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Sample records for increase low-density lipoprotein

  1. Pistachio intake increases high density lipoprotein levels and inhibits low-density lipoprotein oxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Nur; Aksoy, Mehmet; Bagci, Cahit; Gergerlioglu, H Serdar; Celik, Hakim; Herken, Emine; Yaman, Abdullah; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet; Soydinc, Serdar; Sari, Ibrahim; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2007-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that nuts have protective effects against coronary artery disease by improving lipid profile and inhibiting lipid oxidation. However, data about pistachio nuts are limited, and to our knowledge, there is no study investigating the effects of pistachio intake on lipid oxidation and serum antioxidant levels. This study, therefore, sought to determine the effects of pistachio intake on serum lipids and determine whether consumption of pistachio would alter serum antioxidant levels. Rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=12 for each): control group fed basic diet for 10 weeks and treated groups fed basic diet plus pistachio which constituted 20% and 40% of daily caloric intake, respectively. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and decreased total cholesterol (TC)/HDL ratio, compared with those not taking pistachio. However, TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by pistachio consumption. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased serum paraoxonase activity by 35% and arylesterase activity by 60%, which are known to inhibit LDL cholesterol oxidation, compared with the control group. However, increased antioxidant activity was blunted when pistachio intake was increased to 40% of daily caloric intake. In conclusion, the present results show that consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake leads to significant improvement in HDL and TC/HDL ratio and inhibits LDL cholesterol oxidation. These results suggest that pistachio may be beneficial for both prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease.

  2. Interleukin-10 Deficiency Increases Atherosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Low-density Lipoproteins in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Rudling, Mats; Ollivier, Véronique; Jacob, Marie-Paule; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Hansson, Göran K; Nicoletti, Antonino

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that may play a protective role in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of IL-10 deficiency in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse. Apolipoprotein E deficient (E−/−) and IL-10 deficient (−/−) mice were crossed to generate E−/− × IL-10−/− double knockout mice. By 16 wk, cholesterol and triglycerides were similar in double and single knockouts but the lack of IL-10 led to increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol whereas very-low-density lipoprotein was reduced. In parallel, T-helper 1 responses and lesion size were dramatically increased in double knockout compared with E−/− controls. At 48 wk, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue factor activities were increased in lesions of double-knockout mice. Furthermore, markers of systemic coagulation were increased, and vascular thrombosis in response to i.v. thrombin occurred more frequently in E−/− × IL-10−/− than in E−/− mice. Our findings suggest that IL-10 deficiency plays a deleterious role in atherosclerosis. The early phase of lesion development was increased, and the proteolytic and procoagulant activity was elevated in advanced lesions. These data show that IL-10 may reduce atherogenesis and improve the stability of plaques. PMID:12765335

  3. Increased low density lipoprotein degradation in aorta of irradiated mice is inhibited by preenrichment of low density lipoprotein with alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Tribble, D L; Krauss, R M; Chu, B M; Gong, E L; Kullgren, B R; Nagy, J O; La Belle, M

    2000-10-01

    We previously reported that upper thoracic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) accelerates fatty streak formation in C57BL/6 mice and that such effects are inhibited by overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD). Notably, IR-accelerated lesion formation is strictly dependent on a high fat diet (i.e., atherogenic lipoproteins) but does not involve alterations in circulating lipid or lipoprotein levels. We thus proposed that IR promotes changes in the artery wall that enhance the deposition of lipoprotein lipids. To address this hypothesis, we examined the effects of IR on aortic accumulation and degradation of low density lipoproteins (LDL). Ten-week-old C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single (8-Gy) dose of (60)Co radiation to the upper thoracic area or were sham irradiated (controls) and were then placed on the high fat diet. Five days postexposure, the mice received either (125)I-labeled LDL ((125)I-LDL) (which was used to measure intact LDL) or (125)I-labeled tyramine cellobiose ((125)I-TC)-LDL (which was used to measure both intact and cell-degraded LDL) via tail vein injection. On the basis of trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable counts in retroorbital blood samples, > or =95% of donor LDL was cleared within 24 h and there were no differences in time-averaged plasma concentrations of the two forms of LDL among irradiated and control mice. Aortic values increased markedly within the first hour and thereafter exhibited a slow increase up to 24 h. There were no differences between irradiated and control mice at 1 h, when values primarily reflected LDL entry, but a divergence was observed thereafter. At 24 h, (125)I-TC-associated counts were 1.8-fold higher in irradiated mice (P = 0.10). In contrast, (125)I-LDL-associated counts were 30% lower in irradiated mice (P< 0.05), suggesting that most of the retained (125)I-TC was associated with LDL degradation products. Consistent with the proposed involvement of oxidative or redox

  4. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases acetylcholinesterase activity correlating with reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Yamchuen, Panit; Aimjongjun, Sathid; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2014-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their oxidized forms, and oxidative stress are suspected to be a key combination in the onset of AD and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a part in this pathology. The present study aimed to link these parameters using differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in culture. Both mildly and fully oxidized human LDL (mox- and fox-LDL), but not native (non-oxidized) LDL were cytotoxic in dose- and time-dependent patterns and this was accompanied by an increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidized LDL (10-200 μg/mL) augmented AChE activity after 4 and 24h treatments, respectively while the native LDL was without effect. The increased AChE with oxidized LDLs was accompanied by a proportionate increase in intracellular ROS formation (R=0.904). These findings support the notion that oxidized LDLs are cytotoxic and that their action on AChE may reduce central cholinergic transmission in AD and affirm AChE as a continued rational for anticholinesterase therapy but in conjunction with antioxidant/antihyperlipidemic cotreatments.

  5. Electronegative Low-density Lipoprotein Increases Coronary Artery Disease Risk in Uremia Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Wang, Guei-Jane; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Lee, An-Sean; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Shen, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Stancel, Nicole; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the general population, but its role in the development of CAD in uremia patients is unknown. L5 is the most electronegative subfraction of LDL isolated from human plasma. In this study, we examined the distribution of L5 (L5%) and its association with CAD risk in uremia patients. The LDL of 39 uremia patients on maintenance hemodialysis and 21 healthy controls was separated into 5 subfractions, L1–L5, with increasing electronegativity. We compared the distribution and composition of plasma L5 between uremia patients and controls, examined the association between plasma L5% and CAD risk in uremia patients, and studied the effects of L5 from uremia patients on endothelial function. Compared to controls, uremia patients had significantly increased L5% (P < 0.001) and L5 that was rich in apolipoprotein C3 and triglycerides. L5% was significantly higher in uremia patients with CAD (n = 10) than in those without CAD (n = 29) (P < 0.05). Independent of other major CAD risk factors, the adjusted odds ratio for CAD was 1.88 per percent increase in plasma L5% (95% CI, 1.01–3.53), with a near-linear dose–response relationship. Compared with controls, uremia patients had decreased flow-mediated vascular dilatation. In ex vivo studies with preconstricted rat thoracic aortic rings, L5 from uremia patients inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation. In cultured human endothelial cells, L5 inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and induced endothelial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that elevated plasma L5% may induce endothelial dysfunction and play an important role in the increased risk of CAD in uremia patients. PMID:26765403

  6. Increased uptake of alpha-hydroxy aldehyde-modified low density lipoprotein by macrophage scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Heinecke, J W; Chait, A

    2000-07-01

    Reactive aldehydes can be formed during the oxidation of lipids, glucose, and amino acids and during the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified with malondialdehyde are taken up by scavenger receptors on macrophages. In the current studies we determined whether alpha-hydroxy aldehydes also modify LDL to a form recognized by macrophage scavenger receptors. LDL modified by incubation with glycolaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, erythrose, arabinose, or glucose (alpha-hydroxy aldehydes that possess two, three, four, five, and six carbon atoms, respectively) exhibited decreased free amino groups and increased mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis. The lower the molecular weight of the aldehyde used for LDL modification, the more rapid and extensive was the derivatization of free amino groups. Approximately 50-75% of free lysine groups in LDL were modified after incubation with glyceraldehyde, glycolaldehyde, or erythrose for 24-48 h. Less extensive reductions in free amino groups were observed when LDL was incubated with arabinose or glucose, even at high concentration for up to 5 days. LDL modified with glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde labeled with (125)I was degraded more extensively by human monocyte-derived macrophages than was (125)I-labeled native LDL. Conversely, LDL modified with (125)I-labeled erythrose, arabinose, or glucose was degraded less rapidly than (125)I-labeled native LDL. Competition for the degradation of LDL modified with (125)I-labeled glyceraldehyde was nearly complete with acetyl-, glycolaldehyde-, and glyceraldehyde-modified LDL, fucoidin, and advanced glycation end product-modified bovine serum albumin, and absent with unlabeled native LDL. These results suggest that short-chain alpha-hydroxy aldehydes react with amino groups on LDL to yield moieties that are important determinants of recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors.

  7. Increased expression of apolipoprotein E in transgenic rabbits results in reduced levels of very low density lipoproteins and an accumulation of low density lipoproteins in plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, J; Ji, Z S; Huang, Y; de Silva, H; Sanan, D; Mahley, R W; Innerarity, T L; Taylor, J M

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic rabbits expressing human apo E3 were generated to investigate mechanisms by which apo E modulates plasma lipoprotein metabolism. Compared with nontransgenic littermates expressing approximately 3 mg/dl of endogenous rabbit apo E, male transgenic rabbits expressing approximately 13 mg/dl of human apo E had a 35% decrease in total plasma triglycerides that was due to a reduction in VLDL levels and an absence of large VLDL. With its greater content of apo E, transgenic VLDL had an increased binding affinity for the LDL receptor in vitro, and injected chylomicrons were cleared more rapidly by the liver in transgenic rabbits. In contrast to triglyceride changes, transgenic rabbits had a 70% increase in plasma cholesterol levels due to an accumulation of LDL and apo E-rich HDL. Transgenic and control LDL had the same binding affinity for the LDL receptor. Both transgenic and control rabbits had similar LDL receptor levels, but intravenously injected human LDL were cleared more slowly in transgenic rabbits than in controls. Changes in lipoprotein lipolysis did not contribute to the accumulation of LDL or the reduction in VLDL levels. These observations suggest that the increased content of apo E3 on triglyceride-rich remnant lipoproteins in transgenic rabbits confers a greater affinity for cell surface receptors, thereby increasing remnant clearance from plasma. The apo E-rich large remnants appear to compete more effectively than LDL for receptor-mediated binding and clearance, resulting in delayed clearance and the accumulation of LDL in plasma. PMID:9593771

  8. Role of low-density lipoprotein apheresis.

    PubMed

    Ziajka, Paul

    2005-08-22

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis has been shown to reduce plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a). In addition to these lipoprotein changes, LDL apheresis induces atherosclerosis regression, improves myocardial perfusion and endothelial function, and may reduce cardiovascular event rates. PMID:16098847

  9. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  10. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mazière, Cécile; Salle, Valéry; Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  11. Metabolic abnormalities: triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M; Siri, Patty W

    2004-06-01

    Increased plasma triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are key features of the metabolic syndrome. Although elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is not an integral characteristic of this syndrome, there is commonly an increase in the proportion of small, dense low-density lipoprotein particles. Together, these abnormalities constitute the atherogenic dyslipidemia of the metabolic syndrome. This article reviews the pathophysiology of altered triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein metabolism in the metabolic syndrome, outlines the relationship of these lipoprotein abnormalities to increased risk of coronary heart disease,and highlights the application of this information to clinical practice. The role of reduced high-density lipoprotein in the metabolic syndrome is discussed elsewhere in this issue.

