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Sample records for increase hprt mutant

  1. Chromosome instability of HPRT-mutant subclones induced by ionising radiation of various let

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorun, R. D.; Koshlan, I. V.; Koshlan, N. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Shmakova, N. L.

    The induction of HPRT-mutations and survival of Chinese hamster cells (line B11ii-FAF28, clone 431) were studied after irradiation by 4He and 12C-ions of various LET (20 - 360 keV/μm), produced by the U-200 heavy ion accelerator. The RBE increases with LET up to the maximum at 100-200 keV/μm and then decreases. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on the HPRT-mutant subclones selected from unirradiated Chinese hamster V-79 cells and from HPRT- mutant subclones that arose after exposure to γ-rays, 1GeV protons and 14N-ions (LET - 77 keV/μm), produced by the synchrophasotron and the U-400M heavy ion accelerator. Slow growing mutant subclones were observed. The cytogenetic properties of individual clones were highly heterogeneous and chromosome instability was observed in both spontaneous and radiation-induced mutants. Chromosome instability was highest among spontaneous mutants and decreased with increasing LET.

  2. Hypomutability in Fanconi anemia cells is associated with increased deletion frequency at the HPRT locus

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulo, D.; Guillouf, C.; Moustacchi, E. ); Mohrenweiser, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited human disorder associated with a predisposition to cancer and characterized by anomalies in the processing of DNA cross-links and certain monoadducts. The authors reported previously that the frequency of psoralen-photoinduced mutations at the HPRT locus is lower in FA cells than in normal cells. This hypomutability is shown here to be associated with an increased frequency of deletions in the HPRT gene when either a mixture of cross-links and monoadducts or monoadducts alone are induced. Molecular analysis of mutants in the HPRT gene was carried out. In normal cells the majority of spontaneous and induced mutants are point mutations whereas in FA deletion mutations predominate. In that case a majority of mutants were found to lack individual exons or small clusters of exons whereas in normal cells large (complete or major gene loss) and small deletions are almost equally represented. Thus they propose that the FA defect lies in a mutagenic pathway that, in normal cells, involves by passing lesions and subsequent gap filling by a recombinational process during replication.

  3. Impact of maternal lifestyle factors on newborn HPRT mutant frequencies and molecular spectrum--initial results from the Prenatal Exposures and Preeclampsia Prevention (PEPP) Study.

    PubMed

    Bigbee, W L; Day, R D; Grant, S G; Keohavong, P; Xi, L; Zhang, L; Ness, R B

    1999-12-17

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between maternal tobacco smoke exposure and consumption of alcohol during pregnancy and increased risk of pediatric malignancies, particularly infant leukemias. Molecular evidence also suggests that somatic mutational events occurring during fetal hematopoiesis in utero can contribute to this process. As part of an ongoing multi-endpoint biomarker study of 2000 mothers and newborns, the HPRT T-lymphocyte cloning assay was used to determine mutant frequencies (Mf) in umbilical cord blood samples from an initial group of 60 neonates born to a sociodemographically diverse cohort of mothers characterized with respect to age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and cigarette smoke and alcohol exposure. Non-zero Mf (N = 47) ranged from 0.19 to 5.62 x 10(-6), median 0.70 x 10(-6), mean +/- SD 0.98 +/- 0.95 x 10(-6). No significant difference in Mf was observed between female and male newborns. Multivariable Poisson regression analysis revealed that increased HPRT Mf were significantly associated with maternal consumption of alcohol at the beginning [Relative Rate (RR) = 1.84, 95% CI = 0.99-3.40, P = 0.052) and during pregnancy (RR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.14-7.84, P = 0.026). No independent effect of self-reported active maternal cigarette smoking, either at the beginning or throughout pregnancy, nor maternal passive exposure to cigarette smoke was observed. Although based on limited initial data, this is the first report of a positive association between maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and HPRT Mf in human newborns. In addition, the spectrum of mutations at the HPRT locus was determined in 33 mutant clones derived from 19 newborns of mothers with no self-reported exposure to tobacco smoke and 14 newborns of mothers exposed passively or actively to cigarette smoke. In the unexposed group, alterations leading to specific exon 2-3 deletions, presumably as a result of illegitimate V(D)J recombinase activity, were

  4. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and genetic

  5. Age-related increase in the rate of spontaneou and {gamma}-ray-induced hprt mutations in mouse spleen lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gazlev, A.I.; Podlutskii, A.Ya.; Bradbury, R.

    1994-11-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors continually afflict DNA of cells of organisms. A certain amount of the damage is accumulated causing mutations, increasing the risk of malignacies, impairing cell functions, and upsetting the body`s homeostasis. The research reported here studies the rates of spontaneous hprt nmutationsand those induced you ggammairradiation in the splenocytes of mice at various ages. The rate of spontaneous and induced hprt gene mutations increases with aging. In gamma irradiated mice the rate of radiation-induced mutations depended on the absorbed dose and age, with the rate 2.3-3.0 fold higher in 104-110 week old mice than in younger pups. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Increase in radiation-induced HPRT gene mutation frequency after nonthermal exposure to nonionizing 60 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Walleczek, J; Shiu, E C; Hahn, G M

    1999-04-01

    It is widely accepted that moderate levels of nonionizing electric or magnetic fields, for example 50/60 Hz magnetic fields of about 1 mT, are not mutagenic. However, it is not known whether such fields can enhance the action of known mutagens. To explore this question, a stringent experimental protocol, which included blinding and systematic negative controls, was implemented, minimizing the possibility of observer bias or experimental artifacts. As a model system, we chose to measure mutation frequencies induced by 2 Gy gamma rays in the redox-sensitive hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested whether a 12-h exposure to a 60 Hz sinusoidally oscillating magnetic-flux density (Brms = 0.7 mT) could affect the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation on the HPRT gene locus. We determined that the magnetic-field exposure induced an approximate 1.8-fold increase in HPRT mutation frequency. Additional experiments at Brms = 0.23 and 0.47 mT revealed that the effect was reduced at lower flux densities. The field exposure did not enhance radiation-induced cytotoxicity or mutation frequencies in cells not exposed to ionizing radiation. These results suggest that moderate-strength, oscillating magnetic fields may act as an enhancer of mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  7. Mutagenicity monitoring following battlefield exposures: Longitudinal study of HPRT mutations in Gulf War I veterans exposed to depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Richard J; Vacek, Pamela M; Carter, Elizabeth W; Nicklas, Janice A; Squibb, Katherine S; Gucer, Patricia W; Engelhardt, Susan M; McDiarmid, Melissa A

    2015-08-01

    A total of 70 military Veterans have been monitored for HPRT T-cell mutations in five separate studies at 2-year intervals over an 8-year period. Systemic depleted uranium (DU) levels were measured at the time of each study by determining urinary uranium (uU) excretion. Each HPRT study included 30-40 Veterans, several with retained DU-containing shrapnel. Forty-nine Veterans were evaluated in multiple studies, including 14 who were in all five studies. This permitted a characterization of the HPRT mutation assay over time to assess the effects of age, smoking and non-selected cloning efficiencies, as well as the inter- and intra-individual variability across time points. Molecular analyses identified the HPRT mutation and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement in 1,377 mutant isolates. An unexpected finding was that in vivo clones of HPRT mutant T-cells were present in some Veterans, and could persist over several years of the study. The calculated HPRT mutant frequencies (MFs) were repeatedly elevated in replicate studies in three outlier Veterans with elevated urinary uranium excretion levels. However, these three outlier Veterans also harbored large and persistent in vivo HPRT mutant T-cell clones, each of which was represented by a single founder mutation. Correction for in vivo clonality allowed calculation of HPRT T-cell mutation frequencies (MutFs). Despite earlier reports of DU associated increases in HPRT MFs in some Veterans, the results presented here demonstrate that HPRT mutations are not increased by systemic DU exposure. Additional battlefield exposures were also evaluated for associations with HPRT mutations and none were found.

  8. Measurement of chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, hprt mutations, and DNA adducts in peripheral lymphocytes of human populations at increased risk for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson-Kram, D. |; Albertini, R.J.; Branda, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    We have measured various indicators of DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes of human populations potentially at increased risk for cancer. Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts were evaluated in a group of firefighters; chromosomal aberrations and hprt mutations were evaluated in a group of cancer patients undergoing radioimmunoglobulin therapy (RIT); SCE and acrolein-modified DNA were measured in cancer chemotherapy, patients and in pharmacists preparing chemotherapy prescriptions; and SCE and PAH-DNA adducts are being measured in U.S. army troops stationed in Kuwait. Results indicate that both SCE and PAH-DNA adduct levels were not elevated in firefighters, but that other factors such as smoking status and race were risk factors for increased SCE and PAH-DNA adducts. RIT was found to increase background rates of chromosome-type aberrations and frequencies of hprt mutations and there was a strong correlation between levels of therapy-induced chromosome damage sustained in vivo and in vitro sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome damage. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide showed higher levels of SCE and had a higher incidence of acrolein adducts in DNA. Lymphocytes from pharmacists preparing antineoplastic drugs were found to acquire increased in vitro sensitivity to SCE induction by phosphoramide mustard with increased lifetime duration of drug handling. A prospective, longitudinal study was performed to identify environmental factors that modulate genetic damage in breast cancer patients. Women with benign breast masses and no apparent disease served as controls. Mutant frequency, cloning efficiency, and chromosomal aberration frequency did not differ significantly among the three groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Cellular and molecular analyses of hprt mutation in human hepatocyte L02 cells after exposure to carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; He, Jing; Jin, Xiao-Dong; Gong, Li; Li, Sha

    Mutations play an important role in carcinogenesis. The quantitative evaluation of mutation induction by heavy charged particles helps us to delineate the risks of space radiation on astronauts, as well as the risks of heavy ions on patients during tumor therapy. Hprt mutation assay, which has been used as a biological dosimeter, is an ideal gene mutation test in mammalian cells in vitro. In order to provide basic data and evidence for the risk assessment of heavy ions, the relationships between hprt mutation induction and radiation dose in human hepatocyte L02 cells were investigated for highand low-LET carbon ions and X-rays. Moreover, the carbon ion induced hprt mutation spectrum was analyzed. In our study, human hepatocyte L02 cells were irradiated with carbon ions with LET of 30keV/µm and X-rays (0.2keV/µm), respectively. The survival fraction of L02 cells was measured by means of colony-forming assay. The mutation frequency was detected by measuring 6-thioguanine-resistant clones after 10 days of incubation at the presence of 15mg/L 6-TG. To obtain the mutation spectrum, 9 10 mutant cell clones at each dose were randomly selected from the 6-TG containing medium, and were further cultured and analyzed. The deletion patterns of the 9 exons of hprt gene were analyzed with multiplex polymerase chain reactions (multiplex PCR). Our results show that the number of mutants per 106 surviving cells increased with increasing the radiation dose for both the irradiations, and the mutation frequency increased up to 1Gy while reduced with increasing dose further. Partial deletion was the most dominant deletion pattern in the hprt mutant cells, and with the increase of dose, hprt genes tended to have more total deletions and less point deletions. It can be inferred that human hepatocyte L02 cells are more radiosensitive to high-LET carbon ions than to low-LET X-rays, and carbon ions are more effective in inducing hprt mutation in L02 cells. It has been also found that the

  10. Arabidopsis mutants with increased sensitivity to aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P B; Tai, C Y; Kochian, L V; Howell, S H

    1996-01-01

    Al-sensitive (als) mutants of Arabidopsis were isolated and characterized with the aim of defining mechanisms of Al toxicity and resistance. Most als mutants selected on the basis of root growth sensitivity to Al were recessive, and together the mutants constituted eight complementation groups. Also, in most als mutants, Al sensitivity appeared to be specific for Al relative to La (another trivalent cation), except als2, which was more sensitive to La than wild type. The tendency of roots on mutant seedlings to accumulate Al was examined by staining with morin and hematoxylin, dyes used to indicate the presence of Al. A significant increase in morin staining was observed in als5, consistent with its increased sensitivity to Al. Unexpectedly, als7 and als4 showed less morin staining, suggesting that the roots on these mutants accumulate less Al than wild type seedlings after exposure to Al-containing solutions. Roots of wild-type seedlings produce callose in response to AlCl3 concentrations that inhibit root growth. Only als5 accumulated more callose than wild type in response to low levels (25 mu M) of AICI3 However, als4 and als7 did not accumulate callose at this AlCl3 concentration even though root growth was significantly inhibited. The lack of callose accumulation in als4 and als7 suggests that there is not an obligatory relationship between callose deposition and Al-induced inhibition of root growth. PMID:8819866

  11. Aflatoxin B1-induced Hprt mutations in splenic lymphocytes of Fischer 344 rats. Results of an intermittent feeding trial.

    PubMed

    Morris, S M; Aidoo, A; Chen, J J; Chou, M W; Casciano, D A

    1999-01-25

    In a previous study, we found an increase in the mutant frequency at the Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) locus in the splenic lymphocytes of Fischer 344 rats acutely exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Because an acute exposure may not reflect the exposure pattern of individuals whose diet may contain AFB1-contaminated foodstuffs, we sought to determine if the feeding regimen affected the induction of Hprt mutations in the rat splenic lymphocyte. Thus, Fischer 344 rats were fed either (A) a control diet, (B) various doses of AFB1 for three four-week periods interspersed with two four-week periods of the control diet, or (C) continuously fed 1.6 ppm of AFB1. Not only was a significant increase in the mutant frequency detected in the lymphocytes of rats fed a dose as low as 0. 01 ppm of AFB1, but the increase in the mutant frequency at the end of the 20-week experimental period was consistent with an accumulation of damage induced by AFB1. These results indicate that the rat lymphocyte/Hprt assay is useful for detecting chronic low level exposures. Further, these data suggest that an intermittent, low-level exposure to AFB1 may present a human health risk. PMID:10029671

  12. Molecular analyses of in vivo hprt mutations in human T-lymphocytes: IV. Studies in newborns

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, M.J.; Nicklas, J.A.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to characterize in vivo gene mutations that occur during fetal development, molecular analyses were undertaken of mutant 6-thioguanine resistant T-lymphocytes isolated from placental cord blood samples of 13 normal male newborns. These mutant T-cells were studied to define hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene structural alterations and to determine T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns. Structural hprt alterations, as shown by Southern blot analyses, occurred in 85% of these mutant clones. These alterations consisted mostly of deletion of exons 2 and 3. These findings contrast with the 10-20% of gross structural alterations occurring randomly across the entire gene previously reported for T-cell mutants isolated from normal young adults. Iterative analyses of hprt structural alterations and TCR gene rearrangement patterns show that approximately one-third of the newborn derived mutants may have originated as pre- or intrathymic hprt mutations. This too contrasts with previous findings in adults where the background in vivo hprt mutations appeared to originate in postthymic T-lymphocytes.

  13. Novel mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Naviaux, Robert K; Paik, Kacie K; Nyhan, William L

    2011-06-01

    Inherited mutation of a purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), gives rise to Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome (LNS) or HPRT-related gout. Here, we report five novel independent mutations in the coding region of the HPRT gene from five unrelated male patients manifesting different clinical phenotypes associated with LNS: exon 2: c.133A > G, p.45R > G; c.35A > C, p.12D > A; c.88delG; exon 7: c.530A > T, p.177D > V; and c.318 + 1G > C: IVS3 + 1G > C splice site mutation.

  14. Validation of the human T-lymphocyte cloning assay--ring test report from the EU concerted action on HPRT mutation (EUCAHM).

    PubMed

    Hou, S M; Van Dam, F J; de Zwart, F; Warnock, C; Mognato, M; Turner, J; Podlutskaja, N; Podlutsky, A; Becker, R; Barnett, Y; Barnett, C R; Celotti, L; Davies, M; Hüttner, E; Lambert, B; Tates, A D

    1999-12-17

    The T-cell cloning assay, which enables the enumeration and molecular analysis of 6-thioguanine resistant (HPRT-negative) mutant T-cells, has been extensively used for studying human somatic gene mutation in vivo. However, large inter-laboratory variations in the HPRT mutant frequency (MF) call for further investigation of inter-laboratory differences in the experimental methodology, and development of an optimal but easy uniform cloning protocol. As part of the EU Concerted Action on HPRT Mutation (EUCAHM), we have carried out two Ring tests for the T-cell cloning assay. For each test, duplicate and coded samples from three buffy coats were distributed to five laboratories for determination of MF using six different protocols. The results indicated a good agreement between split samples within each laboratory. However, both the cloning efficiencies (CEs) and MFs measured for the same blood donors showed substantial inter-laboratory variations. Also, different medium compositions used in one and the same laboratory resulted in a remarkable difference in the level of MF. A uniform operating protocol (UOP) was proposed and compared with the traditional protocols in the second Ring test. The UOP (preincubation) increased the CE in laboratories traditionally using preincubation, but decreased the CE in laboratories traditionally using priming. Adjusted for donor, use of different protocols contributed significantly to the overall variation in lnCE (P = 0.0004) and lnMF (P = 0.03), but there was no significant laboratory effect on the lnCE (P = 0.38) or lnMF (P = 0.14) produced by the UOP alone. Finally, a simplified version of the UOP using the serum-free medium X-Vivo 10 and PMA was tested in one laboratory, and found to produce a considerable increase in CE. This modified UOP needs to be further evaluated in order to be used for future databases on HPRT MFs in various populations.

  15. Molecular structural analysis of HPRT mutations induced by thermal and epithermal neutrons in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Kinashi, Y; Sakurai, Y; Masunaga, S; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M; Akaboshi, M; Ono, K

    2000-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to thermal and epithermal neutrons, and the occurrence of mutations at the HPRT locus was investigated. The Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which has been improved for use in neutron capture therapy, was the neutron source. Neutron energy spectra ranging from nearly pure thermal to epithermal can be chosen using the spectrum shifters and thermal neutron filters. To determine mutant frequency and cell survival, cells were irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons under three conditions: thermal neutron mode, mixed mode with thermal and epithermal neutrons, and epithermal neutron mode. The mutagenicity was different among the three irradiation modes, with the epithermal neutrons showing a mutation frequency about 5-fold that of the thermal neutrons and about 1.5-fold that of the mixed mode. In the thermal neutron and mixed mode, boron did not significantly increase the frequency of the mutants at the same dose. Therefore, the effect of boron as used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is quantitatively minimal in terms of mutation induction. Over 300 independent neutron-induced mutant clones were isolated from 12 experiments. The molecular structure of HPRT mutations was determined by analysis of all nine exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. In the thermal neutron and mixed modes, total and partial deletions were dominant and the fraction of total deletions was increased in the presence of boron. In the epithermal neutron mode, more than half of the mutations observed were total deletions. Our results suggest that there are clear differences between thermal and epithermal neutron beams in their mutagenicity and in the structural pattern of the mutants that they induce. Mapping of deletion breakpoints of 173 partial-deletion mutants showed that regions of introns 3-4, 7/8-9 and 9-0 are sensitive to the induction of mutants by neutron irradiation.

  16. Mapping the end points of large deletions affecting the hprt locus in human peripheral blood cells and cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.L.; Grosovsky, A.J.; Jones, I.M.; Burkhart-Schultz, K.; Fuscoe, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the extent of of HPRT{sup {minus}} total gene deletions in three mutant collections: spontaneous and X-ray-induced deletions in TK6 human B lymphoblasts, and HPRT{sup {minus}} deletions arising in vivo in T cells. A set of 13 Xq26 STS markers surrounding hprt and spanning approximately 3.3 Mb was used. Each marker used was observed to be missing in at least one of the hprt deletion mutants analyzed. The largest deletion observed encompassed at least 3 Mb. Nine deletions extended outside of the mapped region in the centromeric direction (>1.7 Mb). In contrast, only two telomeric deletions extended to marker 342R (1.26 Mb), and both exhibited slowed or limited cell growth. These data suggest the existence of a gene, within the vicinity of 342R, which establishes the telomeric limit of recoverable deletions. Most (25/41) X-ray-induced total gene deletion mutants exhibited marker loss, but only 1/8 of the spontaneous deletions encompassed any Xq26 markers (P = 0.0187). Furthermore, nearly half (3/8) of the spontaneous 3{prime} total deletion breakpoints were within 14 kb of the hprt coding sequence. In contrast, 40/41 X-ray-induced HPRT{sup {minus}} total deletions extended beyond this point (P = 0.011). Although the overall representation of total gene deletions in the in vivo spectrum is low, 4/5 encompass Xq26 markers flanking hprt. This pattern differs significantly from spontaneous HPRT{sup {minus}} large deletions occurring in vitro (P = 0.032) but resembles the spectrum of X-ray-induced deletions. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Evaluation of an Hprt-Luciferase Reporter Gene on a Mammalian Artificial Chromosome in Response to Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Takeshi; Noda, Natsumi; Kuromi, Yasushi; Kokura, Kenji; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) is known as a house-keeping gene, and has been used as an internal control for real-time quantitative RT-PCR and various other methods of gene expression analysis. To evaluate the Hprt mRNA levels as a reference standard, we engineered a luciferase reporter driven by a long Hprt promoter and measured its response to cytotoxicity. Methods We constructed a reporter vector that harbored a phiC31 integrase recognition site and a mouse Hprt promoter fused with green-emitting luciferase (SLG) coding sequence. The Hprt-SLG vector was loaded onto a mouse artificial chromosome containing a multi-integrase platform using phiC31 integrase in mouse A9 cells. We established three independent clones. Results The established cell lines had similar levels of expression of the Hprt-SLG reporter gene. Hprt-SLG activity increased proportionately under growth conditions and decreased under cytotoxic conditions after blasticidin or cisplatin administration. Similar increases and decreases in the SLG luminescent were observed under growth and cytotoxic conditions, respectively, to those in the fluorescent obtained using the commercially available reagent, alamarBlue. Conclusion By employing a reliable and stable expression system in a mammalian artificial chromosome, the activity of an Hprt-SLG reporter can reflect cell numbers under cell growth condition and cell viability in the evaluation of cytotoxic conditions. PMID:27493490

  18. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  19. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  20. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  1. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  2. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J.; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G. F.; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L.; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K.; Gill, Andrew C.; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  3. Molecular analysis of mutations affecting hprt mRNA splicing in human T-lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A.M. Pisa Univ. ); Tates, A.D.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Vrieling, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) cDNA from 6-thioguanine-resistant T-lymphocytes cloned from smoking and non-smoking adult donors showed that 35% of these mutants were defective in splicing of hprt mRNA. Among a set of 42 hprt splice mutants, the authors observed (1) complete loss of one or more exons, (2) partial loss of one exon, or (3) inclusion of part of an intron sequence between adjacent exons. Loss of exon 4 was significantly more frequent than of the other exons, suggesting that the sequences that regulate splicing of this exon are either larger than those of the other exons or especially prone to mutation. In order to identify the molecular nature of DNA alterations causing aberrant splicing of hprt mRNA, 17 splice mutants were analyzed in more detail by sequencing the genomic regions flanking the mis-spliced exon. Base pair substitutions or small deletions causing defective splicing were either detected in exon sequences or in splice site consensus sequences of introns.

  4. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in brassica.

    PubMed

    Rood, S B; Williams, P H; Pearce, D; Murofushi, N; Mander, L N; Pharis, R P

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode [ein/ein]) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A(3) (GA(3)) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA(1) and GA(3) were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using [(2)H]GA(1), as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA(20) and GA(1), and the rate of GA(19) metabolism were simultaneously analyzed at day 7 by feeding [(2)H(2)]GA(19) and measuring metabolites [(2)H(2)]GA(20) and [(2)H(2)]GA(1) and endogenous GA(20) and GA(1), with [(2)H(5)]GA(20) and [(2)H(5)]GA(1) as quantitative internal standards. Levels of GA(1) and GA(20) were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA(20) and GA(1) were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA(1) biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of [(3)H]GA(20) to [(3)H]GA(1) was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA(1) biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A(1) and A(3). The enhanced GA production probably underlies the accelerated shoot growth and development, and particularly, the increased shoot elongation.

  5. The polyomavirus enhancer activates chromatin accessibility on integration into the HPRT gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pikaart, M; Feng, J; Villeponteau, B

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that enhancers may increase the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors. To test the effects of a viral enhancer on chromatin accessibility, we have inserted minigenes with or without the polyomavirus enhancer into the third exon of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene by homologous recombination and have prepared high-resolution maps of gene accessibility by using a novel polymerase chain reaction assay for DNase I sensitivity. In its native state, we find that the HPRT gene has low sensitivity to DNase I in fibrosarcoma cells. Insertion of the polyomavirus enhancer and neo reporter gene into exon 3 confers altered HPRT DNase I sensitivity for several kilobases on either side of the enhancer. The changes in DNase I sensitivity peak near the enhancer and decline with distance from the enhancer. The increase in HPRT DNase I sensitivity persisted when the tk promoter was deleted from the inserted construct but disappeared when the enhancer was deleted. These experiments identify the polyomavirus enhancer as a cis-acting initiator of chromatin accessibility. Images PMID:1333045

  6. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, S.B. ); Williams, P.H. ); Pearce, D.; Pharis, R.P. ); Murofushi, Noboru ); Mander, L.N. )

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode (ein/ein)) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A{sub 3} (GA{sub 3}) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 3} were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using ({sup 2}H)GA{sub 1} as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1}, and the rate of GA{sub 19} metabolism were simultaneously analyzed. Levels of GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 20} were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1} were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA{sub 1} biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of ({sup 3}H)GA{sub 20} to ({sup 3}H) GA{sub 1} was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA{sub 1} biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A{sub 1} and A{sub 3}.

  7. Molecular analysis and comparison of radiation-induced large deletions of the HPRT locus in primary human skin fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Y.; Park, M. S.; Okinaka, R. T.; Chen, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic alterations in gamma-ray- and alpha-particle-induced HPRT mutants were examined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. A total of 39-63% of gamma-ray-induced and 31-57% of alpha-particle-induced mutants had partial or total deletions of the HPRT gene. The proportion of these deletion events was dependent on radiation dose, and at the resolution limits employed there were no significant differences between the spectra induced by equitoxic doses of alpha particles (0.2-0.4 Gy) and gamma rays (3 Gy). The molecular nature of the deletions was analyzed by the use of sequence tagged site (STS) primers and PCR amplification as a "probe" for specific regions of the human X chromosome within the Xq26 region. These STSs were closely linked and spanned regions approximately 1.7 Mbp from the telomeric side and 1.7 Mbp from the centromeric side of the HPRT gene. These markers include: DXS53, 299R, DXS79, yH3L, 3/19, PR1, PR25, H2, yH3R, 1/44, 1/67, 1/1, DXS86, D8C6, DXS10 and DXS144. STS analyses indicated that the maximum size of total deletions in radiation-induced HPRT mutants can be greater than 2.7 Mbp and deletion size appears to be dependent on radiation dose. There were no apparent differences in the sizes of the deletions induced by alpha particles or gamma rays. On the other hand, deletions containing portions of the HPRT gene were observed to be 800 kbp or less, and the pattern of the partial deletion induced by alpha particles appeared to be different from that induced by gamma rays.

  8. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Vuimo, Tatiana A.; Surov, Stepan S.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Korneeva, Vera A.; Vorobiev, Ivan I.; Orlova, Nadezhda A.; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in ‘global’ assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5–20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  9. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa.

    PubMed

    Kolyadko, Vladimir N; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Vuimo, Tatiana A; Surov, Stepan S; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A; Korneeva, Vera A; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Orlova, Nadezhda A; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in 'global' assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5-20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  10. ars1, an Arabidopsis mutant exhibiting increased tolerance to arsenate and increased phosphate uptake.

    PubMed

    Lee, David A; Chen, Alice; Schroeder, Julian I

    2003-09-01

    Arsenic is one of the most toxic pollutants at contaminated sites, yet little is known about the mechanisms by which certain plants survive exposure to high arsenic levels. To gain insight into the mechanisms of arsenic tolerance in plants, we developed a genetic screen to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered tolerance to arsenic. We report here on the isolation of a mutant arsenic resisant 1 (ars1) with increased tolerance to arsenate. ars1 germinates and develops under conditions that completely inhibit growth of wild-type plants and shows a semi-dominant arsenic resistance phenotype. ars1 accumulates levels of arsenic similar to that accumulated by wild-type plants, suggesting that ars1 plants have an increased ability to detoxify arsenate. However, ars1 plants produce phytochelatin levels similar to levels produced by the wild type, and the enhanced resistance of ars1 is not abolished by the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase inhibitor l-buthionine sulfoxime (BSO). Furthermore, ars1 plants do not show resistance to arsenite or other toxic metals such as cadmium and chromium. However, ars1 plants do show a higher rate of phosphate uptake than that shown by wild-type plants, and wild-type plants grown with an excess of phosphate show increased tolerance to arsenate. Traditional models of arsenate tolerance in plants are based on the suppression of phosphate uptake pathways and consequently on the reduced uptake of arsenate. Our data suggest that arsenate tolerance in ars1 could be due to a new mechanism mediated by increased phosphate uptake in ars1. Models discussing how increased phosphate uptake could contribute to arsenate tolerance are discussed.

  11. Mutation rates at the glycophorin A and HPRT loci in uranium miners exposed to radon progeny.

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, E M; Peterson, D; Roxby, D; Quintana, J; Morely, A A; Woodward, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To find whether a relation exists between estimated levels of exposure to radon and its progeny and mutations in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) and glycophorin A in a cohort of former uranium miners. METHODS--A cohort study involving a sample of miners from the Radium Hill uranium mine in South Australia, which operated from 1952 to 1961. Radiation exposures underground at Radium Hill were estimated from historical radon gas measures with a job exposure matrix. Workers from the mine who worked exclusively above ground according to mine records were selected as controls. In 1991-2 miners were interviewed and blood taken for measurement of somatic mutations. Mutation rates for HPRT and glycophorin A were estimated with standard assay techniques. RESULTS--Homozygous mutations of glycophorin A were increased in underground miners (P = 0.0027) and the mutation rate tended to rise with increasing exposure with the exception of the highest exposure (> 10 working level months). However, there was no association between place of work and either the hemizygous mutations of glycophorin A or the HPRT mutation. CONCLUSIONS--There may be an association between glycophorin A mutations and previous occupational exposure to ionising radiation. However, not enough is known at present to use these assays as biomarkers for historical exposure in underground mining cohorts. PMID:8704866

  12. The Electrogenic Bacterium Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 and its Mutants with Increased Reducing Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikova, T. A.; Emelyanova, L. K.; Novikova, L. M.; Mordkovich, N. N.; Shakulov, R. S.; Debabov, V. G.

    2013-02-01

    Mutants of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 resistant to fosfomycin, a toxic analogue of phosphoenolpyruvate, were obtained. The mutants exhibited an increased reducing activity and a higher rate of lactate utilization. A correlation was shown between the rates of metabolism of oxidized substrates and the rate of reduction of methylene blue, a mediator of electron transport. The mutants of S.oneidensis MR-1 will be used in microbial fuel cells (MFC) to enhance energy production from organic compounds. The strain S. oneidensis MR-1 and its mutants with an increased electron production will be used as a good source of bioelectricity in MFC in the experiments on the International Space Station.

  13. Comparison of hprt variant frequencies and chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes from radiotherapy and chemotherapy patients: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Ammenheuser, M.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Belli, J.A.; Ward, J.B. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    The autoradiographic 6-thioguanine-resistant mutant lymphocyte assay and a chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the time-course of appearance and persistence of elevated frequencies of hprt variants and dicentric chromosomes in patients receiving x-irradiation therapy. The hprt mutation assays were done with frozen/thawed lymphocytes isolated from aliquots of the same blood samples used for the chromosome aberration assays. Five multiple sclerosis patients were also studied before and at 2 and 4 wk intervals after treatment with monthly i.v. doses of 750 mg/m{sup 2} of cyclophosphamide (CP). There were no significant elevations in chromosome aberrations at these post-treatment sample times. The results demonstrate the complementary nature of these two human monitoring assays and emphasize the importance of careful selection of optimal sampling times.

  14. Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid resistant mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with increased salt tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehle, F.R.; Murphy, M.A.; Khan, R.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Nineteen mutant Arabidopsis families resistant to the proline analog azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (ACA) were characterized in terms of NaCl tolerance and proline content. Mutants were selected from about 64,000 progeny of about 16,000 self-pollinated Columbia parents which had been mutated with ethyl methane sulfonate during seed imbibition. Selections were performed during seed germination on aseptic agar medium containing 0.2 to 0.25 mM ACA. Nineteen mutant families, 12 clearly independent, retained resistance to ACA in the M{sub 4} generation. Based on germination on 150 mM NaCl, 13 of the mutant families were more tolerant than the wild type. Two mutants of intermediate resistance to ACA were markedly more salt tolerant than the others. Four mutant families appeared to overproduce proline. Of these, only 3 showed slight increases in salt tolerance.

  15. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosophoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G

    2007-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity is an inborn error of purine metabolism associated with uric acid overproduction and a continuum spectrum of neurological manifestations depending on the degree of the enzymatic deficiency. The prevalence is estimated at 1/380,000 live births in Canada, and 1/235,000 live births in Spain. Uric acid overproduction is present inall HPRT-deficient patients and is associated with lithiasis and gout. Neurological manifestations include severe action dystonia, choreoathetosis, ballismus, cognitive and attention deficit, and self-injurious behaviour. The most severe forms are known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (patients are normal at birth and diagnosis can be accomplished when psychomotor delay becomes apparent). Partial HPRT-deficient patients present these symptoms with a different intensity, and in the least severe forms symptoms may be unapparent. Megaloblastic anaemia is also associated with the disease. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive, thus males are generally affected and heterozygous female are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. To date, more than 300 disease-associated mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been identified. The diagnosis is based on clinical and biochemical findings (hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria associated with psychomotor delay), and enzymatic (HPRT activity determination in haemolysate, intact erythrocytes or fibroblasts) and molecular tests. Molecular diagnosis allows faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis can be performed with amniotic cells obtained by amniocentesis at about 15–18 weeks' gestation, or chorionic villus cells obtained at about 10–12 weeks' gestation. Uric acid overproduction can be managed by allopurinol treatment. Doses must be carefully adjusted to avoid xanthine lithiasis. The lack of precise

  16. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct. PMID:19716523

  17. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system.

    PubMed

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na(+), (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  18. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system.

    PubMed

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na(+), (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis and hormonal balance.

  19. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system

    PubMed Central

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na+, (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na+/K+ homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  20. WR-2721 protects against cytoxan-induced hprt mutagenesis without affecting therapeutic effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Yasushi; Perrin, J.; Hunter, N.; Milas, L.; Grdina, D. ||

    1995-12-31

    The radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) was evaluated for its ability to protect against cytoxan-induced mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in mouse splenocytes under conditions that would not interfere with the therapeutic effectiveness of cytoxan in the treatment of fibrosarcoma lung tumors. Mutations at the hprt locus increase in frequency as a function of the dose of cytoxan used. With a spontaneous mutation frequency in C3H mice of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}, mutation frequencies increased from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} as the dose of cytoxan increased from 50 to 200 mg/kg. C3H male mice were injected in their tail veins with 3.5 {times} 10{sup 5} viable fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells. This protocol gave rise to an average of 68 tumor colonies per mouse. Four days following injection animals were treated with cytoxan at a dose of 100 mg/kg, which gave rise to significant tumor cell killing and a reduction in tumor colony number to less than an average of one per animal. WR-2721 at a concentration of 100 mg/kg did not affect on cytoxan`s therapeutic effectiveness. However, a 100 mg/kg dose of WR-2721 was effective in reducing the cytoxan induced hprt mutation frequency in mice from 160 to 35 per 10{sup 5} viable cells regardless of whether it was administered 30 min before or 2 h following cytoxan treatment.

  1. Identification of an arsenic tolerant double mutant with a thiol-mediated component and increased arsenic tolerance in phyA mutants.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Lee, David; Harris, Hugh; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jörg; Meharg, Andrew; Kumabe, Bryan; Komives, Elizabeth A; Schroeder, Julian I

    2007-03-01

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  2. Identification of An Arsenic Tolerant Double Mutant With a Thiol-Mediated Component And Increased Arsenic Tolerance in PhyA Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, D.Y.; Lee, D.; Harris, H.; Raab, A.; Feldmann, J.; Meharg, A.; Kumabe, B.; Komives, E.A.; Schroeder, J.I.; /SLAC, SSRL /Sydney U. /Aberdeen U. /UC, San Diego

    2007-04-06

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  3. Identification of an arsenic tolerant double mutant with a thiol-mediated component and increased arsenic tolerance in phyA mutants.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Lee, David; Harris, Hugh; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jörg; Meharg, Andrew; Kumabe, Bryan; Komives, Elizabeth A; Schroeder, Julian I

    2007-03-01

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5. PMID:17335514

  4. Increasing the Triacylglycerol Content in Dunaliella tertiolecta through Isolation of Starch-Deficient Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Vuttipongchaikij, Supachai; Suttangkakul, Anongpat; Yokthongwattana, Kittisak; Juntawong, Piyada; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kangvansaichol, Kunn; Meetam, Metha

    2016-05-28

    The production cost of biodiesel from microalgae is still not competitive, compared with that of petroleum fuels. The genetic improvement of microalgal strains to increase triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation is one way to reduce production costs. One of the most promising approaches is the isolation of starch-deficient mutants, which have been reported to successfully increase TAG yields. To date, such a stable mutant is not available in an oleaginous marine microalga, despite several advantages of using marine species for biodiesel production. Algae in the genus Dunaliella are known to tolerate high salt concentration and other environmental stresses. In addition, the cultivation processes for large-scale outdoor commercialization have been well established for this genus. In this study, Dunaliella tertiolecta was used to screen for starch-deficient mutants, using an iodine vapor-staining method. Four out of 20,016 UV-mutagenized strains showed a substantial reduction of starch content. A significantly higher TAG content, up to 3-fold of the wild-type level, was observed in three of the mutants upon induction by nitrogen depletion. The carotenoid production and growth characteristics of these mutants, under both normal and oxidative stress conditions, were not compromised, suggesting that these processes are not necessarily affected by starch deficiency. The results from this work open up new possibilities for exploring Dunaliella for biodiesel production. PMID:26869603

  5. Mutation analyses of a series of TNT-related compounds using the CHO-hprt assay.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Foote, L J; Morris, M; Vass, A A; Griest, W H

    2000-01-01

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT) and related compounds were tested for induction of mutation in the CHO-hprt mutation assay. The parent compound, TNT, was consistently found to be mutagenic at concentrations above 40 microg ml(-1), whether or not S9 activating enzymes were added. Five TNT metabolites gave statistically significant but small increases in mutation frequency over solvent controls: 4-amino-2,6 dinitrotoluene, 2,4',6,6'-tetranitro-2',4-azoxytoluene, 2,2',6,6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azoxytoluene, 2',4,6,6'-tetranitro-2,4'-azoxytoluene and triaminotoluene. Clear dose-response relationships could not be established for the mutagenic response of these compounds. They are considered as very weak mutagens in this mammalian test system. Five compounds did not produce statistically significant mutation frequencies at the levels tested: 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene and 4,4',6,6'-tetranitro-2,2'-azoxytoluene. The results indicate that none of the TNT metabolites tested pose a significant mutational health risk, at least as judged by the CHO-hprt assay. PMID:11180265

  6. A West Nile virus mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2011-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for epidemics of febrile illness, meningitis, encephalitis and flaccid paralysis. WNV gains entry into host cells through endocytosis. The acid pH inside endosomes triggers rapid conformational rearrangements of the flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein that result in fusion of the endosomal membrane with the virion envelope. Conformational rearrangements of the E glycoprotein can be induced by acid exposure in solution in the absence of target membranes, thus causing a loss of infectivity. Following a genetic approach to study this process, a WNV mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation was isolated and its complete genome was sequenced. A single amino acid substitution, T70I, in the E glycoprotein was found to be responsible for the increased acid resistance, which was linked to an increase in the sensitivity of infection to the chemical rise of endosomal pH, suggesting that the mutant required a more acid pH inside the endosomes for fusion. No alterations in viral infection kinetics, plaque size or induced mortality rates in mice of the mutant were noted. However, by means of virus competition assays, a reduction in viral fitness under standard culture conditions was observed for the mutant. These results provide new evidence of the adaptive flexibility to environmental factors--pH variation in this case--of WNV populations. Implications of the T70I replacement on the E glycoprotein structure-function relationship are discussed.

  7. Mutant luciferase enzymes from fireflies with increased resistance to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Noriaki; Kajiyama, Naoki; Maeda, Masako; Murakami, Seiji

    2002-12-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC), used to extract intracellular ATP, interferes with subsequent firefly luciferase-luciferin assays. There was a significant difference among wild-type luciferases with respect to BAC resistance. Luciola lateralis luciferase (LlL) was the most tolerant, followed by Luciola cruciata luciferase (LcL) and Photinus pyralis luciferase. Random mutagenesis of thermostable mutants of LcL showed that the Glu490Lys mutation contributes to improved resistance to BAC. The corresponding Glu490Lys mutation was introduced into thermostable mutants of LlL by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the resultant LlL-217L490K mutant, having both an Ala217Leu and a Glu490Lys mutation, showed the highest resistance to BAC, with an initial remaining bioluminescence intensity of 87.4% and a decay rate per minute of 29.6% in the presence of 0.1% BAC. The Glu490Lys mutation was responsible for increased resistance to inactivation but not inhibition by BAC. The LlL-217L490K had identical thermostability and pH stability to the parental thermostable mutant. From these results, it was concluded that the LlL-217L490K enzyme is advantageous for hygiene monitoring and biomass assays based on the ATP-bioluminescence methodology. This is the first report demonstrating improved resistance to BAC of the firefly luciferase enzyme.

  8. Assessment of 1,3-butadiene exposure in polymer production workers using HPRT mutations in lymphocytes as a biomarker.

    PubMed Central

    Ammenheuser, M M; Bechtold, W E; Abdel-Rahman, S Z; Rosenblatt, J I; Hastings-Smith, D A; Ward, J B

    2001-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), which is used to make styrene-butadiene rubber, is a potent carcinogen in mice and a probable carcinogen, associated with leukemia, in humans. We have previously used HPRT mutation as a biomarker to evaluate exposures to BD in a monomer production plant. We now report on a study of 49 workers in a styrene-butadiene rubber plant in which we used the concentration of the BD metabolite 1,2-dihydroxy-4-(N-acetylcysteinyl-S)-butane (M1) in urine as a biomarker of exposure and the frequency of HPRT variant (mutant) lymphocytes (Vf) as a biomarker of effect. Workers were assigned to high- and low-exposure groups based on historical information about work areas and jobs. Personal exposure to BD for one work shift was measured using a passive badge dosimeter. Each participant provided a urine specimen and blood sample at the end of the work shift and completed a questionnaire providing information on lifestyle, health, and work activities. The average BD exposures in the high- and low-exposure groups were significantly different, even after excluding two extreme values, (high 1.48 ppm; low 0.15 ppm, p < 0.002). This study was done in 1994 and 1995 before the establishment, in 1996, of the new permissible exposure limit of 1 ppm. Both the mean M1 and the HPRT Vf were more than three times greater in the high-exposure group than in the low-exposure group (p < 0.0005). The three end points correlated with each other, with sample correlation coefficients between 0.4 and 0.6. The correlations among BD exposure and the biomarkers of internal exposure and genotoxicity suggest that occupational exposure to BD, in the range of 1-3 ppm, may be associated with adverse biological effects. PMID:11748032

  9. Increased Rrm2 gene dosage reduces fragile site breakage and prolongs survival of ATR mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Specks, Julia; Barlow, Jacqueline H.; Ambrogio, Chiara; Desler, Claus; Vikingsson, Svante; Rodrigo-Perez, Sara; Green, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Murga, Matilde; Nussenzweig, André

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, absence of the checkpoint kinase Mec1 (ATR) is viable upon mutations that increase the activity of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) complex. Whether this pathway is conserved in mammals remains unknown. Here we show that cells from mice carrying extra alleles of the RNR regulatory subunit RRM2 (Rrm2TG) present supraphysiological RNR activity and reduced chromosomal breakage at fragile sites. Moreover, increased Rrm2 gene dosage significantly extends the life span of ATR mutant mice. Our study reveals the first genetic condition in mammals that reduces fragile site expression and alleviates the severity of a progeroid disease by increasing RNR activity. PMID:25838540

  10. Photoprotection mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana acclimate to high light by increasing photosynthesis and specific antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Golan, Talila; Müller-Moulé, Patricia; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2006-05-01

    Biochemical and physiological acclimation to different light environments is crucial for plant growth and survival. In high light (HL), feedback de-excitation (qE) is a well-known photoprotective mechanism that dissipates excess excitation energy in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII) and relieves excitation pressure in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The xanthophylls zeaxanthin (Z) and lutein (L) function in qE, but also have roles as antioxidants. Although several studies have shown that qE is important during short-term fluctuations in light intensity, here we show that it is not required for the growth of Arabidopsis thaliana in prolonged HL conditions in the laboratory. Mutants that are deficient in qE alone, qE and Z synthesis, or in qE, Z synthesis and also L synthesis were able to grow at 1800 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) and exhibited no major symptoms of photooxidative stress. The mutants (and wild type) acclimated to HL by increasing photosynthetic capacity and decreasing light harvesting, which together rendered qE less important for photoprotection. At a metabolite level, the HL-grown mutants appeared to compensate for their remaining qE deficit with increased alpha-tocopherol and ascorbate levels compared to the wild type. The specificity of this response provides insight into the relationship between qE and the antioxidant network in plants.

  11. Asexual development is increased in Neurospora crassa cat-3-null mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Michán, Shaday; Lledías, Fernando; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2003-08-01

    We use asexual development of Neurospora crassa as a model system with which to determine the causes of cell differentiation. Air exposure of a mycelial mat induces hyphal adhesion, and adherent hyphae grow aerial hyphae that, in turn, form conidia. Previous work indicated the development of a hyperoxidant state at the start of these morphogenetic transitions and a large increase in catalase activity during conidiation. Catalase 3 (CAT-3) increases at the end of exponential growth and is induced by different stress conditions. Here we analyzed the effects of cat-3-null strains on growth and asexual development. The lack of CAT-3 was not compensated by other catalases, even under oxidative stress conditions, and cat-3(RIP) colonies were sensitive to H(2)O(2), indicating that wild-type (Wt) resistance to external H(2)O(2) was due to CAT-3. cat-3(RIP) colonies grown in the dark produced high levels of carotenes as a consequence of oxidative stress. Light exacerbated oxidative stress and further increased carotene synthesis. In the cat-3(RIP) mutant strain, increased aeration in liquid cultures led to increased hyphal adhesion and protein oxidation. Compared to the Wt, the cat-3(RIP) mutant strain produced six times more aerial hyphae and conidia in air-exposed mycelial mats, as a result of longer and more densely packed aerial hyphae. Protein oxidation in colonies was threefold higher and showed more aerial hyphae and conidia in mutant strains than did the Wt. Results indicate that oxidative stress due to lack of CAT-3 induces carotene synthesis, hyphal adhesion, and more aerial hyphae and conidia.

  12. Increased Nitrogenase-Dependent H(2) Photoproduction by hup Mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Klipp, W; Klemme, J H

    1994-06-01

    Transposon Tn5 mutagenesis was used to isolate mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum which lack uptake hydrogenase (Hup) activity. Three Tn5 insertions mapped at different positions within the same 13-kb EcoRI fragment (fragment E1). Hybridization experiments revealed homology to the structural hydrogenase genes hupSLM from Rhodobacter capsulatus and hupSL from Bradyrhizobium japonicum in a 3.8-kb EcoRI-ClaI subfragment of fragment E1. It is suggested that this region contains at least some of the structural genes encoding the nickel-dependent uptake hydrogenase of R. rubrum. At a distance of about 4.5 kb from the fragment homologous to hupSLM, a region with homology to a DNA fragment carrying hypDE and hoxXA from B. japonicum was identified. Stable insertion and deletion mutations were generated in vitro and introduced into R. rubrum by homogenotization. In comparison with the wild type, the resulting hup mutants showed increased nitrogenase-dependent H(2) photoproduction. However, a mutation in a structural hup gene did not result in maximum H(2) production rates, indicating that the capacity to recycle H(2) was not completely lost. Highest H(2) production rates were obtained with a mutant carrying an insertion in a nonstructural hup-specific sequence and with a deletion mutant affected in both structural and nonstructural hup genes. Thus, besides the known Hup activity, a second, previously unknown Hup activity seems to be involved in H(2) recycling. A single regulatory or accessory gene might be responsible for both enzymes. In contrast to the nickel-dependent uptake hydrogenase, the second Hup activity seems to be resistant to the metal chelator EDTA. PMID:16349271

  13. Overlapping protein-binding sites within a negative regulatory element modulate the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon-Limas, D.E.; Amaya-Manzanares, E.; Nino-Rosales, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene, whose deficiency in humans causes the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, is constitutively expressed at low levels in all tissues but at higher levels in the brain, the significance and mechanism of which is unknown. Towards dissecting this molecular mechanism, we have previously identified a 182 bp element (hHPRT-NE) within the 5{prime}-flanking region of the human HPRT gene which is involved not only in conferring neuronal specificity but also in repressing gene expression in non-neuronal tissues. Here we report that this element interacts with different nuclear proteins, some of which are present specifically in neuronal cells (complex I) and others of which are present in cells showing constitutive expression of the gene (complex II). In addition, we found that complex I factors are expressed in human NT2/D1 cells following induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. This finding correlates with an increase of HPRT gene transcription following neuronal differentiation, as demonstrated by RT-PCR and RNAase protection assays. We also mapped the binding sites for both complexes to a 60 bp region which, when tested by transient transfections in cultured fibroblasts, functioned as a repressor element. Methylation interference footprinting revealed a minimal unique DNA motif as the binding site for nuclear proteins from both neuronal and non-neuronal sources. Moreover, UV-crosslinking experiments showed that both complexes are formed by the association of several distinct proteins. Strikingly, site-directed mutagenesis of the footprinted region indicated that different nucleotides are essential for the association of these two complexes. These data suggest that differential formation of DNA-protein complexes at this regulatory domain could be a major determinant in the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene.

  14. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Indrayani

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib) belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib-) surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells. PMID:27327956

  15. Isolation of Streptomyces globisporus and Blakeslea trispora mutants with increased carotenoid content.

    PubMed

    Matselyukh, B P; Matselyukh, D Ya; Golembiovska, S L; Polishchuk, L V; Lavrinchuk, V Ya

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpigmented mutants of Streptomyces globisporus 1912-Hp7 and Blakeslea trispora 18(+), 184(-) were isolated by action of hydrogen peroxide and nitrosoguanidine, correspondingly, from initial strains S. globisporus 1912-4Lcp and B. trispora 72(-), 198(+). The carotenoids of dry biomass of obtained strains, rubbed thoroughly with glass powder by a pestle in porcelain mortar were extracted by acetone and purified by TLC. Identification of the individual carotenoids was performed by means of HPLC and LC/MS spectrometry. It was shown that strain S. globisporus 1912-4Crt produced beta-carotene/lycopene (6.91/3.24 mg/L), mutants 1912-4Lcp and 1912-7Hp synthesized only lycopene (26.05 and 50.9 mg/L, respectively), and strains B. trispora 18(+) and 184(-)-beta-carotene (6.2% in dry biomass or more 2.5 g/L) without illumination in shake flasks. It is the first example of high constitutive production of the carotenoids by the representative of genus Streptomyces without photoinduction or increased synthesis of sigma factor The improved strains of B. trispora 18(+) and 184(-) can be used for biotechnological production of beta-carotene in industrial conditions. PMID:24450179

  16. A Chemically Induced New Pea (Pisum sativum) Mutant SGECdt with Increased Tolerance to, and Accumulation of, Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Tsyganov, Viktor E.; Belimov, Andrei A.; Borisov, Alexey Y.; Safronova, Vera I.; Georgi, Manfred; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Tikhonovich, Igor A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims To date, there are no crop mutants described in the literature that display both Cd accumulation and tolerance. In the present study a unique pea (Pisum sativum) mutant SGECdt with increased Cd tolerance and accumulation was isolated and characterized. Methods Ethylmethane sulfonate mutagenesis of the pea line SGE was used to obtain the mutant. Screening for Cd-tolerant seedlings in the M2 generation was performed using hydroponics in the presence of 6 µm CdCl2. Hybridological analysis was used to identify the inheritance of the mutant phenotype. Several physiological and biochemical characteristics of SGECdt were studied in hydroponic experiments in the presence of 3 µm CdCl2, and elemental analysis was conducted. Key Results The mutant SGECdt was characterized as having a monogenic inheritance and a recessive phenotype. It showed increased Cd concentrations in roots and shoots but no obvious morphological defects, demonstrating its capability to cope well with increased Cd levels in its tissues. The enhanced Cd accumulation in the mutant was accompanied by maintenance of homeostasis of shoot Ca, Mg, Zn and Mn contents, and root Ca and Mg contents. Through the application of La+3 and the exclusion of Ca from the nutrient solution, maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in Cd-stressed SGECdt was shown to contribute to the increased Cd tolerance. Control plants of the mutant (i.e. no Cd treatment) had elevated concentrations of glutathione (GSH) in the roots. Through measurements of chitinase and guaiacol-dependent peroxidase activities, as well as proline and non-protein thiol (NPT) levels, it was shown that there were lower levels of Cd stress both in roots and shoots of SGECdt. Accumulation of phytochelatins [(PCcalculated) = (NPT)−(GSH)] could be excluded as a cause of the increased Cd tolerance in the mutant. Conclusions The SGECdt mutant represents a novel and unique model to study adaptation of plants to toxic heavy metal concentrations

  17. Increased actin polymerization and stabilization interferes with neuronal function and survival in the AMPKγ mutant Loechrig.

    PubMed

    Cook, Mandy; Bolkan, Bonnie J; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2014-01-01

    loechrig (loe) mutant flies are characterized by progressive neuronal degeneration, behavioral deficits, and early death. The mutation is due to a P-element insertion in the gene for the γ-subunit of the trimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) complex, whereby the insertion affects only one of several alternative transcripts encoding a unique neuronal isoform. AMPK is a cellular energy sensor that regulates a plethora of signaling pathways, including cholesterol and isoprenoid synthesis via its downstream target hydroxy-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase. We recently showed that loe interferes with isoprenoid synthesis and increases the prenylation and thereby activation of RhoA. During development, RhoA plays an important role in neuronal outgrowth by activating a signaling cascade that regulates actin dynamics. Here we show that the effect of loe/AMPKγ on RhoA prenylation leads to a hyperactivation of this signaling pathway, causing increased phosphorylation of the actin depolymerizating factor cofilin and accumulation of filamentous actin. Furthermore, our results show that the resulting cytoskeletal changes in loe interfere with neuronal growth and disrupt axonal integrity. Surprisingly, these phenotypes were enhanced by expressing the Slingshot (SSH) phosphatase, which during development promotes actin depolymerization by dephosphorylating cofilin. However, our studies suggest that in the adult SSH promotes actin polymerization, supporting in vitro studies using human SSH1 that suggested that SSH can also stabilize and bundle filamentous actin. Together with the observed increase in SSH levels in the loe mutant, our experiments suggest that in mature neurons SSH may function as a stabilization factor for filamentous actin instead of promoting actin depolymerization.

  18. Tipping the mutation-selection balance: Limited migration increases the frequency of deleterious mutants.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jacob D; Neuhauser, Claudia; Dean, Antony M; Kerr, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    Typical mutation-selection models assume well-mixed populations, but dispersal and migration within many natural populations is spatially limited. Such limitations can lead to enhanced variation among locations as different types become clustered in different places. Such clustering weakens competition between unlike types relative to competition between like types; thus, the rate by which a fitter type displaces an inferior competitor can be affected by the spatial scale of movement. In this paper, we use a birth-death model to show that limited migration can affect asexual populations by creating competitive refugia. We use a moment closure approach to show that as population structure is introduced by limiting migration, the equilibrial frequency of deleterious mutants increases. We support and extend the model through stochastic simulation, and we use a spatially explicit cellular automaton approach to corroborate the results. We discuss the implications of these results for standing variation in structured populations and adaptive valley crossing in Wright's "shifting balance" process.

  19. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na+ ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA–isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  20. Spaceflight results in increase of thick filament but not thin filament proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, R.; Takaya, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Higashibata, A.; Ishioka, N.; Kagawa, H.

    We have investigated the effect of microgravity during spaceflight on body-wall muscle fiber size and muscle proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans. Both mutant and wild-type strains were subjected to 10 days of microgravity during spaceflight and compared to ground control groups. No significant change in muscle fiber size or quantity of the protein was observed in wild-type worms; where as atrophy of body-wall muscle and an increase in thick filament proteins were observed in the paramyosin mutant unc-15(e73) animals after spaceflight. We conclude that the mutant with abnormal muscle responded to microgravity by increasing the total amount of muscle protein in order to compensate for the loss of muscle function.

