines in a 'cannot intubate-cannot oxygenate' (CICO) crisis situation is associated with adverse patient outcomes. This study investigated the effects of hands-on training in cricothyrotomy on adherence to the American Society of Anesthesiologists difficult airway algorithm (ASA-DAA) during a simulated CICO scenario. A total of 21 postgraduate second-year anesthesia residents completed a pre-test teaching session during which they reviewed the ASA-DAA, became familiarized with the Melker cricothyrotomy kit, and watched a video on cricothyrotomy. Participants were randomized to either the intervention 'Trained' group (n = 10) (taught and practiced cricothyrotomy) or the control 'Non-Trained' group (n = 11) (no extra training). After two to three weeks, performances of the groups were assessed in a simulated CICO scenario. The primary outcome measure was major deviation from the ASA-DAA. Secondary outcome measures were (1) performance of the four categories of non-technical behaviours using the validated Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills scale (ANTS) and (2) time to perform specific tasks. Significantly more non-trained than trained participants (6/11 vs 0/10, P = 0.012) committed at least one major ASA-DAA deviation, including failure to insert an oral airway, failure to call for help, bypassing the laryngeal mask airway, and attempting fibreoptic intubation. ANTS scores for all four categories of behaviours, however, were similar between the groups. Trained participants called for help faster [26 (2) vs 63 (48) sec, P = 0.012] but delayed opening of the cricothyrotomy kit [130 (50) vs 74 (36) sec, P = 0.014]. Hands-on training in cricothyrotomy resulted in fewer major ASA-DAA deviations in a simulated CICO scenario. Training in cricothyrotomy may play an important role in complying with the ASA-DAA in a CICO situation but does not appear to affect non-technical behaviours such as decision-making.

  13. 75 FR 55942 - Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 915 Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY... increases the assessment rate established for the Avocado Administrative Committee (Committee) for the 2010... avocados handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order which regulates the handling of...

  14. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  15. Health Care Resource Utilization and Costs in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with Better Adherence to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Increased Molecular Monitoring Frequency.

    PubMed

    Latremouille-Viau, Dominick; Guerin, Annie; Gagnon-Sanschagrin, Patrick; Dea, Katherine; Cohen, Benjamin G; Joseph, George J

    2017-02-01

    Frequent molecular monitoring (qPCR tests), as recommended by evidence-based monitoring guidelines, is associated with higher adherence to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); both factors have been associated with better clinical and economic outcomes. To (a) estimate the effect of more frequent qPCR tests on health care resource utilization (HRU) and associated costs, including direct (effect of qPCR test frequency on HRU) and indirect (through TKI adherence) effects, and (b) develop an economic model applicable to multiple clinical practice scenarios. Adult patients newly diagnosed with CML who started TKI firstline therapy were identified from U.S. administrative claims data (2010-2015). TKI adherence (medication possession ratio [MPR]), number of inpatient days, emergency room (ER) visits, outpatient service days, and mean costs per HRU event were measured during the first year of CML treatment. Direct and indirect effects of qPCR test frequency were estimated using multivariate regression models. Subsequently, an economic model was developed to assess the overall effect of varying qPCR test frequency on HRU and associated costs during the first year of CML treatment under different clinical practice scenarios; the scenario reported is the increase from 1 to 2 qPCR tests. Of the 1,431 patients included, 36% had no qPCR tests, the average qPCR test frequency was 1.6, and the average MPR was 0.86 during the first year of CML treatment. The direct effect of increasing qPCR test frequency by 1 was associated with 13.0% fewer inpatient days (adjusted incidence rate ratio [adjusted IRR] = 0.87; P = 0.010); 8.3% fewer ER visits (adjusted IRR = 0.92; P = 0.043); and 3.0% more outpatient service days (adjusted IRR = 1.03; P = 0.002). Each increase of 1 test was associated with an increase in TKI adherence by 2.2 percentage points (adjusted MPR difference = 0.022; P < 0.001). When considering the indirect effect of q

  16. Cost-effectiveness of a tailored intervention designed to increase breast cancer screening among a non-adherent population: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the percentage of women who initiate breast cancer screening is rising, the rate of continued adherence is poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a tailored print intervention compared with a non-tailored print intervention for increasing the breast cancer screening rate among a non-adherent population. Methods In total, 1859 participants aged 51–59 years (except those aged 55 years) were recruited from a Japanese urban community setting. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a tailored print reminder (tailored intervention group) or non-tailored print reminder (non-tailored intervention group). The primary outcome was improvement in the breast cancer screening rate. The screening rates and cost-effectiveness were examined for each treatment group (tailored vs. non-tailored) and each intervention subgroup during a follow-up period of five months. All analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. Results The number of women who underwent a screening mammogram following the reminder was 277 (19.9%) in the tailored reminder group and 27 (5.8%) in the non-tailored reminder group. A logistic regression model revealed that the odds of a woman who received a tailored print reminder undergoing mammography was 4.02 times those of a women who had received a non-tailored print reminder (95% confidence interval, 2.67–6.06). The cost of one mammography screening increase was 2,544 JPY or 30 USD in the tailored intervention group and 4,366 JPY or 52 USD in the non-tailored intervention group. Conclusions Providing a tailored print reminder was an effective and cost-effective strategy for improving breast cancer screening rates among non-adherent women. PMID:22962858

  17. 76 FR 7095 - Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 915 Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural... rate established for the Avocado Administrative Committee (Committee), for the 2010-11 and subsequent fiscal periods from $0.27 to $0.37 per 55-pound bushel container of Florida avocados handled....

  18. Language Shift or Increased Bilingualism in South Africa: Evidence from Census Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posel, Dorrit; Zeller, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In the post-apartheid era, South Africa has adopted a language policy that gives official status to 11 languages (English, Afrikaans, and nine Bantu languages). However, English has remained the dominant language of business, public office, and education, and some research suggests that English is increasingly being spoken in domestic settings.…

  19. 78 FR 57099 - Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 915 Avocados Grown in South Florida... proposed rule would increase the assessment rate established for the Avocado Administrative Committee... of Florida avocados handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order, which regulates...

  20. A Step Toward Equal Justice: Programs to Increase Black Lawyers in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Eli, Ed.

    An extensive evaluation of 5 years of grants from private foundations, corporations, and individuals to increase the number of black lawyers in the South is summarized in this pamphlet. The results of the evaluation of the Earl Warren Legal Training Program, Inc., and the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council indicated: (1) Larger numbers of…

  1. Recent increase in Ba concentrations as recorded in a South Pole ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkikh, Elena V.; Mayewski, Paul A.; Dixon, Daniel; Kurbatov, Andrei V.; Handley, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    Here we present high-resolution (∼9.4 samples/year) records of Ba concentrations for the period from 1541 to 1999 A.D. obtained from an ice core recovered at the South Pole (US ITASE-02-6) site. We note a significant increase in Ba concentration (by a factor of ∼23) since 1980 A.D. The Ba crustal enrichment factor (EFc) values rise from ∼3 before 1980 A.D. to ∼32 after 1980 A.D. None of the other measured major and trace elements reveal such significant increases in concentrations and EFc values. Comparison with previously reported Antarctic Ba records suggests that significant increases in Ba concentrations at South Pole since 1980 A.D. are most likely caused by local source pollution. The core was collected in close proximity to Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station; therefore activities at the station, such as diesel fuel burning and intense aircraft activity, most likely caused the observed increase in Ba concentrations and its EFc values in the South Pole ice core record.

  2. Language Shift or Increased Bilingualism in South Africa: Evidence from Census Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posel, Dorrit; Zeller, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In the post-apartheid era, South Africa has adopted a language policy that gives official status to 11 languages (English, Afrikaans, and nine Bantu languages). However, English has remained the dominant language of business, public office, and education, and some research suggests that English is increasingly being spoken in domestic settings.…

  3. Enjoyment for High-Intensity Interval Exercise Increases during the First Six Weeks of Training: Implications for Promoting Exercise Adherence in Sedentary Adults.

    PubMed

    Heisz, Jennifer J; Tejada, Mary Grace M; Paolucci, Emily M; Muir, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to show that enjoyment for high-intensity interval exercise increases with chronic training. Prior acute studies typically report high-intensity interval training (HIT) as being more enjoyable than moderate continuous training (MCT) unless the high-intensity intervals are too strenuous or difficult to complete. It follows that exercise competency may be a critical factor contributing to the enjoyment of HIT, and therefore building competency through chronic training may be one way to increase its enjoyment. To test this, we randomly assigned sedentary young adults to six weeks of HIT or MCT, and tracked changes in their enjoyment for the exercise. Enjoyment for HIT increased with training whereas enjoyment for MCT remained constant and lower. Changes in exercise enjoyment were predicted by increases in workload, suggesting that strength adaptions may be important for promoting exercise enjoyment. The results point to HIT as a promising protocol for promoting exercise enjoyment and adherence in sedentary young adults.

  4. Increasing incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in black South Africans in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (1983-2006).

    PubMed

    Mosam, A; Carrara, H; Shaik, F; Uldrick, T; Berkman, A; Aboobaker, J; Coovadia, H M

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the temporal trends in the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in black South Africans in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN). The study was designed as a retrospective record review. The incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma was estimated using administrative records for patients receiving care for KS through public sector oncology clinics in KZN, 1983-2006. Annual age-standardized incidence rates were calculated using provincial census data for the denominator. Age-specific rates were calculated for the pre-AIDS (1983-1989) and for the generalized AIDS epidemic eras (2006). Age-standardized incidence of KS increased in KZN from <1:100,000 in 1990 to at least 15:100,000 in 2006; this increase was observed in both men and women. There was a shift in the peak age-specific incidence rates from the sixth decade of life in the pre-AIDS era to the fourth and fifth decades in the AIDS era. In conclusion, KS is a growing public health problem in KZN, South Africa. These data reinforce the need for comprehensive national access to and roll-out of antiretroviral drugs, given their success in prevention and treatment of KS in first-world settings.

  5. Enhanced physician adherence to antibiotic use guidelines through increased availability of guidelines at the time of drug ordering in hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Jean-Frederic; Jehl, Francois; Javelot, Herve; Nonnenmacher, Cathy

    2011-02-01

    Some studies have shown that making practice guidelines accessible to physicians when they are making clinical decisions could improve prescribing practices. The aim of the study was to assess the benefit of impact on physician adherence of the intervention that consisted of embedding previously paper-based antibiotic guidelines in the computerized physician drug order entry system of a teaching hospital in order to make these guidelines available to physician at the time of antibiotic ordering. Before the intervention, these guidelines were available in booklet form in all the wards of the hospital. Adherence to guidelines was evaluated in 471 consecutive antibiotic orders for pneumonia, 104 just before and 367 just after the intervention. The evaluation criteria were: the choice of the antibiotic relative to the context of acquisition of pneumonia, the daily dose, the planned duration of treatment. Evaluation of antibiotic orders was performed at the initiation of antibiotic treatment. The intervention was followed by a significant decrease in the proportion of antibiotic orders containing at least one criterion of non-conformity to the guidelines, respectively, 33% after vs. 51% (p<0.001) before the intervention. Proportion of non-conform orders decreased in the post- vs. pre-intervention period for the daily dosage of antibiotics, respectively, 12.2% vs. 26.9% (p<0.001), for the planned duration of treatment, respectively, 7.3% vs. 18.3% (p<0.001), whereas for the choice of antibiotics relative to the context of acquisition of pneumonia, the improvement failed to reach statistical significance, respectively, 18.2% vs. 25% (p=0.12). In this study, the increased availability of antibiotic guidelines at the time of drug ordering, combined with a periodical reinforcement educational round, was associated with an enhanced physician adherence to these guidelines. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Implementation and Operational Research: Community-Based Adherence Clubs for the Management of Stable Antiretroviral Therapy Patients in Cape Town, South Africa: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Grimsrud, Anna; Lesosky, Maia; Kalombo, Cathy; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Myer, Landon

    2016-01-01

    Community-based models of antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery are widely discussed as a priority in the expansion of HIV treatment services, but data on their effectiveness are limited. We examined outcomes of ART patients decentralized to community-based adherence clubs (CACs) in Cape Town, South Africa and compared these to patients managed in the community health center. The analysis included 8150 adults initiating ART from 2002 to 2012 in a public sector service followed until the end of 2013. From June 2012, stable patients (on ART >12 months, suppressed viral load) were referred to CACs. Loss to follow-up (LTFU) was compared between services using proportional hazards models with time-varying covariates and inverse probability weights of CAC participation. Of the 2113 CAC patients (71% female, 7% youth ages ≤ 24 years), 94% were retained on ART after 12 months. Among CAC patients, LTFU [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26 to 3.73 ] and viral rebound (aHR 2.24, 95% CI: 1.00 to 5.04) were twice as likely in youth (16-24 years old) compared with older patients, but no difference in the risk of LTFU or viral rebound was observed by sex (P-values 0.613 and 0.278, respectively). CAC participation was associated with a 67% reduction in the risk of LTFU (aHR: 0.33, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.40) compared with community health centre, and this association persisted when stratified by patient demographic and clinic characteristics. CACs are associated with reduced risk of LTFU compared with facility-based care. Community-based models represent an important development to facilitate ART delivery and possibly improve patient outcomes.

  7. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mendys, Phil; Zullig, Leah L; Burkholder, Rebecca; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-01-01

    Improving medication adherence is a critically important, but often enigmatic objective of patients, providers, and the overall health care system. Increasing medication adherence has the potential to reduce health care costs while improving care quality, patient satisfaction and health outcomes. While there are a number of papers that describe the benefits of medication adherence in terms of cost, safety, outcomes, or quality of life, there are limited reviews that consider how best to seamlessly integrate tools and processes directed at improving medication adherence. We will address processes for implementing medication adherence interventions with the goal of better informing providers and health care systems regarding the safe and effective use of medications. PMID:25114513

  8. Roles of family dynamics on adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV/AIDS at a tertiary hospital in Osogbo, south-west Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, B A; Afolabi, M O; Afolabi, A A; Odewale, M A; Olowookere, S A

    2013-12-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been proven to be the only effective treatment for HIV/AIDS worldwide. Good adherence to HAART might require good family support. To determine the family dynamics and social support of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and its roles on HAART adherence at an ARV treatment clinic in Osogbo, Nigeria. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Consenting PLWHA on HAART were interviewed using pre-tested semistructured questionnaire incorporating Perceived Social Support- Family Scale and Family APGAR. HAART adherence was measured using patient self report. A total of 379 PLWHA were interviewed. Their mean age was 40.8 (SD=9.9) years. Most (60.7%) were females. More than half (55.7%) were currently married and the majority (72.1%) had secondary education and were Yoruba (86.3%). Most respondents (95.5%) were adherent to HAART. Over 90% were satisfied with support received from their family while 82.3% were treated like other family members. Most attributed their HAART adherence to the care and support received from their family. Most PLWHA had good social support and were adherent to HAART.

  9. Infrared measurements of increased CF(2)Cl(2) (CFC- 12) absorption above the South Pole.

    PubMed

    Rinsland, C P; Goldman, A; Murcray, F J; Murcray, F H; Murcray, D G; Levine, J S

    1988-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based solar spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Dec. 1980 and Nov. 1986 have been analyzed in the region of the CF(2)Cl(2) (chlorofluorocarbon 12) nu(8) band Q branches at 1161 cm(-1). An increase in the CF(2)Cl(2) total vertical column above the South Pole of 1.24 +/- 0.15 over the 6-yr period, corresponding to an average rate of increase of 3.6 +/- 2.1%, is derived. This rate of increase is lower than indicated by in situ measurements at the South Pole over the same time period, but there is agreement when the rather error bars of the spectral measurement results are considered. Spectroscopic parameters that can successfully model CF(2)C1(2) absorption at low temperatures are needed to improve retrieval accuracies and could be applied to a number of pre-1980 atmospheric spectral data sets in the literature to obtain an improved record of early CF(2)Cl(2) concentration trends for comparison with estimates of historical release rates.

  10. Solar radiation increases suicide rate after adjusting for other climate factors in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Yu Jin; Choi, Nari; An, Hyonggin; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that suicide rates have significant seasonal variations. There is seasonal discordance between temperature and solar radiation due to the monsoon season in South Korea. We investigated the seasonality of suicide and assessed its association with climate variables in South Korea. Suicide rates were obtained from the National Statistical Office of South Korea, and climatic data were obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration for the period of 1992-2010. We conducted analyses using a generalized additive model (GAM). First, we explored the seasonality of suicide and climate variables such as mean temperature, daily temperature range, solar radiation, and relative humidity. Next, we identified confounding climate variables associated with suicide rate. To estimate the adjusted effect of solar radiation on the suicide rate, we investigated the confounding variables using a multivariable GAM. Suicide rate showed seasonality with a pattern similar to that of solar radiation. We found that the suicide rate increased 1.008 times when solar radiation increased by 1 MJ/m(2) after adjusting for other confounding climate factors (P < 0.001). Solar radiation has a significant linear relationship with suicide after adjusting for region, other climate variables, and time trends. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The Combination of Pill Count and Self-Reported Adherence is a Strong Predictor of First-Line ART Failure for Adults in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Johnson, Brent A.; Nachega, Jean B.; Wu, Baohua; Ordóñez, Claudia E.; Hare, Anna Q.; Kearns, Rachel; Murphy, Richard; Sunpath, Henry; Marconi, Vincent C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a strong predictor of virologic failure (VF) among people with HIV. Various methods such as patient self-report, pill counts and pharmacy refills have been utilized to monitor adherence. However, there are limited data on the accuracy of combining methods to better predict VF in routine clinical settings. We examined various methods to assess adherence including pill count, medication possession ratio (MPR), and self-reported adherence in order to determine which was most highly associated with VF after ≥ 6 months on ART. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a case-control study. At enrollment, pharmacy refill data were collected retrospectively from the medical chart, pill counts were completed to derive a pill count adherence ratio (PCAR) and a self-report questionnaire was administered to all participants. Parametric smooth splines and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to assess the accuracy of the adherence methods. Results 458 patients were enrolled from October 2010 to June 2012. Of these, 158 (34.50%) experienced VF (cases) and 300 (65.50%) were controls. The median (IQR) PCAR was 1.10 (0.99–1.14) for cases and 1.13 (1.08–1.18) for controls (p<0.0001). The median MPR was 1.00 (0.97–1.07) for cases and 1.03 (0.96–1.07) for controls (p=0.83). Combination of PCAR and self-reported questions was highly associated with VF. Conclusion In this setting, a combination of pill count adherence and self-report adherence questions had the highest diagnostic accuracy for VF. Further validation of this simple, low-cost combination is warranted in large prospective studies. PMID:25426940

  12. Deep South Atlantic carbonate chemistry and increased interocean deep water exchange during last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jimin; Anderson, Robert F.; Jin, Zhangdong; Menviel, Laurie; Zhang, Fei; Ryerson, Fredrick J.; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2014-04-01

    Carbon release from the deep ocean at glacial terminations is a critical component of past climate change, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We present a 28,000-year high-resolution record of carbonate ion concentration, a key parameter of the global carbon cycle, at 5-km water depth in the South Atlantic. We observe similar carbonate ion concentrations between the Last Glacial Maximum and the late Holocene, despite elevated concentrations in the glacial surface ocean. This strongly supports the importance of respiratory carbon accumulation in a stratified deep ocean for atmospheric CO2 reduction during the last ice age. After ˜9 μmol/kg decline during Heinrich Stadial 1, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion concentration rose by ˜24 μmol/kg from the onset of Bølling to Pre-boreal, likely caused by strengthening North Atlantic Deep Water formation (Bølling) or increased ventilation in the Southern Ocean (Younger Drays) or both (Pre-boreal). The ˜15 μmol/kg decline in deep water carbonate ion since ˜10 ka is consistent with extraction of alkalinity from seawater by deep-sea CaCO3 compensation and coral reef growth on continental shelves during the Holocene. Between 16,600 and 15,000 years ago, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion values converged with those at 3.4-km water depth in the western equatorial Pacific, as did carbon isotope and radiocarbon values. These observations suggest a period of enhanced lateral exchange of carbon between the deep South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, probably due to an increased transfer of momentum from southern westerlies to the Southern Ocean. By spreading carbon-rich deep Pacific waters around Antarctica for upwelling, invigorated interocean deep water exchange would lead to more efficient CO2 degassing from the Southern Ocean, and thus to an atmospheric CO2 rise, during the early deglaciation.

  13. Adherence to Referral Criteria at Admission and Patient Management at a Specialized Burns Centre: The Case of the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hasselberg, Marie; Kronblad, Emil; Kim, So-Mang; Wallis, Lee; Rode, Heinz; Laflamme, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Referral guidelines for burn care are meant to assist in decision-making as regards patient transfer and admissions to specialized units. Little is known, however, concerning how closely they are followed and whether they are linked to patient care. This is the object of the current study, focused on the paediatric burns centre of the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. All patients admitted to the centre during the winters of 2011–2015 (n = 1165) were included. The patient files were scrutinized to clarify whether the referral criteria in place were identified (seven in total) and to compile data on patient and injury characteristics. A case was defined as adherent to the criteria when at least one criterion was fulfilled and adherence was expressed as a percentage with 95% confidence intervals, for all years aggregated as well as by year and by patient or injury characteristics. The association between adherence to any individual criterion and hospital care (surgery or longer length of stay) was measured using logistic regressions. The overall adherence was 93.4% (100% among children under 2 years of age and 86% among the others) and it did not vary remarkably over time. The two criteria of “injury sustained at a specific anatomical site” (85.2%) and “young age” (51.9%) were those most often identified. Children aged 2 years or older were more likely to undergo surgery or to stay longer than those of young age (although a referral criterion) and so were those with higher injury severity (a referral criterion). In this specialized paediatric burns centre, children are admitted mainly according to the guidelines. However, given the high prevalence of paediatric burns in the region and the limited resources at the burns centre, adherence to the guidelines need to be further studied at all healthcare levels in the province. PMID:28684713

  14. Adherence as a language game.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Espen Skarstein

    2017-03-02

    Non-adherence, i.e. medication intake behavior not corresponding with agreed recommendations, is associated with increased morbidity and death, and it has been estimated that as many as 50% of patients in developed countries are not taking their medications as prescribed. But even as efforts in improving medication adherence over the years have increased, results are inconsistent, with only a minority of clinical trials showing any improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome. Since patient education is central to promoting good medication adherence, and language is integral to education, perhaps an exploration of the meaning and use of language, using the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein, is in order.

  15. Development and pilot testing of a standardized training program for a patient-mentoring intervention to increase adherence to outpatient HIV care.

    PubMed

    Cully, Jeffrey A; Mignogna, Joseph; Stanley, Melinda A; Davila, Jessica; Wear, Jackie; Amico, K Rivet; Giordano, Thomas P

    2012-03-01

    Although peer interventionists have been successful in medication treatment-adherence interventions, their role in complex behavior-change approaches to promote entry and reentry into HIV care requires further investigation. The current study sought to describe and test the feasibility of a standardized peer-mentor training program used for MAPPS (Mentor Approach for Promoting Patient Self-Care), a study designed to increase engagement and attendance at HIV outpatient visits among high-risk HIV inpatients using HIV-positive peer interventionists to deliver a comprehensive behavioral change intervention. Development of MAPPS and its corresponding training program included collaborations with mentors from a standing outpatient mentor program. The final training program included (1) a half-day workshop; (2) practice role-plays; and (3) formal, standardized patient role-plays, using trained actors with "real-time" video observation (and ratings from trainers). Mentor training occurred over a 6-week period and required demonstration of adherence and skill, as rated by MAPPS trainers. Although time intensive, ultimate certification of mentors suggested the program was both feasible and effective. Survey data indicated mentors thought highly of the training program, while objective rating data from trainers indicated mentors were able to understand and display standards associated with intervention fidelity. Data from the MAPPS training program provide preliminary evidence that peer mentors can be trained to levels necessary to ensure intervention fidelity, even within moderately complex behavioral-change interventions. Although additional research is needed due to limitations of the current study (e.g., limited generalizability due to sample size and limited breadth of clinical training opportunities), data from the current trial suggest that training programs such as MAPPS appear both feasible and effective.

  16. Does Pay-For-Performance Program Increase Providers Adherence to Guidelines for Managing Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Taiwan?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long-Sheng; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Li, Chung-Pin; Wu, Chen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Background Many people are concerned about that the quality of preventive care for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suboptimal. Taiwan, a hyperendemic area of chronic HBV and HCV infection, implemented a nationwide pay-for-performance (P4P) program in 2010, which aimed to improve the preventive care provided to HBV and HCV patients by increasing physicians’ adherence to guidelines through financial incentives. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early effects of the P4P program on utilization of preventive services by HBV and HCV patients. Methods Using a quasi-experimental design with propensity score matching method, we matched the HBV and HCV patients enrolled in the P4P program with non-enrollees in 2010, resulting in 21,643 patients in each group. Generalized estimating equations was applied to examine the difference-in-difference effects of P4P program enrollment on the utilization of three guideline-recommended preventive services (regular outpatient follow-up visits, abdominal ultrasonography (US) examinations, and aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) tests by HBV and HCV patients. Results The P4P program enrollees were significantly more likely to attend twice-annual follow-up visits, to receive recommended US examinations and AST/ALT tests, than non-enrollees. Conclusions The results of our preliminary assessment indicate that financial incentives offered by the P4P program was associated with a modest improvement in adherence to guidelines for better chronic HBV and HBC management. PMID:27517172

  17. Specialty drug coupons lower out-of-pocket costs and may improve adherence at the risk of increasing premiums.

    PubMed

    Starner, Catherine I; Alexander, G Caleb; Bowen, Kevin; Qiu, Yang; Wickersham, Peter J; Gleason, Patrick P

    2014-10-01

    Expenditures for specialty drugs account for more than 25 percent of total US drug spending and have been increasing at more than 13 percent annually. We examined insurers' role in maintaining the affordability and accessibility of specialty drugs while maximizing their value. We conducted two analyses: one using an administrative claims database with information on more than ten million commercially insured patients and another using the same database combined with the drug prescription records from a specialty pharmacy. First, we examined the prevalence of specialty drug coupons and the degree to which these reduced patients' out-of-pocket costs, focusing on 264,801 prescriptions. Second, we quantified the association between the magnitude of out-of-pocket costs for specialty drugs and patients' abandonment of their new or restarted therapy, focusing on a group of nearly 16,000 patients. We found that drug coupons accounted for $21.2 million of patients' $35.3 million annual out-of-pocket costs. In the vast majority of cases, coupons reduced monthly cost sharing to less than $250, a point at which patients were far less likely to abandon therapy with biologic anti-inflammatory drugs or with drugs for multiple sclerosis. However, by reducing cost sharing, coupons may also circumvent efforts to encourage patients to use the most cost-effective drugs. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. A Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Trial on the Effect of a “feeding buddy” Program on adherence to the Prevention of Mother-To-Child-Transmission Guidelines in a Rural Area of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Spies, Lenore; Tanser, Frank; Thior, Ibou; Scott Gordon, W.; Coutsoudis, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background: The uptake of prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT) services has improved in South Africa but challenges remain, including adherence to the World Health Organization's (WHO) PMTCT recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), taking antiretroviral medication (ARV); testing for early infant diagnosis; and reducing stigma. Women who practice EBF for the first 6 months are less likely to transmit HIV to their infants, yet only 7% of women EBF for 6 months in South Africa. Adherence to these recommendations remains challenging because of difficulties relating to disclosure and stigma. To address this challenge, the feeding buddy concept was developed based on studies where ARV buddies have proved effective in providing support for women living with HIV. Buddies have demonstrated a positive effect on providing emotional and social support to adhere to PMTCT guidelines. Methods: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in 16 selected randomly assigned clinics in uMhlathuze and uMlalazi districts of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. HIV-positive pregnant women (n = 625) who intended to breastfeed were enrolled at 8 control clinics and 8 intervention clinics. The clinics were stratified on the basis of urban/rural/periurban locale and then randomly allocated to either intervention or control. In the intervention clinics, the mother chose a feeding buddy to be enrolled alongside her. Quantitative interviews with mothers and their chosen buddies took place at enrollment during pregnancy and at routine postdelivery visits at day 3 and weeks 6, 14 and 22. Women in the control clinics were followed using the same evaluation schedule. The trial evaluated the effect of a voluntary PMTCT feeding buddy program on HIV-infected women's adherence to PMTCT recommendations and stigma reduction. The proportion of women exclusively feeding at 5.5 months postpartum was the primary end-point of the trial. In-depth interviews were conducted among a

  19. Increased S-Nitrosylation and Proteasomal Degradation of Caspase-3 during Infection Contribute to the Persistence of Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) in Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Karl A.; Allam, Amr; McIntosh, Anne; Houston, Stephanie A.; Cerovic, Vuk; Goodyear, Carl S.; Roe, Andrew J.; Beatson, Scott A.; Milling, Simon W.; Walker, Daniel; Wall, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) have been implicated as a causative agent of Crohn’s disease (CD) due to their isolation from the intestines of CD sufferers and their ability to persist in macrophages inducing granulomas. The rapid intracellular multiplication of AIEC sets it apart from other enteric pathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium which after limited replication induce programmed cell death (PCD). Understanding the response of infected cells to the increased AIEC bacterial load and associated metabolic stress may offer insights into AIEC pathogenesis and its association with CD. Here we show that AIEC persistence within macrophages and dendritic cells is facilitated by increased proteasomal degradation of caspase-3. In addition S-nitrosylation of pro- and active forms of caspase-3, which can inhibit the enzymes activity, is increased in AIEC infected macrophages. This S-nitrosylated caspase-3 was seen to accumulate upon inhibition of the proteasome indicating an additional role for S-nitrosylation in inducing caspase-3 degradation in a manner independent of ubiquitination. In addition to the autophagic genetic defects that are linked to CD, this delay in apoptosis mediated in AIEC infected cells through increased degradation of caspase-3, may be an essential factor in its prolonged persistence in CD patients. PMID:23861899

  20. Enjoyment for High-Intensity Interval Exercise Increases during the First Six Weeks of Training: Implications for Promoting Exercise Adherence in Sedentary Adults

    PubMed Central

    Heisz, Jennifer J.; Tejada, Mary Grace M.; Paolucci, Emily M.; Muir, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to show that enjoyment for high-intensity interval exercise increases with chronic training. Prior acute studies typically report high-intensity interval training (HIT) as being more enjoyable than moderate continuous training (MCT) unless the high-intensity intervals are too strenuous or difficult to complete. It follows that exercise competency may be a critical factor contributing to the enjoyment of HIT, and therefore building competency through chronic training may be one way to increase its enjoyment. To test this, we randomly assigned sedentary young adults to six weeks of HIT or MCT, and tracked changes in their enjoyment for the exercise. Enjoyment for HIT increased with training whereas enjoyment for MCT remained constant and lower. Changes in exercise enjoyment were predicted by increases in workload, suggesting that strength adaptions may be important for promoting exercise enjoyment. The results point to HIT as a promising protocol for promoting exercise enjoyment and adherence in sedentary young adults. PMID:27973594

  1. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  2. Telehealth, Wearable Sensors, and the Internet: Will They Improve Stroke Outcomes Through Increased Intensity of Therapy, Motivation, and Adherence to Rehabilitation Programs?

    PubMed

    Burridge, Jane H; Lee, Alan Chong W; Turk, Ruth; Stokes, Maria; Whitall, Jill; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Clatworthy, Phil; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Meagher, Claire; Franco, Enrico; Yardley, Lucy

    2017-07-01

    Stroke, predominantly a condition of older age, is a major cause of acquired disability in the global population and puts an increasing burden on health care resources. Clear evidence for the importance of intensity of therapy in optimizing functional outcomes is found in animal models, supported by neuroimaging and behavioral research, and strengthened by recent meta-analyses from multiple clinical trials. However, providing intensive therapy using conventional treatment paradigms is expensive and sometimes not feasible because of social and environmental factors. This article addresses the need for cost-effective increased intensity of practice and suggests potential benefits of telehealth (TH) as an innovative model of care in physical therapy. We provide an overview of TH and present evidence that a web-supported program, used in conjunction with constraint-induced therapy (CIT), can increase intensity and adherence to a rehabilitation regimen. The design and feasibility testing of this web-based program, "LifeCIT," is presented. We describe how wearable sensors can monitor activity and provide feedback to patients and therapists. The methodology for the development of a wearable device with embedded inertial and mechanomyographic sensors, algorithms to classify functional movement, and a graphical user interface to present meaningful data to patients to support a home exercise program is explained. We propose that wearable sensor technologies and TH programs have the potential to provide most-effective, intensive, home-based stroke rehabilitation.

  3. A closer look at the increase in suicide rates in South Korea from 1986–2005

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin-Won; Chun, Heeran; Cho, Sung-il

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicide rates have recently been decreasing on average among OECD countries, but increasing trends have been detected in South Korea, particularly since the 1997 economic crisis. There have been no detailed analyses about the changes of the suicide rates over time periods in Korea. We examined trends in both absolute and proportional suicide rates over the time period of economic development, crisis, and recovery (1986 – 2005) as well as in birth cohorts from 1924 to 1978. Methods We used data on total mortality and suicide rates from 1986 to 2005 published online by the Korean National Statistical Office (NSO) and extracted data for individuals under 80 years old. The analyses of the trends for 1) the sex-age-specific total mortality rate, 2) the sex-age-specific suicide rate, and 3) the sex-age-specific proportional suicide rate in 1986–2005 were conducted. To demonstrate the birth cohort effect on the proportional suicide rate, the synthetic birth cohort from 1924 to 1978 from the successive cross-sectional data was constructed. Results Age standardized suicide rates in South Korea increased by 98% in men (from 15.3 to 30.3 per 100,000) and by 124% in women (from 5.8 to 13.0 per 100,000). In both genders, the proportional increase in suicide rates was more prominent among the younger group aged under 45, despite the absolute increase being attributed to the older group. There were distinct cohort effects underlying increasing suicide rates particularly among younger age groups. Conclusion Increasing suicide rates in Korea was composed of a greater absolute increase in the older group and a greater proportional increase in the younger group. PMID:19250535

  4. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and close dietetic supervision increase total dietary antioxidant intake and plasma antioxidant capacity in subjects with abdominal obesity.

    PubMed

    Kolomvotsou, Anastasia I; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Lekakis, John; Koutelidakis, Antonis; Efstathiou, Stamatis; Nana-Anastasiou, Maria; Zampelas, Antonis

    2013-02-01

    To determine the effect of Mediterranean-type diet and close dietetic supervision on dietary antioxidant intake and plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in patients with abdominal obesity. Ninety subjects with abdominal obesity, 46 in intervention group, 44 in control group, participated in a 2-month, randomized, parallel dietary intervention. All participants were counseled on Greek Mediterranean diet. The intervention group was under close dietetic supervision, followed a specific relevant daily and weekly food plan consuming antioxidant-rich foods and food products. Total dietary antioxidant intake was calculated from the volunteers' food diaries, and plasma TAC using plasma ORAC assay and plasma ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, both at baseline and at 2 months. Following the 2-month period, total dietary antioxidant intake was increased in the intervention group compared to the control group (P = 0.000). In addition, increased intake of total fat, due to higher consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids, as well as increased intakes of dietary fiber, vitamin C and alcohol was also observed in the intervention group compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Plasma TAC was increased in the intervention group compared to the control group (P = 0.039) using the ORAC assay, while there was a trend toward a TAC increase (P = 0.077) using the FRAP assay. Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet, with emphasis on an increase in foods rich in antioxidants and close dietetic supervision, can increase total dietary antioxidant intake and plasma TAC in patients with abdominal obesity.