  12. [Atherogenic modification of low-density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Sukhorukov, V N; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2016-05-01

    One of the first manifestations of atherosclerosis is accumulation of extra- and intracellular cholesterol esters in the arterial intima. Formation of foam cells is considered as a trigger in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) circulating in human blood is the source of lipids accumulated in the arterial walls. This review considered features and role in atherogenesis different modified forms of LDL: oxidized, small dense, electronegative and especially desialylated LDL. Desialylated LDL of human blood plasma is capable to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells and it is atherogenic. LDL possesses numerous alterations of protein, carbohydrate and lipid moieties and therefore can be termed multiple-modified LDL. Multiple modification of LDL occurs in human blood plasma and represents a cascade of successive changes in the lipoprotein particle: desialylation, loss of lipids, reduction in the particle size, increase of surface electronegative charge, etc. In addition to intracellular lipid accumulation, stimulatory effects of naturally occurring multiple-modified LDL on other processes involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, namely cell proliferation and fibrosis, were shown. PMID:27562992

  13. Rapid Increase in Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration during Hepatitis C Interferon-Free Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abiru, Seigo; Komori, Atsumasa; Nagaoka, Shinya; Saeki, Akira; Uchida, Shinjiro; Bekki, Shigemune; Kugiyama, Yuki; Nagata, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Minoru; Migita, Kiyoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim We performed lipid analyses at the early period of therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C who underwent interferon (IFN)-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment, and we attempted to identify the factors that contributed to a rapid increase in the patients’ serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the cases of 100 consecutive patients with HCV infection treated at the National Hospital Organization Nagasaki Medical Center: 24 patients underwent daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) combination therapy (DCV/ASV) for 24 weeks, and the other 76 patients underwent ledipasvir and sofosbuvir combination therapy (LDV/SOF) for 12 weeks. ΔLDL-C was defined as the changed in LDL-C level at 28 days from the start of therapy. To determine whether ΔLDL-C was associated with several kinds of factors including viral kinetics, we performed a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Results The LDL-C levels in patients treated with LDV/SOF were markedly and significantly elevated (87.45 to 122.5 mg/dl; p<10−10) compared to those in the DCV/ASV-treated patients (80.15 to 87.8 mg/dl; p = 0.0056). The median levels of ΔLDL-C in the LDV/SOF and DCV/ASV groups were 33.2 and 13.1, respectively. LDV/SOF combination therapy as an IFN-free regimen (p<0.001) and ΔHCV core antigen (0–1 day drop) (p<0.044) were identified as independent factors that were closely related to the ΔLDL-C. Conclusions A rapid increase in the serum LDL-C concentration during the IFN-free treatment of hepatitis C was associated with the type of HCV therapy and a decline of HCV core protein. PMID:27680885

  14. Increased Free Cholesterol in Plasma Low and Very Low Density Lipoproteins in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Its Role in the Inhibition of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Christopher J.; Reaven, Gerald M.; Liu, George; Fielding, Phoebe E.

    1984-04-01

    Recombination of low and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL and LDL) from normal subjects with plasma from patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus significantly increased the reduced rate of transfer of cholesteryl ester to these lipoproteins, which is characteristic of diabetic plasma, whereas diabetic VLDL and LDL reduced cholesteryl ester transfer rates in normal plasma. VLDL and LDL from diabetic plasma had an increased ratio of free cholesterol to phospholipid compared to normal, and unlike normal VLDL and LDL spontaneously lost free cholesterol to high density lipoprotein. These data suggest that the block to cholesteryl ester transfer to these lipoproteins in non-insulin-dependent diabetes is mediated by their increased free cholesterol content and may be related to the increased risk of these patients for developing atherosclerosis.

  15. Why are low-density lipoproteins atherogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Young, S G; Parthasarathy, S

    1994-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) carry most of the cholesterol in human plasma, and high levels of LDL cholesterol clearly cause heart disease. In recent years, many scientists have focused on elucidating the pathophysiologic steps that lie between elevated levels of LDL in the plasma and atherosclerotic plaques in the arterial wall. A large number of scientific studies indicate that oxidation of LDL within the arterial wall may be an important early step in atherogenesis. The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a likely explanation for the formation of macrophage foam cells in early atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, oxidized LDL has many other potentially proatherogenic properties. Images PMID:8160466

  16. Charge properties of low density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    La Belle, M; Blanche, P J; Krauss, R M

    1997-04-01

    Measurements of electrophoretic mobility and particle size of low density lipoproteins (LDL) allowed use of standard electrokinetic theory to quantitate LDL charge characteristics from subjects with predominance of large LDL (pattern A, n = 9) or small LDL (pattern B, n = 8). Pattern A LDL was found to have significantly lower (P < or = 0.001) mobility (-0.22 +/- 0.01 micron s-1 cm V-1), surface potential (-4.2 +/- 0.3 mV) and charge density (-500 +/- 34 esu/cm2) than pattern B LDL (-0.25 +/- 0.01 micron s-1 cm V-1, -4.9 +/- 0.3 mV, and -580 +/- 30 esu/cm2), but no significant difference in particle valence (-22.0 +/- 1.4 for pattern A vs. -21.8 +/- 1.9 for pattern B). Thus, the greater mobility of pattern B LDL is due to similar net charge residing on a smaller particle. Comparison of subfractions in pattern B relative to pattern A LDL revealed greater surface potential in all pattern B subfractions and greater charge density in fractions of d > or = 1.032 g/ml. In a subset of subjects incubation with neuraminidase produced significant reductions in all LDL charge parameters for all subfractions, but did not abolish the differences between pattern A and B. Thus increased surface potential and charge density of unfractionated pattern B LDL is due both to charge properties of particles across the size and density spectrum as well as enrichment of pattern B LDL with smaller, denser particles that have higher surface charge density.

  17. Testosterone increases the muscle protein synthesis rate but does not affect very-low-density lipoprotein metabolism in obese premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Smith, Gordon I.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Kampelman, Janine; Magkos, Faidon

    2012-01-01

    Men and women with hyperandrogenemia have a more proatherogenic plasma lipid profile [e.g., greater triglyceride (TG) and total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations] than healthy premenopausal women. Furthermore, castration of male rats markedly reduces testosterone availability below normal and decreases plasma TG concentration, and testosterone replacement reverses this effect. Testosterone is, therefore, thought to be an important regulator of plasma lipid homeostasis. However, little is known about the effect of testosterone on plasma TG concentration and kinetics. Furthermore, testosterone is a potent skeletal muscle protein anabolic agent in men, but its effect on muscle protein turnover in women is unknown. We measured plasma lipid concentrations, hepatic very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 secretion rates, and the muscle protein fractional synthesis rate in 10 obese women before and after trandermal testosterone (1.25 g of 1% AndroGel daily) treatment for 3 wk. Serum total and free testosterone concentrations increased (P < 0.05) by approximately sevenfold in response to testosterone treatment, reaching concentrations that are comparable to those in women with hyperandrogenemia, but lower than the normal range for eugonadal men. Except for a small (∼10%) decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein particle and cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.04), testosterone therapy had no effect on plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein particle sizes, and hepatic VLDL-TG and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 secretion rates (all P > 0.05); the muscle protein fractional synthesis rate, however, increased by ∼45% (P < 0.001). We conclude that testosterone is a potent skeletal muscle protein anabolic agent, but not an important regulator of plasma lipid homeostasis in obese women. PMID:22252942

  18. The antigenic similarity of human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    LEVINE, L; KAUFFMAN, D L; BROWN, R K

    1955-08-01

    THE FOLLOWING HUMAN LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS WERE PREPARED: beta-lipoproteins of densities greater than 1.040 (A, B,C) a beta-lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 5 (D), a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 19 (E), and a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 70 (F). Data are presented which show the immunochemical homogeneity of the D lipoprotein rabbit-anti-D lipoprotein system. Cross-reactions between antibody to A and D lipoproteins and the above lipoproteins have been demonstrated by quantitative precipitation, quanitative complement fixation, and single and double diffusion in agar. The antigenic similarities appear to be associated with the protein portions of the molecule. The antisera produced did not differentiate the low density lipoprotein classes. PMID:13242737

  19. Esterification of Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Human Fibroblasts and Its Absence in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Brown, Michael S.

    1974-01-01

    A new mechanism is described for the cellular esterification of cholesterol derived from extra-cellular lipoproteins. Incubation of monolayers of cultured fibroblasts from normal human subjects with low density lipoproteins led to a 30- to 40-fold increase in the rate of incorporation of either [14C]acetate or [14C]oleate into the fatty acid fraction of cholesteryl [14C]esters. This stimulation of cholesteryl ester formation by low density lipoproteins occurred despite the fact that endogenous synthesis of free cholesterol was completely suppressed by the lipoprotein. Thus, exogenous cholesterol contained in low density lipoproteins, rather than endogenously synthesized sterol, appeared to provide the cholesterol substrate for this cellular esterfication process. High density lipoproteins and the lipoprotein-deficient fraction of serum neither stimulated cholesteryl ester formation nor inhibited cholesterol synthesis. Both the low density lipoprotein-dependent increase in cholesterol esterification and decrease in free cholesterol synthesis required the interaction of the lipoprotein with its recently described cell surface receptor. Cells from homozygotes with familial hypercholesterolemia, which lack specific low density lipoprotein receptors, showed neither lipoprotein-dependent cholesterol esterification nor suppression of cholesterol synthesis. The reciprocal changes in free cholesterol synthesis and cholesteryl ester formation produced by low density lipoprotein-receptor interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the cholesterol content of mammalian cells. PMID:4373706

  20. Esterification of low density lipoprotein cholesterol in human fibroblasts and its absence in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J L; Dana, S E; Brown, M S

    1974-11-01

    A new mechanism is described for the cellular esterification of cholesterol derived from extra-cellular lipoproteins. Incubation of monolayers of cultured fibroblasts from normal human subjects with low density lipoproteins led to a 30- to 40-fold increase in the rate of incorporation of either [(14)C]acetate or [(14)C]oleate into the fatty acid fraction of cholesteryl [(14)C]esters. This stimulation of cholesteryl ester formation by low density lipoproteins occurred despite the fact that endogenous synthesis of free cholesterol was completely suppressed by the lipoprotein. Thus, exogenous cholesterol contained in low density lipoproteins, rather than endogenously synthesized sterol, appeared to provide the cholesterol substrate for this cellular esterfication process. High density lipoproteins and the lipoprotein-deficient fraction of serum neither stimulated cholesteryl ester formation nor inhibited cholesterol synthesis. Both the low density lipoprotein-dependent increase in cholesterol esterification and decrease in free cholesterol synthesis required the interaction of the lipoprotein with its recently described cell surface receptor. Cells from homozygotes with familial hypercholesterolemia, which lack specific low density lipoprotein receptors, showed neither lipoprotein-dependent cholesterol esterification nor suppression of cholesterol synthesis. The reciprocal changes in free cholesterol synthesis and cholesteryl ester formation produced by low density lipoprotein-receptor interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the cholesterol content of mammalian cells.

  1. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  2. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  3. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-12

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  4. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  5. Hemodynamics alter arterial low-density lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Warty, V.S.; Calvo, W.J.; Berceli, S.A.; Pham, S.M.; Durham, S.J.; Tanksale, S.K.; Klein, E.C.; Herman, I.M.; Borovetz, H.S. )

    1989-10-01

    We have investigated the role of hemodynamic factors on low-density lipoprotein transport and metabolism in the intact arterial wall. Freshly excised canine carotid blood vessels were exposed to well-defined pulsatile flow in vitro for continuous periods up to 20 hours. We chose to impose the following hemodynamic conditions on our test carotid arteries: normotension, hypertension (at physiologic flow conditions), and hypertension coupled with elevated flow of canine serum perfusate. In several experiments the effect of endothelial denudation was examined in carotid arteries exposed to normotensive pulsatile flow. A trapped ligand method was used for quantitating low-density lipoprotein uptake and metabolism in the arterial wall. The distribution of both intact and degraded low-density lipoprotein fractions was determined from measurements of radiolabelled low-density lipoprotein activity within thin radial sections of perfused arteries. Our results suggest that both hypertensive hemodynamic simulations exacerbate the uptake of low-density lipoprotein within the arterial wall (by a factor of three to nine). The percentage of low-density lipoprotein that undergoes irreversible degradation falls from 41% under normotensive conditions to below 30% when hypertensive conditions are imposed, indicating that degradative processes are not proportionally elevated with the accelerated influx. A similar pattern is observed for deendothelialized vessels.

  6. Dense low density lipoproteins and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1995-02-23

    A common, genetically influenced lipoprotein subclass profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with relative increases in plasma triglyceride and apolipoprotein (apo) B-100, and reduced levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and apoAI. Recently, this phenotype has also been associated with the insulin resistance syndrome and familial combined hyperlipidemia. Case-control studies of patients with myocardial infarction and angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD) have demonstrated that 40-50% of patients have the small, dense LDL phenotype and that this is associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in disease risk. However, because of strong statistical correlations among the multiple features of the phenotype, it has been difficult to determine whether > or = 1 of its metabolic alterations are primarily responsible for increased CAD susceptibility. More direct evidence for enhanced atherogenicity of lipoproteins in this trait derives from a recent report that LDL-cholesterol lowering by diet and drug treatment resulted in reduced coronary angiographic progression in CAD subjects with predominantly dense LDL, but that an equivalent lowering of LDL cholesterol in subjects with more buoyant LDL was not associated with angiographic benefit. Further, in vitro findings have indicated increased susceptibility of small, dense LDL to oxidative modification and relatively greater binding of these particles to arterial wall proteoglycans. Thus, the small, dense LDL trait may underlie familial predisposition to CAD in a large proportion of the population, and its presence may indicate the potential for benefit from specific therapeutic interventions.