  1. Isolation and characterization of chromosome-gain and increase-in-ploidy mutants in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chan, C S; Botstein, D

    1993-11-01

    We have developed a colony papillation assay for monitoring the copy number of genetically marked chromosomes II and III in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The unique feature of this assay is that it allows detection of a gain of the marked chromosomes even if there is a gain of the entire set of chromosomes (increase-in-ploidy). This assay was used to screen for chromosome-gain or increase-in-ploidy mutants. Five complementation groups have been defined for recessive mutations that confer an increase-in-ploidy (ipl) phenotype, which, in each case, cosegregates with a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Four new alleles of CDC31, which is required for spindle pole body duplication, were also recovered from this screen. Temperature-shift experiments with ipl1 cells show that they suffer severe nondisjunction at 37 degrees. Similar experiments with ipl2 cells show that they gain entire sets of chromosomes and become arrested as unbudded cells at 37 degrees. Molecular cloning and genetic mapping show that IPL1 is a newly identified gene, whereas IPL2 is allelic to BEM2, which is required for normal bud growth. PMID:8293973

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Chromosome-Gain and Increase-in-Ploidy Mutants in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chan, CSM.; Botstein, D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a colony papillation assay for monitoring the copy number of genetically marked chromosomes II and III in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The unique feature of this assay is that it allows detection of a gain of the marked chromosomes even if there is a gain of the entire set of chromosomes (increase-in-ploidy). This assay was used to screen for chromosome-gain or increase-in-ploidy mutants. Five complementation groups have been defined for recessive mutations that confer an increase-in-ploidy (ipl) phenotype, which, in each case, cosegregates with a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Four new alleles of CDC31, which is required for spindle pole body duplication, were also recovered from this screen. Temperature-shift experiments with ipl1 cells show that they suffer severe nondisjunction at 37°. Similar experiments with ipl2 cells show that they gain entire sets of chromosomes and become arrested as unbudded cells at 37°. Molecular cloning and genetic mapping show that IPL1 is a newly identified gene, whereas IPL2 is allelic to BEM2, which is required for normal bud growth. PMID:8293973

  3. Expression of OsCAS (Calcium-Sensing Receptor) in an Arabidopsis Mutant Increases Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rongrong; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaS), which is localized in the chloroplasts, is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis. It has homologs in Oryza sativa and other plants. These sequences all have a rhodanese-like protein domain, which has been demonstrated to be associated with specific stress conditions. In this study, we cloned the Oryza sativa calcium-sensing receptor gene (OsCAS) and demonstrated that OsCAS could sense an increase of extracellular Ca2+ concentration and mediate an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. The OsCAS gene was transformed into an Arabidopsis CaS knockout mutant (Salk) and overexpressed in the transgenic plants. OsCAS promoted stomatal closure. We screened homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis plants and determined physiological indices such as the oxidative damage biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA), relative membrane permeability (RMP), proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, after 21 days of drought treatment. Our results revealed lower RMP and MDA contents and a higher Proline content in transgenic Arabidopsis plants after drought stress, whereas the opposite was observed in Salk plants. With respect to chlorophyll fluorescence, the electron transport rate and effective PSII quantum yield decreased in all lines under drought stress; however, in the transgenic plants these two parameters changed fewer and were higher than those in wild-type and Salk plants. The quantum yield of regulated energy dissipation and nonregulated energy dissipation in PSII were higher in Salk plants, whereas these values were lower in the transgenic plants than in the wild type under drought stress. The above results suggest that the transgenic plants showed better resistance to drought stress by decreasing damage to the cell membrane, increasing the amount of osmoprotectants, and maintaining a relatively high photosynthetic capacity. In conclusion, OsCAS is an extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

  4. Salmonella typhimurium TnphoA mutants with increased sensitivity to biological and chemical detergents.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, F J; Avoyne, C; Pinault, C; Popoff, M Y; Pardon, P

    1995-10-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a ubiquitous pathogenic bacterium able to sustain the environmental conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, including biliary salts. To understand the mechanisms involved in bile salt resistance and, more generally, detergent resistance, we investigated S. typhimurium mutants produced with the random mutagenic TnphoA transposon. A total of 3,000 transpositional mutants were isolated. Three strains among the 1,432 first mutants lost the ability to grow in the presence of biological and chemical detergents. They were prototrophic and exhibited normal lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein profiles after SDS-PAGE. They did not show sensitivity to dyes but showed very different sensitivities to antibiotics. For each mutant strain, Southern blotting analysis revealed a unique TnphoA insertion at different chromosomal locations. These observations were confirmed by transduction experiments.

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NM401) induce ROS-mediated HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Laura; El Yamani, Naouale; Kazimirova, Alena; Dusinska, Maria; Marcos, Ricard

    2016-04-01

    Although there is an important set of data showing potential genotoxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) at the DNA (comet assay) and chromosome (micronucleus test) levels, few studies have been conducted to analyze their potential mutagenic effects at gene level. We have determined the ability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, NM401), to induce mutations in the HPRT gene in Chinese hamster lung (V79) fibroblasts. NM401, characterized in the EU NanoGenotox project, were further studied within the EU Framework Programme Seven (FP7) project NANoREG. From the proliferation assay data we selected a dose-range of 0.12 to 12µg/cm(2) At these range we have been able to observe significant cellular uptake of MWCNT by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as a concentration-dependent induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. In addition, a clear concentration-dependent increase in the induction of HPRT mutations was also observed. Data support a potential genotoxic/ carcinogenic risk associated with MWCNT exposure.

  6. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: increased support for mutants and transgenics.

    PubMed

    Howe, Douglas G; Bradford, Yvonne M; Conlin, Tom; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Westerfield, Monte

    2013-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (http://zfin.org), is the central resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators manually curate and integrate comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenics, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. Integrated views of these data, as well as data gathered through collaborations and data exchanges, are provided through a wide selection of web-based search forms. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are uniquely well suited for rapid and targeted generation of mutant lines. The recent rapid production of mutants and transgenic zebrafish is making management of data associated with these resources particularly important to the research community. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN aimed at improving our support for mutant and transgenic lines, including (i) enhanced mutant/transgenic search functionality; (ii) more expressive phenotype curation methods; (iii) new downloads files and archival data access; (iv) incorporation of new data loads from laboratories undertaking large-scale generation of mutant or transgenic lines and (v) new GBrowse tracks for transgenic insertions, genes with antibodies and morpholinos.

  7. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: increased support for mutants and transgenics.

    PubMed

    Howe, Douglas G; Bradford, Yvonne M; Conlin, Tom; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Westerfield, Monte

    2013-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (http://zfin.org), is the central resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators manually curate and integrate comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenics, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. Integrated views of these data, as well as data gathered through collaborations and data exchanges, are provided through a wide selection of web-based search forms. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are uniquely well suited for rapid and targeted generation of mutant lines. The recent rapid production of mutants and transgenic zebrafish is making management of data associated with these resources particularly important to the research community. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN aimed at improving our support for mutant and transgenic lines, including (i) enhanced mutant/transgenic search functionality; (ii) more expressive phenotype curation methods; (iii) new downloads files and archival data access; (iv) incorporation of new data loads from laboratories undertaking large-scale generation of mutant or transgenic lines and (v) new GBrowse tracks for transgenic insertions, genes with antibodies and morpholinos. PMID:23074187

  8. Increased D-allose production by the R132E mutant of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Seo, Eun-Sun; Kim, Yeong-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2011-03-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium thermocellum converted D-psicose to D-allose, which may be useful as a pharmaceutical compound, with no by-product. The 12 active-site residues, which were obtained by molecular modeling on the basis of the solved three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, were substituted individually with Ala. Among the 12 Ala-substituted mutants, only the R132A mutant exhibited an increase in D-psicose isomerization activity. The R132E mutant showed the highest activity when the residue at position 132 was substituted with Ala, Gln, Ile, Lys, Glu, or Asp. The maximal activity of the wild-type and R132E mutant enzymes for D-psicose was observed at pH 7.5 and 80°C. The half-lives of the wild-type enzyme at 60°C, 65°C, 70°C, 75°C, and 80°C were 11, 7.0, 4.2, 1.5, and 0.6 h, respectively, whereas those of the R132E mutant enzymes were 13, 8.2, 5.1, 3.1, and 0.9 h, respectively. The specific activity and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of the R132E mutant for D-psicose were 1.4- and 1.5-fold higher than those of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. When the same amount of enzyme was used, the conversion yield of D-psicose to D-allose was 32% for the R132E mutant enzyme and 25% for the wild-type enzyme after 80 min.

  9. Increase in Ty1 cDNA Recombination in Yeast sir4 Mutant Strains at High Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Sarah J.; Boyle, Meredith L.; Sheely, Catherine J.; Graham, Joel; Haeusser, Daniel P.; Zimmerman, Leigh; Keeney, Jill B.

    2004-01-01

    Transposition of the Ty1 element of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is temperature sensitive. We have identified a null allele of the silent information regulator gene SIR4 as a host mutant that allows for transposition at high temperature. We show that the apparent increase in transposition activity in sir4 mutant strains at high temperature is dependent on the RAD52 gene and is thus likely resulting from an increase in Ty1 cDNA recombination, rather than in IN-mediated integration. General cellular recombination is not increased at high temperature, suggesting that the increase in recombination at high temperature in sir4 mutants is specific for Ty1 cDNA. Additionally, this high-temperature Ty1 recombination was found to be dependent on functional Sir2p and Sir3p. We speculate that the increase in recombination seen in sir4 mutants at high temperature may be due to changes in chromatin structure or Ty1 interactions with chromosomal structures resulting in higher recombination rates. PMID:15454529

  10. Increased episomal replication accounts for the high rate of adaptive mutation in recD mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P L; Rosche, W A

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive mutation has been studied extensively in FC40, a strain of Escherichia coli that cannot metabolize lactose (Lac-) because of a frameshift mutation affecting the lacZ gene on its episome. recD mutants of FC40, in which the exonuclease activity of RecBCD (ExoV) is abolished but its helicase activity is retained, have an increased rate of adaptive mutation. The results presented here show that, in several respects, adaptive mutation to Lac+ involves different mechanisms in recD mutant cells than in wild-type cells. About half of the apparent increase in the adaptive mutation rate of recD mutant cells is due to a RecA-dependent increase in episomal copy number and to growth of the Lac- cells on the lactose plates. The remaining increase appears to be due to continued replication of the episome, with the extra copies being degraded or passed to recD+ recipients. In addition, the increase in adaptive mutation rate in recD mutant cells is (i) dependent on activities of the single-stranded exonucleases, RecJ and ExoI, which are not required for (in fact, slightly inhibit) adaptive mutation in wild-type cells, and (ii) enhanced by RecG, which opposes adaptive mutation in wild-type cells. PMID:10224241

  11. Characterization and isolation of mutants producing increased amounts of isoamyl acetate derived from hygromycin B-resistant sake yeast.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toyohisa; Iefuji, Haruyuki; Katsumata, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Hygromycin B is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Twenty-four hygromycin B-resistants mutants were isolated from sake yeast, and were divided into three different degrees of strength according to hygromycin B resistance. Three of four hygromycin B strongly resistant mutants produced increased amounts of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing test, although isoamyl alcohol levels remained unchanged. Many hygromycin B-resistants mutants showed higher E/A ratios than K-701 in culture with koji extract medium. Strain HMR-18 produced the largest amount of isoamyl acetate, and its alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) activity was 1.3-fold that of K-701. DNA microarray analysis showed that many genes overexpressed in HMR-18 were involved in stress responses (heat shock, low pH, and so on) but HMR-18 showed thermo- and acid-sensitivity. It was strongly resistant to hygromycin B and another aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. PMID:22232249

  12. CLIC5 mutant mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity and exhibit gastric hemorrhaging and increased susceptibility to torpor

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Emily M.; Miller, Marian L.; Prasad, Vikram; Nieman, Michelle L.; Gawenis, Lara R.; Berryman, Mark; Lorenz, John N.; Tso, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 (CLIC5) and other CLIC isoforms have been implicated in a number of biological processes, but their specific functions are poorly understood. The association of CLIC5 with ezrin and the actin cytoskeleton led us to test its possible involvement in gastric acid secretion. Clic5 mutant mice exhibited only a minor reduction in acid secretion, Clic5 mRNA was expressed at only low levels in stomach, and Clic5 mutant parietal cells were ultrastructurally normal, negating the hypothesis that CLIC5 plays a major role in acid secretion. However, the mutants exhibited gastric hemorrhaging in response to fasting, reduced monocytes and granulocytes suggestive of immune dysfunction, behavioral and social disorders suggestive of neurological dysfunction, and evidence of a previously unidentified metabolic defect. Wild-type and mutant mice were maintained on normal and high-fat diets; plasma levels of various hormones, glucose, and lipids were determined; and body composition was studied by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging. Clic5 mutants were lean, hyperphagic, and highly resistant to diet-induced obesity. Plasma insulin and glucose levels were reduced, and leptin levels were very low; however, plasma triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and fatty acids were normal. Indirect calorimetry revealed increased peripheral metabolism and greater reliance on carbohydrate metabolism. Because Clic5 mutants were unable to maintain energy reserves, they also exhibited increased susceptibility to fasting-induced torpor, as indicated by telemetric measurements showing episodes of reduced body temperature and heart rate. These data reveal a requirement for CLIC5 in the maintenance of normal systemic energy metabolism. PMID:20357015

  13. Early-life exposure to benzo[a]pyrene increases mutant frequency in spermatogenic cells in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; McMahan, C Alex; Walter, Christi A

    2014-01-01

    Children are vulnerable to environmental mutagens, and the developing germline could also be affected. However, little is known about whether exposure to environmental mutagens in childhood will result in increased germline mutations in subsequent adult life. In the present study, male transgenic lacI mice at different ages (7, 25 and 60 days old) were treated with a known environmental mutagen (benzo[a]pyrene, B[a]P) at different doses (0, 50, 200 or 300 mg/kg body weight). Mutant frequency was then determined in a meiotic cell type (pachytene spermatocyte), a post-meiotic cell type (round spermatid) and epididymal spermatozoa after at least one cycle of spermatogenesis. Our results show that 1) mice treated with B[a]P at 7 or 25 days old, both being pre-adult ages, had significantly increased mutant frequencies in all spermatogenic cell types tested when they were 60 days old; 2) spermatogenic cells from mice treated before puberty were more susceptible to B[a]P-associated mutagenesis compared to adult mice; and 3) unexpectedly, epididymal spermatozoa had the highest mutant frequency among the spermatogenic cell types tested. These data show that pre-adult exposure to B[a]P increases the male germline mutant frequency in young adulthood. The data demonstrate that exposure to environmental genotoxins at different life phases (e.g., pre-adult and adult) can have differential effects on reproductive health.

  14. In Vitro selection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae mutants with elevated MIC values and increased resistance to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven R; Grad, Yonatan; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Burroughs, Mark; Frace, Mike; Lipsitch, Marc; Weil, Ryan; Trees, David

    2014-11-01

    Strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with mosaic penA genes bearing novel point mutations in penA have been isolated from ceftriaxone treatment failures. Such isolates exhibit significantly higher MIC values to third-generation cephalosporins. Here we report the in vitro isolation of two mutants with elevated MICs to cephalosporins. The first possesses a point mutation in the transpeptidase region of the mosaic penA gene, and the second contains an insertion mutation in pilQ.

  15. In Vitro selection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae mutants with elevated MIC values and increased resistance to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven R; Grad, Yonatan; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Burroughs, Mark; Frace, Mike; Lipsitch, Marc; Weil, Ryan; Trees, David

    2014-11-01

    Strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with mosaic penA genes bearing novel point mutations in penA have been isolated from ceftriaxone treatment failures. Such isolates exhibit significantly higher MIC values to third-generation cephalosporins. Here we report the in vitro isolation of two mutants with elevated MICs to cephalosporins. The first possesses a point mutation in the transpeptidase region of the mosaic penA gene, and the second contains an insertion mutation in pilQ. PMID:25199775

  16. Inactivation of NMD increases viability of sup45 nonsense mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chabelskaya, Svetlana; Gryzina, Valentina; Moskalenko, Svetlana; Le Goff, Catherine; Zhouravleva, Galina

    2007-01-01

    Background The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway promotes the rapid degradation of mRNAs containing premature termination codons (PTCs). In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activity of the NMD pathway depends on the recognition of the PTC by the translational machinery. Translation termination factors eRF1 (Sup45) and eRF3 (Sup35) participate not only in the last step of protein synthesis but also in mRNA degradation and translation initiation via interaction with such proteins as Pab1, Upf1, Upf2 and Upf3. Results In this work we have used previously isolated sup45 mutants of S. cerevisiae to characterize degradation of aberrant mRNA in conditions when translation termination is impaired. We have sequenced his7-1, lys9-A21 and trp1-289 alleles which are frequently used for analysis of nonsense suppression. We have established that sup45 nonsense and missense mutations lead to accumulation of his7-1 mRNA and CYH2 pre-mRNA. Remarkably, deletion of the UPF1 gene suppresses some sup45 phenotypes. In particular, sup45-n upf1Δ double mutants were less temperature sensitive, and more resistant to paromomycin than sup45 single mutants. In addition, deletion of either UPF2 or UPF3 restored viability of sup45-n double mutants. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that sup45 mutations do not only change translation fidelity but also acts by causing a change in mRNA stability. PMID:17705828

  17. Increased outer membrane resistance to ethylenediaminetetraacetate and cations in novel lipid A mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, M

    1981-01-01

    Polymyxin-resistant pmrA mutants of Salmonella typhimurium differed from their parents in that they were resistant to tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate-lysozyme, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate-deoxycholate, and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate-bacitracin. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate released about 50% less lipopolysaccharide from the pmrA strains than from the parental strains when the bacteria were grown in L-broth containing 2 mM Ca2+. Protamine, polylysine, octapeptin, benzalkonium chloride, cold NaCl, cold MgCl2, or cold tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride (pH 7.2) caused no leakage or markedly less leakage of periplasmic beta-lactamase from a pmrA mutant than from its parent strain. pmrA mutants were more resistant than their parent strains to protamine and polylysine but not to octapeptin or benzalkonium chloride, as measured by the ability of these agents to kill the bacteria or to sensitize them to deoxycholate-induced lysis. The pmrA strains did not differ from their parent strains in sensitivity to several antibiotics, in porin function (as measured by cephaloridine diffusion across the outer membrane), or in outer membrane-associated phospholipase A activity. PMID:6795177

  18. Increased cell surface hydrophobicity of a Serratia marcescens NS 38 mutant lacking wetting activity.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ness, R; Avrahamy, N; Matsuyama, T; Rosenberg, M

    1988-09-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of Serratia marcescens appears to be an important factor in its adhesion to and colonization of various interfaces. The cell surface components responsible for mediating the hydrophobicity of S. marcescens have not been completely elucidated, but may include prodigiosin and other factors. In the present report we have investigated the potential role of serratamolide, an amphipathic aminolipid present on the surfaces of certain S. marcescens strains, in modulating cell surface hydrophobicity. The hydrophobic properties of a serratamolide-producing strain (NS 38) were compared with those of a serratamolide-deficient mutant (NS 38-9) by monitoring the kinetics of adhesion to hexadecane. Serratamolide production was monitored by thin-layer chromatography and the wetting activity of washed-cell suspensions on polystyrene. Wild-type NS 38 cells were far less hydrophobic than the serratamolide-deficient mutant cells were; the removal coefficients were 48 min-1 for the mutant, as compared with only 18 min-1 for the wild type. The data suggest that the presence of serratamolide on S. marcescens cells results in a reduction in hydrophobicity, presumably by blocking hydrophobic sites on the cell surface.

  19. A study on the relationship between TCTA tetranucleotide polymorphism of the HPRT gene and primary hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y S; Wei, S G; Sun, R F; Feng, J L; Kuang, W J; Lai, J H; Li, S B

    2011-12-15

    We examined polymorphism of the TCTA tetranucleotide sequence in the 3rd intron of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in the Han population of Ningxia Province in China. We also looked for a possible relationship between STR polymorphism in the 3rd intron of the HPRT gene and primary hyperuricemia. We used Chelex-100 to extract DNA, then PCR, PAGE and silver staining for allele genotyping and DNA sequencing to obtain the distribution of the alleles. We found, for the first time, that there is high STR polymorphism in the 3rd intron of the HPRT gene. We detected 5 STR alleles in this intron in the Han population of Ningxia Province, with 15 genotypes in females; significant differences were observed in the distribution of alleles and genotypes between control and patient groups for both males and females. Alleles of the TCTA repeat in the 3rd intron of the HPRT gene were found to be associated with primary hyperuricemia; consequently, these alleles may be considered risk factors for primary hyperuricemia.

  20. Neurotransmitter and their metabolite concentrations in different areas of the HPRT knockout mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tschirner, Sarah K; Gutzki, Frank; Schneider, Erich H; Seifert, Roland; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-06-15

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is characterized by uric acid overproduction and severe neurobehavioral symptoms, such as recurrent self-mutilative behavior. To learn more about the pathophysiology of the disease, we quantified neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the cerebral hemisphere, cerebellum and the medulla oblongata of HPRT knockout mice, an animal model for LNS, in comparison to the corresponding wild-type. Our analyses included l-glutamate, 4-aminobutanoic acid (GABA), acetylcholine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), norepinephrine, l-normetanephrine, epinephrine and l-metanephrine and were conducted via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Among these neurotransmitter systems, we did not find any abnormalities in the HPRT knockout mouse brains. On one side, this might indicate that HPRT deficiency most severely affects dopamine signaling, while brain functioning based on other neurotransmitters is more or less spared. On the other hand, our findings may reflect a compensating mechanism for impaired purine salvage that protects the brain in HPRT-deficient mice but not in LNS patients. PMID:27206901

  1. Murine startle mutant Nmf11 affects the structural stability of the glycine receptor and increases deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Caley, Alex; Gielen, Marc C.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Hyperekplexia or startle disease is a serious neurological condition affecting newborn children and usually involves dysfunctional glycinergic neurotransmission.Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are major mediators of inhibition in the spinal cord and brainstem.A missense mutation, replacing asparagine (N) with lysine (K), at position 46 in the GlyR α1 subunit induced hyperekplexia following a reduction in the potency of the transmitter glycine; this resulted from a rapid deactivation of the agonist current at mutant GlyRs.These effects of N46K were rescued by mutating a juxtaposed residue, N61 on binding Loop D, suggesting these two asparagines may interact.Asparagine 46 is considered to be important for the structural stability of the subunit interface and glycine binding site, and its mutation represents a new mechanism by which GlyR dysfunction induces startle disease. Abstract Dysfunctional glycinergic inhibitory transmission underlies the debilitating neurological condition, hyperekplexia, which is characterised by exaggerated startle reflexes, muscle hypertonia and apnoea. Here we investigated the N46K missense mutation in the GlyR α1 subunit gene found in the ethylnitrosourea (ENU) murine mutant, Nmf11, which causes reduced body size, evoked tremor, seizures, muscle stiffness, and morbidity by postnatal day 21. Introducing the N46K mutation into recombinant GlyR α1 homomeric receptors, expressed in HEK cells, reduced the potencies of glycine, β‐alanine and taurine by 9‐, 6‐ and 3‐fold respectively, and that of the competitive antagonist strychnine by 15‐fold. Replacing N46 with hydrophobic, charged or polar residues revealed that the amide moiety of asparagine was crucial for GlyR activation. Co‐mutating N61, located on a neighbouring β loop to N46, rescued the wild‐type phenotype depending on the amino acid charge. Single‐channel recording identified that burst length for the N46K mutant was reduced and fast agonist application

  2. Spirogyra varians mutant generated by high dose gamma-irradiation shows increased antioxidant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Jyung; Yoon, Minchul; Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of a Spirogyra varians mutant (Mut) produced by gamma irradiation. Methanol extracts were prepared from Spirogyra varians wild-type and Mut plants, and their antioxidant activities and total phenolic content (TPC) were determined. Antioxidant parameters, including the 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ferric-reducing/antioxidant power, were higher in the Mut extract. Moreover, the TPC level was higher (P<0.05) in the Mut methanol extract. Therefore, these results suggest that gamma irradiation-induced S. varians Mut has superior antioxidant properties.

  3. Nuclear hormone receptor DHR96 mediates the resistance to xenobiotics but not the increased lifespan of insulin-mutant Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Afschar, Sonita; Toivonen, Janne M; Hoffmann, Julia Marianne; Tain, Luke Stephen; Wieser, Daniela; Finlayson, Andrew John; Driege, Yasmine; Alic, Nazif; Emran, Sahar; Stinn, Julia; Froehlich, Jenny; Piper, Matthew D; Partridge, Linda

    2016-02-01

    Lifespan of laboratory animals can be increased by genetic, pharmacological, and dietary interventions. Increased expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, together with resistance to xenobiotics, are frequent correlates of lifespan extension in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila, and mice. The Green Theory of Aging suggests that this association is causal, with the ability of cells to rid themselves of lipophilic toxins limiting normal lifespan. To test this idea, we experimentally increased resistance of Drosophila to the xenobiotic dichlordiphenyltrichlorethan (DDT), by artificial selection or by transgenic expression of a gene encoding a cytochrome P450. Although both interventions increased DDT resistance, neither increased lifespan. Furthermore, dietary restriction increased lifespan without increasing xenobiotic resistance, confirming that the two traits can be uncoupled. Reduced activity of the insulin/Igf signaling (IIS) pathway increases resistance to xenobiotics and extends lifespan in Drosophila, and can also increase longevity in C. elegans, mice, and possibly humans. We identified a nuclear hormone receptor, DHR96, as an essential mediator of the increased xenobiotic resistance of IIS mutant flies. However, the IIS mutants remained long-lived in the absence of DHR96 and the xenobiotic resistance that it conferred. Thus, in Drosophila IIS mutants, increased xenobiotic resistance and enhanced longevity are not causally connected. The frequent co-occurrence of the two traits may instead have evolved because, in nature, lowered IIS can signal the presence of pathogens. It will be important to determine whether enhanced xenobiotic metabolism is also a correlated, rather than a causal, trait in long-lived mice.

  4. Nuclear hormone receptor DHR96 mediates the resistance to xenobiotics but not the increased lifespan of insulin-mutant Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Afschar, Sonita; Toivonen, Janne M.; Tain, Luke Stephen; Wieser, Daniela; Finlayson, Andrew John; Driege, Yasmine; Alic, Nazif; Emran, Sahar; Stinn, Julia; Froehlich, Jenny; Piper, Matthew D.; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Lifespan of laboratory animals can be increased by genetic, pharmacological, and dietary interventions. Increased expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, together with resistance to xenobiotics, are frequent correlates of lifespan extension in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila, and mice. The Green Theory of Aging suggests that this association is causal, with the ability of cells to rid themselves of lipophilic toxins limiting normal lifespan. To test this idea, we experimentally increased resistance of Drosophila to the xenobiotic dichlordiphenyltrichlorethan (DDT), by artificial selection or by transgenic expression of a gene encoding a cytochrome P450. Although both interventions increased DDT resistance, neither increased lifespan. Furthermore, dietary restriction increased lifespan without increasing xenobiotic resistance, confirming that the two traits can be uncoupled. Reduced activity of the insulin/Igf signaling (IIS) pathway increases resistance to xenobiotics and extends lifespan in Drosophila, and can also increase longevity in C. elegans, mice, and possibly humans. We identified a nuclear hormone receptor, DHR96, as an essential mediator of the increased xenobiotic resistance of IIS mutant flies. However, the IIS mutants remained long-lived in the absence of DHR96 and the xenobiotic resistance that it conferred. Thus, in Drosophila IIS mutants, increased xenobiotic resistance and enhanced longevity are not causally connected. The frequent co-occurrence of the two traits may instead have evolved because, in nature, lowered IIS can signal the presence of pathogens. It will be important to determine whether enhanced xenobiotic metabolism is also a correlated, rather than a causal, trait in long-lived mice. PMID:26787908

  5. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population

    PubMed Central

    Coffee, Erin M.; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P.; Zee, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Δ4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Δ4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance. PMID:20033295

  6. Elevated AIM2-mediated pyroptosis triggered by hypercytotoxic Francisella mutant strains is attributed to increased intracellular bacteriolysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kaitian; Broz, Petr; Jones, Jonathan; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Monack, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens Francisella novicida and the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) are recognized in the macrophage cytosol by the AIM2 inflammasome, which leads to the activation of caspase-1 and the processing and secretion of active IL-1β, IL-18 and pyroptosis. Previous studies have reported that F. novicida and LVS mutants in specific genes (e.g., FTT0584, mviN and ripA) induce elevated inflammasome activation and hypercytotoxicity in host cells, leading to the proposal that F. novicida and LVS may have proteins that actively modulate inflammasome activation. However, there has been no direct evidence of such inflammasome evasion mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the above mutants, along with a wide range of F. novicida hypercytotoxic mutants that are deficient for membrane-associated proteins (ΔFTT0584, ΔmviN, ΔripA, ΔfopA and ΔFTN1217) or deficient for genes involved in O-antigen or LPS biosynthesis (ΔwbtA and ΔlpxH) lyse more intracellularly, thus activating increased levels of AIM2-dependent pyroptosis and other innate immune signaling pathways. This suggests that an inflammasome-specific evasion mechanism may not be present in F. novicida and LVS. Furthermore, future studies may need to consider increased bacterial lysis as a possible cause of elevated stimulation of multiple innate immune pathways when the protein composition or surface carbohydrates of the bacterial membrane is altered. PMID:21883803

  7. Increasing testicular temperature by exposure to elevated ambient temperatures restores spermatogenesis in adult Utp14b (jsd) mutant (jsd) mice.

    PubMed

    Comish, P B; Liang, L Y; Yamauchi, Y; Weng, C C; Shetty, G; Naff, K A; Ward, M A; Meistrich, M L

    2015-03-01

    Because mutations in the human UTP14C gene are associated with male infertility, we sought to develop a method for fertility restoration in azoospermic mice with a mutation in the orthologous Utp14b(jsd) (jsd) gene that have spermatogonial arrest. The method is based on our observation that elevation of testicular temperatures restores spermatogonial differentiation in jsd mutant mice. To non-surgically raise intrascrotal temperatures we placed these mice in incubators at different elevated ambient temperatures. Exposure of jsd/jsd mice to ambient temperatures of 34.5 °C or 35.5 °C for 24 days increased the proportion of tubules with spermatocytes from 0% in untreated controls to over 80%. As those higher temperatures interfere with spermatid differentiation, the mice were then transferred to incubators at 32-32.5 °C for the next 24 days. These environments allowed differentiation to progress, resulting in up to 42% of tubules having late spermatids and about half of the mutant mice having spermatozoa in testicular suspensions. When these spermatozoa were used in intracytoplasmic sperm injection, all gave rise to viable healthy offspring with normal weight gain and fertility. The successful restoration of fertility in Utp14b mutant mice suggests that transient testicular warming might also be useful for spermatogenesis recovery in infertile men with UTP14C gene mutations.

  8. Investigation of Ion Absorption of the High Harmonic Fast Wave in NSTX using HPRT

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; Menard, J.E.; and LeBlanc, B.P.

    2001-05-18

    Understanding high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power absorption by ions in a spherical torus (ST) is of critical importance to assessing the wave's viability as a means of heating and especially driving current. In this work, the HPRT code is used to calculate absorption for helium and deuterium, with and without minority hydrogen in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas using experimental EFIT code equilibria and kinetic profiles. HPRT is a two-dimensional ray-tracing code which uses the full hot plasma dielectric to compute the perpendicular wave number along the hot electron and cold ion plasma ray path. Ion and electron absorption dependence on antenna phasing, ion temperature, beta (subscript t), and minority temperature and concentration is analyzed. These results form the basis for comparisons with other codes, such as CURRAY, METS, TORIC, and AORSA.

  9. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  10. A low, adaptive dose of gamma-rays reduced the number and altered the spectrum of S1- mutants in human-hamster hybrid AL cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Gustafson, D. L.; Wong, J. C.; Waldren, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effects of a low, adaptive dose of 137Cs-gamma-irradiation (0.04 Gy) on the number and kinds of mutants induced in AL human-hamster hybrid cells by a later challenge dose of 4 Gy. The yield of S1- mutants was significantly less (by 53%) after exposure to both the adaptive and challenge doses compared to the challenge dose alone. The yield of hprt- mutants was similarly decreased. Incubation with cycloheximide (CX) or 3-aminobenzamide largely negated the decrease in mutant yield. The adaptive dose did not perturb the cell cycle, was not cytotoxic, and did not of itself increase the mutant yield above background. The adaptive dose did, however, alter the spectrum of S1- mutants from populations exposed only to the adaptive dose, as well as affecting the spectrum of S1- mutants generated by the challenge dose. The major change in both cases was a significant increase in the proportion of complex mutations compared to small mutations and simple deletions.

  11. Mutant strains of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis to increase the efficiency of micro-ecological life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Igor

    The European Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an advanced idea for organizing a bioregenerative system for long term space flights and extraterrestrial settlements (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005). Despite the hostility of both lunar and Martian environments to unprotected life, it seems possible to cultivate photosynthetic bacteria using closed bioreactors illuminated and heated by solar energy. Such reactors might be employed in critical processes, e.g. air revitalization, foodcaloric and protein source, as well as an immunomodulators production. The MELiSSA team suggested cyanobacterium Spirulina as most appropriate agent to revitalize air and produce a simple "fast" food. This is right suggestion because Spirulina was recently shown to be an oxygenic organism with the highest level of O2 production per unit mass (Ananyev et al., 2005). Chemical composition of Spirulina includes proteins (55Aiming to make Spirulina cultivation in life support systems like MELiSSA more efficient, we selected Spirulina mutant strains with increased fraction of methionine in the biomass of this cyanobacterium and compared the effect of parental wild strain of Spirulina and its mutants on the tendency of such experimental illnesses as radiationinduced lesions and hemolythic anemia. Results: It was found that mutant strains 198B and 27G contain higher quantities of total protein, essential amino acids, c-phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and chlorophyll a than parental wild strain of S. platensis. The strain 198B is also characterized with increased content of carotenoids. Revealed biochemical peculiarities of mutant strains suggest that these strains can serve as an additional source of essential amino acids as well as phycobiliproteins and carotenoids for the astronauts. Feeding animals suffering from radiation-induced lesions, c-phycocyanin, extracted from strain 27G, led to a correction in deficient dehydrogenase activity and energy-rich phosphate levels

  12. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D G; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-04-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen PstDC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes.

  13. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes. PMID:26896849

  14. Arginase-Negative Mutants of Arabidopsis Exhibit Increased Nitric Oxide Signaling in Root Development1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Teresita; Todd, Christopher D.; Tovar-Mendez, Alejandro; Dhanoa, Preetinder K.; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Hoyos, Mary Elizabeth; Brownfield, Disa M.; Mullen, Robert T.; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Polacco, Joe C.

    2008-01-01

    Mutation of either arginase structural gene (ARGAH1 or ARGAH2 encoding arginine [Arg] amidohydrolase-1 and -2, respectively) resulted in increased formation of lateral and adventitious roots in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings and increased nitric oxide (NO) accumulation and efflux, detected by the fluorogenic traps 3-amino,4-aminomethyl-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate and diamino-rhodamine-4M, respectively. Upon seedling exposure to the synthetic auxin naphthaleneacetic acid, NO accumulation was differentially enhanced in argah1-1 and argah2-1 compared with the wild type. In all genotypes, much 3-amino,4-aminomethyl-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence originated from mitochondria. The arginases are both localized to the mitochondrial matrix and closely related. However, their expression levels and patterns differ: ARGAH1 encoded the minor activity, and ARGAH1-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) was expressed throughout the seedling; the ARGAH2∷GUS expression pattern was more localized. Naphthaleneacetic acid increased seedling lateral root numbers (total lateral roots per primary root) in the mutants to twice the number in the wild type, consistent with increased internal NO leading to enhanced auxin signaling in roots. In agreement, argah1-1 and argah2-1 showed increased expression of the auxin-responsive reporter DR5∷GUS in root tips, emerging lateral roots, and hypocotyls. We propose that Arg, or an Arg derivative, is a potential NO source and that reduced arginase activity in the mutants results in greater conversion of Arg to NO, thereby potentiating auxin action in roots. This model is supported by supplemental Arg induction of adventitious roots and increased NO accumulation in argah1-1 and argah2-1 versus the wild type. PMID:18567826

  15. Chronic hepatitis, hepatocyte fragility, and increased soluble phosphoglycokeratins in transgenic mice expressing a keratin 18 conserved arginine mutant

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The two major intermediate filament proteins in glandular epithelia are keratin polypeptides 8 and 18 (K8/18). To evaluate the function and potential disease association of K18, we examined the effects of mutating a highly conserved arginine (arg89) of K18. Expression of K18 arg89-->his/cys and its normal K8 partner in cultured cells resulted in punctate staining as compared with the typical filaments obtained after expression of wild-type K8/18. Generation of transgenic mice expressing human K18 arg89-->cys resulted in marked disruption of liver and pancreas keratin filament networks. The most prominent histologic abnormalities were liver inflammation and necrosis that appeared at a young age in association with hepatocyte fragility and serum transaminase elevation. These effects were caused by the mutation since transgenic mice expressing wild-type human K18 showed a normal phenotype. A relative increase in the phosphorylation and glycosylation of detergent solubilized K8/18 was also noted in vitro and in transgenic animals that express mutant K18. Our results indicate that the highly conserved arg plays an important role in glandular keratin organization and tissue fragility as already described for epidermal keratins. Phosphorylation and glycosylation alterations in the arg mutant keratins may account for some of the potential changes in the cellular function of these proteins. Mice expressing mutant K18 provide a novel animal model for human chronic hepatitis, and for studying the tissue specific function(s) of K8/18. PMID:8522591

  16. Cyclic loading increases friction and changes cartilage surface integrity in lubricin-mutant mouse knees

    PubMed Central

    Drewniak, Elizabeth I; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C; Zhang, Ling; Warman, Matthew L; Crisco, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of lubricin gene dosage and cyclic loading on whole joint coefficient of friction and articular cartilage surface integrity in mouse knee joints. Methods Joints from mice with 2 (Prg4+/+), 1 (Prg4+/−), or no (Prg4−/−) functioning lubricin alleles were subjected to 26 hours of cyclic loading using a custom-built pendulum. Coefficient of friction values were measured at multiple time points. Contralateral control joints were left unloaded. Following testing, joints were examined for histologic evidence of damage and cell viability. Results At baseline, the coefficient of friction values in Prg4−/− mice were significantly higher than those in Prg4+/+ and Prg4+/− mice (P < 0.001). Cyclic loading continuously increased the coefficient of friction in Prg4−/− mouse joints. In contrast, Prg4+/− and Prg4+/+ mouse joints had no coefficient of friction increases during the first 4 hours of loading. After 26 hours of loading, joints from all genotypes had increased coefficient of friction values compared to baseline and unloaded controls. Significantly greater increases occurred in Prg4−/− and Prg4+/− mouse joints compared to Prg4+/+ mouse joints. The coefficient of friction values were not significantly associated with histologic evidence of damage or loss of cell viability. Conclusion Our findings indicate that mice lacking lubricin have increased baseline coefficient of friction values and are not protected against further increases caused by loading. Prg4+/− mice are indistinguishable from Prg4+/+ mice at baseline, but have significantly greater coefficient of friction values following 26 hours of loading. Lubricin dosage affects joint properties during loading, and may have clinical implications in patients for whom injury or illness alters lubricin abundance. PMID:21905020

  17. Sertoli cell numbers and spermatogenic efficiency are increased in inducible nitric oxide synthase mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Auharek, S A; Avelar, G F; Lara, N L M; Sharpe, R M; França, L R

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is produced via oxidation of l-arginine by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), and is known as inducible (iNOS), neuronal, endothelial or testis-specific. Suggesting important functions for NOS in the normal rat and mouse testis, iNOS is reported to be constitutively expressed in Leydig cells (LC), Sertoli cells (SC) and germ cells. In our study, we sought to provide further insights into the roles of iNOS in the adult mouse testis using iNOS(-/-) mice. Perfusion-fixed testes from wild type (WT) and iNOS(-/-) mice were used for histological and stereological evaluations. Some of the mice had been injected with (3) H-thymidine to label proliferating cells and to determine the duration of spermatogenesis that was unaffected in iNOS(-/-) mice. Both LC nuclear volume and individual cell size were significantly decreased in iNOS(-/-) mice, but the total number of LC per testis was increased (p < 0.05) by approximately 16%. The number of SC per testis was strikingly increased (approximately twofold) in iNOS(-/-) mice, and testis weight and DSP per gram of testis (spermatogenic efficiency) were similarly increased. The anogenital distance was also significantly increased in iNOS(-/-) mice, and this key endpoint suggests that the augmentation observed for the SC number may be related to increased foetal T-exposure during the masculinization programming window. Compared with WT testes, the numbers of spermatocytes and spermatids and SC per tubule cross sections were significantly increased in iNOS(-/-) mice. Except for stages V-VI and VII-VIII, iNOS(-/-) mice exhibited approximately 3.5-fold fewer apoptotic germ cells than in WT mice. Taken together, our results provide new evidence that iNOS plays an important role in numerical and functional regulation of key somatic cells in the testis, which in turn impacts on germ cells and their survival and thus on daily sperm production.

  18. Do escape mutants explain rapid increases in dengue case-fatality rates within epidemics?

    PubMed

    Guzmán, M G; Kourí, G; Halstead, S B

    2000-05-27

    During the Cuban dengue epidemics of 1981 and 1997, significant monthly increases were observed in the proportion of total cases that presented as dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), and in case-fatality rates for both dengue fever and DHF/DSS. We believe that theses increases can be explained by the hypothesis that some of the population of antibodies against dengue 1 virus raised after natural primary infections react with "neutralisation" determinants found on dengue 2 viruses. These heterotypic antibodies do not prevent secondary dengue 2 infections, but serve to down-regulate the disease to mild illness or symptomless infections. A population of dengue 2 viruses that replicates in dengue-1-immune hosts escape heterotypic neutralisation. When inoculated into a new dengue-1-immune host, these viruses are free to interact with the more abundant infection-enhancing antibodies to produce severe disease.

  19. Increases of efficacy as vaccine against Brucella abortus infection in mice by simultaneous inoculation with avirulent smooth bvrS/bvrR and rough wbkA mutants.

    PubMed

    Grilló, María Jesús; Manterola, Lorea; de Miguel, María Jesús; Muñoz, Pilar María; Blasco, José María; Moriyón, Ignacio; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2006-04-01

    The Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 strains are the most widely used live vaccines against bovine brucellosis. However, both can induce abortion and milk excretion, S19 vaccination interferes in serological tests, and RB51 is less effective. We have shown previously that a rough wbkAB. abortus mutant is attenuated and a better vaccine than RB51 in BALB/c mice, and that mutants in the two-component regulatory system bvrS/bvrR are markedly attenuated while keeping a smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS). In this work, we tested whether simultaneous inoculation with live bvrS increases wbkA vaccine efficacy in mice. Even at high doses, the bvrS mutant was cleared much faster from spleens than the wbkA mutant. The splenic persistence of the wbkA mutant increased when inoculated along with the bvrS mutant, but also with inactivated bvrS cells or with purified B. abortus S-LPS, strongly suggesting that S-LPS in the bvrS mutant played a determinant role in the wbkA persistence. When inoculated alone, both mutants protected against virulent B. abortus but less than when inoculated simultaneously, and the protection afforded by the combination was better than that obtained with B. abortus S19. Increased protection was also obtained after simultaneous inoculation of the wbkA mutant and inactivated bvrS cells or purified S-LPS, showing again the role played by the S-LPS in the bvrS cells. In mice, the bvrS-wbkA combination induced an antibody response reduced with respect to B. abortus S19 vaccination. Thus, the simultaneous use of live bvrS and wbkA B. abortus mutants seems a promising approach to overcome the problems of the S19 andRB51 vaccines.

  20. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  1. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5′ end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays. PMID:26217821

  2. Mild Lesch-Nyhan Disease in a Boy with a Null Mutation in HPRT1: An Exception to the Known Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Allan; Christensen, Mette; Wibrand, Flemming; Duno, Morten; Lund, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency results in a continuous spectrum of clinical phenotypes though all include overproduction of uric acid with hyperuricaemia, urate nephrolithiasis and gout. HPRT1 mutations that result in very low or no HPRT enzyme activities are generally associated with the classic Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) phenotype with intellectual disability, motor handicap and self-injurious behaviour. Mutations that permit a higher residual HPRT activity are seen in some patients with the milder LND variant phenotypes with varying degrees of cognitive, motor handicap and maladaptive behaviour without recurrent self-injury. We present a boy with a LND variant phenotype due to a deletion of exon 5 of HPRT1 predicted to fully abolish HPRT activity. Metabolic analysis confirms lack of significant residual enzyme activity. The boy, currently age 10, presented with hyperuricaemia, hypotonia, developmental delay and extrapyramidal and pyramidal involvement. He has never shown any signs of self-injurious or maladaptive behaviour. This boy is one of the rare cases with a suspected null mutation in HPRT1 that associates with a milder than expected phenotype with lack of self-injurious behaviour. Key Clinical Message HPRT1 mutations that result in very low or no hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activities are generally associated with the classic Lesch-Nyhan disease. This report presents one of the rare cases with a null mutation in the HPRT1 gene that associates with a milder than expected phenotype with lack of self-injurious behaviour.

  3. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5' end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays.

  4. Glucocorticoid Receptor Mutants Demonstrate Increased Motility Inside the Nucleus of Living Cells: Time of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) Is an Integrated Measure of Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Liou, Szu-Heng; Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P

    2004-01-01

    Natural mutations of the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform α cause the glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. Mutant receptors may have abnormal interactions with the ligand, target DNA sequences, and/or multiple intracellular proteins, as well as aberrant nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis, all GR pathologic mutant receptors examined, as well as 2 synthetic GR mutants lacking the activation function (AF)-1 or the lig-and-binding domain (and hence the AF-2), had defective transcriptional activity and dynamic motility defects inside the nucleus of living cells. In the presence of dexamethasone, these mutants displayed a curtailed 50% recovery time (t1/2) after photobleaching and, hence, significantly increased intranuclear motility and decreased “chromatin retention.” The t1/2 values of the mutants correlated positively with their transcriptional activities and depended on the GR domain affected. GRβ, a natural splice variant of the GR gene, also demonstrated a shorter t1/2 than GRα. The motility responsiveness of the natural and artificial mutant receptors examined, and of GRβ, to the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 also depended on the mutant domain. Thus, mutant glucocorticoid receptors possess dynamic motility defects in the nucleus, possibly caused by their inability to properly interact with all key partner nuclear molecules necessary for full activation of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. PMID:16307173

  5. Increased longevity of some C. elegans mitochondrial mutants explained by activation of an alternative energy-producing pathway.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Park, Donha; Riddle, Donald L

    2011-10-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans misc-1 gene encodes a mitochondrial carrier with a role in oxidative stress response. The knock-out mutant has no lifespan phenotype and fails to upregulate the gei-7-mediated glyoxylate shunt, an extra-mitochondrial pathway of energy production. We show that gei-7 is required for the longevity of the mitochondrial mutant clk-1. Our data suggest that only mitochondrial mutants that upregulate gei-7 can achieve longevity.

  6. Increased dopaminergic innervation in the brain of conditional mutant mice overexpressing Otx2: effects on locomotor behavior and seizure susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, P P; Di Giovannantonio, L G; Sanguinetti, E; Acampora, D; Allegra, M; Caleo, M; Wurst, W; Simeone, A; Bozzi, Y

    2014-03-01

    The homeobox-containing transcription factor Otx2 controls the identity, fate and proliferation of mesencephalic dopaminergic (mesDA) neurons. Transgenic mice, in which Otx2 was conditionally overexpressed by a Cre recombinase expressed under the transcriptional control of the Engrailed1 gene (En1(Cre/+); tOtx2(ov/+)), show an increased number of mesDA neurons during development. In adult mice, Otx2 is expressed in a subset of neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and its overexpression renders mesDA more resistant to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-HCl (MPTP) neurotoxin. Here we further investigated the neurological consequences of the increased number of mesDA neurons in En1(Cre/+); tOtx2(ov/+) adult mice. Immunohistochemistry for the active, glycosylated form of the dopamine transporter (glyco-Dat) showed that En1(Cre/+); tOtx2(ov/+) adult mice display an increased density of mesocortical DAergic fibers, as compared to control animals. Increased glyco-Dat staining was accompanied by a marked hypolocomotion in En1(Cre/+); tOtx2(ov/+) mice, as detected in the open field test. Since conditional knockout mice lacking Otx2 in mesDA precursors (En1(Cre/+); Otx2(floxv/flox) mice) show a marked resistance to kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures, we investigated the behavioral response to KA in En1(Cre/+); tOtx2(ov/+) and control mice. No difference was observed between mutant and control mice, but En1(Cre/+); tOtx2(ov/+) mice showed a markedly different c-fos mRNA induction profile in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus after KA seizures, as compared to controls. Accordingly, an increased density of parvalbumin (PV)-positive inhibitory interneurons was detected in the deep layers of the frontal cortex of naïve En1(Cre/+); tOtx2(ov/+) mice, as compared to controls. These data indicate that Otx2 overexpression results in increased DAergic innervation and PV cell density in the fronto-parietal cortex, with important consequences on spontaneous locomotor

  7. The structure of a mutant enzyme of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase provides an understanding of its increased thermostability.

    PubMed

    Houborg, Karen; Harris, Pernille; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Schneider, Palle; Svendsen, Allan; Larsen, Sine

    2003-06-01

    Seven amino-acid substitutions introduced into the 343 amino-acid-long sequence of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) led to a mutant enzyme (TS-rCiP) which is more stable than the native enzyme at higher temperature, pH and hydrogen peroxide concentrations. It is therefore more suitable for industrial applications. A structure determination was conducted on a deglycosylated but still active form of TS-rCiP based on X-ray diffraction data to 2.05 A resolution measured on a crystal cooled to 100 K and refined to R = 0.202 and R(free) = 0.249. The increased stability of the TS-rCiP enzyme can be understood from the structural changes of the TS-rCiP structure revealed by a comparative analysis with other known CiP structures. One of the more significant changes caused by three of the substitutions, I49S, V53A and T121A, is the conversion of a hydrophobic pocket into a hydrophilic pocket with associated changes in the water structure and the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The E239G substitution, which gives rise to increased thermostability at high pH, creates changes in the water structure and in the orientation of a phenylalanine (Phe236) in its vicinity. The three substitutions M166F, M242 and Y242F introduced to increase the oxidative stability do not introduce any structural changes.

  8. Loss of cargo binding in the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) leads to increased actin filament binding

    PubMed Central

    Arden, Susan D.; Tumbarello, David A.; Butt, Tariq; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in myosin VI have been associated with autosomal-recessive (DFNB37) and autosomal-dominant (DFNA22) deafness in humans. Here, we characterise an myosin VI nonsense mutation (R1166X) that was identified in a family with hereditary hearing loss in Pakistan. This mutation leads to the deletion of the C-terminal 120 amino acids of the myosin VI cargo-binding domain, which includes the WWY-binding motif for the adaptor proteins LMTK2, Tom1 as well as Dab2. Interestingly, compromising myosin VI vesicle-binding ability by expressing myosin VI with the R1166X mutation or with single point mutations in the adaptor-binding sites leads to increased F-actin binding of this myosin in vitro and in vivo. As our results highlight the importance of cargo attachment for regulating actin binding to the motor domain, we perform a detailed characterisation of adaptor protein binding and identify single amino acids within myosin VI required for binding to cargo adaptors. We not only show that the adaptor proteins can directly interact with the cargo-binding tail of myosin VI, but our in vitro studies also suggest that multiple adaptor proteins can bind simultaneously to non-overlapping sites in the myosin VI tail. In conclusion, our characterisation of the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) suggests that defects in cargo binding may leave myosin VI in a primed/activated state with an increased actin-binding ability. PMID:27474411

  9. Cell homeostasis in a Leishmania major mutant overexpressing the spliced leader RNA is maintained by an increased proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Juliano S; Ferreira, Tiago R; Defina, Tânia P A; Dossin, Fernando de M; Beattie, Kenneth A; Lamont, Douglas J; Cloutier, Serge; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Schenkman, Sergio; Cruz, Angela K

    2010-10-01

    Although several stage-specific genes have been identified in Leishmania, the molecular mechanisms governing developmental gene regulation in this organism are still not well understood. We have previously reported an attenuation of virulence in Leishmania major and L. braziliensis carrying extra-copies of the spliced leader RNA gene. Here, we surveyed the major differences in proteome and transcript expression profiles between the spliced leader RNA overexpressor and control lines using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differential display reverse transcription PCR, respectively. Thirty-nine genes related to stress response, cytoskeleton, proteolysis, cell cycle control and proliferation, energy generation, gene transcription, RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation have abnormal patterns of expression in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line. The evaluation of proteolytic pathways in the mutant revealed a selective increase of cysteine protease activity and an exacerbated ubiquitin-labeled protein population. Polysome profile analysis and measurement of cellular protein aggregates showed that protein translation in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line is increased when compared to the control line. We found that L. major promastigotes maintain homeostasis in culture when challenged with a metabolic imbalance generated by spliced leader RNA surplus through modulation of intracellular proteolysis. However, this might interfere with a fine-tuned gene expression control necessary for the amastigote multiplication in the mammalian host.

  10. Loss of cargo binding in the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) leads to increased actin filament binding.

    PubMed

    Arden, Susan D; Tumbarello, David A; Butt, Tariq; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in myosin VI have been associated with autosomal-recessive (DFNB37) and autosomal-dominant (DFNA22) deafness in humans. Here, we characterise an myosin VI nonsense mutation (R1166X) that was identified in a family with hereditary hearing loss in Pakistan. This mutation leads to the deletion of the C-terminal 120 amino acids of the myosin VI cargo-binding domain, which includes the WWY-binding motif for the adaptor proteins LMTK2, Tom1 as well as Dab2. Interestingly, compromising myosin VI vesicle-binding ability by expressing myosin VI with the R1166X mutation or with single point mutations in the adaptor-binding sites leads to increased F-actin binding of this myosin in vitro and in vivo As our results highlight the importance of cargo attachment for regulating actin binding to the motor domain, we perform a detailed characterisation of adaptor protein binding and identify single amino acids within myosin VI required for binding to cargo adaptors. We not only show that the adaptor proteins can directly interact with the cargo-binding tail of myosin VI, but our in vitro studies also suggest that multiple adaptor proteins can bind simultaneously to non-overlapping sites in the myosin VI tail. In conclusion, our characterisation of the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) suggests that defects in cargo binding may leave myosin VI in a primed/activated state with an increased actin-binding ability. PMID:27474411

  11. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome in a Family with a Deletion Followed by an Insertion within the HPRT1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare X-linked inherited neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase(HGprt) is defective. The authors report a novel mutation which led to LNS in a family with a deletion followed by an insertion (INDELS) via the serial replication slippage mechanism: c.428_432delTGCAGinsAGCAAA, p.Met143Lysfs*12 in exon 6 of HPRT1 gene. Molecular diagnosis discloses the genetic heterogeneity of HPRT1 gene responsible for HGprt deficiency. It allows fast, accurate carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:25965333

  12. High-LET Patterns of DSBs in DNA Loops, the HPRT Gene and Phosphorylation Foci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    We present new results obtained with our model based on the track structure and chromatin geometry that predicts the DSB spatial and genomic distributions in a cell nucleus with the full genome represented. The model generates stochastic patterns of DSBs in the physical space of the nucleus filled with the realistic configuration of human chromosomes. The model was re-used to find the distribution of DSBs in a physical volume corresponding to a visible phosphorylation focus believed to be associated with a DSB. The data shows whether there must more than one DSB per foci due to finite size of the visible focus, even if a single DSB is radiochemically responsible for the phosphorylation of DNA in its vicinity. The same model can predict patterns of closely located DSBs in a given gene, or in a DNA loop, one of the large-scale chromatin structures. We demonstrated for the example of the HPRT gene, how different sorts of radiation lead to proximity effect in DSB locations, which is important for modeling gene deletions. The spectrum of intron deletions and total gene deletions was simulated for the HPRT gene. The same proximity effect of DSBs in a loop can hinder DSB restitutions, as parts of the loop between DSBs is deleted with a higher likelihood. The distributions of DSBs and deletions of DNA in a loop are presented.