  5. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Tailored message interventions versus typical messages for increasing participation in colorectal cancer screening among a non-adherent population: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kei; Ishikawa, Yoshiki; Fukuyoshi, Jun; Yonekura, Akio; Harada, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Mizota, Yuri; Hamashima, Chisato; Saito, Hiroshi

    2016-05-24

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost-efficiency of a tailored message intervention compared with a non-tailored message intervention for increasing colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates among a non-adherent population, in a community-based client reminder program. After a baseline survey for psychological segmentation, 2140 eligible individuals were randomly assigned either to a group with a tailored matched-message condition (N = 356), a group with a non-tailored unmatched-message condition (N = 355), or to two control groups, one using a typical message with a professional design (N = 717) and one without a professional design (N = 712). The main outcome measure was attendance rates in a community-organized CRC screening program within five months of receiving a print reminder. There was a significant difference in fecal occult blood test (FOBT) attendance rates at follow-up assessments between the tailored matched-message condition (14.0 %) and the control (9.9 %; OR = 1.48, p = 0.026), while there was no significant difference between the unmatched-message condition (11.0 %) and the control (OR = 1.12, p = 0.558), and between the matched-message condition and the unmatched-message condition (OR = 1.32, p = 0.219). The cost of a one-person increase in FOBT screening was 3,740 JPY for the tailored matched-message condition, while it was 2,747 JPY for the control. A tailored-message intervention for segmented individuals designed to increase CRC screening rates in a community-based client reminder program was significantly effective compared to a usual reminder, but not more effective than an unmatched message in a randomized controlled trial, and was not sufficiently effective to highlight its value from a cost perspective. Therefore, the tailored intervention including target segmentation needs to be improved for future implementation in a CRC screening program for a non-adherent

  7. The Improvement of Ion Plated Ag and Au Film Adherence to Si3N4 and SiC Surfaces for Increased Tribological Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1998-01-01

    A modified dc-diode plating system, utilizing a metallic screen cage as a cathode and referred as SCREEN CAGE ION PLATING (SCIP), is used to deposit Ag and Au lubricating films on Si3N4 and SiC surfaces. When deposition is performed in Ar or N2, glow discharge, the surface displays poor adhesive strength (less than 5 MPa). A dramatic increase in adhesive strength (less than 80 MPa) is achieved when plating is performed in a reactive 50% 02 + 50% Ar glow discharge. The excited/ionized oxygen species (O2(+)/O(+) in the glow discharge contribute to the oxidation of the Si3N4 or SiC surfaces as determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XTS) depth profiling. The reactively sputter-oxidized S3N4 or SiC surfaces and the activated-oxidized-metastable Ag or Au species formed in the plasma cooperatively contribute to the increased adherence. As a result, the linear thermal expansion coefficient mismatch at the interface is reduced. These lubricating Ag and Au films under sliding conditions reduce the friction coefficient by a factor of 2-1/2 to 4.

  8. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  9. The prevalence and factors associated for anti-tuberculosis treatment non-adherence among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in public health care facilities in South Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Woimo, Tadele Teshome; Yimer, Wondwossen Kassahun; Bati, Temesgen; Gesesew, Hailay Abrha

    2017-03-20

    Evidence exists pointing out how non-adherence to treatment remains a major hurdle to efficient tuberculosis control in developing countries. Many tuberculosis (Tb) patients do not complete their six-month course of anti-tuberculosis medications and are not aware of the importance of sputum re-examinations, thereby putting themselves at risk of developing multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and relapse. However, there is a dearth of publications about non-adherence towards anti-Tb medication in these settings. We assessed the prevalence of and associated factors for anti-Tb treatment non-adherence in public health care facilities of South Ethiopia. This was a cross-sectional survey using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative study was conducted among 261 Tb patients from 17 health centers and one general hospital. The qualitative aspect included an in-depth interview of 14 key informants. For quantitative data, the analysis of descriptive statistics, bivariate and multiple logistic regression was carried out, while thematic framework analysis was applied for the qualitative data. The prevalence of non-adherence towards anti-Tb treatment was 24.5%. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that poor knowledge towards tuberculosis and its treatment (AOR = 4.6, 95%CI: 1.4-15.6), cost of medication other than Tb (AOR = 4.7, 95%CI: 1.7-13.4), having of health information at every visit (AOR = 3, 95% CI: 1.1-8.4) and distance of DOTS center from individual home (AOR = 5.7, 95%CI: 1.9-16.8) showed statistically significant association with non-adherence towards anti- tuberculosis treatment. Qualitative study also revealed that distance, lack of awareness about importance of treatment completion and cost of transportation were the major barriers for adherence. A quarter of Tb patients interrupted their treatment due to knowledge, availability and accessibility of DOTS service. We recommend

  10. Increased lead availability and enzyme activities in root-adhering soil of Lantana camara during phytoextraction in the presence of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Jusselme, My Dung; Miambi, Edouard; Mora, Philippe; Diouf, Michel; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne

    2013-02-15

    Earthworms are known to increase availability of heavy metals in soils and also play an important role in maintaining the structure and quality of soil. The introduction of earthworms into soils contaminated with metals in the presence of a potential hyperaccumulator has been suggested as an aid for phytoremediation processes. The present study was conducted to evaluate: (i) the effects of earthworms on lead availability in artificially contaminated soil at 500 and 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb in the presence of Lantana camara, a hyperaccumulator, (ii) the effects of earthworms and lead on soil properties such as pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter (OM), total and available N, P and K and (iii) soil enzyme activities. Earthworms increased the bioavailable Pb in root-adhering soil by a factor of 2 to 3 in the contaminated soils at concentrations of 500 to 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), respectively. In lead contaminated soils, the presence of earthworms led to a significant decrease in soil pH by about 0.2 but increased CEC by 17% and OM by more than 30%. Earthworm activities also increased the activities of N-acetylglucosamidase, β-glucosidase, cellulase, xylanase, alkaline and acid phosphatase, urease and fluorescein diacetate assay (FDA). These results indicate that the ecological context for phytoremediation should be broadened by considering plant-soil-earthworm interactions as they influence both plant health and absorption of heavy metals. They also showed that the enzyme activities monitored could serve as useful proxies for phytoremediation capability and, more generally, for soil quality as a whole. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ormocomp-modified glass increases collagen binding and promotes the adherence and maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Käpylä, Elli; Sorkio, Anni; Teymouri, Shokoufeh; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena; Valden, Mika; Skottman, Heli; Kellomäki, Minna; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati

    2014-12-09

    In in vitro live-cell imaging, it would be beneficial to grow and assess human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells on thin, transparent, rigid surfaces such as cover glasses. In this study, we assessed how the silanization of glass with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MAPTMS), or polymer-ceramic material Ormocomp affects the surface properties, protein binding, and maturation of hESC-RPE cells. The surface properties were studied by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and a protein binding assay. The cell adherence and proliferation were evaluated by culturing hESCRPE cells on collagen IV-coated untreated or silanized surfaces for 42 days. The Ormocomp treatment significantly increased the hydrophobicity and roughness of glass surfaces compared to the APTES and MAPTMS treatments. The XPS results indicated that the Ormocomp treatment changes the chemical composition of the glass surface by increasing the carbon content and the number of C-O/═O bonds. The protein-binding test confirmed that the Ormocomp-treated surfaces bound more collagen IV than did APTES- or MAPTMS-treated surfaces. All of the silane treatments increased the number of cells: after 42 days of culture, Ormocomp had 0.38, APTES had 0.16, MAPTMS had 0.19, and untreated glass had only 0.062, all presented as million cells cm(-2). There were no differences in cell numbers compared to smoother to rougher Ormocomp surfaces, suggesting that the surface chemistry and, more specifically, the collagen binding in combination with Ormocomp are beneficial to hESC-RPE cell culture. This study clearly demonstrates that Ormocomp treatment combined with collagen coating significantly increases hESC-RPE cell attachment compared to commonly used silanizing agents APTES and MAPTMS. Ormocomp silanization could thus enable the use of microscopic live cell imaging methods for h

  12. Assessing the need for improved strategies and medication-related education to increase adherence for oral anticancer medications in the young adult oncology population.

    PubMed

    Divakaruni, Anupama; Saylor, Elizabeth; Duffy, Alison P

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Oral anticancer medication adherence is a critical factor in optimizing cancer treatment outcomes and minimizing toxicity. Although potential adherence barriers exist, it is not well understood how these factors impact adherence. Methods This is a prospective, single-center, patient survey-based study conducted at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center including 18- to 39-year-old patients who have been actively taking an oral anticancer medication for at least one month from 1 April 2013 to 1 April 2016. The primary objective of this study is to describe institutional practices for medication education and adherence monitoring practices as perceived by young adult patients at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and to describe practice consistency with recommendations from the American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards. The secondary objectives include patient-reported facilitators and barriers to oral anticancer medication adherence. Results Seventeen patients completed the survey; 24% ( n = 4) of patients denied receiving information about what to do in case of a missed dose. The most common facilitators of adherence include understanding of disease and treatment (88%, n = 15), perceived severity of illness (82%, n = 14), and use of oral anticancer medications (82%, n = 14). The most common barriers to adherence are side effects (59% n = 10), forgetfulness (47%, n = 8), and depressive symptoms (35%, n = 6). Conclusion Based on patient-reported guideline adherence, improvement is needed in including family, caregivers, and others in the education process as well as providing education about plan for missed doses and drug-drug and drug-food interactions. The strengths of the current medication education and adherence monitoring practices as perceived by the young adult patient population include education

  13. Blood oxygen affinity increases during digestion in the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Rafael P; Fuga, Adriana; Micheli-Campbell, Mariana A; Carvalho, José E; Andrade, Denis V

    2015-08-01

    Digesting snakes experience massive increases in metabolism that can last for many days and are accompanied by adjustments in the oxygen transport cascade. Accordingly, we examined the oxygen-binding properties of the blood in the South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) during fasting and 24 and 48h after the snakes have ingested a rodent meal corresponding to 15% (±2%) of its own body mass. In general, oxygen-hemoglobin (Hb-O2) affinity was significantly increased 24h post-feeding, and then returned toward fasting values within 48h post-feeding. Content of organic phosphates ([NTP] and [NTP]/[Hb]), hemoglobin cooperativity (Hill's n), and Bohr Effect (ΔlogP50/ΔpH) were not affected by feeding. The postprandial increase in Hb-O2 affinity in the South American rattlesnake can be almost entirely ascribed by the moderate alkaline tide that follows meal ingestion. In general, digesting snakes were able to regulate blood metabolites at quite constant levels (e.g., plasma osmolality, lactate, glucose, and total protein levels). The level of circulating lipids, however, was considerably increased, which may be related to their mobilization, since lipids are known to be incorporated by the enterocytes after snakes have fed. In conclusion, our results indicate that the exceptional metabolic increment exhibited by C. d. terrificus during meal digestion is entirely supported by the aerobic pathways and that among the attending cardiorespiratory adjustments, pulmonary Hb-O2 loading is likely improved due to the increment in blood O2 affinity.

  14. Using a treatment partner and text messaging to improve adherence to psychotropic medication: a qualitative formative study of service users and caregivers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mall, S; Sibeko, G; Temmingh, H; Stein, D J; Milligan, P; Lund, C

    2013-09-01

    Poor adherence to medications, including psychotropic medications contributes to the burden of disease. Mental health service users (MHSU) may also not attend follow-up appointments at their health care facilities where they could discuss adherence with their health care provider. This paper reports on preliminary qualitative research preceding a randomised controlled trial that aims to improve adherence to psychotropic medication and to follow up treatment visits. The intervention will entail the support of individuals with serious mental disorder by a treatment partner and short message service (SMS) text messaging. The preliminary research reported in this paper aimed to extract views about the intervention from both mental health service users (MHSU) and caregivers through focus group discussions and individual interviews. Data were analysed using ATLAS TI qualitative software. The caregivers interviewed were all mothers of MHSU who took measures to encourage adherence. They held mixed opinions on whether the treatment partner should be a family member. Most participants expressed the view that due to living conditions, family members were natural treatment partners, but others stated that they would prefer a treatment partner who was not a family member. Similarly, while most MHSU supported the idea of a treatment partner, a minority were concerned that a treatment partner may potentially be too controlling and compromise their autonomy. The vast majority of participants supported SMS text messaging as a means of reminding MHSU to take their medication and attend follow-up appointments. One participant mentioned the importance of broader social inclusion issues that should be incorporated in the intervention. Qualitative research may provide useful insights for the design of interventions of this nature related to social inclusion randomised control trials with its focus on adherence.

  15. Evidence for Increased Carbon Storage in the Mid-Depth South Atlantic During the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerra, M.; Lund, D. C.; Yu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon isotope anomalies were a ubiquitous feature in the mid-depth Atlantic during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1, 14.5-17.5 kyr BP) yet their cause is a matter of ongoing debate. New evidence points towards North Atlantic processes as the source of the δ13C anomalies, with the most likely driver being weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) (1, 2). Model simulations suggest that slowing of the AMOC 1) minimizes sinking of high δ13C surface water in the North Atlantic, and 2) increases the residence time of deep water, leading to the accumulation of isotopically light respired carbon (3). The simulated tracer field shows the largest anomalies in the North Atlantic and progressively smaller anomalies in the tropical and South Atlantic, similar to observations. Here, we assess the accumulation of carbon in the mid-depth South Atlantic using foraminiferal B/Ca, a proxy for [CO32-] (which is inversely related to ΣCO2) (4). Using two high resolution records from the Brazil Margin, we show that [CO32-] decreased by 23±6 μmol/kg during HS1 and 15±7 μmol/kg during the Younger Dryas (YD, 11.5-12.9 kyr BP), synchronous with the apparent AMOC weakening recorded in 231Pa/230Th records (5). The [CO32-] response at the Brazil Margin is smaller than at 12°N (6), implying there was a north-south gradient in [CO32-] signals during HS1. The implied millennial scale increases in ΣCO2 are consistent with model results of AMOC shutdown, suggesting the mid-depth Atlantic acted as a temporary reservoir of stored carbon during both HS1 and the YD. On longer time-scales, changes in [CO32-] at the Brazil Margin likely reflect exchange with an atmosphere with progressively higher pCO2. Our results suggest that mid-depth δ13C anomalies were partly due to increased carbon storage, meaning δ13C behaved non-conservatively during the deglaciation. Our results also imply that mechanisms responsible for rising atmospheric CO2levels must have counteracted increased

  16. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Stephen M M; Jensen, Emily L; Simon, Stacey L; Friedman, Norman R

    2016-06-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ(2) test. Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20-4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27-5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the pathophysiology of and to develop adherence

  17. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  18. Antiretroviral adherence interventions in Southern Africa: implications for using HIV treatments for prevention.

    PubMed

    Dewing, Sarah; Mathews, Cathy; Fatti, Geoffrey; Grimwood, Ashraf; Boulle, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    There is concern that the expansion of ART (antiretroviral treatment) programmes to incorporate the use of treatment as prevention (TasP) may be associated with low levels of adherence and retention in care, resulting in the increased spread of drug-resistant HIV. We review research published over the past year that reports on interventions to improve adherence and retention in care in Southern Africa, and discuss these in terms of their potential to support the expansion of ART programmes for TasP. We found eight articles published since January 2012, seven of which were from South Africa. The papers describe innovative models for ART care and adherence support, some of which have the potential to facilitate the ongoing scale- up of treatment programmes for increased coverage and TasP. The extent to which interventions from South Africa can be effectively implemented in other, lower-resource Southern African countries is unclear.

  19. The increasing burden of pelvic fractures in older people, New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Boufous, Soufiane; Finch, Caroline; Lord, Stephen; Close, Jacqueline

    2005-11-01

    Despite their significant health burden, epidemiological information regarding pelvic fractures is scarce. In this study, we examine trends in admission for pelvic fractures to acute hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, between July 1988 and June 2000, using routinely collected hospital separations statistics. Over this period, the number of admissions for pelvic fractures among those aged 50 years and over increased by 58.4% in men and 110.8% in women. Age-specific rates of admissions per 100,000 population for pelvic fracture also rose significantly, particularly for those aged at least 75 years. The number and proportion of transport related pelvic fractures fell significantly for both men (chi(2)=23.82, d.f.=1, p<0.001) and women (chi(2)=49.26, d.f.=1, p<0.001) while those resulting from falls increased significantly over the 12-year-period. Falls are increasingly becoming the single most important cause of pelvic injuries in older people, suggesting that preventive measures aimed at reducing the risk of falls need to be pursued. Factors contributing to the rise of fall-related pelvic fractures need to be investigated to inform strategies aimed at reversing the observed increase in the number and age-specific rates of pelvic fractures in older people.

  20. Social Support, Stigma and Disclosure: Examining the Relationship with HIV Medication Adherence among Ryan White Program Clients in the Mid-South USA

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Latrice C.; Rossi, Kristen R.; Ogg, Siri A.; Krull, Lisa J.; Griffin, Dorcas Young

    2015-01-01

    Social support from friends and family is positively related to better health outcomes among adults living with HIV. An extension of these networks such as religious communities may be an untapped source of social support for promoting HIV medical adherence. This paper explores the association of HIV medication adherence to satisfaction with support from family, friends and church members, as well as HIV-related stigma, and HIV disclosure. In partnership with the Shelby County Health Department, the Memphis Ryan White Part A Program, and the University of Memphis School of Public Health, a total of 286 interviewer-administered surveys were conducted with Ryan White clients. Seventy-six percent (n = 216) of participants reported being prescribed antiretroviral medication (ARVs). Nearly all participants (n = 202, 94%) prescribed ARVs reported disclosing their HIV status to someone. Almost 20% (n = 40) of those prescribed ARVs reported not being satisfied with support received from his/her church. Interestingly, participants reported rarely experiencing stigma as a result of their HIV status. The extent to which satisfaction with support from personal networks and institutional settings like the church affect medication adherence is yet to be understood. The complexity of HIV disclosure and HIV stigma in relation to these supports warrants further investigation to understand how best to improve HIV health outcomes. PMID:26103592

  1. Adherence to therapy with oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Avorn, Jerry; Wang, Philip S; Winer, Eric P

    2002-05-01

    With the rise in availability and increasing use of oral anticancer agents, concerns about adherence to prescribed regimens will become an increasingly important issue in oncology. Few published studies have focused on adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy, in part because the vast majority of chemotherapy is delivered intravenously in physicians' offices or hospitals. In this article, we review current knowledge of adherence behavior with regard to oral medications in general, including factors associated with adherence and methods for measuring adherence. We also review published studies of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents in adult and pediatric populations and adherence issues in cancer prevention. The available evidence reveals that patient adherence to oral chemotherapy recommendations is variable and not easily predicted. Adherence rates ranging from less than 20% to 100% have been reported, and certain populations, such as adolescents, pose particular challenges. Future efforts should focus on improving measurement and prediction of adherence and on developing interventions to improve adherence for both patients in clinical trials and patients being treated outside of the research setting. Assessment of adherence among individuals with cancer and implementation of interventions in situations of poor adherence should improve clinical outcomes.

  2. Quality improvement intervention to increase adherence to ART prescription policy at HIV treatment clinics in Lusaka, Zambia: A cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Subramaniam, Hamsa L; Prust, Margaret L; Prescott, Marta R; Mpasela, Felton; Mwango, Albert; Namonje, Leah; Moyo, Crispin; Chibuye, Benjamin; van den Broek, Jan Willem; Hehman, Lindsey; Moberley, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    In urban areas, crowded HIV treatment facilities with long patient wait times can deter patients from attending their clinical appointments and picking up their medications, ultimately disrupting patient care and compromising patient retention and adherence. Formative research at eight facilities in Lusaka revealed that only 46% of stable HIV treatment patients were receiving a three-month refill supply of antiretroviral drugs, despite it being national policy for stable adult patients. We designed a quality improvement intervention to improve the operationalization of this policy. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in sixteen facilities in Lusaka with the primary objective of examining the intervention's impact on the proportion of stable patients receiving three-month refills. The secondary objective was examining whether the quality improvement intervention reduced facility congestion measured through two proxy indicators: daily volume of clinic visits and average clinic wait times for services. The mean change in the proportion of three-month refills among control facilities from baseline to endline was 10% (from 38% to 48%), compared to a 25% mean change (an increase from 44% to 69%) among intervention facilities. This represents a significant 15% mean difference (95% CI: 2%-29%; P = 0.03) in the change in proportion of patients receiving three-month refills. On average, control facilities had 15 more visits per day in the endline than in the baseline, while intervention facilities had 20 fewer visits per day in endline than in baseline, a mean difference of 35 fewer visits per day (P = 0.1). The change in the mean facility total wait time for intervention facilities dropped 19 minutes between baseline and endline when compared to control facilities (95% CI: -10.2-48.5; P = 0.2). A more patient-centred service delivery schedule of three-month prescription refills for stable patients is viable. We encourage the expansion of this sustainable

  3. Increased rate of apoptosis and diminished phagocytic ability of human neutrophils infected with Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Brest, Patrick; Bétis, Frédéric; Cuburu, Nicolas; Selva, Eric; Herrant, Magali; Servin, Alain; Auberger, Patrick; Hofman, Paul

    2004-10-01

    The proinflammatory effect of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains have been recently demonstrated in vitro by showing that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transepithelial migration is induced after bacterial colonization of apical intestinal monolayers. The effect of Afa/Dr DAEC-PMN interaction on PMN behavior has been not investigated. Because of the putative virulence mechanism of PMN apoptosis during infectious diseases and taking into account the high level of expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF, or CD55), the receptor of Afa/Dr DAEC on PMNs, we sought to determine whether infection of PMNs by Afa/Dr DAEC strains could promote cell apoptosis. We looked at the behavior of PMNs incubated with Afa/Dr DAEC strains once they had transmigrated across polarized monolayers of intestinal (T84) cells. Infection of PMNs by Afa/Dr DAEC strains induced PMN apoptosis characterized by morphological nuclear changes, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and a high level of annexin V expression. However, transmigrated and nontransmigrated PMNs incubated with Afa/Dr DAEC strains showed similar elevated global caspase activities. PMN apoptosis depended on their agglutination, induced by Afa/Dr DAEC, and was still observed after preincubation of PMNs with anti-CD55 and/or anti-CD66 antibodies. Low levels of phagocytosis of Afa/Dr DAEC strains were observed both in nontransmigrated and in transmigrated PMNs compared to that observed with the control E. coli DH5alpha strain. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that interaction of Afa/Dr DAEC with PMNs may increase the bacterial virulence both by inducing PMN apoptosis through an agglutination process and by diminishing their phagocytic capacity.

  4. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  5. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    PubMed

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutations in hns reduce the adherence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli 091:H21 strain B2F1 to human colonic epithelial cells and increase the production of hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Scott, Maria E; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D

    2003-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) 091:H21 strain B2F1, an isolate from a patient with the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), produces elastase-activatable Shiga toxin (Stx) type 2d and adheres well to human colonic epithelial T84 cells. This adherence phenotype occurs even though B2F1 does not contain the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) that encodes the primary adhesin for E. coli O157:H7. To attempt to identify genes involved in binding of B2F1 to T84 cells a bank of mini-Tn5phoACm(r) transposon mutants of this strain was generated. Several of these mutants exhibited a reduced adherence phenotype, but none of the insertions in these mutants were within putative adhesin genes. Rather, insertional mutations within hns resulted in the loss of adherence. Moreover, the hns mutant also displayed an increase in the production of hemolysin and alkaline phosphatase and a loss of motility with no change in Stx2d-activatable expression levels. When B2F1 was cured of the large plasmid that encodes the hemolysin, the resulting strain adhered well to T84 cells. However, an hns mutant of the plasmid-cured B2F1 strain exhibited a reduction in adherence to T84 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that H-NS regulates the expression of several genes and some potential virulence factors in the intimin-negative B2F1 STEC strain and that the large plasmid is not required for T84 cell colonization.

  7. Evaluating an Intervention to Increase Cancer Knowledge in Racially Diverse Communities in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Marvella; Wahlquist, Amy E.; Ridgeway, Celina; Streets, June; Mitchum, Katie A.; Harper, Reverend Remus; Hamilton, Ian; Etheredge, Jim; Sweat, Melanie; Varner, Heidi; Campbell, Katora; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct a cancer education intervention with racially diverse communities in South Carolina. Methods The study was conducted at eight different sites in six counties in SC. The intervention included a 3-hour general cancer knowledge and 30-minute prostate cancer knowledge component. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were administered. Maximum scores were 31, 10 and 5 for the general cancer knowledge, prostate cancer knowledge and perceived self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction instruments, respectively. Analyses were completed using SPSS 16.0, SAS 9.1.3, and R v2.6.1. Results The study sample consisted of 164 predominantly African American participants. Most of the participants who reported age were 50+ years (62.5%). Among those who reported income, 46.1% had an annual household income < $40,000. The mean general cancer knowledge pre-test score was 26.2 (standard deviation (SD) 3.7) with a mean post-intervention increase of 2.15 points (p<0.01). The mean pre-test prostate cancer knowledge score was 7.3 (SD 2.0) with a post-intervention increase of 0.48 points (p<0.01). Perceived self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction scores had a ceiling effect. Conclusions General cancer knowledge and prostate cancer knowledge scores increased following the intervention. Practice Implications The intervention was successful in the short-term. It could be continued by community members. PMID:20674239

  8. Biomass Increases Go under Cover: Woody Vegetation Dynamics in South African Rangelands

    PubMed Central

    Mograbi, Penelope J.; Knapp, David E.; Martin, Roberta E.; Main, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Woody biomass dynamics are an expression of ecosystem function, yet biomass estimates do not provide information on the spatial distribution of woody vegetation within the vertical vegetation subcanopy. We demonstrate the ability of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to measure aboveground biomass and subcanopy structure, as an explanatory tool to unravel vegetation dynamics in structurally heterogeneous landscapes. We sampled three communal rangelands in Bushbuckridge, South Africa, utilised by rural communities for fuelwood harvesting. Woody biomass estimates ranged between 9 Mg ha-1 on gabbro geology sites to 27 Mg ha-1 on granitic geology sites. Despite predictions of woodland depletion due to unsustainable fuelwood extraction in previous studies, biomass in all the communal rangelands increased between 2008 and 2012. Annual biomass productivity estimates (10–14% p.a.) were higher than previous estimates of 4% and likely a significant contributor to the previous underestimations of modelled biomass supply. We show that biomass increases are attributable to growth of vegetation <5 m in height, and that, in the high wood extraction rangeland, 79% of the changes in the vertical vegetation subcanopy are gains in the 1-3m height class. The higher the wood extraction pressure on the rangelands, the greater the biomass increases in the low height classes within the subcanopy, likely a strong resprouting response to intensive harvesting. Yet, fuelwood shortages are still occurring, as evidenced by the losses in the tall tree height class in the high extraction rangeland. Loss of large trees and gain in subcanopy shrubs could result in a structurally simple landscape with reduced functional capacity. This research demonstrates that intensive harvesting can, paradoxically, increase biomass and this has implications for the sustainability of ecosystem service provision. The structural implications of biomass increases in communal rangelands could be

  9. Biomass Increases Go under Cover: Woody Vegetation Dynamics in South African Rangelands.

    PubMed

    Mograbi, Penelope J; Erasmus, Barend F N; Witkowski, E T F; Asner, Gregory P; Wessels, Konrad J; Mathieu, Renaud; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E; Main, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Woody biomass dynamics are an expression of ecosystem function, yet biomass estimates do not provide information on the spatial distribution of woody vegetation within the vertical vegetation subcanopy. We demonstrate the ability of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to measure aboveground biomass and subcanopy structure, as an explanatory tool to unravel vegetation dynamics in structurally heterogeneous landscapes. We sampled three communal rangelands in Bushbuckridge, South Africa, utilised by rural communities for fuelwood harvesting. Woody biomass estimates ranged between 9 Mg ha(-1) on gabbro geology sites to 27 Mg ha(-1) on granitic geology sites. Despite predictions of woodland depletion due to unsustainable fuelwood extraction in previous studies, biomass in all the communal rangelands increased between 2008 and 2012. Annual biomass productivity estimates (10-14% p.a.) were higher than previous estimates of 4% and likely a significant contributor to the previous underestimations of modelled biomass supply. We show that biomass increases are attributable to growth of vegetation <5 m in height, and that, in the high wood extraction rangeland, 79% of the changes in the vertical vegetation subcanopy are gains in the 1-3 m height class. The higher the wood extraction pressure on the rangelands, the greater the biomass increases in the low height classes within the subcanopy, likely a strong resprouting response to intensive harvesting. Yet, fuelwood shortages are still occurring, as evidenced by the losses in the tall tree height class in the high extraction rangeland. Loss of large trees and gain in subcanopy shrubs could result in a structurally simple landscape with reduced functional capacity. This research demonstrates that intensive harvesting can, paradoxically, increase biomass and this has implications for the sustainability of ecosystem service provision. The structural implications of biomass increases in communal rangelands could be

  10. Increasing Drug Resistance in Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jessica; Moodley, Prashini; Moodley, Salona; Babaria, Palav; Ramtahal, Melissa; Heysell, Scott K.; Li, Xuan; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald; Sturm, A. Willem; Gandhi, Neel R.

    2011-01-01

    We expanded second-line tuberculosis (TB) drug susceptibility testing for extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa. Of 19 patients with extensively drug-resistant TB identified during February 2008–April 2009, 13 (68%) had isolates resistant to all 8 drugs tested. This resistance leaves no effective treatment with available drugs in South Africa. PMID:21392446

  11. Factors Contributing to Increases in Prescription Drug Expenditures Borne by National Health Insurance in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Young-Man; Paek, Kyung Won; Bea, Min Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rapid growth of prescription drug expenditures is a problem in South Korea. The objective of this study was to assess the contributions of four variables (therapeutic choice, drug-mix, original use, and price changes) to increases in drug expenditures paid by the National Health Insurance (NHI) in Korea. Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2012 utilizing data from the NHI Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The number of target drug types for final analysis was 13959. To analyze the growth rates of drug expenditures, this study used Fisher ideal index and the Laspeyres and Paasche indexes. Results With the exception of 2012, therapeutic choice contributed to about 40–60% of the increase in drug expenditures every year, while drug-mix contributed to another 30–40%. Conclusion The rapid growth in prescription drug expenditure was found to be largely due to drug-mix and therapeutic choice over time. Original use had little impact on drug spending. PMID:27189299

  12. The World Health Organization's mechanisms for increasing the health sector budget: The South African context.

    PubMed

    Venter, Fouche Hendrik Johannes; Wolfaardt, Jaqueline Elizabeth

    2016-07-04

    South Africa (SA) has limited scope for raising income taxes, and the proposed National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme will necessitate growth in the health sector budget. The NHI White Paper suggests five funding scenarios to meet the expected shortfall. These scenarios are a mixture of a surcharge on taxable income, an increase in value-added tax and a payroll tax. Five alternative options, suggested by the World Health Organization, are interrogated as ways to decrease the general taxation proposed in the White Paper. The five mechanisms (corporate tax, financial transaction levy, and taxes on tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy foods) were chosen based on their fund-raising potential and their mandatory element. A literature review provides the information for a discussion of the potential costs of each mechanism. Within specific assumptions, potential budgetary contribution is compared with the requirement. First, raising corporate tax rates could raise enough funds, but the losses due to capital flight might be too much for the local economy to bear. Second, a levy on currency transactions is unlikely to raise the required resources, even without a probable decrease in the number of transactions. Third, the increase in the tax on tobacco and alcohol would need to be very large, even assuming that consumption patterns would remain unchanged. Lastly, a tax on unhealthy food products is a new idea and could be explored as an option - especially as the SA Treasury has announced its future implementation. Implementing only one of the mechanisms is unlikely to increase available funding sufficiently, but if they are implemented together the welfare-maximising tax rate for each mechanism may be high enough to fulfil the NHI scheme's budgetary requirement, moderating the increases in the tax burden of the SA population.

  13. Potential Impacts of Increased Management Intensities on Planted Pine Growth and Yield and Timber Supply Modeling in the South

    Treesearch

    Jacek P. Siry; Frederick W. Cubbage; Andy J. Malmquist

    1999-01-01

    The South can increase pine productivity on its forest lands as increased timber prices make returns from intensified forest management more profitable. We determined the most likely management intensities on industrial lands resulting in five management intensity classes. They are used to estimate the potential growth and yield levels, and compare these to empirical...

  14. Impact of Increasing Capacity for Generating and Using Research on Maternal and Perinatal Health Practices in South East Asia (SEA-ORCHID Project)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity remain unacceptably high in many low and middle income countries. SEA-ORCHID was a five year international collaborative project in South East Asia which aimed to determine whether health care and health outcomes for mothers and babies could be improved by developing capacity for research generation, synthesis and use. Methods Nine hospitals in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand participated in SEA-ORCHID. These hospitals were supported by researchers from three Australian centres. Health care practices and outcomes were assessed for 1000 women at each hospital both before and after the intervention. The capacity development intervention was tailored to the needs and context of each hospital and delivered over an 18 month period. Main outcomes included adherence to forms of care likely to be beneficial and avoidance of forms of care likely to be ineffective or harmful. Results We observed substantial variation in clinical practice change between sites. The capacity development intervention had a positive impact on some care practices across all countries, including increased family support during labour and decreased perineal shaving before birth, but in some areas there was no significant change in practice and a few beneficial practices were followed less often. Conclusion The results of SEA-ORCHID demonstrate that investing in developing capacity for research use, synthesis and generation can lead to improvements in maternal and neonatal health practice and highlight the difficulty of implementing evidence-based practice change. PMID:21915274

  15. Impact of increasing capacity for generating and using research on maternal and perinatal health practices in South East Asia (SEA-ORCHID Project).

    PubMed

    Lumbiganon, P; McDonald, S J; Laopaiboon, M; Turner, T; Green, S; Crowther, C A

    2011-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity remain unacceptably high in many low and middle income countries. SEA-ORCHID was a five year international collaborative project in South East Asia which aimed to determine whether health care and health outcomes for mothers and babies could be improved by developing capacity for research generation, synthesis and use. Nine hospitals in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand participated in SEA-ORCHID. These hospitals were supported by researchers from three Australian centres. Health care practices and outcomes were assessed for 1000 women at each hospital both before and after the intervention. The capacity development intervention was tailored to the needs and context of each hospital and delivered over an 18 month period. Main outcomes included adherence to forms of care likely to be beneficial and avoidance of forms of care likely to be ineffective or harmful. We observed substantial variation in clinical practice change between sites. The capacity development intervention had a positive impact on some care practices across all countries, including increased family support during labour and decreased perineal shaving before birth, but in some areas there was no significant change in practice and a few beneficial practices were followed less often. The results of SEA-ORCHID demonstrate that investing in developing capacity for research use, synthesis and generation can lead to improvements in maternal and neonatal health practice and highlight the difficulty of implementing evidence-based practice change.