  7. The hypertriglyceridemia of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is associated with an increased prevalence of low density lipoprotein subclass pattern B

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Krauss, R.M.; Pang, M.; Doerrler, W.; Jensen, P.; Grunfeld, C. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1993-06-01

    To better define the role of environmental factors on LDL phenotypic expression, the authors determined LDL patterns in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and infection characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and weight loss. Similar to previous studies, plasma triglyceride levels were increased, whereas plasma cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol levels were decreased in the AIDS subjects compared to those in age-matched controls. The percentage of AIDS subjects with the LDL B phenotype was increased 2.5-fold, demonstrating an increased prevalence of the LDL B phenotype in an acquired form of hypertriglyceridemia. For each LDL phenotype in AIDS, serum triglyceride levels were higher than the same phenotypic pattern in controls, with the most marked elevations in triglycerides found in AIDS subjects with the LDL B phenotype. In contrast to what was observed in controls, HDL cholesterol levels were decreased in all AIDS subjects and were unrelated to LDL pattern. Total and LDL cholesterol levels were higher in controls with the LDL B phenotype than in those with the LDL A phenotype, but there was no difference in total and LDL cholesterol in AIDS subjects with LDL B compared to A. On multiple regression analysis in subjects with AIDS, plasma triglyceride levels, age, and HDL cholesterol all contribute to the occurrence of the LDL B phenotype, but elevations in plasma triglyceride levels are the strongest independent predictor. Body mass index was not a predictor of LDL B phenotype in AIDS. These results suggest that disturbances in triglyceride metabolism that are caused by AIDS lead to the appearance of the LDL subclass B phenotype and provide further evidence that environmental or disease states that perturb lipid metabolism can produce an increased prevalence of the LDL B phenotype. 35 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Human cytomegalovirus increases modified low density lipoprotein uptake and scavenger receptor mRNA expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y F; Guetta, E; Yu, Z X; Finkel, T; Epstein, S E

    1996-01-01

    Evidence suggests a possible role for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the development of arteriosclerosis. One of the earliest events in plaque formation is the accumulation of lipid-laden foam cells, derived from macrophages and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The lipid accumulation that occurs depends upon the uptake of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), a process in which the scavenger receptor (SR) has been postulated to play an important role. We therefore examined the effects of HCMV on this process. We demonstrate that HCMV infection of human SMCs increases modified LDL uptake and stimulates class A SR gene (SR-A) mRNA expression. In addition, infection of rat SMCs with HCMV, which causes immediate early gene expression (IE72/IE84), but no early or late HCMV gene products and no cytopathic effects, also increases SMC uptake of Ox-LDL and acetylated LDL, with either effect blocked by an excess of either cold Ox-LDL or acetylated-LDL, and by fucoidin, an SR competitor. Cotransfection of an IE72, but not an IE84, expression plasmid and a plasmid containing a Class A SR promoter/reporter gene construct enhances SR promoter activity. Since increased Ox-LDL uptake is believed to play an important role in arteriosclerosis, these results provide a link between HCMV infection and arteriosclerotic plaque formation. PMID:8903333

  9. Dot-blot assay for the low density lipoprotein receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, F.M.; Catapano, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a new method for detecting the interaction of low density lipoprotein with its receptor using unmodified nitrocellulose as support for membrane protein. The method is specific and sensitive down to 3 micrograms of membrane protein. Unlabeled LDL, but not HDL, competes with /sup 125/I-labeled LDL for binding, and binding is abolished by pretreatment of the membranes with pronase and is dependent upon the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, modification of arginine or lysine residues on LDL abolishes the lipoprotein interaction with the receptor protein supported on the nitrocellulose. When the membranes are solubilized with octyl glucoside, purification steps of the receptor can be directly followed with no interference of the detergent, therefore eliminating the need for its removal. The increased expression of LDL receptors on liver membranes from estradiol-treated rats was also demonstrated. We suggest, therefore, that this method can be used to detect the presence of LDL receptors on minute amounts of membrane protein.

  10. Intrauterine growth restriction combined with a maternal high-fat diet increases hepatic cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein receptor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zinkhan, Erin K; Zalla, Jennifer M; Carpenter, Jeanette R; Yu, Baifeng; Yu, Xing; Chan, Gary; Joss-Moore, Lisa; Lane, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and maternal consumption of a high-saturated-fat diet (HFD) increase the risk of hypercholesterolemia, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Many pregnant women eat a HFD, thus exposing the fetus to a HFD in utero. The cumulative effect of in utero exposure to IUGR and a HFD on offspring cholesterol levels remains unknown. Furthermore, little is known about the mechanism through which IUGR and maternal HFD consumption increase cholesterol. We hypothesize that IUGR combined with a maternal HFD would increase offspring serum and hepatic cholesterol accumulation via alteration in levels of key proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism. To test our hypothesis we used a rat model of surgically induced IUGR and fed the dams a regular diet or a HFD HFD-fed dams consumed the same kilocalories as regular diet-fed dams, with no difference between surgical intervention groups. In the offspring, IUGR combined with a maternal HFD increased hepatic cholesterol levels, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor protein levels, and Ldlr activity in female rat offspring at birth and both sexes at postnatal day 14 relative to non-IUGR offspring both from regular diet- and HFD-fed dams. These findings suggest that IUGR combined with a maternal HFD increases hepatic cholesterol accumulation via increased LDL cholesterol uptake into the liver with resulting persistent increases in hepatic cholesterol accumulation.

  11. Triolein and trilinolein ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Deng, Ze-yuan; Li, Xiao-ping; Rao, Huan; Fan, Ya-wei

    2014-05-01

    Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells is a critical step for the initiation of atherosclerosis. Triacylglycerol uptake in these cells is understood to be a part of the process. The present investigation, comparison among the effects of simple acylglycerol, including tristearin, triolein, and trilinolein, upon oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced oxidative stress was undertaken. Results indicated that trilinolein (78 % ± 0.02) and triolein (90 % ± 0.01) increased cell viability of endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein, whereas tristearin decreased the cell viability (55 % ± 0.03) (P < 0.05). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein treatment significantly increased apoptosis (23 %), compared to cells simultaneously exposed to trilinolein (19 %) or triolein (16 %), where apoptosis was reduced (P < 0.05). On the other hand, exposure to tristearin further increased oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced cell apoptosis (34 %). Treatment with trilinolein or triolein on oxidized low-density lipoprotein -stimulated endothelial cells inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and E-selectin mRNA. Moreover, both trilinolein and triolein demonstrated a strong antioxidant response to oxidative stress caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Taken together, the results indicate trilinolein and triolein possess anti-inflammatory properties, which are mediated via the antioxidant defense system.

  12. Thermal stability of human plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein: A paradoxical behavior of low-density lipoprotein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rull, Anna; Jayaraman, Shobini; Gantz, Donald L; Rivas-Urbina, Andrea; Pérez-Cuellar, Montserrat; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Gursky, Olga

    2016-09-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) aggregation is central in triggering atherogenesis. A minor fraction of electronegative plasma LDL, termed LDL(-), plays a special role in atherogenesis. To better understand this role, we analyzed the kinetics of aggregation, fusion and disintegration of human LDL and its fractions, LDL(+) and LDL(-). Thermal denaturation of LDL was monitored by spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Initially, LDL(-) aggregated and fused faster than LDL(+), but later the order reversed. Most LDL(+) disintegrated and precipitated upon prolonged heating. In contrast, LDL(-) partially retained lipoprotein morphology and formed soluble aggregates. Biochemical analysis of all fractions showed no significant degradation of major lipids, mild phospholipid oxidation, and an increase in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) upon thermal denaturation. The main baseline difference between LDL subfractions was higher content of NEFA in LDL(-). Since NEFA promote lipoprotein fusion, increased NEFA content can explain rapid initial aggregation and fusion of LDL(-) but not its resistance to extensive disintegration. Partial hydrolysis of apoB upon heating was similar in LDL subfractions, suggesting that minor proteins importantly modulate LDL disintegration. Unlike LDL(+), LDL(-) contains small amounts of apoA-I and apoJ. Addition of exogenous apoA-I to LDL(+) hampered lipoprotein aggregation, fusion and precipitation, while depletion of endogenous apoJ had an opposite effect. Therefore, the initial rapid aggregation of LDL(-) is apparently counterbalanced by the stabilizing effects of minor proteins such as apoA-I and apoJ. These results help identify key determinants for LDL aggregation, fusion and coalescence into lipid droplets in vivo. PMID:27233433

  13. Hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein B production are increased following in vivo induction of betaine–homocysteine S-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Janet D.; Collins, Heidi L.; Chirieac, Doru V.; Cianci, Joanne; Jokinen, Jenny; Sowden, Mark P.; Galloway, Chad A.; Sparks, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported a positive correlation between the expression of BHMT (betaine–homocysteine S-methyltransferase) and ApoB (apolipoprotein B) in rat hepatoma McA (McArdle RH-7777) cells [Sowden, Collins, Smith, Garrow, Sparks and Sparks (1999) Biochem. J. 341, 639–645]. To examine whether a similar relationship occurs in vivo, hepatic BHMT expression was induced by feeding rats a Met (L-methionine)-restricted betaine-containing diet, and parameters of ApoB metabolism were evaluated. There were no generalized metabolic abnormalities associated with Met restriction for 7 days, as evidenced by control levels of serum glucose, ketones, alanine aminotransferase and L-homocysteine levels. Betaine plus the Met restriction resulted in lower serum insulin and non-esterified fatty acid levels. Betaine plus Met restriction induced hepatic BHMT 4-fold and ApoB mRNA 3-fold compared with Met restriction alone. No changes in percentage of edited ApoB mRNA were observed on the test diets. An increase in liver ApoB mRNA correlated with an 82% and 46% increase in ApoB and triacylglycerol production respectively using in vivo Triton WR 1339. Increased secretion of VLDL (very-low-density lipoprotein) with Met restriction plus betaine was associated with a 45% reduction in liver triacylglycerol compared with control. Nuclear run-off assays established that transcription of both bhmt and apob genes was also increased in Met-restricted plus betaine diets. No change in ApoB mRNA stability was detected in BHMT-transfected McA cells. Hepatic ApoB and BHMT mRNA levels were also increased by 1.8- and 3-fold respectively by betaine supplementation of Met-replete diets. Since dietary betaine increased ApoB mRNA, VLDL ApoB and triacylglycerol production and decreased hepatic triacylglycerol, results suggest that induction of apob transcription may provide a potential mechanism for mobilizing hepatic triacylglycerol by increasing ApoB available for VLDL assembly and secretion

  14. Increased {beta}-amyloid levels in the choroid plexus following lead exposure and the involvement of low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, Mamta; Zhang Yanshu; Monnot, Andrew D.; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng Wei

    2009-10-15

    The choroid plexus, a barrier between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is known to accumulate lead (Pb) and also possibly function to maintain brain's homeostasis of A{beta}, an important peptide in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. This study was designed to investigate if Pb exposure altered A{beta} levels at the blood-CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Rats received ip injection of 27 mg Pb/kg. Twenty-four hours later, a FAM-labeled A{beta} (200 pmol) was infused into the lateral ventricle and the plexus tissues were removed to quantify A{beta} accumulation. Results revealed a significant increase in intracellular A{beta} accumulation in the Pb-exposed animals compared to controls (p < 0.001). When choroidal epithelial Z310 cells were treated with 10 {mu}M Pb for 24 h and 48 h, A{beta} (2 {mu}M in culture medium) accumulation was significantly increased by 1.5 fold (p < 0.05) and 1.8 fold (p < 0.05), respectively. To explore the mechanism, we examined the effect of Pb on low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1 (LRP1), an intracellular A{beta} transport protein. Following acute Pb exposure with the aforementioned dose regimen, levels of LRP1 mRNA and proteins in the choroid plexus were decreased by 35% (p < 0.05) and 31.8% (p < 0.05), respectively, in comparison to those of controls. In Z310 cells exposed to 10 {mu}M Pb for 24 h and 48 h, a 33.1% and 33.4% decrease in the protein expression of LRP1 was observed (p < 0.05), respectively. Knocking down LRP1 resulted in even more substantial increases of cellular accumulation of A{beta}, from 31% in cells without knockdown to 72% in cells with LRP1 knockdown (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that the acute exposure to Pb results in an increased accumulation of intracellular A{beta} in the choroid plexus; the effect appears to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of LRP1 production following Pb exposure.