  13. Increased Antibody Affinity Confers Broad In Vitro Protection against Escape Mutants of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Mridula; Bolles, Meagan; Donaldson, Eric F.; Van Blarcom, Thomas; Baric, Ralph; Iverson, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Even though the effect of antibody affinity on neutralization potency is well documented, surprisingly, its impact on neutralization breadth and escape has not been systematically determined. Here, random mutagenesis and DNA shuffling of the single-chain variable fragment of the neutralizing antibody 80R followed by bacterial display screening using anchored periplasmic expression (APEx) were used to generate a number of higher-affinity variants of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-neutralizing antibody 80R with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) as low as 37 pM, a >270-fold improvement relative to that of the parental 80R single-chain variable fragment (scFv). As expected, antigen affinity was shown to correlate directly with neutralization potency toward the icUrbani strain of SARS-CoV. Additionally, the highest-affinity antibody fragment displayed 10-fold-increased broad neutralization in vitro and completely protected against several SARS-CoV strains containing substitutions associated with antibody escape. Importantly, higher affinity also led to the suppression of viral escape mutants in vitro. Escape from the highest-affinity variant required reduced selective pressure and multiple substitutions in the binding epitope. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that engineered antibodies with picomolar dissociation constants for a neutralizing epitope can confer escape-resistant protection. PMID:22696652

  14. Mutations that alter RNA splicing of the human HPRT gene: a review of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, J P; Rogan, P K; Cariello, N; Nicklas, J A

    1998-11-01

    The human HPRT gene contains spans approximately 42,000 base pairs in genomic DNA, has a mRNA of approximately 900 bases and a protein coding sequence of 657 bases (initiation codon AUG to termination codon UAA). This coding sequence is distributed into 9 exons ranging from 18 (exon 5) to 184 (exon 3) base pairs. Intron sizes range from 170 (intron 7) to 13,075 (intron 1) base pairs. In a database of human HPRT mutations, 277 of 2224 (12.5%) mutations result in alterations in splicing of the mRNA as analyzed by both reverse transcriptase mediated production of a cDNA followed by PCR amplification and cDNA sequencing and by genomic DNA PCR amplification and sequencing. Mutations have been found in all eight 5' (donor) and 3' (acceptor) splice sequences. Mutations in the 5' splice sequences of introns 1 and 5 result in intron inclusion in the cDNA due to the use of cryptic donor splice sequences within the introns; mutations in the other six 5' sites result in simple exon exclusion. Mutations in the 3' splice sequences of introns 1, 3, 7 and 8 result in partial exon exclusion due to the use of cryptic acceptor splice sequences within the exons; mutations in the other four 3' sites result in simple exon exclusion. A base substitution in exon 3 (209G-->T) creates a new 5' (donor) splice site which results in the exclusion of 110 bases of exon 3 from the cDNA. Two base substitutions in intron 8 (IVS8-16G-->A and IVS8-3T-->G) result in the inclusion of intron 8 sequences in the cDNA due to the creation of new 3' (acceptor) splice sites. Base substitution within exons 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8 also result in splice alterations in cDNA. Those in exons 1 and 6 are at the 3' end of the exon and may directly affect splicing. Those within exons 3 and 4 may be the result of the creation of nonsense codons, while those in exon 8 cannot be explained by this mechanism. Lastly, many mutations that affect splicing of the HPRT mRNA have pleiotropic effects in that multiple cDNA products are

  15. Inhalation of benzene leads to an increase in the mutant frequencies of a lacI transgene in lung and spleen tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Mullin, A H; Rando, R; Esmundo, F; Mullin, D A

    1995-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if inhalation of benzene leads to an increase in the mutant frequencies in the tissues of male C57BL/6 mice. Mutant frequencies were measured using a previously described assay in which bacteriophage lambda lacI transgenes are rescued from mouse genomic DNA as infectious phage and scored for their LacI phenotype. Eight experimental mice were exposed to a target concentration of 300 ppm of benzene for 6 h/day x 5 days/week x 12 weeks, and eight control mice were treated similarly except that they were not exposed to benzene. Mutant frequencies were calculated as the ratio of LacI-/total phage recovered from organs of interest. The mean mutant frequency measured in lung tissues of mice exposed to benzene was (10.6 +/- 1.4) x 10(-5), which is about 1.7-fold higher than that of the unexposed controls. In spleen tissues from benzene-exposed mice the mean mutation frequency was (12.6 +/- 4.1) x 10(-5), which is about 1.5-fold higher than that of spleen tissues from unexposed controls. The differences in mean mutant frequencies between benzene-exposed and unexposed lung and spleen tissues are statistically significant. In liver tissues, however, the mean mutant frequencies of benzene-exposed mice and unexposed mice are not significantly different. These results demonstrate that inhaled benzene results in a statistically significant increase in the mutant frequencies in lung and spleen, but not in liver tissues of mice.

  16. Analysis of triclosan-selected Salmonella enterica mutants of eight serovars revealed increased aminoglycoside susceptibility and reduced growth rates.

    PubMed

    Rensch, Ulrike; Klein, Guenter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2013-01-01

    The biocide triclosan (TRC) is used in a wide range of household, personal care, veterinary, industrial and medical products to control microbial growth. This extended use raises concerns about a possible association between the application of triclosan and the development of antibiotic resistance. In the present study we determined triclosan mutant prevention concentrations (MPC) for Salmonella enterica isolates of eight serovars and investigated selected mutants for their mechanisms mediating decreased susceptibility to triclosan. MPCTRC values were 8-64-fold higher than MIC values and ranged between 1-16 µg/ml. The frequencies at which mutants were selected varied between 1.3 x 10(-10)-9.9 x 10(-11). Even if MIC values of mutants decreased by 3-7 dilution steps in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide, only minor changes were observed in the expression of genes encoding efflux components or regulators, indicating that neither the major multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC nor AcrEF are up-regulated in triclosan-selected mutants. Nucleotide sequence comparisons confirmed the absence of alterations in the regulatory regions acrRA, soxRS, marORAB, acrSE and ramRA of selected mutants. Single bp and deduced Gly93→Val amino acid exchanges were present in fabI, the target gene of triclosan, starting from a concentration of 1 µg/ml TRC used for MPC determinations. The fabI genes were up to 12.4-fold up-regulated. Complementation experiments confirmed the contribution of Gly93→Val exchanges and fabI overexpression to decreased triclosan susceptibility. MIC values of mutants compared to parent strains were even equal or resulted in a more susceptible phenotype (1-2 dilution steps) for the aminoglycoside antibiotics kanamycin and gentamicin as well as for the biocide chlorhexidine. Growth rates of selected mutants were significantly lower and hence, might partly explain the rare occurrence of Salmonella field isolates exhibiting decreased

  17. MUTANT FREQUENCY AND MUTATIONAL SPECTRA IN THETK AND HPRT GENES OF N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA TREATED MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) utilizing the Tk locus is widely used to identify chemical mutagens. The autosomal location of the Tk locus allows for the detection of a wide range of mutational events, from point mutations to chromosome alterations. However, the ...

  18. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium waaP mutants show increased susceptibility to polymyxin and loss of virulence In vivo.

    PubMed

    Yethon, J A; Gunn, J S; Ernst, R K; Miller, S I; Laroche, L; Malo, D; Whitfield, C

    2000-08-01

    In Escherichia coli, the waaP (rfaP) gene product was recently shown to be responsible for phosphorylation of the first heptose residue of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core region. WaaP was also shown to be necessary for the formation of a stable outer membrane. These earlier studies were performed with an avirulent rough strain of E. coli (to facilitate the structural chemistry required to properly define waaP function); therefore, we undertook the creation of a waaP mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to assess the contribution of WaaP and LPS core phosphorylation to the biology of an intracellular pathogen. The S. enterica waaP mutant described here is the first to be both genetically and structurally characterized, and its creation refutes an earlier claim that waaP mutations in S. enterica must be leaky to maintain viability. The mutant was shown to exhibit characteristics of the deep-rough phenotype, despite its ability to produce a full-length core capped with O antigen. Further, phosphoryl modifications in the LPS core region were shown to be required for resistance to polycationic antimicrobials. The waaP mutant was significantly more sensitive to polymyxin in both wild-type and polymyxin-resistant backgrounds, despite the decreased negative charge of the mutant LPSs. In addition, the waaP mutation was shown to cause a complete loss of virulence in mouse infection models. Taken together, these data indicate that WaaP is a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  19. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium waaP Mutants Show Increased Susceptibility to Polymyxin and Loss of Virulence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yethon, Jeremy A.; Gunn, John S.; Ernst, Robert K.; Miller, Samuel I.; Laroche, Line; Malo, Danielle; Whitfield, Chris

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the waaP (rfaP) gene product was recently shown to be responsible for phosphorylation of the first heptose residue of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core region. WaaP was also shown to be necessary for the formation of a stable outer membrane. These earlier studies were performed with an avirulent rough strain of E. coli (to facilitate the structural chemistry required to properly define waaP function); therefore, we undertook the creation of a waaP mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to assess the contribution of WaaP and LPS core phosphorylation to the biology of an intracellular pathogen. The S. enterica waaP mutant described here is the first to be both genetically and structurally characterized, and its creation refutes an earlier claim that waaP mutations in S. enterica must be leaky to maintain viability. The mutant was shown to exhibit characteristics of the deep-rough phenotype, despite its ability to produce a full-length core capped with O antigen. Further, phosphoryl modifications in the LPS core region were shown to be required for resistance to polycationic antimicrobials. The waaP mutant was significantly more sensitive to polymyxin in both wild-type and polymyxin-resistant backgrounds, despite the decreased negative charge of the mutant LPSs. In addition, the waaP mutation was shown to cause a complete loss of virulence in mouse infection models. Taken together, these data indicate that WaaP is a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:10899846

  20. Increased adenosine levels in mice expressing mutant glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes result in failure of induction of LTP reversal (depotentiation) in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenji F; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko

    2014-08-26

    Astrocytes regulate the activity of neighboring neurons by releasing chemical transmitters, including ATP. Adenosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of mice that express a mutant human glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes are slightly elevated compared to those in wild type mice and this might result from the observed increased release by mutant astrocytes of ATP, which can be used to produce adenosine. Using hippocampal slices from these mutant mice, we examined whether the increased endogenous adenosine levels in the hippocampus modulate the reversal of long-term potentiation (LTP), i.e. depotentiation (DP), in CA1 neurons. In hippocampal slices from wild type mice, a stable LTP was induced by tetanic stimulation consisting of 100 pulses at 100 Hz, and this was reversed by a train of low frequency stimulation (LFS) of 500 pulses at 1 Hz applied 30 min later. This induction of DP was inhibited by application of either 100 nM adenosine or 0.5 nM N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, during LFS, indicating that the increase in extracellular adenosine levels attenuated DP induction by acting on adenosine A1 receptors. In contrast, although a stable LTP was also induced in hippocampal slices from mutant mice, induction of DP was inhibited, but DP could be induced by application, during LFS, of 50 nM 8-cyclopentyltheophylline, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that a small increase in extracellular adenosine levels resulting from increased ATP release by astrocytes results in attenuation of DP in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the mutant mice.

  1. Increased adenosine levels in mice expressing mutant glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes result in failure of induction of LTP reversal (depotentiation) in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenji F; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko

    2014-08-26

    Astrocytes regulate the activity of neighboring neurons by releasing chemical transmitters, including ATP. Adenosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of mice that express a mutant human glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes are slightly elevated compared to those in wild type mice and this might result from the observed increased release by mutant astrocytes of ATP, which can be used to produce adenosine. Using hippocampal slices from these mutant mice, we examined whether the increased endogenous adenosine levels in the hippocampus modulate the reversal of long-term potentiation (LTP), i.e. depotentiation (DP), in CA1 neurons. In hippocampal slices from wild type mice, a stable LTP was induced by tetanic stimulation consisting of 100 pulses at 100 Hz, and this was reversed by a train of low frequency stimulation (LFS) of 500 pulses at 1 Hz applied 30 min later. This induction of DP was inhibited by application of either 100 nM adenosine or 0.5 nM N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, during LFS, indicating that the increase in extracellular adenosine levels attenuated DP induction by acting on adenosine A1 receptors. In contrast, although a stable LTP was also induced in hippocampal slices from mutant mice, induction of DP was inhibited, but DP could be induced by application, during LFS, of 50 nM 8-cyclopentyltheophylline, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that a small increase in extracellular adenosine levels resulting from increased ATP release by astrocytes results in attenuation of DP in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the mutant mice. PMID:25017946

  2. Disease causing mutants of TDP-43 nucleic acid binding domains are resistant to aggregation and have increased stability and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Austin, James A.; Wright, Gareth S. A.; Watanabe, Seiji; Grossmann, J. Günter; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Yamanaka, Koji; Hasnain, S. Samar

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades many secrets of the age-related human neural proteinopathies have been revealed. A common feature of these diseases is abnormal, and possibly pathogenic, aggregation of specific proteins in the effected tissue often resulting from inherent or decreased structural stability. An archetype example of this is superoxide dismutase-1, the first genetic factor to be linked with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutant or posttranslationally modified TAR DNA binding protein-32 (TDP-43) is also strongly associated with ALS and an increasingly large number of other neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Cytoplasmic mislocalization and elevated half-life is a characteristic of mutant TDP-43. Furthermore, patient age at the onset of disease symptoms shows a good inverse correlation with mutant TDP-43 half-life. Here we show that ALS and FTLD-associated TDP-43 mutations in the central nucleic acid binding domains lead to elevated half-life and this is commensurate with increased thermal stability and inhibition of aggregation. It is achieved without impact on secondary, tertiary, or quaternary structure. We propose that tighter structural cohesion contributes to reduced protein turnover, increasingly abnormal proteostasis and, ultimately, faster onset of disease symptoms. These results contrast our perception of neurodegenerative diseases as misfolded proteinopathies and delineate a novel path from the molecular characteristics of mutant TDP-43 to aberrant cellular effects and patient phenotype. PMID:24591609

  3. A combination of gene expression ranking and co-expression network analysis increases discovery rate in large-scale mutant screens for novel Arabidopsis thaliana abiotic stress genes.

    PubMed

    Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Basha, Omer; Acuna, Tania; Verduyn, Christoph; Gordon, Michal; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Hannah, Matthew A; Barak, Simon

    2015-05-01

    As challenges to food security increase, the demand for lead genes for improving crop production is growing. However, genetic screens of plant mutants typically yield very low frequencies of desired phenotypes. Here, we present a powerful computational approach for selecting candidate genes for screening insertion mutants. We combined ranking of Arabidopsis thaliana regulatory genes according to their expression in response to multiple abiotic stresses (Multiple Stress [MST] score), with stress-responsive RNA co-expression network analysis to select candidate multiple stress regulatory (MSTR) genes. Screening of 62 T-DNA insertion mutants defective in candidate MSTR genes, for abiotic stress germination phenotypes yielded a remarkable hit rate of up to 62%; this gene discovery rate is 48-fold greater than that of other large-scale insertional mutant screens. Moreover, the MST score of these genes could be used to prioritize them for screening. To evaluate the contribution of the co-expression analysis, we screened 64 additional mutant lines of MST-scored genes that did not appear in the RNA co-expression network. The screening of these MST-scored genes yielded a gene discovery rate of 36%, which is much higher than that of classic mutant screens but not as high as when picking candidate genes from the co-expression network. The MSTR co-expression network that we created, AraSTressRegNet is publicly available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/arnet. This systems biology-based screening approach combining gene ranking and network analysis could be generally applicable to enhancing identification of genes regulating additional processes in plants and other organisms provided that suitable transcriptome data are available. PMID:25370817

  4. A Mutant Form of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Pilus Secretin Protein PilQ Allows Increased Entry of Heme and Antimicrobial Compounds†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-ju; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Shafer, William M.; Seifert, H. Steven; Sparling, P. Frederick

    2004-01-01

    A spontaneous point mutation in pilQ (pilQ1) resulted in phenotypic suppression of a hemoglobin (Hb) receptor mutant (hpuAB mutant), allowing gonococci to grow on Hb as the sole source of iron. PilQ, formerly designated OMP-MC, is a member of the secretin family of proteins located in the outer membrane and is required for pilus biogenesis. The pilQ1 mutant also showed decreased piliation and transformation efficiency. Insertional inactivation of pilQ1 resulted in the loss of the Hb utilization phenotype and decreased entry of free heme. Despite the ability of the pilQ1 mutant to use Hb for iron acquisition and porphyrin, there was no demonstrable binding of Hb to the cell surface. The pilQ1 mutant was more sensitive to the toxic effect of free heme in growth medium and hypersensitive to the detergent Triton X-100 and multiple antibiotics. Double mutation in pilQ1 and tonB had no effect on these phenotypes, but a double pilQ1 pilT mutant showed a reduction in Hb-dependent growth and decreased sensitivity to heme and various antimicrobial agents. Insertional inactivation of wild-type pilQ also resulted in reduced entry of heme, Triton X-100, and some antibiotics. These results show that PilQ forms a channel that allows entry of heme and certain antimicrobial compounds and that a gain-of function point mutation in pilQ results in TonB-independent, PilT-dependent increase of entry. PMID:14729699

  5. Galactosylated fucose epitopes in nematodes: increased expression in a Caenorhabditis mutant associated with altered lectin sensitivity and occurrence in parasitic species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Plaza, David Fernando; Künzler, Markus; Aebi, Markus; Joachim, Anja; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Jantsch, Verena; Geyer, Rudolf; Wilson, Iain B H; Paschinger, Katharina

    2012-08-17

    The modification of α1,6-linked fucose residues attached to the proximal (reducing-terminal) core N-acetylglucosamine residue of N-glycans by β1,4-linked galactose ("GalFuc" epitope) is a feature of a number of invertebrate species including the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A pre-requisite for both core α1,6-fucosylation and β1,4-galactosylation is the presence of a nonreducing terminal N-acetylglucosamine; however, this residue is normally absent from the final glycan structure in invertebrates due to the action of specific hexosaminidases. Previously, we have identified two hexosaminidases (HEX-2 and HEX-3) in C. elegans, which process N-glycans. In the present study, we have prepared a hex-2;hex-3 double mutant, which possesses a radically altered N-glycomic profile. Whereas in the double mutant core α1,3-fucosylation of the proximal N-acetylglucosamine was abolished, the degree of galactosylation of core α1,6-fucose increased, and a novel Galα1,2Fucα1,3 moiety attached to the distal core N-acetylglucosamine residue was detected. Both galactosylated fucose moieties were also found in two parasitic nematodes, Ascaris suum and Oesophagostomum dentatum. As core modifications of N-glycans are known targets for fungal nematotoxic lectins, the sensitivity of the C. elegans double hexosaminidase mutant was assessed. Although this mutant displayed hypersensitivity to the GalFuc-binding lectin CGL2 and the N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectin XCL, the mutant was resistant to CCL2, which binds core α1,3-fucose. Thus, the use of C. elegans mutants aids the identification of novel N-glycan modifications and the definition of in vivo specificities of nematotoxic lectins with potential as anthelmintic agents.

  6. A combination of gene expression ranking and co-expression network analysis increases discovery rate in large-scale mutant screens for novel Arabidopsis thaliana abiotic stress genes.

    PubMed

    Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Basha, Omer; Acuna, Tania; Verduyn, Christoph; Gordon, Michal; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Hannah, Matthew A; Barak, Simon

    2015-05-01

    As challenges to food security increase, the demand for lead genes for improving crop production is growing. However, genetic screens of plant mutants typically yield very low frequencies of desired phenotypes. Here, we present a powerful computational approach for selecting candidate genes for screening insertion mutants. We combined ranking of Arabidopsis thaliana regulatory genes according to their expression in response to multiple abiotic stresses (Multiple Stress [MST] score), with stress-responsive RNA co-expression network analysis to select candidate multiple stress regulatory (MSTR) genes. Screening of 62 T-DNA insertion mutants defective in candidate MSTR genes, for abiotic stress germination phenotypes yielded a remarkable hit rate of up to 62%; this gene discovery rate is 48-fold greater than that of other large-scale insertional mutant screens. Moreover, the MST score of these genes could be used to prioritize them for screening. To evaluate the contribution of the co-expression analysis, we screened 64 additional mutant lines of MST-scored genes that did not appear in the RNA co-expression network. The screening of these MST-scored genes yielded a gene discovery rate of 36%, which is much higher than that of classic mutant screens but not as high as when picking candidate genes from the co-expression network. The MSTR co-expression network that we created, AraSTressRegNet is publicly available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/arnet. This systems biology-based screening approach combining gene ranking and network analysis could be generally applicable to enhancing identification of genes regulating additional processes in plants and other organisms provided that suitable transcriptome data are available.

  7. HPRT deficiency coordinately dysregulates canonical Wnt and presenilin-1 signaling: a neuro-developmental regulatory role for a housekeeping gene?

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hyuk; Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Jinnah, H A; Friedmann, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    We have used microarray-based methods of global gene expression together with quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis to identify dysregulation of genes and aberrant cellular processes in human fibroblasts and in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells made HPRT-deficient by transduction with a retrovirus stably expressing an shRNA targeted against HPRT. Analysis of the microarray expression data by Gene ontology (GO) and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) as well as significant pathway analysis by GeneSpring GX10 and Panther Classification System reveal that HPRT deficiency is accompanied by aberrations in a variety of pathways known to regulate neurogenesis or to be implicated in neurodegenerative disease, including the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and the Alzheimer's disease/presenilin signaling pathways. Dysregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is confirmed by Western blot demonstration of cytosolic sequestration of β-catenin during in vitro differentiation of the SH-SY5Y cells toward the neuronal phenotype. We also demonstrate that two key transcription factor genes known to be regulated by Wnt signaling and to be vital for the generation and function of dopaminergic neurons; i.e., Lmx1a and Engrailed 1, are down-regulated in the HPRT knockdown SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to the Wnt signaling aberration, we found that expression of presenilin-1 shows severely aberrant expression in HPRT-deficient SH-SY5Y cells, reflected by marked deficiency of the 23 kDa C-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 in knockdown cells. Western blot analysis of primary fibroblast cultures from two LND patients also shows dysregulated presenilin-1 expression, including aberrant proteolytic processing of presenilin-1. These demonstrations of dysregulated Wnt signaling and presenilin-1 expression together with impaired expression of dopaminergic transcription factors reveal broad pleitropic neuro-regulatory defects played by HPRT expression and suggest new directions for investigating mechanisms of

  8. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  9. Analysis of mutant quantity and quality in human-hamster hybrid AL and AL-179 cells exposed to 137Cs-gamma or HZE-Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldren, C.; Vannais, D.; Drabek, R.; Gustafson, D.; Kraemer, S.; Lenarczyk, M.; Kronenberg, A.; Hei, T.; Ueno, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We measured the number of mutants and the kinds of mutations induced by 137Cs-gamma and by HZE-Fe (56Fe [600 MeV/amu, LET = 190 KeV/micrometer) in standard AL human hamster hybrid cells and in a new variant hybrid, AL-179. We found that HZE-Fe was more mutagenic than 137Cs-gamma per unit dose (about 1.6 fold), but was slightly less mutagenic per mean lethal dose, DO, at both the S1 and hprt- loci of AL cells. On the other hand, HZE-Fe induced about nine fold more complex S1- mutants than 137Cs-gamma rays, 28% vs 3%. 137Cs-gamma rays induced about twice as many S1- mutants and hprt-mutants in AL-179 as in AL cells, and about nine times more of the former were complex, and potentially unstable kinds of mutations.

  10. Characterization of a mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Thermus thermophilus and increased L-ribose production by its R142N mutant.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Seo, Eun-Sun; Kim, Bi-Na; Kim, Yeong-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2011-02-01

    An uncharacterized gene from Thermus thermophilus, thought to encode a mannose-6-phosphate isomerase, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The maximal activity of the recombinant enzyme for L-ribulose isomerization was observed at pH 7.0 and 75°C in the presence of 0.5 mM Cu(2+). Among all of the pentoses and hexoses evaluated, the enzyme exhibited the highest activity for the conversion of L-ribulose to L-ribose, a potential starting material for many L-nucleoside-based pharmaceutical compounds. The active-site residues, predicted according to a homology-based model, were separately replaced with Ala. The residue at position 142 was correlated with an increase in L-ribulose isomerization activity. The R142N mutant showed the highest activity among mutants modified with Ala, Glu, Tyr, Lys, Asn, or Gln. The specific activity and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for L-ribulose using the R142N mutant were 1.4- and 1.6-fold higher than those of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. The k(cat)/K(m) of the R142N mutant was 3.8-fold higher than that of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans mannose-6-phosphate isomerase, which exhibited the highest activity to date for the previously reported k(cat)/K(m). The R142N mutant enzyme produced 213 g/liter L-ribose from 300 g/liter L-ribulose for 2 h, with a volumetric productivity of 107 g liter(-1) h(-1), which was 1.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme.

  11. Ambroxol-induced rescue of defective glucocerebrosidase is associated with increased LIMP-2 and saposin C levels in GBA1 mutant Parkinson's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Giulia; Ghezzi, Cristina; Zangaglia, Roberta; Levandis, Giovanna; Pacchetti, Claudio; Blandini, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Heterozygous mutations in GBA1 gene, encoding for lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase), are a major risk factor for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Defective GCase has been reported in fibroblasts of GBA1-mutant PD patients and pharmacological chaperone ambroxol has been shown to correct such defect. To further explore this issue, we investigated GCase and elements supporting GCase function and trafficking in fibroblasts from sporadic PD patients--with or without heterozygous GBA1 mutations--and healthy subjects, in basal conditions and following in vitro exposure to ambroxol. We assessed protein levels of GCase, lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP-2), which mediates GCase trafficking to lysosomes, GCase endogenous activator saposin (Sap) C and parkin, which is involved in degradation of defective GCase. We also measured activities of GCase and cathepsin D, which cleaves Sap C from precursor prosaposin. GCase activity was reduced in fibroblasts from GBA1-mutant patients and ambroxol corrected this defect. Ambroxol increased cathepsin D activity, GCase and Sap C protein levels in all groups, while LIMP-2 levels were increased only in GBA1-mutant PD fibroblasts. Parkin levels were slightly increased only in the PD group without GBA1 mutations and were not significantly modified by ambroxol. Our study confirms that GCase activity is deficient in fibroblasts of GBA1-mutant PD patients and that ambroxol corrects this defect. The drug increased Sap C and LIMP-2 protein levels, without interfering with parkin. These results confirm that chemical chaperone ambroxol modulates lysosomal markers, further highlighting targets that may be exploited for innovative PD therapeutic strategies.

  12. Ambroxol-induced rescue of defective glucocerebrosidase is associated with increased LIMP-2 and saposin C levels in GBA1 mutant Parkinson's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Giulia; Ghezzi, Cristina; Zangaglia, Roberta; Levandis, Giovanna; Pacchetti, Claudio; Blandini, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Heterozygous mutations in GBA1 gene, encoding for lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase), are a major risk factor for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Defective GCase has been reported in fibroblasts of GBA1-mutant PD patients and pharmacological chaperone ambroxol has been shown to correct such defect. To further explore this issue, we investigated GCase and elements supporting GCase function and trafficking in fibroblasts from sporadic PD patients--with or without heterozygous GBA1 mutations--and healthy subjects, in basal conditions and following in vitro exposure to ambroxol. We assessed protein levels of GCase, lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP-2), which mediates GCase trafficking to lysosomes, GCase endogenous activator saposin (Sap) C and parkin, which is involved in degradation of defective GCase. We also measured activities of GCase and cathepsin D, which cleaves Sap C from precursor prosaposin. GCase activity was reduced in fibroblasts from GBA1-mutant patients and ambroxol corrected this defect. Ambroxol increased cathepsin D activity, GCase and Sap C protein levels in all groups, while LIMP-2 levels were increased only in GBA1-mutant PD fibroblasts. Parkin levels were slightly increased only in the PD group without GBA1 mutations and were not significantly modified by ambroxol. Our study confirms that GCase activity is deficient in fibroblasts of GBA1-mutant PD patients and that ambroxol corrects this defect. The drug increased Sap C and LIMP-2 protein levels, without interfering with parkin. These results confirm that chemical chaperone ambroxol modulates lysosomal markers, further highlighting targets that may be exploited for innovative PD therapeutic strategies. PMID:26094596

  13. Novel angiogenin mutants with increased cytotoxicity enhance the depletion of pro-inflammatory macrophages and leukemia cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Christian; Braun, Hanna; Mladenov, Radoslav; Schenke, Lea; Cong, Xiaojing; Jost, Edgar; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Fischer, Rainer; Carloni, Paolo; Barth, Stefan; Nachreiner, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Immunotoxins are fusion proteins that combine a targeting component such as an antibody fragment or ligand with a cytotoxic effector component that induces apoptosis in specific cell populations displaying the corresponding antigen or receptor. Human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs) are less immunogenic than conventional immunotoxins because they contain human pro-apoptotic enzymes as effectors. However, one drawback of hCFPs is that target cells can protect themselves by expressing endogenous inhibitor proteins. Inhibitor-resistant enzyme mutants that maintain their cytotoxic activity are therefore promising effector domain candidates. We recently developed potent variants of the human ribonuclease angiogenin (Ang) that were either more active than the wild-type enzyme or less susceptible to inhibition because of their lower affinity for the ribonuclease inhibitor RNH1. However, combining the mutations was unsuccessful because although the enzyme retained its higher activity, its susceptibility to RNH1 reverted to wild-type levels. We therefore used molecular dynamic simulations to determine, at the atomic level, why the affinity for RNH1 reverted, and we developed strategies based on the introduction of further mutations to once again reduce the affinity of Ang for RNH1 while retaining its enhanced activity. We were able to generate a novel Ang variant with remarkable in vitro cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells and pro-inflammatory macrophages. We also demonstrated the pro-apoptotic potential of Ang-based hCFPs on cells freshly isolated from leukemia patients. PMID:26472728

  14. Mutant Alleles of lptD Increase the Permeability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Define Determinants of Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Grabowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria provide a particular challenge to antibacterial drug discovery due to their cell envelope structure. Compound entry is impeded by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer membrane (OM), and those molecules that overcome this barrier are often expelled by multidrug efflux pumps. Understanding how efflux and permeability affect the ability of a compound to reach its target is paramount to translating in vitro biochemical potency to cellular bioactivity. Herein, a suite of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were constructed in either a wild-type or efflux-null background in which mutations were engineered in LptD, the final protein involved in LPS transport to the OM. These mutants were demonstrated to be defective in LPS transport, resulting in compromised barrier function. Using isogenic strain sets harboring these newly created alleles, we were able to define the contributions of permeability and efflux to the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to a variety of antibiotics. These strains will be useful in the design and optimization of future antibiotics against Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:26596941

  15. Elevated salicylic acid levels conferred by increased expression of ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE 1 contribute to hyperaccumulation of SUMO1 conjugates in the Arabidopsis mutant early in short days 4.

    PubMed

    Villajuana-Bonequi, Mitzi; Elrouby, Nabil; Nordström, Karl; Griebel, Thomas; Bachmair, Andreas; Coupland, George

    2014-07-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is essential for plant growth and development. Mutations in the SUMO protease early in short days 4 (ESD4) cause hyperaccumulation of conjugates formed between SUMO and its substrates, and phenotypically are associated with extreme early flowering and impaired growth. We performed a suppressor mutagenesis screen of esd4 and identified a series of mutants called suppressor of esd4 (sed), which delay flowering, enhance growth and reduce hyperaccumulation of SUMO conjugates. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing indicated that one of these mutations (sed111) is in the gene salicylic acid induction-deficient 2 (SID2), which encodes ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE I, an enzyme required for biosynthesis of salicylic acid (SA). Analyses showed that compared with wild-type plants, esd4 contains higher levels of SID2 mRNA and about threefold more SA, whereas sed111 contains lower SA levels. Other sed mutants also contain lower SA levels but are not mutant for SID2, although most reduce SID2 mRNA levels. Therefore, higher SA levels contribute to the small size, early flowering and elevated SUMO conjugate levels of esd4. Our results support previous data indicating that SUMO homeostasis influences SA biosynthesis in wild-type plants, and also demonstrate that elevated levels of SA strongly increase the abundance of SUMO conjugates.

  16. Interactions of abiraterone, eplerenone, and prednisolone with wild-type and mutant androgen receptor: a rationale for increasing abiraterone exposure or combining with MDV3100.

    PubMed

    Richards, Juliet; Lim, Ai Chiin; Hay, Colin W; Taylor, Angela E; Wingate, Anna; Nowakowska, Karolina; Pezaro, Carmel; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Arlt, Wiebke; McEwan, Iain J; de Bono, Johann S; Attard, Gerhardt

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer progression can be associated with androgen receptor (AR) mutations acquired following treatment with castration and/or an antiandrogen. Abiraterone, a rationally designed inhibitor of CYP17A1 recently approved for the treatment of docetaxel-treated castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is often effective, but requires coadministration with glucocorticoids to curtail side effects. Here, we hypothesized that progressive disease on abiraterone may occur secondary to glucocorticoid-induced activation of mutated AR. We found that prednisolone plasma levels in patients with CRPC were sufficiently high to activate mutant AR. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, such as spironolactone and eplerenone that are used to treat side effects related to mineralocorticoid excess, can also bind to and activate signaling through wild-type or mutant AR. Abiraterone inhibited in vitro proliferation and AR-regulated gene expression of AR-positive prostate cancer cells, which could be explained by AR antagonism in addition to inhibition of steroidogenesis. In fact, activation of mutant AR by eplerenone was inhibited by MDV3100, bicalutamide, or greater concentrations of abiraterone. Therefore, an increase in abiraterone exposure could reverse resistance secondary to activation of AR by residual ligands or coadministered drugs. Together, our findings provide a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of combined CYP17A1 inhibition and AR antagonism.

  17. Control of grain protein contents through SEMIDWARF1 mutant alleles: sd1 increases the grain protein content in Dee-geo-woo-gen but not in Reimei.

    PubMed

    Terao, Tomio; Hirose, Tatsuro

    2015-06-01

    A new possibility for genetic control of the protein content of rice grains was suggested by the allele differences of the SEMIDWARF1 (SD1) mutation. Two quantitative trait loci-qPROT1 and qPROT12-were found on chromosomes 1 and 12, respectively, using backcrossed inbred lines of Sasanishiki/Habataki//Sasanishiki///Sasanishiki. One of them, qPROT1, increased almost all grain proteins instead of only certain proteins in the recessive Habataki allele. Fine mapping of qPROT1 revealed that two gene candidates-Os01g0883800 and Os01g0883900-were included in this region. Os01g0883800 encoded Gibberellin 20 oxidase 2 as well as SD1, the dwarf gene used in the so-called 'Green Revolution'. Mutant analyses as well as sequencing analysis using the semi-dwarf mutant cultivars Dee-geo-woo-gen and Calrose 76 revealed that the sd1 mutant showed significantly higher grain protein contents than their corresponding wild-type cultivars, strongly suggesting that the high protein contents were caused by sd1 mutation. However, the sd1 mutant Reimei did not have high grain protein contents. It is possible to control the grain protein content and column length separately by selecting for sd1 alleles. From this finding, the genetic control of grain protein content, as well as the column length of rice cultivars, might be possible. This ability might be useful to improve rice nutrition, particularly in areas where the introduction of semi-dwarf cultivars is not advanced.

  18. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 Null Mutant Shows Increased Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid, Salt, and Osmotic Stress in Germination and Post-germination Stages

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Muñoz, Silvia; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Ortega-Amaro, Maria A.; Salazar-Badillo, Fatima B.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    DnaJ proteins are essential co-chaperones involved in abiotic and biotic stress responses. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 gene encodes a molecular co-chaperone of 420 amino acids, which belongs to the J-protein family. In this study, we report the functional characterization of the AtDjA3 gene using the Arabidopsis knockout line designated j3 and the 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Loss of AtDjA3 function was associated with small seed production. In fact, j3 mutant seeds showed a reduction of 24% in seed weight compared to Col-0 seeds. Expression analysis showed that the AtDjA3 gene was modulated in response to NaCl, glucose, and abscisic acid (ABA). The j3 line had increased sensitivity to NaCl and glucose treatments in the germination and cotyledon development in comparison to parental Col-0. Furthermore, the j3 mutant line exhibited higher ABA sensitivity in comparison to parental Col-0 and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. In addition, we examined the expression of ABI3 gene, which is a central regulator in ABA signaling, in j3 mutant and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Under 5 μM ABA treatment at 24 h, j3 mutant seedlings displayed higher ABI3 expression, whereas in 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines, ABI3 gene expression was repressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the AtDjA3 gene is involved in seed development and abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26941772

  19. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 Null Mutant Shows Increased Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid, Salt, and Osmotic Stress in Germination and Post-germination Stages.

    PubMed

    Salas-Muñoz, Silvia; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A; Ortega-Amaro, Maria A; Salazar-Badillo, Fatima B; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    DnaJ proteins are essential co-chaperones involved in abiotic and biotic stress responses. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 gene encodes a molecular co-chaperone of 420 amino acids, which belongs to the J-protein family. In this study, we report the functional characterization of the AtDjA3 gene using the Arabidopsis knockout line designated j3 and the 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Loss of AtDjA3 function was associated with small seed production. In fact, j3 mutant seeds showed a reduction of 24% in seed weight compared to Col-0 seeds. Expression analysis showed that the AtDjA3 gene was modulated in response to NaCl, glucose, and abscisic acid (ABA). The j3 line had increased sensitivity to NaCl and glucose treatments in the germination and cotyledon development in comparison to parental Col-0. Furthermore, the j3 mutant line exhibited higher ABA sensitivity in comparison to parental Col-0 and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. In addition, we examined the expression of ABI3 gene, which is a central regulator in ABA signaling, in j3 mutant and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Under 5 μM ABA treatment at 24 h, j3 mutant seedlings displayed higher ABI3 expression, whereas in 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines, ABI3 gene expression was repressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the AtDjA3 gene is involved in seed development and abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26941772

  20. Cystogenesis in ARPKD results from increased apoptosis in collecting duct epithelial cells of Pkhd1 mutant kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bo; He, Xiusheng; Li, Ao; Qiu, Qingchao; Li, Cunxi; Liang, Dan; Zhao, Ping; Ma, Jie; Coffey, Robert J.; Zhan, Qimin; Wu, Guanqing

    2011-01-15

    Mutations in the PKHD1 gene result in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) in humans. To determine the molecular mechanism of the cystogenesis in ARPKD, we recently generated a mouse model for ARPKD that carries a targeted mutation in the mouse orthologue of human PKHD1. The homozygous mutant mice display hepatorenal cysts whose phenotypes are similar to those of human ARPKD patients. By littermates of this mouse, we developed two immortalized renal collecting duct cell lines with Pkhd1 and two without. Under nonpermissive culture conditions, the Pkhd1{sup -/-} renal cells displayed aberrant cell-cell contacts and tubulomorphogenesis. The Pkhd1{sup -/-} cells also showed significantly reduced cell proliferation and elevated apoptosis. To validate this finding in vivo, we examined proliferation and apoptosis in the kidneys of Pkhd1{sup -/-} mice and their wildtype littermates. Using proliferation (PCNA and Histone-3) and apoptosis (TUNEL and caspase-3) markers, similar results were obtained in the Pkhd1{sup -/-} kidney tissues as in the cells. To identify the molecular basis of these findings, we analyzed the effect of Pkhd1 loss on multiple putative signaling regulators. We demonstrated that the loss of Pkhd1 disrupts multiple major phosphorylations of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and these disruptions either inhibit the Ras/C-Raf pathways to suppress MEK/ERK activity and ultimately reduce cell proliferation, or suppress PDK1/AKT to upregulate Bax/caspase-9/caspase-3 and promote apoptosis. Our findings indicate that apoptosis may be a major player in the cyst formation in ARPKD, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies for human ARPKD.

  1. Increased valinomycin production in mutants of Streptomyces sp. M10 defective in bafilomycin biosynthesis and branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wan; Ng, Bee Gek; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-11-01

    Streptomyces sp. M10 is a valinomycin-producing bacterial strain that shows potent bioactivity against Botrytis blight of cucumber plants. During studies to increase the yield of valinomycin (a cyclododecadepsipeptide) in strain M10, additional antifungal metabolites, including bafilomycin derivatives (macrolide antibiotics), were identified. To examine the effect of bafilomycin biosynthesis on valinomycin production, the bafilomycin biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned from the genome of strain M10, as were two branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCDH) gene clusters related to precursor supply for bafilomycin biosynthesis. A null mutant (M10bafm) of one bafilomycin biosynthetic gene (bafV) failed to produce bafilomycin, but resulted in a 1.2- to 1.5-fold increase in the amount of valinomycin produced. In another null mutant (M10bkdFm) of a gene encoding a subunit of the BCDH complex (bkdF), bafilomycin production was completely abolished and valinomycin production increased fourfold relative to that in the wild-type M10 strain. The higher valinomycin yield was likely the result of redistribution of the metabolic flux from bafilomycin to valinomycin biosynthesis, because the two antibiotics share a common precursor, 2-ketoisovaleric acid, a deamination product of valine. The results show that directing precursor flux toward active ingredient biosynthesis could be used as a prospective tool to increase the competence of biofungicides.

  2. Compartmentalized self-replication under fast PCR cycling conditions yields Taq DNA polymerase mutants with increased DNA-binding affinity and blood resistance

    PubMed Central

    Arezi, Bahram; McKinney, Nancy; Hansen, Connie; Cayouette, Michelle; Fox, Jeffrey; Chen, Keith; Lapira, Jennifer; Hamilton, Sarah; Hogrefe, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Faster-cycling PCR formulations, protocols, and instruments have been developed to address the need for increased throughput and shorter turn-around times for PCR-based assays. Although run times can be cut by up to 50%, shorter cycle times have been correlated with lower detection sensitivity and increased variability. To address these concerns, we applied Compartmentalized Self Replication (CSR) to evolve faster-cycling mutants of Taq DNA polymerase. After five rounds of selection using progressively shorter PCR extension times, individual mutations identified in the fastest-cycling clones were randomly combined using ligation-based multi-site mutagenesis. The best-performing combinatorial mutants exhibit 35- to 90-fold higher affinity (lower Kd) for primed template and a moderate (2-fold) increase in extension rate compared to wild-type Taq. Further characterization revealed that CSR-selected mutations provide increased resistance to inhibitors, and most notably, enable direct amplification from up to 65% whole blood. We discuss the contribution of individual mutations to fast-cycling and blood-resistant phenotypes. PMID:25177317

  3. Over-expression of an inactive mutant cathepsin D increases endogenous alpha-synuclein and cathepsin B activity in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Donna; Dodson, Matthew; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Liang, Qiuli; Ballestas, Mary E; Fineberg, Naomi; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder. The histopathology of Parkinson's disease comprises proteinaceous inclusions known as Lewy bodies, which contains aggregated α-synuclein. Cathepsin D (CD) is a lysosomal protease previously demonstrated to cleave α-synuclein and decrease its toxicity in both cell lines and mouse brains in vivo. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of CD, or introduction of catalytically inactive mutant CD, resulted in decreased CD activity and increased cathepsin B activity, suggesting a possible compensatory response to inhibition of CD activity. However, this increased cathepsin B activity was not sufficient to maintain α-synuclein degradation, as evidenced by the accumulation of endogenous α-synuclein. Interestingly, the levels of LC3, LAMP1, and LAMP2, proteins involved in autophagy-lysosomal activities, as well as total lysosomal mass as assessed by LysoTracker flow cytometry, were unchanged. Neither autophagic flux nor proteasomal activities differs between cells over-expressing wild-type versus mutant CD. These observations point to a critical regulatory role for that endogenous CD activity in dopaminergic cells in α-synuclein homeostasis which cannot be compensated for by increased Cathepsin B. These data support the potential need to enhance CD function in order to attenuate α-synuclein accumulation as a therapeutic strategy against development of synucleinopathy.

  4. Increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens in the Arabidopsis constitutive induced resistance 1 mutant is EDS1 and PAD4-dependent and modulated by environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Maryke; McCrindle, Tyronne K; Adams, Nicolette; Diener, Anastashia; Guzha, Delroy T; Murray, Shane L; Parker, Jane E; Denby, Katherine J; Ingle, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis constitutive induced resistance 1 (cir1) mutant displays salicylic acid (SA)-dependent constitutive expression of defence genes and enhanced resistance to biotrophic pathogens. To further characterise the role of CIR1 in plant immunity we conducted epistasis analyses with two key components of the SA-signalling branch of the defence network, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4). We demonstrate that the constitutive defence phenotypes of cir1 require both EDS1 and PAD4, indicating that CIR1 lies upstream of the EDS1-PAD4 regulatory node in the immune signalling network. In light of this finding we examined EDS1 expression in cir1 and observed increased protein, but not mRNA levels in this mutant, suggesting that CIR1 might act as a negative regulator of EDS1 via a post-transcriptional mechanism. Finally, as environmental temperature is known to influence the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions, we analysed cir1 plants grown at 18, 22 or 25°C. We found that susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 is modulated by temperature in cir1. Greatest resistance to this pathogen (relative to PR-1:LUC control plants) was observed at 18°C, while at 25°C no difference in susceptibility between cir1 and control plants was apparent. The increase in resistance to Pst DC3000 at 18°C correlated with a stunted growth phenotype, suggesting that activation of defence responses may be enhanced at lower temperatures in the cir1 mutant.

  5. A novel tomato mutant, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit1 (Slelf1), exhibits an elongated fruit shape caused by increased cell layers in the proximal region of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Chusreeaeom, Katarut; Ariizumi, Tohru; Asamizu, Erika; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Shirasawa, Kenta; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Genes controlling fruit morphology offer important insights into patterns and mechanisms determining organ shape and size. In cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), a variety of fruit shapes are displayed, including round-, bell pepper-, pear-, and elongate-shaped forms. In this study, we characterized a tomato mutant possessing elongated fruit morphology by histologically analyzing its fruit structure and genetically analyzing and mapping the genetic locus. The mutant line, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit 1 (Slelf1), was selected in a previous study from an ethylmethane sulfonate-mutagenized population generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf and rapid-growth variety. Histological analysis of the Slelf1 mutant revealed dramatically increased elongation of ovary and fruit. Until 6 days before flowering, ovaries were round and they began to elongate afterward. We also determined pericarp thickness and the number of cell layers in three designated fruit regions. We found that mesocarp thickness, as well as the number of cell layers, was increased in the proximal region of immature green fruits, making this the key sector of fruit elongation. Using 262 F2 individuals derived from a cross between Slelf1 and the cultivar Ailsa Craig, we constructed a genetic map, simple sequence repeat (SSR), cleaved amplified polymorphism sequence (CAPS), and derived CAPS (dCAPS) markers and mapped to the 12 tomato chromosomes. Genetic mapping placed the candidate gene locus within a 0.2 Mbp interval on the long arm of chromosome 8 and was likely different from previously known loci affecting fruit shape. PMID:24519535

  6. Site-directed mutants of pseudoazurin: explanation of increased redox potentials from X-ray structures and from calculation of redox potential differences.

    PubMed

    Libeu, C A; Kukimoto, M; Nishiyama, M; Horinouchi, S; Adman, E T

    1997-10-28

    In order to understand the origins of differences in redox potentials among cupredoxins (small blue type I copper-containing proteins that reversibly change oxidation state and interact with redox partners), we have determined the structures of the native and two mutants (P80A and P80I) of pseudoazurin from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 in oxidized and reduced forms at resolutions of 2.2 A in the worst case and 1.6 A in the best case. The P80A mutation creates a surface pocket filled by a new water molecule, whereas the P80I mutant excludes this water. Distinct patterns of change occur in response to reduction for all three molecules: the copper position shifts, Met 7 and Pro 35 move, and the relative orientations of residues 81 to 16, 18 to the amide planes of 77 and 86, all change. Systematic changes in the weak electrostatic interactions seen in the structures of different oxidation states can explain the Met 7/Pro 35 structural differences as well as some fluctuating solvent positions. Overall displacement parameters increase reversibly upon reduction. The reduced forms are slightly expanded over the oxidized forms. The geometries of the mutants become more trigonal in their reduced forms, consistent with higher redox potentials (+409 mV for P80A and +450 mV for P80I). Calculations of the differences in redox potentials, using POLARIS, reveal that a water unique to the P80A mutant is required (with correctly oriented hydrogens) to approximate the observed difference in redox potential. The POLARIS calculations suggest that the reduced forms are additionally stabilized through changes in the solvation of the copper center, specifically via the amides of residues 16, 39, 41, 79, and 80 which interact with either Phe 18, Met 86, or Cys 78. The redox potential of P80A is increased largely due to solvation effects, whereas the redox potential of P80I is increased largely due to geometrical effects.

  7. Enhanced Photosynthesis and Growth in atquac1 Knockout Mutants Are Due to Altered Organic Acid Accumulation and an Increase in Both Stomatal and Mesophyll Conductance.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, David B; Martins, Samuel C V; Cavalcanti, João Henrique F; Daloso, Danilo M; Martinoia, Enrico; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; DaMatta, Fábio M; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the exchange of CO2 and water vapor in land plants. Thus, whereas a constant supply of CO2 is required to maintain adequate rates of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. Accordingly, the uptake or release of ions and metabolites from guard cells is necessary to achieve normal stomatal function. The AtQUAC1, an R-type anion channel responsible for the release of malate from guard cells, is essential for efficient stomatal closure. Here, we demonstrate that mutant plants lacking AtQUAC1 accumulated higher levels of malate and fumarate. These mutant plants not only display slower stomatal closure in response to increased CO2 concentration and dark but are also characterized by improved mesophyll conductance. These responses were accompanied by increases in both photosynthesis and respiration rates, without affecting the activity of photosynthetic and respiratory enzymes and the expression of other transporter genes in guard cells, which ultimately led to improved growth. Collectively, our results highlight that the transport of organic acids plays a key role in plant cell metabolism and demonstrate that AtQUAC1 reduce diffusive limitations to photosynthesis, which, at least partially, explain the observed increments in growth under well-watered conditions.

  8. Enhanced Photosynthesis and Growth in atquac1 Knockout Mutants Are Due to Altered Organic Acid Accumulation and an Increase in Both Stomatal and Mesophyll Conductance.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, David B; Martins, Samuel C V; Cavalcanti, João Henrique F; Daloso, Danilo M; Martinoia, Enrico; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; DaMatta, Fábio M; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the exchange of CO2 and water vapor in land plants. Thus, whereas a constant supply of CO2 is required to maintain adequate rates of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. Accordingly, the uptake or release of ions and metabolites from guard cells is necessary to achieve normal stomatal function. The AtQUAC1, an R-type anion channel responsible for the release of malate from guard cells, is essential for efficient stomatal closure. Here, we demonstrate that mutant plants lacking AtQUAC1 accumulated higher levels of malate and fumarate. These mutant plants not only display slower stomatal closure in response to increased CO2 concentration and dark but are also characterized by improved mesophyll conductance. These responses were accompanied by increases in both photosynthesis and respiration rates, without affecting the activity of photosynthetic and respiratory enzymes and the expression of other transporter genes in guard cells, which ultimately led to improved growth. Collectively, our results highlight that the transport of organic acids plays a key role in plant cell metabolism and demonstrate that AtQUAC1 reduce diffusive limitations to photosynthesis, which, at least partially, explain the observed increments in growth under well-watered conditions. PMID:26542441

  9. The pharmacological chaperone isofagomine increases the activity of the Gaucher disease L444P mutant form of beta-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Richie; Benjamin, Elfrida R; Pellegrino, Lee; Schilling, Adriane; Rigat, Brigitte A; Soska, Rebecca; Nafar, Hadis; Ranes, Brian E; Feng, Jessie; Lun, Yi; Powe, Allan C; Palling, David J; Wustman, Brandon A; Schiffmann, Raphael; Mahuran, Don J; Lockhart, David J; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2010-04-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme acid beta-glucosidase (GCase). We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) binds and stabilizes N370S GCase, resulting in increased lysosomal trafficking and cellular activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of IFG on L444P GCase. Incubation of Gaucher patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) or fibroblasts with IFG led to approximately 3.5- and 1.3-fold increases in L444P GCase activity, respectively, as measured in cell lysates. The effect in fibroblasts was increased approximately 2-fold using glycoprotein-enrichment, GCase-immunocapture, or by incubating cells overnight in IFG-free media prior to assay, methods designed to maximize GCase activity by reducing IFG carryover and inhibition in the enzymatic assay. IFG incubation also increased the lysosomal trafficking and in situ activity of L444P GCase in intact cells, as measured by reduction in endogenous glucosylceramide levels. Importantly, this reduction was seen only following three-day incubation in IFG-free media, underscoring the importance of IFG removal to restore lysosomal GCase activity. In mice expressing murine L444P GCase, oral administration of IFG resulted in significant increases (2- to 5-fold) in GCase activity in disease-relevant tissues, including brain. Additionally, eight-week IFG administration significantly lowered plasma chitin III and IgG levels, and 24-week administration significantly reduced spleen and liver weights. Taken together, these data suggest that IFG can increase the lysosomal activity of L444P GCase in cells and tissues. Moreover, IFG is orally available and distributes into multiple tissues, including brain, and may thus merit therapeutic evaluation for patients with neuronopathic and non-neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

  10. Genes Encoding Plant-Specific Class III Peroxidases Are Responsible for Increased Cold Tolerance of the brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beg Hab; Kim, Sun Young; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that one of the brassinosteroid-insensitive mutants, bri1-9, showed increased cold tolerance compared with both wild type and BRI1-overexpressing transgenic plants, despite its severe growth retardation. This increased tolerance in bri1-9 resulted from the constitutively high expression of stress-inducible genes under normal conditions. In this report, we focused on the genes encoding class III plant peroxidases (AtPrxs) because we found that, compared with wild type, bri1-9 plants contain higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are not involved with the activation of NADPH oxidase and show an increased level of expression of a subset of genes encoding class III plant peroxidases. Treatment with a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), led to the reduction of cold resistance in bri1-9. Among 73 genes that encode AtPrxs in Arabidopsis, we selected four (AtPrx1, AtPrx22, AtPrx39, and AtPrx69) for further functional analyses in response to cold temperatures. T-DNA insertional knockout mutants showed increased sensitivity to cold stress as measured by leaf damage and ion leakage. In contrast, the overexpression of AtPrx22, AtPrx39, and AtPrx69 increased cold tolerance in the BRI1-GFP plants. Taken together, these results indicate that the appropriate expression of a particular subset of AtPrx genes and the resulting higher levels of ROS production are required for the cold tolerance. PMID:23180292

  11. Short branched-chain C6 carboxylic acids result in increased growth, novel 'unnatural' fatty acids and increased membrane fluidity in a Listeria monocytogenes branched-chain fatty acid-deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Sen, Suranjana; Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Hantak, Michael P; Lawrence, Peter; Brenna, J Thomas; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J

    2015-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a psychrotolerant food borne pathogen, responsible for the high fatality disease listeriosis, and expensive food product recalls. Branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) of the membrane play a critical role in providing appropriate membrane fluidity and optimum membrane biophysics. The fatty acid composition of a BCFA-deficient mutant is characterized by high amounts of straight-chain fatty acids and even-numbered iso fatty acids, in contrast to the parent strain where odd-numbered anteiso fatty acids predominate. The presence of 2-methylbutyrate (C5) stimulated growth of the mutant at 37°C and restored growth at 10°C along with the content of odd-numbered anteiso fatty acids. The C6 branched-chain carboxylic acids 2-ethylbutyrate and 2-methylpentanoate also stimulated growth to a similar extent as 2-methylbutyrate. However, 3-methylpentanoate was ineffective in rescuing growth. 2-Ethylbutyrate and 2-methylpentanoate led to novel major fatty acids in the lipid profile of the membrane that were identified as 12-ethyltetradecanoic acid and 12-methylpentadecanoic acid respectively. Membrane anisotropy studies indicated that growth of strain MOR401 in the presence of these precursors increased its membrane fluidity to levels of the wild type. Cells supplemented with 2-methylpentanoate or 2-ethylbutyrate at 10°C shortened the chain length of novel fatty acids, thus showing homeoviscous adaptation. These experiments use the mutant as a tool to modulate the membrane fatty acid compositions through synthetic precursor supplementation, and show how existing enzymes in L. monocytogenes adapt to exhibit non-native activity yielding unique 'unnatural' fatty acid molecules, which nevertheless possess the correct biophysical properties for proper membrane function in the BCFA-deficient mutant.