  16. Biomarker evidence for increasing aridity in south-central India over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Wilkes, H.; Prasad, S.; Brauer, A.; Basavaiah, N.; Strecker, M. R.; Sachse, D.

    2012-12-01

    Summer monsoonal rainfall has played an important role in the development and sustenance of the largely agro-based economy in the Indian subcontinent in the recent past. A better understanding of past variations in monsoonal rainfall can therefore lead to an assessment of its potential impact on early human societies. However, our knowledge of spatiotemporal patterns of past monsoon strength, as inferred from proxy records, is limited due to the lack of high-resolution paleo-hydrological records from continental archives. Here, we reconstruct centennial-scale hydrological variability associated with changes in the intensity of the Indian Summer Monsoon based on a record of lipid biomarker abundances and compound-specific stable isotopic composition of a 10-m-long sediment core from saline-alkaline Lonar Lake, situated in the core 'monsoon zone' of south-central India. We identified three periods of distinct hydrology over the Holocene in south-central India. The period between 10.4 and 6.5 ka BP was characterized by a relatively high abundance of land-plant biomarkers, such as long-chain n-alkanes. The composition of these leaf-wax n-alkanes (weighted average of concentration of different chain-length n-alkanes, expressed as the ACL index) and their negative δ13C (-30‰ to -33 ‰) indicate the dominance of woody C3 vegetation in the catchment, and negative δD (-170‰ to -175‰) values argue for a wet period due to an intensified monsoon. Rapid fluctuations in abundance of both terrestrial and aquatic biomarkers between 6.5 and 4 ka BP indicate an unstable lake ecosystem, culminating in a transition to arid conditions. Higher ACL values and a pronounced shift to more positive δ13C values (up to -22‰) of leaf-wax n-alkanes over this period indicate a change of dominant vegetation to C4 grasses. Along with a 40‰ increase in leaf wax n-alkane δD values, which likely resulted from less rainfall and/or higher plant evapotranspiration, we interpret this period

  17. Can we improve adolescent adherence?

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Adherence has been defined as the extent to which a person's action and behaviour matches the agreed recommendations from a clinician.(1,2) It is a continuous and dynamic process influenced by many factors, including the disease, the treatments, the healthcare team and system, social and economic factors, as well as patient-related factors.(1) Non-adherence may adversely affect clinical outcomes and lead to increased healthcare costs.(1-3) Reported rates of adherence are around 50% for people with long-term conditions, and may be as low as 30% among adolescents (aged 10-19 years).(1,3,4) Around 20% of those aged under 18 years have a chronic illness and treatment often requires long-term cumbersome regimens including multiple daily medicines, making adherence challenging.(1,3,5) It is important to distinguish between intentional and non-intentional adherence and to tailor interventions to the individual, using every healthcare contact as an opportunity to discuss adherence.(1) Here we consider the challenges faced by healthcare professionals in encouraging adolescents to adhere to treatment regimens (in particular taking medicines) and some strategies that may help. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Media interventions to increase cervical screening uptake in South Africa: an evaluation study of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Risi, L; Bindman, J P; Campbell, O M R; Imrie, J; Everett, K; Bradley, J; Denny, L

    2004-08-01

    Successful cervical cancer prevention depends on reaching, screening and treating women with pre-invasive disease. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of two media interventions-a photo-comic and a radio-drama-in increasing cervical screening uptake. A randomized controlled trial compared a photo-comic on cervical cancer screening with a placebo comic. One month after the comics were distributed a radio-drama paralleling the photo-comic was broadcast on the community radio station and a retrospective evaluation was carried out. The trial was set in Khayelitsha, a peri-urban squatter community near Cape Town, South Africa. A random sample consisted of 658 women between the ages of 35 and 65 years, from a stratified sample of census areas. The main outcome measure was self-reported cervical screening uptake 6 months after distribution of the comics. Seven percent (18 of 269) of women who received the intervention photo-comic reported cervical screening during the 6 months follow-up, compared with 6% (25 of 389) of controls (P = 0.89). Women who recalled hearing the radio-drama were more likely to report attending screening (nine of 53, 17%) than those who did not (19 of 429, 4%; P < 0.001). We conclude that the photo-comic was ineffective in increasing cervical screening uptake in this population. The radio-drama may have had more impact, but only a minority of women recalled being exposed to it. Future research must concentrate not only on achieving high level of exposure to health messages, but also on investigating the links between exposure and action.

  19. Reducing Sexual Violence by Increasing the Supply of Toilets in Khayelitsha, South Africa: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Gregg S.; Kaplan, Edward H.; Paltiel, A. David

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual violence is a major public health issue, affecting 35% of women worldwide. Major risk factors for sexual assault include inadequate indoor sanitation and the need to travel to outdoor toilet facilities. We estimated how increasing the number of toilets in an urban township (Khayelitsha, South Africa) might reduce both economic costs and the incidence and social burden of sexual assault. Methods We developed a mathematical model that links risk of sexual assault to the number of sanitation facilities and the time a woman must spend walking to a toilet. We defined a composite societal cost function, comprising both the burden of sexual assault and the costs of installing and maintaining public chemical toilets. By expressing total social costs as a function of the number of available toilets, we were able to identify an optimal (i.e., cost-minimizing) social investment in toilet facilities. Findings There are currently an estimated 5600 toilets in Khayelitsha. This results in 635 sexual assaults and US$40 million in combined social costs each year. Increasing the number of toilets to 11300 would minimize total costs ($35 million) and reduce sexual assaults to 446. Higher toilet installation and maintenance costs would be more than offset by lower sexual assault costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows that the optimal number of toilets exceeds the original allocation of toilets in the township in over 80% of the 5000 iterations of the model. Interpretation Improving access to sanitation facilities in urban settlements will simultaneously reduce the incidence of sexual assaults and overall cost to society. Since our analysis ignores the many additional health benefits of improving sanitation in resource-constrained urban areas (e.g., potential reductions in waterborne infectious diseases), the optimal number of toilets identified here should be interpreted as conservative. PMID:25923105

  20. Reducing sexual violence by increasing the supply of toilets in Khayelitsha, South Africa: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Gregg S; Kaplan, Edward H; Paltiel, A David

    2015-01-01

    Sexual violence is a major public health issue, affecting 35% of women worldwide. Major risk factors for sexual assault include inadequate indoor sanitation and the need to travel to outdoor toilet facilities. We estimated how increasing the number of toilets in an urban township (Khayelitsha, South Africa) might reduce both economic costs and the incidence and social burden of sexual assault. We developed a mathematical model that links risk of sexual assault to the number of sanitation facilities and the time a woman must spend walking to a toilet. We defined a composite societal cost function, comprising both the burden of sexual assault and the costs of installing and maintaining public chemical toilets. By expressing total social costs as a function of the number of available toilets, we were able to identify an optimal (i.e., cost-minimizing) social investment in toilet facilities. There are currently an estimated 5600 toilets in Khayelitsha. This results in 635 sexual assaults and US$40 million in combined social costs each year. Increasing the number of toilets to 11300 would minimize total costs ($35 million) and reduce sexual assaults to 446. Higher toilet installation and maintenance costs would be more than offset by lower sexual assault costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows that the optimal number of toilets exceeds the original allocation of toilets in the township in over 80% of the 5000 iterations of the model. Improving access to sanitation facilities in urban settlements will simultaneously reduce the incidence of sexual assaults and overall cost to society. Since our analysis ignores the many additional health benefits of improving sanitation in resource-constrained urban areas (e.g., potential reductions in waterborne infectious diseases), the optimal number of toilets identified here should be interpreted as conservative.

  1. Sources of Increased Spring and Streamflow Caused by the 2014 South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytuba, J. J.; Holzer, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonally dry springs and creeks began flowing over a broad region in the hills around Napa following the M6.0 South Napa earthquake on August 24, 2014. Flows in hillside creek beds, which were dry before the earthquake, were reported from 19 km west, to 6 km east, and 18 km north of Napa and the epicenter, an area that shook at MMI≥VI. The exact timing of the increased flow is unknown because the earthquake occurred at 3:20 AM PDT. A gaging station on the Napa River, which is downstream from several tributaries that began flowing after the earthquake, showed a sudden increase of flow rate within 45 minutes following the earthquake. The sudden increase at the gaging station suggests flows initiated either contemporaneously with or very soon after the strong shaking. This timing is consistent with eyewitness accounts of other streams and springs at daylight, a few hours after the earthquake. One of the largest increases of streamflow was in Green Valley, where a streamflow rate of about 100 cubic hectometers per day was measured in Wild Horse Creek. Two types of waters are being discharged in the Wild Horse Creek drainage: 1) water with low iron concentration that has exchanged with rhyolitic flows and tuffs in the upper part of the drainage; and 2) high iron concentration water that has exchanged with basaltic andesite in the middle part of drainage (vertical interval of about 75 meters). The high iron waters are depositing FeOOH other iron phases. Mixing of the two water types results in water with pH 6.9 and conductivity of 0.197 mS. This water is used by the Vallejo Water District for domestic purposes after it is mixed with recent surface water runoff stored in Lake Frey reservoir in order to improve its quality. Other drainages that have increased flow since the earthquake have water chemistry consistent with exchange with rhyolitic flows and tuffs that are the dominant rock type in these drainages.

  2. Increased adherence eight months after switch from twice daily calcineurin inhibitor based treatment to once daily modified released tacrolimus in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Doesch, Andreas O; Mueller, Susanne; Akyol, Ceylan; Erbel, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Ehlermann, Philipp; Dengler, Thomas J; Katus, Hugo A

    2013-01-01

    Background Modified-release tacrolimus (TAC) is a new, once-daily oral formulation of the established immunosuppressive agent TAC. This study evaluated long-term patient adherence, as well as safety and efficacy, in stable patients after heart transplantation (HTx) who switched from a conventional twice daily calcineurin inhibitor-based regimen (TAC or cyclosporine A [CsA]) to a once-daily modified-release TAC regimen. Methods Stable patients were switched from conventional TAC or CsA (twice-daily dosing) to modified-release TAC (once-daily dosing) according to manufacturer’s recommendations using a pre-experimental design. Self-reported adherence was assessed at baseline and 8 months after the switch with the Basel Assessment of Adherence with Immunosuppressive Medication Scale (BAASIS). Additionally, routine laboratory values were analyzed 8 months after switch. Results Of 76 patients (58 male, 18 female) initially included, 72 were available for statistical analysis, as modified-release TAC was discontinued due to diarrhea in one patient and gastrointestinal discomfort in three patients. Overall nonadherence at baseline for any of the four BAASIS items was 75.0% versus 40.3% after 8 months (P<0.0001). After 8 months, adherence was improved in 41 patients (56.9%), unchanged in 27 (37.5%), and reduced in four patients (5.6%). The BAASIS visual analog scale score improved significantly from 87.0% ± 13.5% to 97.5% ± 5.7% (P<0.0001). No significant changes were observed for hematological, renal, or liver function parameters after 8 months (all P=not significant). Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study in stable patients after HTx to demonstrate a significant improvement in long-term (ie, 8-month) patient adherence after the switch to modified-release TAC. Modified-release TAC was generally well tolerated. Further studies are currently underway to investigate long-term safety after HTx of various calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of rejection and

  3. Increased adherence eight months after switch from twice daily calcineurin inhibitor based treatment to once daily modified released tacrolimus in heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doesch, Andreas O; Mueller, Susanne; Akyol, Ceylan; Erbel, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Ehlermann, Philipp; Dengler, Thomas J; Katus, Hugo A

    2013-01-01

    Modified-release tacrolimus (TAC) is a new, once-daily oral formulation of the established immunosuppressive agent TAC. This study evaluated long-term patient adherence, as well as safety and efficacy, in stable patients after heart transplantation (HTx) who switched from a conventional twice daily calcineurin inhibitor-based regimen (TAC or cyclosporine A [CsA]) to a once-daily modified-release TAC regimen. Stable patients were switched from conventional TAC or CsA (twice-daily dosing) to modified-release TAC (once-daily dosing) according to manufacturer's recommendations using a pre-experimental design. Self-reported adherence was assessed at baseline and 8 months after the switch with the Basel Assessment of Adherence with Immunosuppressive Medication Scale (BAASIS). Additionally, routine laboratory values were analyzed 8 months after switch. Of 76 patients (58 male, 18 female) initially included, 72 were available for statistical analysis, as modified-release TAC was discontinued due to diarrhea in one patient and gastrointestinal discomfort in three patients. Overall nonadherence at baseline for any of the four BAASIS items was 75.0% versus 40.3% after 8 months (P<0.0001). After 8 months, adherence was improved in 41 patients (56.9%), unchanged in 27 (37.5%), and reduced in four patients (5.6%). The BAASIS visual analog scale score improved significantly from 87.0% ± 13.5% to 97.5% ± 5.7% (P<0.0001). No significant changes were observed for hematological, renal, or liver function parameters after 8 months (all P=not significant). To our knowledge, this is the first study in stable patients after HTx to demonstrate a significant improvement in long-term (ie, 8-month) patient adherence after the switch to modified-release TAC. Modified-release TAC was generally well tolerated. Further studies are currently underway to investigate long-term safety after HTx of various calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of rejection and occurrence of side effects.

  4. Defining the rehabilitation adherence curve and adherence phases of stroke patients: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Meiqi; Chen, Jinhua; Jing, Jiyong; Sheng, Han; Tan, Xing; Jin, Jingfen

    2017-01-01

    Patient adherence is a crucial determinant of rehabilitation in the long term after stroke. However, adherence is inconstant and fluctuates along a time course, and the underlying regular pattern of adherence variation remains to be clarified. We aimed to describe the longitudinal pattern of adherence to rehabilitation exercises in stroke patients and to determine different adherence phases based on formulated rehabilitation adherence curve. Rehabilitation adherence levels were prospectively collected using the Questionnaire of Exercise Adherence (EAQ) among patients diagnosed with first-onset stroke since the second week of stroke onset, with a follow-up of 24 weeks. SPSS19.0 was used to formulate a fitting curve based on a scatter diagram. Possible causal factors for the different adherence phases are also discussed from the psychological, socioeconomic, and behavioral aspects. A total of 98 patients were included in this study. General adherence of the included subjects was classified as low to medium during follow-up. The adherence fitting curve was an "S" curve, with the fitting function y =0.005x(3)-0.211x(2)+1.963x+52.345. Three phases, namely, rapid increase phase, slow decrease phase, and stable phase, were identified based on the adherence curve, and relevant theories are explored. Rehabilitation adherence of stroke patients is a dynamic behavioral process that continuously changes along a time course, with a regular pattern of an "S" curve and includes a rapid increase phase, a slow decrease phase, and a stable phase.

  5. Epidemiology of Trichomoniasis in South Korea and Increasing Trend in Incidence, Health Insurance Review and Assessment 2009-2014

    PubMed Central

    Joo, So-Young; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Won Kee; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2016-01-01

    Trichomoniasis, which is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, is one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infections; however, limited population-based data are available that describe patterns and trends of the disease. We summarized insurance claims of trichomoniasis cases reported during 2009–2014 to South Korea Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The average annual incidence in South Korea was 276.8 persons per 100,000 population, and a substantial sex-associated variation was observed. The incidence rate among female subjects trended upward over 6 years, that is, it increased from 501 in 2009 to 625.8 in 2014 per 100,000 female population, which indicates a 25% overall increase. This trend was sharpest in the ≥60 years group of female population. However, a 66% decrease in incidence rates was observed among male subjects (23.7 in 2009 to 15.7 in 2014 per 100,000 male population). Further, substantial decrease was observed in the ≥40 years groups of male population. The incidence of trichomoniasis varied across regions and was the highest in Jeju province of South Korea. Overall, as the incidence of trichomoniasis appears to have increased in South Korea during 2009–2014, the disease burden is increasing; hence, there is a need to better understand the disease transmission. PMID:27936227

  6. Epidemiology of Trichomoniasis in South Korea and Increasing Trend in Incidence, Health Insurance Review and Assessment 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Joo, So-Young; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Won Kee; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2016-01-01

    Trichomoniasis, which is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, is one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infections; however, limited population-based data are available that describe patterns and trends of the disease. We summarized insurance claims of trichomoniasis cases reported during 2009-2014 to South Korea Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The average annual incidence in South Korea was 276.8 persons per 100,000 population, and a substantial sex-associated variation was observed. The incidence rate among female subjects trended upward over 6 years, that is, it increased from 501 in 2009 to 625.8 in 2014 per 100,000 female population, which indicates a 25% overall increase. This trend was sharpest in the ≥60 years group of female population. However, a 66% decrease in incidence rates was observed among male subjects (23.7 in 2009 to 15.7 in 2014 per 100,000 male population). Further, substantial decrease was observed in the ≥40 years groups of male population. The incidence of trichomoniasis varied across regions and was the highest in Jeju province of South Korea. Overall, as the incidence of trichomoniasis appears to have increased in South Korea during 2009-2014, the disease burden is increasing; hence, there is a need to better understand the disease transmission.

  7. Adherence management for patients with cancer taking capecitabine: a prospective two-arm cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Krolop, Linda; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Schwindt, Peter Florian; Schumacher, Claudia; Fimmers, Rolf; Jaehde, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a multiprofessional modular medication management to assure adherence to capecitabine. Methods The study was conducted as a prospective, multicentred observational cohort study. All participants received pharmaceutical care consisting of oral and written information. Daily adherence was defined as percentage of days with correctly administered capecitabine doses and assessed using medication event monitoring. According to their daily adherence during the first cycle, patients were identified as initially non-adherent (<90% adherence) or adherent (≥90% adherence). Initially non-adherent patients received additional adherence support. Results Seventy-three patients with various tumour entities were enrolled, 58 were initially adherent and 15 non-adherent. Median daily adherence of initially non-adherent patients increased from 85.7% to 97.6% during the observation period of six cycles. Throughout all cycles, median daily adherence of initially adherent patients was 100.0%. Daily adherence was not associated with sociodemographic and disease-related factors. No patient was non-persistent. Conclusions An early adherence screening effectively distinguishes between patients adhering and non-adhering to capecitabine. The provision of specific adherence support is associated with enhanced adherence of initially non-adherent patients, whereas initially adherent patients remain adherent for at least six cycles without specific support. Our needs-based approach helps to use available resources for adherence management efficiently. PMID:23872296

  8. A population-based analysis of increasing rates of suicide mortality in Japan and South Korea, 1985-2010.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sun Y; Reither, Eric N; Masters, Ryan K

    2016-04-23

    In the past two decades, rates of suicide mortality have declined among most OECD member states. Two notable exceptions are Japan and South Korea, where suicide mortality has increased by 20 % and 280 %, respectively. Population and suicide mortality data were collected through national statistics organizations in Japan and South Korea for the period 1985 to 2010. Age, period of observation, and birth cohort membership were divided into five-year increments. We fitted a series of intrinsic estimator age-period-cohort models to estimate the effects of age-related processes, secular changes, and birth cohort dynamics on the rising rates of suicide mortality in the two neighboring countries. In Japan, elevated suicide rates are primarily driven by period effects, initiated during the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s. In South Korea, multiple factors appear to be responsible for the stark increase in suicide mortality, including recent secular changes, elevated suicide risks at older ages in the context of an aging society, and strong cohort effects for those born between the Great Depression and the aftermath of the Korean War. In spite of cultural, demographic and geographic similarities in Japan and South Korea, the underlying causes of increased suicide mortality differ across these societies-suggesting that public health responses should be tailored to fit each country's unique situation.

  9. Communication style and exercise compliance in physiotherapy (CONNECT). A cluster randomized controlled trial to test a theory-based intervention to increase chronic low back pain patients’ adherence to physiotherapists’ recommendations: study rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical activity and exercise therapy are among the accepted clinical rehabilitation guidelines and are recommended self-management strategies for chronic low back pain. However, many back pain sufferers do not adhere to their physiotherapist’s recommendations. Poor patient adherence may decrease the effectiveness of advice and home-based rehabilitation exercises. According to self-determination theory, support from health care practitioners can promote patients’ autonomous motivation and greater long-term behavioral persistence (e.g., adherence to physiotherapists’ recommendations). The aim of this trial is to assess the effect of an intervention designed to increase physiotherapists’ autonomy-supportive communication on low back pain patients’ adherence to physical activity and exercise therapy recommendations. Methods/Design This study will be a single-blinded cluster randomized controlled trial. Outpatient physiotherapy centers (N =12) in Dublin, Ireland (population = 1.25 million) will be randomly assigned using a computer-generated algorithm to either the experimental or control arm. Physiotherapists in the experimental arm (two hospitals and four primary care clinics) will attend eight hours of communication skills training. Training will include handouts, workbooks, video examples, role-play, and discussion designed to teach physiotherapists how to communicate in a manner that promotes autonomous patient motivation. Physiotherapists in the waitlist control arm (two hospitals and four primary care clinics) will not receive this training. Participants (N = 292) with chronic low back pain will complete assessments at baseline, as well as 1 week, 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after their first physiotherapy appointment. Primary outcomes will include adherence to physiotherapy recommendations, as well as low back pain, function, and well-being. Participants will be blinded to treatment allocation, as they will not be told

  10. Communication style and exercise compliance in physiotherapy (CONNECT): a cluster randomized controlled trial to test a theory-based intervention to increase chronic low back pain patients' adherence to physiotherapists' recommendations: study rationale, design, and methods.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Chris; Hall, Amanda M; Williams, Geoffrey C; McDonough, Suzanne M; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Murray, Aileen; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2012-06-15

    Physical activity and exercise therapy are among the accepted clinical rehabilitation guidelines and are recommended self-management strategies for chronic low back pain. However, many back pain sufferers do not adhere to their physiotherapist's recommendations. Poor patient adherence may decrease the effectiveness of advice and home-based rehabilitation exercises. According to self-determination theory, support from health care practitioners can promote patients' autonomous motivation and greater long-term behavioral persistence (e.g., adherence to physiotherapists' recommendations). The aim of this trial is to assess the effect of an intervention designed to increase physiotherapists' autonomy-supportive communication on low back pain patients' adherence to physical activity and exercise therapy recommendations. This study will be a single-blinded cluster randomized controlled trial. Outpatient physiotherapy centers (N =12) in Dublin, Ireland (population = 1.25 million) will be randomly assigned using a computer-generated algorithm to either the experimental or control arm. Physiotherapists in the experimental arm (two hospitals and four primary care clinics) will attend eight hours of communication skills training. Training will include handouts, workbooks, video examples, role-play, and discussion designed to teach physiotherapists how to communicate in a manner that promotes autonomous patient motivation. Physiotherapists in the waitlist control arm (two hospitals and four primary care clinics) will not receive this training. Participants (N = 292) with chronic low back pain will complete assessments at baseline, as well as 1 week, 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after their first physiotherapy appointment. Primary outcomes will include adherence to physiotherapy recommendations, as well as low back pain, function, and well-being. Participants will be blinded to treatment allocation, as they will not be told if their physiotherapist has

  11. Water-column cooling and sea surface salinity increase in the upwelling region off central-south Chile driven by a poleward displacement of the South Pacific High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Wolfgang; Donoso, David; Garcés-Vargas, José; Escribano, Rubén

    2017-02-01

    Here we present results of direct observations of seawater temperature and salinity over the continental shelf off central-south Chile that shows an unprecedented cooling of the entire water column and an increase in upper layer salinity during 2002 to 2013. We provide evidence that this phenomenon is related to the intensification but mostly to a recent southward displacement of the South Pacific High over the same period, from 2007 on. This in turn has accelerated alongshore, equatorward, subtropical coastal upwelling favorable winds, particularly during winter, injecting colder water from below into the upper water column. Consequently, the environmental conditions on the shelf off central-south Chile shifted from a warmer (fresher) to a cooler (saltier) phase; water column temperature dropped from 11.7 °C (2003-2006) to 11.3 °C (2007-2012) and upper layer salinity rose by 0.25; water column stratification gradually decreased. The biological impacts of such abrupt cooling are apparently already happening in this coastal ecosystem, as recent evidence shows substantial changes in the plankton community and negative trends in zooplankton biomass over the same period.

  12. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently.

  13. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  14. Increasing Transfers-Out from an Antiretroviral Treatment Service in South Africa: Patient Characteristics and Rates of Virological Non-Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Nglazi, Mweete D.; Kaplan, Richard; Orrell, Catherine; Myer, Landon; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Lawn, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the proportion, characteristics and outcomes of patients who transfer-out from an antiretroviral therapy (ART) service in a South African township. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all patients aged ≥15 years who enrolled between September 2002 and December 2009. Follow-up data were censored in December 2010. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to describe time to transfer-out and cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine associated risk factors. Results 4511 patients (4003 ART-naïve and 508 non-naïve at baseline) received ART during the study period. Overall, 597 (13.2%) transferred out. The probability of transferring out by one year of ART steadily increased from 1.4% in 2002/2004 cohort to 8.9% for the 2009 cohort. Independent risk factors for transfer-out were more recent calendar year of enrolment, younger age (≤25 years) and being ART non-naïve at baseline (i.e., having previously transferred into this clinic from another facility). The proportions of patients transferred out who had a CD4 cell count <200 cells/µL and/or a viral load ≥1000 copies/mL were 19% and 20%, respectively. Conclusions With scale-up of ART over time, an increasing proportion of patients are transferring between ART services and information systems are needed to track patients. Approximately one-fifth of these have viral loads >1000 copies/mL around the time of transfer, suggesting the need for careful adherence counseling and assessment of medication supplies among those planning transfer. PMID:23472118

  15. Relationship between depressive symptoms, alcohol use, and antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected, clinic-attending patients in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Saal, Wylene; Nel, Adriaan; Remmert, Jocelyn E; Kagee, Ashraf

    2016-02-15

    Despite the prevalence of depression and alcohol use among HIV-infected individuals, few studies have examined their association together in relation to nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. This study examined depressive symptoms, alcohol use, and other psychosocial factors (stigma, demographic characteristics) in relation to nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy among clinic-attending, HIV-infected individuals in South Africa (n = 101). Nonadherence was assessed using event-level measurement (missed doses over the past weekend). Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that only alcohol use, over and above depressive symptoms and education level, was associated with antiretroviral therapy nonadherence(AOR = 1.15; 95%CI = 1.02-1.29; p < .05). Findings point to the independent association of alcohol use and nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy above and beyond depressive symptoms.

  16. Impact of telephonic psycho-social support on adherence to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) after rape.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Naeemah; Jewkes, Rachel; Lombard, Carl; Mathews, Shanaaz; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Meel, Banwari

    2010-10-01

    South Africa has one of the highest rates of both rape and HIV infections. Of great concern is the possibility of HIV transmission during the assault, but adherence to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) has been varied and low. We developed a telephonic psycho-social support, leaflet and adherence diary intervention for rape victims and tested its impact on adherence to PEP. A randomised control trial was conducted in the Western and Eastern Cape and 279 rape survivors were enrolled in two arms. The intervention involved the providing of an information leaflet including an adherence diary and follow-up support through telephone calls by a counsellor during the 28 days of taking the PEP. The controls received the leaflet. Follow-up interviews and tablet checks were done with 253 participants to assess adherence. The primary outcome was completion of 28 days of PEP with no more than three missed doses (94% adherence). There was more adherence in the intervention arm (38.2% vs. 31.9%), but the estimated intervention effect of 6.5% (95% CI: -4.6 to 17.6%) was not statistically significant, p=0.13. The intervention was associated with the reading of the pamphlet (p=0.07) and an increased use of the diary (p=0.01), but did not reduce depressive psychopathology. Overall adherence was greater amongst those who read the leaflet and used the medication diary. The study showed that the intervention was not effective in significantly improving adherence and adherence levels were low in both study arms. Further research to understand reasons for non-adherence is needed before further interventions are developed.

  17. Adherence and Viral Suppression among Infants and Young Children Initiating Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teasdale, Chloe A; Abrams, Elaine J; Coovadia, Ashraf; Strehlau, Renate; Martens, Leigh; Kuhn, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are considered necessary to achieve viral suppression. We analyzed data from a cohort of HIV-infected children who were less than 2 years of age receiving protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART to investigate associations between viral suppression and adherence ascertained using different methods. Methods Data were from the pre-randomization phase of a clinical trial in South Africa of HIV-infected children initiating either ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r)- or ritonavir-based ART. At scheduled visits during the first 24 weeks of enrollment, study pharmacists measured quantities of medications returned (MR) to the clinic. Caregivers answered questionnaires on missed doses and adherence barriers. Associations between adherence and viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL) were investigated by regimen. Results By 24 weeks, 197/269 (73%) children achieved viral suppression. There was no association between viral suppression and caregiver reported missed doses or adherence barriers. For children receiving the LPV/r-based regimen, MR adherence to each of the three drugs in the regimen (LPV/r, lamivudine or stavudine) individually or together was associated with viral suppression at different adherence thresholds. For example, <85% adherence to any of the three medications significantly increased odds of lack of viral suppression (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.30 [95% CI: 1.30–4.07], p=.004). In contrast, for children receiving the ritonavir-based regimen, there was no consistent pattern of association between MR and viral suppression. Conclusions Caregiver reports of missed doses did not predict virologic response to treatment. Pharmacist medication reconciliation correlated strongly with virologic response for children taking a LPV/r-based regimen and appears to be a valid method for measuring pediatric adherence. PMID:23249913

  18. Increased time-to-pregnancy is associated with domestic work in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bello, Braimoh; Heederik, Dick; Kielkowski, Danuta; Wilson, Kerry

    2016-09-06

    The effects of female occupational exposures on fecundity have not been evaluated in South Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of three specific occupational groups on time-to-pregnancy (TTP). This cross-sectional study collected data, by means of a questionnaire, on 1210 women representative of a South African population, and sought information on: TTP for the most recent pregnancy, time-specific information on maternal factors and occupational exposures, as well as some paternal factors. Occupational exposure groups were determined using employment profile prior to the pregnancy. In the risk analysis, domestic workers and teachers were compared to administrative staff. Accidental and unplanned pregnancies were excluded from the analysis and participants who were never pregnant were censored. Discrete-time Cox regression models were built to estimate fecundability ratios (FR). The median TTP in administrative workers, domestic workers and teachers was 4, 12 and 3 months respectively. After adjusting for a number of potential confounders, TTP was significantly related to occupation at the time of pregnancy attempt. Compared to administrative workers, domestic workers had a significantly lower per-cycle probability of conception (adjusted FR = 0.53; 95 CI 0.32-0.88). The per-cycle probability of conception in teachers compared to administrative workers was not significantly different (adjusted FR = 1.14; 95 CI: 0.75-1.72). Domestic work was associated with prolonged TTP. Working as a domestic worker in South Africa may affect fecundity.

  19. Cervical cancer screening and adherence to follow-up among Hispanic women study protocol: a randomized controlled trial to increase the uptake of cervical cancer screening in Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Catherine; Coronado, Gloria; Martinez, Javiera; Byrd, Theresa L; Carosso, Elizabeth; Lopez, Cathy; Benavides, Maria; Thompson, Beti

    2012-05-06

    In the US, Hispanic women have a higher incidence of, and mortality from, cervical cancer than non-Hispanic white women. The reason for this disparity may be attributable to both low rates of screening and poor adherence to recommended diagnostic follow-up after an abnormal Pap test. The 'Cervical Cancer Screening and Adherence to Follow-up Among Hispanic Women' study is a collaboration between a research institution and community partners made up of members from community based organizations, the Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic and the Breast, Cervical, and Colon Health Program of the Yakima District . The study will assess the efficacy of two culturally-appropriate, tailored educational programs designed to increase cervical cancer screening among Hispanic women, based in the Yakima Valley, Washington, US. A parallel randomized-controlled trial of 600 Hispanic women aged 21-64, who are non-compliant with Papanicolau (Pap) test screening guidelines. Participants will be randomized using block randomization to (1) a control arm (usual care); (2) a low-intensity information program, consisting of a Spanish-language video that educates women on the importance of cervical cancer screening; or (3) a high-intensity program consisting of the video plus a 'promotora' or lay-community health educator-led, home based intervention to encourage cervical cancer screening. Participants who attend cervical cancer screening, and receive a diagnosis of an abnormal Pap test will be assigned to a patient navigator who will provide support and information to promote adherence to follow-up tests, and any necessary surgery or treatment. Primary endpoint: Participants will be tracked via medical record review at community-based clinics, to identify women who have had a Pap test within 7 months of baseline assessment. Medical record reviewers will be blinded to randomization arm. Secondary endpoint: An evaluation of the patient navigator program as a method to improve adherence and

  20. Cervical cancer screening and adherence to follow-up among Hispanic women study protocol: a randomized controlled trial to increase the uptake of cervical cancer screening in Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the US, Hispanic women have a higher incidence of, and mortality from, cervical cancer than non-Hispanic white women. The reason for this disparity may be attributable to both low rates of screening and poor adherence to recommended diagnostic follow-up after an abnormal Pap test. The 'Cervical Cancer Screening and Adherence to Follow-up Among Hispanic Women' study is a collaboration between a research institution and community partners made up of members from community based organizations, the Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic and the Breast, Cervical, and Colon Health Program of the Yakima District . The study will assess the efficacy of two culturally-appropriate, tailored educational programs designed to increase cervical cancer screening among Hispanic women, based in the Yakima Valley, Washington, US. Methods/design A parallel randomized-controlled trial of 600 Hispanic women aged 21–64, who are non-compliant with Papanicolau (Pap) test screening guidelines. Participants will be randomized using block randomization to (1) a control arm (usual care); (2) a low-intensity information program, consisting of a Spanish-language video that educates women on the importance of cervical cancer screening; or (3) a high-intensity program consisting of the video plus a ‘promotora’ or lay-community health educator-led, home based intervention to encourage cervical cancer screening. Participants who attend cervical cancer screening, and receive a diagnosis of an abnormal Pap test will be assigned to a patient navigator who will provide support and information to promote adherence to follow-up tests, and any necessary surgery or treatment. Primary endpoint: Participants will be tracked via medical record review at community-based clinics, to identify women who have had a Pap test within 7 months of baseline assessment. Medical record reviewers will be blinded to randomization arm. Secondary endpoint: An evaluation of the patient navigator program as a

  1. Adherence to targeted oral anticancer medications.

    PubMed

    Geynisman, Daniel M; Wickersham, Karen E

    2013-04-01

    The use of targeted oral anticancer medications (OAMs) is becoming increasingly prevalent in cancer care. Approximately 25-30% of the oncology drug pipeline involves oral agents and there are now over 50 OAMs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This change represents a major shift in management of patients with cancer from directly observed, intermittent intravenous therapy to self-administered, oral chronic therapy. The increased prevalence of OAMs raises the issue of adherence in oncology, including understanding the challenges of adherence to OAMs. This review focuses on studies of adherence for patients taking molecularly targeted OAMs for breast cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We then discuss barriers to adherence and studies performed to date testing interventions for improving adherence. Finally, we discuss future areas of investigation needed to define and improve adherence to OAMs in targeted therapy for cancer.