  15. Acute Central Neuropeptide Y Administration Increases Food Intake but Does Not Affect Hepatic Very Low-Density Lipoprotein (Vldl) Production in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Havekes, Louis M.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Central neuropeptide Y (NPY) administration stimulates food intake in rodents. In addition, acute modulation of central NPY signaling increases hepatic production of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) in rats. As hypertriglyceridemia is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis, for which well-established mouse models are available, we set out to validate the effect of NPY on hepatic VLDL-TG production in mice, to ultimately investigate whether NPY, by increasing VLDL production, contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Research Design and Methods Male C57Bl/6J mice received an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) cannula into the lateral (LV) or third (3V) ventricle of the brain. One week later, after a 4 h fast, the animals received an intravenous (i.v.) injection of Tran35S (100 µCi) followed by tyloxapol (500 mg/kg body weight; BW), enabling the study of hepatic VLDL-apoB and VLDL-TG production, respectively. Immediately after the i.v. injection of tyloxapol, the animals received either an i.c.v. injection of NPY (0.2 mg/kg BW in artificial cerebrospinal fluid; aCSF), synthetic Y1 receptor antagonist GR231118 (0.5 mg/kg BW in aCSF) or vehicle (aCSF), or an i.v. injection of PYY3–36 (0.5 mg/kg BW in PBS) or vehicle (PBS). Results Administration of NPY into both the LV and 3V increased food intake within one hour after injection (+164%, p<0.001 and +367%, p<0.001, respectively). NPY administration neither in the LV nor in the 3V affected hepatic VLDL-TG or VLDL-apoB production. Likewise, antagonizing central NPY signaling by either PYY3–36 or GR231118 administration did not affect hepatic VLDL production. Conclusion In mice, as opposed to rats, acute central administration of NPY increases food intake without affecting hepatic VLDL production. These results are of great significance when extrapolating findings on the central regulation of hepatic VLDL production between species. PMID:23460782

  16. Low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns and risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Austin, M A; Breslow, J L; Hennekens, C H; Buring, J E; Willett, W C; Krauss, R M

    1988-10-01

    The association of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclass patterns with coronary heart disease was investigated in a case-control study of nonfatal myocardial infarction. Subclasses of LDL were analyzed by gradient gel electrophoresis of plasma samples from 109 cases and 121 controls. The LDL subclass pattern characterized by a preponderance of small, dense LDL particles was significantly associated with a threefold increased risk of myocardial infarction, independent of age, sex, and relative weight. Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased, and levels of triglyceride, very low-density lipoproteins, and intermediate-density lipoproteins were increased in subjects with this LDL subclass pattern. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels contributed to the risk associated with the small, dense LDL subclass pattern. Thus, the metabolic trait responsible for this LDL subclass pattern results in a set of interrelated lipoprotein changes that lead to increased risk of coronary heart disease.

  17. 99mTc-low density lipoprotein: intracellularly trapped radiotracer for noninvasive imaging of low density lipoprotein metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, S; Goldsmith, S J

    1990-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is the major transport protein for endogenous cholesterol in human plasma. LDL can be radiolabeled with 99mTc using sodium dithionite as a reducing agent. Biodistribution studies of 99mTc-LDL in normal rabbits confirm that 99mTc-LDL acts as an intracellularly "trapped ligand" similar to radioiodinated tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand). In addition, studies performed in hypercholesterolemic rabbit models demonstrated the feasibility of imaging hepatic LDL-receptor concentration noninvasively. 99mTc-LDL imaging studies in a number of hypercholesterolemic and hypocholesterolemic patients have proven useful in understanding the abnormal uptake and metabolism of LDL. In patients with hypercholesterolemia (HC), 99mTc-LDL appears to be taken up well by the actively evolving atherosclerotic lesions and xanthomata that contained foam cells and macrophages. In patients with myeloproliferative disease and chronic hypocholesterolemia, 99mTc-LDL images showed intense accumulation of radioactivity in the spleen and bone marrow; this demonstrated extensive proliferation of the macrophage population suggesting that hypocholesterolemia in these patients may be due to increased uptake of LDL uptake by the macrophages. 99mTc-LDL is a powerful tool for the noninvasive exploration of a variety of disorders of lipoprotein metabolism in patients.

  18. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters endothelial progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuqi; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Liu, Lingjuan; Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Jia; Xie, Xiaoyun; Hao, Hong; Liu, Jason Z; He, Guanglong; Cowan, Peter J; Cui, Lianqun; Zhu, Hua; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is critical to atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemia. Bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are important to preventing atherosclerosis, and significantly decreased in hyperlipidemia. This study was to demonstrate ox-LDL and hyperlipidemia could exhibit similar effect on EPC population and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production in BM and blood was significantly increased in male C57BL/6 mice with intravenous ox-LDL treatment, and in hyperlipidemic LDL receptor knockout mice with 4-month high-fat diet. ROS formation was effectively blocked with overexpression of antioxidant enzymes or N-acetylcysteine treatment. In hyperlipidemic and ox-LDL-treated mice, c-Kit(+)/CD31(+) cell number in BM and blood, and Sca-1(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number in blood, not in BM, were significantly decreased, which were not affected by inhibiting ROS production, while blood CD34(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number was significantly increased that was prevented with reduced ROS formation. However, blood CD34(+)/CD133(+) cell number increased in ox-LDL-treated mice, while decreased in hyperlipidemic mice. These data suggested that ox-LDL produced significant changes in BM and blood EPC populations similar (but not identical) to chronic hyperlipidemia with predominantly ROS-independent mechanism(s).

  19. Tiliroside and gnaphaliin inhibit human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Schinella, Guillermo R; Tournier, Horacio A; Máñez, Salvador; de Buschiazzo, Perla M; Del Carmen Recio, María; Ríos, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    Two flavonoids, gnaphaliin and tiliroside, isolated from Helichrysum italicum, were studied in vitro for their capacity to inhibit Cu(2+)-induced human low density lipoprotein (LDL) and diluted plasma oxidation. LDL oxidation was monitored by conjugated diene, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) formation and electrophoretic mobility on agarose gel. Gnaphaliin and tiliroside increased the lag-phase for diene conjugate production in a dose-dependent manner. The reduction of TBARS production confirmed the antioxidant activity of gnaphaliin and tiliroside with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 8.0+/-3.9 microM and 7.0+/-2.6 microM respectively. Furthermore, the flavonoids negated the Cu(2+)-induced increase in electrophoretic mobility of LDL. Antioxidant activity of gnaphaliin and tiliroside was significantly different when diluted plasma was oxidised by adding 1 mM CuSO(4). Although both flavonoids again reduced the TBARS production, tiliroside showed higher activity than gnaphaliin (IC(50)=10.6+/-2.5 microM vs. IC(50)>50 microM). In conclusion, tiliroside and gnaphaliin are antioxidants against in vitro Cu(2+)-induced LDL oxidation in the same order of magnitude compared to that of the reference drug, probucol.

  20. Increases in oxidized low-density lipoprotein and other inflammatory and adhesion molecules with a concomitant decrease in high-density lipoprotein in the individuals exposed to arsenic in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Karim, Md Rezaul; Rahman, Mashiur; Islam, Khairul; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Hossain, Ekhtear; Aziz, Abdul; Yeasmin, Fouzia; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Md Imam; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Nikkon, Farjana; Hossain, Mostaque; Mandal, Abul; Jenkins, Richard O; Haris, Parvez I; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2013-09-01

    Elevated exposure to arsenic has been suggested to be associated with atherosclerosis leading to cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, biochemical events underlying the arsenic-induced atherosclerosis have not yet been fully documented. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of circulating molecules involved in atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure in the individuals exposed to arsenic in Bangladesh. A total of 324 study subjects, 218 from arsenic-endemic areas and 106 from nonendemic areas in Bangladesh, were recruited. Drinking water, hair, nail, and blood samples were collected from the study subjects for analysis. Total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were lower in arsenic-endemic subjects than those of nonendemic subjects. Oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) levels were significantly higher in arsenic-endemic subjects than those in nonendemic subjects. All these circulating molecules showed significant correlations with arsenic exposure (water, hair, and nail arsenic concentrations), and all these relations were significant before and after adjusting for relevant covariates. Among the circulating molecules tested in this study, HDL, Ox-LDL, and CRP showed dose-response relationships with arsenic exposure. Ox-LDL/HDL ratios were increased with the increasing concentrations of arsenic in the water, hair, and nails. Furthermore, non-HDL cholesterol and TC/HDL ratios were significantly correlated with arsenic exposure before and after adjusting for relevant covariates. Thus, all the observed associations may be the major features of arsenic exposure-related atherosclerosis leading to CVD.

  1. Heterogeneity of serum low density lipoproteins in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M.M.S.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; Forte, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) from twelve healthy human subjects was used to separate six subfractions with mean dinsity ranging from 1.0268 to 1.0597 g/ml. Mean corrected peak flotation rate (S/sup o//sub f/) measured by analytic ultracentrifugation, and mean particle diameter determined by negative staining electron microscopy, both declined significantly with increasing density of the subfractions. Major differences in chemical composition of the subfractions were noted, including a singnificantly lower triglyceride content and higher ratio of cholesteryl ester to triglyceride in the middle fractions compared with those of highest and lowest density. Concentration of fraction 2 correlated positively with HDL (P < 0.01) and negatively with VLDL (P < 0.001); concentration of fraction 4 correlated negatively with HDL (P < 0.05) and positively with VLDL (P < 0.001) and IDL (P < 0.01). LDL may thus include subspecies of differing structure and composition which might also have different metabolic and atherogenic roles.

  2. Dietary and genetic effects on low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    2001-01-01

    We have tested whether differences in distribution and dietary responsiveness of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses contribute to the variability in the magnitude of LDL-cholesterol reduction induced by diets low in total and saturated fat and high in carbohydrate. Our studies have focused on a common, genetically influenced metabolic profile, characterized by a predominance of small, dense LDL particles (subclass pattern B), that is associated with a two- to threefold increase in risk for coronary artery disease. We have found that healthy normolipidemic individuals with this trait show a greater reduction in LDL cholesterol and particle number in response to low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets than do unaffected individuals (subclass pattern A). Moreover, such diets result in reduced LDL particle size, with induction of pattern B in a substantial proportion of pattern A men. Recent studies have indicated that this response is under genetic influence. Future identification of the specific genes involved may lead to improved targeting of dietary therapies aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease risk.

  3. Alcohol alters low density lipoprotein composition and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hoinacki, J.; Brown, J.; Dawson, M.; Deschenes, R.; Mulligan, J. )

    1991-03-11

    Two separate studies were conducted to examine the effect of ethanol (EtOH) dose on atherogenic low density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions and LDL metabolism in vivo. In the first study, male, atherosclerosis-susceptible squirrel monkeys were divided in three treatments: controls fed liquid diet, and low and high alcohol groups given liquid diet with vodka substituted for carbohydrate at 12% and 24% of calories, respectively. After 6 months, LDL subclasses (LDL{sub 1a}, LDL{sub 1b} and LDL{sub 2}) were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, and their lipid and protein composition was determined. Low dose EtOH had no effect on LDL subfraction distribution while 24% EtOH resulted in an increase in the larger (LDL{sub 1a} and LDL{sub 1b}), buoyant subspecies without affecting the level of the more atherogenic, smaller, denser LDL{sub 2} particles. In the second study, {sup 125}I-LDL apolipoprotein B (apo B) was injected intravenously into Control and High EtOH monkeys and kinetic analyses were performed. Although the absolute catabolic rate (LDL production) was not altered, High EtOH primates showed a reduction in the fractional catabolic rate and a longer LDL apoB residence time.