  12. Short branched-chain C6 carboxylic acids result in increased growth, novel 'unnatural' fatty acids and increased membrane fluidity in a Listeria monocytogenes branched-chain fatty acid-deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Sen, Suranjana; Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Hantak, Michael P; Lawrence, Peter; Brenna, J Thomas; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J

    2015-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a psychrotolerant food borne pathogen, responsible for the high fatality disease listeriosis, and expensive food product recalls. Branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) of the membrane play a critical role in providing appropriate membrane fluidity and optimum membrane biophysics. The fatty acid composition of a BCFA-deficient mutant is characterized by high amounts of straight-chain fatty acids and even-numbered iso fatty acids, in contrast to the parent strain where odd-numbered anteiso fatty acids predominate. The presence of 2-methylbutyrate (C5) stimulated growth of the mutant at 37°C and restored growth at 10°C along with the content of odd-numbered anteiso fatty acids. The C6 branched-chain carboxylic acids 2-ethylbutyrate and 2-methylpentanoate also stimulated growth to a similar extent as 2-methylbutyrate. However, 3-methylpentanoate was ineffective in rescuing growth. 2-Ethylbutyrate and 2-methylpentanoate led to novel major fatty acids in the lipid profile of the membrane that were identified as 12-ethyltetradecanoic acid and 12-methylpentadecanoic acid respectively. Membrane anisotropy studies indicated that growth of strain MOR401 in the presence of these precursors increased its membrane fluidity to levels of the wild type. Cells supplemented with 2-methylpentanoate or 2-ethylbutyrate at 10°C shortened the chain length of novel fatty acids, thus showing homeoviscous adaptation. These experiments use the mutant as a tool to modulate the membrane fatty acid compositions through synthetic precursor supplementation, and show how existing enzymes in L. monocytogenes adapt to exhibit non-native activity yielding unique 'unnatural' fatty acid molecules, which nevertheless possess the correct biophysical properties for proper membrane function in the BCFA-deficient mutant. PMID:26225744

  13. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Mutant Defective in a Putative Glycosyltransferase Exhibits Defective Biosynthesis of the Polysaccharide Portions of Lipopolysaccharide, Decreased Gingipain Activities, Strong Autoaggregation, and Increased Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Mikiyo; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Noiri, Yuichiro; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Nakayama, Koji

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in periodontal disease, one of the biofilm-caused infectious diseases. The bacterium possesses potential virulence factors, including fimbriae, proteinases, hemagglutinin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and outer membrane vesicles, and some of these factors are associated with biofilm formation; however, the precise mechanism of biofilm formation is still unknown. Colonial pigmentation of the bacterium on blood agar plates is related to its virulence. In this study, we isolated a nonpigmented mutant that had an insertion mutation within the new gene PGN_1251 (gtfB) by screening a transposon insertion library. The gene shares homology with genes encoding glycosyltransferase 1 of several bacteria. The gtfB mutant was defective in biosynthesis of both LPSs containing O side chain polysaccharide (O-LPS) and anionic polysaccharide (A-LPS). The defect in the gene resulted in a complete loss of surface-associated gingipain proteinases, strong autoaggregation, and a marked increase in biofilm formation, suggesting that polysaccharide portions of LPSs influence attachment of gingipain proteinases to the cell surface, autoaggregation, and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis. PMID:20624909

  14. Reduced Sweetness of a Monellin (MNEI) Mutant Results from Increased Protein Flexibility and Disruption of a Distant Poly-(L-Proline) II Helix

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Catherine M.; Ostovar pour, Saeideh; Hobbs, Jeanette R.; Blanch, Ewan W.; Munger, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Monellin is a highly potent sweet-tasting protein but relatively little is known about how it interacts with the sweet taste receptor. We determined X-ray crystal structures of 3 single-chain monellin (MNEI) proteins with alterations at 2 core residues (G16A, V37A, and G16A/V37A) that induce 2- to 10-fold reductions in sweetness relative to the wild-type protein. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the global protein fold or the positions of surface amino acids important for MNEI sweetness that could explain these differences in protein activity. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that while the thermal stability of each mutant MNEI was reduced, the least sweet mutant, G16A-MNEI, was not the least stable protein. In contrast, solution spectroscopic measurements revealed that changes in protein flexibility and the C-terminal structure correlate directly with protein activity. G16A mutation-induced disorder in the protein core is propagated via changes to hydrophobic interactions that disrupt the formation and/or position of a critical C-terminal poly-(L-proline) II helix. These findings suggest that MNEI interaction with the sweet taste receptor is highly sensitive to the relative positions of key residues across its protein surface and that loss of sweetness in G16A-MNEI may result from an increased entropic cost of binding. PMID:21343241

  15. An attenuated mutant of the Rv1747 ATP-binding cassette transporter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a mutant of its cognate kinase, PknF, show increased expression of the efflux pump-related iniBAC operon

    PubMed Central

    Spivey, Vicky L; Whalan, Rachael H; Hirst, Elizabeth M A; Smerdon, Stephen J; Buxton, Roger S

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter Rv1747 is required for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice and in macrophages. Its structure suggests it is an exporter. Rv1747 forms a two-gene operon with pknF coding for the serine/threonine protein kinase PknF, which positively modulates the function of the transporter. We show that deletion of Rv1747 or pknF results in a number of transcriptional changes which could be complemented by the wild type allele, most significantly up-regulation of the iniBAC genes. This operon is inducible by isoniazid and ethambutol and by a broad range of inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis and is required for efflux pump functioning. However, neither the Rv1747 or pknF mutant showed increased susceptibility to a range of drugs and cell wall stress reagents including isoniazid and ethambutol, cell wall structure and cell division appear normal by electron microscopy, and no differences in lipoarabinomannan were found. Transcription from the pknF promoter was not induced by a range of stress reagents. We conclude that the loss of Rv1747 affects cell wall biosynthesis leading to the production of intermediates that cause induction of iniBAC transcription and implicates it in exporting a component of the cell wall, which is necessary for virulence. PMID:23915284

  16. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Influenza Neuraminidase Suggest a Mechanism for the Increased Virulence of Stalk-Deletion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Deletions in the stalk of the influenza neuraminidase (NA) surface protein are associated with increased virulence, but the mechanisms responsible for this enhanced virulence are unclear. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of stalk deletion on enzymatic activity, contrasting NA proteins from the A/swine/Shandong/N1/2009 strain both with and without a stalk deletion. By modeling and simulating neuraminidase apo glycoproteins embedded in complex-mixture lipid bilayers, we show that the geometry and dynamics of the neuraminidase enzymatic pocket may differ depending on stalk length, with possible repercussions on the binding of the endogenous sialylated-oligosaccharide receptors. We also use these simulations to predict previously unrecognized druggable “hotspots” on the neuraminidase surface that may prove useful for future efforts aimed at structure-based drug design. PMID:27141956

  17. Impaired TGF-β induced growth inhibition contributes to the increased proliferation rate of neural stem cells harboring mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Naumann, Ulrike; Aigner, Ludwig; Wischhusen, Joerg; Beier, Christoph P; Beier, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas have been classified according to their histological properties. However, their respective cells of origin are still unknown. Neural progenitor cells (NPC) from the subventricular zone (SVZ) can initiate tumors in murine models of glioma and are likely cells of origin in the human disease. In both, p53 signaling is often functionally impaired which may contribute to tumor formation. Also, TGF-beta, which under physiological conditions exerts a strong control on the proliferation of NPCs in the SVZ, is a potent mitogen on glioma cells. Here, we approach on the crosstalk between p53 and TGF-beta by loss of function experiments using NPCs derived from p53 mutant mice, as well as pharmacological inhibition of TGF-beta signaling using TGF-beta receptor inhibitors. NPC derived from p53 mutant mice showed increased clonogenicity and more rapid proliferation than their wildtype counterparts. Further, NPC derived from p53(mut/mut) mice were insensitive to TGF-beta induced growth arrest. Still, the canonical TGF-beta signaling pathway remained functional in the absence of p53 signaling and expression of key proteins as well as phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD2 were unaltered. TGF-beta-induced p21 expression could, in contrast, only be detected in p53(wt/wt) but not in p53(mut/mut) NPC. Conversely, inhibition of TGF-beta signaling using SB431542 increased proliferation of p53(wt/wt) but not of p53(mut/mut) NPC. In conclusion, our data suggest that the TGF-beta induced growth arrest in NPC depends on functional p53. Mutational inactivation of p53 hence contributes to increased proliferation of NPC and likely to the formation of hyperplasia of the SVZ observed in p53 deficient mice in vivo.

  18. The Reaumuria trigyna leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (RtLDOX) gene complements anthocyanidin synthesis and increases the salt tolerance potential of a transgenic Arabidopsis LDOX mutant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huirong; Du, Chao; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jia; Zheng, Linlin; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-09-01

    Reaumuria trigyna is a typical, native desert halophyte that grows under extreme conditions in Inner Mongolia. In a previous transcriptomic profiling analysis, flavonoid pathway-related genes in R. trigyna showed significant differences in transcript abundance under salt stress. Leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX, EC 1.14.11.19) is one of three dioxygenases in the flavonoid pathway that catalyzes the formation of anthocyanidins from leucoanthocyanidins. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of R. trigyna LDOX (RtLDOX), and found RtLDOX recombinant protein was able to replace flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H, EC 1.14.11.9), another dioxygenase in the flavonoid pathway, to convert naringenin to dihydrokaempferol in vitro. R. trigyna LDOX can complement the Arabidopsis LDOX mutant transparent testa11 (tt11-11), which has reduced proanthocyanin (PA) and anthocyanin levels in seeds, to accumulate these two compounds. Thus, RtLDOX acts as a multifunctional dioxygenase to effect the synthesis of PA and anthocyanins and can perform F3H dioxygenase activities in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The RtLDOX promoter harbored many cis-acting elements that might be recognized and bound by transcription factors related to stress response. RtLDOX expression was strongly increased under salt stress, and RtLDOX transgenic Arabidopsis mutant under NaCl stress accumulated the content of flavonoids leading to an increased antioxidant activities and plant biomass. These results suggest that RtLDOX as a multifunctional dioxygenase in flavonoid biosynthesis involves in enhancing plant response to NaCl stress. PMID:27219053

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  20. SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK AND HPRT GENES OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemicals that are capable of inducing mutational damages. The Tk+/- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wider range of mutational events than the X-linked Hprt locus. However, chemical-induced muta...

  1. Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations in the human hprt gene: a biophysical model based on random walk interphase chromatin geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Sachs, R. K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a biophysical model that explains the sizes of radiation-induced hprt deletions. METHODS: Key assumptions: (1) Deletions are produced by two DSB that are closer than an interaction distance at the time of DSB induction; (2) Interphase chromatin is modelled by a biphasic random walk distribution; and (3) Misrejoining of DSB from two separate tracks dominates at low-LET and misrejoining of DSB from a single track dominates at high-LET. RESULTS: The size spectra for radiation-induced total deletions of the hprt gene are calculated. Comparing with the results of Yamada and coworkers for gamma-irradiated human fibroblasts the study finds that an interaction distance of 0.75 microm will fit both the absolute frequency and the size spectrum of the total deletions. It is also shown that high-LET radiations produce, relatively, more total deletions of sizes below 0.5 Mb. The model predicts an essential gene to be located between 2 and 3 Mb from the hprt locus towards the centromere. Using the same assumptions and parameters as for evaluating mutation frequencies, a frequency of intra-arm chromosome deletions is calculated that is in agreement with experimental data. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations of the human hprt gene and intrachange chromosome aberrations share a common mechanism for their induction.

  2. Target binding to S100B reduces dynamic properties and increases Ca2+-binding affinity for wild type and EF-hand mutant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liriano, Melissa A.; Varney, Kristen M.; Wright, Nathan T.; Hoffman, Cassandra L.; Toth, Eric A.; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the second EF-hand (D61N, D63N, D65N, E72A) of S100B were used to study its Ca2+-binding and dynamic properties in the absence and presence of abound target, TRTK-12. With D63NS100B as an exception (D63NKD = 50 ± 9 µM), Ca2+-binding to EF2-hand mutants were reduced by more than 8-fold in the absence of TRTK-12 (D61NKD = 412 ± 67 µM; D65NKD = 968 ± 171 µM; E72AKD = 471 ± 133 µM), when compared to wild-type protein (WTKD = 56 ± 9 µM). For the TRTK-12 complexes, the Ca2+-binding affinity to wild type (WT+TRTKKD = 12 ± 10 µM) and the EF2 mutants were increased by 5- to 19-fold versus in the absence of target (D61N+TRTKKD = 29 ± 1.2 µM; D63N+TRTKKD = 10 ± 2.2 µM; D65N+TRTKKD = 73 ± 4.4 µM; E72A+TRTKKD = 18 ± 3.7 µM). In addition, Rex, as measured using relaxation dispersion for side chain 15N resonances of Asn63 (D63NS100B) was reduced upon TRTK-12 binding when measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Likewise, backbone motions on multiple time scales (ps-ms) throughout wild type, D61NS100B D63NS100B, and D65NS100B were lowered upon binding TRTK-12. However, the X-ray structures of Ca2+-bound (2.0 Å) and TRTK-bound (1.2 Å) D63NS100B showed no change in Ca2+ coordination, so these and analogous structural data for the wild-type protein could not be used to explain how target binding increased Ca2+-binding affinity in solution. Thus, a model for how S100B-TRTK12 complex formation increases Ca2+ binding is discussed, which considers changes in protein dynamics upon binding the target TRTK-12. PMID:22824086

  3. Molecular characterization of mutation and comparison of mutation profiles in the hprt gene of Chinese hamster ovary cells treated with benzo[a]pyrene trans-7,8-diol-anti-9,10-epoxide, 1-nitrobenzol[a]pyrene trans-7,8-diol-anti-9,10-epoxide, and 3-nitrobenzol[a]pyrene trans-7,8-diol-anti-9,10-epoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, D.J.; Heflich, R.H.; Fu, P.P.

    1996-12-31

    Both 1- and 3-nitrobenzol[a] pyrene (nitro-BaP) are environmental contaminants, potent mutagens in Salmonella, and moderate mutagens in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The mutagenicity of their oxidized metabolites, trans-7,8-dihydroxy-anti-9, 10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-1-nitrobenzol[a]pyrene (1-nitro-BaP-DE) and trans-7,8-dihydroxy-anti-9, 10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-3-nitrobenzo[a]pyrene (3-nitro-BaP-DE), together with trans-7,8-dihydroxy-anti-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzol[a]pyren (BaP-DE), was determined in CHO-K1 cells, and the resulting mutations at the hprt locus were characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of reverse-transcribed hprt mRNA, followed by DNA sequence analysis. The mutant frequencies, in mutants/10{sup 6} clonable cells, at 30 and 100 ng/ml, were BaP-DE, 248 and 456; 1-nitro-BaP-DE, 68 and 260; 3-nitro-BaP-DE, 81 and 232, respectively. In general, the three diolepoxides exhibited similar mutational spectra: (1) 64% (23/36 sequenced mutants) of BaP-DE, 53% (19/36) of 1-nitro-BaP-DE, and 64% (23/36) of 3-nitro-BaP-DE mutants resulted from simple base pair substitution, with the predominant mutation being G{r_arrow}T transversion: (2) 90%, 100%, and 100% of mutations at G:C had the mutated dG on the nontranscribed DNA strand; and (3) about one quarter of the mutants produced by each mutagen had one or more PCR products with partial or complete exon deletions. 61 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  4. In vivo selection of porin-deficient mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae with increased resistance to cefoxitin and expanded-spectrum-cephalosporins.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, L; Hernández-Allés, S; Albertí, S; Tomás, J M; Benedi, V J; Jacoby, G A

    1996-01-01

    Four Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates (LB1, LB2, LB3, and LB4) with increased antimicrobial resistance were obtained from the same patient. The four isolates were indistinguishable in biotype, plasmid content, lipopolysaccharide, and DNA analysis by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. Isolate LB1 made TEM-1 and SHV-1 beta-lactamases. Isolates LB2, LB3, and LB4 produced SHV-5 in addition to TEM-1 and SHV-1. MICs of cefoxitin, ceftazidime, and cefotaxime against LB1 were 4, 1, and 0.06 micrograms/ml, respectively. MICs of ceftazidime against K. pneumoniae LB2, LB3, and LB4 were > 256 micrograms/ml, and those of cefotaxime were 2, 4, and 64 micrograms/ml, respectively. MICs of cefoxitin against K. pneumoniae LB2 and LB3 were 4 micrograms/ml, but that against K. pneumoniae LB4 was 128 micrgrams/ml. K. pneumoniae LB4 could transfer resistance to ceftazidime and cefotaxime, but not that to cefoxitin, to Escherichia coli. Isolate LB4 and cefoxitin-resistant laboratory mutants lacked an outer membrane protein of about 35 kDa whose molecular mass, mode of isolation, resistance to proteases, and reaction with a porin-specific antiserum suggested that it was a porin. MICs of cefoxitin and cefotaxime reverted to 4 and 2 micrograms/ml, respectively, when isolate LB4 was transformed with a gene coding for the K. pneumoniae porin OmpK36. We conclude that the increased resistance to cefoxitin and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins of isolate LB4 was due to loss of a porin channel for antibiotic uptake. PMID:8834877

  5. Programmed Cell Death in the Leaves of the Arabidopsis Spontaneous Necrotic Spots (sns-D) Mutant Correlates with Increased Expression of the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor eIF4B2

    PubMed Central

    Gaussand, Gwénaël M. D. J.-M.; Jia, Qi; van der Graaff, Eric; Lamers, Gerda E. M.; Fransz, Paul F.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; de Pater, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    From a pool of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants harboring an activator T-DNA construct, one mutant was identified that developed spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) on the rosette leaves under aseptic conditions. The sns-D mutation is dominant and homozygous plants are embryo lethal. The mutant produced smaller rosettes with a different number of stomata than the wild-type. DNA fragmentation in the nuclei of cells in the necrotic spots and a significant increase of caspase-3 and caspase-6 like activities in sns-D leaf extracts indicated that the sns-D mutation caused programmed cell death (PCD). The integration of the activator T-DNA caused an increase of the expression level of At1g13020, which encodes the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2. The expression level of eIF4B2 was positively correlated with the severity of sns-D mutant phenotype. Overexpression of the eIF4B2 cDNA mimicked phenotypic traits of the sns-D mutant indicating that the sns-D mutant phenotype is indeed caused by activation tagging of eIF4B2. Thus, incorrect regulation of translation initiation may result in PCD. PMID:22639576

  6. A herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant disrupted for microRNA H2 with increased neurovirulence and rate of reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xianzhi; Brown, Don; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; Li, Lily; Chan, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) encodes several microRNAs. One of these, miR-H2, overlaps and is antisense to the ICP0 gene, and appears to decrease expression of the ICP0 protein. To determine if miR-H2 plays a role in the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle, we constructed a mutant, McK-ΔH2, in which this microRNA has been disrupted without altering the predicted amino acid sequence of ICP0. McK-ΔH2 produced increased amounts of ICP0. Although replication of McK-ΔH2 was similar to that of its wt McKrae parental virus in RS cells and mouse eyes, McK-ΔH2 was more neurovirulent in Swiss Webster mice than McKrae based on the percent of mice that died from herpes encephalitis following ocular infection. In addition, using a mouse TG explant model of induced reactivation, we show here for the first time that miR-H2 appears to play a role in modulating HSV-1 reactivation. Although the percent of TG from which virus reactivated by day 10 after explant was similar for McK-ΔH2, wt McKrae, and the marker rescued virus McK-ΔH2Res, at earlier times significantly more reactivation was seen with McK-ΔH2. Our results suggest that in the context of the virus, miR-H2 downregulates ICP0 and this moderates both HSV-1 neurovirulence and reactivation. PMID:25645379

  7. Mutations in Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit C Increase Radiosensitivity and Bystander Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    Although radiation-induced bystander effect is well studied in the past decade, the precise mech-anisms are still unclear. It is likely that a combination of pathways involving both primary and secondary signaling processes is involved in producing a bystander effect. There is recent evidence that mitochondria play a critical role in bystander responses. Recently studies found that a mutation in succinate dehydrogenese subunit C (SDHC), an integral membrane protein in complex II of the electron transport chain, resulted in increased superoxide, oxidative stress, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and genomic instability, indicating that SDHC play a critical role in maintaining mitochondrial function. In the present study, using Chinese hamster fibroblasts (B1 cells) and the mutants (B9 cells) containing a single base substitution that produced a premature stop codon resulting in a 33-amino acid COOH-terminal truncation of the SDHC protein, we found that B9 cells had an increase in intracellular superoxide content, nitric oxide species, and mitochondrial membrane potential when compared with wild type cells. After irradiated with a grade of doses of gamma rays, B9 cells show an increased radiosensitivity, especially at high doses. The HPRT- mutant yield after gamma-ray irradiation in B9 cells was significantly higher than that of B1 cells. A single, 3Gy dose of gamma-rays increased the background mutant level by more than 4 fold. In contrast, the mutant induction was less than 2 fold in B1 cells. In addition, B9 cells produced a higher bystander mutagenesis after alpha particle irradiation than the B1 cells. Furthermore, pretreated with carboxy-2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO), a nitric oxide scavenger, significantly decreased the bystander effect. Our findings demonstrate that a mutation in SDHC increases radiosensitivity in both directly irradiated cells and in neighboring bystander cells, and mito-chondrial function play an essential role in

  8. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein–protein interactions with HPRT1

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S.; Jackson, Brian C.; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Johnson, Richard J.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. PMID:23348497

  9. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  10. Increased Hydrolysis of Oximino-β-Lactams by CMY-107, a Tyr199Cys Mutant Form of CMY-2 Produced by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vetouli, E. E.; Bozavoutoglou, E.; Lebessi, E.; Tzelepi, E.; Tzouvelekis, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    The cephalosporinase CMY-107, a Tyr199Cys mutant form of CMY-2 encoded by an IncI self-transferable plasmid carried by an Escherichia coli clinical strain, was characterized. The enzyme hydrolyzed oximino-cephalosporins and aztreonam more efficiently than CMY-2 did. PMID:26438499

  11. Oral treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) increases mutant SOD1 in vivo but protects motor neurons and improves the phenotype of a transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Blaine R; Lim, Nastasia K H; McAllum, Erin J; Donnelly, Paul S; Hare, Dominic J; Doble, Philip A; Turner, Bradley J; Price, Katherine A; Lim, Sin Chun; Paterson, Brett M; Hickey, James L; Rhoads, Timothy W; Williams, Jared R; Kanninen, Katja M; Hung, Lin W; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Grubman, Alexandra; Monty, Jean-Francois; Llanos, Roxana M; Kramer, David R; Mercer, Julian F B; Bush, Ashley I; Masters, Colin L; Duce, James A; Li, Qiao-Xin; Beckman, Joseph S; Barnham, Kevin J; White, Anthony R; Crouch, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the metallo-protein Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in humans and an expression level-dependent phenotype in transgenic rodents. We show that oral treatment with the therapeutic agent diacetyl-bis(4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)] increased the concentration of mutant SOD1 (SOD1G37R) in ALS model mice, but paradoxically improved locomotor function and survival of the mice. To determine why the mice with increased levels of mutant SOD1 had an improved phenotype, we analyzed tissues by mass spectrometry. These analyses revealed most SOD1 in the spinal cord tissue of the SOD1G37R mice was Cu deficient. Treating with Cu(II)(atsm) decreased the pool of Cu-deficient SOD1 and increased the pool of fully metallated (holo) SOD1. Tracking isotopically enriched (65)Cu(II)(atsm) confirmed the increase in holo-SOD1 involved transfer of Cu from Cu(II)(atsm) to SOD1, suggesting the improved locomotor function and survival of the Cu(II)(atsm)-treated SOD1G37R mice involved, at least in part, the ability of the compound to improve the Cu content of the mutant SOD1. This was supported by improved survival of SOD1G37R mice that expressed the human gene for the Cu uptake protein CTR1. Improving the metal content of mutant SOD1 in vivo with Cu(II)(atsm) did not decrease levels of misfolded SOD1. These outcomes indicate the metal content of SOD1 may be a greater determinant of the toxicity of the protein in mutant SOD1-associated forms of ALS than the mutations themselves. Improving the metal content of SOD1 therefore represents a valid therapeutic strategy for treating ALS caused by SOD1. PMID:24899723

  12. Deficiency in the glycerol channel Fps1p confers increased freeze tolerance to yeast cells: application of the fps1delta mutant to frozen dough technology.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Ikeda, Kayo; Maeta, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2004-12-01

    Intracellular glycerol content affects the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have recently reported that intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells cultured in glycerol medium acquire tolerance to freeze stress and retain high leavening ability even in dough after frozen storage [Izawa et al. (2004) Appl Microbiol Biotechnol http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-004-1624-4]. A deletion mutant of the FPS1 gene, which encodes a glycerol channel, accumulates glycerol inside the cell without an exogenous supply of glycerol into the medium. We found that the fps1delta cells acquired tolerance to freeze stress and retained high leavening ability in dough after frozen storage for 7 days. These results suggest that the fps1delta mutant is a useful strain for developing better frozen-dough with a commercial advantage.

  13. Deficiency in the glycerol channel Fps1p confers increased freeze tolerance to yeast cells: application of the fps1delta mutant to frozen dough technology.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Ikeda, Kayo; Maeta, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2004-12-01

    Intracellular glycerol content affects the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have recently reported that intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells cultured in glycerol medium acquire tolerance to freeze stress and retain high leavening ability even in dough after frozen storage [Izawa et al. (2004) Appl Microbiol Biotechnol http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-004-1624-4]. A deletion mutant of the FPS1 gene, which encodes a glycerol channel, accumulates glycerol inside the cell without an exogenous supply of glycerol into the medium. We found that the fps1delta cells acquired tolerance to freeze stress and retained high leavening ability in dough after frozen storage for 7 days. These results suggest that the fps1delta mutant is a useful strain for developing better frozen-dough with a commercial advantage. PMID:15278313

  14. K-Ras mutant fraction in A/J mouse lung increases as a function of benzo[a]pyrene dose

    EPA Science Inventory

    K-Ras mutant fraction (MF) was measured to examine the default assumption of low dose linearity in the benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) mutational response. Groups of ten male A/J mice (7-9 weeks-old) received a single i.p. injection of 0, 0.05, 0.5, 5, or 50 mg/kg B[a]P, and were sacrifi...

  15. Pigment pattern formation in the quail mutant of the silkworm, Bombyx mori: parallel increase of pteridine biosynthesis and pigmentation of melanin and ommochromes.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tomomi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Mase, Keisuke; Nakagoshi, Motoko

    2006-08-01

    The larval pigment pattern in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is formed by melanin, ommochromes and pteridines. During development all these pigments are synthesized autonomously, and possibly also with mutual interaction between them, to yield unique pigment patterns. In order to find the key trigger for such pigment pattern formation, developmental changes in pteridine biosynthesis were studied using the quail mutant (q/q), which has darker larval marks formed by melanin and an abundance of ommochromes in the integument. In the current study, emphasis has been placed on the analysis of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTP-CH I), which is a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of pteridines, during the development of the silkworm. Results of Northern blotting showed that in the quail mutant strong signals of GTP-CH I mRNA appeared around each period of ecdysis, while no such signals appeared in the background strain (+q/q) used. Also, both GTP-CH I activities and pteridine content were higher in the quail mutant compared with the background strain. These results strongly suggest that pteridine biosynthesis is closely linked to the formation of melanin and ommochromes. It is also suggested here that in the silkworm a recessive gene (q) may be involved in the regulation of its pigment pattern formation.

  16. The tolerance of the Arabidopsis defense hormone receptor mutant coi1 against the vascular pathogen Verticillium longisporum is not due to increased levels of the active hormone jasmonoyl-isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Ralhan, Anjali; Thurow, Corinna; Gatz, Christiane

    2013-11-01

    Verticillium longisporum is a soil-borne vascular pathogen found primarily on oilseed rape in Northern Europe. Infection of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana can be achieved under laboratory conditions. In the article related to this addendum, we have shown that Arabidopsis dde2-2 mutants that are compromised in their ability to synthesize the defense hormone jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) are slightly more susceptible than wild-type. Contrary to the expectation that hormone biosynthesis mutants and their respective receptor mutants should have the same phenotype, we found that plants that lack the JA-Ile receptor CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) are more tolerant to the disease. This addendum addressed the question whether the increased JA-Ile levels found in coi1 are responsible for its tolerance phenotype. Based on the evidence that the JA-Ile-deficient dde2-2 coi1-t double mutant is as tolerant as coi1-t, we conclude that increased JA-Ile levels do not protect Arabidopsis against the fungus in the absence of COI1.

  17. The tolerance of the Arabidopsis defense hormone receptor mutant coi1 against the vascular pathogen Verticillium longisporum is not due to increased levels of the active hormone jasmonoyl-isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Ralhan, Anjali; Thurow, Corinna; Gatz, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium longisporum is a soil-borne vascular pathogen found primarily on oilseed rape in Northern Europe. Infection of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana can be achieved under laboratory conditions. In the article related to this addendum, we have shown that Arabidopsis dde2–2 mutants that are compromised in their ability to synthesize the defense hormone jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) are slightly more susceptible than wild-type. Contrary to the expectation that hormone biosynthesis mutants and their respective receptor mutants should have the same phenotype, we found that plants that lack the JA-Ile receptor CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) are more tolerant to the disease. This addendum addressed the question whether the increased JA-Ile levels found in coi1 are responsible for its tolerance phenotype. Based on the evidence that the JA-Ile-deficient dde2–2 coi1-t double mutant is as tolerant as coi1-t, we conclude that increased JA-Ile levels do not protect Arabidopsis against the fungus in the absence of COI1. PMID:24300304

  18. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-01-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. Images PMID:3023867

  19. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-04-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. PMID:3023867

  20. 2-O-methylation of fucosyl residues of a rhizobial lipopolysaccharide is increased in response to host exudate and is eliminated in a symbiotically defective mutant.

    PubMed

    Noel, K Dale; Box, Jodie M; Bonne, Valerie J

    2004-03-01

    When Rhizobium etli CE3 was grown in the presence of Phaseolus vulgaris seed extracts containing anthocyanins, its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sugar composition was changed in two ways: greatly decreased content of what is normally the terminal residue of the LPS, di-O-methylfucose, and a doubling of the 2-O-methylation of other fucose residues in the LPS O antigen. R. etli strain CE395 was isolated after Tn5 mutagenesis of strain CE3 by screening for mutant colonies that did not change antigenically in the presence of seed extract. The LPS of this strain completely lacked 2-O-methylfucose, regardless of whether anthocyanins were present during growth. The mutant gave only pseudonodules in association with P. vulgaris. Interpretation of this phenotype was complicated by a second LPS defect exhibited by the mutant: its LPS population had only about 50% of the normal amount of O-antigen-containing LPS (LPS I). The latter defect could be suppressed genetically such that the resulting strain (CE395 alpha 395) synthesized the normal amount of an LPS I that still lacked 2-O-methylfucose residues. Strain CE395 alpha 395 did not elicit pseudonodules but resulted in significantly slower nodule development, fewer nodules, and less nitrogenase activity than lps(+) strains. The relative symbiotic deficiency was more severe when seeds were planted and inoculated with bacteria before they germinated. These results support previous conclusions that the relative amount of LPS I on the bacterial surface is crucial in symbiosis, but LPS structural features, such as 2-O-methylation of fucose, also may facilitate symbiotic interactions. PMID:15006776

  1. 2-O-Methylation of Fucosyl Residues of a Rhizobial Lipopolysaccharide Is Increased in Response to Host Exudate and Is Eliminated in a Symbiotically Defective Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K. Dale; Box, Jodie M.; Bonne, Valerie J.

    2004-01-01

    When Rhizobium etli CE3 was grown in the presence of Phaseolus vulgaris seed extracts containing anthocyanins, its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sugar composition was changed in two ways: greatly decreased content of what is normally the terminal residue of the LPS, di-O-methylfucose, and a doubling of the 2-O-methylation of other fucose residues in the LPS O antigen. R. etli strain CE395 was isolated after Tn5 mutagenesis of strain CE3 by screening for mutant colonies that did not change antigenically in the presence of seed extract. The LPS of this strain completely lacked 2-O-methylfucose, regardless of whether anthocyanins were present during growth. The mutant gave only pseudonodules in association with P. vulgaris. Interpretation of this phenotype was complicated by a second LPS defect exhibited by the mutant: its LPS population had only about 50% of the normal amount of O-antigen-containing LPS (LPS I). The latter defect could be suppressed genetically such that the resulting strain (CE395α395) synthesized the normal amount of an LPS I that still lacked 2-O-methylfucose residues. Strain CE395α395 did not elicit pseudonodules but resulted in significantly slower nodule development, fewer nodules, and less nitrogenase activity than lps+ strains. The relative symbiotic deficiency was more severe when seeds were planted and inoculated with bacteria before they germinated. These results support previous conclusions that the relative amount of LPS I on the bacterial surface is crucial in symbiosis, but LPS structural features, such as 2-O-methylation of fucose, also may facilitate symbiotic interactions. PMID:15006776

  2. Infection with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Escape Mutants Results in Increased Mortality and Growth Retardation in Mice Infected with a Neurotropic Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Pewe, Lecia; Xue, Shurong; Perlman, Stanley

    1998-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice infected with mouse hepatitis virus strain JHM (MHV-JHM) develop a chronic demyelinating encephalomyelitis several weeks after inoculation. Previously, we showed that mutations in the immunodominant CD8 T-cell epitope (S-510-518) could be detected in nearly all samples of RNA and virus isolated from these mice. These mutations abrogated recognition by T cells harvested from the central nervous systems of infected mice in direct ex vivo cytotoxicity assays. These results suggested that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutants contributed to virus amplification and the development of clinical disease in mice infected with wild-type virus. In the present study, the importance of these mutations was further evaluated by infecting naive mice with MHV-JHM variants isolated from infected mice and in which epitope S-510-518 was mutated. Compared to mice infected with wild-type virus, variant virus-infected animals showed higher mortality and morbidity manifested by decreased weight gain and neurological signs. Although a delay in the kinetics of virus clearance has been demonstrated in previous studies of CTL escape mutants, this is the first illustration of significant changes in clinical disease resulting from infection with viruses able to evade the CD8 T-cell immune response. PMID:9621053

  3. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  4. A nuclear mutant of Chlamydomonas that exhibits increased sensitivity to UV irradiation, reduced recombination of nuclear genes, and altered transmission of chloroplast genes.

    PubMed

    Rosen, H; Newman, S M; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1991-01-01

    Meiotic progeny of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii normally receive chloroplast genomes only from the mt+ parent. However, exceptional zygotes, which transmit the chloroplast genomes of both parents or, more rarely, only those of the mt- parent, arise at a low frequency. Mutations at the mt(+)-linked mat-3 locus were found previously to elevate the transmission of chloroplast genomes from the mt- parent, resulting in a much higher than normal frequency of exceptional zygotes. In this paper we demonstrate that an ultraviolet-sensitive nuclear mutation mapping at the uvsE1 locus, which is unlinked to mating type, also promotes chloroplast genome transmission from the mt- parent. This mutant, which was previously shown to reduce recombination of nuclear genes in meiosis, acts synergistically with the mat-3-3 mutation to produce an extremely high frequency of exceptional zygotes. Through the use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms existing in the chloroplast genomes of C. reinhardtii and the interfertile strain C. smithii, we show that chloroplast DNA fragments from the mt- parent normally begin to disappear shortly after zygote formation. However, this process appears to be blocked totally in the absence of wild-type uvsE1 and mat-3 gene products. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that both gene products contribute to the mechanism responsible for uniparental inheritance of the chloroplast genome from the mt+ parent.

  5. Streptavidin mutants

    DOEpatents

    Sano, Takeshi; Cantor, Charles R.; Vajda, Sandor; Reznik, Gabriel O.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Pandori, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to streptavidin proteins and peptides having a altered physical properties such as an increased stability or increased or decreased affinity for binding biotin. The invention also relates to methods for the detection, identification, separation and isolation of targets using streptavidin proteins or peptides. Streptavidin with increased or reduced affinity allows for the use of the streptavidin-biotin coupling systems for detection and isolation systems wherein it is necessary to remove of one or the other of the binding partners. Such systems are useful for the purification of functional proteins and viable cells. The invention also relates to nucleic acids which encode these streptavidin proteins and peptides and to recombinant cells such as bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells which contain these nucleic acids.

  6. Chemical chaperones mediate increased secretion of mutant α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) Z: A potential pharmacological strategy for prevention of liver injury and emphysema in α1-AT deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Jon A. J.; Willis, Lauren K.; Perlmutter, David H.

    2000-01-01

    In α1-AT deficiency, a misfolded but functionally active mutant α1-ATZ (α1-ATZ) molecule is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells rather than secreted into the blood and body fluids. Emphysema is thought to be caused by the lack of circulating α1-AT to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. Liver injury is thought to be caused by the hepatotoxic effects of the retained α1-ATZ. In this study, we show that several “chemical chaperones,” which have been shown to reverse the cellular mislocalization or misfolding of other mutant plasma membrane, nuclear, and cytoplasmic proteins, mediate increased secretion of α1-ATZ. In particular, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) mediated a marked increase in secretion of functionally active α1-ATZ in a model cell culture system. Moreover, oral administration of PBA was well tolerated by PiZ mice (transgenic for the human α1-ATZ gene) and consistently mediated an increase in blood levels of human α1-AT reaching 20–50% of the levels present in PiM mice and normal humans. Because clinical studies have suggested that only partial correction is needed for prevention of both liver and lung injury in α1-AT deficiency and PBA has been used safely in humans, it constitutes an excellent candidate for chemoprophylaxis of target organ injury in α1-AT deficiency. PMID:10677536

  7. Linkage of the gene for an X-linked mental retardation disorder to a hypervariable (AGAT)n repeat motif within the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus (Xq26).

    PubMed Central

    Huang, T H; Hejtmancik, J F; Edwards, A; Pettigrew, A L; Herrera, C A; Hammond, H A; Caskey, C T; Zoghbi, H Y; Ledbetter, D H

    1991-01-01

    We recently reported a new X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) disorder in a four-generation family of Dutch descent. Features included Dandy-Walker malformation, basal ganglia disease, and seizures. Twenty-six family members, including two living affected males and two obligate carriers, were available for study. No evidence of linkage was observed between the disease locus and RFLPs from several X-chromosome regions, including Xp21-p22 (13 markers), proximal Xq (four markers), and Xq28 (three markers). However, a new hypervariable short tandem repeat (STR) within the HPRT gene at Xq26 showed positive linkage to the disease locus, with a maximum lod score of 2.19 at a recombination fraction of 0. A second hypervariable marker in Xq26, the dinucleotide repeat XL90A3 (DXS425), showed a lod score of .84 at a recombination fraction of .11. Both the HPRT and DXS425 markers were typed in 40 CEPH families, and subsequent multipoint linkage analysis showed the following order: Xcen-DXS425-(HPRT,XLMR)-F9-qter. HPRT and these flanking markers are therefore useful for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in this family. This study illustrates that hypervariable STRs will be powerful tools for linkage analysis and genetic diagnosis, particularly when relatively small families are involved. Images Figure 1 PMID:1746558

  8. Enzymatic dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I of the Candida albicans goa1 mutant is associated with increased reactive oxidants and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; Chen, Hui; Florentino, Abigail; Alex, Deepu; Sikorski, Patricia; Fonzi, William A; Calderone, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We have previously shown that deletion of GOA1 (growth and oxidant adaptation) of Candida albicans results in a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP synthesis, increased sensitivity to oxidants and killing by human neutrophils, and avirulence in a systemic model of candidiasis. We established that translocation of Goa1p to mitochondria occurred during peroxide stress. In this report, we show that the goa1Δ (GOA31), compared to the wild type (WT) and a gene-reconstituted (GOA32) strain, exhibits sensitivity to inhibitors of the classical respiratory chain (CRC), including especially rotenone (complex I [CI]) and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), an inhibitor of the alternative oxidase pathway (AOX), while potassium cyanide (KCN; CIV) causes a partial inhibition of respiration. In the presence of SHAM, however, GOA31 has an enhanced respiration, which we attribute to the parallel respiratory (PAR) pathway and alternative NADH dehydrogenases. Interestingly, deletion of GOA1 also results in a decrease in transcription of the alternative oxidase gene AOX1 in untreated cells as well as negligible AOX1 and AOX2 transcription in peroxide-treated cells. To explain the rotenone sensitivity, we measured enzyme activities of complexes I to IV (CI to CIV) and observed a major loss of CI activity in GOA31 but not in control strains. Enzymatic data of CI were supported by blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) experiments which demonstrated less CI protein and reduced enzyme activity. The consequence of a defective CI in GOA31 is an increase in reactive oxidant species (ROS), loss of chronological aging, and programmed cell death ([PCD] apoptosis) in vitro compared to control strains. The increase in PCD was indicated by an increase in caspase activity and DNA fragmentation in GOA31. Thus, GOA1 is required for a functional CI and partially for the AOX pathway; loss of GOA1 compromises cell survival. Further, the loss of chronological aging is new to

  9. Genetic and Diet-Induced Obesity Increased Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the Double Mutant Mouse Model Multiple Intestinal Neoplasia X Obese via Disturbed Glucose Regulation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Ha Thi; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Steffensen, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    We have studied how spontaneous or carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis was affected by genetic or diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ X C57BL/6J-Lepob/+ mice. Obesity was induced by the obese (ob) mutation in the lep gene coding for the hormone leptin, or by a 45% fat diet. The effects of obesity were examined on spontaneous intestinal tumors caused by the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and on tumors induced by the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). F1 ob/ob (homozygous mutated) mice had increased body weight (bw) and number of spontaneous and PhIP-induced small intestinal tumors (in ApcMin/+ mice), versus ob/wt (heterozygous mutated) and wt/wt mice (homozygous wild-type). A 45% fat diet exacerbated bw and spontaneous tumor numbers versus 10% fat, but not PhIP-induced tumors. Except for bw, ob/wt and wt/wt were not significantly different. The obesity caused hyperglucosemia and insulinemia in ob/ob mice. A 45% fat diet further increased glucose, but not insulin. Inflammation was seen as increased TNFα levels in ob/ob mice. Thus the results implicate disturbed glucose regulation and inflammation as mechanisms involved in the association between obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis. Ob/ob mice had shorter lifespan than ob/wt and wt/wt mice. PMID:26347815

  10. G2019S LRRK2 mutant fibroblasts from Parkinson's disease patients show increased sensitivity to neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium dependent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yakhine-Diop, Sokhna M S; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Rodríguez-Arribas, Mario; Climent, Vicente; Aiastui, Ana; López de Munain, Adolfo; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa A

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology. It is considered as a multifactorial disease dependent on environmental and genetic factors. Deregulation in cell degradation has been related with a significant increase in cell damage, becoming a target for studies on the PD etiology. In the present study, we have characterized the parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-induced damage in fibroblasts from Parkinson's patients with the mutation G2019S in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 protein (LRRK2) and control individuals without this mutation. The results reveal that MPP(+) induces mTOR-dependent autophagy in fibroblasts. Moreover, the effects of caspase-dependent cell death to MPP(+) were higher in cells with the G2019S LRRK2 mutation, which showed basal levels of autophagy due to the G2019S LRRK2 mutation (mTOR-independent). The inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) treatment reduces these sensitivity differences between both cell types, however, the inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion by bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1) increases these differences. This data confirm the importance of the combination of genetic and environmental factors in the PD etiology. Thereby, the sensitivity to the same damage may be different in function of a genetic predisposition, reason why individuals with certain mutations can develop some early-onset diseases, such as individuals with G2019S LRRK2 mutation and PD.

  11. Increase in IS256 transposition in invasive vancomycin heteroresistant Staphylococcus aureus isolate belonging to ST100 and its derived VISA mutants.

    PubMed

    Di Gregorio, Sabrina; Fernandez, Silvina; Perazzi, Beatriz; Bello, Natalia; Famiglietti, Angela; Mollerach, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, transposition of IS256 has been described to play an important role in biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. This study describes the molecular characterization of two clinical heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) isolates recovered from the same patient (before and after antibiotic treatment) and two VISA derivatives obtained by serial passages in the presence of vancomycin. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment (in vivo and in vitro) could enhance IS256 transposition, being responsible for the eventual loss of agr function. As far as we know this is the first study that reports the increase of IS256 transposition in isogenic strains after antibiotic treatment in a clinical setting.

  12. TT Mutant Homozygote of Kruppel-like Factor 5 Is a Key Factor for Increasing Basal Metabolic Rate and Resting Metabolic Rate in Korean Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ran; Kwon, In-Su; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Lee, Myoungsook

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the contribution of genetic variations of KLF5 to basal metabolic rate (BMR) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) and the inhibition of obesity in Korean children. A variation of KLF5 (rs3782933) was genotyped in 62 Korean children. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we developed a model to predict BMR in children. We divided them into several groups; normal versus overweight by body mass index (BMI) and low BMR versus high BMR by BMR. There were no differences in the distributions of alleles and genotypes between each group. The genetic variation of KLF5 gene showed a significant correlation with several clinical factors, such as BMR, muscle, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and insulin. Children with the TT had significantly higher BMR than those with CC (p = 0.030). The highest muscle was observed in the children with TT compared with CC (p = 0.032). The insulin and C-peptide values were higher in children with TT than those with CC (p= 0.029 vs. p = 0.004, respectively). In linear regression analysis, BMI and muscle mass were correlated with BMR, whereas insulin and C-peptide were not associated with BMR. In the high-BMR group, we observed that higher muscle, fat mass, and C-peptide affect the increase of BMR in children with TT (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.018, respectively), while Rohrer's index could explain the usual decrease in BMR (adjust r(2) = 1.000, p < 0.001, respectively). We identified a novel association between TT of KLF5 rs3782933 and BMR in Korean children. We could make better use of the variation within KLF5 in a future clinical intervention study of obesity.

  13. Two enzymes, TilS and HprT, can form a complex to function as a transcriptional activator for the cell division protease gene ftsH in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ta-Hui; Hu, Yi-Nei; Shaw, Gwo-Chyuan

    2014-01-01

    The FtsH protein is an ATP-dependent cytoplasmic membrane protease involved in the control of membrane protein quality, cell division and heat shock response in Bacillus subtilis and many other bacteria. TilS, the tRNA(Ile2) lysidine synthetase, is a tRNA-binding protein that can modify pre-tRNA(Ile2). HprT, the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, is implicated in purine salvage. Both tilS and hprT are essential for cell viability of B. subtilis. In this report, by co-purification experiments and gel filtration analyses, we show that there is complex formation between co-expressed TilS and HprT. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and in vitro transcription analyses demonstrated that the TilS/HprT complex functions as a specific DNA-binding protein that can stimulate ftsH transcription in vitro. Two regions located upstream of the ftsH promoter have been identified as the TilS/HprT-binding sites and shown to be required for TilS/HprT-dependent ftsH transcription in vitro and in vivo. Results from gel supershift assays support the notion that the TilS/HprT complex likely employs its distinct segments for interaction with these two distinct TilS/HprT-binding sites, respectively. In conclusion, we present the first evidence that bi-functional TilS and HprT can form a complex to function as a transcriptional activator to stimulate ftsH transcription.

  14. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Schwartz, J.L. |; Shigematsu, N.

    1993-06-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide NN{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent (WR-2721). Because of their structural similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of VM-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents were electroporated into cells. Electroporation alone reduced cell survival to 75% but had no effect on hprt mutation frequency. The electroporation of either spermine or WR-33278 at concentrations greater than 0.01 mM was extremely toxic. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction. Cell survival values at a radiation dose of 750 cGy were enhanced by factors of 1.3 and 1.8 following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278, respectively, 30 min prior to irradiation. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested.

  15. Increasing the electron-transfer ability of Cyanidioschyzon merolae ferredoxin by a one-point mutation – A high resolution and Fe-SAD phasing crystal structure analysis of the Asp58Asn mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Yuko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yamano, Akihito; Imai, Takeo; Morimoto, Yukio

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •A single amino acid change on the ferredoxin surface affects electron transfer. •Precise positions of amide atoms were located utilizing no prior structural data. •Ultra high resolution and SAD phasing may be used for bias-free model building. -- Abstract: Cyanidioschyzon merolae (Cm) is a single cell red algae that grows in rather thermophilic (40–50 °C) and acidic (pH 1–3) conditions. Ferredoxin (Fd) was purified from this algae and characterized as a plant-type [2Fe–2S] Fd by physicochemical techniques. A high resolution (0.97 Å) three-dimensional structure of the CmFd D58N mutant molecule has been determined using the Fe-SAD phasing method to clarify the precise position of the Asn58 amide, as this substitution increases the electron-transfer ability relative to wild-type CmFd by a factor of 1.5. The crystal structure reveals an electro-positive surface surrounding Asn58 that may interact with ferredoxin NADP{sup +} reductase or cytochrome c.

  16. HISTONE DEACETYLASE6-Defective Mutants Show Increased Expression and Acetylation of ENHANCER OF TRIPTYCHON AND CAPRICE1 and GLABRA2 with Small But Significant Effects on Root Epidermis Cellular Pattern1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong-Xu; Chen, Wen-Qian; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Shu-Nong

    2015-01-01

    Cellular patterning in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root epidermis is dependent on positional information, the transmission of which involves histone acetylation. Here, we report that HISTONE DEACETYLASE6 (HDA6) has significant effects on this cellular patterning. Mutation of HDA6 led to ectopic hair cells in the nonhair positions of root epidermis in Arabidopsis, based on an analysis of paraffin sections stained with Toluidine Blue. While HDA6 was present throughout the root tip, epidermis-specific complementation with HDA6 could rescue the hda6 phenotype. Both transcript levels and expression patterns of ENHANCER OF TRIPTYCHON AND CAPRICE1 (ETC1) and GLABRA2 (GL2) in the root tip were affected in hda6. Consistent with these changes in expression, HDA6 directly bound to the promoter regions of ETC1 and GL2, and acetylation of histone H3 on these promoter regions and acetylation of histone H4 on the ETC1 promoter region was increased in the hda6 mutant. Taken together, these results indicate that HDA6 affects the cellular patterning of Arabidopsis root epidermis through altering the histone acetylation status of ETC1 and GL2 promoters and thereby affects the expression of these two components of the core transcription factor network determining epidermal cell fates. Our findings thus provide new insights into the role of histone acetylation in root epidermis cell patterning. PMID:26143251

  17. Sublethal concentrations of salicylic acid decrease the formation of reactive oxygen species but maintain an increased nitric oxide production in the root apex of the ethylene-insensitive never ripe tomato mutants.

    PubMed

    Tari, Irma; Poór, Péter; Gémes, Katalin

    2011-09-01

    The pattern of salicylic acid (SA)-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) were different in the apex of adventitious roots in wild-type and in the ethylene-insensitive never ripe (Nr) mutants of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Ailsa Craig). ROS were upregulated, while NO remained at the control level in apical root tissues of wildtype plants exposed to sublethal concentrations of SA. In contrast, Nr plants expressing a defective ethylene receptor displayed a reduced level of RO S and a higher NO content in the apical root cells. In wild-type plants NO production seems to be RO S(H2O2)-dependent at cell death-inducing concentrations of SA, indicating that ROS and NO may interact to trigger oxidative cell death. In the absence of significant RO S accumulation, the increased NO production caused moderate reduction in cell viability in root apex of Nr plants exposed to 10(-3) M SA. This suggests that a functional ethylene signaling pathway is necessary for the control of ROS and NO production induced by SA.

  18. Germinal HPRT splice donor site mutation results in multiple RNA splicing products in T-lymphocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, T.C.; Albertini, R.J.; O`Neill, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by birth defects, progressive bone marrow failure and increased risk for leukemia. FA cells display chromosome breakage and increased cell killing in response to DNA crosslinking agents. At least 5 genes have been defined by cell complementation studies, but only one of these, FAC has been cloned to date. Efforts to map and isolate new FA genes by functional complementation have been hampered by the lack of immortalized FA fibroblast cell lines. Here we report the use of a novel immortalization strategy to create 4 new immortalized FA fibroblast lines, including one from the rare complementation group D. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Mutant p53: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand

    PubMed Central

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Del Sal, Giannino

    2015-01-01

    Encoded by the mutated variants of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, mutant p53 proteins are getting an increased experimental support as active oncoproteins promoting tumor growth and metastasis. p53 missense mutant proteins are losing their wild-type tumor suppressor activity and acquire oncogenic potential, possessing diverse transforming abilities in cell and mouse models. Whether various mutant p53s differ in their oncogenic potential has been a matter of debate. Recent discoveries are starting to uncover the existence of mutant p53 downstream programs that are common to different mutant p53 variants. In this review, we discuss a number of studies on mutant p53, underlining the advantages and disadvantages of alternative experimental approaches that have been used to describe the numerous mutant p53 gain-of-function activities. Therapeutic possibilities are also discussed, taking into account targeting either individual or multiple mutant p53 proteins in human cancer. PMID:26734571

  20. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  1. A Bystander Effect Observed in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Study of the Induction of Mutations in the HPRT Locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kinashi, Yuko . E-mail: kinashi@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Takahashi, Sentaro; Ono, Koji

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander mutagenic effects induced by {alpha}-particles during boron neutron capture therapy, we mixed cells that were electroporated with borocaptate sodium (BSH), which led to the accumulation of {sup 10}B inside the cells, and cells that did not contain the boron compound. The BSH-containing cells were irradiated with {alpha}-particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, whereas cells without boron were affected only by the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. Methods and Materials: The lethality and mutagenicity measured by the frequency of mutations induced in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells irradiated with neutrons (Kyoto University Research Reactor: 5 MW). Neutron irradiation of 1:1 mixtures of cells with and without BSH resulted in a survival fraction of 0.1, and the cells that did not contain BSH made up 99.4% of the resulting cell population. The molecular structures of the mutations were determined using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: Because of the bystander effect, the frequency of mutations increased in the cells located nearby the BSH-containing cells compared with control cells. Molecular structural analysis indicated that most of the mutations induced by the bystander effect were point mutations and that the frequencies of total and partial deletions induced by the bystander effect were less than those induced by the original neutron irradiation. Conclusion: These results suggested that in boron neutron capture therapy, the mutations caused by the bystander effect and those caused by the original neutron irradiation are induced by different mechanisms.

  2. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels. PMID:26732534

  3. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  4. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  5. Paranodal permeability in "myelin mutants".