  2. Short-Term Effectiveness of a Mobile Phone App for Increasing Physical Activity and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial (EVIDENT II Study)

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Rodriguez, Jose I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Martin-Cantera, Carlos; González-Viejo, Mª Natividad; Fernandez-Alonso, Mª Del Carmen; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, Maria Soledad; Schmolling-Guinovart, Yolanda; Maderuelo-Fernandez, Jose-Angel; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of mobile phone apps for improving lifestyles has become generalized in the population, although little is still known about their effectiveness in improving health. Objective We evaluate the effect of adding an app to standard counseling on increased physical activity (PA) and adherence to the Mediterranean diet, 3 months after implementation. Methods A randomized, multicenter clinical trial was carried out. A total of 833 participants were recruited in six primary care centers in Spain through random sampling: 415 in the app+counseling group and 418 in the counseling only group. Counseling on PA and the Mediterranean diet was given to both groups. The app+counseling participants additionally received training in the use of an app designed to promote PA and the Mediterranean diet over a 3-month period. PA was measured with the 7-day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) questionnaire and an accelerometer; adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener questionnaire. Results Participants were predominantly female in both the app+counseling (249/415, 60.0%) and counseling only (268/418, 64.1%) groups, with a mean age of 51.4 (SD 12.1) and 52.3 (SD 12.0) years, respectively. Leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) by 7-day PAR increased in the app+counseling (mean 29, 95% CI 5-53 min/week; P=.02) but not in the counseling only group (mean 17.4, 95% CI –18 to 53 min/week; P=.38). No differences in increase of activity were found between the two groups. The accelerometer recorded a decrease in PA after 3 months in both groups: MVPA mean –55.3 (95% CI –75.8 to –34.9) min/week in app+counseling group and mean –30.1 (95% CI –51.8 to –8.4) min/week in counseling only group. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet increased in both groups (8.4% in app+counseling and 10.4% in counseling only group), with an increase in score of 0.42 and 0.53 points, respectively (P<.001), but no

  3. Short-Term Effectiveness of a Mobile Phone App for Increasing Physical Activity and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial (EVIDENT II Study).

    PubMed

    Recio-Rodriguez, Jose I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Martin-Cantera, Carlos; González-Viejo, Mª Natividad; Fernandez-Alonso, Mª Del Carmen; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, Maria Soledad; Schmolling-Guinovart, Yolanda; Maderuelo-Fernandez, Jose-Angel; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A; Garcia-Ortiz, Luis

    2016-12-19

    The use of mobile phone apps for improving lifestyles has become generalized in the population, although little is still known about their effectiveness in improving health. We evaluate the effect of adding an app to standard counseling on increased physical activity (PA) and adherence to the Mediterranean diet, 3 months after implementation. A randomized, multicenter clinical trial was carried out. A total of 833 participants were recruited in six primary care centers in Spain through random sampling: 415 in the app+counseling group and 418 in the counseling only group. Counseling on PA and the Mediterranean diet was given to both groups. The app+counseling participants additionally received training in the use of an app designed to promote PA and the Mediterranean diet over a 3-month period. PA was measured with the 7-day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) questionnaire and an accelerometer; adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener questionnaire. Participants were predominantly female in both the app+counseling (249/415, 60.0%) and counseling only (268/418, 64.1%) groups, with a mean age of 51.4 (SD 12.1) and 52.3 (SD 12.0) years, respectively. Leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) by 7-day PAR increased in the app+counseling (mean 29, 95% CI 5-53 min/week; P=.02) but not in the counseling only group (mean 17.4, 95% CI -18 to 53 min/week; P=.38). No differences in increase of activity were found between the two groups. The accelerometer recorded a decrease in PA after 3 months in both groups: MVPA mean -55.3 (95% CI -75.8 to -34.9) min/week in app+counseling group and mean -30.1 (95% CI -51.8 to -8.4) min/week in counseling only group. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet increased in both groups (8.4% in app+counseling and 10.4% in counseling only group), with an increase in score of 0.42 and 0.53 points, respectively (P<.001), but no difference between groups (P=.86). Leisure-time MVPA

  4. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  5. Infrared measurements of increased CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (CFC-12) absorption above the South Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsland, C.P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F.J.; Murcray, F.H.; Murcray, D.G.; Levine, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based solar spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Dec. 1980 and Nov. 1986 have been analyzed in the region of the CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (chlorofluorocarbon 12) atgn/sub 8/ band Q branches at 1161 cm/sup arrow-right-left//sup 1/. An increase in the CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ total vertical column above the South Pole of 1.24 atmapprox. = 0.15 over the 6-yr period, corresponding to an average rate of increase of 3.6 atmapprox. = 2.1%, is derived. This rate of increase is lower than indicated by in situ measurements at the South Pole over the same time period, but there is agreement when the rather error bars of the spectral measurement results are considered. Spectroscopic parameters that can successfully model CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ absorption at low temperatures are needed to improve retrieval accuracies and could be applied to a number of pre-1980 atmospheric spectral data sets in the literature to obtain an improved record of early CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ concentration trends for comparison with estimates of historical release rates.

  6. Mobile phone intervention for increasing adherence to treatment for type 2 diabetes in an urban area of Bangladesh: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Lechner, Andreas; Ferrari, Uta; Froeschl, Guenter; Alam, Dewan Shamsul; Holle, Rolf; Seissler, Jochen; Niessen, Louis W

    2014-11-26

    Mobile phone technologies including SMS (short message service) have been used to improve the delivery of health services in many countries. However, data on the effects of mobile health technology on patient outcomes in resource-limited settings are limited. The aim of this study therefore is to measure the impact of a mobile phone SMS service on treatment success of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in an urban area of Bangladesh. This is a single-centred randomized controlled intervention trial (prospective) comparing standard-of-care with standard-of-care plus a mobile phone-based SMS intervention for 6 months. A total of 216 participants with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes will be recruited. Data will be collected at the outpatient department of Bangladesh Institute of Health Science (BIHS) hospital at baseline and after 6 months. The primary outcome measure will be change in HbA1c between baseline and 6 months. The secondary outcome measures are self-reported medication adherence, clinic attendance, self-reported adoption of healthy behaviours, diabetes knowledge, quality of life and cost effectiveness of the SMS intervention. The inclusion criteria will be as follows: diagnosed as patients with type 2 diabetes by the BIHS physician, using oral medication therapy, living in Dhaka city, registered with the BIHS hospital, using a mobile phone, willing to return for follow up after 6 months and providing written informed consent. Participants will be allocated to control and intervention arms after recruitment using a randomization software. Data will be collected on socio-demographic and economic information, mobile phone use and habits, knowledge of prevention, management and complications of diabetes, self-perceived quality of life assessment, self-reported diseases, medical history, family history of diseases, medication history, medication adherence, health seeking behaviour, tobacco use, physical activity, diet, mental health status, life events and

  7. Context effects and behaviour change techniques in randomised trials: a systematic review using the example of trials to increase adherence to physical activity in musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Felicity L; Fenge-Davies, Anya L; Kirby, Sarah; Geraghty, Adam W A

    2015-01-01

    To describe and explore the effects of contextual and behaviour change technique (BCT) content of control and target interventions in clinical trials. Review and meta-analysis of 42 trials from a Cochrane review of physical activity in chronic musculoskeletal pain. Two researchers coded descriptions of target and control interventions for (a) 93 BCTs and (b) whether target and control interventions shared each of five contextual features (practitioners' characteristics, patient-practitioner relationship, intervention credibility, superficial treatment characteristics e.g. delivery modality, and environment). Quality of study reporting was assessed. Effect sizes for adherence to physical activity and class attendance were computed (Cohen's d) and analysed separately. For physical activity outcomes, after controlling for reporting quality, larger effect sizes were associated with target and control interventions using different modalities (β = -.34, p = .030), target and control interventions involving equivalent patient-practitioner relationship (β = .40, p = .002), and target interventions having more unique BCTs (i.e. more BCTs not also in the control) (β = .008, p = .030). There were no significant effect moderators for class attendance outcomes. Contents of control conditions can influence effect sizes and should be considered carefully in trial design and systematic reviews.

  8. Increasing game prices may alter farmers’ behaviours towards leopards (Panthera pardus) and other carnivores in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pirie, Tara J.; Thomas, Rebecca L.

    2017-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflict occurs globally, particularly in regions where large carnivores predate livestock. Retaliatory killings do occur, and although predation of livestock by carnivores happens, losses from other factors such as disease or injury can be misattributed because of landowner perceptions. Game farming for both trophy hunting and eco-tourism is becoming increasingly common in South Africa, and there has been a rapid increase in the cost of game animals (in some species as much as five-fold) between 2010 and 2015. This could result in an increase in conflict between commercial game farmers and carnivores. We conducted two questionnaire surveys of farmers in 2010 and 2015 to investigate this. We asked if there had been changes in farming practices, perceived predator activity, perceived amount of livestock and commercial game losses, and actions taken towards carnivores in a South African farming community. We found no significant change in farming types in the area or losses of livestock between the years. However, there was a significant increase in perceived commercial game losses reported, even though protection of game had increased. Actions taken towards carnivores by livestock/game farmers were also significantly more negative in 2015 compared to farmers growing crops, but there was no such difference in 2010. We suggest that these changes could be a result of the increase in game prices over that period, leading to greater financial losses when an animal is predated, which in turn could increase the likelihood of retaliatory killings of carnivores. PMID:28584709

  9. Increasing game prices may alter farmers' behaviours towards leopards (Panthera pardus) and other carnivores in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pirie, Tara J; Thomas, Rebecca L; Fellowes, Mark D E

    2017-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflict occurs globally, particularly in regions where large carnivores predate livestock. Retaliatory killings do occur, and although predation of livestock by carnivores happens, losses from other factors such as disease or injury can be misattributed because of landowner perceptions. Game farming for both trophy hunting and eco-tourism is becoming increasingly common in South Africa, and there has been a rapid increase in the cost of game animals (in some species as much as five-fold) between 2010 and 2015. This could result in an increase in conflict between commercial game farmers and carnivores. We conducted two questionnaire surveys of farmers in 2010 and 2015 to investigate this. We asked if there had been changes in farming practices, perceived predator activity, perceived amount of livestock and commercial game losses, and actions taken towards carnivores in a South African farming community. We found no significant change in farming types in the area or losses of livestock between the years. However, there was a significant increase in perceived commercial game losses reported, even though protection of game had increased. Actions taken towards carnivores by livestock/game farmers were also significantly more negative in 2015 compared to farmers growing crops, but there was no such difference in 2010. We suggest that these changes could be a result of the increase in game prices over that period, leading to greater financial losses when an animal is predated, which in turn could increase the likelihood of retaliatory killings of carnivores.

  10. Stratigraphic potential of Bolboforma significantly increased by new finds in the North Atlantic and South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Karowe, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    Until now, the genus Bolboforma, a problematic group of calcareous microfossils, has been recorded only in Oligocene to Pliocene marine sedimentary rocks, chiefly in the eastern North Atlantic region. We add to this eastern North Atlantic record six new sites and eleven undescribed species from the continental slopes of Ireland and Morocco. More significantly, we record, for the first time, abundant assemblages of Bolboforma on the western side of the North Atlantic and in the western South Pacific. Seven boreholes on the continental shelf and slope of New Jersey and Virginia contain ten species, three of which are new. Two species are present in two outcrops in eastern Mississippi and four are present in a borehole in the coastal plain of Virginia. On the Lord Howe Rise, west of New Zealand, a DSDP corehole has yielded a rich assemblage including four undescribed species. In addition to expanding the geographic distribution of Bolboforma, our work extends the known stratigraphic range downward into the upper Eocene on both sides of the North Atlantic and in the western South Pacific. Our findings firmly support the inference of a planktonic life style for Bolboforma, which implies a significant potential for biostratigraphic, paleobiogeographic, and paleoenvironmental studies, on both a local and global scale. We recommend a concerted effort to further document the nature and distribution of Bolboforma.

  11. Evidence for an increased distribution range of Dermacentor reticulatus in south-west Poland.

    PubMed

    Kiewra, Dorota; Czulowska, Aleksandra

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of Dermacentor reticulatus to new geographical areas has been observed in several countries in Europe, including Poland and it's neighbors. In 2011 and 2012, a total of 148 host-seeking D. reticulatus ticks were collected after flagging the vegetation in Lower Silesia, south-western Poland. Tick monitoring was conducted in mixed and deciduous forest, on meadows, in river valleys and ecotones between forested and grassy areas. The ornate dog ticks were found in 10 out of 33 sites located in five districts: Legnica, Wroclaw, Środa Śląska, Lubin and Boleslawiec County. All sites where D. reticulatus ticks were found are located to the south-west of the Odra River. The greatest distance between these disconnected localities was approximately 90 km. It seems that at present the southern boundary of the range is Wroclaw district. This study indicates that D. reticulatus can be ranked as a typical element of the fauna in Lower Silesia in southwestern Poland.

  12. Adherence to a predominantly Mediterranean diet decreases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease: a cross-sectional study in a South Eastern European population.

    PubMed

    Mone, I; Kraja, B; Bregu, A; Duraj, V; Sadiku, E; Hyska, J; Burazeri, G

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to assess the association of a Mediterranean diet and gastroesophageal reflux disease among adult men and women in Albania, a former communist country in South Eastern Europe with a predominantly Muslim population. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012, which included a population-based sample of 817 individuals (≥18 years) residing in Tirana, the Albanian capital (333 men; overall mean age: 50.2 ± 18.7 years; overall response rate: 82%). Assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease was based on Montreal definition. Participants were interviewed about their dietary patterns, which in the analysis was dichotomized into: predominantly Mediterranean (frequent consumption of composite/traditional dishes, fresh fruit and vegetables, olive oil, and fish) versus largely non-Mediterranean (frequent consumption of red meat, fried food, sweets, and junk/fast food). Logistic regression was used to assess the association of gastroesophageal reflux disease with the dietary patterns. Irrespective of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle factors including eating habits (meal regularity, eating rate, and meal-to-sleep interval), employment of a non-Mediterranean diet was positively related to gastroesophageal reflux disease risk (fully adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-4.5). Our findings point to a beneficial effect of a Mediterranean diet in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in transitional Albania. Findings from this study should be confirmed and expanded further in prospective studies in Albania and in other Mediterranean countries. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  13. Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Erin; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to antihypertensive medication remains a key modifiable factor in the management of hypertension. The multidimensional nature of adherence and blood pressure (BP) control call for multicomponent, patient-centered interventions to improve adherence. Promising strategies to improve antihypertensive medication adherence and BP control include regimen simplification, reduction of out-of-pocket costs, use of allied health professionals for intervention delivery, and self-monitoring of BP. Research to understand the effects of technology-mediated interventions, mechanisms underlying adherence behavior, and sex-race differences in determinants of low adherence and intervention effectiveness may enhance patient-specific approaches to improve adherence and disease control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Population increase and environmental deterioration correspond with microlithic innovations in South Asia ca. 35,000 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Petraglia, Michael; Clarkson, Christopher; Boivin, Nicole; Haslam, Michael; Korisettar, Ravi; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Ditchfield, Peter; Fuller, Dorian; James, Hannah; Jones, Sacha; Kivisild, Toomas; Koshy, Jinu; Lahr, Marta Mirazón; Metspalu, Mait; Roberts, Richard; Arnold, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Genetic studies of South Asia's population history have led to postulations of a significant and early population expansion in the subcontinent, dating to sometime in the Late Pleistocene. We evaluate this argument, based on new mtDNA analyses, and find evidence for significant demographic transition in the subcontinent, dating to 35–28 ka. We then examine the paleoenvironmental and, particularly, archaeological records for this time period and note that this putative demographic event coincides with a period of ecological and technological change in South Asia. We document the development of a new diminutive stone blade (microlithic) technology beginning at 35–30 ka, the first time that the precocity of this transition has been recognized across the subcontinent. We argue that the transition to microlithic technology may relate to changes in subsistence practices, as increasingly large and probably fragmented populations exploited resources in contracting favorable ecological zones just before the onset of full glacial conditions. PMID:19620737

  15. Transient improvement of urticaria induces poor adherence as assessed by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sakae; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Inomata, Naoko; Furue, Masutaka; Onozuka, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Sugaya, Makoto; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shintani, Yoichi; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Kitami, Yuki; Tanioka, Miki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Hagihara, Akihito; Morisky, Donald E; Katoh, Norito

    2015-11-01

    Poor adherence to medication is a major public health challenge. Here, we aimed to determine the adherence to oral and topical medications and to analyze underlying associated factors using the translated Japanese version of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 regarding urticaria treatment. Web-based questionnaires were performed for 3096 registered dermatological patients, along with a subanalysis of 751 registered urticaria patients in this study. The adherence to oral medication was significantly associated with the frequency of hospital visits. Variables that affected the adherence to topical medication included age and experience of drug effectiveness. The rate of responses that "It felt like the symptoms had improved" varied significantly among the dermatological diseases treated with oral medications. Dermatologists should be aware that adherence to the treatment of urticaria is quite low. Regular visits and active education for patients with urticaria are mandatory in order to achieve a good therapeutic outcome by increasing the adherence.

  16. Non-adherence in difficult asthma and advances in detection.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, John T; Heaney, Liam G

    2013-12-01

    Non-adherence to anti-inflammatory therapies is common in patients referred for specialist assessment at difficult-to-treat asthma services. In the difficult asthma setting, non-adherence to treatment is associated with poor baseline asthma control, increased frequency of exacerbations and asthma-related hospitalizations, as well as increased risk of death. Here, we present a review of the current literature surrounding the prevalence and risks of non-adherence in difficult asthma and we report on current methods of measuring treatment adherence and advances in the detection of non-adherence. We will also explore methods by which non-adherence in difficult asthma can be addressed.

  17. Increased metal concentrations in giant sungazer lizards (Smaug giganteus) from mining areas in South Africa.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Trevor; Whiting, Martin J

    2012-11-01

    Environmental contaminants from anthropogenic activity such as mining can have profound health effects on the animals living in adjacent areas. We investigated whether inorganic contaminants associated with gold-mining waste discharges were accumulated by a threatened species of lizard, Smaug giganteus, in South Africa. Lizards were sampled from two mining sites and two control sites. Blood samples from the most contaminated mining site had significantly greater concentrations of lithium, sodium, aluminum, sulfur, silicon, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, copper, tungsten, and bismuth than the remaining sites. Contaminant concentrations were not significantly related to lizard body condition, although these relationships were consistently negative. The adult sex ratio of the population inhabiting the most contaminated site also deviated from an expected 1:1 ratio in favour of female lizards. We demonstrate that lizards at these mining sites contained high concentrations of heavy metals that may be imposing as yet poorly understood costs to these lizards.

  18. Body mass index adjustments to increase the validity of body fatness assessment in UK Black African and South Asian children

    PubMed Central

    Hudda, M T; Nightingale, C M; Donin, A S; Fewtrell, M S; Haroun, D; Lum, S; Williams, J E; Owen, C G; Rudnicka, A R; Wells, J C K; Cook, D G; Whincup, P H

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Body mass index (BMI) (weight per height2) is the most widely used marker of childhood obesity and total body fatness (BF). However, its validity is limited, especially in children of South Asian and Black African origins. We aimed to quantify BMI adjustments needed for UK children of Black African and South Asian origins so that adjusted BMI related to BF in the same way as for White European children. Methods: We used data from four recent UK studies that made deuterium dilution BF measurements in UK children of White European, South Asian and Black African origins. A height-standardized fat mass index (FMI) was derived to represent BF. Linear regression models were then fitted, separately for boys and girls, to quantify ethnic differences in BMI–FMI relationships and to provide ethnic-specific BMI adjustments. Results: We restricted analyses to 4–12 year olds, to whom a single consistent FMI (fat mass per height5) could be applied. BMI consistently underestimated BF in South Asians, requiring positive BMI adjustments of +1.12 kg m−2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83, 1.41 kg m−2; P<0.0001) for boys and +1.07 kg m−2 (95% CI: 0.74, 1.39 kg m−2; P<0.0001) for girls of all age groups and FMI levels. BMI overestimated BF in Black Africans, requiring negative BMI adjustments for Black African children. However, these were complex because there were statistically significant interactions between Black African ethnicity and FMI (P=0.004 boys; P=0.003 girls) and also between FMI and age group (P<0.0001 for boys and girls). BMI adjustments therefore varied by age group and FMI level (and indirectly BMI); the largest adjustments were in younger children with higher unadjusted BMI and the smallest in older children with lower unadjusted BMI. Conclusions: BMI underestimated BF in South Asians and overestimated BF in Black Africans. Ethnic-specific adjustments, increasing BMI in South Asians and reducing BMI in Black

  19. In vitro measurements of burn dressing adherence and the effect of interventions on reducing adherence.

    PubMed

    Brichacek, Michal; Ning, Chenxi; Gawaziuk, Justin P; Liu, Song; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2017-08-01

    There is a paucity of research on reducing dressing adherence. This is partly due to lack of an in vitro model, recreating the clinical variability of wounds. Previously we described an in vitro gelatin model to evaluate adherence in a standardized manner. We present evaluation of strategies to reduce adherence in six dressings. Dressing materials used were: PET (Control), fine mesh gauze coated in bismuth and petroleum jelly (BIS), nanocrystalline silver (NS), wide mesh polyester coated in polysporin ointment (WM), fine mesh cellulose acetate coated in polysporin ointment (FM), and soft silicone mesh (SIL). The dressing material was applied to gelatin and incubated for 24h. Adherence was tested using an Instron 5965 force-measurement device. Testing was repeated with various adherence reducing agents: water, surfactant, and mineral oil. Adherence from least to greatest was: SIL, NS, BIS, WM, FM, PET. Water reduced adherence in all dressings; the effect increasing with exposure time. Surfactant reduced adherence of NS. Mineral oil effectively decreased adherence of BIS, and WM. This model allows for reproducible measurement of dressing adherence. Different interventions affect various dressings. No single intervention optimally decreases adherence for all dressings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Adherence with the pre-hospital triage protocol in the transport of injured patients in an urban setting.

    PubMed

    Fitzharris, Michael; Stevenson, Mark; Middleton, Paul; Sinclair, Garry

    2012-09-01

    Pre-hospital triage protocols are an important component in the treatment of injured patients. The aim was to determine the level of, and factors associated with, adherence to the pre-hospital trauma triage criteria for urban patients transported in New South Wales, Australia. This retrospective study included patients injured in urban areas who were transported by road for the treatment of traumatic injuries in the period 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007. Of the 57,775 transported to hospital due to traumatic injury, 9344 (16%) met one or more of the pre-hospital triage criteria. Of these, 74% were transported to a protocol adherent major or regional trauma centre. Adherence rates differed by triage criteria met and was lowest for patients meeting physiologic-only criteria (63.5%) and highest for patients meeting all three triage criteria of physiology, mechanism and injury (85.4%). Female gender, increasing patient age, patients classified as having had a fall, the qualification level of treating officer and patients transported between midday to 18:00 (relative to those transported between midnight to 06:00) were factors associated with significantly lower levels of protocol adherence with respect to hospital destination. Minimal time differences were evident between patients transported to protocol adherent and non-adherent destinations. Based on the post hoc evaluation of triage status, adherence to the triage protocol was 74%. Analysis of patient destinations for protocol non-adherence appears to indicate that paramedic interpretation and discretion played a role in determining hospital choice. There was a marginal time difference between those transported to protocol adherent and non-adherent destinations. Future research needs to determine whether deviations from protocol are associated with differential mortality. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Viral hepatitis in South African healthcare workers at increased risk of occupational exposure to blood-borne viruses.

    PubMed

    Vardas, E; Ross, M H; Sharp, G; McAnerney, J; Sim, J

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis A, B and C antibodies was measured in a group of healthcare workers (HCWs) at increased risk of occupational acquisition of blood-borne viruses (N=402) from a large, urban referral hospital in South Africa. The aims of this study were to determine the immunity of HCWs to these agents and to recommend policy for the protection of HCWs against occupational exposure to viral hepatitis in this country. Race, sex and age were shown to be important factors influencing the presence of hepatitis A (HAV) antibodies. Most black HCWs (96.2%) are protected from HAV infection. Females have significantly higher HAV antibodies compared with males and antibodies increase with increasing age. Hepatitis B antibodies (anti-HBs) were found in 30.6% of HCWs. Anti-HBs levels were significantly associated with a past history of HBV vaccination. However, only a small proportion of HCWs (21.2%) could remember ever being immunized against HBV. For those individuals that did receive HBV vaccination (N=83), the mean number of years since their last vaccine was 6.2 years (SD +/- 3.5). HCV antibodies were found in 1.8% of HCWs at increased risk of occupational exposure. It was not possible to define whether these infections were occupationally acquired but genotyping of the HCV (in two of seven cases) showed genotype 5, the predominant South African genotype. New recommendations for the prevention of viral hepatitis in HCWs in South Africa are made, including pre-employment screening for HAV based on self-selection criteria, universal anti-HBs screening with HBV booster vaccination. HCV recommendations are based on appropriate education of HCWs about this infection and its prevention and a standardized post-exposure testing protocol. Copyright 2001 The Hospital Infection Society.

  2. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that-in all social interventions-the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient's hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA's household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his/her household

  3. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that–in all social interventions–the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient’s hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA’s household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his

  4. The value of theory in programmes to implement clinical guidelines: Insights from a retrospective mixed-methods evaluation of a programme to increase adherence to national guidelines for chronic disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Sheringham, Jessica; Solmi, Francesca; Ariti, Cono; Baim-Lance, Abigail; Morris, Steve; Fulop, Naomi J

    2017-01-01

    Programmes have had limited success in improving guideline adherence for chronic disease. Use of theory is recommended but is often absent in programmes conducted in 'real-world' rather than research settings. This mixed-methods study tested a retrospective theory-based approach to evaluate a 'real-world' programme in primary care to improve adherence to national guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Qualitative data, comprising analysis of documents generated throughout the programme (n>300), in-depth interviews with planners (clinicians, managers and improvement experts involved in devising, planning, and implementing the programme, n = 14) and providers (practice clinicians, n = 14) were used to construct programme theories, experiences of implementation and contextual factors influencing care. Quantitative analyses comprised controlled before-and-after analyses to test 'early' and evolved' programme theories with comparators grounded in each theory. 'Early' theory predicted the programme would reduce emergency hospital admissions (EHA). It was tested using national analysis of standardized borough-level EHA rates between programme and comparator boroughs. 'Evolved' theory predicted practices with higher programme participation would increase guideline adherence and reduce EHA and costs. It was tested using a difference-in-differences analysis with linked primary and secondary care data to compare changes in diagnosis, management, EHA and costs, over time and by programme participation. Contrary to programme planners' predictions in 'early' and 'evolved' programme theories, admissions did not change following the programme. However, consistent with 'evolved' theory, higher guideline adoption occurred in practices with greater programme participation. Retrospectively constructing theories based on the ideas of programme planners can enable evaluators to address some limitations encountered when evaluating programmes without a theoretical

  5. Adherence: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Carrie Lee

    2015-04-01

    To utilize a Wilsonian method of concept analysis to define and describe the concept of adherence. Published research articles, nursing literature, published books, and national and international advisory reports. The concept of adherence was analyzed using the Wilson method. Results, applications, and practice implications in regards to the concept of adherence were then derived from the analysis. Adherence is a complex, multifaceted concept that can greatly impact patient behaviors and nursing practice. Further clarification of adherence is needed to help delineate this concept from other related terms. Healthcare providers should have an understanding of the concept of adherence in the context of patient care in order to guide patient self-care behaviors. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  6. Medication adherence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Francisco Javier; Hernández, José Luis; Pereira, José; Herrera, Judit; Rodríguez, Carlos J

    2012-10-22

    Non-adherence is a major problem in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its high prevalence, potentially severe consequences and associated costs make the study of this phenomenon a priority issue. In this article, basic non-adherence concepts of prevalence, consequences, evaluation methods, methodological restrictions of available studies, risk factors and intervention strategies, are reviewed. Studying non-adherence risk factors is a necessary step toward designing adequately oriented intervention strategies. An operative definition of adherence and good knowledge of its evaluation methods are essential to study this phenomenon. Unfortunately, most available studies contain methodological restrictions, especially concerning the evaluation methods, and an agreed operative definition of adherence has only very recently been reached. Knowing non-adherence risk factors, intervention strategies and available evidence on their effectiveness is essential in making treatment decisions in daily clinical practice.

  7. Medication adherence in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Francisco Javier; Hernández, José Luis; Pereira, José; Herrera, Judit; Rodríguez, Carlos J

    2012-01-01

    Non-adherence is a major problem in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its high prevalence, potentially severe consequences and associated costs make the study of this phenomenon a priority issue. In this article, basic non-adherence concepts of prevalence, consequences, evaluation methods, methodological restrictions of available studies, risk factors and intervention strategies, are reviewed. Studying non-adherence risk factors is a necessary step toward designing adequately oriented intervention strategies. An operative definition of adherence and good knowledge of its evaluation methods are essential to study this phenomenon. Unfortunately, most available studies contain methodological restrictions, especially concerning the evaluation methods, and an agreed operative definition of adherence has only very recently been reached. Knowing non-adherence risk factors, intervention strategies and available evidence on their effectiveness is essential in making treatment decisions in daily clinical practice. PMID:24175171

  8. Lactobacillus-Deficient Cervicovaginal Bacterial Communities Are Associated with Increased HIV Acquisition in Young South African Women.

    PubMed

    Gosmann, Christina; Anahtar, Melis N; Handley, Scott A; Farcasanu, Mara; Abu-Ali, Galeb; Bowman, Brittany A; Padavattan, Nikita; Desai, Chandni; Droit, Lindsay; Moodley, Amber; Dong, Mary; Chen, Yuezhou; Ismail, Nasreen; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Wesemann, Duane R; Mitchell, Caroline; Dong, Krista L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Walker, Bruce D; Virgin, Herbert W; Kwon, Douglas S

    2017-01-17

    Elevated inflammation in the female genital tract is associated with increased HIV risk. Cervicovaginal bacteria modulate genital inflammation; however, their role in HIV susceptibility has not been elucidated. In a prospective cohort of young, healthy South African women, we found that individuals with diverse genital bacterial communities dominated by anaerobes other than Gardnerella were at over 4-fold higher risk of acquiring HIV and had increased numbers of activated mucosal CD4(+) T cells compared to those with Lactobacillus crispatus-dominant communities. We identified specific bacterial taxa linked with reduced (L. crispatus) or elevated (Prevotella, Sneathia, and other anaerobes) inflammation and HIV infection and found that high-risk bacteria increased numbers of activated genital CD4(+) T cells in a murine model. Our results suggest that highly prevalent genital bacteria increase HIV risk by inducing mucosal HIV target cells. These findings might be leveraged to reduce HIV acquisition in women living in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. Does dog or cat ownership lead to increased gastroenteritis in young children in South Australia?

    PubMed

    Heyworth, J S; Cutt, H; Glonek, G

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dog and cat ownership and gastroenteritis in young children. A diary study of 965 children aged 4-6 years living in rural or semi-rural South Australia was undertaken. Data were collected on pet ownership, drinking water and other risk factors for gastroenteritis. Overall 89% of households had pets and dog ownership was more common than cat ownership. The multivariable models for gastroenteritis and pet ownership indicated that living in a household with a dog or cat was associated with a reduced risk of gastroenteritis (adj. OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55-0.92; OR 0.70, % CI 0.51-0.97 respectively). This paper adds to the evidence that pets are not a major source of gastroenteritis in the home and lends support to the health benefits of pet ownership. However, this must be weighed against the potential negative consequences, such as dog bites, particularly for this age group.

  10. High and increasing prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in Finland with a clear North-South difference.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Airi; Virta, Lauri J; Salomaa, Veikko; Mäki, Juhani; Jula, Antti; Färkkilä, Martti A

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) prevalence has increased and a North-South gradient has been reported. We estimated the nationwide prevalence of IBD, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in 1993, and prevalence of IBD in 2008, and assessed the geographical distribution of IBD in Finland. In addition, we investigated the vitamin D levels in a study population from a large, nationally representative health examination survey, the Health 2000 Survey. The register study for prevalences included all patients who had special reimbursement of medications for IBD in the years 1993 (n=10,958) and 2008 (31,703). The study for D-vitamin measurement consisted of 6134 persons who had participated in the Health 2000 Survey. The nationwide point prevalence of IBD in 1993 was 216 per 100,000 inhabitants, and 595 in 2008. In 1993, the prevalence of UC (177) was fourfold higher than the prevalence of CD (38). The prevalence of IBD and UC in Finland increased from South to North. For CD, no geographical variation could be demonstrated. In the Health 2000 survey, vitamin D levels were lower in Northern than in Southern Finland. Finland belongs to high prevalence area of IBD and this prevalence has increased nearly threefold during the past 15 years. A clear North-South gradient has been shown for IBD and UC, but not for CD. Slightly lower vitamin D levels in Northern Finland may be associated with the observed higher prevalence of IBD there. Copyright © 2012 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Early adolescent pregnancy increases risk of incident HIV infection in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Nicola J; Jewkes, Rachel K; Dunkle, Kristin L; Nduna, Mzikazi; Shai, Nwabisa Jama; Sterk, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents having unprotected heterosexual intercourse are at risk of HIV infection and unwanted pregnancy. However, there is little evidence to indicate whether pregnancy in early adolescence increases the risk of subsequent HIV infection. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that adolescent pregnancy (aged 15 or younger) increases the risk of incident HIV infection in young South African women. We assessed 1099 HIV-negative women, aged 15-26 years, who were volunteer participants in a cluster-randomized, controlled HIV prevention trial in the predominantly rural Eastern Cape province of South Africa. All of these young women had at least one additional HIV test over two years of follow-up. Outcomes were HIV incidence rates per 100 person years and HIV incidence rate ratios (IRRs) estimated by Poisson multivariate models. Three pregnancy categories were created for the Poisson model: early adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 15 years or younger); later adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 16 to 19 years); and women who did not report an adolescent pregnancy. Models were adjusted for study design, age, education, time since first sexual experience, socio-economic status, childhood trauma and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection. HIV incidence rates were 6.0 per 100 person years over two years of follow-up. The adjusted IRR was 3.02 (95% CI 1.50-6.09) for a pregnancy occurring at age 15 or younger. Women with pregnancies occurring between 16 and 19 years of age did not have a higher incidence of HIV (IRR 1.08; 95% CI 0.64-1.84). Early adolescent pregnancies were associated with higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners. Early adolescent pregnancies increase the incidence of HIV among South African women. The higher risk is associated with sexual risk behaviours such as higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners rather than a biological explanation of hormonal changes during pregnancy.