  4. Metabolism of a Lipid Nanoemulsion Resembling Low-Density Lipoprotein in Patients with Grade III Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Simone Alves; Ficker, Elisabeth Salvatori; Vinagre, Carmen G. C.; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Maranhão, Raul Cavalcante; Mady, Charles

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity increases triglyceride levels and decreases high-density lipoprotein concentrations in plasma. Artificial emulsions resembling lipidic plasma lipoprotein structures have been used to evaluate low-density lipoprotein metabolism. In grade III obesity, low density lipoprotein metabolism is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the kinetics with which a cholesterol-rich emulsion (called a low-density emulsion) binds to low-density lipoprotein receptors in a group of patients with grade III obesity by the fractional clearance rate. METHODS: A low-density emulsion was labeled with [14C]-cholesterol ester and [3H]-triglycerides and injected intravenously into ten normolipidemic non-diabetic patients with grade III obesity [body mass index higher than 40 kg/m2] and into ten non-obese healthy controls. Blood samples were collected over 24 hours to determine the plasma decay curve and to calculate the fractional clearance rate. RESULTS: There was no difference regarding plasma levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol between the two groups. The fractional clearance rate of triglycerides was 0.086 ± 0.044 in the obese group and 0.122 ± 0.026 in the controls (p = 0.040), and the fractional clearance rate of cholesterol ester (h−1) was 0.052 ± 0.021 in the obese subjects and 0.058 ± 0.015 (p = 0.971) in the controls. CONCLUSION: Grade III obese subjects exhibited normal low-density lipoprotein removal from plasma as tested by the nanoemulsion method, but triglyceride removal was slower. PMID:20126342

  5. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  6. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats exposed to premium motor spirit fumes

    PubMed Central

    Aberare, Ogbevire L.; Okuonghae, Patrick; Mukoro, Nathaniel; Dirisu, John O.; Osazuwa, Favour; Odigie, Elvis; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deliberate and regular exposure to premium motor spirit fumes is common and could be a risk factor for liver disease in those who are occupationally exposed. A possible association between premium motor spirit fumes and plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a rodent model could provide new insights in the pathology of diseases where cellular dysfunction is an established risk factor. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of premium motor spirit fumes on lipids and lipoproteins in workers occupationally exposed to premium motor spirit fumes using rodent model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five Wister albino rats (of both sexes) were used for this study between the 4th of August and 7th of September, 2010. The rats were divided into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 rats were not exposed to premium motor spirit fumes (control group), group 2 rats were exposed for 1 hour daily, group 3 for 3 hours daily, group 4 for 5 hours daily and group 5 for 7 hours daily. The experiment lasted for a period of 4 weeks. Blood samples obtained from all the groups after 4 weeks of exposure were used for the estimation of plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol. Result: Results showed significant increase in means of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels (P<0.05). The mean triglyceride and total body weight were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the exposed group when compared with the unexposed. The plasma level of high density lipoprotein, the ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein and the ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly in exposed subjects when compared with the control group. Conclusion: These results showed that frequent exposure to petrol fumes may be highly

  7. Statins do not decrease small, dense low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol Ung; Seo, Hong Seog; Lee, Eun Mi; Shin, Seung Yong; Choi, Un-Jung; Na, Jin Oh; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Oh, Dong Joo

    2010-01-01

    In an observational study, we examined the effect of statins on low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions.Using density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we measured small, dense LDL density in 612 patients (mean age, 61.7 ± 12.6 yr), some with and some without coronary artery disease, who were placed in a statin-treated group (n=172) or a control group (n=440) and subdivided on the basis of coronary artery disease status.Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and the LDL cholesterol/apolipoprotein B ratio were significantly lower in the statin group. However, the proportion of small, dense LDL was higher in the statin group (42.9% ± 9.5% vs 41.3% ± 8.5%; P=0.046) and the proportion of large, buoyant LDL was lower (23.6% ± 7.5% vs 25.4% ± 7.9%; P=0.011). In the statin group, persons without coronary artery disease had higher proportions of small, dense LDL, and persons with coronary artery disease tended to have higher proportions of small, dense LDL.Our study suggests that statin therapy--whether or not recipients have coronary artery disease--does not decrease the proportion of small, dense LDL among total LDL particles, but in fact increases it, while predictably reducing total LDL cholesterol, absolute amounts of small, dense LDL, and absolute amounts of large, buoyant LDL. If and when our observation proves to be reproducible in subsequent large-scale studies, it should provide new insights into small, dense LDL and its actual role in atherogenesis or the progression of atherosclerosis.

  8. Lipid composition of circulating multiple-modified low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zakiev, E R; Sukhorukov, V N; Melnichenko, A A; Sobenin, I A; Ivanova, E A; Orekhov, A N

    2016-01-01

    Atherogenic modified low- density lipoprotein (LDL) induces pronounced accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in the arterial wall, while native LDL seems to lack such capability. Therefore, modified LDL appears to be a major causative agent in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Possible modifications of LDL particles include changes in size and density, desialylation, oxidation and acquisition of negative charge. Total LDL isolated from pooled plasma of patients with coronary atherosclerosis, as well as from healthy subjects contains two distinct subfractions: normally sialylated LDL and desialylated LDL, which can be isolated by binding to a lectin affinity column. We called the desialylated LDL subfraction circulating modified LDL (cmLDL). In this study, we focused on lipid composition of LDL particles, analysing the total LDL preparation and two LDL subfractions: cmLDL and native LDL. The composition of LDL was studied using thin-layer chromatography. We found that cmLDL subfraction had decreased levels of free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids (except for lysophosphatidylcholine) and sphingomyelin in comparison to native LDL. On the other hand, levels of mono-, and diglycerides, lysophosphatidylcholine and free fatty acids were higher in cmLDL than in native LDL. Our study demonstrated that lipid composition of cmLDL from atherosclerotic patients was altered in comparison to healthy subjects. In particular, phospholipid content was decreased, and free fatty acids levels were increased in cmLDL. This strengthens the hypothesis of multiple modification of LDL particles in the bloodstream and underscores the clinical importance of desialylated LDL as a possible marker of atherosclerosis progression. PMID:27558696

  9. Onion peel extract increases hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 messenger RNA expressions in Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Moon, Jiyoung; Do, Hyun Ju; Chung, Ji Hyung; Lee, Kyung-Hea; Cha, Yong-Jun; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, we hypothesized that onion peel extract (OPE) alters hepatic gene expression to improve blood cholesterol profiles. To investigate the effect of OPE to test our hypothesis, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum for 8 weeks with the control, high-fat diet (HFD) or the high-fat diet with 0.2% OPE supplementations (HFD + OPE). Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of genes in cholesterol metabolism and fatty acid metabolism were examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The OPE in HFD reverted high fat-induced reduction in mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme reductase genes in the liver comparable with the levels of the control group. Onion peel extract slightly increased stearoyl-coA desaturase 1 (SCD-1) expression compared with high-fat feeding. However, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and fatty acid synthase were not affected by high-fat or OPE feeding. Onion peel extract also enhanced expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 and scavenger receptor class B type I genes when compared with high-fat feeding. However, OPE did not influence high fat-triggered changes in apolipoprotein A1 mRNA levels and liver X receptor α were not affected by either high-fat or OPE feeding. Our results suggest that OPE changes the expression of genes associated with cholesterol metabolism in favor of lowering blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and enhancing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through increasing mRNA abundance of low-density lipoprotein receptor and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 genes. PMID:22464808

  10. Particulate Matter Promotes In Vitro Receptor-Recognizable Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Dysfunction of Lipid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-León, Natalia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Sevilla-Tapia, Laura; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Serrano, Jesús; O’Neill, Marie S.; García-Cuellar, Claudia M.; Quintana, Raúl; Vázquez-López, Inés

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter may promote cardiovascular disease, possibly as a consequence of its oxidative potential. Studies using susceptible animals indicate that particulate matter aggravates atherosclerosis by increasing lipid/macrophage content in plaques. Macrophage lipid uptake requires oxidized low-density lipoprotein and scavenger receptors; same receptors are involved in particulate matter uptake. We studied in vitro particulate matter potential to oxidize low-density lipoproteins and subsequent cell uptake through scavenger receptors. Particulate matter-induced low-density lipoproteins oxidation was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid assay. Binding/internalization was tested in wild type and scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, and in RAW264.7 cells using fluorescently labeled low-density lipoproteins. Dose-dependent binding/internalization only occurred in scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells and RAW264.7 cells. Competition binding/internalization using particles showed that particulate matter induced decreased binding (~50%) and internalization (~70%) of particle-oxidized low-density lipoproteins and native low-density lipoproteins. Results indicate that particulate matter was capable of oxidizing low-density lipoproteins, favoring macrophage internalization, and also altered scavenger and low-density lipoproteins receptor function. PMID:23297186

  11. Human very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons can protect against endotoxin-induced death in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Rapp, J H

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxemia stimulates many physiologic responses including disturbances in lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that this lipemia may be part of a defensive mechanism by which the body combats the toxic effects of circulating endotoxin. We tested the effects of mixtures of endotoxin, lipoproteins, and lipoprotein-free plasma and determined the ability of varying concentrations of human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, as well as low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL), and of the synthetic lipid emulsion SOYACAL to prevent endotoxin-induced death in mice. This study demonstrates that the triglyceride-rich VLDL and chylomicrons, as well as cholesterol-rich LDL and HDL, and cholesterol-free SOYACAL can protect against endotoxin-induced death. Protection required small amounts of lipoprotein-free plasma, and depended on the incubation time and the concentration of lipoprotein lipid. Despite stringent techniques to prevent exogenous endotoxin contamination eight of ten duplicate VLDL preparations contained endotoxin (5,755 +/- 3,514 ng endotoxin/mg triglyceride, mean +/- SEM) making the isolation of endotoxin-free VLDL difficult. In contrast, simultaneous preparations of LDL and HDL were relatively free of endotoxin contamination (3 +/- 3 and 320 +/- 319 ng/mg total cholesterol, respectively), suggesting that the contamination of VLDL occurs in vivo and not during the isolation procedure. These observations suggest a possible role for increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the host's defense against endotoxemia and infection. Images PMID:2394827

  12. Radiotracers for low density lipoprotein biodistribution studies in vivo: technetium-99m low density lipoprotein versus radioiodinated low density lipoprotein preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Paidi, M.; Badimon, J.J.; Le, N.A.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.; Ginsberg, H.N.

    1988-07-01

    In an attempt to characterize the in vivo behavior of (99mTc) low density lipoprotein (LDL), biodistribution studies were performed in normal and hypercholesterolemic (HC) rabbits. In normal rabbits, 24 hr after the injection of (99mTc)LDL, 99mTc activity accumulated mainly in adrenal glands, spleen, liver, and kidney. In HC rabbits, however, there was a marked reduction of 99mTc activity in these organs. In both normal and HC rabbits, less than 17% of 99mTc activity appeared in the 24-hr urine following injection of (99mTc)LDL, suggesting that in vivo, (99mTc)LDL is trapped and accumulated within the tissues. Direct comparison of (99mTc)LDL, 125I-native-LDL and (131I)tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand) in normal rabbits, demonstrated that the biodistribution of (99mTc)LDL was similar to that of (131I)tyramine cellobiose-LDL. The adrenal glands, liver, and spleen accumulated significantly greater quantities of 99mTc and 131I activity per gram of tissue than 125I (from native-LDL). In addition, imaging studies in monkeys, showed that the hepatic uptake and retention of (99mTc) LDL was similar to that of (131I)tyramine cellobiose LDL. In contrast, radioiodine from native-LDL was deiodinated in liver with subsequent excretion into the intestine. These results suggest that (99mTc)LDL acts as a trapped ligand in vivo and should therefore, be a good tracer for noninvasive quantitative biodistribution studies of LDL.