    PubMed

    Shroff, Seema; Mierzwa, Amanda; Scherer, Steven S; Peles, Elior; Arevalo, Juan C; Chao, Moses V; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three "myelin mutant" mice, Caspr-null, cst-null, and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3 kDa and 10 kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40 kDa and 70 kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands (TBs) in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of TBs in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of TBs. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of TBs but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of "pathway 3," the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  6. Increased Prevalence of Mutant Allele Pfdhps 437G and Pfdhfr Triple Mutation in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from a Rural Area of Gabon, Three Years after the Change of Malaria Treatment Policy

    PubMed Central

    Ndong Ngomo, Jacques-Mari; Mawili-Mboumba, Denise Patricia; M'Bondoukwe, Noé Patrick; Nikiéma Ndong Ella, Rosalie; Bouyou Akotet, Marielle Karine

    2016-01-01

    In Gabon, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is recommended for intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp-SP) and for uncomplicated malaria treatment through ACTs drug. P. falciparum strains resistant to SP are frequent in areas where this drug is highly used and is associated with the occurrence of mutations on Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (Pfdhps) genes. The aim of the study was to compare the proportion of mutations on Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes in isolates collected at Oyem in northern Gabon, in 2005 at the time of IPTp-SP introduction and three years later. Point mutations were analyzed by nested PCR-RFLP method. Among 91 isolates, more than 90% carried Pfdhfr 108N and Pfdhfr 59R alleles. Frequencies of Pfdhfr 51I (98%) and Pfdhps 437G (67.7%) mutant alleles were higher in 2008. Mutations at codons 164, 540, and 581 were not detected. The proportion of the triple Pfdhfr mutation and quadruple mutation including A437G was high: 91.9% in 2008 and 64.8% in 2008, respectively. The present study highlights an elevated frequency of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutant alleles, although quintuple mutations were not found in north Gabon. These data suggest the need of a continuous monitoring of SP resistance in Gabon. PMID:27190671

  7. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4 days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under

  8. Accelerated bang recovery in Drosophila genderblind mutants.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, David E; Yanoga, Fatoumata; Grosjean, Yael

    2008-07-01

    Cystine-glutamate transporters import cystine into cells for glutathione synthesis and protection from oxidative stress, but also export significant amounts of glutamate. Increasing evidence suggests that 'ambient extracellular glutamate' secreted by cystine-glutamate transporters in the nervous system modulates glutamatergic synapse strength and behavior. To date, the only cystine-glutamate transporter mutants examined behaviorally are Drosophila genderblind mutants. These animals contain loss-of-function mutations in the 'genderblind' gene, which encodes an xCT subunit essential for cystine-glutamate transporter function. Genderblind was named based on a mutant courtship phenotype: male genderblind mutants are attracted to normally aversive male pheromones and thus court and attempt to copulate with both male and female partners equally. However, genderblind protein is expressed in many parts of the fly brain and thus might be expected to also regulate other behaviors, including behaviors not related to male courtship or chemosensation. Here, we show that genderblind mutants display faster recovery and increased negative geotaxis after strong mechanical stimuli (e.g., they climb faster and farther after vial banging). This phenotype is displayed by both males and females, consistent with strong genderblind expression in both sexes. PMID:19430543

  9. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  10. An ethA-ethR-Deficient Mycobacterium bovis BCG Mutant Displays Increased Adherence to Mammalian Cells and Greater Persistence In Vivo, Which Correlate with Altered Mycolic Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Siti, Zarina Zainul Rahim; Shui, Guanghou; Dianišková, Petronela; Madacki, Jan; Lin, Wenwei; Koh, Vanessa Hui Qi; Martinez Gomez, Julia Maria; Sudarkodi, Sukumar; Bendt, Anne; Wenk, Markus; Mikušová, Katarína; Korduláková, Jana; Pethe, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major worldwide epidemic because of its sole etiological agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ethionamide (ETH) is one of the major antitubercular drugs used to treat infections with multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. ETH is a prodrug that requires activation within the mycobacterial cell; its bioactivation involves the ethA-ethR locus, which encodes the monooxygenase EthA, while EthR is a transcriptional regulator that binds to the intergenic promoter region of the ethA-ethR locus. While most studies have focused on the role of EthA-EthR in ETH bioactivation, its physiological role in mycobacteria has remained elusive, although a role in bacterial cell detoxification has been proposed. Moreover, the importance of EthA-EthR in vivo has never been reported on. Here we constructed and characterized an EthA-EthR-deficient mutant of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Our results indicate that absence of the ethA-ethR locus led to greater persistence of M. bovis BCG in the mouse model of mycobacterial infection, which correlated with greater adherence to mammalian cells. Furthermore, analysis of cell wall lipid composition by thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed differences between the ethA-ethR KO mutant and the parental strain in the relative amounts of α- and keto-mycolates. Therefore, we propose here that M. bovis BCG ethA-ethR is involved in the cell wall-bound mycolate profile, which impacts mycobacterial adherence properties and in vivo persistence. This study thus provides some experimental clues to the possible physiological role of ethA-ethR and proposes that this locus is a novel factor involved in the modulation of mycobacterial virulence. PMID:24566628

  11. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G; Chesler, Elissa J; Johnson, Dabney K; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  12. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  13. Enhanced cellulase production in mutants of Thermomonospora

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Lupo, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1982-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata, a thermophilic actinomycete, secretes multiple forms of endo-beta, 1-4-glucanase (EG) when grown on cellulose-mineral salts liquid medium. The EG activity (measured as carboxymethyl cellulose hydrolysis) was separated by ion exchange chromatography into three distinct components which differed in their kinetic properties. Exposure of T. curvata to ultraviolet light, N-nitrosoguanidine, or ethane methyl sulfonate produced mutants with enhanced EG production. Selection of colonies which cleared cellulose agar plants containing 2-deoxyglucose or glycerol yielded mutants having 1.5 to 2.6 times the extracellular EG and saccharifying activity (measured by filter-paper and cotton-fiber hydrolysis). The secretion of extracellular protein was increased proportionally in mutant cultures. (Refs. 40).

  14. Colony mutants of compatible nocardiae displaying variations in recombining capacity.

    PubMed

    Brownell, G H; Walsh, R S

    1972-03-01

    Colonial morphology mutants of Nocardia erythropolis were isolated following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The alleles rou-1/smo-1 were located by recombinant analysis and found to be linked to previously mapped characters. On the basis of recombinant class type patterns obtained from various selective characters it was postulated that the rou-1 allele may span a region of unique nucleotides in the Mat-Ce genome. Recombination frequencies of rou-1 and smo-2 bearing mutants of the Mat-Ce mating type were found to differ by over 1000 fold. Attempts to demonstrate that low recombination frequencies produced by the Smo mutants were due to Rec(-) genes were unsuccessful. No increased sensitivity to either UV or X irradiation was observed by the Smo mutants. Acriflavine treatment of either Rou or Smo colony mutants failed to accelerate reversion or to alter the recombining potentials of the mutants.

  15. Induced mutants from dihaploid potatoes after pollen mother cell treatment.

    PubMed

    Przewoźny, T; Schieder, O; Wenzel, G

    1980-05-01

    Microspore mother cells of dihaploid Solanum tuberosum plants were mutagenically treated during the stage of meiosis. Mutagenesis was performed either by irradiation with x- or γ-rays or by the application of nitrosomethylurethane or methylnitronitrosoguanidine. Then, by use of the anther culture technique, 913 functional plants and 442 untreated control plants were regenerated. From the exposed plants seven distinct mutants could be isolated, predominantly chlorophyll deficient lines, while from the controls no clear-cut mutants arose. One mutant turned out to be photomorphogenetic in addition to having a chlorophyll defect. In addition to the production of mutants the treatments significantly increased the frequency of multicellular structure formation from microspores.

  16. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  17. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  18. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Shigematsu, N.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention.

  19. Nondisjunction Mutants of the Nematode CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan; Horvitz, H. Robert; Brenner, Sydney

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of males (5AA; XO) among the self progeny of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites (5AA; XX) is about one in 500. Fifteen him (for "high incidence of males") mutations have been identified that increase this frequency by a factor of ten to 150, as a result of increased X-chromosome nondisjunction. The mutations define ten complementation groups, which have been mapped: nine are autosomal, and one sex linked. Most of the mutants are superficially wild type in anatomy and behavior; however, him-4 mutants display gonadal abnormalities, and unc-86 mutants, which have a Him phenotype, exhibit a variety of anatomical and behavioral abnormalities. All the mutants segregate fertile 3X hermaphrodite progeny as well as XO male progeny. Some produce large numbers of inviable zygotes. Mutants in all ten genes produce diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional ova, and in the four strains tested, diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional sperm are produced by 2X "transformed" males. It appears likely that most of the mutants have defects in both gamete lines of the hermaphrodite. XO males of him strains other than him-4 and unc-86 are similar to wild-type males in anatomy and behavior, and all produce equal or almost equal numbers of haplo-X and nullo-X sperm, and no diplo-X sperm. Male fertility is reduced to varying extents in all him mutants. In four of the strains, nondisjunction during oogenesis has been shown to occur at a reductional division, and in three of these strains, abnormalities in recombination have been demonstrated. One mutant also exhibits autosomal nondisjunction, but many of the others probably do not. Therefore, the X chromosome of C. elegans may differ from the autosomes in the mechanisms controlling its meiotic behavior.——3X hermaphrodites are shorter and less fertile than 2X hermaphrodites, and they produce many inviable zygotes among their self progeny: these are probably 4X zygotes. Haplo-X and diplo-X ova are produced in 2:1 ratio by 3X

  20. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  1. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  2. Fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Linkevicius, Marius; Anderssen, Jytte Mark; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline after exposure to adverse conditions in vitro and in vivo. Methods Survival in response to low pH, bile salts, oxidative stress and human serum was examined for E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline due to single mutations that caused increased efflux (marR, lon) or impaired LPS (rfaC, rfaE, lpcA). An in vitro competition assay was used to determine growth fitness defects. Competitive fitness was assessed using mouse infection models. MICs, exponential growth rates and expression levels of efflux-related genes were measured for genetically reconstructed double and triple mutants. Results The LPS mutants were 48–85-fold more susceptible to bile salts compared with the ERN mutants and the WT. As shown by in vitro competitions, the fitness reduction was 0.3%–13% for ERN mutants and ∼24% for LPS mutants. During in vivo survival experiments, LPS mutants were outcompeted by the WT strain in the thigh infection model. Constructed double ERN and LPS mutants showed additive and synergistic increases in tigecycline MICs. Conclusions Generally, reduced susceptibility to tigecycline caused a decrease in fitness under stressful in vitro and in vivo conditions with ERN mutants being fitter than LPS mutants. When combined, ERN mutations caused a synergistic increase in the MIC of tigecycline. These findings could explain why clinical resistance to tigecycline in E. coli is mainly associated with up-regulation of the AcrAB efflux system. PMID:26851608

  3. Yeast mutants overproducing iso-cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.; Cardillo, T.S.; Errede, B.; Friedman, L.; McKnight, G.; Stiles, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    For over 15 years, the iso-cytochrome c system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to investigate a multitude of problems in genetics and molecular biology. More recently, attention has been focused on using mutants for examining translation and transcriptional processes and for probing regulatory regions governing gene expression. In an effort to explore regulatory mechanisms and to investigate mutational alterations that lead to increased levels of gene products, we have isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce cytochrome c. In this paper we have briefly summarized background information of some essential features of the iso-cytochrome c system and we have described the types of mutants that overproduce iso-1-cytochrome c or iso-2-cytochrome c. Genetic procedures and recombinant DNA procedures were used to demonstrate that abnormally high amounts of gene products occur in mutants as result of duplications of gene copies or of extended alteration of regulatory regions. The results summarized in this paper point out the requirements of gross mutational changes or rearrangements of chromosomal segments for augmenting gene products.

  4. Architectural phenotypes in the transparent testa mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Charles S.; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are low molecular weight secondary plant metabolites with a myriad of functions. As flavonoids affect auxin transport (an important growth-controlling hormone) and are biologically active in eukaryotes, flavonoid mutants were expected to have undescribed architectural phenotypes. The Arabidopsis thaliana transparent testa (tt) mutants are compromised in the enzymatic steps or transcriptional regulators affecting flavonoid synthesis. tt mutant seedlings were grown on hard-slanted agar (a stress condition), under varying light conditions, and in soil to examine the resulting growth patterns. These tt mutants revealed a wide variety of architectural phenotypes in root and aerial tissues. Mutants with increased inflorescences, siliques, and lateral root density or reduced stature are traits that could affect plant yield or performance under certain environmental conditions. The regulatory genes affected in architectural traits may provide useful molecular targets for examination in other plants. PMID:19129166

  5. Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, K.J.; Kiser, C.S.; Esko, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in proteoglycan synthesis by radiographic screening for cells unable to incorporate TVSO4 into acid-precipitable material. Some mutants did not incorporate TVSO4 into acid-precipitable material, whereas others incorporated about 3-fold less radioactivity. HPLC anion exchange chromatographic analysis of radiolabelled glycosaminoglycans isolated from these mutants revealed many are defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis. Mutants 803 and 677 do not synthesize heparan sulfate, although they produce chondroitin sulfate: strain 803 makes chondroitin sulfate normally, whereas 677 overaccumulates chondroitin sulfate by a factor of three. These mutants fall into the same complementation group, suggesting that the mutations are allelic. A second group of heparan sulfate biosynthetic mutants, consisting of cell lines 625, 668 and 679, produce undersulfated heparan sulfate and normal chondroitin sulfate. Treatment of the chains with nitrous acid should determine the position of the sulfate groups along the chain. These mutants may define a complementation group that is defective in the enzymes which modify the heparan sulfate chain. To increase the authors repertoire of heparan sulfate mutants, they are presently developing an in situ enzyme assay to screen colonies replica plated on filter discs for sulfotransferase defects.

  6. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Da-Long; Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape. PMID:27610363

  7. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape.

  8. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape. PMID:27610363

  9. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  10. Metabolic Disruption in Drosophila Bang-Sensitive Seizure Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fergestad, Tim; Bostwick, Bret; Ganetzky, Barry

    2006-01-01

    We examined a number of Drosophila mutants with increased susceptibility to seizures following mechanical or electrical stimulation to better understand the underlying factors that predispose neurons to aberrant activity. Several mutations in this class have been molecularly identified and suggest metabolic disruption as a possible source for increased seizure susceptibility. We mapped the bang-sensitive seizure mutation knockdown (kdn) to cytological position 5F3 and identified citrate synthase as the affected gene. These results further support a role for mitochondrial metabolism in controlling neuronal activity and seizure susceptibility. Biochemical analysis in bang-sensitive mutants revealed reductions in ATP levels consistent with disruption of mitochondrial energy production in these mutants. Electrophysiological analysis of mutants affecting mitochondrial proteins revealed an increased likelihood for a specific pattern of seizure activity. Our data implicate cellular metabolism in regulating seizure susceptibility and suggest that differential sensitivity of neuronal subtypes to metabolic changes underlies distinct types of seizure activity. PMID:16648587

  11. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  12. Combined Isothermal Titration and Differential Scanning Calorimetry Define Three-State Thermodynamics of fALS-Associated Mutant Apo SOD1 Dimers and an Increased Population of Folded Monomer.

    PubMed

    Broom, Helen R; Vassall, Kenrick A; Rumfeldt, Jessica A O; Doyle, Colleen M; Tong, Ming Sze; Bonner, Julia M; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-26

    Many proteins are naturally homooligomers, homodimers most frequently. The overall stability of oligomeric proteins may be described in terms of the stability of the constituent monomers and the stability of their association; together, these stabilities determine the populations of different monomer and associated species, which generally have different roles in the function or dysfunction of the protein. Here we show how a new combined calorimetry approach, using isothermal titration calorimetry to define monomer association energetics together with differential scanning calorimetry to measure total energetics of oligomer unfolding, can be used to analyze homodimeric unmetalated (apo) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and determine the effects on the stability of structurally diverse mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Despite being located throughout the protein, all mutations studied weaken the dimer interface, while concomitantly either decreasing or increasing the marginal stability of the monomer. Analysis of the populations of dimer, monomer, and unfolded monomer under physiological conditions of temperature, pH, and protein concentration shows that all mutations promote the formation of folded monomers. These findings may help rationalize the key roles proposed for monomer forms of SOD1 in neurotoxic aggregation in ALS, as well as roles for other forms of SOD1. Thus, the results obtained here provide a valuable approach for the quantitative analysis of homooligomeric protein stabilities, which can be used to elucidate the natural and aberrant roles of different forms of these proteins and to improve methods for predicting protein stabilities.

  13. Databases and software for the analysis of mutations in the human p53 gene, human hprt gene and both the lacI and lacZ gene in transgenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Cariello, N F; Douglas, G R; Gorelick, N J; Hart, D W; Wilson, J D; Soussi, T

    1998-01-01

    We have created databases and software applications for the analysis of DNA mutations at the human p53 gene, the human hprt gene and both the rodent transgenic lacI and lacZ loci. The databases themselves are stand-alone dBASE files and the software for analysis of the databases runs on IBM-compatible computers with Microsoft Windows. Each database has a separate software analysis program. The software created for these databases permit the filtering, ordering, report generation and display of information in the database. In addition, a significant number of routines have been developed for the analysis of single base substitutions. One method of obtaining the databases and software is via the World Wide Web. Open the following home page with a Web Browser: http://sunsite.unc.edu/dnam/mainpage. html . Alternatively, the databases and programs are available via public FTP from: anonymous@sunsite.unc.edu. There is no password required to enter the system. The databases and software are found beneath the subdirectory: pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations. Two other programs are available at the site, a program for comparison of mutational spectra and a program for entry of mutational data into a relational database.

  14. Mutant γPKC that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 upregulates Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kota; Seki, Takahiro; Onji, Tomoya; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2013-10-11

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We previously demonstrated that the mutant γPKC found in SCA14 is misfolded, susceptible to aggregation and cytotoxic. Molecular chaperones assist the refolding and degradation of misfolded proteins and prevention of the proteins' aggregation. In the present study, we found that the expression of mutant γPKC-GFP increased the levels of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in SH-SY5Y cells. To elucidate the role of this elevation, we investigated the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Hsp70 on the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC. Knockdown of Hsp70 exacerbated the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC-GFP by inhibiting this mutant's degradation. These findings suggest that mutant γPKC increases the level of Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity by enhancing its degradation.

  15. Ascorbate, added after irradiation, reduces the mutant yield and alters the spectrum of CD59- mutations in A(L) cells irradiated with high LET carbon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Akiko; Vannais, Diane; Lenarczyk, Marek; Waldren, Charles A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    It has been reported that X-ray induced HPRT- mutation in cultured human cells is prevented by ascorbate added after irradiation. Mutation extinction is attributed to neutralization by ascorbate, of radiation-induced long-lived radicals (LLR) with half-lives of several hours. We here show that post-irradiation treatment with ascorbate (5 mM added 30 min after radiation) reduces, but does not eliminate, the induction of CD59- mutants in human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells exposed to high-LET carbon ions (LET of 100 KeV/microm). RibCys, [2(R,S)-D-ribo-1',2',3',4'-Tetrahydroxybutyl]-thiazolidene-4(R)-ca riboxylic acid] (4 mM) gave a similar but lesser effect. The lethality of the carbon ions was not altered by these chemicals. Preliminary data are presented that ascorbate also alters the spectrum of CD59- mutations induced by the carbon beam, mainly by reducing the incidence of small mutations and mutants displaying transmissible genomic instability (TGI), while large mutations are unaffected. Our results suggest that LLR are important in initiating TGI.

  16. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Hauben, K J; Bartlett, D H; Soontjens, C C; Cornelis, K; Wuytack, E Y; Michiels, C W

    1997-01-01

    Alternating cycles of exposure to high pressure and outgrowth of surviving populations were used to select for highly pressure-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli MG1655. Three barotolerant mutants (LMM1010, LMM1020, and LMM1030) were isolated independently by using outgrowth temperatures of 30, 37, and 42 degrees C, respectively. Survival of these mutants after pressure treatment for 15 min at ambient temperature was 40 to 85% at 220 MPa and 0.5 to 1.5% at 800 MPa, while survival of the parent strain, MG1655, decreased from 15% at 220 MPa to 2 x 10(-8)% at 700 MPa. Heat resistance of mutants LMM1020 and LMM1030 was also altered, as evident by higher D values at 58 and 60 degrees C and reduced z values compared to those for the parent strain. D and z values for mutant LMM1010 were not significantly different from those for the parent strain. Pressure sensitivity of the mutants increased from 10 to 50 degrees C, as opposed to the parent strain, which showed a minimum around 40 degrees C. The ability of the mutants to grow at moderately elevated pressure (50 MPa) was reduced at temperatures above 37 degrees C, indicating that resistance to pressure inactivation is unrelated to barotolerant growth. The development of high levels of barotolerance as demonstrated in this work should cause concern about the safety of high-pressure food processing. PMID:9055412

  17. Selection and properties of Streptococcus thermophilus mutants deficient in urease.

    PubMed

    Monnet, C; Pernoud, S; Sepulchre, A; Fremaux, C; Corrieu, G

    2004-06-01

    Natural variations of the urea content of milk have a detrimental effect on the regularity of acidification by Streptococcus thermophilus strains used in dairy processes. The aim of the present study was to select urease-deficient mutants of S. thermophilus and to investigate their properties. Using an improved screening medium on agar plates, mutants were selected from 4 different parent strains after mutagen treatment and by spontaneous mutation. Most mutants were stable and had a phage sensitivity profile similar to that of their parent strain. Some of them contained detrimental secondary mutations, as their acidifying activity was lower than that of the parent strain cultivated in the presence of the urease inhibitor flurofamide. The proportion of this type of mutant was much lower among spontaneous mutants than among mutants selected after mutagen treatment. Utilization of urease-deficient mutants in dairy processes may have several advantages, such as an increase in acidification, an improved regularity of acidification, and a lower production of ammonia in whey.

  18. Isolation and characterization of Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, D N; Palomares, A J; Casadesús, J

    1991-06-01

    Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in the production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) were isolated after N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. The mutants were classified into three phenotypic classes: (I) Exo-, rough mutants lacking exopolysaccharide; (II) Exos (for "small") which form tiny, compact colonies and synthesize reduced amounts of EPS; and (III) Exoc (for "constitutive"), hypermucoid mutants which overproduce EPS. Hypermucoid strains showed increased resistance to desiccation. All the mutants were able to nodulate, although a significant decrease in infectivity degree and/or competitiveness was found in rough and compact strains. Two mutants proved to be deficient in nitrogen fixation. Complementation analysis with cloned R. meliloti exo genes could not be applied to the study of these Fix- mutants because introduction of plasmids derived from cosmid vector pLAFR1 caused loss of nodulating ability. However, complementation of calcofluor staining and EPS production was observed. Complementation with certain exo genes also caused a marked increase in motility.

  19. Proteomic analysis of the flooding tolerance mechanism in mutant soybean.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Nanjo, Yohei; Nishimura, Minoru

    2013-02-21

    Flooding stress of soybean is a serious problem because it reduces growth; however, flooding-tolerant cultivars have not been identified. To analyze the flooding tolerance mechanism of soybean, the flooding-tolerant mutant was isolated and analyzed using a proteomic technique. Flooding-tolerance tests were repeated five times using gamma-ray irradiated soybeans, whose root growth (M6 stage) was not suppressed even under flooding stress. Two-day-old wild-type and mutant plants were subjected to flooding stress for 2days, and proteins were identified using a gel-based proteomic technique. In wild-type under flooding stress, levels of proteins related to development, protein synthesis/degradation, secondary metabolism, and the cell wall changed; however, these proteins did not markedly differ in the mutant. In contrast, an increased number of fermentation-related proteins were identified in the mutant under flooding stress. The root tips of mutant plants were not affected by flooding stress, even though the wild-type plants had damaged root. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the mutant increased at an early stage of flooding stress compared with that of the wild-type. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the fermentation system in the early stages of flooding may be an important factor for the acquisition of flooding tolerance in soybean.

  20. C. elegans and mutants with chronic nicotine exposure as a novel model of cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kanteti, Rajani; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; El-Hashani, Essam; Riehm, Jacob J; Stricker, Thomas; Nagy, Stanislav; Zaborin, Alexander; Zaborina, Olga; Biron, David; Alverdy, John C; Im, Hae Kyung; Siddiqui, Shahid; Padilla, Pamela A; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated MET and its oncogenic mutants relevant to lung cancer in C. elegans. The inactive orthlogues of the receptor tyrosine kinase Eph and MET, namely vab-1 and RB2088 respectively, the temperature sensitive constitutively active form of KRAS, SD551 (let-60; GA89) and the inactive c-CBL equivalent mutants in sli-1 (PS2728, PS1258, and MT13032) when subjected to chronic exposure of nicotine resulted in a significant loss in egg-laying capacity and fertility. While the vab-1 mutant revealed increased circular motion in response to nicotine, the other mutant strains failed to show any effect. Overall locomotion speed increased with increasing nicotine concentration in all tested mutant strains except in the vab-1 mutants. Moreover, chronic nicotine exposure, in general, upregulated kinases and phosphatases. Taken together, these studies provide evidence in support of C. elegans as initial in vivo model to study nicotine and its effects on oncogenic mutations identified in humans.

  1. Isolation of prostrate turfgrass mutants via screening of dwarf phenotype and characterization of a perennial ryegrass prostrate mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junmei; Thammina, Chandra; Li, Wei; Yu, Hao; Yer, Huseyin; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Marron, Manon; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Chen, Yongqin; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J; Guillard, Karl; Zhang, Xian; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Prostrate turf varieties are desirable because of their increased low mowing tolerance, heat resistance, traffic resistance and ground coverage compared with upright varieties. Mutation breeding may provide a powerful tool to create prostrate varieties, but there are no simple, straightforward methods to screen for such mutants. Elucidation of the molecular basis of the major 'green revolution' traits, dwarfism and semi-dwarfism, guided us to design a simple strategy for isolating dwarf mutants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). We have shown that gamma-ray-mediated dominant dwarf mutants can be easily screened for at the three-leaf stage. About 10% of dwarf mutant lines also displayed a prostrate phenotype at mature stages (>10 tillers). One prostrate line, Lowboy I, has been characterized in detail. Lowboy I had significantly shorter canopy, leaf blade and internode lengths compared with wild type. Lowboy I also exhibited greater tolerance to low mowing stress than wild type. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA) restored Lowboy I to a wild-type phenotype, indicating that the dwarf and prostrate phenotypes were both due to GA deficiency. We further showed that phenotypes of Lowboy I were dominant and stably inherited through sexual reproduction. Prostrate turfgrass mutants are difficult to screen for because the phenotype is not observed at young seedling stages, therefore our method represents a simple strategy for easily isolating prostrate mutants. Furthermore, Lowboy I may provide an outstanding germplasm for breeding novel prostrate perennial ryegrass cultivars. PMID:26955481

  2. Isolation of prostrate turfgrass mutants via screening of dwarf phenotype and characterization of a perennial ryegrass prostrate mutant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junmei; Thammina, Chandra; Li, Wei; Yu, Hao; Yer, Huseyin; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Marron, Manon; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Chen, Yongqin; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J.; Guillard, Karl; Zhang, Xian; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Prostrate turf varieties are desirable because of their increased low mowing tolerance, heat resistance, traffic resistance and ground coverage compared with upright varieties. Mutation breeding may provide a powerful tool to create prostrate varieties, but there are no simple, straightforward methods to screen for such mutants. Elucidation of the molecular basis of the major ‘green revolution’ traits, dwarfism and semi-dwarfism, guided us to design a simple strategy for isolating dwarf mutants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). We have shown that gamma-ray-mediated dominant dwarf mutants can be easily screened for at the three-leaf stage. About 10% of dwarf mutant lines also displayed a prostrate phenotype at mature stages (>10 tillers). One prostrate line, Lowboy I, has been characterized in detail. Lowboy I had significantly shorter canopy, leaf blade and internode lengths compared with wild type. Lowboy I also exhibited greater tolerance to low mowing stress than wild type. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA) restored Lowboy I to a wild-type phenotype, indicating that the dwarf and prostrate phenotypes were both due to GA deficiency. We further showed that phenotypes of Lowboy I were dominant and stably inherited through sexual reproduction. Prostrate turfgrass mutants are difficult to screen for because the phenotype is not observed at young seedling stages, therefore our method represents a simple strategy for easily isolating prostrate mutants. Furthermore, Lowboy I may provide an outstanding germplasm for breeding novel prostrate perennial ryegrass cultivars. PMID:26955481

  3. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  4. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  5. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  6. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropical

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, S.G.; Rayle, D.L. ); Cleland, R.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  7. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  8. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance.

  9. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance. PMID:19735697

  10. Repair effects of laser on mutants of filamentous fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yansheng; Xiao, Canpeng; Qian, Hailun; Su, Baoliang; Hu, Yujun; Deng, Jianhui

    1999-09-01

    The paper reports that penicillin-producing strains and lovastatin-producing strains were irradiated by UV and subsequently by laser (632.8 nm), and the reparation rate reached 297% and 264%. High-yield mutant was selected with improved potency of 24.5% and 30%, respectively; Gibberellin producing strains were treated with chemical agent LiCl, and then irradiated with 632.8 nm laser. One mutant with 189.6% increased potency was obtained. The experimental results indicated that using laser irradiation after UV or chemical agent mutation was a new useful method in breeding high-yield strains.

  11. Characterization of a mutant glucose isomerase from Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Shen, Dong; Wu, Xue-Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Qi-He

    2014-10-01

    A series of site-directed mutant glucose isomerase at tryptophan 139 from Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum strain B6A were purified to gel electrophoretic homogeneity, and the biochemical properties were determined. W139F mutation is the most efficient mutant derivative with a tenfold increase in its catalytic efficiency toward glucose compared with the native GI. With a maximal activity at 80 °C of 59.58 U/mg on glucose, this mutant derivative is the most active type ever reported. The enzyme activity was maximal at 90 °C and like other glucose isomerase, this mutant enzyme required Co(2+) or Mg(2+) for enzyme activity and thermal stability (stable for 20 h at 80 °C in the absence of substrate). Its optimum pH was around 7.0, and it had 86 % of its maximum activity at pH 6.0 incubated for 12 h at 60 °C. This enzyme was determined as thermostable and weak-acid stable. These findings indicated that the mutant GI W139F from T. saccharolyticum strain B6A is appropriate for use as a potential candidate for high-fructose corn syrup producing enzyme. PMID:25139657

  12. Characterization of a mutant glucose isomerase from Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Shen, Dong; Wu, Xue-Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Qi-He

    2014-10-01

    A series of site-directed mutant glucose isomerase at tryptophan 139 from Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum strain B6A were purified to gel electrophoretic homogeneity, and the biochemical properties were determined. W139F mutation is the most efficient mutant derivative with a tenfold increase in its catalytic efficiency toward glucose compared with the native GI. With a maximal activity at 80 °C of 59.58 U/mg on glucose, this mutant derivative is the most active type ever reported. The enzyme activity was maximal at 90 °C and like other glucose isomerase, this mutant enzyme required Co(2+) or Mg(2+) for enzyme activity and thermal stability (stable for 20 h at 80 °C in the absence of substrate). Its optimum pH was around 7.0, and it had 86 % of its maximum activity at pH 6.0 incubated for 12 h at 60 °C. This enzyme was determined as thermostable and weak-acid stable. These findings indicated that the mutant GI W139F from T. saccharolyticum strain B6A is appropriate for use as a potential candidate for high-fructose corn syrup producing enzyme.

  13. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Whittle, Edward J.

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  14. Selection and characterization of L-ethionine resistant mutants of Trichosporon cutaneum.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Nelly; Alexieva, Zlatka

    2005-01-01

    Trichosporon cutaneum R57 and its L-ethionine resistant mutant NZ94 strain were investigated. The amino acid analyses of cell content of both strains were carried out. The pool of free methionine in the mutant strain is enhanced 16.5 times. The total amount of sulphur-containing amino acids in the mutant cells was significantly increased from 36.8 in the wild strain to 113.4 mg/g protein in the mutant strain. In the process of mutant strain cultivation there was found a high excretion of free methionine (259 microg/ml) in the medium. It was shown that the amino acid content of both wild and mutant strains would be helpful for formulating of new improved animal nutritional diets.

  15. Membrane function in lipid mutants of Arabidopsis. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Browse, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    Progress on the biochemical characterization of the fad3 mutants deficient in 18:3 fatty acid synthesis and the fab2 mutant that accumulates increased amounts of 18:0 is described. Studies of the cell biology and physiology of the fab2 and fad2 mutants have provided evidence for some of the critical roles played by unsaturated fatty acids as components of plant membranes. Finally, the fab2 mutant has allowed us to carry out the first isolation and characterization of intergenic suppressor mutations in a higher plant.

  16. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  17. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-10-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein calculations. The trend accuracy of the methods decreased as I-Mutant 2.0 (R=0.64-0.65), SDM (R=0.57-0.60), POPMUSIC2.1 (R=0.54-0.57), I-Mutant 3.0 (R=0.53-0.55), mCSM (R=0.35-0.47), and CUPSAT (R=0.25-0.48). The mean signed errors increased as SDMMutant 2.0Mutant 3.0increased as I-Mutant 2.0Mutant 3.0increased as I-Mutant 3.0 (0.05)Mutant 2.0 (0.09)Mutant 2.0 is proficient for this purpose, as further validated against a data set of related cytochrome c like proteins. The results also emphasize the importance of high-quality crystal structures and reveal structure-dependent effects even in the near-atomic resolution limit.

  18. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-10-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein calculations. The trend accuracy of the methods decreased as I-Mutant 2.0 (R=0.64-0.65), SDM (R=0.57-0.60), POPMUSIC2.1 (R=0.54-0.57), I-Mutant 3.0 (R=0.53-0.55), mCSM (R=0.35-0.47), and CUPSAT (R=0.25-0.48). The mean signed errors increased as SDMMutant 2.0Mutant 3.0increased as I-Mutant 2.0Mutant 3.0increased as I-Mutant 3.0 (0.05)Mutant 2.0 (0.09)Mutant 2.0 is proficient for this purpose, as further validated against a data set of related cytochrome c like proteins. The results also emphasize the importance of high-quality crystal structures and reveal structure-dependent effects even in the near-atomic resolution limit. PMID:26054434

  19. Preventing neurodegeneration in the Drosophila mutant bubblegum.

    PubMed

    Min, K T; Benzer, S

    1999-06-18

    The Drosophila melanogaster recessive mutant bubblegum (bgm) exhibits adult neurodegeneration, with marked dilation of photoreceptor axons. The bubblegum mutant shows elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), as seen in the human disease adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In ALD, the excess can be lowered by dietary treatment with "Lorenzo's oil," a mixture of unsaturated fatty acids. Feeding the fly mutant one of the components, glyceryl trioleate oil, blocked the accumulation of excess VLCFAs as well as development of the pathology. Mutant flies thus provide a potential model system for studying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and screening drugs for treatment.

  20. Melanin-deficient mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Guererro, H; Edman, J C

    1994-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen in immunocompromised patients. The ability of C. neoformans to produce melanin has been correlated with virulence. The role of melanin in promoting virulence is unclear, although an anti-oxidant function has been suggested. To begin to define the genetic mechanisms responsible for melanin production in C. neoformans, we describe the isolation of seven melanin-deficient mutant classes. Some of the mutants can be suppressed by addition of Cu2+ to media, suggesting that the phenoloxidase of C. neoformans, like other fungal phenoloxidases, contains copper. Other mutants display a recessive sterile phenotype. A genetic and phenotypic characterisation of these mutants is presented. PMID:7983575

  1. 'Green revolution' genes encode mutant gibberellin response modulators.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Richards, D E; Hartley, N M; Murphy, G P; Devos, K M; Flintham, J E; Beales, J; Fish, L J; Worland, A J; Pelica, F; Sudhakar, D; Christou, P; Snape, J W; Gale, M D; Harberd, N P

    1999-07-15

    World wheat grain yields increased substantially in the 1960s and 1970s because farmers rapidly adopted the new varieties and cultivation methods of the so-called 'green revolution'. The new varieties are shorter, increase grain yield at the expense of straw biomass, and are more resistant to damage by wind and rain. These wheats are short because they respond abnormally to the plant growth hormone gibberellin. This reduced response to gibberellin is conferred by mutant dwarfing alleles at one of two Reduced height-1 (Rht-B1 and Rht-D1) loci. Here we show that Rht-B1/Rht-D1 and maize dwarf-8 (d8) are orthologues of the Arabidopsis Gibberellin Insensitive (GAI) gene. These genes encode proteins that resemble nuclear transcription factors and contain an SH2-like domain, indicating that phosphotyrosine may participate in gibberellin signalling. Six different orthologous dwarfing mutant alleles encode proteins that are altered in a conserved amino-terminal gibberellin signalling domain. Transgenic rice plants containing a mutant GAI allele give reduced responses to gibberellin and are dwarfed, indicating that mutant GAI orthologues could be used to increase yield in a wide range of crop species.

  2. Eskimo1 mutants of Arabidopsis are constitutively freezing-tolerant.

    PubMed

    Xin, Z; Browse, J

    1998-06-23

    Temperate plants develop a greater ability to withstand freezing in response to a period of low but nonfreezing temperatures through a complex, adaptive process of cold acclimation. Very little is known about the signaling processes by which plants perceive the low temperature stimulus and transduce it into the nucleus to activate genes needed for increased freezing tolerance. To help understand the signaling processes, we have isolated mutants of Arabidopsis that are constitutively freezing-tolerant in the absence of cold acclimation. Freezing tolerance of wild-type Arabidopsis was increased from -5.5 degreesC to -12.6 degreesC by cold acclimation whereas the freezing tolerance of 26 mutant lines ranged from -6.8 degreesC to -10.6 degreesC in the absence of acclimation. Plants with mutations at the eskimo1 (esk1) locus accumulated high levels of proline, a compatible osmolyte, but did not exhibit constitutively increased expression of several cold-regulated genes involved in freezing tolerance. RNA gel blot analysis suggested that proline accumulation in esk1 plants was mediated by regulation of transcript levels of genes involved in proline synthesis and degradation. The characterization of esk1 mutants and results from other mutants suggest that distinct signaling pathways activate different aspects of cold acclimation and that activation of one pathway can result in considerable freezing tolerance without activation of other pathways.

  3. Erythritol production with minimum by-product using Candida magnoliae mutant.

    PubMed

    Ghezelbash, G R; Nahvi, I; Malekpour, A

    2014-01-01

    In order to enhance erythritol production, mutants of Candida magnoliae DSM70638 were generated by ultraviolet and chemical mutagenesis. Erythritol productivity of samples was analyzed by TLC and HPLC with the refractive index detector. One of the mutants named mutant 12-2 gave a 2.4-fold increase in erythritol (20.32 g/L) and a 5.5-fold decrease in glycerol production compared to the wild strain. A sequence-based map of erythrose reductase gene in this mutant showed a replacement of the A321 by G321 that did not cause any amino acid exchange in protein structure. Therefore, the reason of higher erythritol production in C. magnoliae mutant 12-2 is probably the increase in expression of the open reading frame gene. This study revealed that a mutation or minor change in the sequence of genes involved in a production pathway can lead to a significant increase in protein translation.

  4. Analyses of tomato fruit brightness mutants uncover both cutin-deficient and cutin-abundant mutants and a new hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase.

    PubMed

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants.

  5. Analyses of Tomato Fruit Brightness Mutants Uncover Both Cutin-Deficient and Cutin-Abundant Mutants and a New Hypomorphic Allele of GDSL Lipase[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants. PMID:24357602

  6. Cardiac-Targeted Transgenic Mutant Mitochondrial Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J.; Hosseini, Seyed H.; Green, Elgin; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Cucoranu, Ioan; Haase, Chad P.; Russ, Rodney; Srivastava, Jaya; Ivey, Kristopher; Ludaway, Tomika; Kapoor, Victor; Abuin, Allison; Shapoval, Alexsey; Santoianni, Robert; Saada, Ann; Elpeleg, Orly; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA biogenesis is critical to cardiac contractility. DNA polymerase gamma (pol γ) replicates mtDNA, whereas thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) monophosphorylates pyrimidines intramitochondrially. Point mutations in POLG and TK2 result in clinical diseases associated with mtDNA depletion and organ dysfunction. Pyrimidine analogs (NRTIs) inhibit Pol γ and mtDNA replication. Cardiac “dominant negative” murine transgenes (TGs; Pol γ Y955G, and TK2 H121N or I212N) defined the role of each in the heart. mtDNA abundance, histopathological features, histochemistry, mitochondrial protein abundance, morphometry, and echocardiography were determined for TGs in “2 × 2” studies with or without pyrimidine analogs. Cardiac mtDNA abundance decreased in Y955C TGs (∼50%) but increased in H121N and I212N TGs (20-70%). Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) increased in hearts of all mutants. Ultrastructural changes occurred in Y955C and H121N TGs. Histopathology demonstrated hypertrophy in H121N, LV dilation in I212N, and both hypertrophy and dilation in Y955C TGs. Antiretrovirals increased LV mass (≈50%) for all three TGs which combined with dilation indicates cardiomyopathy. Taken together, these studies demonstrate three manifestations of cardiac dysfunction that depend on the nature of the specific mutation and antiretroviral treatment. Mutations in genes for mtDNA biogenesis increase risk for defective mtDNA replication, leading to LV hypertrophy. PMID:18446447

  7. Metabolism of Proline, Glutamate, and Ornithine in Proline Mutant Root Tips of Zea mays (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dierks-Ventling, Christa; Tonelli, Chiara

    1982-01-01

    In excised pro1-1 mutant and corresponding normal type roots of Zea mays L. the uptake and interconversion of [14C]proline, [14C]glutamic acid, [14C]glutamine, and [14C]ornithine and their utilization for protein synthesis was measured with the intention of finding an explanation for the proline requirement of the mutant. Uptake of these four amino acids, with the exception of proline, was the same in mutant and normal roots, but utilization differed. Higher than normal utilization rates for proline and glutamic acid were noted in mutant roots leading to increased CO2 production, free amino acid interconversion, and protein synthesis. Proline was synthesized from either glutamic acid (or glutamine) or ornithine in both mutant and normal roots; it did not accumulate but rather was used for protein synthesis. Ornithine was not a good precursor for proline in either system, but was preferentially converted to arginine and glutamine, particularly in mutant roots. The pro1-1 mutant was thus not deficient in its ability to make proline. Based on these findings, and on the fact that ornithine, arginine, glutamic acid and aspartic acid are elevated as free amino acids in mutant roots, it is suggested that in the pro1-1 mutant proline catabolism prevails over proline synthesis. PMID:16662144

  8. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus mutants expressing reduced susceptibility to common house-cleaners

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A.O.; O’Leary, J.O.; Muthaiyan, A.; Langevin, M.J.; Delgado, A.; Abalos, A.T.; Fajardo, A.R.; Marek, J.; Wilkinson, B.J.; Gustafson, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To characterize mutants of Staphylococcus aureus expressing reduced susceptibility to house cleaners (HC), assess the impact of the alternative sigma factor SigB on HC susceptibility, and determine the MIC of clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) to a HC. Methods and Results Susceptibility to HC, HC components, H2O2, vancomycin and oxacillin and physiological parameters were determined for HC-reduced susceptibility (HCRS) mutants, parent strain COL and COLsigB::kan. HCRS mutants selected with three HC expressed reduced susceptibility to multiple HC, HC components, H2O2 and vancomycin. Two unique HCRS mutants also lost the methicillin resistance determinant. In addition, all HCRS mutants exhibited better growth at two temperatures, and one HCRS mutant expressed reduced carotenoid production. COLsigB::kan demonstrated increased susceptibility to all HC and many HC components. sigB operon mutations were not detected in one HCRS mutant background. Of 76 clinical MRSA, 20 exhibited reduced susceptibility to a HC. Conclusions HCRS mutants demonstrate altered susceptibility to multiple antimicrobials. While sigB is required for full HC resistance, one HCRS mechanism does not involve sigB operon mutations. Clinical MRSA expressing reduced susceptibility to a common HC were detected. Significance and Impact of the Study This study suggests that HCRS mutants are not protected against, nor selected by, practical HC concentrations. PMID:15659191

  9. Susceptibility genes for schizophrenia: mutant models, endophenotypes and psychobiology.

    PubMed

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Desbonnet, Lieve; Moran, Paula M; Waddington, John L

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterised by a multifactorial aetiology that involves genetic liability interacting with epigenetic and environmental factors to increase risk for developing the disorder. A consensus view is that the genetic component involves several common risk alleles of small effect and/or rare but penetrant copy number variations. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence for broader, overlapping genetic-phenotypic relationships in psychosis; for example, the same susceptibility genes also confer risk for bipolar disorder. Phenotypic characterisation of genetic models of candidate risk genes and/or putative pathophysiological processes implicated in schizophrenia, as well as examination of epidemiologically relevant gene × environment interactions in these models, can illuminate molecular and pathobiological mechanisms involved in schizophrenia. The present chapter outlines both the evidence from phenotypic studies in mutant mouse models related to schizophrenia and recently described mutant models addressing such gene × environment interactions. Emphasis is placed on evaluating the extent to which mutant phenotypes recapitulate the totality of the disease phenotype or model selective endophenotypes. We also discuss new developments and trends in relation to the functional genomics of psychosis which might help to inform on the construct validity of mutant models of schizophrenia and highlight methodological challenges in phenotypic evaluation that relate to such models.

  10. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  11. Gibberella fujikuroi mutants obtained with UV radiation and N-methyl-N'-nitro-nitrosoguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Avalos, J.; Casadesus, J.; Cerda-Olmedo, E.

    1985-01-01

    N-methyl-N'-nitrosoguanidine and to a lesser extent UV radiation are very mutagenic for Gibberella microconidia. The recommended nitrosoguanidine doses lead to much higher frequencies of mutants than are found in other microorganisms. The frequency of mutants among the survivors increases linearly with the nitrosoguanidine dose (molar concentration x time); the absolute number of viable mutants in a given population reaches a maximum for a dose of ca. 0.7 M x s. The microconidia are uninucleate. The onset of germination brings about increased lethality of nitrosoguanidine, but it does not modify the action of UV radiation. Mycelia are more resistant than spores to both agents. Visible illumination effectively prevents lethality when given immediately after UV irradiation. Auxotrophs and color mutants are very easily obtained. Pink adenine auxotrophs and several classes of color mutants are affected in the biosynthesis of the carotenoid pigment, neurosporaxanthin.

  12. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  13. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes. PMID:25398898

  14. Mutants of thermotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.J.; Fontana, D.R.; Poff, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum, strain HL50 were mutagenized with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, cloned, allowed to form pseudoplasmodia and screened for aberrant positive and negative thermotaxis. Three types of mutants were found. Mutant HO428 exhibits only positive thermotaxis over the entire temperature range (no negative thermotaxis). HO596 and HO813 exhibit weakened positive thermotaxis and normal negative thermotaxis. The weakened positive thermotactic response results in a shift toward warmer temperatures in the transition temperature from negative to positive thermotaxis. Mutant HO209 exhibits weakened positive and negative thermotactic responses and has a transition temperature similar to the 'wild type' (HL50).The two types of mutants represented by HO428, HO596 and HO813 support the model that positive and negative thermotaxis have separate pathways for temperature sensing. The type of mutants which contains HO209 suggests that those two pathways converge at some point before the response.

  15. Factors influencing maternal behavior in the hubb/hubb mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Alston-Mills, B; Parker, A C; Eisen, E J; Wilson, R; Fletcher, S

    We examined the maternal behavior of hubb/hubb mutant mice and normal control (+/hubb) siblings. From previous observations we noted that mutants groom their pups less, suckle less than normal, and often cannibalize the young. To date, these observations had not been quantified. Although prolactin (PRL) is linked to maternal behavior, it was difficult to measure because of the hyperirratibility of the mutant mice. Consequently, dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), were measured in the median eminence in brains of both normal and mutant mice. Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-determining step in dopamine synthesis, was localized in the brain by immunohistochemistry. Five mutant and nine normal dams were observed for pup retrieval and crouching. Mean time for pup retrieval was slower (p < 0.06) for mutants (28.09 s) than for normal dams (18.49 s). Crouching was the same for both strains. Mutant pups were cold to the touch, and not well groomed. Brains from both strains were examined at Day 11 and Day 18 of gestation and Day 2 and Day 11 of lactation. Qualitatively, tyrosine hydroxylase localization in the arcuate nucleus and median eminence was the same in both strains for the gestation samples. The decrease in staining observed from gestation to lactation in the normal mice was increased in the mutants. Dopamine was similar in both strains at all stages, but DOPAC was significantly higher at early lactation in the mutants. We do not assume an absolute inverse relationship between dopaminergic activities and prolactin, but it is likely that the increase in DOPAC in the mutant reflects a decrease in prolactin, which could contribute to the diminished maternal care in the mutants. PMID:10627055

  16. Plaque color method for rapid isolation of novel recA mutants of Escherichia coli K-12: new classes of protease-constitutive recA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Tessman, E S; Peterson, P

    1985-01-01

    As a prerequisite to mutational analysis of functional sites on the RecA protein of Escherichia coli, a method was developed for rapid isolation of recA mutants with altered RecA protease function. The method involves plating mutagenized lambda recA+ cI ind on strains deleted for recA and containing, as indicators of RecA protease activity, Mu d(Ap lac) fusions in RecA-inducible genes. The lambda recA phages were recognized by their altered plaque colors, and the RecA protease activity of the lambda recA mutant lysogens was measured by expression of beta-galactosidase from dinD::lac. One class of recA mutants had constitutive protease activity and was designated Prtc; in these cells the RecA protein was always in the protease form without the usual need for DNA damage to activate it. Some Prtc mutants were recombinase negative and were designated Prtc Rec-. Another class of 65 recA mutants isolated as being protease defective were all also recombinase defective. Unlike the original temperature-dependent Prtc Rec+ mutant (recA441), the new Prtc Rec+ mutants showed constitutive protease activity at any growth temperature, with some having considerably greater activity than the recA441 strain. Study of these strong Prtc Rec+ mutants revealed a new SOS phenomenon, increased permeability to drugs. Use of this new SOS phenomenon as an index of protease strength clearly distinguished 5 Prtc mutants as the strongest among 150. These five strongest Prtc mutants showed the greatest increase in spontaneous mutation frequency and were not inhibited by cytidine plus guanosine, which inhibited the constitutive protease activity of the recA441 strain and of all the other new Prtc mutants. Strong Prtc Rec+ mutants were more UV resistant than recA+ strains and showed indications of having RecA proteins whose specific activity of recombinase function was higher than that of wild-type RecA. A Prt+ Rec- mutant with an anomalous response to effectors is described. PMID:3160686

  17. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th) subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  18. Rapid Mutation of Spirulina platensis by a New Mutagenesis System of Atmospheric and Room Temperature Plasmas (ARTP) and Generation of a Mutant Library with Diverse Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  19. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th) subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  20. Expression of mutant bone morphogenetic protein receptor II worsens pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Andrew J; Robinson, Linda J; Moore, Christy S; Blackwell, Thomas R; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L; Burman, Ankita; McClellan, Lucas J; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Tanjore, Harikrishna; McConaha, Melinda E; Gleaves, Linda A; Talati, Megha A; Hemnes, Anna R; Fessel, Joshua P; Lawson, William E; Blackwell, Timothy S; West, James D

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is often complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PH), and previous studies have shown a potential link between bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR2) and PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. We exposed transgenic mice expressing mutant BMPR2 and control mice to repetitive intraperitoneal injections of bleomycin for 4 weeks. The duration of transgene activation was too short for mutant BMPR2 mice to develop spontaneous PH. Mutant BMPR2 mice had increased right ventricular systolic pressure compared to control mice, without differences in pulmonary fibrosis. We found increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1-α stabilization in lungs of mutant-BMPR2-expressing mice compared to controls following bleomycin treatment. In addition, expression of the hypoxia response element protein connective tissue growth factor was increased in transgenic mice as well as in a human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell line expressing mutant BMPR2. In mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, mutant BMPR2 expression resulted in increased HIF1-α and reactive oxygen species production following exposure to hypoxia, both of which were attenuated with the antioxidant TEMPOL. These data suggest that expression of mutant BMPR2 worsens secondary PH through increased HIF activity in vascular endothelium. This pathway could be therapeutically targeted in patients with PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. Expression of mutant bone morphogenetic protein receptor II worsens pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Linda J.; Moore, Christy S.; Blackwell, Thomas R.; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L.; Burman, Ankita; McClellan, Lucas J.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Tanjore, Harikrishna; McConaha, Melinda E.; Gleaves, Linda A.; Talati, Megha A.; Hemnes, Anna R.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; West, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is often complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PH), and previous studies have shown a potential link between bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR2) and PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. We exposed transgenic mice expressing mutant BMPR2 and control mice to repetitive intraperitoneal injections of bleomycin for 4 weeks. The duration of transgene activation was too short for mutant BMPR2 mice to develop spontaneous PH. Mutant BMPR2 mice had increased right ventricular systolic pressure compared to control mice, without differences in pulmonary fibrosis. We found increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1-α stabilization in lungs of mutant-BMPR2-expressing mice compared to controls following bleomycin treatment. In addition, expression of the hypoxia response element protein connective tissue growth factor was increased in transgenic mice as well as in a human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell line expressing mutant BMPR2. In mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, mutant BMPR2 expression resulted in increased HIF1-α and reactive oxygen species production following exposure to hypoxia, both of which were attenuated with the antioxidant TEMPOL. These data suggest that expression of mutant BMPR2 worsens secondary PH through increased HIF activity in vascular endothelium. This pathway could be therapeutically targeted in patients with PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26697175

  2. Impaired exercise tolerance and skeletal muscle myopathy in sulfonylurea receptor-2 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Douglas; Pytel, Peter; Katz, Sophie; Earley, Judy U.; Collins, Keith; Metcalfe, Jamie; Lang, Roberto M.

    2009-01-01

    By sensing intracellular energy levels, ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels help regulate vascular tone, glucose metabolism, and cardioprotection. SUR2 mutant mice lack full-length KATP channels in striated and smooth muscle and display a complex phenotype of hypertension and coronary vasospasm. SUR2 mutant mice also display baseline cardioprotection and can withstand acute sympathetic stress better than normal mice. We now studied response to a form of chronic stress, namely that induced by 4 wk of daily exercise on SUR2 mutant mice. Control mice increased exercise capacity by 400% over the training period, while SUR2 mutant mice showed little increase in exercise capacity. Unexercised SUR2 mutant showed necrotic and regenerating fibers in multiple muscle skeletal muscles, including quadriceps, tibialis anterior, and diaphragm muscles. Unlike exercised control animals, SUR2 mutant mice did not lose weight, presumably due to less overall exertion. Unexercised SUR2 mutant mice showed a trend of mildly reduced cardiac function, measured by fractional shortening, (46 ± 4% vs. 57 ± 7% for SUR2 mutant and control, respectively), and this decrease was not exacerbated by chronic exercise exposure. Despite an improved response to acute sympathetic stress and baseline cardioprotection, exercise intolerance results from lack of SUR2 KATP channels in mice. PMID:19675276

  3. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  4. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  5. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T; Gainor, Justin F; Corcoran, Ryan B; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Rudin, Charles M; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-06-30

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proved difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, a MEK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, which acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signalling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signalling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumour cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities: it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS-mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patients’ tumours treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer. PMID:27338794

  6. Arabidopsis Mutant bik1 Exhibits Strong Resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Bi, Kai; He, Zhangchao; Gao, Zhixiao; Zhao, Ying; Fu, Yanping; Cheng, Jiasen; Xie, Jiatao; Jiang, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1), a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1, and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2, and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40–50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS) at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA) treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2) and npr1-1 [non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR)] mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms. PMID:27679580

  7. Arabidopsis Mutant bik1 Exhibits Strong Resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Bi, Kai; He, Zhangchao; Gao, Zhixiao; Zhao, Ying; Fu, Yanping; Cheng, Jiasen; Xie, Jiatao; Jiang, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1), a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1, and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2, and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40–50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS) at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA) treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2) and npr1-1 [non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR)] mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms.

  8. Rest mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Cara E; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2015-05-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest. PMID:25712696

  9. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Suvà, Mario L.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas1,2. Mutant IDH protein produces a novel onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), that interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5′-methylcytosine hydroxylases3–7. TET enzymes catalyze a key step in the removal of DNA methylation8,9. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP)10,11, though the functional significance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hyper-methylation at CTCF binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to aberrantly interact with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and down-regulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wildtype gliomaspheres up-regulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  10. Enhanced cellulase producing mutants developed from heterokaryotic Aspergillus strain.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljit; Oberoi, H S; Chadha, B S

    2014-03-01

    A heterokaryon 28, derived through protoplast fusion between Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus tubingensis (Dal8), was subjected cyclic mutagenesis followed by selection on increasing levels of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) as selection marker. The derived deregulated cellulase hyper producing mutant '64', when compared to fusant 28, produced 9.83, 7.8, 3.2, 4.2 and 19.74 folds higher endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, FPase and xylanase, respectively, under shake cultures. The sequence analysis of PCR amplified β-glucosidase gene from wild and mutant showed nucleotide deletion/substitution. The mutants showed highly catalytic efficient β-glucosidase as evident from low Km and high Vmax values. The expression profiling through zymogram analysis also indicated towards over-expression of cellulases. The up/down regulated expressed proteins observed through SDS-PAGE were identified by Peptide mass fingerprinting The cellulase produced by mutants in conjunction with cellulase free xylanase derived from Thermomyces lanuginosus was used for efficient utilization of alkali treated rice straw for obtaining xylo-oligosaccharides and ethanol.

  11. Rest Mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences

    PubMed Central

    Moravec, Cara E.; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F.; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I.

    2015-01-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest. PMID:25712696

  12. Mutant IDH is sufficient to initiate enchondromatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Makoto; Sasaki, Masato; Cairns, Rob A; Inoue, Satoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Li, Wanda Y; Snow, Bryan E; Jones, Lisa D; Wei, Qingxia; Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J; Nadesan, Puviindran; Rockel, Jason; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Weng, Angela; Gross, Stefan; Straley, Kimberly; Gliser, Camelia; Xu, Yingxia; Wunder, Jay; Mak, Tak W; Alman, Benjamin A

    2015-03-01

    Enchondromas are benign cartilage tumors and precursors to malignant chondrosarcomas. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in the majority of these tumor types. How these mutations cause enchondromas is unclear. Here, we identified the spectrum of IDH mutations in human enchondromas and chondrosarcomas and studied their effects in mice. A broad range of mutations was identified, including the previously unreported IDH1-R132Q mutation. These mutations harbored enzymatic activity to catalyze α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Mice expressing Idh1-R132Q in one allele in cells expressing type 2 collagen showed a disordered growth plate, with persistence of type X-expressing chondrocytes. Chondrocyte cell cultures from these animals or controls showed that there was an increase in proliferation and expression of genes characteristic of hypertrophic chondrocytes with expression of Idh1-R132Q or 2HG treatment. Col2a1-Cre;Idh1-R132Q mutant knock-in mice (mutant allele expressed in chondrocytes) did not survive after the neonatal stage. Col2a1-Cre/ERT2;Idh1-R132 mutant conditional knock-in mice, in which Cre was induced by tamoxifen after weaning, developed multiple enchondroma-like lesions. Taken together, these data show that mutant IDH or d-2HG causes persistence of chondrocytes, giving rise to rests of growth-plate cells that persist in the bone as enchondromas. PMID:25730874

  13. An Escherichia coli Mutant That Makes Exceptionally Long Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Escherichia coli is a very small (1- to 2-μm) rod-shaped cell, here we describe an E. coli mutant that forms enormously long cells in rich media such as Luria broth, as long indeed as 750 μm. These extremely elongated (eel) cells are as long as the longest bacteria known and have no internal subdivisions. They are metabolically competent, elongate rapidly, synthesize DNA, and distribute cell contents along this length. They lack only the ability to divide. The concentration of the essential cell division protein FtsZ is reduced in these eel cells, and increasing this concentration restores division. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is usually a very small bacterium, 1 to 2 μm long. We have isolated a mutant that forms enormously long cells, 700 times longer than the usual E. coli cell. E. coli filaments that form under other conditions usually die within a few hours, whereas our mutant is fully viable even when it reaches such lengths. This mutant provides a useful tool for the study of aspects of E. coli physiology that are difficult to investigate with small cells. PMID:25691528

  14. Rest mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Cara E; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2015-05-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest.