  12. Claustrophobia and adherence to CPAP treatment.

    PubMed

    Chasens, Eileen R; Pack, Allan I; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F; Weaver, Terri E

    2005-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of claustrophobia, an abnormal dread or fear of closed spaces, on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. The design was a secondary analysis of data from a prospective study of participants (N = 153) that completed 3 months of CPAP therapy from seven sleep disorders centers in the United States and Canada. A 15-item subscale adapted from the Fear and Avoidance Scale measured claustrophobic tendencies pre-CPAP treatment and again after 3 months. An overt monitor attached to the CPAP machines recorded mask-on CPAP adherence. There was a statistically significant difference in claustrophobia scores by adherence group (< 2 hours, 2 to < 5 hours, > or = 5 hours) and time period (pre-CPAP and after 3 months CPAP). Poor CPAP adherence (< 2 hours per night)was more than two times higher in participants with a claustrophobia score > or = 25. Identification of persons with increased claustrophobia tendencies and targeted interventions may increase adherence.

  13. Increased mortality among Indigenous persons during and after release from prison in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Kariminia, Azar; Butler, Tony; Jones, Jocelyn; Law, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    To estimate the overall and cause specific mortality of Aboriginal offenders in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The study cohort consisted of all Aboriginal men and women aged 18 years and older who had experienced full-time imprisonment in NSW between 1 January 1988 and 31 December 2002. Their data were linked probabilistically to the Australian National Death Index to obtain information on death. Standardised mortality ratios were calculated for all causes of death and adjusted for age, sex, and calendar year. The cohort comprised 7,980 men and 1,373 women with 75,801 person years of observation. During a median follow-up period of 8.3 years, 485 men and 73 women died, giving an overall mortality rate of 733 and 755 deaths per 100,000 person-years. The risk of death in men was 4.8 (95% CI: 4.4-5.3) times and among women 12.6 (95% CI: 10.0-15.8) times that of the NSW residents, with a markedly elevated risk for almost all conditions. The leading cause of death was cardiovascular disease in men (112 deaths, 23%) and mental and behavioural disorders (17 deaths, 23%) in women. The risk of death was greatest following release from prison. High mortality rates for cardiovascular disease, a preventable and treatable condition, were seen among Aboriginal offenders. Prison has an important role to play in screening marginalised populations for a range of health conditions. This is particularly true for Indigenous offenders. © 2012 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2012 Public Health Association of Australia.

  14. Effects of neutrophil adherence on the characteristics of receptors for tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Chamba, A; Stockley, R A; Burnett, D

    1991-05-06

    Human recombinant [125I]TNF-alpha was incubated with non-adherent human neutrophils, cells adherent to fibronectin-coated plastic, or adherent cells scraped into suspension (post-adherent). Binding of TNF to all cells increased with doses of added TNF but adherent cells bound little TNF. Binding of TNF by post-adherent cells was greater than when adherent, but still significantly less than that of non-adhered neutrophils, suggesting that TNF receptors were relocated on the adherent surface of neutrophils. Scatchard analysis showed that adherent cells expressed significantly fewer TNF receptors, but of higher affinity, than non-adherent cells. The results suggest that altered expression of TNF receptors might contribute to the differential effects of TNF on adherent and non-adherent neutrophils.

  15. Medication Adherence Interventions That Target Subjects with Adherence Problems: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate medication adherence is a pervasive, under-recognized cause of poor health outcomes. Many intervention trials designed to improve medication adherence have targeted adults with adherence problems. No previous reviews have synthesized the effectiveness of medication adherence interventions focused on subjects with medication adherence difficulties. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized findings from medication adherence intervention studies conducted among adults with medication adherence difficulties. Methods Primary research studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested an intervention designed to increase medication adherence among adults with documented adherence difficulties and reported medication adherence behavior outcomes. Comprehensive search strategies of 13 computerized databases, author and ancestry searches, and hand searches of 57 journals were used to locate eligible primary research. Participant demographics, intervention characteristics, and methodological features were reliably coded from reports along with medication adherence outcomes. Effect sizes for outcomes were calculated as standardized mean differences, and random effects models were used to estimate overall mean effects. Exploratory dichotomous and continuous variable moderator analyses were employed to examine potential associations between medication adherence effect size and sample, intervention, and methodological characteristics. Results Data were extracted from 53 reports of studies involving 8,243 individual primary study participants. The overall standardized mean difference effect size for treatment vs. control subjects was 0.301. For treatment pre- vs. post-intervention comparisons, the overall effect size was 0.533. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with interventions incorporating prompts to take medications than interventions lacking medication prompts (0.497 vs. 0.234). Larger effect sizes were also found

  16. Current Situation of Medication Adherence in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vrijens, Bernard; Antoniou, Sotiris; Burnier, Michel; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Volpe, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Despite increased awareness, poor adherence to treatments for chronic diseases remains a global problem. Adherence issues are common in patients taking antihypertensive therapy and associated with increased risks of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Whilst there has been a gradual trend toward improved control of hypertension, the number of patients with blood pressure values above goal has remained constant. This has both personal and economic consequences. Medication adherence is a multifaceted issue and consists of three components: initiation, implementation, and persistence. A combination of methods is recommended to measure adherence, with electronic monitoring and drug measurement being the most accurate. Pill burden, resulting from free combinations of blood pressure lowering treatments, makes the daily routine of medication taking complex, which can be a barrier to optimal adherence. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations simplify the habit of medication taking and improve medication adherence. Re-packing of medication is also being utilized as a method of improving adherence. This paper presents the outcomes of discussions by a European group of experts on the current situation of medication adherence in hypertension. PMID:28298894

  17. Can increased visceral adiposity without body weight changes accelerate carotid atherosclerosis in South Korean participants with type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul Sik; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Lee, Eun Jig; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Huh, Kab Bum

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and visceral obesity are associated with each other and with cardiovascular diseases. We determined whether increased visceral adiposity without weight gain was associated with sex-specific accelerated carotid atherosclerosis in South Koreans with T2DM. From 2003 to 2012, we recruited 280 participants with T2DM for the Seoul Metabolic Syndrome cohort who had body weight, visceral fat thickness (VFT), and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) measured at intervals of 2years. According to VFT change, sex-specific quartiles of clinical characteristics and changes of CIMT were determined. Logistic regression models predicted the odds of the progression of CIMTs in each quartile. During 2years of observation, VFTs fell by 5.2±13.5mm in men (P<0.001) and 3.4±10.5mm in women (P<0.001). Progression of CIMT was only significant for women's maximal CIMT (0.031±0.145mm, P=0.012), while significant improvements in HbA1c were found (0.9%; P<0.001 in both sexes). There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics, or in progression of CIMT in men or women according to 2-year quartiles of VFT change. Our results do not suggest that increased visceral adiposity without body weight changes impacts the CIMT progression in South Korean men or women with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adherence to Diabetes Medication in Individuals with Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review of Rates and Determinants of Adherence.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Paul; Patel, Hiren; Ganguli, Rohan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the importance of medication adherence for the effective treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), little research has examined adherence with diabetes medication treatment in schizophrenia. The purpose of this systematic review was to: 1) evaluate rates of adherence and determinants of adherence with medication for T2DM in individuals with schizophrenia; and, where possible, 2) examine the relationship between medication adherence and glycemic control. Studies were included if they presented information on dosing regimens and adherence or compliance rates for T2DM and included samples where at least 50% of the participants were individuals with schizophrenia. Six studies were included in this review that predominantly examined men over the age of 50 years. Studies confirmed that many individuals with schizophrenia were not adhering to their diabetes medication as adherence rates ranged from 51-85%. Two studies that compared medication adherence in individuals with and without schizophrenia found those with the mental illness had higher rates of adherence. One study reported that blood glucose control levels were not statistically different between those who did and did not adhere to their medication, indicating more research is necessary in this area. Factors that improved adherence included disease and medical service and medication-related factors. Interventions to increase diabetes medication adherence in schizophrenia need to address disease and medical service and medication-related factors. Further research needs to examine diabetes medication adherence in women, younger individuals, and those recently diagnosed with diabetes as these individuals have been underrepresented in the literature.

  19. Adherence in ulcerative colitis: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Anna; Castiglione, Fabiana; Nardone, Olga Maria; Colombo, Giorgio L

    2017-01-01

    Medication adherence is an important challenge while treating chronic illnesses, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), that require a long-term management to induce and maintain clinical remission. This review provides an overview of the role that medication adherence plays in the routine management of UC, with a focus on the results of a recent Italian study reporting the perception of patients with UC regarding adherence to treatment. A literature analysis was conducted on topics, such as measurement of adherence in real practice, causes, risk factors and consequences of non-adherence and strategies, to raise patients’ adherence. Most of the data refer to adherence to 5-aminosalicylic acid, and standard of care for the induction and maintenance of remission in UC. The adherence rate to 5-aminosalicylic acid is low in clinical practice, thus resulting in fivefold higher risk of relapse, likely increased risk of colorectal cancer, reduced quality of life and higher health care costs for in- and outpatient settings. There are various causes affecting non-adherence to therapy: forgetfulness, high cost of drugs, lack of understanding of the drug regimen – which are sometimes due to insufficient explanation by the specialist – anxiety created by possible adverse events, lack of confidence in physicians’ judgment and complex dosing regimen. The last aspect negatively influences adherence to medication both in clinical trial settings and in real-world practice. Regarding this feature, mesalamine in once-daily dosage may be preferable to medications with multiple doses per day because the simplification of treatment regimens improves adherence. PMID:28260866

  20. Exercise Adherence. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Pat

    This digest discusses exercise adherence, noting its vital role in maximizing the benefits associated with physical activity. Information is presented on the following: (1) factors that influence adherence to self-monitored programs of regular exercise (childhood eating habits, and psychological, physical, social, and situational factors); (2)…

  1. Increase of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence is associated with increase of women's depression symptoms in a nationally representative longitudinal study in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meffert, Susan M; McCulloch, Charles E; Neylan, Thomas C; Gandhi, Monica; Lund, Crick

    2015-04-01

    Studies that examine the effects of neighborhood characteristics on mental health show that perceptions of general neighborhood violence are associated with depression across diverse populations (Clark et al., 2008; Velez-Gomez et al., 2013; Wilson-Genderson & Pruchno, 2013). However, to our knowledge, none have examined the specific effect of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence (PFNDV) on residents' mental health, despite knowledge that domestic violence is a potent predictor of depression at the level of the individual. This study investigates the impact of PFNDV on mental health using the South African National Income Dynamics Study (SA-NIDS). NIDS Waves 2 and 3 measure the perceived frequency of six neighborhood violence subtypes through the NIDS household respondent questionnaire and depression through a questionnaire administered to all NIDS participants. Linear regression was used to model the relationship between change in depression symptoms and change in violence subtypes between Waves 2 and 3. We found that two-year increase in PFNDV was significantly correlated with increase of depression symptoms over the same time period for women, independently of individual, household and neighborhood level characteristics, including five other types of neighborhood violence. No other type of violence was associated with increased depression in women in the fully adjusted model. Research and policy implications are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Increase of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence is associated with increase of women's depression symptoms in a nationally representative longitudinal study in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Meffert, Susan M.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Neylan, Thomas C.; Gandhi, Monica; Lund, Crick

    2015-01-01

    Studies that examine the effects of neighborhood characteristics on mental health show that perceptions of general neighborhood violence are associated with depression across diverse populations (Clark et al., 2008; Velez-Gomez et al., 2013; Wilson-Genderson & Pruchno, 2013). However, to our knowledge, none have examined the specific effect of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence (PFNDV) on residents' mental health, despite knowledge that domestic violence is a potent predictor of depression at the level of the individual. This study investigates the impact of PFNDV on mental health using the South African National Income Dynamics Study (SA-NIDS). NIDS Waves 2 and 3 measure the perceived frequency of six neighborhood violence subtypes through the NIDS household respondent questionnaire and depression through a questionnaire administered to all NIDS participants. Linear regression was used to model the relationship between change in depression symptoms and change in violence subtypes between Waves 2 and 3. We found that two-year increase in PFNDV was significantly correlated with increase of depression symptoms over the same time period for women, independently of individual, household and neighborhood level characteristics, including five other types of neighborhood violence. No other type of violence was associated with increased depression in women in the fully adjusted model. Research and policy implications are discussed. PMID:25769107

  3. South Africa?s Increased Matriculation Passes: What Skunks behind the Rose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monyooe, Lebusa; Tjatji, Martin; Mosese, Eulenda

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that the exponential increases in the Grade 12 (Matriculation) passes post 1994 do not necessarily translate to quality because of the low performance norms and standards set for passing Grade 12. It further calls for a serious reflection and interrogation of existing policies on performance, benchmarks, teacher education…

  4. Increased cytogenetic abnormalities in exfoliated oral mucosal cells of South Indian foundry workers.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Saranya Ramalingam; Sellappa, Sudha

    2015-02-01

    Biomonitoring offers a valuable tool to estimate the genetic risk as of exposure to genotoxic agents. Here, we intend to assess the potential cytogenetic damage related with occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by evaluating the genetic damages in exfoliated buccal epithelial cells of foundry workers via counting micronucleus (MNs) and other nuclear abnormalities (NAs). This was a cross-sectional study and all study subjects were male . Exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were obtained from 100 subjects involved in either foundry molding or melting processes, and 100 controls matched for sex, age, and smoking from the area of Coimbatore city, Southern India. For each individual, 2000 exfoliated buccal cells were analyzed. Significantly, there was a higher frequency of MN in the exposed workers than in the controls (P < 0.05). Smoking was associated with the increased frequencies of micronuclei and NAs in the buccal epithelium of both the control and the exposed groups. Smoking represented significant factors in terms of increasing the production of MN when the control and the exposed groups were compared (P < 0.05). The results specify that buccal cells of foundry workers display increased levels of genotoxicity and these biomarker responses may be related to the increased cancer risk. These results conclude that the studied individuals are at a risk group and they require periodical biological monitoring and proper care which is essential for them.

  5. Integrating Group Counseling, Cell Phone Messaging, and Participant-Generated Songs and Dramas into a Microcredit Program Increases Nigerian Women’s Adherence to International Breastfeeding Recommendations123

    PubMed Central

    Flax, Valerie L.; Negerie, Mekebeb; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Leatherman, Sheila; Daza, Eric J.; Bentley, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    In northern Nigeria, interventions are urgently needed to narrow the large gap between international breastfeeding recommendations and actual breastfeeding practices. Studies of integrated microcredit and community health interventions documented success in modifying health behaviors but typically had uncontrolled designs. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Bauchi State, Nigeria, with the aim of increasing early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among female microcredit clients. The intervention had 3 components. Trained credit officers led monthly breastfeeding learning sessions during regularly scheduled microcredit meetings for 10 mo. Text and voice messages were sent out weekly to a cell phone provided to small groups of microcredit clients (5–7 women). The small groups prepared songs or dramas about the messages and presented them at the monthly microcredit meetings. The control arm continued with the regular microcredit program. Randomization occurred at the level of the monthly meeting groups. Pregnant clients were recruited at baseline and interviewed again when their infants were aged ≥6 mo. Logistic regression models accounting for clustering were used to estimate the odds of performing recommended behaviors. Among the clients who completed the final survey (n = 390), the odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 mo (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.0) and timely breastfeeding initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6, 4.1) were increased in the intervention vs. control arm. Delayed introduction of water explained most of the increase in exclusive breastfeeding among clients receiving the intervention. In conclusion, a breastfeeding promotion intervention integrated into microcredit increased the likelihood that women adopted recommended breastfeeding practices. This intervention could be scaled up in Nigeria, where local organizations provide microcredit to >500,000 clients. Furthermore, the intervention could be adopted more widely

  6. Integrating group counseling, cell phone messaging, and participant-generated songs and dramas into a microcredit program increases Nigerian women's adherence to international breastfeeding recommendations.

    PubMed

    Flax, Valerie L; Negerie, Mekebeb; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Leatherman, Sheila; Daza, Eric J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2014-07-01

    In northern Nigeria, interventions are urgently needed to narrow the large gap between international breastfeeding recommendations and actual breastfeeding practices. Studies of integrated microcredit and community health interventions documented success in modifying health behaviors but typically had uncontrolled designs. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Bauchi State, Nigeria, with the aim of increasing early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among female microcredit clients. The intervention had 3 components. Trained credit officers led monthly breastfeeding learning sessions during regularly scheduled microcredit meetings for 10 mo. Text and voice messages were sent out weekly to a cell phone provided to small groups of microcredit clients (5-7 women). The small groups prepared songs or dramas about the messages and presented them at the monthly microcredit meetings. The control arm continued with the regular microcredit program. Randomization occurred at the level of the monthly meeting groups. Pregnant clients were recruited at baseline and interviewed again when their infants were aged ≥6 mo. Logistic regression models accounting for clustering were used to estimate the odds of performing recommended behaviors. Among the clients who completed the final survey (n = 390), the odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 mo (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.0) and timely breastfeeding initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6, 4.1) were increased in the intervention vs. control arm. Delayed introduction of water explained most of the increase in exclusive breastfeeding among clients receiving the intervention. In conclusion, a breastfeeding promotion intervention integrated into microcredit increased the likelihood that women adopted recommended breastfeeding practices. This intervention could be scaled up in Nigeria, where local organizations provide microcredit to >500,000 clients. Furthermore, the intervention could be adopted more widely

  7. Early adolescent pregnancy increases risk of incident HIV infection in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Nicola J; Jewkes, Rachel K; Dunkle, Kristin L; Nduna, Mzikazi; Shai, Nwabisa Jama; Sterk, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents having unprotected heterosexual intercourse are at risk of HIV infection and unwanted pregnancy. However, there is little evidence to indicate whether pregnancy in early adolescence increases the risk of subsequent HIV infection. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that adolescent pregnancy (aged 15 or younger) increases the risk of incident HIV infection in young South African women. Methods We assessed 1099 HIV-negative women, aged 15–26 years, who were volunteer participants in a cluster-randomized, controlled HIV prevention trial in the predominantly rural Eastern Cape province of South Africa. All of these young women had at least one additional HIV test over two years of follow-up. Outcomes were HIV incidence rates per 100 person years and HIV incidence rate ratios (IRRs) estimated by Poisson multivariate models. Three pregnancy categories were created for the Poisson model: early adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 15 years or younger); later adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 16 to 19 years); and women who did not report an adolescent pregnancy. Models were adjusted for study design, age, education, time since first sexual experience, socio-economic status, childhood trauma and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection. Results HIV incidence rates were 6.0 per 100 person years over two years of follow-up. The adjusted IRR was 3.02 (95% CI 1.50–6.09) for a pregnancy occurring at age 15 or younger. Women with pregnancies occurring between 16 and 19 years of age did not have a higher incidence of HIV (IRR 1.08; 95% CI 0.64–1.84). Early adolescent pregnancies were associated with higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners. Conclusions Early adolescent pregnancies increase the incidence of HIV among South African women. The higher risk is associated with sexual risk behaviours such as higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners rather than a biological explanation

  8. Increase in the prescription rate of antidepressants after the Sewol Ferry disaster in Ansan, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Man; Kim, Kyoung-Hoon; Lee, Mikyung; Lee, Sang-Min; Ko, Young-Hoon; Paik, Jong-Woo

    2017-09-01

    Previous pharmaco-epidemiological studies have reported increases in the prescription of psychotropic medications after a disaster, reflecting post-disaster changes in psychiatric conditions and mental health service utilization. We investigated changes in the prescription of psychotropic medications in the Danwon district of Ansan city (Ansan Danwon) compared to a control community before and after the Sewol Ferry disaster on April 16, 2014. Data was collected from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. We analyzed the prescription rates of psychotropic medications including antidepressants, anxiolytics, and sedatives/hypnotics, and investigated whether the time-series pattern of monthly prescriptions per 100,000 people was different in Ansan Danwon compared to that in Cheonan city after the Sewol Ferry disaster through difference-in-differences regression analysis. Ansan Danwon showed a significantly greater increase (5.6%) in the prescription rate of antidepressants compared to Cheonan city following the Sewol Ferry disaster. There were no significant differences in changes in the prescription rates of anxiolytics or sedatives/hypnotics. In the secondary analysis, a significantly greater increase in the prescription rate of antipsychotics was observed in Ansan Danwon compared to a control community after the disaster. We could not exclude the possibility that other events influenced changes in the prescription rates of psychotropic medications during the study period. Pharmaco-epidemiological studies on psychotropic medication prescription after a disaster provide important information about population-level mental health. Our results suggest that the Sewol Ferry disaster exerted a harmful effect on the mental health status of the affected community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of increasing the coinsurance rate on outpatient utilization of healthcare services in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Jang, Sung-In; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-02-20

    The Korean healthcare system is composed of costly and inefficient structures that fail to adequately divide the functions and roles of medical care organizations. To resolve this matter, the government reformed the cost-sharing policy in November of 2011 for the management of outpatients visiting general or tertiary hospitals with comparatively mild diseases. The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of increasing the coinsurance rate of prescription drug costs for 52 mild diseases at general or tertiary hospitals on outpatient healthcare service utilization. The present study used health insurance claim data collected from 2010 to 2013. The study population consisted of 505,691 outpatients and was defined as those aged 20-64 years who had visited medical care organizations for the treatment of 52 diseases both before and after the program began. To examine the effect of the cost-sharing policy on outpatient healthcare service utilization (percentage of general or tertiary hospital utilization, number of outpatient visits, and outpatient medical costs), a segmented regression analysis was performed. After the policy to increase the coinsurance rate on prescription drug costs was implemented, the number of outpatient visits at general or tertiary hospitals decreased (β = -0.0114, p < 0.0001); however, the number increased at hospitals and clinics (β = 0.0580, p < 0.0001). Eventually, the number of outpatient visits to hospitals and clinics began to decrease after policy initiation (β = -0.0018, p < 0.0001). Outpatient medical costs decreased for both medical care organizations (general or tertiary hospitals: β = -2913.4, P < 0.0001; hospitals or clinics: β = -591.35, p < 0.0001), and this decreasing trend continued with time. It is not clear that decreased utilization of general or tertiary hospitals has transferred to that of clinics or hospitals due to the increased cost-sharing policy of prescription

  10. The value of theory in programmes to implement clinical guidelines: Insights from a retrospective mixed-methods evaluation of a programme to increase adherence to national guidelines for chronic disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Sheringham, Jessica; Solmi, Francesca; Ariti, Cono; Baim-Lance, Abigail; Morris, Steve; Fulop, Naomi J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Programmes have had limited success in improving guideline adherence for chronic disease. Use of theory is recommended but is often absent in programmes conducted in ‘real-world’ rather than research settings. Materials and methods This mixed-methods study tested a retrospective theory-based approach to evaluate a ‘real-world’ programme in primary care to improve adherence to national guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Qualitative data, comprising analysis of documents generated throughout the programme (n>300), in-depth interviews with planners (clinicians, managers and improvement experts involved in devising, planning, and implementing the programme, n = 14) and providers (practice clinicians, n = 14) were used to construct programme theories, experiences of implementation and contextual factors influencing care. Quantitative analyses comprised controlled before-and-after analyses to test ‘early’ and evolved’ programme theories with comparators grounded in each theory. ‘Early’ theory predicted the programme would reduce emergency hospital admissions (EHA). It was tested using national analysis of standardized borough-level EHA rates between programme and comparator boroughs. ‘Evolved’ theory predicted practices with higher programme participation would increase guideline adherence and reduce EHA and costs. It was tested using a difference-in-differences analysis with linked primary and secondary care data to compare changes in diagnosis, management, EHA and costs, over time and by programme participation. Results Contrary to programme planners’ predictions in ‘early’ and ‘evolved’ programme theories, admissions did not change following the programme. However, consistent with ‘evolved’ theory, higher guideline adoption occurred in practices with greater programme participation. Conclusions Retrospectively constructing theories based on the ideas of programme planners can enable evaluators to

  11. Long-term patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ostrop, N J; Hallett, K A; Gill, M J

    2000-06-01

    To measure patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy over a two-year period and to identify factors impacting adherence. In a regional HIV treatment center, 100 consecutive patients starting any new antiretroviral agent were enrolled in this study, which consisted of a one-year retrospective data review and a one-year prospective component. The tools used for evaluating adherence were the monthly prescription refill data and a patient questionnaire. Data analyzed included overall adherence, adherence to individual antiretrovirals, and change in adherence over time, as well as factors reported as influencing adherence. Greater than 80% adherence in taking prescribed doses was seen in 75% of patients during the retrospective phase of the study; adherence increased to 84% in the prospective phase. Throughout the prospective phase of the study, monthly median adherence rates were 98-100%. Suboptimal adherence secondary to pill fatigue or number of daily pills did not occur. Reported nonadherence to dietary restrictions varied among drugs. The primary cause given for poor adherence was difficulty remembering followed by inconvenient dosing schedule and difficulty scheduling administration times around meals. At least one adherence tool was used by 61% of patients. A diagnosis of AIDS was associated with lower adherence in our patient population (p = 0.039); substance abuse and psychiatric history had no influence. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment regimens did not diminish over the two years studied. Several patients with poor adherence were identified, emphasizing the importance of addressing this issue both prior to and throughout treatment. A personalized approach by healthcare providers can optimize patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy by providing careful drug selection in addition to routine follow-up and the provision of information, feedback, and reminder systems.

  12. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  13. Increasing prevalence of comorbidity in patients with colorectal cancer in the South of the Netherlands 1995-2010.

    PubMed

    van Leersum, N J; Janssen-Heijnen, M L G; Wouters, M W J M; Rutten, H J T; Coebergh, J W; Tollenaar, R A E M; Lemmens, V E P P

    2013-05-01

    Comorbidity has large impact on colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment and outcomes and may increase as the population ages. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and time trends of comorbid diseases in patients with CRC from 1995 to 2010. The Eindhoven Cancer Registry registers comorbidity in all patients with primary CRC in the South of the Netherlands. We analyzed the prevalence of serious comorbid diseases in four time frames from 1995 to 2010. Thereby, we addressed its association with age, gender and socio-economic status (SES). The prevalence of comorbidity was registered in 27,339 patients with primary CRC. During the study period, the prevalence of comorbidity increased from 47% to 62%, multimorbidity increased from 20% to 37%. Hypertension and cardiovascular diseases were most prevalent and increased largely over time (respectively 16-29% and 12-24%). Pulmonary diseases increased in women, but remained stable in men. Average age at diagnosis increased from 68.3 to 69.5 years (p = 0.004). A low SES and male gender were associated with a higher risk of comorbidity (not changing over time). This study indicates that comorbidity among patients with CRC is common, especially in males and patients with a low SES. The prevalence of comorbidity increased from 1995 to 2010, in particular in presumably nutritional diseases. Ageing, increased life expectancy and life style changes may contribute to more comorbid diseases. Also, improved awareness among health care providers on the importance of comorbidity may have resulted in better registration. The increasing burden of comorbidity in patients with CRC emphasizes the need for more focus on individualized medicine. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  14. Increases in adult life expectancy in rural South Africa: valuing the scale-up of HIV treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Jacob; Herbst, Abraham J; Newell, Marie-Louise; Bärnighausen, Till

    2013-01-01

    The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expected to raise adult life expectancy in populations with high HIV prevalence. Using data from a population cohort of over 101,000 individuals in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, we measured changes in adult life expectancy for 2000–2011. In 2003, the year before ART became available in the public sector health system, adult life expectancy was 49.2 years; by 2011, adult life expectancy had increased to 60.5 years – an 11.3-year gain. Based on standard monetary valuation of life, the survival benefits of ART far outweigh the costs of providing treatment in this community. These gains in adult life expectancy signify the social value of ART and have implications for investment decisions of individuals, governments, and donors. PMID:23430655

  15. Increased burden of coronary artery disease in South-Asians living in North America. Need for an aggressive management algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bainey, Kevin R; Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2009-05-01

    Despite improvements in cardiovascular outcomes, coronary artery disease (CAD) continues to be a major cause of death worldwide. South-Asians (SAs) show an increased risk of atherosclerosis and have the highest mortality rates from CAD than any other ethnic group. The greater susceptibility of SAs to CAD cannot be explained entirely by conventional risk factors alone. Other factors are involved, such as genetic predisposition and high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes. CAD is more severe, extensive and malignant among SAs. It is often unsuspected and associated with adverse outcome requiring a more aggressive management strategy. With the growing SA population in North America, physicians need to be aware of the epidemiology, conventional causes, associated contributors, and adverse outcomes of CAD in this group. Importantly, physicians need a structured approach and an aggressive management algorithm for the optimal care of the high-risk SA patient population.

  16. HLA class I antibodies trigger increased adherence of monocytes to endothelial cells by eliciting an increase in endothelial P-selectin and, depending on subclass, by engaging FcγRs1

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M; Mulder, Arend; Reed, Elaine F

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants is characterized by intragraft macrophages. It is incompletely understood how donor specific antibody binding to graft endothelium promotes monocyte adhesion, and what, if any, contribution is made by the Fc region of the antibody. We investigated the mechanisms underlying monocyte recruitment by HLA class I antibody-activated endothelium. We used a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies of different subclasses to crosslink HLA I on human aortic, venous and microvascular endothelial cells, and measured the binding of human monocytic cell lines and peripheral blood monocytes. Both anti-HLA I murine IgG1 and mIgG2a induced endothelial P-selectin, which was required for monocyte adhesion to endothelium irrespective of subclass. Mouse IgG2a but not mIgG1 could bind human FcγRs. Accordingly, HLA I mIgG2a but not mIgG1 treatment of endothelial cells significantly augmented recruitment, predominantly through FcγRI, and, to a lesser extent, FcγRIIa. Moreover, HLA I mIgG2a promoted firm adhesion of monocytes to ICAM-1 through Mac-1, which may explain the prominence of monocytes during antibody mediated rejection. We confirmed these observations using human HLA allele specific monoclonal antibodies and IgG purified from transplant patient sera. HLA I antibodies universally elicit endothelial exocytosis leading to monocyte adherence, implying that P-selectin is a putative therapeutic target to prevent macrophage infiltration during antibody-mediated rejection. Importantly, the subclass of donor specific antibody may influence its pathogenesis. These results imply that hIgG1 and hIgG3 should have a greater capacity to trigger monocyte infiltration into the graft than IgG2 or IgG4 due to enhancement by FcγR interactions. PMID:23690477

  17. Effect of Medicaid Policy Changes on Medication Adherence: Differences by Baseline Adherence.

    PubMed

    Amin, Krutika; Farley, Joel F; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Domino, Marisa E

    2017-03-01

    In 2001, the North Carolina (NC) Medicaid program reduced the number of days prescription supply that enrollees could fill from 100 days to 34 days and increased copayments for brand-name medications. Previous work has shown that a change in these policies led to a decrease in medication adherence from 2.9 to 8.0 percentage points in specific populations with chronic conditions. Studies have also shown that days supply limits and copayment increases have heterogeneous effects based on enrollees' baseline characteristics, including baseline adherence. However, this phenomenon has not been studied in the Medicaid population. We undertook this study to assess the heterogeneous effect of the NC Medicaid policy changes in groups with varying levels of baseline adherence. To examine whether restrictions on days supply had heterogeneous effects in subgroups defined by medication adherence before the policy changes. A partial difference-in-difference-in-differences model with fixed effects was used to compare medication adherence before and after the NC Medicaid policy changes among Medicaid enrollees subject to the policy changes because of their use of long prescriptions (> 40 days) as compared with (a) NC Medicaid enrollees using short prescriptions (< 40 days) before policy adoption, as well as (b) Medicaid enrollees in Georgia restricted to a 31 days supply through the study period. Medicaid enrollees were included if they filled a prescription for 1 of the following medication classes: antihypertensives, lipid-lowering drugs, or antipsychotics. The effect of the policy changes on medication adherence, calculated using the proportion of days covered (PDC) each quarter by baseline adherence level and clinical condition group, was studied. Average adherence levels over the 18-month prechange period were used to stratify individuals into 3 baseline adherence groups: fully adherent (PDC ≥ 80%), partially adherent (50%-79%), and nonadherent (PDC ≤ 50%). Enrollees fully

  18. Poor adherence to folic acid and iodine supplement recommendations in preconception and pregnancy: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Malek, Lenka; Umberger, Wendy; Makrides, Maria; Zhou, Shao J

    2016-10-01

    To determine pregnant women's knowledge of and adherence to the recommendations for periconceptional folic acid supplementation (PFS) and iodine supplementation (IS). Secondary objectives include determining predictors of adherence, and identifying influential nutrition information sources. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 857 pregnant women, including a national cohort (n=455) recruited using an online panel provider and a South Australian cohort (n=402) recruited from a public maternity hospital. Adherence to PFS and IS recommendations was 27% and 23%, respectively. Planning pregnancy and awareness of the correct timing of recommendations were predictors of adherence for both recommendations. Not consuming any alcohol during pregnancy and living in metropolitan areas also predicted adherence to the IS recommendation. Awareness of the recommendation was greater for folic acid (more than 90%) than iodine (56-69%). Knowledge of the importance of folic acid and iodine was greater than knowledge regarding the recommended dose and timing of supplementation. Main healthcare providers were considered the most influential nutrition information sources. Knowledge of and adherence to supplement recommendations for preconception and pregnancy needs improvement. While main healthcare providers may play an important role, further research is needed to explore strategies for increasing adoption of recommendations. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. HIV Treatment Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Risk Activities When One Partner Is HIV+ Substance Abuse/Use Pregnancy & Childbirth Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Post-Exposure ... Doctor, Clinical & Dental Visits Treatment Adherence Mental Health Substance Abuse Issues Sexual Health Nutrition & Food Safety Exercise Immunizations ...

  20. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: March 2, 2017 Key ...

  1. Increasing the priority of mental health in Africa: findings from qualitative research in Ghana, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia.

    PubMed

    Bird, Philippa; Omar, Maye; Doku, Victor; Lund, Crick; Nsereko, James Rogers; Mwanza, Jason

    2011-09-01

    Despite the high prevalence of mental illness, mental health remains a low priority in Africa. There has been no investigation of the views of stakeholders in Africa on why this is and what can be done. This paper reports a comparison of the views of stakeholders in Ghana, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia, focusing on the priority given to mental health by the government at the national and regional/province levels. We conducted semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and used a two-stage approach to analysis: firstly framework analysis in each study country, followed by comparative analysis of the country data. Mental health was largely considered a low priority at national and regional/provincial levels in all four countries. We identified nine factors affecting the priority of mental health, which were grouped into three categories: legitimacy of the problem, feasibility of response and support for response. Respondents put forward a range of experiences and suggestions for increasing the priority given to mental health. We conclude with broad suggestions to raise the priority of mental health. These suggestions are particularly relevant as mental health increases in priority on the international agenda, in order to inform advocacy for increased priority for mental health in Africa.

  2. Morbidly adherent placenta.

    PubMed

    Abuhamad, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    Morbidly adherent placenta, which describes placenta accreta, increta, and percreta, implies an abnormal implantation of the placenta into the uterine wall. The incidence of placenta accreta has increased significantly over the past several decades, with the main risk factors include prior cesarean section and placental previa. Sonographic markers of placenta accreta can be present as early as the first trimester and include a low uterine implantation of a gestational sac, multiple vascular lacunae within the placenta, loss of the normal hypoechoic retroplacental zone, and abnormality of the uterine serosa-bladder interface, among others. Ultrasound has high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of placenta accreta and MRI should be reserved for rare cases in which the ultrasound is non-diagnostic. The optimum time for planned delivery for a patient with placenta accreta is around 34-35 weeks following a course of corticosteroid injection. The successful management of placenta accreta includes a multidisciplinary care team approach with the successful management relying heavily on the prenatal diagnosis of this entity and preparing for the surgical management in a multidisciplinary approach by assuring the most skilled team is available for those patients.