  13. Radiotracers for low density lipoprotein biodistribution studies in vivo: technetium-99m low density lipoprotein versus radioiodinated low density lipoprotein preparations.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, S; Paidi, M; Badimon, J J; Le, N A; Goldsmith, S J; Fuster, V; Ginsberg, H N

    1988-07-01

    In an attempt to characterize the in vivo behavior of [99mTc] low density lipoprotein (LDL), biodistribution studies were performed in normal and hypercholesterolemic (HC) rabbits. In normal rabbits, 24 hr after the injection of [99mTc]LDL, 99mTc activity accumulated mainly in adrenal glands, spleen, liver, and kidney. In HC rabbits, however, there was a marked reduction of 99mTc activity in these organs. In both normal and HC rabbits, less than 17% of 99mTc activity appeared in the 24-hr urine following injection of [99mTc]LDL, suggesting that in vivo, [99mTc]LDL is trapped and accumulated within the tissues. Direct comparison of [99mTc]LDL, 125I-native-LDL and [131I]tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand) in normal rabbits, demonstrated that the biodistribution of [99mTc]LDL was similar to that of [131I]tyramine cellobiose-LDL. The adrenal glands, liver, and spleen accumulated significantly greater quantities of 99mTc and 131I activity per gram of tissue than 125I (from native-LDL). In addition, imaging studies in monkeys, showed that the hepatic uptake and retention of [99mTc] LDL was similar to that of [131I]tyramine cellobiose LDL. In contrast, radioiodine from native-LDL was deiodinated in liver with subsequent excretion into the intestine. These results suggest that [99mTc]LDL acts as a trapped ligand in vivo and should therefore, be a good tracer for noninvasive quantitative biodistribution studies of LDL.

  14. Reliability of Calculated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W; Snozek, Christine L; Baumann, Nikola A; Jaffe, Allan S; Saenger, Amy K

    2015-08-15

    Aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering strategies are recommended for prevention of cardiovascular events in high-risk populations. Guidelines recommend a 30% to 50% reduction in at-risk patients even when LDL-C concentrations are between 70 and 130 mg/dl (1.8 to 3.4 mmol/L). However, calculation of LDL-C by the Friedewald equation is the primary laboratory method for routine LDL-C measurement. We compared the accuracy and reproducibility of calculated LDL-C <130 mg/dl (3.4 mmol/L) to LDL-C measured by β quantification (considered the gold standard method) in 15,917 patients with fasting triglyceride concentrations <400 mg/dl (4.5 mmol/L). Both variation and bias of calculated LDL-C increased at lower values of measured LDL-C. The 95% confidence intervals for a calculated LDL-C of 70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/L) and 30 mg/dl (0.8 mmol/L) were 60 to 86 mg/dl (1.6 to 2.2 mmol/L) and 24 to 60 mg/dl (0.6 to 1.6 mmol/L), respectively. Previous recommendations have emphasized the requirement for a fasting sample with triglycerides <400 mg/dl (4.5 mmol/L) to calculate LDL-C by the Friedewald equation. However, no recommendations have addressed the appropriate lower reportable limit for calculated LDL-C. In conclusion, calculated LDL-C <30 mg/dl (0.8 mmol/L) should not be reported because of significant deviation from the gold standard measured LDL-C results, and caution is advised when using calculated LDL-CF values <70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/L) to make treatment decisions.

  15. Biologically active low density lipoprotein in human peripheral lymph.

    PubMed Central

    Reichl, D; Myant, N B; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1978-01-01

    We have compared the ability of human serum and peripheral lymph to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), to activate cholesteryl ester synthesis, and to compete with 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) for binding to LDL receptors in cultured human fibroblasts. Whole lymph was active in all three tests and the activity per unit volume in lymph was approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. All three biologic activities in lymph were confined to the d less than 1.063 g/ml fraction. Whole lymph had no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity in fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, whose cells lack LDL receptors. The LDL-like biologic activity per unit mass of immunologically active apoprotein B was approximately the same in lymph as in serum. The current data indicate that functionally active LDL is present in lymph and that the concentration of this lipoprotein is approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. PMID:201669

  16. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  17. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density...

  19. Krill oil supplementation lowers serum triglycerides without increasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults with borderline high or high triglyceride levels.

    PubMed

    Berge, Kjetil; Musa-Veloso, Kathy; Harwood, Melody; Hoem, Nils; Burri, Lena

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the effects of 12 weeks daily krill oil supplementation on fasting serum triglyceride (TG) and lipoprotein particle levels in subjects whose habitual fish intake is low and who have borderline high or high fasting serum TG levels (150-499 mg/dL). We hypothesized that Krill oil lowers serum TG levels in subjects with borderline high or high fasting TG levels. To test our hypothesis 300 male and female subjects were included in a double-blind, randomized, multi-center, placebo-controlled study with five treatment groups: placebo (olive oil) or 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 g/day of krill oil. Serum lipids were measured after an overnight fast at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Due to a high intra-individual variability in TG levels, data from all subjects in the four krill oil groups were pooled to increase statistical power, and a general time- and dose-independent one-way analysis of variance was performed to assess efficacy. Relative to subjects in the placebo group, those administered krill oil had a statistically significant calculated reduction in serum TG levels of 10.2%. Moreover, LDL-C levels were not increased in the krill oil groups relative to the placebo group. The outcome of the pooled analysis suggests that krill oil is effective in reducing a cardiovascular risk factor. However, owing to the individual fluctuations of TG concentrations measured, a study with more individual measurements per treatment group is needed to increase the confidence of these findings. PMID:24461313

  20. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves suppressed oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitro and in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Miu; Tani, Mariko; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Iizuka, Maki; Saita, Emi; Toyozaki, Miku; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Ikeguchi, Motoya; Kondo, Kazuo

    2011-05-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves are consumed as vegetables around the world, especially in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of sweet potato leaves on low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro and in human subjects. We compared the antioxidant activity of 8 kinds of sweet potato leaves. Every sweet potato leaf had high radical scavenging activity and prolonged a lag time for starting low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro. We found that sweet potato leaves contained abundant polyphenol compounds and the radical scavenging activity and prolongation rate of lag time were highly correlated with total polyphenol content. We also confirmed that thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production was increased in endothelial cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein oxidation, which was decreased by treatment with sweet potato leaves. We further measured the low-density lipoprotein oxidizability in 13 healthy volunteers after their intake of 18 g of "Suioh", raw sweet potato leaves. "Suioh" prolonged a lag time for starting low-density lipoprotein oxidation and decreased low-density lipoprotein mobility. These results suggest that sweet potato leaves have antioxidant activity leading to the suppression of low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

  1. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob; Samson, Abraham O

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25-4 μM). Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels. PMID:27516832

  2. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25–4 μM). Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels. PMID:27516832

  3. Novel Therapies for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Reduction.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-09-15

    Although many clinical trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated that lower serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are associated with proportionately greater reductions in the risk of cardiovascular disease events, not all patients with hypercholesterolemia are able to attain risk-stratified LDL-C goals with statin monotherapy. Elucidation of the pathophysiology of genetic disorders of lipid metabolism (e.g., familial hypercholesterolemia) has led to the development of several novel lipid-lowering strategies, including blocking the degradation of hepatic LDL-C receptors that are important in LDL-C clearance, or the inhibition of apoprotein synthesis and lipidation. Mipomersen and lomitapide are highly efficacious new agents available for the treatment of patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. The recent introduction of PCSK9 inhibitors (alirocumab and evolocumab) have made it possible for many patients to achieve very low LDL-C concentrations (e.g., <40 mg/dl) that are usually not attainable with statin monotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are examining the impact of very low LDL-C levels on cardiovascular disease event rates and the long-term safety of this approach. PMID:27620356

  4. Associations of hepatic and lipoprotein lipase activities with changes in dietary composition and low density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    Campos, H; Dreon, D M; Krauss, R M

    1995-03-01

    To test whether lipoprotein lipase or hepatic lipase activities are associated with lipoprotein subclasses, and to assess the effects of dietary manipulations on these associations, enzyme activities were measured in postheparin plasma (75 U heparin/kg) from 43 healthy men who were randomly allocated to a low-fat (24% fat, 60% carbohydrate) and a high-fat (46% fat, 38% carbohydrate) diet for 6 weeks each in a cross-over design. The high-fat diet significantly increased both lipoprotein lipase (+20%, P = 0.02) and hepatic lipase (+8%, P = 0.007) activities. On both diets, hepatic lipase activity was significantly positively correlated (P < 0.01) with plasma apolipoprotein (apo)B concentrations, and with levels of small dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) III, measured by analytic ultracentrifugation as mass of lipoproteins of flotation rate (Sof) 3-5, while lipoprotein lipase activity was inversely associated with levels of LDL III (P < 0.05). Despite the cross-sectional correlations, increased hepatic lipase activity was not significantly correlated with the reduction in LDL III mass observed on the high-fat diet. Rather, changes in hepatic lipase were correlated inversely with changes in small very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) of Sof 20-40, and small intermediate density lipoproteins (VLDL) of Sof 10-16. Moreover, changes in lipoprotein lipase activity were not significantly correlated with changes in small LDL, but were positively associated with changes in small IDL of Sof 10-14, and large LDL I of Sof 7-10. Thus, while increased levels of small dense LDL are associated with a metabolic state characterized by relatively increased hepatic lipase and decreased lipoprotein lipase activity, changes in these enzymes do not appear to be primary determinants of diet-induced changes in levels of this LDL subfraction. On the other hand, increased lipoprotein lipase activity induced by high-fat feeding may contribute to the accumulation in plasma of both large LDL I

  5. Iron-ascorbate-phospholipid mediated modification of low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, P; Yu, H; Gutman, R L; Mao, F; Ryu, B H; Lou, P

    1996-06-11

    LDL can be oxidized by a variety of agents to form a modified lipoprotein which is capable of being avidly metabolized by macrophages. While previous in vitro studies have focused exclusively on the oxidation of LDL, other lipids found in the atheroma are also subject to oxidation and its lipoperoxide byproducts may contribute to the process of LDL modification. To examine the relationship between the oxidation of phospholipids and the subsequent modification of LDL, we incubated 250 microM phosphatidylcholine with 10 microM ferrous sulfate and 50 microM ascorbic acid in 10 mM Tris (pH 7.0). After 18 h at 37 degrees C, significant amounts of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were formed. The inclusion of LDL (100 micrograms protein/ml) elevated the TBARS and increased the electrophoretic mobility of the lipoprotein. LDL treated with iron and ascorbate in the absence of phosphatidylcholine did not result in the modification of this lipoprotein. LDL that was incubated with phosphatidylcholine, iron and ascorbate was found to be metabolized by macrophages to a far greater extent than native LDL or LDL treated with phosphatidylcholine alone. Probucol (10 microM) inhibited the LDL modification process. These results demonstrate that while iron and ascorbate cannot oxidize LDL directly, the addition of phosphatidylcholine to these initiators of lipid peroxidation can mediate and lead to the modification of LDL. PMID:8664335

  6. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  7. Low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns and lipoprotein response to a reduced-fat diet in men.

    PubMed

    Dreon, D M; Fernstrom, H A; Miller, B; Krauss, R M

    1994-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclass pattern B is a common genetically influenced lipoprotein profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense LDL particles, and associated with increased levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, reductions in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and increased risk of coronary artery disease compared to individuals with a predominance of larger LDL (pattern A). We sought to determine whether LDL subclass patterns are associated with response of plasma lipoprotein levels to changes in dietary fat and carbohydrate content. In a randomized cross-over study, 105 men consumed, for six weeks each, high-fat (46%) and low-fat (24%) solid food diets, with replacement of fat by carbohydrate. Diet-induced changes in subjects who exhibited pattern B (n = 18) following the high-fat diet differed significantly from those in subjects with pattern A (n = 87): in pattern B subjects LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) reductions were two-fold greater and plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B levels decreased significantly. These differences remained significant after adjustment for levels of plasma LDL-C, apo B, HDL-C, and body mass index. Thus, LDL subclass pattern is a factor that contributes significantly to interindividual variation of plasma lipoprotein response to a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet.

  8. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  9. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  10. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  11. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in assessment and management of cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Jialal, I; Remaley, A T

    2014-07-01

    The deposition of cholesterol in the arterial wall by the infiltration of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) is a key step in the development of atherosclerosis. In this Commentary, we discuss recent recommendations for clinical laboratory measurement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and its utility both for assessing cardiovascular disease risk and as a tool in the management of patients receiving lipid-lowering therapy.