  15. Reduced gravitropic sensitivity in roots of a starch-deficient mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in seedlings of Nicotiana sylvestris Speg. et Comes wild-type (WT) and mutant NS 458 which has a defective plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1.). Starch was greatly reduced in NS 458 compared to the WT, but small amounts of starch were detected in rootcap columella cells in NS 458 by light and electron microscopy. The roots of WT are more sensitive to gravity than mutant NS 458 roots since: (1) in mutant roots, curvature was reduced and delayed in the time course of curvature; (2) curvature of mutant roots was 24-56% that of WT roots over the range of induction periods tested; (3) in intermittent-stimulation experiments, curvature of mutant roots was 37% or less than that of WT roots in all treatments tested. The perception time, determined by intermittent-stimulation experiments, was < or = 5 s for WT roots and 30-60 s for mutant roots. The growth rates for WT and NS 458 roots were essentially equal. These results and our previous results with WT and starchless mutant Arabidopsis roots (Kiss et al. 1989, Planta 177, 198-206) support the conclusions that a full complement of starch is necessary for full gravitropic sensitivity and that amyloplasts function in gravity perception. Since a presumed relatively small increase in plastid buoyant mass (N. sylvestris mutant versus Arabidopsis mutant) significantly improves the orientation of the N. sylvestris mutant roots, we suggest that plastids are the likeliest candidates to be triggering gravity perception in roots of both mutants.

  16. Gamma-rays and EMS induced pentaphyllous mutant in black gram (Vigna mungo).

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Raghuvanshi, S S; Prakash, D

    1988-01-01

    Pentaphyllous mutants in black gram were isolated in M2 generation of a segregating family, irradiated at 20 kR. The genetic nature of mutants was tested by hybridizing with controls, and chi-square tests applied to the F2 population, proved it to be a monogenic recessive. The pentaphyllous mutant had a greater number of pods and leaves per plant and larger and more root nodules. It also showed improved nutritional value with increased seed protein percentage and no increase in TIA (trypsin inhibitor activity).

  17. Oxysterol-binding protein ORP3 rescues the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked mutant VAPB phenotype.

    PubMed

    Darbyson, Angie; Ngsee, Johnny K

    2016-02-01

    A mutation in VAPB causes a familial form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. The mutant protein (VAPB-P56S) is aggregate prone and blocks retrograde traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) including trafficking to the nuclear envelope (NE). Here we report a morphological screen where overexpression of oxysterol binding protein-related protein-3 (ORP3) rescued the mutant VAPB phenotype. It resolved the mutant VAPB-induced membrane expansions, restored solubility of the mutant protein in non-ionic detergent, and restored trafficking of Emerin to the NE. Knockdown of ORP3 or VAPB increased the intracellular level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P). Decreasing PtdIns4P levels by inhibiting its synthesis reduced the severity of the mutant VAPB-induced membrane expansions and restored Emerin trafficking to the NE. Thus, VAPB and its interacting partners cooperatively regulate protein trafficking through the ERGIC by modulating PtdIns4P levels.

  18. [Catabolyte repression of Escherichia coli K12 mutants with defects in different systems of glucose transport].

    PubMed

    Gershanovich, V N; Iurovitskaia, N V; Komissarova, L V; Bol'shakova, T N; Erlagaeva, R S

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of glucose catabolite repression was studied in E. coli mutants inable to transport this carbohydrate. The pts 1, H mutant P34 was much less sensitive to the repressive effect of glucose on beta-galactosidase synthesis than the parent type. The 1103 mutant devoid of enzyme 1 of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) behaves in the same way as P34 mutant after addition of glucose to casamino acid mineral medium. However, in minimal medium with succinate as the sole source of carbon, cells of the 1103 mutant show enhanced sensibility to transient glucose repression. The effect of hypersensibility disappears when the lac I mutation leading to constitutive the beta-galactosidase synthesis is introduced in 1103 mutant. It is shown that the enhanced sensibility of beta-galactosidase synthesis to glucose transient repression in 1103 mutant is an effect of the aburpt decrease in its growth rate in the presence of succinate and most probably this decrease leads to "inducer exclusion" of the lac operon. It is also shown that if one introduces the P34 mutation in strain JD3 devoid of one of the enzymes II for glucose (and due to this resistant to glucose catabolite respression) then the level of resistance in double mutant does not increase in spite of considerable supression of 14C glucose accumulation. In connection with this the role is discussed of separate components of the E. coli K 12 glucose transport system in realization of the phenomenon of catabolite repression. PMID:785237

  19. Behavioral Mutants of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER. II. Behavioral Analysis and Focus Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Homyk, Theodore

    1977-01-01

    Several simple tests have been applied to study the behavior and performance of mutants of Drosophila melanogaster isolated in the preceding study (Homyk and Sheppard 1977). The tests showed that many mutants have specific behavioral abnormalities and that most mutants can easily be distinguished from an Oregon-R control on the basis of their behavioral phenotypes. Mutants representing six genes hop poorly and are unable to initiate wing oscillation when tethered. Mutations in four genes reduce the level of spontaneous motor activity of flies and increase the excitability threshold necessary to induce high activity motor functions such as running and flying. The latter mutants are referred to as hypoactive. Another class, stress-sensitive, including mutations in three genes, are reversibly paralyzed by mechanical shock. Mosaic analyses suggest that six mutations affect muscular tissue and two others affect neural tissue. It is also shown that tan mutants fail to retract their forelegs during flight and that the focus responsible for this behavioral phenotype is the compound eye. Specific behavioral abnormalities of several mutants are discussed in conjunction with previous studies from many laboratories concerning the participation of neural, sensory and muscular elements producing behavior in normal (nonmutant) insects. Such considerations are an essential prelude to anatomical and physiological studies of the mutants in Drosophila. PMID:17248753

  20. Sheep heart RNA stimulates myofibril formation and beating in cardiac mutant axolotl hearts in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; LaFrance, Sherrie M; Lemanski, Sharon L; Huang, Xupei; Dube, Dipak K; Lemanski, Larry F

    2003-05-01

    In the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, recessive mutant gene c, when homozygous, results in a failure of the heart to form sarcomeric myofibrils and contract normally. Previous studies have shown that purified RNA from normal anterior endoderm or from medium conditioned with anterior endoderm/pre-cardiac mesoderm has the capacity to rescue mutant hearts in organ culture. In the present study, RNA extracted from adult sheep heart was tested for its capacity to promote differentiation in the mutant axolotl hearts. Mutant hearts cultured in the presence of the sheep heart RNA in Steinberg's solution for 48 h displayed rhythmic contractions. Ultrastructural studies showed that the rescued mutant axolotl ventricular myocardial cells contained myofibrils of normal morphology. Mutant hearts cultured in Steinberg's solution alone did not beat throughout their lengths and myofibrils were not observable in the ventricles. Confocal microscopy confirmed the increase of Tropomyosin expression and formation of myofibrils in mutant hearts treated by sheep heart RNA. Thus, sheep heart RNA promotes myofibrillogenesis and the development of contractile function in embryonic cardiac mutant axolotl hearts. PMID:12684761

  1. Isolation of homozygous mutant mouse embryonic stem cells using a dual selection system

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yue; Pettitt, Stephen J.; Guo, Ge; Liu, Guang; Li, Meng Amy; Yang, Fengtang; Bradley, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining random homozygous mutants in mammalian cells for forward genetic studies has always been problematic due to the diploid genome. With one mutation per cell, only one allele of an autosomal gene can be disrupted, and the resulting heterozygous mutant is unlikely to display a phenotype. In cells with a genetic background deficient for the Bloom's syndrome helicase, such heterozygous mutants segregate homozygous daughter cells at a low frequency due to an elevated rate of crossover following mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes. We constructed DNA vectors that are selectable based on their copy number and used these to isolate these rare homozygous mutant cells independent of their phenotype. We use the piggyBac transposon to limit the initial mutagenesis to one copy per cell, and select for cells that have increased the transposon copy number to two or more. This yields homozygous mutants with two allelic mutations, but also cells that have duplicated the mutant chromosome and become aneuploid during culture. On average, 26% of the copy number gain events occur by the mitotic recombination pathway. We obtained homozygous cells from 40% of the heterozygous mutants tested. This method can provide homozygous mammalian loss-of-function mutants for forward genetic applications. PMID:22127858

  2. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  3. Mutants of yeast sensitive to ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Snow, R

    1967-09-01

    Six uvr mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with hypersensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light were isolated after mutagen treatment with ethylmethanesulfonate. UV sensitivity ranges from moderate to extreme, and four of the mutants are also sensitive to nitrous acid. Ranking in terms of UV sensitivity does not parallel ranking in terms of nitrous acid sensitivity. Homozygous diploid mutant strains are somewhat less sensitive than the corresponding haploids. All mutations are recessive. None of the mutants is sensitive to gamma rays, and each shows photoreactivation after UV radiation. Complementation tests and tetrad analysis indicate that each strain represents mutation in a different gene. Two of the uvr genes are linked, and two others are centromere-linked.

  4. Prodigiosin synthesis in mutants of Serratia marcesens.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D A

    1966-04-01

    Morrison, D. A. (Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass.). Prodigiosin synthesis in mutants of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 91:1509-1604. 1966.-Exchange of biosynthetic intermediates through the culture medium was used to characterize several hundred new color mutants of Serratia marcescens. The general scheme of prodigiosin synthesis as a bifurcated pathway, in which monopyrrole and bipyrrole precursors are synthesized separately and then coupled to form pigment, was confirmed and extended. Mutants of one new class excreted a product likely to be a new intermediate in monopyrrole synthesis, those of a second excreted a new product in the bipyrrole pathway, and those of a third were blocked at early steps in both pathways. Two novel classes of mutants were isolated, in each of which a lack of some product present in Serratia and Escherichia cultures resulted in loss of all steps in prodigiosin biosynthesis.

  5. Cooperative Interaction Within RNA Virus Mutant Spectra.

    PubMed

    Shirogane, Yuta; Watanabe, Shumpei; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses usually consist of mutant spectra because of high error rates of viral RNA polymerases. Growth competition occurs among different viral variants, and the fittest clones predominate under given conditions. Individual variants, however, may not be entirely independent of each other, and internal interactions within mutant spectra can occur. Examples of cooperative and interfering interactions that exert enhancing and suppressing effects on replication of the wild-type virus, respectively, have been described, but their underlying mechanisms have not been well defined. It was recently found that the cooperation between wild-type and variant measles virus genomes produces a new phenotype through the heterooligomer formation of a viral protein. This observation provides a molecular mechanism underlying cooperative interactions within mutant spectra. Careful attention to individual sequences, in addition to consensus sequences, may disclose further examples of internal interactions within mutant spectra. PMID:26162566

  6. Selective targeting of KRAS-Mutant cells by miR-126 through repression of multiple genes essential for the survival of KRAS-Mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Toshifumi; Jones, Matthew F.; Subramanian, Murugan; Li, Xiao Ling; Ou, Oliver; Zhu, Yuelin; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M.; Hussain, S. Perwez; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ried, Thomas; Luo, Ji; Caplen, Natasha J.; Lal, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of hundreds of genes. However, identifying the critical targets within a miRNA-regulated gene network is challenging. One approach is to identify miRNAs that exert a context-dependent effect, followed by expression profiling to determine how specific targets contribute to this selective effect. In this study, we performed miRNA mimic screens in isogenic KRAS-Wild-type (WT) and KRAS-Mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines to identify miRNAs selectively targeting KRAS-Mutant cells. One of the miRNAs we identified as a selective inhibitor of the survival of multiple KRAS-Mutant CRC lines was miR-126. In KRAS-Mutant cells, miR-126 over-expression increased the G1 compartment, inhibited clonogenicity and tumorigenicity, while exerting no effect on KRAS-WT cells. Unexpectedly, the miR-126-regulated transcriptome of KRAS-WT and KRAS-Mutant cells showed no significant differences. However, by analyzing the overlap between miR-126 targets with the synthetic lethal genes identified by RNAi in KRAS-Mutant cells, we identified and validated a subset of miR-126-regulated genes selectively required for the survival and clonogenicity of KRAS-Mutant cells. Our strategy therefore identified critical target genes within the miR-126-regulated gene network. We propose that the selective effect of miR-126 on KRAS-Mutant cells could be utilized for the development of targeted therapy for KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25245095

  7. Selection of hypercellulolytic mutants of Trichoderma reesei based on resistance to nystatin

    SciTech Connect

    Schimenti, J.; Garrett, T.; Montenecourt, B.S.; Eveleigh, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Nystatin-resistant mutants of Trichoderma reesei were isolated, and several derived from the wild strain showed increased production of cellulase. Thus, the concept of gaining greater enzyme release through interference with membrane function was confirmed. Certain nystatin-resistant mutants derived from the hypercellulolytic strain RUT-C30 also showed increased cellulase yields, but these strains proved unstable and reverted to giving basal enzyme yields.

  8. A physiological, biochemical and proteomic characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae trk1,2 transport mutants grown under limiting potassium conditions.

    PubMed

    Gelis, Samuel; González-Fernández, Raquel; Herrera, Rito; Jorrín, Jesús; Ramos, José

    2015-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking both isoforms of the main plasma membrane potassium transporter display impaired potassium transport and defective growth at limiting concentrations of the cation. Moreover, they are hyperpolarized and have a lower intracellular pH than wild-type. In order to unravel global physiological processes altered in trk1,2 mutants, we have established conditions at which both wild-type and mutants can grow at different rates. Using a combination of physiological, biochemical and proteomic approaches, we show that during growth at suboptimal potassium concentrations, double trk1,2 mutants accumulate less potassium and reach lower yields. In contrast, the mutants maintain increased viability in the stationary phase and retain more potassium. Moreover, the mutants show increased expression of stress-related proteins such as catalase T, thioredoxin peroxidase or hexokinase 2, suggesting that they are better adapted to the additional stress factors associated with entry into stationary growth phase. PMID:25777080

  9. Mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} identified in MODY3 and MODY5 downregulate DPP-IV gene expression in Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Ning; Adachi, Tetsuya; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Takeda, Jun; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Ishihara, Akihiko; Yasuda, Koichiro; Tsuda, Kinsuke . E-mail: jinkan@tom.life.h.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-04

    Dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a well-documented drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1{alpha} and HNF-1{beta}, known as the causal genes of MODY3 and MODY5, respectively, have been reported to be involved in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression. But, it is not completely clear (i) that they play roles in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression, and (ii) whether DPP-IV gene activity is changed by mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} in MODY3 and MODY5. To explore these questions, we investigated transactivation effects of wild HNF-1{alpha} and 13 mutant HNF-1{alpha}, as well as wild HNF-1{beta} and 2 mutant HNF-1{beta}, on DPP-IV promoter luciferase gene in Caco-2 cells by means of a transient experiment. Both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} significantly transactivated DPP-IV promoter, but mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} exhibited low transactivation activity. Moreover, to study whether mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} change endogenous DPP-IV enzyme activity, we produced four stable cell lines from Caco-2 cells, in which wild HNF-1{alpha} or wild HNF-1{beta}, or else respective dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC or dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{beta}R177X, was stably expressed. We found that DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly increased in wild HNF-1{alpha} cells and wild HNF-1{beta} cells, whereas they decreased in HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC cells and HNF-1{beta}R177X cells, compared with DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} have a stimulatory effect on DPP-IV gene expression, but that mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} attenuate the stimulatory effect.

  10. [Evaluation of penicillin expandase mutants and complex substrate inhibition characteristics at high concentrations of penicillin G].

    PubMed

    Wu, Linjun; Fan, Keqiang; Ji, Junjie; Yang, Keqian

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin expandase, also known as deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS), is an essential enzyme involved in cephalosporin C biosynthesis. To evaluate the catalytic behaviors of penicillin expandase under high penicillin G concentration and to identify mutants suitable for industrial applications, the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and several mutants with increased activities toward penicillin G were determined by HPLC under high penicillin G concentrations. Their specific activity profiles were compared with theoretical predictions by different catalytic dynamics models. We evaluated the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and previous reported high-activity mutants H4, H5, H6 and H7 at concentrations ranging from 5.6 to 500 mmol/L penicillin G. The specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and mutant H4 increased as penicillin G concentration increased, but decreased when concentrations of substrate go above 200 mmol/L. Other mutants H5, H6 and H7 showed more complex behaviors under high concentration of penicillin G. Among all tested enzymes, mutant H6 showed the highest activity when concentration of penicillin G is above 100 mmol/L. Our results revealed that the substrate inhibition to wild-type DAOCS' by penicillin G is noncompetitive. Other DAOCS mutants showed more complex trends in their specific activities at high concentration of penicillin G (>100 mmol/L), indicating more complex substrate inhibition mechanism might exist. The substrate inhibition and activity of DAOCS mutants at high penicillin G concentration provide important insight to help select proper mutants for industrial application. PMID:27093832

  11. Ipsen 5i is a Novel Potent Pharmacoperone for Intracellularly Retained Melanocortin-4 Receptor Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ya-Xiong; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) cause early-onset severe obesity in humans. Comprehensive functional studies show that most of the inactivating mutants of the MC4R are retained intracellularly. In the present study, we investigated whether a small molecule inverse agonist of the MC4R, Ipsen 5i, could act as a pharmacoperone and correct the cell surface expression and function of intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs using multiple cell lines, including HEK293 and two neuronal cell lines. We showed that Ipsen 5i rescued the cell surface expression of all 11 intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs studied herein in at least one cell line. Ipsen 5i functionally rescued seven mutants in all cell lines used. One mutant (Y157S) was functionally rescued in HEK293 cells but not in the two neuronal cell lines. Ipsen 5i increased cell surface expression of three mutants (S58C, G98R, and F261S) but did not affect signaling. Ipsen 5i had no effect on mutant MC4Rs with other defects (Δ88-92, D90N, I102S) or no defect (N274S). It also did not affect trafficking of a misrouted MC3R mutant (I335S). Cell impermeable peptide ligands of the MC4R or cell permeable small molecule ligand of δ opioid receptor could not rescue misrouted mutant MC4R. In summary, we demonstrated that Ipsen 5i was a novel potent pharmacoperone of the MC4R, correcting trafficking and signaling of a significant portion (73%) of intracellularly retained mutants. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy. PMID:25136332

  12. Transposon-Derived Brucella abortus Rough Mutants Are Attenuated and Exhibit Reduced Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Chris A.; Adams, L. Garry; Ficht, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The O antigen of Brucella abortus has been described as a major virulence determinant based on the attenuated survival of fortuitously isolated rough variants. However, the lack of genetic definition of these mutants and the virulence of naturally occurring rough species, Brucella ovis and Brucella canis, has confused interpretation. To better characterize the role of O antigen in virulence and survival, transposon mutagenesis was used to generate B. abortus rough mutants defective in O-antigen presentation. Sequence analysis of DNA flanking the site of Tn5 insertion was used to verify insertion in genes encoding lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic functions. Not surprisingly, each of the rough mutants was attenuated for survival in mice, but unexpected differences among the mutants were observed. In an effort to define the basis for the observed differences, the structure of the rough LPS and the sensitivity of these mutants to individual killing mechanisms were examined in vitro. All of the B. abortus rough mutants exhibited a 4- to 5-log-unit increase, compared to the smooth parental strain, in sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. Little change was evident in the sensitivity of these organisms to hydrogen peroxide, consistent with an inability of O antigen to exclude relatively small molecules. Sensitivity to polymyxin B, which was employed as a model cationic, amphipathic peptide similar to defensins found in phagocytic cells, revealed survival differences among the rough mutants similar to those observed in the mouse. One mutant in particular exhibited hypersensitivity to polymyxin B and reduced survival in mice. This mutant was characterized by a truncated rough LPS. DNA sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a transposon interruption in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase (pmm), suggesting that this activity may be required for the synthesis of a full-length core polysaccharide in addition to O antigen. B. abortus O antigen appears to be essential

  13. Mutant p53 cooperates with the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex to regulate VEGFR2 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Neil T; Fomin, Vitalay; Regunath, Kausik; Zhou, Jeffrey Y; Zhou, Wen; Silwal-Pandit, Laxmi; Freed-Pastor, William A; Laptenko, Oleg; Neo, Suat Peng; Bargonetti, Jill; Hoque, Mainul; Tian, Bin; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Engebraaten, Olav; Manley, James L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Neilsen, Paul M; Prives, Carol

    2015-06-15

    Mutant p53 impacts the expression of numerous genes at the level of transcription to mediate oncogenesis. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), the primary functional VEGF receptor that mediates endothelial cell vascularization, as a mutant p53 transcriptional target in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Up-regulation of VEGFR2 mediates the role of mutant p53 in increasing cellular growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions. Mutant p53 binds near the VEGFR2 promoter transcriptional start site and plays a role in maintaining an open conformation at that location. Relatedly, mutant p53 interacts with the SWI/SNF complex, which is required for remodeling the VEGFR2 promoter. By both querying individual genes regulated by mutant p53 and performing RNA sequencing, the results indicate that >40% of all mutant p53-regulated gene expression is mediated by SWI/SNF. We surmise that mutant p53 impacts transcription of VEGFR2 as well as myriad other genes by promoter remodeling through interaction with and likely regulation of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. Therefore, not only might mutant p53-expressing tumors be susceptible to anti VEGF therapies, impacting SWI/SNF tumor suppressor function in mutant p53 tumors may also have therapeutic potential.

  14. S100A4 interacts with mutant p53 and affects gastric cancer MKN1 cell autophagy and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Chen, Danqi; Liu, Shanshan; Chen, Lisha; Yu, Aiwen; Fu, Hao; Sun, Xiuju

    2015-12-01

    The acquired p53 mutations are the most common genetic alterations in human cancers. Mutant p53 proteins tend to accumulate, augmenting their oncogenic potential. However, the mechanisms for mutant p53 accumulation are not known. Previous studies have shown that S100A4 interacts with wild‑type p53. The present study marks the first time the effect of S100A4 on mutant p53 levels in gastric cancer MKN1 cells, which harbor mutant p53V143A, and the functional consequences have been investigated. S100A4 interacted with mutant p53V143A in the cells, and S100A4 inhibition decreased mutant p53V143A levels, indicating that S100A4 promoted mutant p53 accumulation through their interaction. We also found that S100A4 inhibition altered the expression of the mutant p53V143A target genes [c-Myc and inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2)]. Moreover, we demonstrated that S100A4 knockdown increased mutant p53-related autophagy and cell differentiation. In conclusion, our data suggest a novel mechanism for mutant p53V143A accumulation and add a new facet to the role of S100A4 in cancer.

  15. Fatty acid composition analyses of the DCMU resistant mutants of Nannochloropsis oculata (eustigmatophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimin, Zhang; Shuang, Liu; Xue, Sun; Guanpin, Yang; Xuecheng, Zhang; Zhenhui, Gao

    2003-04-01

    Ultraviolet mutagenesis was applied to Nannochloropsis oculata and three mutants resistant to 3-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) were isolated. The cellular chlorophyll a and total lipid content of the wild are higher in the medium supplemented with DCMU than in the control without DCMU. Without DCMU, the growth rates and chlorophyll a contents of the mutants are similar to those of the wild. Significant changes of fatty acid content and composition have occurred in DCMU-resistant mutants growing in the medium supplemented with DCMU. The total lipid, palmitic acid (16:0), palmitoleic acid (16:1ω9) and oleic (18:1ω9) contents decrease significantly, while the vaccenic acid (18:1ω11) increases significantly and the EPA content of dried powder increases slightly in the mutants. The study may provide a basis to improve EPA content in Nannochloropsis oculata in the future.

  16. [Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53].

    PubMed

    Tongyang, Liu; Haiqiang, Guo; Meiyan, Zhu; Yingze, Huang; Shuting, Jia; Ying, Luo; Jihong, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Targeted therapy has become a powerful approach for cancer treatment. Better understanding of oncogenes as well as synthetic lethal interactions with oncogenes will lead to new strategies for tumor-specific treatment. It is well known that mutant p53 plays an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Thus, understanding the synthetic lethal relationship between p53 mutations and interacting genes in tumor is critical for the personalized treatments of p53 mutant tumors. Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53 can be divided into cell cycle regulators and non-cell cycle regulators. This paper review show these two types of target genes contribute to synthetic lethal interactions with p53 mutations and potential applications of these interactions in anticancer therapy.

  17. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  18. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  19. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  20. The isolation of Staphylococcus aureus tea tree oil-reduced susceptibility mutants.

    PubMed

    Cuaron, Jesus A; Dulal, Santosh; Cooke, Peter H; Torres, Nathanial J; Gustafson, John E

    2014-08-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO)-reduced susceptibility (TTORS) mutants of two Staphylococcus aureus laboratory strains were isolated utilizing TTO gradient plates. Attempts to isolate TTORS mutants employing agar plates containing single TTO concentrations failed. All TTORS mutants demonstrated a small colony variant (SCV) phenotype and produced cells with a smaller diameter, as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The addition of SCV auxotrophic supplements to media did not lead to an increase in TTORS mutant colony size. Revertants were also isolated from the TTORS mutants following growth in drug-free media, and all revertant strains demonstrated phenotypes similar to their respective parent strains. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that an SH1000 TTORS mutant demonstrated a thinner cell wall and novel septal invaginations compared with parent strain SH1000. In addition, comparative genomic sequencing did not reveal any mutations in an SH1000 TTORS mutant previously linked to well-characterized SCV genotypes. This study demonstrates that TTO can select for a unique SCV phenotype.

  1. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered responses to auxins and gravity.

    PubMed

    Maher, E P; Martindale, S J

    1980-12-01

    Auxin-resistant mutants of Arabidopsis have been induced and isolated by screening for survivors on a medium containing the herbicide 2,4-D. Thirty independently arisen mutants have been isolated in this way and one of them, P 83, has been investigated in detail. When wild type and P 83 are compared in concentration/response curves, where the response is the inhibition of root growth, the ED50 values of the auxins, 2,4-D and IAA, are 14-fold higher for the mutant. The mutant also responds differently to gravity: its roots do not show positive geotropism, but tend to grow with a clockwise curvature on agar surfaces. The seedling roots of the mutant also grow more rapidly than those of the wild type in the absence of 2,4-D, following faster germination. The F1 between P 83 and wild type is similar to the latter, but has a slightly increased resistance to 2,4-D. Results obtained from the F2, F3 and backcross generations suggest monofactorial inheritance. Most of the other 29 mutants have the P 83 phenotype, but at least five are different. Four have lower levels of resistance to 2,4-D and P 83, and their roots appear to respond normally to gravity. One mutant has an abnormal georesponse and a much higher level of resistance to 2,4-D than P 83.

  2. Characterization of the ERAD process of the L444P mutant glucocerebrosidase variant.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Ron, Idit; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2011-01-15

    A large number of mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA gene), encoding the lysosomal acid hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GCase), lead to Gaucher disease (GD). The second most prevalent GD causing mutation, carried by 38% of non-Jewish patients, is L444P, resulting from a T to C transition in nucleotide 6092 of the GBA gene. It is a severe mutation that, in homozygosity, leads to neuropathic type 3 GD. We have previously shown that mutant GCase variants present variable degrees of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention and undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD). However, ERAD of the L444P mutant variant of GCase has never been tested. In the current study, we present results indicating that the L444P mutant protein undergoes extensive ERAD. In skin fibroblasts, originated from GD patients homozygous for L444P mutation, the level of GCase is 12%-21% of normal and at least 50% of it is in the ER. The mutant protein undergoes polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation. Recently Ambroxol, a known expectorant, was identified as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant GCase. We tested the effect of Ambroxol on the L444P mutant GCase and found that it enhances the removal of the mutant enzyme from the ER. In some cases, this removal leads to a concomitant increase in enzymatic activity. PMID:21106416

  3. Characterization of novel sorghum brown midrib mutants from an EMS-mutagenized population

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sattler, Scott E.; Saballos, Ana; Xin, Zhanguo; Funnell-Harris, Deanna L.; Vermerris, Wilfred; Pedersen, Jeffrey F.

    2014-09-02

    Reducing lignin concentration in lignocellulosic biomass can increase forage digestibility for ruminant livestock and saccharification yields of biomass for bioenergy. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and several other C4 grasses, brown midrib (bmr) mutants have been shown to reduce lignin concentration. Putative bmr mutants isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population were characterized and classified based on their leaf midrib phenotype and allelism tests with the previously described sorghum bmr mutants bmr2, bmr6, and bmr12. These tests resulted in the identification of additional alleles of bmr2, bmr6,and bmr12, and, in addition, six bmr mutants were identified that were not allelic tomore » these previously described loci. Further allelism testing among these six bmr mutants showed that they represented four novel bmr loci. Based on this study, the number of bmr loci uncovered in sorghum has doubled. The impact of these lines on agronomic traits and lignocellulosic composition was assessed in a 2-yr field study. Most of the identified bmr lines showed reduced lignin concentration of their biomass relative to wild-type (WT). Effects of the six new bmr mutants on enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic materials were determined, but the amount of glucose released from the stover was similar to WT in all cases. Like bmr2, bmr6, and bmr12, these mutants may affect monolignol biosynthesis and may be useful for bioenergy and forage improvement when stacked together or in combination with the three previously described bmr alleles.« less

  4. Rab7 Mutants Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Exhibit Enhanced NGF-Stimulated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Elsa; Wilson, Michael C.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Missense mutants in the late endosomal Rab7 GTPase cause the autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B (CMT2B). As yet, the pathological mechanisms connecting mutant Rab7 protein expression to altered neuronal function are undefined. Here, we analyze the effects Rab7 CMT2B mutants on nerve growth factor (NGF) dependent intracellular signaling in PC12 cells. The nerve growth factor receptor TrkA interacted similarly with Rab7 wild-type and CMT2B mutant proteins, but the mutant proteins significantly enhanced TrkA phosphorylation in response to brief NGF stimulation. Two downstream signaling pathways (Erk1/2 and Akt) that are directly activated in response to phospho-TrkA were differentially affected. Akt signaling, arising in response to activated TrkA at the plasma membrane was unaffected. However Erk1/2 phosphorylation, triggered on signaling endosomes, was increased. Cytoplasmic phospho-Erk1/2 persisted at elevated levels relative to control samples for up to 24 h following NGF stimulation. Nuclear shuttling of phospho Erk1/2, which is required to induce MAPK phosphatase expression and down regulate signaling, was greatly reduced by the Rab7 CMT2B mutants and explains the previously reported inhibition in PC12 neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, the data demonstrate a mechanistic link between Rab7 CMT2B mutants and altered TrkA and Erk1/2 signaling from endosomes. PMID:21151572

  5. Substrate Availability of Mutant SPT Alters Neuronal Branching and Growth Cone Dynamics in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Byung Kyu; Chandra, Ankush; Kuljis, Dika; Schmidt, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is a key enzyme in the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Mutations in the SPTLC1 gene that encodes for SPT subunits cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1. However, little is understood about how mutant SPT regulates mechanisms of sensory neuron and axonal growth. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the C133W SPT mutant, we found that mutant dorsal root ganglia (DRG) during growth in vitro exhibit increased neurite length and branching, coinciding with elevated expression of actin-cross-linking proteins at the neuronal growth cone, namely phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin. In addition, inhibition of SPT was able to reverse the mutant phenotype. Because mutant SPT preferentially uses l-alanine over its canonical substrate l-serine, we also investigated the effects of substrate availability on DRG neurons. Supplementation with l-serine or removal of l-alanine independently restored normal growth patterns in mutant SPTLC1C133W DRG. Therefore, we report that substrate availability and selectivity of SPT influence the regulation of neurite growth in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 is an autosomal-dominant disorder that leads to a sensory neuropathy due to mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) enzyme. We investigated how mutant SPT and substrate levels regulate neurite growth. Because SPT is an important enzyme in the synthesis of sphingolipids, our data are of broader significance to other peripheral and metabolic disorders. PMID:26446223

  6. Bacillus sp. mutant for improved biodegradation of Congo red: random mutagenesis approach.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Kannappan Panchamoorthy; Murugesan, Shreela; Abraham, Joanna; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2009-12-01

    This study presents the improved biodegradation of Congo red, a toxic azo dye, using mutant Bacillus sp. obtained by random mutagenesis of wild Bacillus sp. using UV and ethidium bromide. The mutants obtained were screened based on their decolorization performance and best mutants were selected for further studies. Better decolorization was observed in the initial Congo red concentration range 100-1000 mg/l for wild species whereas mutant strain was found to offer better decolorization up to 3000 mg/l. Mutant strain offered 12-30% reduction in time required for the complete decolorization by wild strain. The optimum pH and temperature were found to be 7.0 and 37 degrees C, respectively. Two efficient strains such as Bacillus sp. ACT 1 and Bacillus sp. ACT 2 were isolated from the various mutants obtained. Bacillus sp. ACT 2 showed improved enzymatic production and Bacillus sp. ACT 1 showed improved growth compared to wild strain. The enzyme responsible for the degradation was found to be azoreductase by SDS-PAGE and about 53% increased production of enzyme was achieved with mutant species. The experimental data were modeled using growth and substrate inhibition models.

  7. Resistance to adriamycin cytotoxicity among respiratory-deficient mutants in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hixon, S C; Ocak, A; Thomas, J E; Daugherty, J P

    1980-03-01

    Saccharomyces cell uptake of Adriamycin and the ensuing cytotoxic response were found to be dependent upon the ionic strength of the medium used for drug treatment. A given concentration of Adriamycin which inhibited growth in complete medium ws found to be significantly cytotoxic when administered in water. Many survivors after Adriamycin treatment in water were found to be respiratory-deficient petite mutants containing mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid mutations. Petite mutants arising after Adriamycin treatment were not induced but selected from the preexisting population of spontaneously derived petite mutants (normal frequency, 2%) due to an increased resistance of these mutants to killing by Adriamycin as compared with normal respiratory-sufficient cells. The responses to Adriamycin in mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid respiratory-deficient mutants (rho-, rho degrees, mit-) with different impaired mitochondrial functions was studied. All were similarly more resistant to killing by Adriamycin than wild-type cells. The common deficiency shared by these mutants, i.e., nonfunctioning electron transport, may play a role in protecting these mutants from Adriamycin cytotoxicity. In addition, normal cells grown on glycerol, requiring aerobic respiration for carbon source utilization were more susceptible to killing by Adriamycin than cells grown on glucose. These studies suggest that a mitochndrial function in yeast may interact with Adriamycin to potentiate a cell cytotoxic mechanism of the drug.

  8. Resistance to β-Lactamase Inhibitor Protein Does Not Parallel Resistance to Clavulanic Acid in TEM β-Lactamase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, William A.; Locke, Troy R.; Jensen, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    In order to compare patterns of resistance to inhibition by clavulanic acid with patterns of resistance to inhibition by a β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP), R164S, R244S, and R164S/R244S mutant forms of TEM β-lactamase were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis. When kinetic parameters were determined for these mutant and wild-type forms of TEM, the single mutants showed properties that were similar to those in the literature but the double mutant showed properties that were very different. The R164S/R244S double mutant form of TEM retained its resistance to inhibition by clavulanic acid (characteristic of the R244S mutation) but lost all its ability to hydrolyze ceftazidime (characteristic of the R164S mutation). While these characteristics are contrary to those previously reported for an R164S/R244S double mutant, this discrepancy resulted from the use of a defective mutant in the earlier study. Both the single and double mutant forms of TEM remained highly sensitive when tested for inhibition by BLIP, showing only slightly increased resistance compared to that of the wild type; this pattern of resistance is quite different from the pattern of clavulanic acid resistance. The slight increases in resistance to inhibition by BLIP seen in the mutants may have been related to the fact that all of the mutations effected changes in the net charge on the TEM protein that could impede interactions with BLIP. PMID:12384366

  9. TOMATOMA: A Novel Tomato Mutant Database Distributing Micro-Tom Mutant Collections

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takeshi; Ariizumi, Tohru; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Fukuda, Naoya; Mizoguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Aoki, Koh; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The tomato is an excellent model for studies of plants bearing berry-type fruits and for experimental studies of the Solanaceae family of plants due to its conserved genetic organization. In this study, a comprehensive mutant tomato population was generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf, rapid-growth variety. In this and previous studies, a family including 8,598 and 6,422 M2 mutagenized lines was produced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis and γ-ray irradiation, and this study developed and investigated these M2 plants for alteration of visible phenotypes. A total of 9,183 independent M2 families comprising 91,830 M2 plants were inspected for phenotypic alteration, and 1,048 individual mutants were isolated. Subsequently, the observed mutant phenotypes were classified into 15 major categories and 48 subcategories. Overall, 1,819 phenotypic categories were found in 1,048 mutants. Of these mutants, 549 were pleiotropic, whereas 499 were non-pleiotropic. Multiple different mutant alleles per locus were found in the mutant libraries, suggesting that the mutagenized populations were nearly saturated. Additionally, genetic analysis of backcrosses indicated the successful inheritance of the mutations in BC1F2 populations, confirming the reproducibility in the morphological phenotyping of the M2 plants. To integrate and manage the visible phenotypes of mutants and other associated data, we developed the in silico database TOMATOMA, a relational system interfacing modules between mutant line names and phenotypic categories. TOMATOMA is a freely accessible database, and these mutant recourses are available through the TOMATOMA (http://tomatoma.nbrp.jp/index.jsp). PMID:21258066

  10. Behavioral characterization of system xc- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Featherstone, David E

    2014-05-15

    The slc7a11 gene encodes xCT, an essential component of 'system xc-', a plasma membrane exchanger that imports cystine and exports glutamate. Slc7a11 is expressed primarily in the brain, but its role there is not clear. We performed behavioral tests on two different strains of homozygous slc7a11 mutant mice ('sut' and 'xCT'), as well as heteroallelic offspring of these two strains ('xCT/sut') and their associated genetic backgrounds. Homozygous sut mutant males showed reduced spontaneous alternation in spontaneous alternation tasks as well as reduced movement in an open field maze, but xCT and xCT/sut strains did not show significant changes in these tasks compared to appropriate controls. Neither xCT nor sut mutants showed differences from controls in rotarod tests. Female behavioral phenotypes were independent of estrus cycle stage. To ensure that homozygous xCT, sut, and xCT/sut strains all represent protein null alleles, we measured whole brain xCT protein levels using immunoblots. xCT, sut and xCT/sut strains showed no detectable xCT protein expression, confirming them as null alleles. Previously published microdialysis experiments showed reduced striatal glutamate in xCT mutants. Using the same methods, we measured reduced interstitial glutamate levels in the striatum but not cerebellum of sut mutants. However, we detected no glutamate change in the striatum or cerebellum of sut/xCT mice. We detected no changes in whole brain EAAT-1, -2, or -3 expression. We conclude that the behavioral and chemical differences exist between slc7a11 mutant strains, but we were unable to definitively attribute any of these differences to loss of system xc-.

  11. Genetic analysis of salt-tolerant mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, V; Ponce, M R; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    Stress caused by the increased salinity of irrigated fields impairs plant growth and is one of the major constraints that limits crop productivity in many important agricultural areas. As a contribution to solving such agronomic problems, we have carried out a large-scale screening for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants induced on different genetic backgrounds by EMS treatment, fast neutron bombardment, or T-DNA insertions. From the 675,500 seeds we screened, 17 mutant lines were isolated, all but one of which yielded 25-70% germination levels on 250 mm NaCl medium, a condition in which their ancestor ecotypes are unable to germinate. Monogenic recessive inheritance of NaCl-tolerant germination was displayed with incomplete penetrance by all the selected mutants, which fell into five complementation groups. These were named SALOBRENO (SAN) and mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites, the map positions of three of them suggesting that they are novel genes. Strains carrying mutations in the SAN1-SAN4 genes display similar responses to both ionic effects and osmotic pressure, their germination being NaCl and mannitol tolerant but KCl and Na(2)SO(4) sensitive. In addition, NaCl-, KCl-, and mannitol-tolerant as well as abscisic-acid-insensitive germination was displayed by sañ5, whose genetic and molecular characterization indicates that it carries an extremely hypomorphic or null allele of the ABI4 gene, its deduced protein product lacking the APETALA2 DNA binding domain. PMID:10629000

  12. Mutant SOD1 forms ion channel: implications for ALS pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael J; Lacroix, Jérome J; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Capone, Ricardo; Whitlock, Jenny L; Ghadge, Ghanashyam D; Arnsdorf, Morton F; Roos, Raymond P; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-03-01

    Point mutations in the gene encoding copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) impart a gain-of-function to this protein that underlies 20-25% of all familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) cases. However, the specific mechanism of mutant SOD1 toxicity has remained elusive. Using the complementary techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrophysiology, and cell and molecular biology, here we examine the structure and activity of A4VSOD1, a mutant SOD1. AFM of A4VSOD1 reconstituted in lipid membrane shows discrete tetrameric pore-like structure with outer and inner diameters 12.2 and 3.0nm respectively. Electrophysiological recordings show distinct ionic conductances across bilayer for A4VSOD1 and none for wildtype SOD1. Mouse neuroblastoma cells exposed to A4VSOD1 undergo membrane depolarization and increases in intracellular calcium. These results provide compelling new evidence that a mutant SOD1 is capable of disrupting cellular homeostasis via an unregulated ion channel mechanism. Such a "toxic channel" mechanism presents a new therapeutic direction for ALS research. PMID:21930207

  13. Inositol depletion restores vesicle transport in yeast phospholipid flippase mutants.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Kanako; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Sakai, Shota; Mioka, Tetsuo; Sano, Takamitsu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, type 4 P-type ATPases function as phospholipid flippases, which translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Flippases function in the formation of transport vesicles, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we isolate an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, ART5, as a multicopy suppressor of the growth and endocytic recycling defects of flippase mutants in budding yeast. Consistent with a previous report that Art5p downregulates the inositol transporter Itr1p by endocytosis, we found that flippase mutations were also suppressed by the disruption of ITR1, as well as by depletion of inositol from the culture medium. Interestingly, inositol depletion suppressed the defects in all five flippase mutants. Inositol depletion also partially restored the formation of secretory vesicles in a flippase mutant. Inositol depletion caused changes in lipid composition, including a decrease in phosphatidylinositol and an increase in phosphatidylserine. A reduction in phosphatidylinositol levels caused by partially depleting the phosphatidylinositol synthase Pis1p also suppressed a flippase mutation. These results suggest that inositol depletion changes the lipid composition of the endosomal/TGN membranes, which results in vesicle formation from these membranes in the absence of flippases.

  14. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients.

  15. Temperature Sensitivity of Neural Tube Defects in Zoep Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Phyo; Swartz, Morgan R; Kindt, Lexy M; Kangas, Ashley M; Liang, Jennifer Ostrom

    2015-12-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) occur when the flat neural plate epithelium fails to fold into the neural tube, the precursor to the brain and spinal cord. Squint (Sqt/Ndr1), a Nodal ligand, and One-eyed pinhead (Oep), a component of the Nodal receptor, are required for anterior neural tube closure in zebrafish. The NTD in sqt and Zoep mutants are incompletely penetrant. The penetrance of several defects in sqt mutants increases upon heat or cold shock. In this project, undergraduate students tested whether temperature influences the Zoep open neural tube phenotype. Single pairs of adults were spawned at 28.5°C, the normal temperature for zebrafish, and one half of the resulting embryos were moved to 34°C at different developmental time points. Analysis of variance indicated temperature and clutch/genetic background significantly contributed to the penetrance of the open neural tube phenotype. Heat shock affected the embryos only at or before the midblastula stage. Many factors, including temperature changes in the mother, nutrition, and genetic background, contribute to NTD in humans. Thus, sqt and Zoep mutants may serve as valuable models for studying the interactions between genetics and the environment during neurulation.

  16. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. PMID:23158495

  17. Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, K G; Nelson, R E; Schuster, S M

    1983-01-01

    Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase were selected by using the procedure of inositol-less death. Complementation tests among the 100 mutants isolated suggested that their alterations were genetically allelic. Recombination analysis with strain S1007t, an asparagine auxotroph, indicated that the mutations were located near or within the asn gene on linkage group V. In vitro assays with a heterokaryon indicated that the mutation was dominant. Thermal instability of cell extracts from temperature-sensitive strains in an in vitro asparagine synthetase assay determined that the mutations were in the structural gene(s) for asparagine synthetase. PMID:6137480

  18. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C.; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95pdz3) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo. This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. PMID:27563054

  19. Generation and characterisation of stable ethanol-tolerant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dragana; Fraser, Sarah; Chambers, Paul J; Rogers, Peter; Stanley, Grant A

    2010-02-01

    Saccharomyces spp. are widely used for ethanologenic fermentations, however yeast metabolic rate and viability decrease as ethanol accumulates during fermentation, compromising ethanol yield. Improving ethanol tolerance in yeast should, therefore, reduce the impact of ethanol toxicity on fermentation performance. The purpose of the current work was to generate and characterise ethanol-tolerant yeast mutants by subjecting mutagenised and non-mutagenised populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A to adaptive evolution using ethanol stress as a selection pressure. Mutants CM1 (chemically mutagenised) and SM1 (spontaneous) had increased acclimation and growth rates when cultivated in sub-lethal ethanol concentrations, and their survivability in lethal ethanol concentrations was considerably improved compared with the parent strain. The mutants utilised glucose at a higher rate than the parent in the presence of ethanol and an initial glucose concentration of 20 g l(-1). At a glucose concentration of 100 g l(-1), SM1 had the highest glucose utilisation rate in the presence or absence of ethanol. The mutants produced substantially more glycerol than the parent and, although acetate was only detectable in ethanol-stressed cultures, both mutants produced more acetate than the parent. It is suggested that the increased ethanol tolerance of the mutants is due to their elevated glycerol production rates and the potential of this to increase the ratio of oxidised and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)/NADH) in an ethanol-compromised cell, stimulating glycolytic activity.

  20. Photoinhibition of photosystem I in a pea mutant with altered LHCII organization.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A G; Morgan-Kiss, R M; Krol, M; Allakhverdiev, S I; Zanev, Yu; Sane, P V; Huner, N P A

    2015-11-01

    Comparative analysis of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) of leaves of the Costata 2/133 pea mutant with altered pigment composition and decreased level of oligomerization of the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complexes (LHCII) of PSII (Dobrikova et al., 2000; Ivanov et al., 2005) did not differ from that of WT. In contrast, photosystem I (PSI) activity of the Costata 2/133 mutant measured by the far-red (FR) light inducible P700 (P700(+)) signal exhibited 39% lower steady state level of P700(+), a 2.2-fold higher intersystem electron pool size (e(-)/P700) and higher rate of P700(+) re-reduction, which indicate an increased capacity for PSI cyclic electron transfer (CET) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than WT. The mutant also exhibited a limited capacity for state transitions. The lower level of oxidizable P700 (P700(+)) is consistent with a lower amount of PSI related chlorophyll protein complexes and lower abundance of the PsaA/PsaB heterodimer, PsaD and Lhca1 polypeptides in Costata 2/133 mutant. Exposure of WT and the Costata 2/133 mutant to high light stress resulted in a comparable photoinhibition of PSII measured in vivo, although the decrease of Fv/Fm was modestly higher in the mutant plants. However, under the same photoinhibitory conditions PSI photochemistry (P700(+)) measured as ΔA820-860 was inhibited to a greater extent (50%) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than in the WT (22%). This was accompanied by a 50% faster re-reduction rate of P700(+) in the dark indicating a higher capacity for CET around PSI in high light treated mutant leaves. The role of chloroplast thylakoid organization on the stability of the PSI complex and its susceptibility to high light stress is discussed.

  1. Photoinhibition of photosystem I in a pea mutant with altered LHCII organization.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A G; Morgan-Kiss, R M; Krol, M; Allakhverdiev, S I; Zanev, Yu; Sane, P V; Huner, N P A

    2015-11-01

    Comparative analysis of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) of leaves of the Costata 2/133 pea mutant with altered pigment composition and decreased level of oligomerization of the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complexes (LHCII) of PSII (Dobrikova et al., 2000; Ivanov et al., 2005) did not differ from that of WT. In contrast, photosystem I (PSI) activity of the Costata 2/133 mutant measured by the far-red (FR) light inducible P700 (P700(+)) signal exhibited 39% lower steady state level of P700(+), a 2.2-fold higher intersystem electron pool size (e(-)/P700) and higher rate of P700(+) re-reduction, which indicate an increased capacity for PSI cyclic electron transfer (CET) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than WT. The mutant also exhibited a limited capacity for state transitions. The lower level of oxidizable P700 (P700(+)) is consistent with a lower amount of PSI related chlorophyll protein complexes and lower abundance of the PsaA/PsaB heterodimer, PsaD and Lhca1 polypeptides in Costata 2/133 mutant. Exposure of WT and the Costata 2/133 mutant to high light stress resulted in a comparable photoinhibition of PSII measured in vivo, although the decrease of Fv/Fm was modestly higher in the mutant plants. However, under the same photoinhibitory conditions PSI photochemistry (P700(+)) measured as ΔA820-860 was inhibited to a greater extent (50%) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than in the WT (22%). This was accompanied by a 50% faster re-reduction rate of P700(+) in the dark indicating a higher capacity for CET around PSI in high light treated mutant leaves. The role of chloroplast thylakoid organization on the stability of the PSI complex and its susceptibility to high light stress is discussed. PMID:26321219

  2. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  3. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  4. Rapid Antibiotic Resistance Evolution of GASP Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Kim, Hyunsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The GASP phenotype in bacteria is due to a mutation which enables the bacteria to grow under high stress conditions where other bacteria stop growing. We probe using our Death Galaxy microenvironment how rapidly the GASP mutant can evolve resistance to mutagenic antibiotics compared to wild-type bacteria, and explore the genomic landscape changes due to the evolution of resistance.

  5. Genotyping-by-sequencing of glossy mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glossy mutants are a common occurrence in Brassica oleracea L. and they have been documented in most crop varieties of the species including cabbage, kale, broccoli, and collard. Glossy phenotypes have been of particular interest to researchers due to observations that they influence insect behavior...

  6. POST Quantum Cryptography from Mutant Prime Knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuoli, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giandomenico

    By resorting to basic features of topological knot theory we propose a (classical) cryptographic protocol based on the `difficulty' of decomposing complex knots generated as connected sums of prime knots and their mutants. The scheme combines an asymmetric public key protocol with symmetric private ones and is intrinsecally secure against quantum eavesdropper attacks.

  7. Generation and analysis of bacteriorhodopsin mutants with the potential for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, P; Moosaabadi, J Mohammadian; Sebtahmadi, S Sina; Mehrabadi, J Fallah; Behmanesh, M; Nejad, H Rouhani; Nazaktabar, A

    2012-01-01

    The properties of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) can be manipulated by genetic engineering. Therefore, by the methods of gene engineering, Asp85 was replaced individually by two other amino acids (D85V, D85S). The resulting recombinant proteins were assembled into soybean vesicles retinylated to form functional BR-like nano-particles. Proton translocation was almost completely abrogated by the mutant D85S, while the D85V mutant was partially active in pumping protons. Compared with wild type, maximum absorption of the mutants, D85V and D85S, were 563 and 609 nm, which illustrated 5 nm reductions (blue shift) and 41 nm increases (red shift), respectively. Since proton transport activity and spectroscopic activities of the mutants are different, a wide variety of membrane bioreactors (MBr) have been developed. Modified proteins can be utilized to produce unique photo/Electro-chromic materials and tools. PMID:22976247

  8. The phenotype of Arabidopsis thaliana det1 mutants suggest a role for cytokinins in greening

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.; Aguilar, N.; Peto, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    When grown in the absence of light, the det1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana develop characteristics of light-grown plants by morphological, cellular, and molecular criteria. Further, in light-grown plants, mutations in the DET1 gene affect cell-type-specific expression of light-regulated genes and the chloroplast developmental program. Here we show that the addition of exogenously added cytokinins (either 2-isopentenyl adenine, kinetin, or benzyladenine) to the growth medium of dark-germinated wild-type seedlings results in seedlings that resemble det1 mutants, instead of having the normal etiolated morphology. Like det1 mutants, these dark-grown seedlings now contain chloroplasts and have high levels of expression of genes that are normally light''-regulated. These results suggest an important role for cytokinins during greening of Arabidopsis, and may implicate cytokinin levels or an increased sensitivity to cytokinins as explanations for some of the observed phenotypes of det1 mutants.

  9. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-07-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK. PMID:25908239

  10. [Study of degradation of flavonols in the mutants of poppy (Papaver somniferum L.)].

    PubMed

    Rat'kin, A V; Evdokimova, L I; Zhanaeva, T A

    2003-01-01

    We studied flavonol-degrading activity of cell-free extracts from petals of the flower color and structure mutants. The relationship between degradation of flavonols (kaempferol, quercetin, and myricetin) and biosynthesis of anthocyanins has been revealed. The highest flavonol-degrading activity has been revealed in white flower mutants towards all substrates, particularly, quercetin. The mutations inhibiting synthesis of an anthocyanin pelargonidin provide for synthesis of various quantities of cyanidin in the petals. The flavonol-degrading activity considerably increases with the content of cyanidin. A similar relationship has been revealed in the mutants synthesizing both cyanidin and pelargonidin. The plants accumulating considerable quantities of pelargonidin in their petals have accordingly higher flavonol-degrading activity and predominantly hydrolyze kaempferol. The plants forming additional pods in their flower (pistillody) have higher flavonol-degrading activity as compared to the anther-in-petal and doubleness mutants.

  11. Effects of cold acclimation on the energetic metabolism of the staggerer mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Bertin, R; Guastavino, J M; Portet, R

    1990-02-01

    Staggerer mutant mice are lean despite their hyperphagia. Brown adipose tissue activity may be implicated in this phenomenon. The aim of this work is to determine the energetic metabolism and to detail some characteristics of the brown adipose tissue of Staggerer mutant mice born and reared either at 28 degrees C (within the thermoneutral zone) or 22 degrees C (cold temperature) compared to nonmutant control mice. In mutant mice reared at thermoneutrality the resting metabolism was found to be higher than that of controls, and further the activity of the brown adipose tissue increased as indicated in relative mass, composition and cytochrome oxydase activity. A stimulatory effect of cold exposure was observed in both mutant and nonmutant mice. It is suggested that Staggerer mice may provide a good model for the study of the cold-induced or diet-induced mechanisms of brown fat stimulation.

  12. New pleiotropic alkaline phosphatase-negative mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Heyde, M; Portalier, R

    1982-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutants showing reduced alkaline phosphatase activity were isolated as 5-fluorouracil-plus-adenosine-resistant derivatives of a upp pho (either phoS or phoT) strain. One class of these mutants displayed a temperature-sensitive alkaline phosphatase-negative phenotype, a pleiotropic defect for growth on some substrates, an increased sensitivity to toxic compounds (e.g., EDTA, mitomycin, and chloramphenicol), and alterations in the expression of some membrane proteins. It phenotypically differed from previously described mutants. The mutation was located at min 8.5 close to the phoA gene and defines a new genetic locus we called napA (for negative alkaline phosphatase pleiotropic phenotype). As these mutants have lost the ability to grow on lactose and galactose, Lac+ and Gal+ revertants were isolated that simultaneously recovered the parental phenotype. PMID:7047492

  13. Mutant breeding of Serratia marcescens strain for enhancing prodigiosin production and application to textiles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yujie; Sun, Shiqing; Zhu, Changjun; Xu, Wei; Park, Yongdoo; Zhou, Haimeng

    2013-01-01

    Microwaves have been used as a mutant agent to select mutant strains with high-yield and high-purity pigment. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques were used to elucidate the structures of the pigment. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure pigment purity. The analysis of the mutant strain showed that pigment yield increased by 109% and was 98% pure. Prodigiosin in ethanol solution had good stability under ambient temperature and natural indoor light. However, prodigiosin rapidly decomposed under intense sunlight. Prodigiosin is an ecological colorant to dye fabrics, including synthetic and natural fibers. Synthetic fabrics dyed with prodigiosin, such as polyamide and acrylic, have high colorfastness to washing (≥4th grade) and antimicrobial properties (>90%) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Antimicrobial properties were significantly different between synthetic and natural fabrics. The mutant strain Serratia marcescens jx1-1, with high prodigiosin yield and purity, has promising prospects in food, cosmetic, and textile industries.