  3. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile: An Observational Study on a Large Cohort From South Italy.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S; Irace, Concetta

    2016-02-01

    Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk.Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods.We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women.Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk.

  4. Barriers to and determinants of medication adherence in hypertension management: perspective of the cohort study of medication adherence among older adults.

    PubMed

    Krousel-Wood, Marie A; Muntner, Paul; Islam, Tareq; Morisky, Donald E; Webber, Larry S

    2009-05-01

    Low adherence to antihypertensive medication remains a public health challenge. Understanding barriers to, and determinants of, adherence to antihypertensive medication may help identify interventions to increase adherence and improve outcomes. The Cohort Study of Medication Adherence in Older Adults is designed to assess risk factors for low antihypertensive medication adherence, explore differences across age, gender, and race subgroups, and determine the relationship of adherence with blood pressure control and cardiovascular outcomes over time. This article discusses the relevance of this study in addressing the issue of barriers to anithypertensive medication adherence.

  5. Increasing Patient Acceptance and Adherence Toward Insulin.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Matthew; Peters, Anne; Funnell, Martha

    2016-10-01

    Because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the majority of patients will need insulin to achieve and maintain glycemic control. By maintaining glycemic control, patients will avoid acute osmotic symptoms of hyperglycemia, instability in plasma glucose (PG) over time, and prevent or delay the development of diabetes complications without adversely affecting quality of life. Despite recommendations for initiating insulin therapy, both patient and health system barriers stand in the way. To develop confidence in individualizing patient therapy and maximize outcomes for patients with T2DM, healthcare practitioners (HCPs) were updated on recommendations and clinical evidence supporting when to initiate insulin therapy, strategies for overcoming provider and patient barriers for initiating insulin therapy, and the safety and efficacy of current and emerging insulin therapy and delivery technology for patients with T2DM.

  6. Adherence and the Lie in a HIV Prevention Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Jonathan; Scorgie, Fiona; van der Straten, Ariane; Saethre, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    The lie has been presented as a performance that protects identities against moral judgment in the context of power imbalances. We explore this assertion from the perspective of a pre-exposure prophylaxis trial to prevent HIV for African women in South Africa, in which context biological evidence of widespread lying about product adherence was produced, resulting in a moral discourse that opposed altruistic and selfish motivations. In this article, we seek to understand the meaning of the lie from the perspective of women trial participants. Seeing the trial as representing a hopeful future, and perfect adherence as sustaining their investment in this, participants recited scripted accounts of adherence and performed the role of the perfect adherer, while identifying other participants as dishonest. Given that clinical trials create moral orders and adherence is key to this, we argue that women embraced the apparatus of the clinical trial to assert their moral subjectivities. PMID:26575611

  7. Adherence and the Lie in a HIV Prevention Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jonathan; Scorgie, Fiona; van der Straten, Ariane; Saethre, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    The lie has been presented as a performance that protects identities against moral judgment in the context of power imbalances. We explore this assertion from the perspective of a pre-exposure prophylaxis trial to prevent HIV for African women in South Africa, in which context biological evidence of widespread lying about product adherence was produced, resulting in a moral discourse that opposed altruistic and selfish motivations. In this article, we seek to understand the meaning of the lie from the perspective of women trial participants. Seeing the trial as representing a hopeful future, and perfect adherence as sustaining their investment in this, participants recited scripted accounts of adherence and performed the role of the perfect adherer, while identifying other participants as dishonest. Given that clinical trials create moral orders and adherence is key to this, we argue that women embraced the apparatus of the clinical trial to assert their moral subjectivities.

  8. 77 FR 66744 - Temporary Rule to Increase the Commercial Annual Catch Limit for South Atlantic Yellowtail Snapper

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... the Commercial Annual Catch Limit for South Atlantic Yellowtail Snapper AGENCY: National Marine... catch limit (ACL) for yellowtail snapper, as requested by the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council... Annual Catch Limit Amendment (Comprehensive ACL Amendment) to the Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for the...

  9. Association of cinacalcet adherence and costs in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew; Song, Xue; Khan, Irfan; Belozeroff, Vasily; Goodman, William; Fulcher, Nicole; Diakun, David

    2011-01-01

    In addition to negative impacts on clinical effectiveness in treating secondary hyperparathyroidism, low adherence to cinacalcet may have negative impacts on healthcare costs. This study assessed the relationship between medication adherence and healthcare costs among US patients on dialysis given cinacalcet to manage secondary hyperparathyroidism. Retrospective cohort study of patients who were receiving dialysis with an initial cinacalcet prescription between January 2004 and April 2010 and who survived ≥12 months. Longitudinal, integrated medical, and pharmacy claims data from the MarketScan? database were used to calculate medication possession ratios (MPR) over 12 months and to examine the association of adherence with inpatient, outpatient, emergency room, outpatient medication, and total costs while controlling for patient characteristics, co-morbid medical conditions, and concomitant medication MPR in a multivariate regression model. Patients were dichotomized as adherent (<180 days refill gap) or non-adherent (≥180 day refill gap). Adherent patients were further dichotomized as low adherent (<0.8 MPR) and high adherent (≥0.8 MPR). The final study cohort included 4923 patients. After 12 months, 46% were non-adherent, 27% were low adherent, and 28% were high adherent. Greater cinacalcet adherence was associated with significantly lower inpatient costs with cost-savings of a greater magnitude than the increased medication costs. This study demonstrated that low adherence to cinacalcet, which may be associated with undesirable clinical and health-economic outcomes, is common. Despite limitations inherent in retrospective studies of claims databases, such as unobserved confounding, non-discrimination between prescription fill and actual use, and not knowing the reasons for non-adherence, these results suggest that inpatient cost savings of $8899, more than offset higher medication costs of $5858 associated with increased cinacalcet adherence.

  10. Chronic hepatitis B increases mortality and complexity among HIV-coinfected patients in South Africa: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Velen, K; Charalambous, S; Innes, C; Churchyard, G J; Hoffmann, C J

    2016-10-01

    To assess the effect of chronic hepatitis B on survival and clinical complexity among people living with HIV following antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. We evaluated mortality and single-drug substitutions up to 3 years from ART initiation (median follow-up 2.75 years; interquartile range 2-3 years) among patients with and without chronic hepatitis B (CHB) enrolled in a workplace HIV care programme in South Africa. Mortality was increased for CHB patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA levels > 10 000 copies/mL (adjusted hazard ratio 3.1; 95% confidence interval 1.2-8.0) compared with non-CHB patients. We did not observe a similar difference between non-CHB patients and those with CHB and HBV DNA < 10 000 copies/mL (adjusted hazard ratio 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.2-2.3). Single-drug substitutions occurred more frequently among coinfected patients regardless of HBV DNA level. Our findings suggest that CHB may increase mortality and complicate ART management. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  11. Is greater acculturation associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among Latinos in South Florida?

    PubMed

    Chang, Aileen; Kenya, Sonjia; Ilangovan, Kumar; Li, Hua; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Alonzo, Yisel; Carrasquillo, Olveen

    2015-05-01

    To examine the association of acculturation with various cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs) among Latinos with diabetes in South Florida. In a cross-sectional analysis of data collected from 300 Latinos with poorly controlled diabetes we measured acculturation using the Marin Short Acculturation Scale. We examined correlations between acculturation and the following 7 CRFs: hemoglobin A1C, low-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, smoking status, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable intake. Cubans made up 38% of our population; no other Latino subgroup represented over 17% of the sample. Of the 8 outcomes examined, only smoking was associated with increased acculturation; 12% of Latinos in the 2 lowest acculturation groups were current smokers versus 25% in the highest acculturation group (P=0.02). Furthermore, Cuban Americans from our sample had over double the prevalence of smoking compared with non-Cubans in both the lowest and highest acculturation groups. With the exception of smoking, our data does not support a link between increased acculturation and higher prevalence of CRFs in Latinos with diabetes. Smoking prevention and cessation programs targeting Latinos and particularly among Cubans are needed.

  12. Increasing relative prevalence of HSV-2 infection among men with genital ulcers from a mining community in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lai, W; Chen, C; Morse, S; Htun, Y.; Fehler, H; Liu, H; Ballard, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the aetiology of genital ulcer disease (GUD) and its association with HIV infection in the mining community of Carletonville, South Africa, from two cross sectional surveys of consecutive men presenting with genital lesions during October 1993 to January 1994 and July to November 1998. Methods: A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay combined with amplicon detection was used to identify DNA specific sequences of Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and Haemophilus ducreyi. A real time PCR assay was used to differentiate between HSV-1 and HSV-2. Results: M-PCR detected T pallidum, HSV, and H ducreyi in 10.3%, 17.2%, and 69.4% of 232 GUD patients during 1993–4 and in 12.4%, 36.0%, and 50.5% of 186 GUD patients in 1998. The proportion of patients with more than one agent increased significantly from 7.3% (17/232) in 1993–4 to 16.7% (31/186) in 1998 (p <0.01). HSV-2 was detected in a higher proportion of ulcer specimens from HIV infected patients than in specimens from HIV uninfected patients during both time periods (1993–4: 26.2% v 6.7%, p <0.001; 1998: 42.1% v 29.6%, p >0.09). Conclusions: Based on two cross sectional surveys, 4 years apart, chancroid remained the leading cause of GUD in men who presented at the STD clinic with genital ulcers in the mining community of Carletonville, South Africa. The relative prevalence of primary syphilis has remained low. However, HSV-2 has emerged as a more significant cause of GUD and the proportion of GUD patients infected with more than one agent also increased significantly. HSV-2 DNA was detected in a significantly higher proportion of ulcer specimens from HIV positive patients than from HIV negative patients. No association was found between HIV infection status and the relative prevalence of chancroid or syphilis. PMID:12794202

  13. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Nicola A; Almomani, Basima A; Hawwa, Ahmed F; McElnay, James C

    2013-10-02

    This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004-2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the potential to help educate and shape the public

  14. Increased drought impacts on temperate rainforests from southern South America: results of a process-based, dynamic forest model.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alvaro G; Armesto, Juan J; Díaz, M Francisca; Huth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increased droughts due to regional shifts in temperature and rainfall regimes are likely to affect forests in temperate regions in the coming decades. To assess their consequences for forest dynamics, we need predictive tools that couple hydrologic processes, soil moisture dynamics and plant productivity. Here, we developed and tested a dynamic forest model that predicts the hydrologic balance of North Patagonian rainforests on Chiloé Island, in temperate South America (42°S). The model incorporates the dynamic linkages between changing rainfall regimes, soil moisture and individual tree growth. Declining rainfall, as predicted for the study area, should mean up to 50% less summer rain by year 2100. We analysed forest responses to increased drought using the model proposed focusing on changes in evapotranspiration, soil moisture and forest structure (above-ground biomass and basal area). We compared the responses of a young stand (YS, ca. 60 years-old) and an old-growth forest (OG, >500 years-old) in the same area. Based on detailed field measurements of water fluxes, the model provides a reliable account of the hydrologic balance of these evergreen, broad-leaved rainforests. We found higher evapotranspiration in OG than YS under current climate. Increasing drought predicted for this century can reduce evapotranspiration by 15% in the OG compared to current values. Drier climate will alter forest structure, leading to decreases in above ground biomass by 27% of the current value in OG. The model presented here can be used to assess the potential impacts of climate change on forest hydrology and other threats of global change on future forests such as fragmentation, introduction of exotic tree species, and changes in fire regimes. Our study expands the applicability of forest dynamics models in remote and hitherto overlooked regions of the world, such as southern temperate rainforests.

  15. Increased risk of death in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children with pneumococcal meningitis in South Africa, 2003-2005.

    PubMed

    Nyasulu, Peter; Cohen, Cheryl; De Gouveia, Linda; Feldman, Charles; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne

    2011-12-01

    Pneumococcal disease is a major global cause of morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated risk factors for mortality in children with pneumococcal meningitis and other invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD). The study population included patients <15 years of age with laboratory-confirmed IPD and available outcome data between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2005 as reported to a national laboratory-based surveillance program. Meningitis was defined by having pneumococcus identified from cerebrospinal fluid culture, while other IPD included patients with pneumococci identified from other normally sterile site specimens. Risk factors for mortality were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. A total of 2251 patients with IPD were reported from sentinel sites: 581 with laboratory-confirmed meningitis and 1670 with other IPD. The case-fatality ratio was 35% (205/581) among meningitis cases and 18% (300/1670) among other IPD cases (P < 0.001). Among individuals with available human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status data, HIV coinfection was less likely among patients with meningitis compared with other IPD (74% [244/328] vs. 82% [880/1067] P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, HIV-infected status (odds ratio [OR]: 5.34, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.32-12.29), Pitt bacteremia score ≥4 (OR: 3.08, 95% CI: 1.21-7.83) and age group <1 year (OR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.21-5.51) were independent predictors of death among patients with meningitis. Among children with other IPD, malnutrition was an independent predictor of death while HIV infection was not independently associated with increased risk of death. Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with a high case-fatality ratio among South African children and this is increased by HIV coinfection. Increasing access to antiretroviral therapy and a catch-up program for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine among HIV-infected and malnourished children could reduce this excess mortality.

  16. Increased HIV prevention program coverage and decline in HIV prevalence among female sex workers in south India.

    PubMed

    Alary, Michel; Banandur, Pradeep; Rajaram, Subramanian Potty; Thamattoor, Usha K; Mainkar, Mandar K; Paranjape, Ramesh; Adhikary, Rajatashurva; Duchesne, Thierry; Isac, Shajy; Moses, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    As one way of assessing the impact of Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, we examined the association between HIV prevention program indicators and changes in HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSWs) between 2005 and 2009. We conducted a secondary data analysis from 2 large cross-sectional surveys (2005-2006 and 2008-2009) across 24 districts in south India (n = 11,000 per round). A random-effect multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed using HIV as the outcome, with individual independent variables (from both surveys) at level 1 and district-level FSW-specific program indicators and contextual variables at level 2. Program indicators included their 2006 value, the difference in their values between 2008 and 2006, and the interaction between this difference and study round. HIV prevalence among FSWs decreased from 17.0% to 14.2% (P < 0.001). This decline varied significantly (P = 0.006) across levels of difference in program coverage (% of FSWs contacted by the program in a given year). Odds ratios comparing HIV prevalence between rounds changed with the level of increase in coverage and were statistically significant with coverage increase ≥ quartile (Q) 1: odds ratio, 0.85 at Q1; 0.78 at Q2; 0.66 at Q3; and 0.51 at Q4. These findings suggest that increased program coverage was associated with declining HIV prevalence among FSWs covered by the Avahan program. The triangulation of our results with those from other approaches used in evaluating Avahan suggests a major impact of this intervention on the HIV epidemic in southern India.

  17. Increased HIV Prevention Program Coverage and Decline in HIV Prevalence Among Female Sex Workers in South India

    PubMed Central

    Alary, Michel; Banandur, Pradeep; Rajaram, Subramanian Potty; Thamattoor, Usha K.; Mainkar, Mandar K.; Paranjape, Ramesh; Adhikary, Rajatashurva; Duchesne, Thierry; Isac, Shajy; Moses, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background As one way of assessing the impact of Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, we examined the association between HIV prevention program indicators and changes in HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSWs) between 2005 and 2009. Methods We conducted a secondary data analysis from 2 large cross-sectional surveys (2005–2006 and 2008–2009) across 24 districts in south India (n = 11,000 per round). A random-effect multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed using HIV as the outcome, with individual independent variables (from both surveys) at level 1 and district-level FSW-specific program indicators and contextual variables at level 2. Program indicators included their 2006 value, the difference in their values between 2008 and 2006, and the interaction between this difference and study round. Results HIV prevalence among FSWs decreased from 17.0% to 14.2% (P < 0.001). This decline varied significantly (P = 0.006) across levels of difference in program coverage (% of FSWs contacted by the program in a given year). Odds ratios comparing HIV prevalence between rounds changed with the level of increase in coverage and were statistically significant with coverage increase ≥ quartile (Q) 1: odds ratio, 0.85 at Q1; 0.78 at Q2; 0.66 at Q3; and 0.51 at Q4. Conclusions These findings suggest that increased program coverage was associated with declining HIV prevalence among FSWs covered by the Avahan program. The triangulation of our results with those from other approaches used in evaluating Avahan suggests a major impact of this intervention on the HIV epidemic in southern India. PMID:24825335

  18. Increased Drought Impacts on Temperate Rainforests from Southern South America: Results of a Process-Based, Dynamic Forest Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Alvaro G.; Armesto, Juan J.; Díaz, M. Francisca; Huth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increased droughts due to regional shifts in temperature and rainfall regimes are likely to affect forests in temperate regions in the coming decades. To assess their consequences for forest dynamics, we need predictive tools that couple hydrologic processes, soil moisture dynamics and plant productivity. Here, we developed and tested a dynamic forest model that predicts the hydrologic balance of North Patagonian rainforests on Chiloé Island, in temperate South America (42°S). The model incorporates the dynamic linkages between changing rainfall regimes, soil moisture and individual tree growth. Declining rainfall, as predicted for the study area, should mean up to 50% less summer rain by year 2100. We analysed forest responses to increased drought using the model proposed focusing on changes in evapotranspiration, soil moisture and forest structure (above-ground biomass and basal area). We compared the responses of a young stand (YS, ca. 60 years-old) and an old-growth forest (OG, >500 years-old) in the same area. Based on detailed field measurements of water fluxes, the model provides a reliable account of the hydrologic balance of these evergreen, broad-leaved rainforests. We found higher evapotranspiration in OG than YS under current climate. Increasing drought predicted for this century can reduce evapotranspiration by 15% in the OG compared to current values. Drier climate will alter forest structure, leading to decreases in above ground biomass by 27% of the current value in OG. The model presented here can be used to assess the potential impacts of climate change on forest hydrology and other threats of global change on future forests such as fragmentation, introduction of exotic tree species, and changes in fire regimes. Our study expands the applicability of forest dynamics models in remote and hitherto overlooked regions of the world, such as southern temperate rainforests. PMID:25068869

  19. Pediatric Psychologist Use of Adherence Assessments and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Rohan, Jennifer M.; Martin, Staci; Hommel, Kevin; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Loiselle, Kristin; Ambrosino, Jodie; Fredericks, Emily M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document current clinical practices for medical regimen adherence assessment and intervention in the field of pediatric psychology. Methods 113 members of the Society of Pediatric Psychology completed an anonymous online survey that assessed use of adherence assessments and interventions in clinical practice, barriers and facilitators to their use, and preferred resources for obtaining information on adherence assessments and interventions. Results Respondents reported using a range of adherence assessment and intervention strategies, some of which are evidence-based. Barriers to implementing these clinical strategies included time constraints and lack of familiarity with available clinical tools. Respondents reported that education about effective clinical tools would facilitate their use of adherence assessments and interventions. Conclusions Future research and clinical efforts in adherence should consider developing practical tools for clinical practice, making accessible resources to promote dissemination of these tools, and increase understanding of clinician implementation of adherence assessments and interventions. PMID:23658375

  20. Origin of increased terrigenous supply to the NE South American continental margin during Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yancheng; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Mulitza, Stefan; Zabel, Matthias; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Hollanda, Maria Helena B. M.; Dantas, Elton L.; Govin, Aline; Tiedemann, Ralf; Wefer, Gerold

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the redistribution of terrigenous materials in the northeastern (NE) South American continental margin during slowdown events of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The compilation of stratigraphic data from 108 marine sediment cores collected across the western tropical Atlantic shows an extreme rise in sedimentation rates off the Parnaíba River mouth (about 2°S) during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1, 18-15 ka). Sediment core GeoB16206-1, raised offshore the Parnaíba River mouth, documents relatively constant 143Nd/144Nd values (expressed as εNd(0)) throughout the last 30 ka. Whereas the homogeneous εNd(0) data support the input of fluvial sediments by the Parnaíba River from the same source area directly onshore, the increases in Fe/Ca, Al/Si and Rb/Sr during HS1 indicate a marked intensification of fluvial erosion in the Parnaíba River drainage basin. In contrast, the εNd(0) values from sediment core GeoB16224-1 collected off French Guiana (about 7°N) suggest Amazon-sourced materials within the last 30 ka. We attribute the extremely high volume of terrigenous sediments deposited offshore the Parnaíba River mouth during HS1 to (i) an enhanced precipitation in the catchment region and (ii) a reduced North Brazil Current, which are both associated with a weakened AMOC.

  1. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli infection in T84 cell monolayers induces increased neutrophil transepithelial migration, which in turn promotes cytokine-dependent upregulation of decay-accelerating factor (CD55), the receptor for Afa/Dr adhesins.

    PubMed

    Bétis, Fréderic; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Véronique; Guignot, Julie; Kansau, Imad; Rossi, Bernard; Servin, Alain; Hofman, Paul

    2003-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are inflammatory bowel diseases thought to involve strains of Escherichia coli. We report here that two wild-type Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli (DAEC) strains, C1845 and IH11128, which harbor the fimbrial F1845 adhesin and the Dr hemagglutinin, respectively, and the E. coli laboratory strain HB101, transformed with the pSSS1 plasmid to produce Afa/Dr F1845 adhesin, all induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production and transepithelial migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in polarized monolayers of the human intestinal cell line T84 grown on semipermeable filters. We observed that after PMNL migration, expression of decay-accelerating factor (DAF, or CD55), the brush border-associated receptor for Afa/Dr adhesins, was strongly enhanced, increasing the adhesion of Afa/Dr DAEC bacteria. When examining the mechanism by which DAF expression was enhanced, we observed that the PMNL transepithelial migration induced epithelial synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha and IL-1beta, which in turn promoted the upregulation of DAF.

  2. A recent increase of swift terns Thalasseus bergii off South Africa - The possible influence of an altered abundance and distribution of prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Robert J. M.

    2009-12-01

    In the 2000s, there were large increases in the numbers of swift terns Thalasseus bergii breeding in the Western and Eastern Cape Provinces of South Africa, which are most plausibly attributed to good recruitment and to an increase in the proportion of mature birds breeding. Numbers increased coincidentally with a greatly increased abundance of two of the main prey species of swift terns, sardine Sardinops sagax and anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus, and remained high as these resources decreased. After 2005, numbers of swift terns breeding in the north and central portions of the Western Cape decreased, whereas numbers breeding farther south in that province increased. This followed displacements to the south and east of sardine and anchovy. In southern Africa, swift terns show low fidelity to breeding localities, which enables a rapid adjustment of the location of breeding to an altered availability of prey. For two seabirds that feed mainly on sardine and anchovy, but once breeding show high fidelity to colonies, African penguin Spheniscus demersus and Cape gannet Morus capensis, proportions breeding in the south and east also increased, but there were substantial decreases in overall numbers breeding in the Western Cape.

  3. Whale, Whale, Everywhere: Increasing Abundance of Western South Atlantic Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in Their Wintering Grounds

    PubMed Central

    Danilewicz, Daniel; Andriolo, Artur; Secchi, Eduardo R.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.

    2016-01-01

    The western South Atlantic (WSA) humpback whale population inhabits the coast of Brazil during the breeding and calving season in winter and spring. This population was depleted to near extinction by whaling in the mid-twentieth century. Despite recent signs of recovery, increasing coastal and offshore development pose potential threats to these animals. Therefore, continuous monitoring is needed to assess population status and support conservation strategies. The aim of this work was to present ship-based line-transect estimates of abundance for humpback whales in their WSA breeding ground and to investigate potential changes in population size. Two cruises surveyed the coast of Brazil during August-September in 2008 and 2012. The area surveyed in 2008 corresponded to the currently recognized population breeding area; effort in 2012 was limited due to unfavorable weather conditions. WSA humpback whale population size in 2008 was estimated at 16,410 (CV = 0.228, 95% CI = 10,563–25,495) animals. In order to compare abundance between 2008 and 2012, estimates for the area between Salvador and Cabo Frio, which were consistently covered in the two years, were computed at 15,332 (CV = 0.243, 95% CI = 9,595–24,500) and 19,429 (CV = 0.101, 95% CI = 15,958–23,654) whales, respectively. The difference in the two estimates represents an increase of 26.7% in whale numbers in a 4-year period. The estimated abundance for 2008 is considered the most robust for the WSA humpback whale population because the ship survey conducted in that year minimized bias from various sources. Results presented here indicate that in 2008, the WSA humpback whale population was at least around 60% of its estimated pre-modern whaling abundance and that it may recover to its pre-exploitation size sooner than previously estimated. PMID:27736958

  4. Whale, Whale, Everywhere: Increasing Abundance of Western South Atlantic Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in Their Wintering Grounds.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Guilherme A; Danilewicz, Daniel; Andriolo, Artur; Secchi, Eduardo R; Zerbini, Alexandre N

    2016-01-01

    The western South Atlantic (WSA) humpback whale population inhabits the coast of Brazil during the breeding and calving season in winter and spring. This population was depleted to near extinction by whaling in the mid-twentieth century. Despite recent signs of recovery, increasing coastal and offshore development pose potential threats to these animals. Therefore, continuous monitoring is needed to assess population status and support conservation strategies. The aim of this work was to present ship-based line-transect estimates of abundance for humpback whales in their WSA breeding ground and to investigate potential changes in population size. Two cruises surveyed the coast of Brazil during August-September in 2008 and 2012. The area surveyed in 2008 corresponded to the currently recognized population breeding area; effort in 2012 was limited due to unfavorable weather conditions. WSA humpback whale population size in 2008 was estimated at 16,410 (CV = 0.228, 95% CI = 10,563-25,495) animals. In order to compare abundance between 2008 and 2012, estimates for the area between Salvador and Cabo Frio, which were consistently covered in the two years, were computed at 15,332 (CV = 0.243, 95% CI = 9,595-24,500) and 19,429 (CV = 0.101, 95% CI = 15,958-23,654) whales, respectively. The difference in the two estimates represents an increase of 26.7% in whale numbers in a 4-year period. The estimated abundance for 2008 is considered the most robust for the WSA humpback whale population because the ship survey conducted in that year minimized bias from various sources. Results presented here indicate that in 2008, the WSA humpback whale population was at least around 60% of its estimated pre-modern whaling abundance and that it may recover to its pre-exploitation size sooner than previously estimated.

  5. Psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence among PLWH in China: role of self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong

    2017-05-11

    Globally, optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is insufficient despite it is critical for maximum clinical benefits and treatment success among people living with HIV (PLWH). Many factors have been evidenced to influence medication adherence, including perceived barriers and self-efficacy. However, limited data are available regarding to psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence in China. Moreover, few studies have examined the mechanism of these two factors underlying HIV medication adherence. The aim of the current study is to examine the mediating role of adherence self-efficacy between perceived barriers and ART adherence among PLWH. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 2095 PLWH in Guangxi China who provided data on ART adherence. Participants reported their medication adherence, self-efficacy, barriers to ART adherence, as well as background characteristics. Results indicated a significant indirect effect from perceived barriers to medication adherence through adherence self-efficacy. Higher perceived psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence were related to lower adherence self-efficacy, which in turn was related to lower ART adherence. Self-efficacy could buffer the negative effects of perceived barriers on ART adherence. Future interventions to promote HIV medication adherence are recommended to focus on eliminating psychological and behavioral barriers, as well as increasing adherence self-efficacy.

  6. [Anticancer drug adherence].

    PubMed

    Despas, Fabien; Roche, Henri; Laurent, Guy

    2013-05-01

    A large number of anticancer drugs have been introduced during the two last decades with significant impact for survival, making cancer a chronic disease in a growing number of indications. However, these drugs are costly, induce adverse effects and their efficacy frequently depends on the dose. For all these reasons, adherence in cancer therapy is critical for an optimal benefit-risk ratio. Patient adherence remains virtually unexplored in many cancers, such as malignant blood diseases. When measured, adherence is poor, especially when the drug is administered as oral and prolonged therapy (hormonotherapy in breast cancer, imatinib). Physician nonadherence represents another form of drug misadministration; poorly documented, its mechanism remains obscure. Adherence may be measured by a panel of methods, each of them displaying limits and pitfalls, suggesting that several complementary methods should be used in the context of prospective studies. Risk factors are age, socio-educative profile, disease stage and physician profile. This review emphasizes some methods to prevent nonadherence. Finally, this review argues for prospective studies, which should integrate a social pharmacology approach, including medicine, psycho-sociology and economics.

  7. Breast milk DHA levels may increase after informing women: a community-based cohort study from South Dakota USA.

    PubMed

    Juber, Brian A; Jackson, Kristina Harris; Johnson, Kristopher B; Harris, William S; Baack, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid found in breast milk, has many health benefits for both mother and baby. A 2007 meta-analysis found U.S. women had breast milk DHA levels (0.20% of total fatty acids) below the worldwide mean (0.32%). In 2008, international dietary recommendations were made for pregnant and lactating women to consume 200 mg of DHA per day. This community-based study aimed to define current milk DHA levels from upper Midwest USA lactating mothers and to determine if providing information about their own level along with dietary recommendations would incite changes to increase breast milk DHA content. New mothers attending lactation classes or using hospital pumping rooms in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA participated by providing one drop of breast milk on a card for fatty acid analysis at baseline and 1 month after initial reporting. DHA levels were analyzed by gas chromatography. Mothers received a report of their own breast milk level along with dietary recommendations on DHA intake for lactating women. Median baseline and follow-up DHA levels were determined and differences were compared by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. At baseline, breast milk DHA content (n = 84) was highly variable (range 0.05 to 0.73%) with a median of 0.18% (IQR, 0.13, 0.28; mean ± SD, 0.22 ± 0.13%), well below the worldwide average (0.32%). Women who reported taking DHA supplements (n = 43) had higher levels than those who did not (0.23% vs. 0.15%, P < 0.0001). In a subset of 60 mothers who submitted a second sample, median breast milk DHA content increased from 0.19 to 0.22% (P < 0.01). Findings suggest that providing nursing mothers with their breast milk DHA level and education about DHA intake while breastfeeding motivates change to increase DHA levels.

  8. Lower cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to increased insulin resistance and fasting glycaemia in middle-aged South Asian compared with European men living in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ghouri, N; Purves, D; McConnachie, A; Wilson, J; Gill, J M R; Sattar, N

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the extent to which increased insulin resistance and fasting glycaemia in South Asian men, compared with white European men, living in the UK, was due to lower cardiorespiratory fitness (maximal oxygen uptake [VO(2max)]) and physical activity. One hundred South Asian and 100 age- and BMI-matched European men without diagnosed diabetes, aged 40-70 years, had fasted blood taken for measurement of glucose concentration, HOMA-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)), plus other risk factors, and underwent assessment of physical activity (using accelerometry), VO(2max), body size and composition, and demographic and other lifestyle factors. For 13 South Asian and one European man, HbA1c levels were >6.5% (>48 mmol/mol), indicating potential undiagnosed diabetes; these men were excluded from the analyses. Linear regression models were used to determine the extent to which body size and composition, fitness and physical activity variables explained differences in HOMA(IR) and fasting glucose between South Asian and European men. HOMA(IR) and fasting glucose were 67% (p < 0.001) and 3% (p < 0.018) higher, respectively, in South Asians than Europeans. Lower VO(2max), lower physical activity and greater total adiposity in South Asians individually explained 68% (95% CI 45%, 91%), 29% (11%, 46%) and 52% (30%, 80%), respectively, and together explained 83% (50%, 119%) (all p < 0.001) of the ethnic difference in HOMA(IR). Lower VO(2max) and greater total adiposity, respectively, explained 61% (9%, 111%) and 39% (9%, 76%) (combined effect 63% [8%, 115%]; all p < 0.05) of the ethnic difference in fasting glucose. Lower cardiorespiratory fitness is a key factor associated with the excess insulin resistance and fasting glycaemia in middle-aged South Asian, compared with European, men living in the UK.

  9. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria: an overview of research studies and implications for policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Monjok, Emmanuel; Smesny, Andrea; Okokon, Ita B; Mgbere, Osaro; Essien, E James

    2010-01-01

    Both Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and AIDS remain major public health crises in Nigeria, a country which harbors more people living with HIV/AIDS than any country in the world, with the exception of South Africa and India. In response to the HIV pandemic, global and international health initiatives have targeted several countries, including Nigeria, for the expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs for the increasing number of affected patients. The success of these expanded ART initiatives depends on the treated individual's continual adherence to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. Thirteen peer-reviewed studies concerning adherence to ART in Nigeria were reviewed with very few pediatric and adolescent studies being found. Methodologies of adherence measurement were analyzed and reasons for nonadherence were identified in the geopolitical zones in the federal republic of Nigeria. The results of the literature review indicate that adherence to ART is mixed (both high and low adherence) with patient self-recall identified as the common method of assessment. The most common reasons identified for patient nonadherence include the cost of therapy (even when the drugs are heavily subsidized), medication side effects, nonavailability of ARV drugs, and the stigma of taking the drugs. This manuscript highlights the policy and practice implications from these studies and provides recommendations for future ART program management.

  10. A system dynamics modelling approach to studying the increasing prevalence of people with intellectual developmental disorders in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lynette; Heffernan, Mark; McDonnell, Geoffrey; Short, Stephanie D; Naganathan, Vasi

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence count of people with intellectual developmental disorders (IDD) in New South Wales (NSW) in 2003, by age groups, and to forecast their prevalence until 2043. Methods Administrative data obtained from NSW government departments of education, pensions, health and disability were used to profile the number of people whose characteristics met the criteria for 'intellectual developmental disorders' who had received services in 2003. These figures were compared with published tables of NSW data from the national self-report Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) of 2003 to estimate the likely prevalence of people with intellectual developmental disorders, by age groups in that year. The results were then used as baseline figures in a computational system dynamics model of the aging chain of people with these disorders, built to project prevalence to 2043. Results The number of people who met the criteria for having intellectual developmental disorder in NSW in 2003 was estimated to be 57000 (a ratio of 85 per 10000), with 32000 aged 0-15 years, 15000 aged 16-39 years, 9000 aged 40-64 years and 1000 aged 65+ years. Using these figures as baseline, the computer simulation predicted a total increase to 77225 people in 2013 and 135905 people by 2043. By 2043, the number of children with intellectual developmental disorders will have doubled, from 32000 to 59480, and the number of adults will have tripled, from 25000 to 76420. Conclusions This modelling technique forecast an increase in the prevalence count of people with intellectual developmental disorders in NSW over the period 2003-43 from 57000 (85 per 10000) to 135905 (135 per 10000). These predictions may have important implications for the planning of specialist health services for this group of people. What is known about the topic? The prevalence ratio of people with intellectual developmental disorders is quoted at lying between 1% and 2% of

  11. Antiretroviral adherence during pregnancy and postpartum in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Kreitchmann, Regis; Harris, D Robert; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Haberer, Jessica E; Cahn, Pedro; Losso, Marcelo; Teles, Elizabete; Pilotto, Jose H; Hofer, Cristina B; Read, Jennifer S

    2012-08-01

    Adherence to antiretrovirals by pregnant women (and postpartum women if breastfeeding) is crucial to effectively decrease maternal viral load and decrease the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Our objectives were to describe self-reported adherence to antiretrovirals during the antepartum (after 22 weeks of pregnancy) and postpartum periods (6-12 weeks and 6 months), and identify predictors of adherence among HIV-infected women enrolled and followed in a prospective cohort study from June 2008 to June 2010 at multiple sites in Latin America. Adherence was evaluated using the number of missed and expected doses during the 3 days before the study visit. At the pre-delivery visit, 340 of 376 women (90%) reported perfect adherence. This rate significantly decreased by 6-12 weeks (171/214 [80%]) and 6 months postpartum (163/199 [82%], p<0.01). The odds for less than perfect adherence at the pre-delivery visit was significantly higher for pregnant women with current tobacco use (odds ratio [OR]=2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-6.14; p=0.0029). At 6-12 weeks postpartum, the probability of non-perfect adherence increased by 6% for each 1 year increase in age (OR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.00-1.12, p=0.0497). At 6 months postpartum, the odds of nonperfect adherence was higher for those who were currently using alcohol (OR=3.04, 95% CI: 1.34-6.90; p=0.0079). Although a self-report measure of adherence based on only 3 days may lead to overestimation of actual adherence over time, women with perfect adherence had lower viral loads and higher CD4 counts. Adherence to antiretrovirals decreased significantly postpartum. Interventions should target women at high risk for lower adherence during pregnancy and postpartum, including tobacco and alcohol users.