  12. Low-density-lipoprotein subclasses and response to a low-fat diet in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M; Dreon, D M

    1995-08-01

    Lipid and lipoprotein responses to reduced dietary fat intake were investigated in relation to differences in distribution of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses among 105 healthy men consuming high-fat (46% fat) and low-fat (24% fat) diets in random order for 6 wk each. With high-fat diets, 87 subjects had predominantly large, buoyant LDL (pattern A), whereas the remainder had primarily smaller, denser LDL (pattern B). With low-fat diets, 36 men changed from pattern A to B. Compared with the 51 men with pattern A with both diets (stable A group), men in the stable B group (n = 18) had significantly greater reductions in plasma LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and mass of mid-sized (LDL II) and small (LDL III) LDL subfractions. In both the stable A and change groups, there was a shift in LDL particle mass from larger, lipid-enriched (LDL I and II) to smaller, lipid-depleted (LDL III and IV) subfractions, suggestive of change in LDL composition with minimal change in particle number, and consistent with the observation of reduced plasma LDL cholesterol without reduced apolipoprotein B. Stable B subjects had significantly greater increases in the largest very-low-density-lipoprotein subfraction with the low-fat diet than the stable A group, and also had greater decreases in the high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) subclass HDL3 but smaller reductions in HDL2. Genetic and environmental factors influencing LDL subclass distributions thus may also contribute substantially to interindividual variation in plasma lipoprotein response to a low-fat diet.

  13. Switching to black rice diets modulates low-density lipoprotein oxidation and lipid measurements in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moemin, Aly R

    2011-04-01

    The effect of white and black rice consumption on lipid profile, hydroperoxides, thiobarbituric reactive substances and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) induced by hypercholesterolemia was investigated in 24 male rabbits; a purified normal diet (NC, n = 6), a high fat/cholesterol (1.0 g/100 g) diet (PC group, n = 6), a high fat/cholesterol diet with 25 g/100 g white ground rice (PCWR group, n = 6), 25 g/100 g black ground rice (PCBR group, n = 6) for 10 weeks. Blood samples were collected for lipid measurements. Results indicate that serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was higher (P < 0.05) in the PCBR compared with the PC and PCWR groups. Hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric reactive substances were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the PCBR compared with PCWR and PC groups. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy-3-Glu) and peonidin-3-glucoside have been tested in vitro against copper-mediated low-density lipoprotein. Cy-3-Glu was excelled peonidin-3-glucoside by increasing the lag time of NC from 80 to 500 minutes in the presence of 2.0 μM of Cy-3-Glu. Hierarchically, black rice rabbits group was given the best results compared with other groups. The results may be indicating to a suggested mechanism (anthocyanins protection; Cy-3-Glu) of the cardioprotective effect of black rice. PMID:21289511

  14. Assembly and secretion of hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, G F

    1990-01-01

    In contrast to water-soluble fuels such as glucose or ketone bodies, the use of lipids as an energy source for tissues has required the development of complex structures for their transport through the aqueous plasma. In the case of endogenously synthesized triacylglycerol this is achieved by the assembly and secretion of hepatic VLDL which provides the necessary stability in an aqueous medium. An essential component of this assembly process is apo B. Dietary changes which require an increase in hepatic VLDL secretion appear to be accompanied by increases in the availability of functional apo B. Interesting questions relate to: (a) the intracellular site(s) of triacylglycerol association with apo B, and (b) the mechanism(s) by which the availability of functional apo B at this site responds to metabolic and hormonal signals which reflect dietary status and, thus, the need to secrete triacylglycerol. As regards the latter, although in some cases changes in apo B synthesis occur in response to VLDL secretion hepatic apo B mRNA levels appear to be quite stable in vitro. Intracellular switching of apo B between the secretory and degradative pathways may be important in controlling VLDL assembly and post-translational modifications of the apoprotein may also play a role by influencing its ability to bind to triacylglycerol. Transport is not the only problem associated with the utilization of a concentrated energy source such as triacylglycerol and the complex problems of waste product disposal and recycling have to be dealt with. In the case of triacylglycerol, potentially toxic waste products include atherogenic remnants and LDL. The overall problem, then, in the long-term, involves the development of a 'safe' means of utilizing triacylglycerol and this requirement accounts for much of the complexity of plasma lipoprotein metabolism. In this area, the rat could teach the human a few tricks. One of these appears to be the utilization of hepatic apo B48 rather than apo B

  15. The farnesoid X receptor induces very low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Claudel, Thierry; Martin, Geneviève; Brozek, John; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-05-21

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor activated by bile acids (BAs). In response to ligand-binding, FXR regulates many genes involved in BA, lipid, and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify new FXR target genes, microarray technology was used to profile total RNA extracted from HepG2 cells treated with the natural FXR agonist chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Interestingly, a significant increase of transcript level of the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) was observed. Our data, resulting from selective FXR activation, FXR RNA silencing and FXR-deficient mice, clearly demonstrate that BAs up-regulate VLDLR transcript levels via a FXR-dependent mechanism in vitro in human and in vivo in mouse liver cells.

  16. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  17. Linkage between cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and high plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Freeman, D J; Grundy, S M; Levine, D M; Guerra, R; Cohen, J C

    1998-01-01

    Interindividual differences in plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels reflect both environmental variation and genetic polymorphism, but the specific genes involved and their relative contributions to the variance in LDL-C are not known. In this study we investigated the relationship between plasma LDL-C concentrations and three genes with pivotal roles in LDL metabolism: the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB), and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7). Analysis of 150 nuclear families indicated statistically significant linkage between plasma LDL-C concentrations and CYP7, but not LDLR or APOB. Further sibling pair analyses using individuals with high plasma LDL-C concentrations as probands indicated that the CYP7 locus was linked to high plasma LDL-C, but not to low plasma LDL-C concentrations. This finding was replicated in an independent sample. DNA sequencing revealed two linked polymorphisms in the 5' flanking region of CYP7. The allele defined by these polymorphisms was associated with increased plasma LDL-C concentrations, both in sibling pairs and in unrelated individuals. Taken together, these findings indicate that polymorphism in CYP7 contributes to heritable variation in plasma LDL-C concentrations. Common polymorphisms in LDLR and APOB account for little of the heritable variation in plasma LDL-C concentrations in the general population. PMID:9502769

  18. Preferential enrichment of large-sized very low density lipoprotein populations with transferred cholesteryl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.

    1985-04-01

    The effect of lipid transfer proteins on the exchange and transfer of cholesteryl esters from rat plasma HDL2 to human very low (VLDL) and low density (LDL) lipoprotein populations was studied. The use of a combination of radiochemical and chemical methods allowed separate assessment of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl ester exchange and of cholesteryl ester transfer. VLDL-I was the preferred acceptor for transferred cholesteryl esters, followed by VLDL-II and VLDL-III. LDL did not acquire cholesteryl esters. The contribution of exchange of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl esters to total transfer was highest for LDL and decreased in reverse order along the VLDL density range. Inactivation of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and heating the HDL2 for 60 min at 56 degrees C accelerated transfer and exchange of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl esters. Addition of lipid transfer proteins increased cholesterol esterification in all systems. The data demonstrate that large-sized, triglyceride-rich VLDL particles are preferred acceptors for transferred cholesteryl esters. It is suggested that enrichment of very low density lipoproteins with cholesteryl esters reflects the triglyceride content of the particles.

  19. Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or progressive loss of β-cell function. T2DM patients are at increased risk of micro- and macrovascular disease, and are often considered as representing an atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Interventions directed at glucose and lipid level control in T2DM patients may reduce micro- and macrovascular disease. The optimal T2DM agent is one that lowers glucose levels with limited risk for hypoglycemia, and with no clinical trial evidence of worsening CHD risk. Lipid-altering drugs should preferably reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and have evidence that the mechanism of action reduces CHD risk. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apo B and have evidence of improving CHD outcomes, and are thus first-line therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In patients who do not achieve optimal lipid levels with statin therapy, or who are intolerant to statin therapy, add-on therapy or alternative therapies may be indicated. Additional available agents to treat hypercholesterolemic patients with T2DM include bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe. This review discusses the use of these alternative agents to treat hypercholesterolemia in patients with T2DM, either as monotherapy or in combination with statin therapy. PMID:25045281

  20. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  1. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  2. Proteome of human plasma very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein exhibits a link with coagulation and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dashty, M; Motazacker, M M; Levels, J; de Vries, M; Mahmoudi, M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Rezaee, F

    2014-03-01

    Apart from transporting lipids through the body, the human plasma lipoproteins very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are also thought to serve as a modality for intra-organismal protein transfer, shipping proteins with important roles in inflammation and thrombosis from the site of synthesis to effector locations. To better understand the role of VLDL and LDL in the transport of proteins, we applied a combination of LTQ ORBITRAP-XL (nLC-MS/MS) with both in-SDS-PAGE gel and in-solution tryptic digestion of pure and defined VLDL and LDL fractions. We identified the presence of 95 VLDL- and 51 LDL-associated proteins including all known apolipoproteins and lipid transport proteins, and intriguingly a set of coagulation proteins, complement system and anti- microbial proteins. Prothrombin, protein S, fibrinogen γ, PLTP, CETP, CD14 and LBP were present on VLDL but not on LDL. Prenylcysteine oxidase 1, dermcidin, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, TFPI-1 and fibrinogen α chain were associated with both VLDL and LDL. Apo A-V is only present on VLDL and not on LDL. Collectively, this study provides a wealth of knowledge on the protein constituents of the human plasma lipoprotein system and strongly supports the notion that protein shuttling through this system is involved in the regulation of biological processes. Human diseases related to proteins carried by VLDL and LDL can be divided in three major categories: 1 - dyslipidaemia, 2 - atherosclerosis and vascular disease, and 3 - coagulation disorders. PMID:24500811

  3. Membrane receptors for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) inhibitor of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, P.I.; Beck, G.; Zucker, S.

    1981-06-01

    Physiologic concentrations of human plasma very low density lipoproteins inhibit the DNA synthesis of lymphocytes stimulated by allogeneic cells or lectins. In this report reachers have compared the effects of isolated lipoproteins (very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL)) and lipoprotein-depleted plasma (LDP) on DNA synthesis by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes. The relative potency for the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was VLDL greater than LDL greater than HDL greater than LDP. Fifty percent inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed at a VLDL protein concentration of 1.5--2.0 microgram/ml. Researchers have further demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for VLDL on human lymphocytes. Native VLDL was more effective than LDL in competing for 125I-VLDL binding sites. Subsequent to binding to lymphocytes, 125I-VLDL was internalized and degraded to acid-soluble products. Based on a Scatchard analysis of VLDL binding at 4 degrees C, the number of VLDL receptors per lymphocyte was estimated at 28,000 +/- 1300. Based on an estimated mean binding affinity for the VLDL receptor complex at half saturation of approximately 8.8 X 10(7) liter/mole, it is estimated that 91% of lymphocyte VLDL receptors are occupied at physiologic VLDL concentrations in blood. Although the immune regulatory role of plasma lipoproteins is uncertain, researchers suggest tha VLDL and LDL-In may maintain circulating blood lymphocytes in a nonproliferative state via their respective cell receptor mechanisms.

  4. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein. PMID:22481012

  5. Low-Density Lipoprotein Modified by Myeloperoxidase in Inflammatory Pathways and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, Luc; Roumeguère, Thierry; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has a key role in atherogenesis. Among the different models of oxidation that have been studied, the one using myeloperoxidase (MPO) is thought to be more physiopathologically relevant. Apolipoprotein B-100 is the unique protein of LDL and is the major target of MPO. Furthermore, MPO rapidly adsorbs at the surface of LDL, promoting oxidation of amino acid residues and formation of oxidized lipoproteins that are commonly named Mox-LDL. The latter is not recognized by the LDL receptor and is accumulated by macrophages. In the context of atherogenesis, Mox-LDL accumulates in macrophages leading to foam cell formation. Furthermore, Mox-LDL seems to have specific effects and triggers inflammation. Indeed, those oxidized lipoproteins activate endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages and induce proinflammatory molecules such as TNFα and IL-8. Mox-LDL may also inhibit fibrinolysis mediated via endothelial cells and consecutively increase the risk of thrombus formation. Finally, Mox-LDL has been involved in the physiopathology of several diseases linked to atherosclerosis such as kidney failure and consequent hemodialysis therapy, erectile dysfunction, and sleep restriction. All these issues show that the investigations of MPO-dependent LDL oxidation are of importance to better understand the inflammatory context of atherosclerosis. PMID:23983406

  6. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-01-01

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL. PMID:27087061

  7. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection

    PubMed Central

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-01-01

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL. PMID:27087061

  8. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-04-18

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL.