  14. Characterization of a flavinogenic mutant of methanol yeast Candida boidinii and its extracellular secretion of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Suryadi, H; Yoshida, N; Yamada-Onodera, K; Katsuragi, T; Tani, Y

    2000-01-01

    A flavinogenic mutant was derived from Candida boidinii by mutagenesis. The mutant was smaller than the wild type, did not grow on a minimal medium, and required l-tryptophan, l-leucine, inositol, and nicotinate for growth. The mutant was defective in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, lacking glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. The specific activities of the transaldolase and transketolase of the mutant were higher than those of the wild type. These high activities might direct the flux of the carbon source to the nonoxidative pathway with formation of a large amount of pentose phosphates, increasing riboflavin synthesis. Under microaerobic conditions at 25 degrees C, 90 mg/l riboflavin was obtained. PMID:16232817

  15. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-07-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK.

  16. Enlarged meristems and delayed growth in plp mutants result from lack of CaaX prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Running, Mark P; Lavy, Meirav; Sternberg, Hasana; Galichet, Arnaud; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Hake, Sarah; Ori, Naomi; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2004-05-18

    Meristems require a myriad of intercellular signaling pathways for coordination of cell division within and between functional zones and clonal cell layers. This control of cell division ensures a constant availability of stem cells throughout the life span of the meristem while limiting overproliferation of meristematic cells and maintaining the meristem structure. We have undertaken a genetic screen to identify additional components of meristem signaling pathways. We identified pluripetala (plp) mutants based on their dramatically larger meristems and increased floral organ number. PLURIPETALA encodes the alpha-subunit shared between protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase-I. plp mutants also have altered abscisic acid responses and overall much slower growth rate. plp is epistatic to mutations in the beta-subunit of farnesyltransferase and shows a synergistic interaction with clavata3 mutants. plp mutants lead to insights into the mechanism of meristem homeostasis and provide a unique in vivo system for studying the functional role of prenylation in eukaryotes.

  17. Disruption of Endocytosis with the Dynamin Mutant shibirets1 Suppresses Seizures in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jason R.; Wong, Karen G.; Siddiqui, Faria M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in modern medicine is to control epilepsies that do not respond to currently available medications. Since seizures consist of coordinated and high-frequency neural activity, our goal was to disrupt neurotransmission with a synaptic transmission mutant and evaluate its ability to suppress seizures. We found that the mutant shibire, encoding dynamin, suppresses seizure-like activity in multiple seizure–sensitive Drosophila genotypes, one of which resembles human intractable epilepsy in several aspects. Because of the requirement of dynamin in endocytosis, increased temperature in the shits1 mutant causes impairment of synaptic vesicle recycling and is associated with suppression of the seizure-like activity. Additionally, we identified the giant fiber neuron as critical in the seizure circuit and sufficient to suppress seizures. Overall, our results implicate mutant dynamin as an effective seizure suppressor, suggesting that targeting or limiting the availability of synaptic vesicles could be an effective and general method of controlling epilepsy disorders. PMID:26341658

  18. Enlarged meristems and delayed growth in plp mutants result from lack of CaaX prenyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Running, Mark P.; Lavy, Meirav; Sternberg, Hasana; Galichet, Arnaud; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Hake, Sarah; Ori, Naomi; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2004-01-01

    Meristems require a myriad of intercellular signaling pathways for coordination of cell division within and between functional zones and clonal cell layers. This control of cell division ensures a constant availability of stem cells throughout the life span of the meristem while limiting overproliferation of meristematic cells and maintaining the meristem structure. We have undertaken a genetic screen to identify additional components of meristem signaling pathways. We identified pluripetala (plp) mutants based on their dramatically larger meristems and increased floral organ number. PLURIPETALA encodes the α-subunit shared between protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase-I. plp mutants also have altered abscisic acid responses and overall much slower growth rate. plp is epistatic to mutations in the β-subunit of farnesyltransferase and shows a synergistic interaction with clavata3 mutants. plp mutants lead to insights into the mechanism of meristem homeostasis and provide a unique in vivo system for studying the functional role of prenylation in eukaryotes. PMID:15128936

  19. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK. PMID:25908239

  20. Identification of Wee1 as a novel therapeutic target for mutant RAS-driven acute leukemia and other malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhao; Liu, Feiyang; Zhang, Jianming; Sattler, Martin; Nelson, Erik; Cowens, Kristen; Christie, Amanda L.; Mitsiades, Constantine; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael; Griffin, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Direct targeting of RAS, which is frequently mutated, has proven to be challenging, and inhibition of individual downstream RAS mediators has resulted in limited clinical efficacy. We designed a chemical screen to identify compounds capable of potentiating mTOR inhibition in mutant RAS-positive leukemia, and identified a Wee1 inhibitor. Synergy was observed in both mutant NRAS- and mutant KRAS-positive acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary patient samples. The observed synergy enhanced dephosphorylation of AKT, 4E-BP1 and S6K, and correlated with increased apoptosis. The specificity of Wee1 as the target of MK-1775 was validated by Wee1 knockdown (KD), as well as partial reversal of drug combination-induced apoptosis by a CDK1 inhibitor. Importantly, we also extended our findings to other mutant RAS-expressing malignancies, including mutant NRAS-positive melanoma, and mutant KRAS-positive colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and lung cancer. We observed favorable responses with combined Wee1/mTOR inhibition in human cancer cell lines from multiple malignancies, and inhibition of tumor growth in in vivo models of mutant KRAS lung cancer and leukemia. The present study introduces for the first time Wee1 inhibition combined with mTOR inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy to the selective treatment of mutant RAS-positive leukemia and other mutant RAS-expressing malignancies. PMID:24791855

  1. Generation and identification of Arabidopsis EMS mutants.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li-Jia; Qin, Genji

    2014-01-01

    EMS mutant analysis is a routine experiment to identify new players in a specific biological process or signaling pathway using forward genetics. It begins with the generation of mutants by treating Arabidopsis seeds with EMS. A mutant with a phenotype of interest (mpi) is obtained by screening plants of the M2 generation under a specific condition. Once the phenotype of the mpi is confirmed in the next generation, map-based cloning is performed to locate the mpi mutation. During the map-based cloning, mpi plants (Arabidopsis Columbia-0 (Col-0) ecotype background) are first crossed with Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype, and the presence or absence of the phenotype in the F1 hybrids indicates whether the mpi is recessive or dominant. F2 plants with phenotypes similar to the mpi, if the mpi is recessive, or those without the phenotype, if the mpi is dominant, are used as the mapping population. As few as 24 such plants are selected for rough mapping. After finding one marker (MA) linked to the mpi locus or mutant phenotype, more markers near MA are tested to identify recombinants. The recombinants indicate the interval in which the mpi is located. Additional recombinants and molecular markers are then required to narrow down the interval. This is an iterative process of narrowing down the mapping interval until no further recombinants or molecular markers are available. The genes in the mapping interval are then sequenced to look for the mutation. In the last step, the wild-type or mutated gene is cloned to generate binary constructs. Complementation or recapitulation provides the most convincing evidence in determining the mutation that causes the phenotype of the mpi. Here, we describe the procedures for generating mutants with EMS and analyzing EMS mutations by map-based cloning.

  2. Plasmolysis induced by toluene in a cyoB mutant of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Duque, Estrella; García, Vanina; de la Torre, Jesús; Godoy, Patricia; Bernal, Patricia; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2004-10-01

    The cyoABCDE gene cluster of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E encodes a terminal cytochrome oxidase. A 500-bp 'cyoB' DNA fragment was cloned in pCHESI Omega Km and used to generate a cyoB knock-out mutant in vivo. The mutant strain was not limited in the generation of proton-motif force, although when grown on minimal medium with glucose or citrate, the CyoB mutant exhibited a slight increase in duplication time with respect to the wild-type strain. This effect was even more pronounced when toluene was supplied in the gas phase. In consonance with the negative effect of toluene on the growth was the finding that the CyoB mutant was hypersensitive to sudden 0.3% (v/v) toluene shocks, in contrast with the wild-type strain. This effect was particularly exacerbated in cells that reached the stationary phase. The increased sensitivity to solvents of the CyoB mutant did not appear to be related to the inability of the cells to strengthen the membrane package or to induce the efflux pumps in response to the solvent, but rather to solvent-induced plasmolysis that may be triggered by wrinkles in the cytoplasmic membrane at the poles of the mutant cells, and invagination of the outer membranes, which eventually lead to cell death.

  3. Differential effects of lesion mimic mutants in barley on disease development by facultative pathogens.

    PubMed

    McGrann, Graham R D; Steed, Andrew; Burt, Christopher; Nicholson, Paul; Brown, James K M

    2015-06-01

    Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous necrotic spots and chlorotic leaves as a result of mis-regulated cell death programmes. Typically these mutants have increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens but their response to facultative fungi that cause necrotrophic diseases is less well studied. The effect of altered cell death regulation on the development of disease caused by Ramularia collo-cygni, Fusarium culmorum and Oculimacula yallundae was explored using a collection of barley necrotic (nec) lesion mimic mutants. nec8 mutants displayed lower levels of all three diseases compared to nec9 mutants, which had increased R. collo-cygni but decreased F. culmorum disease symptoms. nec1 mutants reduced disease development caused by both R. collo-cygni and F. culmorum. The severity of the nec1-induced lesion mimic phenotype and F. culmorum symptom development was reduced by mutation of the negative cell death regulator MLO. The significant reduction in R. collo-cygni symptoms caused by nec1 was completely abolished in the presence of the mlo-5 allele and both symptoms and fungal biomass were greater than in the wild-type. These results indicate that physiological pathways involved in regulation of cell death interact with one another in their effects on different fungal pathogens. PMID:25873675

  4. New methods for the isolation and characterization of biofilm-persistent mutants in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Aroa; Jiménez-Fernández, Alicia; Calero, Patricia; Gallego, Laura D; Govantes, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Here we describe two new methods for the genetic characterization of bacterial biofilm development. First, we have designed a microtitre dish-based approach for high-throughput screening of Pseudomonas putida mutants showing increased biofilm under dispersal conditions. Using this method, nine such biofilm-persistent mutants, bearing transposon insertions in four loci: lapG, bifA, mvaB and dksA, were isolated. Second, we have developed a serial dilution-based scheme to monitor biofilm development and dispersal in microtitre dish wells in a simple, time-efficient and reproducible manner. Using this method, we showed that (i) mutants in bifA and dksA do not undergo starvation-induced biofilm dispersal in LB or minimal medium, (ii) a mvaB mutant does not disperse the biofilm in LB, but shows a normal dispersal response in minimal medium, and (iii) unlike the lapG mutant, the bifA, mvaB and dksA mutants do not show an increase in biofilm production. The procedures shown here are useful tools for the identification of previously uncharacterized biofilm-related genes and considerably simplify the characterization of biofilm growth phenotypes.

  5. DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants of Salmonella Typhimurium and a Novel Dam-Regulated Locus

    PubMed Central

    Torreblanca, J.; Casadesus, J.

    1996-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium lacking DNA adenine methylase were isolated; they include insertion and deletion alleles. The dam locus maps at 75 min between cysG and aroB, similar to the Escherichia coli dam gene. Dam(-) mutants of S. typhimurium resemble those of E. coli in the following phenotypes: (1) increased spontaneous mutations, (2) moderate SOS induction, (3) enhancement of duplication segregation, (4) inviability of dam recA and dam recB mutants, and (5) suppression of the inviability of the dam recA and dam recB combinations by mutations that eliminate mismatch repair. However, differences between S. typhimurium and E. coli dam mutants are also found: (1) S. typhimurium dam mutants do not show increased UV sensitivity, suggesting that methyl-directed mismatch repair does not participate in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Salmonella. (2) S. typhimurium dam recJ mutants are viable, suggesting that the Salmonella RecJ function does not participate in the repair of DNA strand breaks formed in the absence of Dam methylation. We also describe a genetic screen for detecting novel genes regulated by Dam methylation and a locus repressed by Dam methylation in the S. typhimurium virulence (or ``cryptic'') plasmid. PMID:8878670

  6. Differential effects of lesion mimic mutants in barley on disease development by facultative pathogens

    PubMed Central

    McGrann, Graham R. D.; Steed, , Andrew; Burt, Christopher; Nicholson, Paul; Brown, James K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous necrotic spots and chlorotic leaves as a result of mis-regulated cell death programmes. Typically these mutants have increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens but their response to facultative fungi that cause necrotrophic diseases is less well studied. The effect of altered cell death regulation on the development of disease caused by Ramularia collo-cygni, Fusarium culmorum and Oculimacula yallundae was explored using a collection of barley necrotic (nec) lesion mimic mutants. nec8 mutants displayed lower levels of all three diseases compared to nec9 mutants, which had increased R. collo-cygni but decreased F. culmorum disease symptoms. nec1 mutants reduced disease development caused by both R. collo-cygni and F. culmorum. The severity of the nec1-induced lesion mimic phenotype and F. culmorum symptom development was reduced by mutation of the negative cell death regulator MLO. The significant reduction in R. collo-cygni symptoms caused by nec1 was completely abolished in the presence of the mlo-5 allele and both symptoms and fungal biomass were greater than in the wild-type. These results indicate that physiological pathways involved in regulation of cell death interact with one another in their effects on different fungal pathogens. PMID:25873675

  7. Pleiotropic phenotypes of the salt-tolerant and cytosine hypomethylated leafless inflorescence, evergreen dwarf and irregular leaf lamina mutants of Catharanthus roseus possessing Mendelian inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    In Catharanthus roseus, three morphological cum salt-tolerant chemically induced mutants of Mendelian inheritance and their wild-type parent cv Nirmal were characterized for overall cytosine methylation at DNA repeats, expression of 119 protein coding and seven miRNA-coding genes and 50 quantitative traits. The mutants, named after their principal morphological feature(s), were leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill). The Southern-blot analysis of MspI digested DNAs of mutants probed with centromeric and 5S and 18S rDNA probes indicated that, in comparison to wild type, the mutants were extensively demethylated at cytosine sites. Among the 126 genes investigated for transcriptional expression, 85 were upregulated and 41 were downregulated in mutants. All of the five genes known to be stress responsive had increased expression in mutants. Several miRNA genes showed either increased or decreased expression in mutants. The C. roseus counterparts of CMT3, DRM2 and RDR2 were downregulated in mutants. Among the cell, organ and plant size, photosynthesis and metabolism related traits studied, 28 traits were similarly affected in mutants as compared to wild type. Each of the mutants also expressed some traits distinctively. The egd mutant possessed superior photosynthesis and water retention abilities. Biomass was hyperaccumulated in roots, stems, leaves and seeds of the lli mutant. The ill mutant was richest in the pharmaceutical alkaloids catharanthine, vindoline, vincristine and vinblastine. The nature of mutations, origins of mutant phenotypes and evolutionary importance of these mutants are discussed.

  8. Characterization of echinocandin-resistant mutants of Candida albicans: genetic, biochemical, and virulence studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, M B; Abruzzo, G; Flattery, A; Bartizal, K; Marrinan, J A; Li, W; Milligan, J; Nollstadt, K; Douglas, C M

    1996-01-01

    The pneumocandins are potent antifungal agents of the echinocandin class which are under development for use as broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy. One important consideration for any new therapeutic class for treating serious fungal infections is the potential for drug resistance development. In this study we have isolated and characterized four independent spontaneous Candida albicans mutants resistant to the potent semisynthetic pneumocandin L-733,560. These mutants have many of the properties of FKS1/ETG1 echinocandin-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including (i) cross-resistance to other 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase inhibitors, such as papulacandin and echinocandins, but no change in sensitivity to other antifungal agents; (ii) in vitro glucan synthase activity that is more resistant to pneumocandins than the wild-type parent enzyme; and (iii) semidominant drug resistance in spheroplast fusion strains. The mutants were compared with C. albicans echinocandin-resistant mutants isolated by mutagenesis by L. Beckford and D. Kerridge (mutant M-2) (abstr. PS3.11, in Proceedings of the XI Congress of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology, Montreal, Canada, 1992) and by A. Cassone, R. E. Mason, and D. Kerridge (mutant CA-2) (Sabouraudia 19:97-110, 1981). All of the strains had resistant enzyme activity in vitro. M-2 grew poorly and had low levels of enzyme activity. In contrast, CA-2 and the spontaneous mutants grew as well as the parents and had normal levels of glucan synthase activity. These results suggest that these resistant mutants may have alterations in glucan synthase. CA-2 was unable to form germ tubes, an ability retained by the spontaneous mutants. The virulence of the spontaneous mutants was unimpaired in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, while M-2 and CA-2 were 2 orders of magnitude less virulent than their parent strains. Significantly, mice challenged with the spontaneous mutant CAI4R1 responded therapeutically

  9. Auditory and vestibular defects in the circling (ci2) rat mutant.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Fedrowitz, M; Ebert, U; Zimmermann, E; Hedrich, H J; Wedekind, D; Löscher, W

    2001-10-01

    shape, reduced size and increased density compared to controls. In contrast, no abnormal neuronal morphology was seen in the vestibular nuclei, but a significantly reduced neuronal density was found in the medial vestibular nucleus. Abnormal vestibular function would be a likely explanation for the disturbed balance of mutant rats as exemplified by the ataxia and the inability to swim, whereas the previous data on these rats strongly indicate an involvement of the basal ganglia in the abnormal circling behaviour. The genetic defect in the mutant rats, thus, results in a clinical syndrome with features also seen in human genetic disorders with deafness and hyperkinesia, making the ci2/ci2 rat an excellent model for investigating both cochlear/vestibular dysfunction and hyperkinetic movement disorders.

  10. Pregnancy Hyperglycemia in Prolactin Receptor Mutant, but Not Prolactin Mutant, Mice and Feeding-Responsive Regulation of Placental Lactogen Genes Implies Placental Control of Maternal Glucose Homeostasis1

    PubMed Central

    Rawn, Saara M.; Huang, Carol; Hughes, Martha; Shaykhutdinov, Rustem; Vogel, Hans J.; Cross, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is often viewed as a conflict between the fetus and mother over metabolic resources. Insulin resistance occurs in mothers during pregnancy but does not normally lead to diabetes because of an increase in the number of the mother's pancreatic beta cells. In mice, this increase is dependent on prolactin (Prl) receptor signaling but the source of the ligand has been unclear. Pituitary-derived Prl is produced during the first half of pregnancy in mice but the placenta produces Prl-like hormones from implantation to term. Twenty-two separate mouse genes encode the placenta Prl-related hormones, making it challenging to assess their roles in knockout models. However, because at least four of them are thought to signal through the Prl receptor, we analyzed Prlr mutant mice and compared their phenotypes with those of Prl mutants. We found that whereas Prlr mutants develop hyperglycemia during gestation, Prl mutants do not. Serum metabolome analysis showed that Prlr mutants showed other changes consistent with diabetes. Despite the metabolic changes, fetal growth was normal in Prlr mutants. Of the four placenta-specific, Prl-related hormones that have been shown to interact with the Prlr, their gene expression localizes to different endocrine cell types. The Prl3d1 gene is expressed by trophoblast giant cells both in the labyrinth layer, sitting on the arterial side where maternal blood is highest in oxygen and nutrients, and in the junctional zone as maternal blood leaves the placenta. Expression increases during the night, though the increase in the labyrinth is circadian whereas it occurs only after feeding in the junctional zone. These data suggest that the placenta has a sophisticated endocrine system that regulates maternal glucose metabolism during pregnancy. PMID:26269505

  11. Pregnancy Hyperglycemia in Prolactin Receptor Mutant, but Not Prolactin Mutant, Mice and Feeding-Responsive Regulation of Placental Lactogen Genes Implies Placental Control of Maternal Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rawn, Saara M; Huang, Carol; Hughes, Martha; Shaykhutdinov, Rustem; Vogel, Hans J; Cross, James C

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy is often viewed as a conflict between the fetus and mother over metabolic resources. Insulin resistance occurs in mothers during pregnancy but does not normally lead to diabetes because of an increase in the number of the mother's pancreatic beta cells. In mice, this increase is dependent on prolactin (Prl) receptor signaling but the source of the ligand has been unclear. Pituitary-derived Prl is produced during the first half of pregnancy in mice but the placenta produces Prl-like hormones from implantation to term. Twenty-two separate mouse genes encode the placenta Prl-related hormones, making it challenging to assess their roles in knockout models. However, because at least four of them are thought to signal through the Prl receptor, we analyzed Prlr mutant mice and compared their phenotypes with those of Prl mutants. We found that whereas Prlr mutants develop hyperglycemia during gestation, Prl mutants do not. Serum metabolome analysis showed that Prlr mutants showed other changes consistent with diabetes. Despite the metabolic changes, fetal growth was normal in Prlr mutants. Of the four placenta-specific, Prl-related hormones that have been shown to interact with the Prlr, their gene expression localizes to different endocrine cell types. The Prl3d1 gene is expressed by trophoblast giant cells both in the labyrinth layer, sitting on the arterial side where maternal blood is highest in oxygen and nutrients, and in the junctional zone as maternal blood leaves the placenta. Expression increases during the night, though the increase in the labyrinth is circadian whereas it occurs only after feeding in the junctional zone. These data suggest that the placenta has a sophisticated endocrine system that regulates maternal glucose metabolism during pregnancy.

  12. Process of Cellular Division in Escherichia coli: Physiological Study on Thermosensitive Mutants Defective in Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Matthieu; Hirota, Yukinori

    1973-01-01

    Thermosensitive fts mutants of Escherichia coli belonging to seven previously identified genetic classes (ftsA to ftsG) were studied from a physiological standpoint. These mutants immediately stopped dividing and formed multinucleated filaments when the temperature was shifted to 41 C. Macromolecular syntheses (deoxyribonucleic acid), ribonucleic acid, cell mass, and murein) continued exponentially for at least 40 to 120 min. The number of surviving bacteria remained constant during the time of incubation, and this number began to decrease exponentially, as the rate of cell mass increase leveled off from the initial rate. The recovery of cell division at 30 C in these filamentous cells was studied after 60 min of incubation at 41 C. The existence of three types of mutants was shown. The ftsA and ftsE mutants resumed cell division without new protein synthesis; ftsD mutants resumed cell division only if new protein synthesis occured, while ftsB, C, F and G mutants did not resume cell division at all. No alteration in the cell envelope was detected by the method used here, although the ftsA, B, D, F and G mutations, in contrast with ftsC and E, caused an increased resistance to penicillin G. It was also shown that the recA mutation did not suppress the effect of the fts mutations and that none of the lysogenic fts mutants induced prophage multiplication while forming filaments. The effects of osmotic pressure and salts which rescue the mutant phenotype is described. PMID:4583216

  13. Link between reduced nephron number and hypertension: studies in a mutant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Poladia, Deepali Pitre; Kish, Kayle; Kutay, Benjamin; Bauer, John; Baum, Michel; Bates, Carlton M

    2006-04-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) infants with reduced nephron numbers have significantly increased risk for hypertension later in life, which is a devastating health problem. The risk from a reduction in nephron number alone is not clear. Recently, using conditional knock-out approach, we have developed a mutant mouse with reduced nephron number in utero and no change in birth weight, by deleting fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (fgfr2) in the ureteric bud. Our purpose was to investigate the role of in utero reduced nephron number alone in absence of LBW as a risk for developing hypertension in adulthood. Using tail cuff blood pressure measurements we observed significant increases in systolic blood pressure in one year old mutant mice versus controls. We also detected cardiac end-organ injury from hypertension as shown by significant increases in normalized heart weights, left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, and LV tissue area. Two-dimensional echocardiography revealed no changes in cardiac output and therefore significant increases in systemic vascular resistance in mutants versus controls. We also observed increases in serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histologic evidence of glomerular and renal tubular injury in mutant mice versus controls. Thus, these studies suggest that our mutant mice may serve as a relevant model to study the link between reduction of nephron number in utero and the risk of hypertension and chronic renal failure in adulthood.

  14. Use of Electroporation To Generate a Thiobacillus neapolitanus Carboxysome Mutant

    PubMed Central

    English, R. S.; Jin, S.; Shively, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Two cloning vectors designed for use in Escherichia coli and the thiobacilli were constructed by combining a Thiobacillus intermedius plasmid replicon with a multicloning site, lacZ(prm1), and either a kanamycin or a streptomycin resistance gene. Conditions necessary for the introduction of DNA into T. intermedius and T. neapolitanus via electroporation were examined and optimized. By using optimal electroporation conditions, the gene encoding a carboxysome shell protein, csoS1A, was insertionally inactivated in T. neapolitanus. The mutant showed a reduced number of carboxysomes and an increased level of CO(inf2) necessary for growth. PMID:16535117

  15. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  16. A pea mutant for the study of hydrotropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M J; Takahashi, H; Biro, R L

    1985-10-25

    Plant roots grow in the direction of increasing soil moisture, but studies of hydrotropism have always been difficult to interpret because of the effect of gravity. In this study it was found that roots of the mutant pea ;Ageotropum' are neither gravitropic nor phototropic, but do respond tropically to a moisture gradient, making them an ideal subject for the study of hydrotropism. When the root caps were removed, elongation was not affected but hydrotropism was blocked, suggesting that the site of sensory perception resides in the root cap.

  17. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  18. Abnormal Synaptic Vesicle Biogenesis in Drosophila Synaptogyrin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Robin J.; Akbergenova, Yulia; Jorquera, Ramon A.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2012-01-01

    Sustained neuronal communication relies on the coordinated activity of multiple proteins that regulate synaptic vesicle biogenesis and cycling within the presynaptic terminal. Synaptogyrin and synaptophysin are conserved MARVEL domain-containing transmembrane proteins that are among the most abundant synaptic vesicle constituents, although their role in the synaptic vesicle cycle has remained elusive. To further investigate the function of these proteins, we generated and characterized a synaptogyrin (gyr) null mutant in Drosophila, whose genome encodes a single synaptogyrin isoform and lacks a synaptophysin homolog. We demonstrate that Drosophila synaptogyrin plays a modulatory role in synaptic vesicle biogenesis at larval neuromuscular junctions. Drosophila lacking synaptogyrin are viable and fertile and have no overt deficits in motor function. However, ultrastructural analysis of gyr larvae revealed increased synaptic vesicle diameter and enhanced variability in the size of synaptic vesicles. In addition, the resolution of endocytic cisternae into synaptic vesicles in response to strong stimulation is defective in gyr mutants. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated an increase in quantal size and a concomitant decrease in quantal content, suggesting functional consequences for transmission caused by the loss of synaptogyrin. Furthermore, high-frequency stimulation resulted in increased facilitation and a delay in recovery from synaptic depression, indicating that synaptic vesicle exo-endocytosis is abnormally regulated during intense stimulation conditions. These results suggest that synaptogyrin modulates the synaptic vesicle exo-endocytic cycle and is required for the proper biogenesis of synaptic vesicles at nerve terminals. PMID:23238721

  19. [Pigment accumulation and functional activity of chloroplasts in common Pisum sativum L. mutants with low chlorophyll level (chlorotica)].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 with a low content of chlorophyll were studied. The mutant 2004 has light green leaves and stem, and the mutant 2014 has yellow green leaves and stem. They accumulate approximately 80 and 50% chlorophylls of the parent form of pea Torsdag cv. The content of carotene in carotenoids of the mutant 2004 was much lower, and the accumulation of lutein and violaxanthine was increased. The accumulation of all carotenoids in the mutant 2014 decreased almost proportionally to a decrease in the chlorophyll content. The rate of CO2 evolution in mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 was established to be lower. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants was 29-30% lower as compared to the control, and in hybrid plants it was 1.5-2-fold higher. It is assumed that the increase in the activity of the night-time respiration in gas exchange of chlorotica mutants and the drop of photosynthesis lead to a decrease in biomass increment. The results obtained allow us to conclude that the mutation of chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affects the genes controlling the formation and functioning of different components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  20. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanli; Zhou, Jinan; Qu, Yilin; Yang, Xinguang; Shi, Guojing; Wang, Xiuhong; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical) are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid). These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold) the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability. PMID:27045517

  1. Rubisco mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Pinto, T S; Malcata, F X; Arrabaça, J D; Silva, J M; Spreitzer, R J; Esquível, M G

    2013-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is an ideal fuel characterized by high enthalpy change and lack of greenhouse effects. This biofuel can be released by microalgae via reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen catalyzed by hydrogenases. The main competitor for the reducing power required by the hydrogenases is the Calvin cycle, and rubisco plays a key role therein. Engineered Chlamydomonas with reduced rubisco levels, activity and stability was used as the basis of this research effort aimed at increasing hydrogen production. Biochemical monitoring in such metabolically engineered mutant cells proceeded in Tris/acetate/phosphate culture medium with S-depletion or repletion, both under hypoxia. Photosynthetic activity, maximum photochemical efficiency, chlorophyll and protein levels were all measured. In addition, expression of rubisco, hydrogenase, D1 and Lhcb were investigated, and H2 was quantified. At the beginning of the experiments, rubisco increased followed by intense degradation. Lhcb proteins exhibited monomeric isoforms during the first 24 to 48 h, and D1 displayed sensitivity under S-depletion. Rubisco mutants exhibited a significant decrease in O2 evolution compared with the control. Although the S-depleted medium was much more suitable than its complete counterpart for H2 production, hydrogen release was observed also in sealed S-repleted cultures of rubisco mutated cells under low-moderate light conditions. In particular, the rubisco mutant Y67A accounted for 10-15-fold higher hydrogen production than the wild type under the same conditions and also displayed divergent metabolic parameters. These results indicate that rubisco is a promising target for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered microalgae.

  2. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  3. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future.

  4. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  5. Fluoride-tolerant mutants of Aspergillus niger show enhanced phosphate solubilization capacity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ubiana de Cássia; Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Silva, Nina Morena R M; Duarte, Josiane Leal; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Tótola, Marcos Rogério; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-01-01

    P-solubilizing microorganisms are a promising alternative for a sustainable use of P against a backdrop of depletion of high-grade rock phosphates (RPs). Nevertheless, toxic elements present in RPs, such as fluorine, can negatively affect microbial solubilization. Thus, this study aimed at selecting Aspergillus niger mutants efficient at P solubilization in the presence of fluoride (F-). The mutants were obtained by exposition of conidia to UV light followed by screening in a medium supplemented with Ca3(PO4)2 and F-. The mutant FS1-555 showed the highest solubilization in the presence of F-, releasing approximately 70% of the P contained in Ca3(PO4)2, a value 1.7 times higher than that obtained for the wild type (WT). The mutant FS1-331 showed improved ability of solubilizing fluorapatites, increasing the solubilization of Araxá, Catalão, and Patos RPs by 1.7, 1.6, and 2.5 times that of the WT, respectively. These mutants also grew better in the presence of F-, indicating that mutagenesis allowed the acquisition of F- tolerance. Higher production of oxalic acid by FS1-331 correlated with its improved capacity for RP solubilization. This mutant represents a significant improvement and possess a high potential for application in solubilization systems with fluoride-rich phosphate sources. PMID:25310310

  6. Ascorbate-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis grow in high light despite chronic photooxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Müller-Moulé, Patricia; Golan, Talila; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2004-03-01

    Acclimation to changing environments, such as increases in light intensity, is necessary, especially for the survival of sedentary organisms like plants. To learn more about the importance of ascorbate in the acclimation of plants to high light (HL), vtc2, an ascorbate-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis, and the double mutants vtc2npq4 and vtc2npq1 were tested for growth in low light and HL and compared with the wild type. The vtc2 mutant has only 10% to 30% of wild-type levels of ascorbate, vtc2npq4 has lower ascorbate levels and lacks non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) because of the absence of the photosystem II protein PsbS, and vtc2npq1 is NPQ deficient and also lacks zeaxanthin in HL but has PsbS. All three genotypes were able to grow in HL and had wild-type levels of Lhcb1, cytochrome f, PsaF, and 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin. However, the mutants had lower electron transport and oxygen evolution rates and lower quantum efficiency of PSII compared with the wild type, implying that they experienced chronic photooxidative stress. The mutants lacking NPQ in addition to ascorbate were only slightly more affected than vtc2. All three mutants had higher glutathione levels than the wild type in HL, suggesting a possible compensation for the lower ascorbate content. These results demonstrate the importance of ascorbate for the long-term acclimation of plants to HL.

  7. Respiratory-deficient mutants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas: a review.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Thalia; Larosa, Véronique; Cardol, Pierre; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Remacle, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Genetic manipulation of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is straightforward. Nuclear genes can be interrupted by insertional mutagenesis or targeted by RNA interference whereas random or site-directed mutagenesis allows the introduction of mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This, combined with a screen that easily allows discriminating respiratory-deficient mutants, makes Chlamydomonas a model system of choice to study mitochondria biology in photosynthetic organisms. Since the first description of Chlamydomonas respiratory-deficient mutants in 1977 by random mutagenesis, many other mutants affected in mitochondrial components have been characterized. These respiratory-deficient mutants increased our knowledge on function and assembly of the respiratory enzyme complexes. More recently some of these mutants allowed the study of mitochondrial gene expression processes poorly understood in Chlamydomonas. In this review, we update the data concerning the respiratory components with a special focus on the assembly factors identified on other organisms. In addition, we make an inventory of different mitochondrial respiratory mutants that are inactivated either on mitochondrial or nuclear genes.

  8. Fluoride-Tolerant Mutants of Aspergillus niger Show Enhanced Phosphate Solubilization Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ubiana de Cássia; Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Silva, Nina Morena R. M.; Duarte, Josiane Leal; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Tótola, Marcos Rogério; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-01-01

    P-solubilizing microorganisms are a promising alternative for a sustainable use of P against a backdrop of depletion of high-grade rock phosphates (RPs). Nevertheless, toxic elements present in RPs, such as fluorine, can negatively affect microbial solubilization. Thus, this study aimed at selecting Aspergillus niger mutants efficient at P solubilization in the presence of fluoride (F−). The mutants were obtained by exposition of conidia to UV light followed by screening in a medium supplemented with Ca3(PO4)2 and F−. The mutant FS1-555 showed the highest solubilization in the presence of F−, releasing approximately 70% of the P contained in Ca3(PO4)2, a value 1.7 times higher than that obtained for the wild type (WT). The mutant FS1-331 showed improved ability of solubilizing fluorapatites, increasing the solubilization of Araxá, Catalão, and Patos RPs by 1.7, 1.6, and 2.5 times that of the WT, respectively. These mutants also grew better in the presence of F−, indicating that mutagenesis allowed the acquisition of F− tolerance. Higher production of oxalic acid by FS1-331 correlated with its improved capacity for RP solubilization. This mutant represents a significant improvement and possess a high potential for application in solubilization systems with fluoride-rich phosphate sources. PMID:25310310

  9. Restoration of gravitropic sensitivity in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis by hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzelle, K. J.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the extensive study of plant gravitropism, there have been few experiments which have utilized hypergravity as a tool to investigate gravisensitivity in flowering plants. Previous studies have shown that starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis are less sensitive to gravity compared to the wild-type (WT). In this report, the question addressed was whether hypergravity could restore the sensitivity of starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis. The strains examined include a WT, a starchless mutant and a reduced-starch mutant. Vertical orientation studies with dark-grown seedlings indicate that increased centrifugal acceleration improves orientation relative to the acceleration vector for all strains, even the WT. For starchless roots, growth of seedlings under constant 5 g acceleration was required to restore orientation to the level of the WT at 1 g. In contrast, approximately 10 g was required to restore the orientation of the starchless mutant hypocotyls to a WT level at 1 g. Examination of plastid position in root cap columella cells of the starchless mutant revealed that the restoration of gravitropic sensitivity was correlated with the sedimentation of plastids toward the distal cell wall. Even in WT plants, hypergravity caused greater sedimentation of plastids and improved gravitropic capability. Collectively, these experiments support the hypothesis of a statolith-based system of gravity perception in plants. As far as is known, this is the first report to use hypergravity to study the mechanisms of gravitropism in Arabidopsis.

  10. Mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana Altered in Epicuticular Wax and Leaf Morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Jenks, M. A.; Rashotte, A. M.; Tuttle, H. A.; Feldmann, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    We report eight new mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana possessing altered leaf morphology and epicuticular wax. These were isolated from a T-DNA-mutagenized population using a visual screen for altered leaf reflectance, i.e. increased glaucousness or glossiness. The mutants were placed into three distinct classes based on alterations in overall plant morphology: knobhead (knb), bicentifolia (bcf), and wax. The four knb mutants formed callus-like growths in the axillary region of the rosette leaves and apical meristem, the two bcf mutants produced hundreds of narrow leaves, and the two wax mutants had leaves and stems that were more glossy than wild type and organs that fused during early development. Leaves of knb and bcf were more glaucous and abnormally shaped than wild type. Epicuticular wax crystals over knb and bcf leaf surfaces (where none were present on wild type) likely contributed to their more glaucous appearance. In contrast, the glossy appearance of the wax mutants was associated with a reduced epicuticular wax load on both leaves and stems. One representative from each phenotypic class was selected for detailed analyses of epicuticular wax chemistry. All three lines, knb1, bcf1, and wax1, had dramatic alterations in the total amounts and relative proportions of their leaf epicuticular wax constituents. PMID:12226189

  11. [A flavinogenic mutant of the yeast Pichia guilliermondii with impaired iron transport].

    PubMed

    Shavlovskiĭ, G M; Fedorovich, D V; Zviagil'skais, R A

    1976-01-01

    A mutant of the yeast Pichia guilliermondii was produced by means of UV; the mutant was capable of riboflavin overproduction in the presence of high concentrations of iron in the medium. The content of total and non-hemin iron and cytochrome c, and the activity of catalase, were lower in the cells of the mutant than in the parent cells, while the activity of riboflavin synthetase was higher. The content of iron in the cells increased when the mutant was cultivated on media with citric acid, siderochromes of Klebsiella aerogenes, Neurospora crassa, Rhodotorula glutinis, cultural broth of Pichia ohmeri, and autolysate of brewer's yeast, whereas the flavinogenous activity of the cells decreased. Rotenone inhibited respiration of the intact cells of the mutant producing elevated amounts of riboflavin; therefore, flavinogenesis was not regulated by non-hemin iron on the first segment of the respiratory chain. Overproduction of riboflavin in the mutant of Pichia guilliermondii was proved to be a recessive property. PMID:933879

  12. Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in the induction of ethylene biosynthesis by cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. P.; Schuerman, P.; Woeste, K.; Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins elevate ethylene biosynthesis in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings via a post-transcriptional modification of one isoform of the key biosynthetic enzyme ACC synthase. In order to begin to dissect the signaling events leading from cytokinin perception to this modification, we have isolated a series of mutants that lack the ethylene-mediated triple response in the presence of cytokinin due to their failure to increase ethylene biosynthesis. Analysis of genetic complementation and mapping revealed that these Cin mutants (cytokinin-insensitive) represent four distinct complementation groups, one of which, cin4, is allelic to the constitutive photomorphogenic mutant fus9/cop10. The Cin mutants have subtle effects on the morphology of adult plants. We further characterized the Cin mutants by analyzing ethylene biosynthesis in response to various other inducers and in adult tissues, as well as by assaying additional cytokinin responses. The cin3 mutant did not disrupt ethylene biosynthesis under any other conditions, nor did it disrupt any other cytokinin responses. Only cin2 disrupted ethylene biosynthesis in multiple circumstances. cin1 and cin2 made less anthocyanin in response to cytokinin. cin1 also displayed reduced shoot initiation in tissue culture in response to cytokinin, suggesting that it affects a cytokinin signaling element.

  13. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14712.001 PMID:27183270

  14. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-07-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future.

  15. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-05-16

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control.

  16. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Y.; Clewell, D.B.

    1980-08-01

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli.

  17. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P R; Michelsen, O

    1992-12-01

    The membrane-bound H(+)-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth rate and growth yield were decreased less than expected for a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis alone as a source of ATP. Moreover, the respiration rate of a atp deletion strain was increased by 40% compared with the wild-type strain. This result is surprising, since the atp deletion strain is not able to utilize the resulting proton motive force for ATP synthesis. Indeed, the ratio of ATP concentration to ADP concentration was decreased from 19 in the wild type to 7 in the atp mutant, and the membrane potential of the atp deletion strain was increased by 20%, confirming that the respiration rate was not controlled by the magnitude of the opposing membrane potential. The level of type b cytochromes in the mutant cells was 80% higher than the level in the wild-type cells, suggesting that the increased respiration was caused by an increase in the expression of the respiratory genes. The atp deletion strain produced twice as much by-product (acetate) and exhibited increased flow through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glycolytic pathway. These three changes all lead to an increase in substrate level phosphorylation; the first two changes also lead to increased production of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis.

  18. Mutant Sodium Channel for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Bakhos A; Christensen, Adam P; Pike, Lisa; Wurdinger, Thomas; Perry, Katherine F; Saydam, Okay; Jacobs, Andreas H; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Weissleder, Ralph; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Corey, David P; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2009-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used to deliver a wide range of therapeutic genes to tumors. In this study, a novel tumor therapy was achieved by the delivery of a mammalian brain sodium channel, ASIC2a, carrying a mutation that renders it constitutively open. This channel was delivered to tumor cells using a herpes simplex virus-1/Epstein–Barr virus (HSV/EBV) hybrid amplicon vector in which gene expression was controlled by a tetracycline regulatory system (tet-on) with silencer elements. Upon infection and doxycycline induction of mutant channel expression in tumor cells, the open channel led to amiloride-sensitive sodium influx as assessed by patch clamp recording and sodium imaging in culture. Within hours, tumor cells swelled and died. In addition to cells expressing the mutant channel, adjacent, noninfected cells connected by gap junctions also died. Intratumoral injection of HSV/EBV amplicon vector encoding the mutant sodium channel and systemic administration of doxycycline led to regression of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The advantage of this direct mode of tumor therapy is that all types of tumor cells become susceptible and death is rapid with no time for the tumor cells to become resistant. PMID:19259066

  19. Isolation of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, M; Sharma, B; Petras, S F; Reese, C P; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M

    1995-01-01

    Two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 that do not produce leukotoxin were isolated. Following mutagenesis, colonies were screened with antiserum by a filter assay for absence of the secreted leukotoxin. The two mutants both appeared to produce normal amounts of other antigens, as judged by reactivity with polyclonal serum from an animal with pasteurellosis, and were not altered in beta-hemolytic activity as seen on blood agar plates. There was no evidence of either cell-associated or secreted leukotoxin protein when Western blots (immunoblots) were carried out with the polyclonal serum or with a monoclonal antibody directed against the leukotoxin. Southern blots revealed that both mutants show the wild-type restriction pattern at the leukotoxin locus, although the strain with the lktA2 mutation showed differences in other regions of the chromosome on analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The strain with the lktA2 mutation grew more slowly than did the wild-type strain, while the strain with the lktA1 mutation was indistinguishable from the wild-type strain in its growth properties. The strain with the lktA1 mutation should be valuable in determining the role of the leukotoxin in virulence as well as in identifying other virulence factors of P. haemolytica. PMID:7868223

  20. Two Sweetclover (Melilotus alba Desr.) Mutants Temperature Sensitive for Chlorophyll Expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bevins, M. A.; Madhavan, S.; Markwell, J.

    1993-01-01

    The nonallelic sweetclover (Melilotus alba Desr.) mutants U371 (ch10/ch10 genotype) and U372 (ch11/ch11 genotype) are derived from the U389 (+/+ genotype) parental strain. Growth of the U389 strain at a temperature of 17 or 26[deg]C results in plants normally green in appearance. The U371 and U372 mutant plants grown at 26[deg]C are slightly to moderately chlorophyll (Chl) deficient and have decreased Chl b/a ratios. Growth of the mutants at 17[deg]C results in plants severely deficient in Chl a, with markedly reduced levels of carotenoids except for violaxanthin, and with negligible amounts of Chl b or apoproteins for the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II. If mutant plants grown at 17[deg]C are transferred to 26[deg]C, during the next 20 d the amount of Chl per fresh weight will increase 5-fold and both the Chl b/a ratio and the expression of the light-harvesting complex apoproteins will progressively increase. Studies of the U371 mutant during the temperature-induced greening demonstrate progressive changes in chloroplast ultra-structure and leaf carbon isotope fractionation that parallel the increases in Chl. Changes observed in the leaf carbon isotope fractionation in the mutant suggest that, in addition to the already known effects of various abiotic factors, structural and metabolic internal factors can also influence whether the limitation in CO2 fixation is at the level of diffusion or carboxylation. Such temperature-initiated progressive greening in these and similar mutants may make them useful tools to elucidate not only the biosynthesis and assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus, but also physiological phenomena such as the influence of light-driven energy production on the overall carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis. PMID:12232006

  1. Kinetic stability of designed glycosylation mutants of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Tams, J W; Welinder, K G

    2001-08-31

    The effect of glycans and surface mutations on protein unfolding induced by heat or urea has been studied. Removal of the only native high mannose type glycan in the N142P, N142T, and N142D CIP mutants reduced the lifetime to half of that of wtCIP at irreversible conditions of unfolding. The effect was moderate at reversible conditions. Five glycomutants designed to have 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6N glycans showed a correlation between increased carbohydrate mass and increased stability toward irreversible unfolding. The results are in agreement with a dampening effect of glycans on backbone fluctuation in both the native and the unfolded states. However, experiments in reversible conditions were less clear because of additional effects of an increasing number of amino acid substitutions and aggregation. Examples of strong effects from minor surface changes were also observed.

  2. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Crum, Mary A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Benedik, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme’s thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its kcat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein–protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  3. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Crum, Mary A; Sewell, B Trevor; Benedik, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme's thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its k cat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein-protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  4. Characterization of chloroplast division using the Arabidopsis mutant arc5.

    PubMed

    Robertson, E J; Rutherford, S M; Leech, R M

    1996-09-01

    arc5 is a chloroplast division mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify the role of ARC5 in the chloroplast replication process we have followed the changes in arc5 chloroplasts during their perturbed division. ARC5 does not affect proplastid division but functions at a later stage in chloroplast development. Chloroplasts in developing mesophyll cells of arc5 leaves do not increase in number and all of the chloroplasts in mature leaf cells show a central constriction. Young arc5 chloroplasts are capable of initiating the division process but fail to complete daughter-plastid separation. Wild-type plastids increase in number to a mean of 121 after completing the division process, but in the mutant arc5 the approximately 13 plastids per cell are still centrally constricted but much enlarged. As the arc5 chloroplasts expand and elongate without dividing, the internal thylakoid membrane structure becomes flexed into an undulating ribbon. We conclude that the ARC5 gene is necessary for the completion of the last stage of chloroplast division when the narrow isthmus breaks, causing the separation of the daughter plastids.

  5. Isolation and characterization of OmpC porin mutants with altered pore properties

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, R.; Benson, S.A.

    1988-02-01

    The LamB protien is normally required for the uptake of maltodextrins. Starting with a LamB/sup -/ OmpF/sup -/ strain, we have isolated mutants that will grow on maltodextrins. The mutation conferring the Dex/sup +/ phenotype in the majority of these mutants has been mapped to the ompC locus. These mutants, unlike LamB/sup -/ OmpF/sup -/ strains, grew on maltotriose and maltotetraose, but not on maltopentaose, and showed a significantly higher rate of (/sup 14/C) maltose uptake than the parent strain did. In addition, these mutants showed increased sensitivity to certain ..beta..-lactam antibiotics and sodium dodecyl sulfate, but did not exhibit an increase in sensitivity to other antibiotics and detergents. The nucleotide sequence of these mutants has been determined. In all cases, residue 74 (arginine) of the mature OmpC protein was affected. The results suggest that this region of the OmpC protein is involved in the pore domain and that the alterations lead to an increased pore size.

  6. Mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells pleiotropically defective in receptor-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells selected for resistance to diphtheria toxin were found to be highly enriched for mutants deficient in the uptake of lysosomal hydrolases via the mannose 6-phosphate receptor. One doubly defective mutant, DTF 1-5-1, exhibited increased resistance to Sindbis virus, although it was able to bind and internalize virus normally. Normal production of virus was obtained when, subsequent to virus binding, the mutant was exposed for 2 min to acidic pH. Similarly, a shift to acidic pH increased the sensitivity of DTF 1-5-1 to diphtheria toxin 12-fold. Decreased uptake of lysosomal hydrolases by the mutant correlated with decreased mannose 6-phosphate receptor activity at the cell surface; results of lactoperoxidase- catalyzed iodination indicated that the surface-associated receptor was present but inactive on DTF 1-5-1. Total mannose 6-phosphate receptor activity was also decreased in the mutant and this decrease was reflected by increased secretion of lysosomal hydrolases. The phenotype of DTF 1-5-1 resembles in many ways that of cells treated with ammonia. We suggest that the defect in DTF 1-5-1 stems from an inability to deliver virus, diphtheria toxin, and lysosomal hydrolases to an acidic compartment. Other ligands may be endocytosed through a different pathway since the defect of DTF 1-5-1 did not decrease the endocytosis of ricin, modeccin, or Pseudomonas toxin and had minimal effects on uptake and degradation of low density lipoprotein. PMID:6300143

  7. Branching patterns in leaf starches from Arabidopsis mutants deficient in diverse starch synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Szydlowski, Nicolas; d'Hulst, Christophe; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2015-01-12

    This is the first report on the cluster structure of transitory starch from Arabidopsis leaves. In addition to wild type, the molecular structures of leaf starch from mutants deficient in starch synthases (SS) including single enzyme mutants ss1-, ss2-, or ss3-, and also double mutants ss1-ss2- and ss1-ss3- were characterized. The mutations resulted in increased amylose content. Clusters from whole starch were isolated by partial hydrolysis using α-amylase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The clusters were then further hydrolyzed with concentrated α-amylase of B. amyloliquefaciens to produce building blocks (α-limit dextrins). Structures of the clusters and their building blocks were characterized by chromatography of samples before and after debranching treatment. While the mutations increased the size of clusters, the reasons were different as reflected by the composition of their unit chains and building blocks. In general, all mutants contained more of a-chains that preferentially increased the number of small building blocks with only two chains. The clusters of the double mutant ss1-ss3- were very large and possessed also more of large building blocks with four or more chains. The results from transitory starch are compared with those from agriculturally important crops in the context that to what extent the Arabidopsis can be a true biotechnological reflection for starch modifications through genetic means.

  8. Mutant IDH1 Downregulates ATM and Alters DNA Repair and Sensitivity to DNA Damage Independent of TET2.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y; Tseng, Alan; Beerman, Isabel; Elia, Andrew J; Bendall, Sean C; Lemonnier, François; Kron, Ken J; Cescon, David W; Hao, Zhenyue; Lind, Evan F; Takayama, Naoya; Planello, Aline C; Shen, Shu Yi; Shih, Alan H; Larsen, Dana M; Li, Qinxi; Snow, Bryan E; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Gorrini, Chiara; Bassi, Christian; Thu, Kelsie L; Murakami, Kiichi; Elford, Alisha R; Ueda, Takeshi; Straley, Kimberly; Yen, Katharine E; Melino, Gerry; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Levine, Ross L; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Lupien, Mathieu; Rossi, Derrick J; Nolan, Garry P; Cairns, Rob A; Mak, Tak W

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1) are common drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but their mechanism is not fully understood. It is thought that IDH1 mutants act by inhibiting TET2 to alter DNA methylation, but there are significant unexplained clinical differences between IDH1- and TET2-mutant diseases. We have discovered that mice expressing endogenous mutant IDH1 have reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), in contrast to Tet2 knockout (TET2-KO) mice. Mutant IDH1 downregulates the DNA damage (DD) sensor ATM by altering histone methylation, leading to impaired DNA repair, increased sensitivity to DD, and reduced HSC self-renewal, independent of TET2. ATM expression is also decreased in human IDH1-mutated AML. These findings may have implications for treatment of IDH-mutant leukemia. PMID:27424808

  9. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  10. Escherichia coli Mutants that Synthesize Dephosphorylated Lipid A Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Brian O.; Masoudi, Ali; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2010-01-01

    The lipid A moiety of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide is a hexa-acylated disaccharide of glucosamine that is phosphorylated at the 1 and 4′ positions. Expression of the Francisella novicida lipid A 1-phosphatase FnLpxE in E. coli results in dephosphorylation of the lipid A proximal unit. Co-expression of FnLpxE and the Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A oxidase RlLpxQ in E. coli converts much of the proximal glucosamine to 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. Expression of the F. novicida lipid A 4′-phosphatase FnLpxF in wild-type E. coli has no effect because FnLpxF cannot dephosphorylate hexa-acylated lipid A. However, expression of FnLpxF in E. coli lpxM mutants, which synthesize penta-acylated lipid A lacking the secondary 3′-myristate chain, causes extensive 4′-dephosphorylation. Co-expression of FnLpxE and FnLpxF in lpxM mutants results in massive accumulation of lipid A species lacking both phosphate groups, and introduction of RlLpxQ generates phosphate-free lipid A variants containing 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. The proposed lipid A structures were confirmed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Strains with 4′-dephosphorylated lipid A display increased polymyxin resistance. Heptose-deficient mutants of E. coli lacking both the 1- and 4′-phosphate moieties are viable on plates but sensitive to CaCl2. Our methods for re-engineering lipid A structure may be useful for generating novel vaccines and adjuvants. PMID:20795687

  11. Phosphatase Under-Producer Mutants Have Altered Phosphorus Relations1

    PubMed Central

    Tomscha, Jennifer L.; Trull, Melanie C.; Deikman, Jill; Lynch, Jonathan P.; Guiltinan, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) acquisition and partitioning are essential for plant homeostasis. P is available for plant uptake when in its inorganic form (H2PO4−, or Pi), but Pi is often limiting in soils. Plants secrete acid phosphatases (APases) into the apoplastic space, which may be important for obtaining Pi from organic P sources; however, the relative importance of these enzymes for plant P nutrition has yet to be determined. We demonstrate that the root-associated APase pool is increased in Arabidopsis when Pi is limiting and document five APase isoforms secreted from Arabidopsis roots. Previously, we presented the identification of the phosphatase under-producer (pup) mutants, which have decreased in vivo root APase staining when grown under low P conditions. Here, we present the characterization of one of these, pup3, and further studies with pup1. pup3 has 49%, 38%, and 37% less specific APase activity in exudates, roots, and shoots, respectively. Root-associated APase activity is decreased by 16% in pup1 and 25% in pup3, regardless of P treatment. Two APase activity isoforms are reduced in pup3 exudates, and root and shoot isoforms are also affected. One of the two exudate isoforms is recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised to an Arabidopsis purple APase recombinant protein (AtPAP12); however, AtPAP12 transcript levels are unaffected in the mutant. The pup3 mutation was mapped to 68.4 ± 6.0 centimorgans on chromosome 5. Although P concentrations were not altered in pup1 and pup3 tissues when grown in nutrient solution in which Pi was the sole source of P, the mutants had 10% (pup1) and 17% (pup3) lower shoot P concentrations when grown in a peat-vermiculite mix in which the majority of the total P was present as organic P. Therefore, the pup defects, which include secreted APases, are functionally important for plant P nutrition. PMID:15122033

  12. Turgor regulation in the osmosensitive cut mutant of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Levina, Natalia N

    2007-05-01

    The internal hydrostatic pressure (turgor) of fungal cells is maintained at 400-500 kPa. The turgor is regulated by changes in ion flux and by production of the osmotically active metabolite glycerol. In Neurospora crassa, there are at least two genetically distinct pathways that function in adaptation to hyperosmotic shock. One involves a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade (kinases OS-4, OS-5 and OS-2 downstream of the osmosensing OS-1); the other is less understood, but involves the cut gene, which encodes a putative phosphatase. This study examined turgor regulation, electrical responses, ion fluxes and glycerol accumulation in the cut mutant. Turgor recovery after hyperosmotic treatment was similar to that in the wild-type, for both time-course ( approximately 40 min) and magnitude. Prior to turgor recovery, the hyperosmotic shock caused a rapid transient depolarization of the membrane potential, followed by a sustained hyperpolarization that occurred concomitant with increased H(+) efflux, indicating that the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase was being activated. These changes also occurred in the wild-type. Net fluxes of Ca(2+) and Cl(-) during turgor recovery were similar to those in the wild-type, but K(+) influx was attenuated in the cut mutant. The similar turgor recovery can be explained by the ion uptake, since glycerol did not accumulate in the cut mutant within the time frame of turgor recovery (but did accumulate in the wild-type). The results suggest that turgor regulation involves multi-faceted coordination of both ion flux and glycerol accumulation. Ion uptake is activated by a MAP kinase cascade, while CUT is required for glycerol accumulation.