  12. Antiretroviral Adherence During Pregnancy and Postpartum in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D. Robert; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Haberer, Jessica E.; Cahn, Pedro; Losso, Marcelo; Teles, Elizabete; Pilotto, Jose H.; Hofer, Cristina B.; Read, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adherence to antiretrovirals by pregnant women (and postpartum women if breastfeeding) is crucial to effectively decrease maternal viral load and decrease the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Our objectives were to describe self-reported adherence to antiretrovirals during the antepartum (after 22 weeks of pregnancy) and postpartum periods (6–12 weeks and 6 months), and identify predictors of adherence among HIV-infected women enrolled and followed in a prospective cohort study from June 2008 to June 2010 at multiple sites in Latin America. Adherence was evaluated using the number of missed and expected doses during the 3 days before the study visit. At the pre-delivery visit, 340 of 376 women (90%) reported perfect adherence. This rate significantly decreased by 6–12 weeks (171/214 [80%]) and 6 months postpartum (163/199 [82%], p<0.01). The odds for less than perfect adherence at the pre-delivery visit was significantly higher for pregnant women with current tobacco use (odds ratio [OR]=2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46–6.14; p=0.0029). At 6–12 weeks postpartum, the probability of non-perfect adherence increased by 6% for each 1 year increase in age (OR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.00–1.12, p=0.0497). At 6 months postpartum, the odds of nonperfect adherence was higher for those who were currently using alcohol (OR=3.04, 95% CI: 1.34–6.90; p=0.0079). Although a self-report measure of adherence based on only 3 days may lead to overestimation of actual adherence over time, women with perfect adherence had lower viral loads and higher CD4 counts. Adherence to antiretrovirals decreased significantly postpartum. Interventions should target women at high risk for lower adherence during pregnancy and postpartum, including tobacco and alcohol users. PMID:22663185

  13. High self-reported non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy amongst adolescents living with HIV in Malawi: barriers and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Maria H; Mazenga, Alick C; Yu, Xiaoying; Ahmed, Saeed; Paul, Mary E; Kazembe, Peter N; Abrams, Elaine J

    2017-03-30

    Globally adolescents and young adults account for more than 40% of new HIV infections, and HIV-related deaths amongst adolescents increased by 50% from 2005 to 2012. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical to control viral replication and preserve health; however, there is a paucity of research on adherence amongst the growing population of adolescents living with HIV/AIDS (ALHIV) in Southern Africa. We examined levels of self-reported ART adherence, barriers to adherence, and factors associated with non-adherence amongst ALHIV in Malawi. Cross-sectional study of 519 ALHIV (12-18 years) attending two large HIV clinics in central and south-eastern Malawi. Participants self-reported missed doses (past week/month), barriers to adherence, and completed questionnaires on past traumatic events/stressors, disclosure, depression, substance use, treatment self-efficacy, and social support. Biomedical data were retrieved from existing medical records. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with self-reported ART adherence (7 day recall). The mean age of participants (SD) was 14.5 (2) years and 290 (56%) were female. Of the 519 participants, 153 (30%) reported having missed ART doses within the past week, and 234 (45%) in the past month. Commonly reported barriers to adherence included forgetting (39%), travel from home (14%), busy with other things (11%), feeling depressed/overwhelmed (6%), feeling stigmatized by people outside (5%) and within the home (3%). Factors found to be independently associated with missing a dose in the past week were drinking alcohol in the past month (OR 4.96, 95% CI [1.41-17.4]), missed clinic appointment in the past 6 months (OR 2.23, 95% CI [1.43-3.49]), witnessed or experienced violence in the home (OR 1.86, 95% CI [1.08-3.21]), and poor treatment self-efficacy (OR 1.55 95% CI [1.02-2.34]). Sex and age were not associated with adherence. In our study, nearly half of all ALHIV

  14. Ethical considerations in adherence research

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nupur U; Moore, Blake A; Craver, Rebekah F; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a common cause of medical treatment failure. Studying adherence is complicated by the potential for the study environment to impact adherence behavior. Studies performed without informing patients about adherence monitoring must balance the risks of deception against the potential benefits of the knowledge to be gained. Ethically monitoring a patient’s adherence to a treatment plan without full disclosure of the monitoring plan requires protecting the patient’s rights and upholding the fiduciary obligations of the investigator. Adherence monitoring can utilize different levels of deception varying from stealth monitoring, debriefing after the study while informing the subject that some information had been withheld in regard to the use of adherence monitoring (withholding), informed consent that discloses some form of adherence monitoring is being used and will be disclosed at the end of the study (authorized deception), and full disclosure. Different approaches offer different benefits and potential pitfalls. The approach used must balance the risk of nondisclosure against the potential for confounding the adherence monitoring data and the potential benefits that adherence monitoring data will have for the research subjects and/or other populations. This commentary aims to define various methods of adherence monitoring and to provide a discussion of the ethical considerations that accompany the use of each method and adherence monitoring in general as it is used in clinical research. PMID:27980394

  15. Ethical considerations in adherence research.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nupur U; Moore, Blake A; Craver, Rebekah F; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a common cause of medical treatment failure. Studying adherence is complicated by the potential for the study environment to impact adherence behavior. Studies performed without informing patients about adherence monitoring must balance the risks of deception against the potential benefits of the knowledge to be gained. Ethically monitoring a patient's adherence to a treatment plan without full disclosure of the monitoring plan requires protecting the patient's rights and upholding the fiduciary obligations of the investigator. Adherence monitoring can utilize different levels of deception varying from stealth monitoring, debriefing after the study while informing the subject that some information had been withheld in regard to the use of adherence monitoring (withholding), informed consent that discloses some form of adherence monitoring is being used and will be disclosed at the end of the study (authorized deception), and full disclosure. Different approaches offer different benefits and potential pitfalls. The approach used must balance the risk of nondisclosure against the potential for confounding the adherence monitoring data and the potential benefits that adherence monitoring data will have for the research subjects and/or other populations. This commentary aims to define various methods of adherence monitoring and to provide a discussion of the ethical considerations that accompany the use of each method and adherence monitoring in general as it is used in clinical research.

  16. Social work and medical care: electronic reminders to address adherence.

    PubMed

    Whisenhunt, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Social workers are often involved with patients and families around adherence, both to clinic appointments as well as to the medication regimen. An evidence-based practice project was created and implemented to determine the efficacy of electronic reminders such as text messaging on adherence. The implications of improving adherence can positively impact the patient on an individual level as well as reduce costs and increase revenue at a systems level.

  17. The use of incentives to reinforce medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    DeFulio, Anthony; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Objective Poor medication adherence is a longstanding problem, and is especially pertinent for individuals with chronic conditions or diseases. Adherence to medications can improve patient outcomes and greatly reduce the cost of care. The purpose of the present review is to describe the literature on the use of incentives as applied to the problem of medication adherence. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed empirical evaluations of incentives provided to patients contingent upon medication adherence. Results This review suggests that incentive-based medication adherence interventions can be very effective, but there are few controlled studies. The studies on incentive-based medication adherence interventions most commonly feature patients taking medication for drug or alcohol dependence, HIV, or latent tuberculosis. Across studies that reported percent adherence comparisons, incentives increased adherence by a mean of 20 percentage points, but effects varied widely. Cross-study comparisons indicate a positive relationship between the value of the incentive and the impact of the intervention. Post-intervention evaluations were rare, but tended to find that adherence effects diminish after the interventions are discontinued. Conclusions Incentive-based medication adherence interventions are promising but understudied. A significant challenge for research in this area is the development of sustainable and cost-effective long-term interventions. PMID:22580095

  18. "They Have Opened Our Mouths": Increasing Women's Skills and Motivation for Sexual Communication with Young People in Rural South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phetla, Godfrey; Busza, Joanna; Hargreaves, James R.; Pronyk, Paul M.; Kim, Julia C.; Morison, Linda A.; Watts, Charlotte; Porter, John D. H.

    2008-01-01

    Communication between parents and young people about sex has been identified as a positive influence on young people's sexual behavior. This article presents findings from South Africa, where a social intervention to reduce levels of HIV and intimate partner violence actively promoted sexual communication between adults and young people. We…

  19. Managing white and Lutz spruce stands in south-central Alaska for increased resistance to spruce beetle.

    Treesearch

    J.S. Hard; E.H. Holsten

    1985-01-01

    Thinning is recommended for maintaining vigorous tree growth to minimize losses caused by spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipenni Kirby) and windthrow in residual stands of spruce in south-central Alaska. The anatomy of conifer stems, the variation in stem diameter growth, and the variability of tree response to wounding are discussed to explain why...

  20. "They Have Opened Our Mouths": Increasing Women's Skills and Motivation for Sexual Communication with Young People in Rural South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phetla, Godfrey; Busza, Joanna; Hargreaves, James R.; Pronyk, Paul M.; Kim, Julia C.; Morison, Linda A.; Watts, Charlotte; Porter, John D. H.

    2008-01-01

    Communication between parents and young people about sex has been identified as a positive influence on young people's sexual behavior. This article presents findings from South Africa, where a social intervention to reduce levels of HIV and intimate partner violence actively promoted sexual communication between adults and young people. We…

  1. Antihypertensive medication adherence and mortality according to ethnicity: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Quan, Hude; Chen, Guanmin; Qian, Hong; Khan, Nadia

    2014-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated adherence to antihypertensive medication in Chinese and South Asian populations and little is known about the long-term outcome. Our objectives were to compare adherence to antihypertensive medications and assess the association of adherence and long-term mortality in Chinese, South Asian, and white patients with newly diagnosed hypertension. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with hypertension who were new users of antihypertensive medications (1997-2005) using administrative data and a province-wide prescription database from British Columbia, Canada. Antihypertensive medication adherence within 1 year from the date of the first antihypertensive drug prescription was assessed using the 'proportion of days covered' metric. Proportion of days covered ≥ 80% indicated optimal adherence. Patients were followed for up to 10 years for mortality. There were 16,471 (11.1%) Chinese, 6099 (4.1%) South Asian, and 126,081 (84.8%) white patients who were prescribed antihypertensive medications. Compared with white patients, Chinese (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.72) and South Asian patients (odds ratio, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.40) were less likely to be optimally adherent to antihypertensive medications. Optimal adherence was associated with reduced mortality in white patients (risk-adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.89; 95% CI, 0.85-0.93) but not associated with mortality in Chinese (aHR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.83-1.17) and South Asian patients (aHR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.84-1.44). Chinese and South Asian patients with newly diagnosed hypertension were significantly less likely to adhere to antihypertensive medications than their white counterparts. However, optimal adherence in Chinese and South Asian patients was not associated with mortality. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Increasing surface albedo in the dry subtropical forests of South America: the role of agriculture expansion and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houspanossian, J.; Kuppel, S.; Gimenez, R.; Jobbagy, E. G.; Nosetto, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The increase in surface albedo inherent to land clearing and cultivation (land-cover change, LCC) in the subtropical dry forests of the South American Chaco offsets part of the radiative forcing (RF) of the related carbon emissions. The magnitude of these albedo changes, however, is also dependent on shifts in agricultural practices (land-management change, LMC) and will influence the net effect on Earth's radiation balance as well as other potential feedbacks on climate. We quantified the surface albedo changes between 2001 and 2013 and the consequent shifts in the radiation balance resulting from LCC and LMC, using MODIS imagery a columnar radiation model parameterized with satellite data. Agricultural systems replacing dry forests presented a large variety of managements, ranging from pasture systems with remnant trees to different grain crops, displaying a wide range of phenologies. Cultivated lands showed higher and more variable albedo values (mean = 0.162, Standard Deviation = 0.013, n = 10,000 pixels) than the dry forests they replace (mean = 0.113, SD = 0.010, n = 10,000). These albedo contrasts resulted in a cooling RF of deforestation of -10.1 W m-2 on average, but both livestock and grain crop production systems showed large differences among the different land management options. For instance, livestock systems based on open pasture lands showed higher albedo change and RF (0.06 and -16.3 W m-2, respectively) than silvopastoral systems (0.02 and -4.4 W m-2). Similarly in cropping systems, the replacement of double-cropping by single summer crops, a widespread process in the region lately, resulted in higher albedo change (0.06 vs. 0.08) and RF (-16.3 vs. -22.3 W m-2). Although the effects of LCC on climate are widely acknowledged, those of LMC are still scarcely understood. In the Chaco region, the latter could play an important role and offer a yet-overlooked pathway to influence the radiative balance of our planet.

  3. A comprehensive perspective on patient adherence to topical glaucoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, James C

    2009-11-01

    Risk factors for poor adherence or nonadherence to topical glaucoma medication regimens. Poor adherence to glaucoma medication regimens may be associated with subsequent visual loss and irreversible optic nerve damage. A literature search was performed using the words "glaucoma AND adherence AND risk" and "glaucoma AND compliance AND risk," limited to those studies in English and focused on care in the United States. Publications from well-regarded journals in this field were reviewed, and a focused summary of the literature is presented. There are a myriad of adherence barriers inherent to the glaucoma patient population. Although most of these obstacles are common in the elderly (e.g., reduced cognition, musculoskeletal problems, and transportation difficulties), older age has not been shown to be a consistent risk factor for poor adherence to glaucoma medication regimens. Other expected barriers, such as medication cost, limited health insurance, disease severity, and role of complicated dosing regimens, have varied effects based on the patient population studied and the definition of adherence. Poor medication adherence also is associated with decreased adherence to follow-up medical visit schedules. A systematic taxonomy of adherence barriers has been formulated. In addition, subanalyses from the Glaucoma Adherence and Persistency Study identified 8 variables that affect adherence to glaucoma medication regimens as well as several characteristics that support the importance of and associations between doctor-patient communications. Recent studies have provided valuable insights into the many factors that increase the risk(s) for poor adherence in patients prescribed glaucoma medications. Four major types of barriers to effective patient adherence (medication regimen, patient factors, provider factors, and situational or environmental factors) have been identified. Addressing these specific barriers will require a tailored, patient-centered approach

  4. Impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only models of the HadGEM1.1 family upon the climate patterns of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Custodio, Maria; da Rocha, Rosmeri; Ambrizzi, Tercio; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Demory, Marie-Estelle

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzes the impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only climate models on the simulation of climate patterns in South America. To this end, we analyze models of the HadGEM1.1 family with three different horizontal resolutions in the atmosphere - 135, 90 and 60 km - and in the ocean - 1-1/3o and 1/3o. In general, the coupled simulation with the highest resolution (60 km) has smaller systematic errors than the atmosphere-only models for seasonal fields over SA (precipitation, temperature and circulation). The simulations, both coupled and atmosphere-only, represent observed spatial patterns related to the seasonal march of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), formation and positioning of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone, and the subtropical Atlantic and Pacific highs; nevertheless they overestimate the rainfall rate, especially for the ITCZ and over the western border of the higher-elevation areas such as southern Chile. For the Atlantic ITCZ and the continental branch of the SACZ in particular, the coupling combined with higher resolution results in a more realistic spatial pattern of rain. All simulations correctly represent the phase and amplitude of the annual cycle of precipitation and air temperature over the most subdomains in South America. The results show that despite some problems, increasing the resolution of the HadGEM1.1 family of models results in a more realistic representation of climate patterns over South America and the adjacent oceans.

  5. Women and vulnerability to HAART non-adherence: a literature review of treatment adherence by gender from 2000 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Puskas, Cathy M; Forrest, Jamie I; Parashar, Surita; Salters, Kate A; Cescon, Angela M; Kaida, Angela; Miller, Cari L; Bangsberg, David R; Hogg, Robert S

    2011-12-01

    A literature review of original research articles on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developed countries, covering January 2000 to June 2011, was conducted to determine if gender differences exist in the prevalence of nonadherence to ART. Of the 1,255 articles reviewed, only 189 included data on the proportion of the study population that was adherent and only 57 (30.2%) of these reported proportional adherence values by gender. While comparing articles was challenging because of varied reporting strategies, women generally exhibit poorer adherence than men. Thirty of the 44 articles (68.2%) that reported comparative data on adherence by gender found women to be less adherent than men. Ten articles (17.5%) reported significant differences in proportional adherence by gender, nine of which showed women to be less adherent than men. These findings suggest that in multiple studies from developed countries, female gender often predicts lower adherence. The unique circumstances of HIV-positive women require specialized care to increase adherence to ART.

  6. Estimating the economic consequences of an increased medication adherence due to a potential improvement in the inhaler technique with Spiromax® compared with Turbuhaler® in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Darbà, Josep; Ramírez, Gabriela; García-Rivero, Juan L; Mayoralas, Sagrario; Pascual, José Francisco; Vargas, Diego; Bijedic, Adi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to estimate the economic impact of the introduction of DuoResp® Spiromax®, budesonide/formoterol fixed-dose combination (FDC), focusing on an increase in medication adherence due to an enhancement of the inhalation technique for the treatment of COPD patients in Spain and 5 regions including Andalusia, Catalonia, Galicia, Madrid, and Valencia. Methods A 4-year budget impact model was developed for the time period of 2015–2018. This study aimed at evaluating the budget impact associated with the introduction of DuoResp Spiromax in comparison with Symbicort® Turbuhaler® and Rilast® Turbuhaler. National and regional data on COPD prevalence were obtained from the literature. Input data on health care resource utilization were obtained by clinical consultation. Resource included primary care visits, specialist visits, hospitalization, and emergency room visits as well as the length of hospital stay. Based on both pharmacological and health care resource costs, overall annual treatment cost per patient was estimated in EUR 2015. Results It was calculated that 130,777 adults were treated with budesonide/formoterol FDC delivered by a dry powder inhaler, Turbuhaler, in Spain in 2015. However, the target population decreases over the next 4 years. This pattern was observed in 4 regions, but for Andalusia, the treated population increased slightly. The overall budget savings in Spain with the market share of DuoResp Spiromax were estimated to be €6.01 million for the time period of 2015–2018. Region-specific data resulted in savings of €902,133 in Andalusia, €740,520 in Catalonia, €464,281 in Galicia, €748,996 in Madrid, and €495,812 in Valencia for the time period of 2015–2018. Conclusion The introduction of budesonide/formoterol FDC delivered by Spiromax for COPD treatment is likely to contribute in a reduction of health care costs for Spain and in 5 Spanish regions. This model forecasts that Spain and these 5

  7. Assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Sandra L; Given, Charles W

    2011-05-01

    The increase in oral anticancer medications with complex regimens creates a need to assure that patients are taking therapeutic dosages as prescribed. This article reviews the assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. Research and journal articles from CINAHL and PubMed. Assessing and measuring adherence to oral antineoplastics should include three dimensions: the percentage of medications taken, the duration, and the timing of taking the medication. Clinicians need to conduct ongoing assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. This includes eliciting patient report of adherence, pill counts, drug diaries, and pharmacy or medical record audits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adherence to physiotherapy clinical guideline acute ankle injury and determinants of adherence: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    van der Wees, Philip J; Hendriks, Erik JM; Jansen, Mariette J; van Beers, Hans; de Bie, Rob A; Dekker, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality in health care. In physiotherapy, insight in adherence to guidelines is limited. Knowledge of adherence is important to identify barriers and to enhance implementation. Purpose of this study is to investigate the ability to adherence to recommendations of the guideline Acute ankle injury, and to identify patient characteristics that determine adherence to the guideline. Methods Twenty-two physiotherapists collected data of 174 patients in a prospective cohort study, in which the course of treatment was systematically registered. Indicators were used to investigate adherence to recommendations. Patient characteristics were used to identify prognostic factors that may determine adherence to the guideline. Correlation between patient characteristics and adherence to outcome-indicators (treatment sessions, functioning of patient, accomplished goals) was calculated using univariate logistic regression. To calculate explained variance of combined patient characteristics, multivariate analysis was performed. Results Adherence to individual recommendations varied from 71% to 100%. In 99 patients (57%) the physiotherapists showed adherence to all indicators. Adherence to preset maximum of six treatment sessions for patients with severe ankle injury was 81% (132 patients). The odds to receive more than six sessions were statistically significant for three patient characteristics: females (OR:3.89; 95%CI: 1.41–10.72), recurrent sprain (OR: 6.90; 95%CI: 2.34 – 20.37), co-morbidity (OR: 25.92; 95% CI: 6.79 – 98.93). All factors together explained 40% of the variance. Inclusion of physiotherapist characteristics in the regression model showed that work-experience reduced the odds to receive more than six sessions (OR: 0.2; 95%CI: 0.06 – 0.77), and increased explained variance to 45%. Conclusion Adherence to the clinical guideline Acute ankle sprain showed that the guideline is

  9. Adherence to prophylactic asthma medication: habit strength and cognitions.

    PubMed

    Bolman, Catherine; Arwert, Titia G; Völlink, Trijntje

    2011-01-01

    To explain adherence to prophylactic asthma medication (PAM, inhaled corticosteroids) by the attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy (ASE) model added with the concept of habit strength and to study whether habit moderates or mediates relationships between ASE factors and adherence. A mail-out survey was conducted among 139 asthmatic adults. Multiple regression analysis was conducted, with self-reported adherence as the outcome and ASE factors and habit as the independent variables. Simple slope analyses and bootstrapping mediation analyses were also conducted. Having more severe asthma, taking PAM habitually, and perceiving few negative consequences of taking PAM were associated with better adherence. Self-efficacy influenced adherence indirectly through habit. The relationship between social norms and adherence was moderated by habit: In the case of weak habits, a supportive norm in a patient's environment toward taking PAM was positively related to PAM adherence; in the case of strong habits, a supportive norm led to less adherence. Interventions to increase adherence should enhance the formation of habits by stimulating patients to perform the behavior frequently in similar situations by increasing self-efficacy and providing environmental cues, such as reminder devices and pill organizers. In addition, the disadvantages of PAM use should be negated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased waist circumference is the main driver for the development of the metabolic syndrome in South African Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Prakaschandra, Rosaley; Naidoo, Datshana P

    2016-12-15

    There is no current evidence available on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in South African Asian Indians, who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of the MetS in this group, between males and females, as well as in the different age-groups, using the harmonised criteria and determined the main components driving the development of MetS.

  11. Adherence to Antihypertensives in Patients With Comorbid Condition

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Zahra; Nikdoust, Farahnaz; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Bahremand, Mostafa; Shobeiri, Elham; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharramzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity has been noted as a potential barrier to proper adherence to antihypertensive medications. Objectives: We decided to investigate whether comorbidity could significantly affect adherence of Iranian patients with hypertension to their medication regimen. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and eighty consecutive hypertensive patients were interviewed in 4 cities of Iran. The 8-item Morisky medication adherence scale (MMAS-8) (validated in Persian) was used to assess medication adherence. This scale determines adherence by scores as lower than 6 (low adherence), 6 or 7 (moderate adherence), and 8 (high adherence). Comorbidity was considered as any concomitant medical condition, which necessitates the patient to take medicine for a minimum of 6 months prior to the interviews. Results: The most common comorbid conditions were ischemic heart disease (65 patients, 23.2%), diabetes mellitus (55 patients, 19.6%), and dyslipidemia (51 patients, 18.2%). Mean (± SD) MMAS-8 score in comorbid group was 5.68 (± 1.85) and in non-comorbid hypertensive patients, it was 5.83 (± 1.91) (P = 0.631). Mean (± SD) number of comorbidities was 1.53 (± 0.75) in low adherence group compared to 1.54 (± 0.77) in moderate/high adherers (P = 0.98). With increasing the number of comorbid diseases, the proportion of patients with high adherence decreased successively from 20% in those with no comorbid disease to 14.1% in those with one or two comorbid conditions, and finally 11.1% in those with 3 to 5 comorbid conditions. Conclusions: With increasing the number of comorbid conditions, the proportion of patients with high adherence decreases. In our opinion, this finding is a useful clinical note for healthcare providers when managing patients with hypertension who have other medical problems at the same time. PMID:26539419

  12. Risk Minimization and a Late Holocene Increase in Mobility at Roonka Flat, South Australia: An Analysis of Lower Limb Bone Diaphyseal Shape.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ethan C; Durband, Arthur C; Walshe, Keryn

    2016-09-01

    The strengthening of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the mid-Holocene caused significant changes in climate, vegetation, and faunal assemblages in South Australia. The appearance of a light, flexible backed-artifact toolkit ∼4 kya has been interpreted as evidence for changes in foraging behavior in response to this event. Optimal foraging theory supports a risk minimization strategy for South Australian hunter-gatherers in which increased mobility was used to cope with effects of a dryer, unstable environment in the late Holocene. Whether this event caused changes in foraging mobility will be tested by examining lower limb external diaphyseal shape between pre-ENSO and post-ENSO skeletons from Roonka Flat, South Australia. Anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters were used to construct diaphyseal shape indices for Roonka Flat femora and tibiae. If populations living in South Australia became more mobile over time, then post-ENSO skeletons should exhibit higher shape indices. The pooled-sex post-ENSO sample has significantly higher femoral shape indices than the pre-ENSO sample. Males do not show significant diaphyseal shape differences over time, but females significantly increase. These data are consistent with the risk minimization model, indicating that South Australians became more mobile post-ENSO to better exploit a less productive environment by expanding their foraging radii. The temporal shift toward more elliptical diaphyses is more notable in females than males, which is consistent with Aboriginal ethnographies that show both sexes being intensely involved in hunting and capturing game animals. Am J Phys Anthropol 161:94-103, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Conceptualizing Antiretroviral Adherence in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Helene; Simoni, Jane; Zhao, Hongxin; Huang, Bu; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Pearson, Cynthia; Chen, Wei-Ti; Lu, Lianhe; Zhang, Fujie

    2012-01-01

    International health experts agree that China is on the verge of an AIDS crisis. In response, the Chinese government initiated the “Four Frees and One Care” policy in 2003 to decrease economic barriers and increase access to antiretroviral therapies for people with HIV. However, long-term treatment success requires not only access, but high rates of medication adherence. This qualitative interview study with 29 persons receiving HIV care at Beijing’s Ditan Hospital identified barriers to and facilitators of medication adherence. The interviews were guided by an a priori conceptual model of adherence with four components: access, knowledge about medications, motivation, and proximal cues to action. Barriers to adherence were related to stigma and fear of discrimination; the medications themselves (including side effects and complicated dosing regimens); and other economic issues (i.e., costs of transportation, lab tests, and hospitalizations). Facilitators included participants’ strong will to live, use of electronic reminders, and family support. These results support the conceptual model and suggest that successful interventions must minimize stigma as it negatively affects all components of the model for adherence. PMID:18576162

  14. Conceptualizing antiretroviral adherence in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Starks, H; Simoni, J; Zhao, H; Huang, B; Fredriksen-Goldsen, K; Pearson, C; Chen, W-T; Lu, L; Zhang, F

    2008-07-01

    International health experts agree that China is on the verge of an AIDS crisis. In response, the Chinese government initiated the "Four Frees and One Care" policy in 2003 to decrease economic barriers and increase access to antiretroviral therapies for people with HIV. However, long-term treatment success requires not only access, but high rates of medication adherence. This qualitative interview study with 29 persons receiving HIV care at Beijing's Ditan Hospital identified barriers to and facilitators of medication adherence. The interviews were guided by an a priori conceptual model of adherence with four components: access, knowledge about medications, motivation, and proximal cues to action. Barriers to adherence were related to stigma and fear of discrimination; the medications themselves (including side-effects and complicated dosing regimens); and other economic issues (i.e. costs of transportation, lab tests and hospitalizations). Facilitators included participants' strong will to live, use of electronic reminders and family support. These results support the conceptual model and suggest that successful interventions must minimize stigma as it negatively affects all components of the model for adherence.

  15. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P < 0.05). Time to reinitiation was significantly shorter in the intervention group, 59.5 (+/- 69.0) days vs. 107.4 (+/- 109) days for the control group (P < 0.05). This initiative demonstrated that a targeted disease management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a

  16. Pulling on adhered vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ana-Suncana; Goennenwein, Stefanie; Lorz, Barbara; Seifert, Udo; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-03-01

    A theoretical model describing pulling of vesicles adhered in a contact potential has been developed. Two different regimes have been recognized. For weak to middle-strength adhesive potentials, locally stable shapes are found in a range of applied forces, separated from the free shape by an energy barrier. The phase diagram contains regions with either a unique bound shape or an additional meta-stable shape. Upon pulling, these shapes unbind discontinuously since the vesicle disengage from the surface while still possessing a finite adhesion area (Smith 2003a). In a strong adhesion regime, a competition between adhesion and tether formation is observed. A critical onset force is identified where a tether spontaneously appears as a part of a second order shape transition. Further growth of a tether is followed by a detachment process which terminates at a finite force when a vesicle continuously unbinds from the substrate (Smith 2003b). Both critical forces, as well as all shape parameters, are calculated as a function of the reduced volume and the strength of adhesive potential. Analogous experimental study has been performed where a vertical magnetic tweezers are used in combination with micro-interferometric and confocal techniques to reproduce the same symmetry as in the theoretical investigation. Giant vesicles are bound to the substrate by numerous specific bonds formed between ligands and receptors incorporated into the vesicle and the substrate, respectively. Application of a constant force is inducing a new thermodynamic equilibrium of the system where the vesicle is partially unbound from the substrate (Goennenwein 2003). The shapes of vesicles are compared prior and during application of the force. Very good agreement is obtained, particularly in the middle-strength adhesion regime (Smith 2003c). References: 1. A.-S. Smith, E. Sackmann, U. Seifert: Effects of a pulling force on the shape of a bound vesicle, Europhys. Lett., 64, 2 (2003). 2. A.-S. Smith

  17. Improving Adherence to Hand Hygiene among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maskerine, Courtney; Loeb, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Increased adherence to hand hygiene is widely acknowledged to be the most important way of reducing infections in health care facilities. Despite evidence of benefit, adherence to hand hygiene among health care professionals remains low. Several behavioral and organizational theories have been proposed to explain this. As a whole, the success of…

  18. Enhancing Commitment Improves Adherence to a Medical Regimen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Dana E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated commitment-based intervention for improvement of adherence to 10-day antibiotic regimen. Subjects were 60 college students. Experimental subjects made verbal and written commitments for adherence and completed tasks designed to increase their investment in medication regimen. Controls performed similarly structured tasks unrelated to…

  19. Enhancing Commitment Improves Adherence to a Medical Regimen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Dana E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated commitment-based intervention for improvement of adherence to 10-day antibiotic regimen. Subjects were 60 college students. Experimental subjects made verbal and written commitments for adherence and completed tasks designed to increase their investment in medication regimen. Controls performed similarly structured tasks unrelated to…

  20. Improving Adherence to Hand Hygiene among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maskerine, Courtney; Loeb, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Increased adherence to hand hygiene is widely acknowledged to be the most important way of reducing infections in health care facilities. Despite evidence of benefit, adherence to hand hygiene among health care professionals remains low. Several behavioral and organizational theories have been proposed to explain this. As a whole, the success of…

  1. What strategies do ulcerative colitis patients employ to facilitate adherence?

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Aki; Tanaka, Makoto; Naganuma, Makoto; Maeda, Shin; Kunisaki, Reiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2017-01-01

    Overall, 30%-45% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) are non-adherent and have difficulties taking their medications; this non-adherence increases the risk of clinical relapse 1.4- to 5.5-fold. This study aimed to clarify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and determine whether the strategies had an impact on good adherence. This was a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire and review of medical records. Patients diagnosed as having UC and attending one of the outpatient clinics of four urban hospitals from June 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled. A questionnaire was developed to identify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and then administered to patients with UC. Adherence to 5-aminosalicylic acid was calculated, and univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the strategies that were associated with good adherence. The final analyses included 671 participants (mean age 40.2 years; 54.3% males). The valid response rate was 96.9%; 186 (27.7%) participants were classified as non-adherent, the mean adherence rate being 86.1% (standard deviation [SD] 17.9). Seven strategies that patients employ to facilitate adherence were identified, the following two being significantly associated with good adherence: "I keep my medicines where I eat meals" and "I keep each day's medicine in a pill case or something similar to make sure I have taken them". The identified strategies might be used to develop a program to improve medication adherence in patients with UC.