  13. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  14. Cytosine arabinoside enhancement of gamma irradiation induced mutations in human T-lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Sullivan, L.M.; Hunter, T.C.; Nicklas, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The frequency of 6-thioguanine resistant (TGr) mutants induced in human G0 phase T-lymphocytes by 200 cGy of gamma irradiation is greatly enhanced by incubation with cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) after irradiation. The mutant frequency increased with increasing incubation time in ara-C for up to 2 hr. This mutation induction required a phenotypic expression time of 5-8 days mass culture growth, similar to that found with mutants induced by 300 cGy of irradiation alone. Southern blot analysis of 40 isolated mutant clones revealed 8 independent mutations by T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns. Four of these eight showed hprt gene structural alterations (0.50). An alternative method to allow phenotypic expression was developed to minimize the isolation of hprt/TCR sibling mutants. The use of in situ expression in the microtiter dish wells resulted in the isolation of 17 independent mutations in 19 mutant clones. Ten of these 17 mutations showed hprt structural alterations (0.59). The high fraction of mutations involving structural alterations detected by Southern blot analysis is consistent with the known induction of chromosome aberrations by irradiation plus ara-C treatment. We propose that both the increase in Mf and the increase in the incidence of hprt gene structural alterations are due to the accumulation of strand breaks in repairing regions of DNA under these conditions of ara-C induced inhibition of repair. We further propose that upon release of the ara-C inhibition, these repairing regions can interact to yield both gene mutations and chromosome aberrations.

  15. Molecular basis of alpha-methyltryptophan resistance in amt-1, a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, J A; Ponappa, T; Dong, W; Town, C D

    1996-01-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, amt-1, was previously selected for resistance to growth inhibition by the tryptophan analog alpha-methyltryptophan. This mutant had elevated tryptophan levels and exhibited higher anthranilate synthase (AS) activity that showed increased resistance to feedback inhibition by tryptophan. In this study, extracts of the mutant callus exhibited higher AS activity than wild-type callus when assayed with either glutamine or ammonium sulfate as amino donor, thus suggesting that elevated AS activity in the mutant was due to an alteration in the alpha subunit of the enzyme. The mutant also showed cross-resistance to 5-methylanthranilate and 6-methylanthranilate and mapped to chromosome V at or close to ASA1 (a gene encoding the AS alpha subunit). ASA1 mRNA and protein levels were similar in mutant and wild-type leaf extracts. Levels of ASA1 mRNA and protein were also similar in callus cultures of mutant and wild type, although the levels in callus were higher than in leaf tissue. Sequencing of the ASA1 gene from amt-1 revealed a G to A transition relative to the wild-type gene that would result in the substitution of an asparagine residue in place of aspartic acid at position 341 in the predicted amino acid sequence of the ASA1 protein. The mutant allele in strain amt-1 has been renamed trp5-1. PMID:8934623

  16. Functional analysis and drug response to zinc and D-penicillamine in stable ATP7B mutant hepatic cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chandhok, Gursimran; Horvath, Judit; Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut HJ

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of anti-copper treatment for survival of hepatic cells expressing different ATP7B mutations in cell culture. METHODS: The most common Wilson disease (WD) mutations p.H1069Q, p.R778L and p.C271*, found in the ATP7B gene encoding a liver copper transporter, were studied. The mutations represent major genotypes of the United States and Europe, China, and India, respectively. A human hepatoma cell line previously established to carry a knockout of ATP7B was used to stably express WD mutants. mRNA and protein expression of mutant ATP7B, survival of cells, apoptosis, and protein trafficking were determined. RESULTS: Low temperature increased ATP7B protein expression in several mutants. Intracellular ATP7B localization was significantly impaired in the mutants. Mutants were classified as high, moderate, and no survival based on their viability on exposure to toxic copper. Survival of mutant p.H1069Q and to a lesser extent p.C271* improved by D-penicillamine (DPA) treatment, while mutant p.R778L showed a pronounced response to zinc (Zn) treatment. Overall, DPA treatment resulted in higher cell survival as compared to Zn treatment; however, only combined Zn + DPA treatment fully restored cell viability. CONCLUSION: The data indicate that the basic impact of a genotype might be characterized by analysis of mutant hepatic cell lines. PMID:27122662

  17. [Isolation of a high hydrogen-producing mutant TB34 generated by transposon insertion and analysis of hydrogen production].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Guang-Ce; Shi, Liu-Yang; Zhu, Da-Ling

    2012-07-01

    To increase the hydrogen-producing capacity of Pantoea agglomerans BH18, isolated from mangrove sludge, we constructed a stable transposon mutagenesis library of this strain. A Tn7-based transposon was randomly inserted into the genomic DNA. Mutants were screened by kanamycin resistance and identified by amplification of the inserted transposon sequences. A mutant strain TB34 was isolated, whose hydrogen production capacity was significantly improved compared to the wild type strain. In seawater-containing medium supplemented with 10 g x L(-1) glucose and had an initial pH of 7.0, the hydrogen yield (H2/glucose) of the mutant strain was (2.04 +/- 0.04) mol x mol(-1), which was 43% higher than that of the wild type strain. The mutant TB34 showed steady hydrogen production capacity for five consecutive passages. Different carbon sources were tested in the hydrogen production by the mutant TB34 and the results showed that both the mutant strain TB34 and the wild type strain BH18 were able to produce hydrogen on sucrose, glucose and fructose. However, different from the wild type strain, the mutant strain TB34 was also able to produce hydrogen using xylose as substrate, with a hydrogen yield (H2/xylose) of (1.34 +/- 0.09) mol x mol(-1), indicating a broader substrate spectrum in the mutant.

  18. Mutants with enhanced nitrogenase activity in hydroponic Azospirillum brasilense-wheat associations.

    PubMed

    Pereg Gerk, L; Gilchrist, K; Kennedy, I R

    2000-05-01

    The effect of a mutation affecting flocculation, differentiation into cyst-like forms, and root colonization on nitrogenase expression by Azospirillum brasilense is described. The gene flcA of strain Sp7 restored these phenotypes in spontaneous mutants of both strains Sp7 and Sp245. Employing both constitutive pLA-lacZ and nifH-lacZ reporter fusions expressed in situ, the colony morphology, colonization pattern, and potential for nitrogenase activity of spontaneous mutants and flcA Tn5-induced mutants were established. The results of this study show that the ability of Sp7 and Sp245 mutant strains to remain in a vegetative form improved their ability to express nitrogenase activity in association with wheat in a hydroponic system. Restoring the cyst formation and colonization pattern to the spontaneous mutant Sp7-S reduced nitrogenase activity rates in association with plants to that of the wild-type Sp7. Although Tn5-induced flcA mutants showed higher potentials for nitrogenase expression than Sp7, their potentials were lower than that of Sp7-S, indicating that other factors in this strain contribute to its exceptional nitrogenase activity rates on plants. The lack of lateral flagella is not one of these factors, as Sp7-PM23, a spontaneous mutant impaired in swarming and lateral-flagellum production but not in flocculation, showed wild-type nitrogenase activity and expression. The results also suggest factors of importance in evolving an effective symbiosis between Azospirillum and wheat, such as increasing the availability of microaerobic niches along the root, increased supply of carbon sources by the plant, and the retention of the bacterial cells in vegetative form for faster metabolism.

  19. Mutants with Enhanced Nitrogenase Activity in Hydroponic Azospirillum brasilense-Wheat Associations

    PubMed Central

    Pereg Gerk, Lily; Gilchrist, Kate; Kennedy, Ivan R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a mutation affecting flocculation, differentiation into cyst-like forms, and root colonization on nitrogenase expression by Azospirillum brasilense is described. The gene flcA of strain Sp7 restored these phenotypes in spontaneous mutants of both strains Sp7 and Sp245. Employing both constitutive pLA-lacZ and nifH-lacZ reporter fusions expressed in situ, the colony morphology, colonization pattern, and potential for nitrogenase activity of spontaneous mutants and flcA Tn5-induced mutants were established. The results of this study show that the ability of Sp7 and Sp245 mutant strains to remain in a vegetative form improved their ability to express nitrogenase activity in association with wheat in a hydroponic system. Restoring the cyst formation and colonization pattern to the spontaneous mutant Sp7-S reduced nitrogenase activity rates in association with plants to that of the wild-type Sp7. Although Tn5-induced flcA mutants showed higher potentials for nitrogenase expression than Sp7, their potentials were lower than that of Sp7-S, indicating that other factors in this strain contribute to its exceptional nitrogenase activity rates on plants. The lack of lateral flagella is not one of these factors, as Sp7-PM23, a spontaneous mutant impaired in swarming and lateral-flagellum production but not in flocculation, showed wild-type nitrogenase activity and expression. The results also suggest factors of importance in evolving an effective symbiosis between Azospirillum and wheat, such as increasing the availability of microaerobic niches along the root, increased supply of carbon sources by the plant, and the retention of the bacterial cells in vegetative form for faster metabolism. PMID:10788397

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana siRNA biogenesis mutants have the lower frequency of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are involved in the regulation of plant development and response to stress. We have previously shown that mutants impaired in Dicer-like 2 (DCL2), DCL3 and DCL4, RDR2, RDR6 and NPRD1 are partially impaired in their response to stress and dcl2 and dcl3 plants are also impaired in transgenerational response to stress, including changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Here, we have analyzed genome stability of dcl2, dcl3, dcl4, dcl2 dcl3, dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 and rdr6 mutants by measuring the non-induced and the stress-induced recombination frequency. We found that all mutants had the lower spontaneous HRF. The analysis of strand breaks showed that all tested Arabidopsis mutants had a higher level of spontaneous strand breaks, suggesting that the lower HRF is not due to the unusually low level of breaks. Exposure to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) resulted in an increase in the level of strand breaks in wild-type plants and a decrease in mutants. All mutants had the higher methylation of cytosines at CpG sites under non-induced conditions. Exposure to MMS resulted in a decrease in methylation level in wild-type plants and an increase in methylation in all dcl mutants. The expression of several DNA repair genes was altered in dcl4 plants under non-induced and induced conditions. Our data suggest that siRNA biogenesis may be essential for the maintenance of the genome stability and stress response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26901311

  1. Clinically Relevant Mutant DNA Gyrase Alters Supercoiling, Changes the Transcriptome, and Confers Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Mark A.; Ricci, Vito; Whitehead, Rebekah; Patel, Meha; Fookes, Maria; Ivens, Alasdair; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial DNA is maintained in a supercoiled state controlled by the action of topoisomerases. Alterations in supercoiling affect fundamental cellular processes, including transcription. Here, we show that substitution at position 87 of GyrA of Salmonella influences sensitivity to antibiotics, including nonquinolone drugs, alters global supercoiling, and results in an altered transcriptome with increased expression of stress response pathways. Decreased susceptibility to multiple antibiotics seen with a GyrA Asp87Gly mutant was not a result of increased efflux activity or reduced reactive-oxygen production. These data show that a frequently observed and clinically relevant substitution within GyrA results in altered expression of numerous genes, including those important in bacterial survival of stress, suggesting that GyrA mutants may have a selective advantage under specific conditions. Our findings help contextualize the high rate of quinolone resistance in pathogenic strains of bacteria and may partly explain why such mutant strains are evolutionarily successful. PMID:23882012

  2. Mutants of Streptomyces roseosporus that express enhanced recombination within partially homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Hosted, T J; Baltz, R H

    1996-10-01

    Streptomyces roseosporus mutants that express enhanced recombination between partially homologous (homeologous) sequences were isolated by selection for recombination between the bacteriophage phi C31 derivative KC570 containing the Streptomyces coelicolor glucose kinase (glk) gene and the S. roseosporus chromosome. The frequencies of homeologous recombination in the ehr mutants were determined by measuring the chromosomal insertion frequencies of plasmids containing S. coelicolor glnA or whiG genes. S. roseosporus ehr mutants showed 10(2)- to 10(4)-fold increases in homeologous recombination relative to Ehr+ strains, but no increase in homologous recombination. Southern hybridization analysis revealed single unique sites for the insertion of each of the plasmids, and the crossovers occurred in frame and in proper translational register, yielding functional chimeric glnA and whiG genes.

  3. Impairment of cobalt-induced riboflavin biosynthesis in a Debaryomyces hansenii mutant.

    PubMed

    Seda-Miró, Jasmine M; Arroyo-González, Nancy; Pérez-Matos, Ana; Govind, Nadathur S

    2007-11-01

    Flavinogenic yeasts such as Debaryomyces hansenii overproduce riboflavin (RF) in the presence of heavy metals. Growth and RF production were compared between wild-type D. hansenii and a RF production-impaired metal-tolerant ura3 mutant in the presence of sublethal cobalt(II) concentrations. Debaryomyces hansenii (wild type) exhibits an extended lag phase with an increase in RF synthesis. Supplementation of exogenous uracil shortened the lag phase at the highest concentration of cobalt(II) used, suggesting that uracil has a possible role in metal acclimation. The D. hansenii ura3 mutant isolated by chemical mutagenesis exhibited a higher level of metal tolerance, no extended lag phase, and no marked increase in RF synthesis. Transformation of the mutant with the URA3 gene isolated from Saccharyomyces cerevisiae or D. hansenii did not restore wild-type characteristics, suggesting a second mutation that impairs RF oversynthesis. Our results demonstrate that growth, metal sensitivity, and RF biosynthesis are linked. PMID:18026221

  4. Mutant-prevention concentration and mechanism of resistance in clinical isolates and enrofloxacin/marbofloxacin-selected mutants of Escherichia coli of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Gebru, Elias; Choi, Myung-Jin; Lee, Seung-Jin; Damte, Dereje; Park, Seung Chun

    2011-10-01

    The antibacterial activity and selection of resistant bacteria, along with mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance, were investigated by integrating the static [MIC or mutant-prevention concentration (MPC)] and in vitro dynamic model approaches using Escherichia coli isolates from diseased dogs. Using the dynamic models, selected E. coli strains and enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin at a range of simulated area under concentration-time curve over a 24 h interval (AUC(24 h))/MIC ratios were investigated. Our results indicated increasing losses in susceptibility of E. coli upon continuous exposure to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in vitro. This effect was transferable to other fluoroquinolones, as well as to structurally unrelated drugs. Our results also confirmed an AUC(24 h)/MIC (AUC(24 h)/MPC)-dependent antibacterial activity and selection of resistant E. coli mutants, in which maximum losses in fluoroquinolone susceptibility occurred at simulated AUC(24 h)/MIC ratios of 40-60. AUC(24 h)/MPC ratios of 39 (enrofloxacin) and 32 (marbofloxacin) were considered protective against the selection of resistant mutants of E. coli. Integrating our MIC and MPC data with published pharmacokinetic information in dogs revealed a better effect of the conventional dosing regimen of marbofloxacin than that of enrofloxacin in restricting the selection of resistant mutants of E. coli. Target mutations, especially at codon 83 (serine to leucine) of gyrA, and overexpression of efflux pumps contributed to resistance development in both clinically resistant and in vitro-selected mutants of E. coli. We also report here a previously undescribed mutation at codon 116 of parC in two laboratory-derived resistant mutants of E. coli. Additional studies would determine the exact role of this mutation in fluoroquinolone susceptibility, as well as establish the importance of our findings in the clinical setting.

  5. Recovery of a low mutant frequency after ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; Intano, Gabriel W; McCarrey, John R; Walter, Ronald B; McMahan, C Alex; Walter, Christi A

    2008-07-31

    Humans are exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) under various circumstances, e.g. cosmic radiation, diagnostic X-rays and radiotherapy for cancer. It has been shown that IR can impair spermatogenesis and can cause mutations in germ cells. However, the mutagenic responses of germ cells exposed to IR at different stages of testicular maturation have not been examined by directly assessing the mutant frequency in defined spermatogenic cell types. This study was performed to address whether preadult exposure to IR can increase mutations in adult germ cells that could in turn have a major impact on adult reproductive function and the health of ensuing offspring. Male Lac I transgenic mice were irradiated with a single dose of 2.5 Gy of gamma-ray at different ages before adulthood, reflecting different stages of testicular maturation, and then mutant frequency (MF) was determined directly in spermatogenic cell types emanating from the irradiated precursor cells. The results showed that (1) preadult exposure to IR did not significantly increase MF in adult epididymal spermatozoa; (2) spermatogenic stages immediately following the irradiated stage(s) displayed an elevated mutant frequency; but (3) the mutant frequency was restored to unirradiated levels in later stages of spermatogenesis. These findings provide evidence that there is a mechanism(s) to prevent spermatogenic cells with elevated mutant frequencies from progressing through spermatogenesis. PMID:18582597

  6. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  7. MIG6 is MEK-regulated and affects EGF-induced migration in mutant NRAS melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Ha Linh; Rosenbaum, Sheera; Capparelli, Claudia; Purwin, Timothy J.; Davies, Michael A.; Berger, Adam C.; Aplin, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in NRAS are frequent driver events in cutaneous melanoma. NRAS is a GTP-binding protein, whose most well-characterized downstream effector is RAF leading to activation of MEK-ERK1/2 signaling. While there are no FDA-approved targeted therapies for melanoma patients with a primary mutation in NRAS, one form of targeted therapy that has been explored is MEK inhibition. In clinical trials, MEK inhibitors have shown disappointing efficacy in mutant NRAS patients, the reasons for which are unclear. To explore the effects of MEK inhibitors in mutant NRAS melanoma, we utilized a high-throughput reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) platform to identify signaling alterations. RPPA analysis of phospho-proteomic changes in mutant NRAS melanoma in response to trametinib indicated a compensatory increase in AKT signaling and decreased expression of mitogen-inducible gene 6 (MIG6), a negative regulator of EGFR/ERBB receptors. MIG6 expression did not alter the growth or survival properties of mutant NRAS melanoma cells. Rather, we identified a role for MIG6 as a negative regulator of EGF-induced signaling and cell migration and invasion. In MEK inhibited cells, further depletion of MIG6 increased migration and invasion, whereas MIG6 expression decreased these properties. Therefore, a decrease in MIG6 may promote the migration and invasiveness of MEK-inhibited mutant NRAS melanoma especially in response to EGF stimulation. PMID:26967478

  8. [Mutant gene expression in murine aggregation chimeras. 5. The ocular retardation and fidget genes].

    PubMed

    Kindiakov, B N; Koniukhov, B V

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of ocular retardation (or) and fidget (fi) genes expression in 18 day old embryos, 10 and 20 day old or/or C/C----+/+ c/c and fi/fi or/or C/C----+/+ +/+ c/c mice has shown that genes or and fi are active in developing retina and suppress cell proliferation. Structural defects of retina and decrease in the eye size in the chimaeras, compared to the normal embryos, were observed already in the presence of 13-16% of mutant cells. As the fraction of mutant cells increased, the degree of eye disturbances increased as well. In the fi/fi or/or----+/+ +/+ chimaeras structural defects of retina and decrease in the eye size are more pronounced than in the or/or----+/+ chimaeras, due to the synergetical effect of both mutant genes in the fi/fi or/or cell clones. In the ontogenesis of the or/or----+/+ chimaeras the development of the retinal photoreceptor layer is normalized due to the substitution of mutant cells for actively proliferating normal cells. No metabolic cooperation between the mutant and normal cells was observed in the developing retina of chimaeras.

  9. Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii high-CO sub 2 -requiring mutants to limiting CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Spalding, M.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics of four high-CO{sub 2}-requiring mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were compared to those of wild type before and after a 24-hour exposure to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The four mutants represent two loci involved in the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system of this unicellular alga. All mutants had a lower photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon than did the wild type when grown at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration, indicating that the genetic lesion in each is expressed even at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Wild type and all four mutants exhibited adaptive responses to limiting CO{sub 2} characteristic of the induction of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system, resulting in an increased affinity for inorganic carbon only in wild type. Although other components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system were induced in these mutants, the defective component in each was sufficient to prevent any increase in the affinity for inorganic carbon. It was concluded that the genes corresponding to the ca-1 and pmp-1 loci exhibit at least partially constitutive expression and that all components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system may be required to significantly affect the photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon.

  10. A photorespiratory mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Marek, L.F.; Spalding, M.H. )

    1990-05-01

    A mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, designated 18-7F, has been isolated and characterized. 18-7F requires a high CO{sub 2} concentration for photoautrophic growth in spite of the apparent induction of a functional CO{sub 2} concentrating mechanism in air-adapted cells. In 2% O{sub 2} the photosynthetic characteristics of 18-7F and wild type are similar. In 21% O{sub 2}, photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution is severely inhibited in the mutant by preillumination in limiting CO{sub 2}, although the apparent photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon is similar in preilluminated cells and in cells incubated in the dark prior to O{sub 2} evolution measurements. Net CO{sub 2} uptake is also inhibited when the cells are exposed to air (21% O{sub 2}, 0.035% CO{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2}) for longer than a few minutes. ({sup 14}C)Phosphoglycolate accumulates within 5 minutes of photosynthetic {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation in cells of 18-7F. Phosphoglycolate does not accumulate in wild type. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase activity in extracts from air-adapted cells of 18-7F is 10 to 20% of that in wild-type Chlamydomonas. The activity of phosphoglycolate phosphatase in heterozygous diploids is intermediate between that of homozygous mutant and wild-type diploids. It was concluded that the high-CO{sub 2} requiring phenotype in 18-7F results from a phosphoglycolate phosphatase deficiency. Genetic analyses indicate that this deficiency results from a single-gene, nuclear mutation. We have named the locus pgp-1.

  11. A large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered salicylic acid accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yezhang; Shaholli, Danjela; Mou, Zhonglin

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key defense signal molecule against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens in plants, but how SA is synthesized in plant cells still remains elusive. Identification of new components involved in pathogen-induced SA accumulation would help address this question. To this end, we performed a large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered SA accumulation during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis using a bacterial biosensor Acinetobacter sp. ADPWH_lux-based SA quantification method. A total of 35,000 M2 plants in the npr1-3 mutant background have been individually analyzed for the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) ES4326-induced SA accumulation. Among the mutants isolated, 19 had SA levels lower than npr1 (sln) and two exhibited increased SA accumulation in npr1 (isn). Complementation tests revealed that seven of the sln mutants are new alleles of eds5/sid1, two are sid2/eds16 alleles, one is allelic to pad4, and the remaining seven sln and two isn mutants are new non-allelic SA accumulation mutants. Interestingly, a large group of mutants (in the npr1-3 background), in which Psm ES4326-induced SA levels were similar to those in the wild-type Columbia plants, were identified, suggesting that the signaling network fine-tuning pathogen-induced SA accumulation is complex. We further characterized the sln1 single mutant and found that Psm ES4326-induced defense responses were compromised in this mutant. These defense response defects could be rescued by exogenous SA, suggesting that SLN1 functions upstream of SA. The sln1 mutation was mapped to a region on the north arm of chromosome I, which contains no known genes regulating pathogen-induced SA accumulation, indicating that SLN1 likely encodes a new regulator of SA biosynthesis. Thus, the new sln and isn mutants identified in this genetic screen are valuable for dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen-induced SA accumulation in plants. PMID:25610446

  12. A large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered salicylic acid accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yezhang; Shaholli, Danjela; Mou, Zhonglin

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key defense signal molecule against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens in plants, but how SA is synthesized in plant cells still remains elusive. Identification of new components involved in pathogen-induced SA accumulation would help address this question. To this end, we performed a large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered SA accumulation during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis using a bacterial biosensor Acinetobacter sp. ADPWH_lux-based SA quantification method. A total of 35,000 M2 plants in the npr1-3 mutant background have been individually analyzed for the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) ES4326-induced SA accumulation. Among the mutants isolated, 19 had SA levels lower than npr1 (sln) and two exhibited increased SA accumulation in npr1 (isn). Complementation tests revealed that seven of the sln mutants are new alleles of eds5/sid1, two are sid2/eds16 alleles, one is allelic to pad4, and the remaining seven sln and two isn mutants are new non-allelic SA accumulation mutants. Interestingly, a large group of mutants (in the npr1-3 background), in which Psm ES4326-induced SA levels were similar to those in the wild-type Columbia plants, were identified, suggesting that the signaling network fine-tuning pathogen-induced SA accumulation is complex. We further characterized the sln1 single mutant and found that Psm ES4326-induced defense responses were compromised in this mutant. These defense response defects could be rescued by exogenous SA, suggesting that SLN1 functions upstream of SA. The sln1 mutation was mapped to a region on the north arm of chromosome I, which contains no known genes regulating pathogen-induced SA accumulation, indicating that SLN1 likely encodes a new regulator of SA biosynthesis. Thus, the new sln and isn mutants identified in this genetic screen are valuable for dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen-induced SA accumulation in plants. PMID:25610446

  13. Computational and Experimental Study of Neuroglobin and Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Lauren; Cho, Samuel; Kim-Shaprio, Daniel

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a hexacoordinated heme protein that is closely related to hemoglobin and myoglobin and normally found in the brain and nervous systems. It is involved in cellular oxygen homeostasis and reversibly binds to oxygen with a higher binding affinity than hemoglobin. To protect the brain tissue from hypoxic or ischemic conditions, Ngb increases oxygen availability. We have previously shown that a mutant form of Ngb reduces nitrite to nitric oxide 50x faster than myoglobin and 500x faster than hemoglobin. It also tightly binds to carbon monoxide (CO) with an association rate that is 500x faster than hemoglobin. To analyze the structure of neuroglobin and the characteristics causing these phenomena, we performed 3 sets of 1 microsecond molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of wild-type oxidized and reduced human Ngb and their C46A, C55A, H64L, and H64Q mutants. We also directly compare our MD simulations with time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. These studies will help identify treatments for diseases involving low nitric oxide availability and carbon monoxide poisoning. This research was supported by an NIH NSRA predoctoral fellowship in the Structural and Computational Biophysics Program training Grant (T32GM095440-05).

  14. Mutants of PC12 cells with altered cyclic AMP responses

    SciTech Connect

    Block, T.; Kon, C.; Breckenridge, B.M.

    1984-10-01

    PCl2 cells, derived from a rat pheochromocytoma, were mutagenized and selected in media containing agents known to elevate intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP (cAMP). More than 40 clones were isolated by selection with cholera toxin or 2-chloroadenosine or both. The variants that were deficient in accumulating cAMP were obtained by using a protocol in which 1 ..mu..m 8-bromo-cAMP was included in addition to the agonist. Certain of these variants were partially characterized with respect to the site of altered cAMP metabolism. The profiles of adenylate cyclase activity responsiveness of certain variants to guanosine-5'-(BETA,..gamma..-imido) triphosphate and to forskolin resembled those of UNC and cyc phenotypes of S49 lymphoma cells, which are functionally deficient in the GTP-sensitive coupling protein, N/sub s/. Other variants were characterized by increased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity at low substrate concentration. Diverse morphological traits were observed among the variants, but it was not possible to assign them to a particular cAMP phenotype. Two revertants of a PCl2 mutant were isolated and observed to have regained a cellular cAMP response to 2-chloroadenosine and to forskolin. It is hoped that these PCl2 mutants will have utility for defining cAMP-mediated functions, including any links to the action of nerve growth factor, in cells derived from the neural crest.

  15. Impairment in motor learning of somatostatin null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Zeyda, T; Diehl, N; Paylor, R; Brennan, M B; Hochgeschwender, U

    2001-07-01

    Somatostatin was first identified as a hypothalamic factor which inhibits the release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary (somatotropin release inhibitory factor, SRIF). Both SRIF and its receptors were subsequently found widely distributed within and outside the nervous system, in the adult as well as in the developing organism. Reflecting this wide distribution, somatostatin has been implicated regulating a diverse array of biological processes. These include body growth, homeostasis, sensory perception, autonomous functions, rate of intestinal absorption, behavior, including cognition and memory, and developmental processes. We produced null mutant mice lacking somatostatin through targeted mutagenesis. The mutant mice are healthy, fertile, and superficially indistinguishable from their heterozygous and wildtype littermates. A 'first round' phenotype screen revealed that mice lacking somatostatin have elevated plasma growth hormone levels, despite normal body size, and have elevated basal plasma corticosterone levels. In order to uncover subtle and unexpected differences, we carried out a systematic behavioral phenotype screen which identified a significant impairment in motor learning revealed when increased demands were made on motor coordination. Motor coordination and motor learning require an intact cerebellum. While somatostatin is virtually absent from the adult cerebellum, the ligand and its receptor(s) are transiently expressed at high levels in the developing cerebellum. This result suggests the functional significance of transient expression of SRIF and its receptors in the development of the cerebellum. PMID:11430867

  16. Treatment of MDR1 Mutant Dogs with Macrocyclic Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Joachim; Janko, Christina

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance gene MDR1, is an ATP-driven drug efflux pump which is highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier of vertebrates. Drug efflux of macrocyclic lactones by P-glycoprotein is highly relevant for the therapeutic safety of macrocyclic lactones, as thereby GABA-gated chloride channels, which are confined to the central nervous system in vertebrates, are protected from high drug concentrations that otherwise would induce neurological toxicity. A 4-bp deletion mutation exists in the MDR1 gene of many dog breeds such as the Collie and the Australian Shepherd, which results in the expression of a non-functional P-glycoprotein and is associated with multiple drug sensitivity. Accordingly, dogs with homozygous MDR1 mutation are in general prone to neurotoxicity by macrocyclic lactones due to their increased brain penetration. Nevertheless, treatment of these dogs with macrocyclic lactones does not inevitably result in neurological symptoms, since, the safety of treatment highly depends on the treatment indication, dosage, route of application, and the individual compound used as outlined in this review. Whereas all available macrocyclic lactones can safely be administered to MDR1 mutant dogs at doses usually used for heartworm prevention, these dogs will experience neurological toxicity following a high dose regimen which is common for mange treatment in dogs. Here, we review and discuss the neurotoxicological potential of different macrocyclic lactones as well as their treatment options in MDR1 mutant dogs. PMID:22039792

  17. JC polyomavirus mutants escape antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Ray, Upasana; Cinque, Paola; Gerevini, Simonetta; Longo, Valeria; Lazzarin, Adriano; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V

    2015-09-23

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) persistently infects the urinary tract of most adults. Under conditions of immune impairment, JCV causes an opportunistic brain disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV strains found in the cerebrospinal fluid of PML patients contain distinctive mutations in surface loops of the major capsid protein, VP1. We hypothesized that VP1 mutations might allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated neutralization. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutralization serology revealed that plasma samples from PML patients neutralized wild-type JCV strains but failed to neutralize patient-cognate PML-mutant JCV strains. This contrasted with serological results for healthy individuals, most of whom robustly cross-neutralized all tested JCV variants. Mice administered a JCV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine initially showed neutralizing "blind spots" (akin to those observed in PML patients) that closed after booster immunization. A PML patient administered an experimental JCV VLP vaccine likewise showed markedly increased neutralizing titer against her cognate PML-mutant JCV. The results indicate that deficient humoral immunity is a common aspect of PML pathogenesis and that vaccination may overcome this humoral deficiency. Thus, vaccination with JCV VLPs might prevent the development of PML.

  18. Taq DNA Polymerase Mutants and 2'-Modified Sugar Recognition.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Hayley J; Gochi, Andrea M; Chia, Hannah E; Ogonowsky, Alexie L; Chiang, Sharon; Filipovic, Nedim; Weiden, Aurora G; Hadley, Emma E; Gabriel, Sara E; Leconte, Aaron M

    2015-09-29

    Chemical modifications to DNA, such as 2' modifications, are expected to increase the biotechnological utility of DNA; however, these modified forms of DNA are limited by their inability to be effectively synthesized by DNA polymerase enzymes. Previous efforts have identified mutant Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Taq) enzymes capable of recognizing 2'-modified DNA nucleotides. While these mutant enzymes recognize these modified nucleotides, they are not capable of synthesizing full length modified DNA; thus, further engineering is required for these enzymes. Here, we describe comparative biochemical studies that identify useful, but previously uncharacterized, properties of these enzymes; one enzyme, SFM19, is able to recognize a range of 2'-modified nucleotides much wider than that previously examined, including fluoro, azido, and amino modifications. To understand the molecular origins of these differences, we also identify specific amino acids and combinations of amino acids that contribute most to the previously evolved unnatural activity. Our data suggest that a negatively charged amino acid at 614 and mutation of the steric gate residue, E615, to glycine make up the optimal combination for modified oligonucleotide synthesis. These studies yield an improved understanding of the mutational origins of 2'-modified substrate recognition as well as identify SFM19 as the best candidate for further engineering, whether via rational design or directed evolution. PMID:26334839

  19. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  20. Purification of a. beta. -amylase that accumulates in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism. [Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D.; Preiss, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Amylase activity is elevated 5- to 10-fold in leaves of several different Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism when they are grown under a 12-hour photoperiod. Activity is also increased when plants are grown under higher light intensity. It was previously determined that the elevated activity was an extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. Due to the location of this enzyme outside the chloroplast, its function is not known. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from leaves of both a starchless mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase and from the wild type using polyethylene glycol fractionation and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the {beta}-amylase from both sources was 55,000 daltons as determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration studies indicated that the enzyme was a monomer. The specific activities of the purified protein from mutant and wild-type sources, their substrate specificities, and K{sub m} for amylopectin were identical. Based on these results it was concluded that the mutant contained an increased level of {beta}-amylase protein. Enzyme neutralization studies using a polyclonal antiserum raised to purified {beta}-amylase showed that in each of two starchless mutants, one starch deficient mutant and one starch overproducing mutant, the elevated amylase activity was due to elevated {beta}-amylase protein.

  1. A Novel Two-Step Method for Screening Shade Tolerant Mutant Plants via Dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Krishnan, Sanalkumar; Thammina, Chandra; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Yer, Huseyin; Merewitz, Emily; Guillard, Karl; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J.; Liu, Zongrang; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    When subjected to shade, plants undergo rapid shoot elongation, which often makes them more prone to disease and mechanical damage. Shade-tolerant plants can be difficult to breed; however, they offer a substantial benefit over other varieties in low-light areas. Although perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is a popular species of turf grasses because of their good appearance and fast establishment, the plant normally does not perform well under shade conditions. It has been reported that, in turfgrass, induced dwarfism can enhance shade tolerance. Here we describe a two-step procedure for isolating shade tolerant mutants of perennial ryegrass by first screening for dominant dwarf mutants, and then screening dwarf plants for shade tolerance. The two-step screening process to isolate shade tolerant mutants can be done efficiently with limited space at early seedling stages, which enables quick and efficient isolation of shade tolerant mutants, and thus facilitates development of shade tolerant new cultivars of turfgrasses. Using the method, we isolated 136 dwarf mutants from 300,000 mutagenized seeds, with 65 being shade tolerant (0.022%). When screened directly for shade tolerance, we recovered only four mutants from a population of 150,000 (0.003%) mutagenized seeds. One shade tolerant mutant, shadow-1, was characterized in detail. In addition to dwarfism, shadow-1 and its sexual progeny displayed high degrees of tolerance to both natural and artificial shade. We showed that endogenous gibberellin (GA) content in shadow-1 was higher than wild-type controls, and shadow-1 was also partially GA insensitive. Our novel, simple and effective two-step screening method should be applicable to breeding shade tolerant cultivars of turfgrasses, ground covers, and other economically important crop plants that can be used under canopies of existing vegetation to increase productivity per unit area of land. PMID:27752260

  2. A human brain tumor-derived PDGFR-alpha deletion mutant is transforming.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I D; Dirks, P B

    2003-02-01

    Aberrant receptor tyrosine kinase signaling plays an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of brain tumors. We have been studying a previously identified human glioblastoma-derived PDGFR-alpha mutant that has an in-frame deletion in the extracellular domain, causing loss of exons 8 and 9 (PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)). In the primary tumor, this deletion mutant receptor was shown to be amplified and overexpressed. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression, activity, localization, and transformation properties of this deletion mutant. In the absence of serum, or PDGF-AA, PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, indicating ligand-independent autoactivation. Localization by staining and cell surface biotinylation studies revealed expression of the deletion mutant predominantly in the cytoplasm, with very little present on the cell surface. To determine if PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was oncogenic, we transfected wild-type and mutant receptors into Rat1 cells and performed analyses of cell growth, in vitro transformation, and subcutaneous growth in the nude mouse. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing cells displayed enhanced cell growth and survival in low serum, and formed foci in monolayer cultures. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing Rat1 cells were also tumorigenic when injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Expression of PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was also associated with increased c-Jun phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF ligand, demonstrating also that the mutant receptor is associated with altered intracellular signaling. These data demonstrate that PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) is transforming, and it is the first demonstration of a naturally occurring tumor-derived mutant PDGFR-alpha with oncogenic properties.

  3. A human brain tumor-derived PDGFR-alpha deletion mutant is transforming.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I D; Dirks, P B

    2003-02-01

    Aberrant receptor tyrosine kinase signaling plays an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of brain tumors. We have been studying a previously identified human glioblastoma-derived PDGFR-alpha mutant that has an in-frame deletion in the extracellular domain, causing loss of exons 8 and 9 (PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)). In the primary tumor, this deletion mutant receptor was shown to be amplified and overexpressed. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression, activity, localization, and transformation properties of this deletion mutant. In the absence of serum, or PDGF-AA, PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, indicating ligand-independent autoactivation. Localization by staining and cell surface biotinylation studies revealed expression of the deletion mutant predominantly in the cytoplasm, with very little present on the cell surface. To determine if PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was oncogenic, we transfected wild-type and mutant receptors into Rat1 cells and performed analyses of cell growth, in vitro transformation, and subcutaneous growth in the nude mouse. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing cells displayed enhanced cell growth and survival in low serum, and formed foci in monolayer cultures. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing Rat1 cells were also tumorigenic when injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Expression of PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was also associated with increased c-Jun phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF ligand, demonstrating also that the mutant receptor is associated with altered intracellular signaling. These data demonstrate that PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) is transforming, and it is the first demonstration of a naturally occurring tumor-derived mutant PDGFR-alpha with oncogenic properties. PMID:12569364

  4. Isolation and characterization of low-sulphur-tolerant mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Zhao, Qing; Gao, Lei; Yu, Xiao-Min; Fang, Ping; Oliver, David J.; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element for plant growth and development as well as for defence against biotic and abiotic stresses. Increasing sulphate utilization efficiency (SUE) is an important issue for crop improvement. Little is known about the genetic determinants of sulphate utilization efficiency. No gain-of-function mutants with improved SUE have been reported to date. Here the isolation and characterization of two low-sulphur-tolerant mutants, sue3 and sue4 are reported using a high-throughput genetic screen where a ‘sulphur-free’ solid medium was devised to give the selection pressure necessary to suppress the growth of the wild-type seedlings. Both mutants showed improved tolerance to low sulphur conditions and well-developed root systems. The mutant phenotype of both sue3 and sue4 was specific to sulphate deficiency and the mutants displayed enhanced tolerance to heavy metal and oxidative stress. Genetic analysis revealed that sue3 was caused by a single recessive nuclear mutation while sue4 was caused by a single dominant nuclear mutation. The recessive locus in sue3 is the previously identified VirE2-interacting Protein 1. The dominant locus in sue4 is a function-unknown locus activated by the four enhancers on the T-DNA. The function of SUE3 and SUE4 in low sulphur tolerance was confirmed either by multiple mutant alleles or by recapitulation analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this genetic screen is a reasonable approach to isolate Arabidopsis mutants with improved low sulphur tolerance and potentially with enhanced sulphate utilization efficiency. The two loci identified in sue3 and sue4 should assist in understanding the molecular mechanisms of low sulphur tolerance. PMID:20547563

  5. Simulations in evolution. II. Relative fitness and the propagation of mutants.

    PubMed

    Testa, Bernard; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2009-03-01

    In Neo-Darwinism, variation and natural selection are the two evolutionary mechanisms which propel biological evolution. Our previous article presented a histogram model [1] consisting in populations of individuals whose number changed under the influence of variation and/or fitness, the total population remaining constant. Individuals are classified into bins, and the content of each bin is calculated generation after generation by an Excel spreadsheet. Here, we apply the histogram model to a stable population with fitness F(1)=1.00 in which one or two fitter mutants emerge. In a first scenario, a single mutant emerged in the population whose fitness was greater than 1.00. The simulations ended when the original population was reduced to a single individual. The histogram model was validated by excellent agreement between its predictions and those of a classical continuous function (Eqn. 1) which predicts the number of generations needed for a favorable mutation to spread throughout a population. But in contrast to Eqn. 1, our histogram model is adaptable to more complex scenarios, as demonstrated here. In the second and third scenarios, the original population was present at time zero together with two mutants which differed from the original population by two higher and distinct fitness values. In the fourth scenario, the large original population was present at time zero together with one fitter mutant. After a number of generations, when the mutant offspring had multiplied, a second mutant was introduced whose fitness was even greater. The histogram model also allows Shannon entropy (SE) to be monitored continuously as the information content of the total population decreases or increases. The results of these simulations illustrate, in a graphically didactic manner, the influence of natural selection, operating through relative fitness, in the emergence and dominance of a fitter mutant.

  6. Isolation and characterization of low-sulphur-tolerant mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Zhao, Qing; Gao, Lei; Yu, Xiao-Min; Fang, Ping; Oliver, David J; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2010-07-01

    Sulphur is an essential element for plant growth and development as well as for defence against biotic and abiotic stresses. Increasing sulphate utilization efficiency (SUE) is an important issue for crop improvement. Little is known about the genetic determinants of sulphate utilization efficiency. No gain-of-function mutants with improved SUE have been reported to date. Here the isolation and characterization of two low-sulphur-tolerant mutants, sue3 and sue4 are reported using a high-throughput genetic screen where a 'sulphur-free' solid medium was devised to give the selection pressure necessary to suppress the growth of the wild-type seedlings. Both mutants showed improved tolerance to low sulphur conditions and well-developed root systems. The mutant phenotype of both sue3 and sue4 was specific to sulphate deficiency and the mutants displayed enhanced tolerance to heavy metal and oxidative stress. Genetic analysis revealed that sue3 was caused by a single recessive nuclear mutation while sue4 was caused by a single dominant nuclear mutation. The recessive locus in sue3 is the previously identified VirE2-interacting Protein 1. The dominant locus in sue4 is a function-unknown locus activated by the four enhancers on the T-DNA. The function of SUE3 and SUE4 in low sulphur tolerance was confirmed either by multiple mutant alleles or by recapitulation analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this genetic screen is a reasonable approach to isolate Arabidopsis mutants with improved low sulphur tolerance and potentially with enhanced sulphate utilization efficiency. The two loci identified in sue3 and sue4 should assist in understanding the molecular mechanisms of low sulphur tolerance.

  7. Plant resistance to fungal infection induced by nontoxic pokeweed antiviral protein mutants.

    PubMed

    Zoubenko, O; Uckun, F; Hur, Y; Chet, I; Tumer, N

    1997-10-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a 29-kD protein isolated from Phytolacca americana inhibits translation by catalytically removing a specific adenine residue from the large rRNA of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. Transgenic plants expressing PAP are resistant to a broad spectrum of plant viruses. Nontoxic PAP mutants have been isolated by random mutagenesis and selection in yeast. One of these mutants, PAP-X, had a point mutation at the active-site (E176V) that abolished enzymatic activity, and another mutant, delta C25PAP, had a nonsense mutation near the C-terminus (W237stop) that deleted 25 C-terminal amino acids. Unlike the wild-type PAP, expression of neither mutant was toxic to transgenic plants. We show that both class I (basic) and class II (acidic) isoforms of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are overexpressed in transgenic plants expressing PAP and the nontoxic PAP mutants. Although PR-proteins are constitutively expressed, no increase in salicylic acid levels was detected. Homozygous progeny of transgenic plants expressing either PAP or the nontoxic PAP mutants displayed resistance to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. These results show that expression of PAP or the nontoxic PAP mutants activates multiple plant defense pathways independently of salicylic acid and confers resistance to fungal infection. The C-terminal 25 amino acids of PAP, which are required for toxicity in vivo, are not critical for resistance to viral or fungal infection, indicating that toxicity of PAP can be separated from pathogen resistance.

  8. A tomato strigolactone-impaired mutant displays aberrant shoot morphology and plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Hinanit; LekKala, Sivarama P.; Bhattacharya, Chaitali; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Resnick, Nathalie; Wininger, Smadar; Dor, Evgenya; Yoneyama, Kaori; Yoneyama, Koichi; Hershenhorn, Joseph; Joel, Daniel M.; Kapulnik, Yoram

    2010-01-01

    Strigolactones are considered a new group of plant hormones. Their role as modulators of plant growth and signalling molecules for plant interactions first became evident in Arabidopsis, pea, and rice mutants that were flawed in strigolactone production, release, or perception. The first evidence in tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) of strigolactone deficiency is presented here. Sl-ORT1, previously identified as resistant to the parasitic plant Orobanche, had lower levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus intraradices) colonization, possibly as a result of its reduced ability to induce mycorrhizal hyphal branching. Biochemical analysis of mutant root extracts suggested that it produces only minute amounts of two of the tomato strigolactones: solanacol and didehydro-orobanchol. Accordingly, the transcription level of a key enzyme (CCD7) putatively involved in strigolactone synthesis in tomato was reduced in Sl-ORT1 compared with the wild type (WT). Sl-ORT1 shoots exhibited increased lateral shoot branching, whereas exogenous application of the synthetic strigolactone GR24 to the mutant restored the WT phenotype by reducing the number of lateral branches. Reduced lateral shoot branching was also evident in grafted plants which included a WT interstock, which was grafted between the mutant rootstock and the scion. In roots of these grafted plants, the CCD7 transcription level was not significantly induced, nor was mycorrhizal sensitivity restored. Hence, WT-interstock grafting, which restores mutant shoot morphology to WT, does not restore mutant root properties to WT. Characterization of the first tomato strigolactone-deficient mutant supports the putative general role of strigolactones as messengers of suppression of lateral shoot branching in a diversity of plant species. PMID:20194924

  9. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  10. Isolation of mouse cell proteoglycan mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, K.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    The sulfated proteoglycans on the surface of cultured mammalian cells have been implicated in a variety of phenomena. To obtain more direct evidence for the role of these molecules in specific cellular functions, they are isolating mutants that produce altered sulfated proteoglycans from a cloned line of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells. This cell type was selected because it exhibits contact inhibition of growth and there is extensive information on its' cell surface and extracellular proteoglycans and other glycoproteins. Cells were chemically mutagenized and subjected to one or more cycles of radiation suicide in the presence of /sup 35/S-sulfate. By replica plating, 150 clones, which appear to incorporate abnormal amounts of /sup 35/S-sulfate, have been selected. After recloning three times via the replica plating technique, the proteoglycans of 29 clones have thus far been analyzed. They have identified four clones which appear to make altered amounts of either cell surface heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate. The biochemical bases for the altered levels of the proteoglycans are under study. Of particular interest, however, is the fact that in this limited collection of mutants the chemical alterations correlate with specific altered cellular morphologies.

  11. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  12. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  13. Atnoa1 mutant Arabidopsis plants induce compensation mechanisms to reduce the negative effects of the mutation.

    PubMed

    Majláth, Imre; Szalai, Gabriella; Papp, István; Vanková, Radomíra; Janda, Tibor

    2011-07-15

    Alterations in temperature adaptation processes and changes in the content of stress-related compounds, polyamines and salicylic acid were evaluated in Atnoa1 (NO-associated 1) Arabidopsis mutant. The F(v)/F(m) chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction parameter and the actual quantum yield were significantly lower in the Atnoa1 mutant than in the wild-type. In the wild-type Col-0, the fastest increase in the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) occurred in plants pre-treated at low temperature (4 °C), while the slowest was in those adapted to 30 °C. The NPQ showed not only a substantially increased level in the light-adapted state, but also more rapid light induction after the dark-adapted state in the Atnoa1 mutant than in the wild-type. The results of freezing tests indicated that both the wild-type and the mutant had better freezing tolerance after cold hardening, since no significant differences were found between the genotypes. The level of putrescine increased substantially, while that of spermine decreased by the end of the cold-hardening (4°C, 4d) period. The quantity of spermidine in Atnoa1 was significantly higher than in Col-0, at both control and cold-hardening temperatures. A similar trend was observed for spermine, but only under control conditions. The mutant plants showed substantially higher salicylic acid (SA) contents for both the free and bound forms. This difference was significant not only in the control, but also in the cold-hardened plants. These results suggest that there is a compensation mechanism in Atnoa1 mutant Arabidopsis plants to reduce the negative effects of the mutation. These adaptation processes include the stimulation of photoprotection and alterations in the SA and polyamine compositions. PMID:21392840

  14. Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Defects in Acetate Metabolism: Isolation and Characterization of Acn(-) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn(-) (``ACetate Nonutilizing'') mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism. PMID:8878673

  15. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in acetate metabolism: isolation and characterization of Acn- mutants.

    PubMed

    McCammon, M T

    1996-09-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn- ("ACetate Nonutilizing") mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism.

  16. Mutants of Downy Mildew Resistance in Lactuca Sativa (Lettuce)

    PubMed Central

    Okubara, P. A.; Anderson, P. A.; Ochoa, O. E.; Michelmore, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    As part of our investigation of disease resistance in lettuce, we generated mutants that have lost resistance to Bremia lactucae, the casual fungus of downy mildew. Using a rapid and reliable screen, we identified 16 distinct mutants of Latuca sativa that have lost activity of one of four different downy mildew resistance genes (Dm). In all mutants, only a single Dm specificity was affected. Genetic analysis indicated that the lesions segregated as single, recessive mutations at the Dm loci. Dm3 was inactivated in nine of the mutants. One of five Dm1 mutants was selected from a population of untreated seeds and therefore carried a spontaneous mutation. All other Dm1, Dm3, Dm5/8 and Dm7 mutants were derived from γ- or fast neutron-irradiated seed. In two separate Dm1 mutants and in each of the eight Dm3 mutants analyzed, at least one closely linked molecular marker was absent. Also, high molecular weight genomic DNA fragments that hybridized to a tightly linked molecular marker in wild type were either missing entirely or were truncated in two of the Dm3 mutants, providing additional evidence that deletions had occurred in these mutants. Absence of mutations at loci epistatic to the Dm genes suggested that such loci were either members of multigene families, were critical for plant survival, or encoded components of duplicated pathways for resistance; alternatively, the genes determining downy mildew resistance might be limited to the Dm loci. PMID:8088530

  17. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-07-06

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis.

  18. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis. PMID:26143750

  19. In vivo mutations in human blood cells: biomarkers for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, R J; Nicklas, J A; Fuscoe, J C; Skopek, T R; Branda, R F; O'Neill, J P

    1993-01-01

    Mutations arising in vivo in recorder genes of human blood cells provide biomarkers for molecular epidemiology by serving as surrogates for cancer-causing genetic changes. Current markers include mutations of the glycophorin-A (GPA) or hemoglobin (Hb) genes, measured in red blood cells, or mutations of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) or HLA genes, measured in T-lymphocytes. Mean mutant frequencies (variant frequencies) for normal young adults are approximately: Hb (4 x 10(-8)) < hprt (5 x 10(-6)) = GPA (10 x 10(-6)) < HLA (30 x 10(-6)). Mutagen-exposed individuals show decided elevations. Molecular mutational spectra are also being defined. For the hprt marker system, about 15% of background mutations are gross structural alterations of the hprt gene (e.g., deletions); the remainder are point mutations (e.g., base substitutions or frameshifts). Ionizing radiations result in dose-related increases in total gene deletions. Large deletions may encompass several megabases as shown by co-deletions of linked markers. Possible hprt spectra for defining radiation and chemical exposures are being sought. In addition to their responsiveness to environmental mutagens/carcinogens, three additional findings suggest that the in vivo recorder mutations are relevant in vivo surrogates for cancer mutations. First, a large fraction of GPA and HLA mutations show exchanges due to homologous recombination, an important mutational event in cancer. Second, hprt mutations arise preferentially in dividing T-cells, which can accumulate additional mutations in the same clone, reminiscent of the multiple hits required in the evolution of malignancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8319611

  20. Biotransformation of ethanol to acetaldehyde by wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, O.M.; Sibirnyi, A.A.; Ksheminskaya, G.P. |

    1995-05-01

    The conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by intact cells of wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha was studied. It was established that mutations that lower the activity of aldehyde reductase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. The highest accumulation of acetaldehyde was found in a mutant that possessed increased alcohol oxidase activity in growth on a medium with glucose. A decrease in formaldehyde dehydrogenase did not stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. Bioconversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde was most effective at lowered temperatures due to marked suppression of catabolic alcohol oxidase inactivation, but not to the activity of this enzyme under indicated conditions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Engineered epidermal growth factor mutants with faster binding on-rates correlate with enhanced receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Jennifer L.; Lui, Bertrand H.; Beck, Stayce E.; Lee, Stephen S.; Ly, Daphne P.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate critical cell signaling pathways, yet the properties of their cognate ligands that influence receptor activation are not fully understood. There is great interest in parsing these complex ligand-receptor relationships using engineered proteins with altered binding properties. Here we focus on the interaction between two engineered epidermal growth factor (EGF) mutants and the EGF receptor (EGFR), a model member of the RTK superfamily. We found that EGF mutants with faster kinetic on-rates stimulate increased EGFR activation compared to wild-type EGF. These findings support previous predictions that faster association rates correlate with enhanced receptor activity. PMID:21439278

  2. A novel root gravitropism mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibiting altered auxin physiology.

    PubMed

    Simmons, C; Migliaccio, F; Masson, P; Caspar, T; Soll, D

    1995-01-01

    A root gravitropism mutant was isolated from the DuPont Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertional mutagenesis collection. This mutant has reduced root gravitropism, hence the name rgr1. Roots of rgr1 are shorter than those of wild-type, and they have reduced lateral root formation. In addition, roots of rgr1 coil clockwise on inclined agar plates, unlike wild-type roots which grow in a wavy pattern. The rgr1 mutant has increased resistance, as measured by root elongation, to exogenously applied auxins (6-fold to indole-3-acetic acid, 3-fold to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2-fold to napthyleneacetic acid). It is also resistant to polar auxin transport inhibitors (2-fold to triiodobenzoic acid and 3- to 5-fold to napthylphthalamic acid). The rgr1 mutant does not appear to be resistant to other plant hormone classes. When grown in the presence of 10(-7) M 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, rgr1 roots have fewer root hairs than wild type. All these rgr1 phenotypes are Mendelian recessives. Complementation tests indicate that rgr1 is not allelic to previously characterized agravitropic or auxin-resistant mutants. The rgr1 locus was mapped using visible markers to 1.4 +/- 0.6 map units from the CH1 locus at 1-65.4. The rgr1 mutation and the T-DNA cosegregate, suggesting that rgr1 was caused by insertional gene inactivation.

  3. [Genetic analysis of maize cytoplasmic male sterile mutants obtained by space flight].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai-Bo; Yuan, Guo-Zhao; Wang, Jing; Pan, Guang-Tang; Rong, Ting-Zhao; Cao, Mo-Ju

    2011-02-01

    Three maize male sterile mutants were obtained from the offsprings of two maize inbred lines 18-599 and 08-641, which were carried into space by the Shijian 8 Satellite. The stability of male sterile expression was observed in different locations, years, and seasons. In order to analyze the genetic characteristic of male sterility, testcross, backcross and reciprocal cross were made with these male sterile plants. The results showed that the male sterility character was stable in different locations, years, and seasons, and the sterility was inheritable. Because the maintainer lines and restorer lines for these sterile materials were found, and there was no male sterile plant separated among the reciprocal cross F2. Thus, we concluded that these mutants could be cytoplasmic male sterile. Combining the results of male fertility restoration test and PCR analysis, we could conclude that the three male sterile mutants were classified into the CMS-C type in maize. Owing to their difference in fertility restoration, these mutants may belong to different subgroups of CMS-C type. The discovery of the three male sterile mutants increased the genetic diversity of CMS-C type, improved the tolerance to Bipolaris maydis, and laid a foundation for extensive application of CMS-C in seeds production.

  4. Oxysterol-binding protein ORP3 rescues the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked mutant VAPB phenotype.

    PubMed

    Darbyson, Angie; Ngsee, Johnny K

    2016-02-01

    A mutation in VAPB causes a familial form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. The mutant protein (VAPB-P56S) is aggregate prone and blocks retrograde traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) including trafficking to the nuclear envelope (NE). Here we report a morphological screen where overexpression of oxysterol binding protein-related protein-3 (ORP3) rescued the mutant VAPB phenotype. It resolved the mutant VAPB-induced membrane expansions, restored solubility of the mutant protein in non-ionic detergent, and restored trafficking of Emerin to the NE. Knockdown of ORP3 or VAPB increased the intracellular level of phosphatidylinosit