  2. What strategies do ulcerative colitis patients employ to facilitate adherence?

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Aki; Tanaka, Makoto; Naganuma, Makoto; Maeda, Shin; Kunisaki, Reiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2017-01-01

    Background Overall, 30%–45% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) are non-adherent and have difficulties taking their medications; this non-adherence increases the risk of clinical relapse 1.4- to 5.5-fold. This study aimed to clarify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and determine whether the strategies had an impact on good adherence. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire and review of medical records. Patients diagnosed as having UC and attending one of the outpatient clinics of four urban hospitals from June 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled. A questionnaire was developed to identify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and then administered to patients with UC. Adherence to 5-aminosalicylic acid was calculated, and univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the strategies that were associated with good adherence. Results The final analyses included 671 participants (mean age 40.2 years; 54.3% males). The valid response rate was 96.9%; 186 (27.7%) participants were classified as non-adherent, the mean adherence rate being 86.1% (standard deviation [SD] 17.9). Seven strategies that patients employ to facilitate adherence were identified, the following two being significantly associated with good adherence: “I keep my medicines where I eat meals” and “I keep each day’s medicine in a pill case or something similar to make sure I have taken them”. Conclusion The identified strategies might be used to develop a program to improve medication adherence in patients with UC. PMID:28203059

  3. Understanding the growth hormone therapy adherence paradigm: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Benjamin G; Acerini, Carlo L

    2013-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) therapy is used to treat a variety of growth disorders in childhood/adolescence. Its efficacy is thought to be dependent on patients' adherence to their treatment regimen. PubMed was searched using the keywords 'growth hormone', 'child'[Mesh], 'adolescent'[Mesh], and 'patient compliance'[Mesh]. Most studies of adherence to paediatric GH therapy have used either issued/encashed GH prescriptions or questionnaires. Estimates of prevalence of non-adherence vary from 5-82%, depending on the methods and definitions used. Different studies have variously demonstrated an association (or lack thereof) between adherence and age, socioeconomic status, treatment duration, injection device used and injection-giver. A number of interventions have been proposed to improve adherence, including offering a choice of injection device, but none are supported by trials. Poor adherence is associated with reduced height velocity and likely increased economic costs; evidence for other effects is circumstantial. Adherence to paediatric GH therapy is suboptimal, which may partially explain why the mean final height attained is below that of the general population. Analysis of the causes of non-adherence is complicated by conflicting evidence from different studies. Multifactorial interventions are most likely to be successful in improving adherence. We make recommendations for further research. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Bav; Zokaie, Simon; Carr, Alison J

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK). Objectives To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305) of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01): 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05). Conclusion This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved adherence rates. PMID:24379656

  5. Evidence that extracellular components function in adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles and a highly proteinaceous polymer associated with a leukotoxin-producing strain, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75, were shown to increase adherence of other weakly adherent A. actinomycetemcomitans strains to KB epithelial cells. Images PMID:8406899

  6. Has the conversion of natural wetlands to agricultural land increased the incidence and severity of damaging freezes in south Florida?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, C.H.; Pielke, R.A.; Steyaert, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    On several occasions, winter freezes have wrought severe destruction on Florida agriculture. A series of devastating freezes around the turn of the twentieth century, and again during the 1980s, were related to anomalies in the large-scale flow of the ocean–atmosphere system. During the twentieth century, substantial areas of wetlands in south Florida were drained and converted to agricultural land for winter fresh vegetable and sugarcane production. During this time, much of the citrus industry also was relocated to those areas to escape the risk of freeze farther to the north. The purpose of this paper is to present a modeling study designed to investigate whether the conversion of the wetlands to agriculture itself could have resulted in or exacerbated the severity of recent freezes in those agricultural areas of south Florida.For three recent freeze events, a pair of simulations was undertaken with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. One member of each pair employed land surface properties that represent pre-1900s (near natural) land cover, whereas the other member of each pair employed data that represent near-current land-use patterns as derived from analysis of Landsat data valid for 1992/93. These two different land cover datasets capture well the conversion of wetlands to agriculture in south Florida during the twentieth century. Use of current land surface properties resulted in colder simulated minimum temperatures and temperatures that remained below freezing for a longer period at locations of key agricultural production centers in south Florida that were once natural wetlands. Examination of time series of the surface energy budget from one of the cases reveals that when natural land cover is used, a persistent moisture flux from the underlying wetlands during the nighttime hours served to prevent the development of below-freezing temperatures at those same locations. When the model results were subjected to an important sensitivity factor

  7. Adherence to antiepilepsy drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-11-01

    Adherence to antiepilepsy drug (AED) therapy is critical for effective disease management, yet adherence and persistence rates are low due to several barriers. The definitions of adherence (80% rate of total pills taken, medication possession ratio, and days covered by prescriptions filled) and methods of measurement (patient self-reports, serum drug levels, pill counts, electronic bottle tops, and reviews of pharmacy records) are not without limitations, and their applicability to epilepsy is not clear. The use of simple adherence scales during office visits can provide an overall impression of a patient's adherence and can serve as a basis for practitioner-patient dialog. Efforts to improve adherence should focus on provider and healthcare system determinants versus those focused only on the patient. These interventions include non-judgmental communication, patient education, simplification of the dosage regimen with once-daily therapies, and the use of patient reminders.

  8. Factors governing adherence of Candida species to plastic surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, S A; Drutz, D J; Zajic, J E

    1985-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans and Candida spp. to adhere to inert polymeric surfaces may allow these organisms direct ingress into the human host. Biophysical characterization of this adherence shows that the forces responsible for such adherence are attractive London-van der Waals forces (or hydrophobic forces) and electrostatic forces. The hydrophobic affinity of yeasts was determined by (i) a water-hydrocarbon two-phase assay and by (ii) measurement of the contact angle (theta) of a liquid droplet on a monolayer of yeast cells. The hydrophobicity of the yeasts correlated with the tendency of yeasts to adhere to polystyrene and was reduced in the presence of Tween 20. The adherence of yeasts to polymers of increasing hydrophobicity (determined by the contact angle method) was directly proportional to theta. Yeast surface charges were altered by selectively blocking amino and carboxyl groups. The more positively charged yeasts adhered in greater numbers. Increasing the molarity of NaCl increased yeast adherence. These forces probably contribute to the negative cooperativity (determined by Scatchard and Hill plot) that characterizes the adherence of yeasts to polymers. PMID:3899942

  9. Increased Risk for Group B Streptococcus Sepsis in Young Infants Exposed to HIV, Soweto, South Africa, 2004–20081

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Thigpen, Michael C.; Velaphi, Sithembiso C.; Wadula, Jeannette; Adrian, Peter V.; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Groome, Michelle J.; Buchmann, Eckhart; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Although group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in young infants worldwide, epidemiologic data and knowledge about risk factors for the disease are lacking from low- to middle-income countries. To determine the epidemiology of invasive GBS disease among young infants in a setting with high maternal HIV infection, we conducted hospital-based surveillance during 2004–2008 in Soweto, South Africa. Overall GBS incidence was 2.72 cases/1,000 live births (1.50 and 1.22, respectively, among infants with early-onset disease [EOD] and late-onset [LOD] disease). Risk for EOD and LOD was higher for HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants. GBS serotypes Ia and III accounted for 84.0% of cases, and 16.9% of infected infants died. We estimate that use of trivalent GBS vaccine (serotypes Ia, Ib, and III) could prevent 2,105 invasive GBS cases and 278 deaths annually among infants in South Africa; therefore, vaccination of all pregnant women in this country should be explored. PMID:25812061

  10. Increased risk for group B Streptococcus sepsis in young infants exposed to HIV, Soweto, South Africa, 2004-2008(1).

    PubMed

    Cutland, Clare L; Schrag, Stephanie J; Thigpen, Michael C; Velaphi, Sithembiso C; Wadula, Jeannette; Adrian, Peter V; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Groome, Michelle J; Buchmann, Eckhart; Madhi, Shabir A

    2015-04-01

    Although group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in young infants worldwide, epidemiologic data and knowledge about risk factors for the disease are lacking from low- to middle-income countries. To determine the epidemiology of invasive GBS disease among young infants in a setting with high maternal HIV infection, we conducted hospital-based surveillance during 2004-2008 in Soweto, South Africa. Overall GBS incidence was 2.72 cases/1,000 live births (1.50 and 1.22, respectively, among infants with early-onset disease [EOD] and late-onset [LOD] disease). Risk for EOD and LOD was higher for HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants. GBS serotypes Ia and III accounted for 84.0% of cases, and 16.9% of infected infants died. We estimate that use of trivalent GBS vaccine (serotypes Ia, Ib, and III) could prevent 2,105 invasive GBS cases and 278 deaths annually among infants in South Africa; therefore, vaccination of all pregnant women in this country should be explored.

  11. CONDITIONS THAT INCREASE DRUG MARKET INVOLVEMENT: THE INVITATIONAL EDGE AND THE CASE OF MEXICANS IN SOUTH TEXAS

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Kaplan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Research on drug trafficking has not been able to discern the exact nature of illegal drug markets and the relationship between their individual and group participants. This article delineates the role of Mexican immigrants and Mexican-American participants involved in the stratified drug market of South Texas. This article synthesizes ethnographic materials drawn from two previous National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) studies in order identify the different types of drug distribution behaviors that occur within the groups, the differentiated roles of individuals, the organizational framework, and most significantly, the processes that link market participants to others outside of the drug market. This illegal behavior can be interpreted as an adaptive mechanism that is a direct response to the marginal economic status imposed by macro socio-economical background factors. As well, we conclude that the specific foreground factors of the opportunities offered by the context, culture, and proximity of the U.S./Mexico border and invitational edges explain this behavior. There are both parallels and particular differences between the South Texas case and the structuring and functioning of informal legal and illegal markets that are characteristic of other economically disadvantaged communities. PMID:21218142

  12. Was an increase in cocaine use among injecting drug users in New South Wales, Australia, accompanied by an increase in violent crime?

    PubMed Central

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Day, Carolyn; Hall, Wayne; Conroy, Elizabeth; Gilmour, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Background A sharp reduction in heroin supply in Australia in 2001 was followed by a large but transient increase in cocaine use among injecting drug users (IDU) in Sydney. This paper assesses whether the increase in cocaine use among IDU was accompanied by increased rates of violent crime as occurred in the United States in the 1980s. Specifically, the paper aims to examine the impact of increased cocaine use among Sydney IDU upon police incidents of robbery with a weapon, assault and homicide. Methods Data on cocaine use among IDU was obtained from the Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS). Monthly NSW Police incident data on arrests for cocaine possession/use, robbery offences, homicides, and assaults, were obtained from the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research. Time series analysis was conducted on the police data series where possible. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives from law enforcement and health agencies about the impacts of cocaine use on crime and policing. Results There was a significant increase in cocaine use and cocaine possession offences in the months immediately following the reduction in heroin supply. There was also a significant increase in incidents of robbery where weapons were involved. There were no increases in offences involving firearms, homicides or reported assaults. Conclusion The increased use of cocaine among injecting drug users following the heroin shortage led to increases in violent crime. Other States and territories that also experienced a heroin shortage but did not show any increases in cocaine use did not report any increase in violent crimes. The violent crimes committed did not involve guns, most likely because of its stringent gun laws, in contrast to the experience of American cities that have experienced high rates of cocaine use and violent crime. PMID:15840173

  13. Patient adherence to allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reisacher, William R; Visaya, Jiovani M

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the literature on patient adherence to two different approaches to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic disease. Factors related to adherence in general, as well as the various methods used to measure adherence, will be discussed. Although a complex interaction of factors related to both the physician and the patient influence the adherence to a particular therapeutic regimen, effective communication between these two parties and the simplicity of the regimen are frequently noted to be of primary importance. Variability with respect to the definition of adherence, the method of measuring adherence, and the length of the measuring period has resulted in a wide range of adherence rates to allergy immunotherapy reported in the literature. Patients most often site inconvenience, side-effects, and poor efficacy as reasons for discontinuing allergy immunotherapy. Adherence to therapy not only improves individual patient outcomes, but also helps determine the best treatment modalities and reduces the burden of disease on society. As new methods of delivering immunotherapy are being developed, such as allergy immunotherapy tablets and oral mucosal immunotherapy, the factors associated with patient adherence should be carefully considered.

  14. Ethnic Disparity and Increased Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes among South Asians: Aetiology and Future Implications for Diabetes Prevention and Management.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Venugopal; Mavathur, Ramesh; Sharma, Manjunath Nk

    2017-09-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is turning out to be a global health crisis. Current available literature clearly indicates an increased risk of type 2 diabetes amongst South Asian population. The objective of this narrative review is to explore the non-modifiable and modifiable risk factors of T2DM in South Asian population, including their beliefs, attitudes, socio economic and cultural barriers and also to explore the possible implications in designing culture specific diabetes prevention and management programs. This narrative review is based upon the data from individual studies and review article known to the authors. Additional relevant studies were identified through PubMed search on English-language papers published 2000-2017 using the relevant keywords. Where appropriate, the reference lists of key papers were reviewed to identify additional studies of interest. Many genetic and environmental risk factors such as diet, physical inactivity, and sleep contribute to the increased prevalence of diabetes in the ethnic group. Providing mere knowledge about diabetes and these risk factors might not be sufficient in this particular ethnic group. It is essential to address their beliefs, attitudes and the cultural barriers faced. To overcome the health disparity in the South Asian ethnic group, various risk factors associated with diabetes, and the challenges faced are to be considered while designing future diabetes prevention and management strategies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Spatial and temporal changes in leaf coloring date of Acer palmatum and Ginkgo biloba in response to temperature increases in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Kyun; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Jeong, Su-Jong; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Jinwon

    2017-01-01

    Understanding shifts in autumn phenology associated with climate changes is critical for preserving forest ecosystems. This study examines the changes in the leaf coloring date (LCD) of two temperate deciduous tree species, Acer palmatum (Acer) and Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgo), in response to surface air temperature (Ts) changes at 54 stations of South Korea for the period 1989–2007. The variations of Acer and Ginkgo in South Korea are very similar: they show the same mean LCD of 295th day of the year and delays of about 0.45 days year-1 during the observation period. The delaying trend is closely correlated (correlation coefficient > 0.77) with increases in Ts in mid-autumn by 2.8 days °C-1. It is noted that the LCD delaying and temperature sensitivity (days °C-1) for both tree species show negligible dependences on latitudes and elevations. Given the significant LCD-Ts relation, we project LCD changes for 2016–35 and 2046–65 using a process-based model forced by temperature from climate model simulation. The projections indicate that the mean LCD would be further delayed by 3.2 (3.7) days in 2016–35 (2046–65) due to mid-autumn Ts increases. This study suggests that the mid-autumn warming is largely responsible for the observed LCD changes in South Korea and will intensify the delaying trends in the future. PMID:28346534

  16. Spatial and temporal changes in leaf coloring date of Acer palmatum and Ginkgo biloba in response to temperature increases in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Kyun; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Jeong, Su-Jong; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Jinwon

    2017-01-01

    Understanding shifts in autumn phenology associated with climate changes is critical for preserving forest ecosystems. This study examines the changes in the leaf coloring date (LCD) of two temperate deciduous tree species, Acer palmatum (Acer) and Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgo), in response to surface air temperature (Ts) changes at 54 stations of South Korea for the period 1989-2007. The variations of Acer and Ginkgo in South Korea are very similar: they show the same mean LCD of 295th day of the year and delays of about 0.45 days year-1 during the observation period. The delaying trend is closely correlated (correlation coefficient > 0.77) with increases in Ts in mid-autumn by 2.8 days °C-1. It is noted that the LCD delaying and temperature sensitivity (days °C-1) for both tree species show negligible dependences on latitudes and elevations. Given the significant LCD-Ts relation, we project LCD changes for 2016-35 and 2046-65 using a process-based model forced by temperature from climate model simulation. The projections indicate that the mean LCD would be further delayed by 3.2 (3.7) days in 2016-35 (2046-65) due to mid-autumn Ts increases. This study suggests that the mid-autumn warming is largely responsible for the observed LCD changes in South Korea and will intensify the delaying trends in the future.

  17. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  18. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  19. Notes from the Field: Increase in Human Cases of Tularemia--Colorado, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming, January-September 2015.

    PubMed

    Pedati, Caitlin; House, Jennifer; Hancock-Allen, Jessica; Colton, Leah; Bryan, Katie; Ortbahn, Dustin; Kightlinger, Lon; Kugeler, Kiersten; Petersen, Jeannine; Mead, Paul; Safranek, Tom; Buss, Bryan

    2015-12-04

    Tularemia is a rare, often serious disease caused by a gram-negative coccobacillus, Francisella tularensis, which infects humans and animals in the Northern Hemisphere. Approximately 125 cases have been reported annually in the United States during the last two decades. As of September 30, a total of 100 tularemia cases were reported in 2015 among residents of Colorado (n = 43), Nebraska (n = 21), South Dakota (n = 20), and Wyoming (n = 16) (Figure). This represents a substantial increase in the annual mean number of four (975% increase), seven (200%), seven (186%) and two (70%) cases, respectively, reported in each state during 2004-2014.

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease in young South African Indians.

    PubMed

    Ramkaran, Prithiksha; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Khan, Sajidah; Moodley, Devapregasan; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2015-10-15

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) reduces 5',10'-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5'-methyltetrahydrofolate, and is involved in remethylation of homocysteine to methionine, two important reactions involved in folate metabolism and methylation pathways. The common MTHFR C677T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs1801133) has been associated with raised levels of homocysteine, a well known risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is a major cause of mortality worldwide. The age of onset of this chronic disorder is on the decline, particularly in the Indian population. Indians in South Africa (SA) have a higher prevalence of premature CAD compared to Black South Africans. The MTHFR C677T SNP has not been investigated in the SA Indian population. The present study therefore investigated the MTHFR C677T SNP in young SA Indian males with CAD compared to young Indian and Black male controls. A total of 290 subjects were recruited into this study which included 106 CAD patients (diagnosed on angiography, mean age 37.5, range 24-45 years), 100 Indian male controls (mean age 37.5, range 28-45 years), and 84 Black male controls (mean age 36.4, range 25-45). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to genotype CAD patients and healthy controls. Data for clinical markers were obtained from pathology reports. There was a significant association between the 677 MTHFR variant (T) allele and CAD patients compared to the healthy Indian controls (p=0.0353, OR=2.105 95% CI 1.077-4.114). Indian controls presented with a higher frequency of the variant allele compared to Black controls (7% vs. 2% respectively, p=0.0515 OR=3.086 95% CI 0.9958-9.564). The MTHFR C677T SNP did not influence levels of total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HbA1c or hsCRP. The higher frequency of the MTHFR 677 variant allele in South African Indians may be a contributing factor to the higher

  1. Impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only models of the HadGEM1 family upon the climate patterns of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Custodio, Maria; da Rocha, Rosmeri Porfírio; Ambrizzi, Tércio; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Demory, Marie-Estelle

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only global climate models on the simulation of climate patterns in South America (SA). We analyze simulations of the HadGEM1 model family with three different horizontal resolutions in the atmosphere—N96 (~135 km at 50°N), N144 (~90 km) and N216 (~60 km)—and two different resolutions in the ocean—1° and 1/3°. In general, the coupled simulation with the highest resolution (60 km in the atmosphere and 1/3° in the ocean) has smaller systematic errors in seasonal mean precipitation, temperature and circulation over SA than the atmosphere-only model at all resolutions. The models, both coupled and atmosphere-only, properly simulate spatial patterns of the seasonal shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the formation and positioning of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), and the subtropical Atlantic and Pacific highs. However, the models overestimate rainfall, especially in the ITCZ and over the western border of high-elevation areas such as southern Chile. The coupling, combined with higher resolution, result in a more realistic spatial pattern of rain, particularly over the Atlantic ITCZ and the continental branch of the SACZ. All models correctly simulate the phase and amplitude of the annual cycle of precipitation and air temperature over most of South America. The overall results show that despite some problems, increasing the resolution in the HadGEM1 model family results in a more realistic representation of climate patterns over South America and the adjacent oceans.

  2. Impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only models of the HadGEM1 family upon the climate patterns of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Custodio, Maria; da Rocha, Rosmeri Porfírio; Ambrizzi, Tércio; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Demory, Marie-Estelle

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only global climate models on the simulation of climate patterns in South America (SA). We analyze simulations of the HadGEM1 model family with three different horizontal resolutions in the atmosphere—N96 ( 135 km at 50°N), N144 ( 90 km) and N216 ( 60 km)—and two different resolutions in the ocean—1° and 1/3°. In general, the coupled simulation with the highest resolution (60 km in the atmosphere and 1/3° in the ocean) has smaller systematic errors in seasonal mean precipitation, temperature and circulation over SA than the atmosphere-only model at all resolutions. The models, both coupled and atmosphere-only, properly simulate spatial patterns of the seasonal shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the formation and positioning of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), and the subtropical Atlantic and Pacific highs. However, the models overestimate rainfall, especially in the ITCZ and over the western border of high-elevation areas such as southern Chile. The coupling, combined with higher resolution, result in a more realistic spatial pattern of rain, particularly over the Atlantic ITCZ and the continental branch of the SACZ. All models correctly simulate the phase and amplitude of the annual cycle of precipitation and air temperature over most of South America. The overall results show that despite some problems, increasing the resolution in the HadGEM1 model family results in a more realistic representation of climate patterns over South America and the adjacent oceans.

  3. Clonogenic Assay: Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T.; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 19561. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture1. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811)2. Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  4. Predictors and clinical consequences of non-adherence with antipsychotic medication in the outpatient treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Novick, Diego; Haro, Josep Maria; Suarez, David; Perez, Victor; Dittmann, Ralf W; Haddad, Peter M

    2010-04-30

    To assess baseline predictors and consequences of antipsychotic adherence during the long-term treatment of schizophrenia outpatients, data were taken from the 3-year, prospective, observational, European Schizophrenia Outpatients Health Outcomes (SOHO) study, in which outpatients starting or changing antipsychotics were assessed every 6 months. Physician-rated adherence was dichotomized as adherence/non-adherence. Regression models tested for predictors of adherence during follow-up, and associations between adherence and outcome measures. Of the 6731 patients analysed, 71.2% were adherent and 28.8% were non-adherent over 3 years. The strongest predictor of adherence was adherence in the month before baseline assessment. Other baseline predictors of adherence included initial treatment for schizophrenia and greater social activities. Baseline predictors of non-adherence were alcohol dependence and substance abuse in the previous month, hospitalization in the previous 6 months, independent housing and the presence of hostility. Non-adherence was significantly associated with an increased risk of relapse, hospitalization and suicide attempts. In conclusion, non-adherence is common but can partly be predicted. This may allow strategies to improve adherence to be targeted to high-risk patients. Also, reversal of some risk factors may improve adherence. Non-adherence is associated with a range of poorer long-term outcomes, with clinical and economic implications. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between trajectories of statin adherence and subsequent cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jessica M; Krumme, Alexis A; Tong, Angela Y; Shrank, William H; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2015-10-01

    Trajectory models have been shown to (1) identify groups of patients with similar patterns of medication filling behavior and (2) summarize the trajectory, the average adherence in each group over time. However, the association between adherence trajectories and clinical outcomes remains unclear. This study investigated the association between 12-month statin trajectories and subsequent cardiovascular events. We identified patients with insurance coverage from a large national insurer who initiated a statin during January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010. We assessed medication adherence during the 360 days following initiation and grouped patients based on the proportion of days covered (PDC) and trajectory models. We then measured cardiovascular events during the year after adherence assessment. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between adherence measures and cardiovascular outcomes; strength of association was quantified by the hazard ratio, the increase in model C-statistic, and the net reclassification index (NRI). Among 519 842 statin initiators, 8777 (1.7%) had a cardiovascular event during follow-up. More consistent medication use was associated with a lower likelihood of clinical events, whether adherence was measured through trajectory groups or PDC. When evaluating the prediction of future cardiovascular events by including a measure of adherence in the model, the best model reclassification was observed when adherence was measured using three or four trajectory groups (NRI = 0.189; 95% confidence interval: [0.171, 0.210]). Statin adherence trajectory predicted future cardiovascular events better than measures categorizing PDC. Thus, adherence trajectories may be useful for targeting adherence interventions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Adherence to treatment in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Prados-Moreno, Sebastián; Sabio, José Mario; Pérez-Mármol, José Manuel; Navarrete-Navarrete, Nuria; Peralta-Ramírez, María Isabel

    2017-06-29

    Non-adherence to treatment is usually a clinical problem in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increasing the knowledge of predictors of treatment adherence can be meaningful in the clinical setting. The main objective of the present study was to analyse the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and psychological variables on the degree of treatment adherence in a sample of Spanish women with SLE. This is an observational-transversal study. All participants were evaluated for the degree of treatment adherence, their clinical status, psychopathological manifestations, the level of perceived stress and self-efficacy. The sample was divided into two groups (adherent vs non-adherent). The factors associated with a lack of adherence in this sample were analysed by means of logistic regression. This study comprises 72 women with SLE (average age=36.72±12.2 years). Almost 64% of patients with SLE were non-adherent to treatment. The results showed that a low educational level, being unemployed, living with a partner and alcohol abuse were associated with low treatment adherence. There were significant mean differences between groups in psychopathological subscales of somatisation, obsession-compulsion and general psychopathological indices. There were also mean differences between groups for the level of perceived stress. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, suffering arthrosis and scoring higher in dimensions of psychopathology were significant predictors of treatment adherence, explaining between 35% and 47% of its variability. Including the clinical and psychopathological manifestations as important aspects in the clinical reasoning of health professionals could improve the adherence to treatment of patients with SLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Age, Stigma, Adherence and Clinical Indicators in HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Higgins, Melinda; Zuñiga, Julie Ann; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell

    2016-01-01

    Stigma has become a gendered phenomenon that affects increasing numbers of HIV-infected women worldwide. This study examined the role of age as a possible moderator of the relationship between stigma and antiretroviral therapy adherence, CD4% and viral load among 120 HIV-infected women. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the Keeping Healthy and Active with Risk Reduction and Medication Adherence (KHARMA) Project, an National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded randomized controlled trial to improve Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence and reduce risky behaviors in HIV-infected women at five clinical sites in a South-eastern city from 2005 to 2008. Stigma was measured using the Perceived Personal Stigma of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) scale. Among participants <50 years old (n=90), age was significantly associated with viral load (rho=−.24, p=.02) and stigma was negatively associated with CD4% (r =−.26, p=.02). For the 30 participants >50 years old, age was not significantly associated with viral load, stigma or CD4%, and there was no significant association between stigma and CD4% (r=.07, p=.70). These findings indicate the need for further study regarding this potential moderating effect and possible interventions to address the susceptibility of younger women to the harmful effects of stigma. PMID:27200416

  8. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  9. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-12-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of 'universal access' and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients' health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested.

  10. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  11. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  12. Study of Adherent Oxide Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-14

    oxide scale-metal interface, thereby improving scale adherence. Because the reactive elements which improve scale adherence (yttrium, hafnium , etc...temperature range, the chromium in the alloy lowers the sulfur activity greater than that of aluminium . Despite this ability of chromium to reduce sulfur

  13. Cognitive mediators linking social support networks to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiko; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    This paper argues that normative considerations are more important than attitudinal factors in engaging colorectal cancer screening, and tests a model explaining how unique cultural expressions of social networks influence screening adherence. Structural equation modeling was used to understand colorectal cancer screening in a population-based sample of 341 Japanese Americans aged 50 and over. The model accounted for 25% of the variance in screening adherence. Adherence was most strongly associated with family/friend subjective norms about colorectal cancer screening use. Emotional family support, but not the size of the networks, was indirectly related to adherence via increased family/friend subjective norms, while emotional friend support was directly related to adherence. While usual source of care was directly associated with adherence, better provider-patient communication was directly and indirectly associated with adherence via increased perceived benefits. The findings of this study support strengthening informal support networks to enhance adherence among Japanese Americans at risk.

  14. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. Methods A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004–2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Results Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Conclusion Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the

  15. [Strategies to improve medication adherence].

    PubMed

    Laufs, U; Böhm, M; Kroemer, H K; Schüssel, K; Griese, N; Schulz, M

    2011-08-01

    Up to 50 % of patients with chronic diseases do not take their medication regularly. Poor adherence to drug therapy is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. A selective literature search using the terms adherence, compliance, concordance, persistence, medication management, and pharmaceutical care was performed. Evidence for improving adherence has been provided for the following principles: individual counselling of patients and care givers, medication management including simplifying dosing and use of combination tablets as well as the use of individual unit doses, e. g. blister cards. The effectiveness has only been shown for the duration of the interventions. The improvement of medication adherence represents an area of research with high impact on outcomes and cost. Measures to improve adherence may be as important as the development of novel therapies. However, prospective clinical evaluations with clinical endpoints are missing especially for the German health care system in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice. Joint efforts of physicians and pharmacists are needed.

  16. Increasing Recovery of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Respiratory Specimens over a 10-Year Period in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Boksoon; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Su-Young; Lee, Nam Yong; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of patients with pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term trends in the NTM recovery rate from respiratory specimens over a 10-year period in a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of mycobacterial cultures of respiratory specimens at Samsung Medical Center from January 2001 to December 2011. Results During the study period, 32,841 respiratory specimens from 10,563 patients were found to be culture-positive for mycobacteria. These included 12,619 (38%) Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 20,222 (62%) NTM isolates. The proportion of NTM among all positive mycobacterial cultures increased from 43% (548/1,283) in 2001 to 70% (3,341/4,800) in 2011 (p<0.001, test for trend). The recovery rate of NTM isolates from acid-fast bacilli smear-positive specimens increased from 9% (38/417) in 2001 to 64% (1,284/1,997) in 2011 (p<0.001, test for trend). The proportion of positive liquid cultures was higher for NTM than for M. tuberculosis (p<0.001). The most frequently isolated NTM were Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (53%) and Mycobacterium abscessus-massiliense complex (25%). Conclusion The recovery rate of NTM from respiratory specimens in South Korea has increased steadily. PMID:24348667

  17. SmartMed: A Medication Management System to Improve Adherence.

    PubMed

    Diemert, Simon; Richardson, Kirk; Hunter, Paul; Weber, Jens; Price, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Adherence is the degree to which patients comply with their caregivers prescribed treatments. Lack of adherence due to various causes negatively affects health objectives. Prior work in the field of medication management has indicated the usefulness of IT as a possible aid for those who have difficulty adhering to prescribed medication regimes. In this paper we present a medication management system (SmartMed) that has been designed to monitor and increase adherence. The SmartMed system consists of a portable pill bottle device, a local base station, and a cloud data service. It reminds users when it is time to take their medications, and acquires adherence data which is accessible for applications that query the data service. The project was undertaken as an undergraduate engineering design project. This paper describes the design and prototype implementation of this system and provides direction for future work.

  18. Gender differences in Chinese immigrants: predictors for antihypertensive medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wen; Froelicher, Erika S

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe gender differences in predictors for antihypertensive medication adherence in Chinese immigrants. A cross-sectional design was used with recruitment with a convenience sample of 100 men and 100 women with hypertension. Measurements for demographics, cultural factors, clinical factors, and medication adherence were self-administered by the participants. Blood pressure was checked twice. A multivariate logistic regression was used to establish a parsimonious prediction model for medication adherence. It was found that in men, longer length of stay in the United States was a predictor for nonadherence. The predictor of nonadherence in women was lower perceived benefits of antihypertensive medications. To increase adherence in women, the benefits of antihypertensive medications should be emphasized. For men who have lived in the United States for 12 years or more, their adherence should be closely monitored.

  19. Adherence to BCR-ABL Inhibitors: Issues for CML Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Saglio, Giuseppe; Radich, Jerald; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has improved substantially in the last 20 years, especially since the introduction of oral BCR-ABL inhibitors a decade ago. However, for patients to reap the benefits of BCR-ABL inhibitors, they must likely be on therapy for the remainder of their lives. In this situation, adherence to medication becomes a concern. Adherence to therapy for chronic health conditions, including CML, has been demonstrated to be poor. Studies have shown nonadherence in CML to be common in one-third or more of patients, and 100% adherence is rare. Furthermore, evidence suggests that reduced adherence to BCR-ABL inhibitors is associated with reduced efficacy and increased healthcare costs. Factors that can cause nonadherence, including dose, toxicity, time from diagnosis to prescription, and the number of concomitant medications, should be addressed and monitored by the physician. To maximize adherence, CML treatment should be individualized to the patient and simplified as appropriate. PMID:22633166

  20. Forgiveness of non-adherence to HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Shuter, Jonathan

    2008-04-01

    Superior adherence to HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy is a mainstay of successful HIV management. Studies performed in the early era of highly active antiretroviral therapy demonstrated the need for > or =95% adherence in order to achieve and sustain viral suppression. High rates of viral suppression have been observed at more moderate levels of adherence with newer antiretroviral regimens. The term 'forgiveness' is being used to describe the ability of a regimen to achieve and sustain viral suppression, despite suboptimal adherence. A variety of pharmacological, viral and host properties determine the level of forgiveness of any specific regimen. As the choice of treatment options continues to expand, forgiveness of non-adherence is likely to emerge as an increasingly important factor in therapeutic decision-making.

  1. Antiretroviral therapy adherence among transgender women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Sevelius, Jae M; Carrico, Adam; Johnson, Mallory O

    2010-01-01

    Despite disproportionate rates of HIV among transgender women and evidence that medication adherence is necessary for treatment success and increased likelihood of survival, there has been little investigation into antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence issues among transgender women. This study examined rates of self-reported ART adherence among transgender women on ART (n = 35) and well-established correlates of nonadherence, including depression, adherence self-efficacy, patient perceptions of interactions with their providers, and perceived adverse side effects of ART compared to other respondents (n = 2,770). Transgender women on ART were less likely to report 90% adherence rates or higher and reported less confidence in their abilities to integrate treatment regimens into their daily lives. When transgender women were compared to other respondents, regardless of the current medication regimen, they reported significantly fewer positive interactions with their health care providers. Training for providers and integration of hormone therapy into HIV care is recommended.

  2. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  3. Genetic factors in exercise adoption, adherence and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herring, M P; Sailors, M H; Bray, M S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise play critical roles in energy balance. While many interventions targeted at increasing physical activity have demonstrated efficacy in promoting weight loss or maintenance in the short term, long term adherence to such programmes is not frequently observed. Numerous factors have been examined for their ability to predict and/or influence physical activity and exercise adherence. Although physical activity has been demonstrated to have a strong genetic component in both animals and humans, few studies have examined the association between genetic variation and exercise adherence. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the non-genetic and genetic predictors of physical activity and adherence to exercise. In addition, we report the results of analysis of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in six candidate genes examined for association to exercise adherence, duration, intensity and total exercise dose in young adults from the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Based on both animal and human research, neural signalling and pleasure/reward systems in the brain may drive in large part the propensity to be physically active and to adhere to an exercise programme. Adherence/compliance research in other fields may inform future investigation of the genetics of exercise adherence.

  4. Adherence enhancing interventions for oral anticancer agents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Tim; Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Pieper, Dawid; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-02-01

    The use of oral anticancer agents has increased in the last decades. Adherence is a crucial factor for the success of oral anticancer agent therapy. However, many patients are non-adherent. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of adherence interventions in patients taking oral anticancer agents. A systematic literature search was performed in Medline and Embase. Titles and abstracts and in case of potential relevance, full-texts were assessed for eligibility according to the predefined inclusion criteria. The study quality was evaluated. Both process steps were carried out independently by two reviewers. Relevant data on study design, patients, interventions and results were extracted in standardized tables by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Six controlled studies were included. Only one study was randomized. The study quality was moderate to low. One study showed statistically significant results in favor of the adherence intervention, two studies showed a tendency in favor of the intervention, one study showed an inconsistent result depending on the adherence definition and one study showed almost identical adherence rates in both groups. One study showed a tendency in favor of the control group. Although most of the interventions are not very effective, it appears that certain adherence enhancing interventions could have a promising effect. One crucial point is the consideration of the baseline adherence when choosing patients to avoid ceiling effects. The evidence is limited due to lack of sufficient studies and partly inconsistent results. Further high quality studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient adherence and persistence with oral anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Kathryn; Mayer, Erica; Partridge, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Given the recent significant increase in the use of oral therapies in cancer management, an understanding of patients' adherence to and persistence with oral therapy is crucial. Nonadherence and early cessation may be substantial barriers to the delivery of valuable therapies, and may impair health. Potential obstacles to adherence and persistence include personal characteristics, treatment features, and system factors. Techniques for measuring adherence and per