  9. Suppression by diets rich in fish oil of very low density lipoprotein production in man.

    PubMed Central

    Nestel, P J; Connor, W E; Reardon, M F; Connor, S; Wong, S; Boston, R

    1984-01-01

    The highly polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils lower the plasma triglyceride concentration. We have studied the effect of a diet rich in fish oil on the rate of production of the triglyceride-transporting very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Seven subjects, five normal and two with hypertriglyceridemia received up to 30% of daily energy needs from a fish oil preparation that was rich in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids with five and six double bonds, respectively. Compared with a diet similarly enriched with safflower oil (in which the predominant fatty acid is the omega-6 linoleic acid, with two double bonds), the fish oil diet lowered VLDL lipids and B apoprotein concentrations profoundly. High density lipoprotein lipids and A1 apoprotein were also lowered, but the effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration was inconsistent. The daily production or flux of VLDL apoprotein B, calculated from reinjected autologous 125I-labeled lipoprotein, was substantially less in six subjects studied after 3 wk of fish oil, compared with after safflower oil. This effect on flux was more consistent than that on the irreversible fractional removal rate, which was increased in the four normolipidemic but inconsistent in the hypertriglyceridemic subjects. This suggests that fish oil reduced primarily the production of VLDL. The daily production of VLDL triglyceride, calculated from the kinetics of the triglyceride specific radioactivity-time curves after [3H]glycerol was injected, also showed very substantial reductions in five subjects studied. The marked suppression in VLDL apoprotein B and VLDL triglyceride formation was found not to be due to diminished plasma total free fatty acid or plasma eicosapentaenoic flux, calculated during constant infusions of [14C]eicosapentaenoic acid and [3H]oleic acid in four subjects. In two subjects there was presumptive evidence for substantial independent influx of LDL during the fish oil diet

  10. Suppression by diets rich in fish oil of very low density lipoprotein production in man.

    PubMed

    Nestel, P J; Connor, W E; Reardon, M F; Connor, S; Wong, S; Boston, R

    1984-07-01

    The highly polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils lower the plasma triglyceride concentration. We have studied the effect of a diet rich in fish oil on the rate of production of the triglyceride-transporting very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Seven subjects, five normal and two with hypertriglyceridemia received up to 30% of daily energy needs from a fish oil preparation that was rich in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids with five and six double bonds, respectively. Compared with a diet similarly enriched with safflower oil (in which the predominant fatty acid is the omega-6 linoleic acid, with two double bonds), the fish oil diet lowered VLDL lipids and B apoprotein concentrations profoundly. High density lipoprotein lipids and A1 apoprotein were also lowered, but the effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration was inconsistent. The daily production or flux of VLDL apoprotein B, calculated from reinjected autologous 125I-labeled lipoprotein, was substantially less in six subjects studied after 3 wk of fish oil, compared with after safflower oil. This effect on flux was more consistent than that on the irreversible fractional removal rate, which was increased in the four normolipidemic but inconsistent in the hypertriglyceridemic subjects. This suggests that fish oil reduced primarily the production of VLDL. The daily production of VLDL triglyceride, calculated from the kinetics of the triglyceride specific radioactivity-time curves after [3H]glycerol was injected, also showed very substantial reductions in five subjects studied. The marked suppression in VLDL apoprotein B and VLDL triglyceride formation was found not to be due to diminished plasma total free fatty acid or plasma eicosapentaenoic flux, calculated during constant infusions of [14C]eicosapentaenoic acid and [3H]oleic acid in four subjects. In two subjects there was presumptive evidence for substantial independent influx of LDL during the fish oil diet

  11. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  12. Heterogeneity of plasma low-density lipoproteins and atherosclerosis risk.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1994-10-01

    Increased levels of IDL and small, dense LDL are associated with the risk of coronary artery disease. Possible mechanisms include increased susceptibility of small, dense LDL to oxidation, and to other pathologic effects, such as increased retention in the arterial wall. Beneficial effects of a low-fat diet and certain lipid-lowering therapies on the levels and properties of small, dense LDL or their precursors may contribute substantially to the reductions in coronary atherosclerosis observed in several lipid-lowering trials.

  13. Oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 mediates oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-ping; Xun, Ke-li; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Tian-tai; Shi, Jing-shan; Du, Guan-hua

    2007-07-01

    Studies have shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) elicits both necrotic and apoptotic cell death and several mechanisms have been proposed. Ox-LDL induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), a second messenger that might be involved in apoptosis, formation in different types of cells including endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). As lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) was the main receptor for ox-LDL, this study was designed to determine whether the apoptosis induced by ox-LDL was mediated by LOX-1 in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and whether there is an association between LOX-1 mediated apoptosis and the production of ROS. After exposure to ox-LDL (50,100, and 150 microg/ml for 18 h), HUVECs exhibit typical apoptotic characteristics as determined by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry analysis in a dose-dependent pattern. Ox-LDL increases intracellular ROS formation including superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with anti-LOX-1 mAb, Vitamin C, apocynin or catalase significantly reduced ROS production and prevented ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, while indomethacin or allopurinol had no effect. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells and that ROS production and NADPH oxidase might play an important role in ox-LDL-induced apoptosis.

  14. Edaravone attenuates monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijuan; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Liping

    2015-10-30

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plays a vital role in recruitment of monocytes to endothelial cells, which is important during early stages of atherosclerosis development. Edaravone, a potent and novel scavenger of free radicals inhibiting hydroxyl radicals, has been clinically used to reduce the neuronal damage following ischemic stroke. In the present study, Edaravone was revealed to markedly reduce oxLDL-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The inhibitory mechanism of Edaravone was associated with suppression of the chemokine MCP-1 and adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression. In addition, luciferase reporter assay results revealed that administration of Edaravone attenuated the increase in NF-κB transcriptional activity induced by oxLDL. Notably, it's also shown that Edaravone treatment blocked oxLDL induced p65 nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Results indicate that Edaravone negatively regulates endothelial inflammation.

  15. Hypercholesterolemia, low density lipoprotein receptor and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-type 9

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hong-mei; Zhang, Da-wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. Plasma levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are positively correlated with the risk of atherosclerosis. High plasma LDL concentrations in patients with hypercholesterolemia lead to build-up of LDL in the inner walls of the arteries, which becomes oxidized and promotes the formation of foam cells, consequently initiating atherosclerosis. Plasma LDL is mainly cleared through the LDL receptor (LDLR) pathway. Mutations in the LDLR cause familiar hypercholesterolemia and increase the risk of premature coronary heart disease. The expression of LDLR is regulated at the transcriptional level via the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and at the posttranslational levels mainly through proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-type 9 (PCSK9) and inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL). In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the studies of PCSK9. PMID:26445568

  16. Glycated albumin and direct low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. We evaluated the ut...

  17. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. 866.5600 Section 866.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. 866.5600 Section 866.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  20. Direct Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Glycated Albumin Levels in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) have been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. The aim in this st...

  1. Overexpression of LOXIN Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Veas, Carlos; Jara, Casandra; Willis, Naomi D; Pérez-Contreras, Karen; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Toledo, Jorge; Fernandez, Paulina; Radojkovic, Claudia; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escudero, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) are adult stem cells located in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Studies have indicated that hEPC play an important role in the recovery and repair of injured endothelium, however, their quantity and functional capacity is reduced in several diseases including hypercholesterolemia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hEPC express lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and its activation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate whether overexpression of LOXIN, a truncated isoform of LOX-1 that acts as a dominant negative, plays a protective role against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in hEPC. Human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to ox-LDL showed a significant increase in LOX-1 expression, and apoptosis began at ox-LDL concentrations above 50 μg/mL. All hEPC apoptosed at 200 μg/mL ox-LDL. High LOXIN expression was generated using adenoviral systems in hEPC and SiHa cells transduced with 100 colony-forming units per cell. Transduced LOXIN localized to the plasma membrane and blocked ox-LDL uptake mediated by LOX-1. Overexpression of LOXIN protected hEPC from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, and therefore maybe a novel way of improving hEPC function and quantity. These results suggest that adenoviral vectors of LOXIN may provide a possible treatment for diseases related to ox-LDL and vascular endothelium dysfunction, including atherosclerosis.

  2. Overexpression of LOXIN Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Veas, Carlos; Jara, Casandra; Willis, Naomi D; Pérez-Contreras, Karen; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Toledo, Jorge; Fernandez, Paulina; Radojkovic, Claudia; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escudero, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) are adult stem cells located in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Studies have indicated that hEPC play an important role in the recovery and repair of injured endothelium, however, their quantity and functional capacity is reduced in several diseases including hypercholesterolemia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hEPC express lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and its activation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate whether overexpression of LOXIN, a truncated isoform of LOX-1 that acts as a dominant negative, plays a protective role against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in hEPC. Human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to ox-LDL showed a significant increase in LOX-1 expression, and apoptosis began at ox-LDL concentrations above 50 μg/mL. All hEPC apoptosed at 200 μg/mL ox-LDL. High LOXIN expression was generated using adenoviral systems in hEPC and SiHa cells transduced with 100 colony-forming units per cell. Transduced LOXIN localized to the plasma membrane and blocked ox-LDL uptake mediated by LOX-1. Overexpression of LOXIN protected hEPC from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, and therefore maybe a novel way of improving hEPC function and quantity. These results suggest that adenoviral vectors of LOXIN may provide a possible treatment for diseases related to ox-LDL and vascular endothelium dysfunction, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26771151

  3. Molecular studies of pH-dependent ligand interactions with the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Chen, Hsuan-Chih; Guigard, Emmanuel; Kay, Cyril M; Ryan, Robert O

    2008-11-01

    The release of ligand from the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) has been postulated to involve a "histidine switch"-induced intramolecular rearrangement that discharges bound ligand. A recombinant soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor (sLDLR) was employed in ligand binding experiments with a fluorescently tagged variant apolipoprotein E N-terminal domain (apoE-NT). Binding was monitored as a function of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from excited Trp residues in sLDLR to an extrinsic fluorophore covalently attached to Trp-null apoE3-NT. In binding experiments with wild-type (WT) sLDLR, FRET-dependent AEDANS fluorescence decreased as the pH was lowered. To investigate the role of His190, His562, and His586 in sLDLR in pH-dependent ligand binding and discharge, site-directed mutagenesis studies were performed. Compared to WT sLDLR, triple His --> Ala mutant sLDLR displayed attenuated pH-dependent ligand binding and a decreased level of ligand release as a function of low pH. When these His residues were substituted for Lys, the positively charged side chain of which does not ionize over this pH range, ligand binding was nearly abolished at all pH values. When sequential His to Lys mutants were examined, the evidence suggested that His562 and His586 function cooperatively. Whereas the sedimentation coefficient for WT sLDLR increased when the pH was reduced from 7 to 5, no such change occurred in the case of the triple Lys mutant receptor or a His562Lys/His586Lys double mutant receptor. The data support the existence of a cryptic, histidine side chain ionization-dependent alternative ligand that modulates ligand discharge via conformational reorganization.

  4. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  5. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway. PMID:26559024

  6. Optical Characterization of Europium Tetracycline Complex in the presence of Low Density Lipoprotein and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Silva, Flávia Rodrigues; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Neto, Antônio M. Figueiredo; Gidlund, Magnus A.; Gomes, Laércio; Junior, Nilson Dias Vieira; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2008-04-01

    Development of native Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) biosensors is of great importance in clinical analysis because the LDL concentration, which is the main carrier of cholesterol, in the plasma, is a fundamental parameter for the prevention and diagnosis of a number of clinical disorders such as heart disease, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The optical properties of the Europium-Tetracycline Complex (EuTc) were investigated for the solutions containing LDL in their compositions. In this paper we show an enhancement in the europium luminescence of EuTc complex in the presence of LDL. The time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experimental results of the pure EuTc sample and samples with LDL (EuTc:LDL) reveal an increase in the europium emission lifetime in the lipoprotein-doped samples with respect to the pure EuTc sample. A calibration curve, reasonably well described by a linear function between 0 and 3 mg/mL of LDL, was obtained. The obtained limit of detection was 0.23 mg/mL. Sixteen blood plasma samples all of them contend approximately 90 mg/dL of LDL were studied and the LDL concentrations were calculated with our method. The average LDL concentration obtained was 94 mg/dL. The results show that the EuTc complex can be used as a sensor to determine LDL with fast response, compact design, and reproducible results.

  7. Thinking beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: strategies to further reduce cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh K; Singh, Vibhuti N; Reddy, Hanumanth K

    2009-01-01

    Several large statin trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some trials have also highlighted the significance of residual cardiovascular risk after treatment of LDL-C to target levels. This reflects the complex nature of residual cardiovascular risk. This residual risk is partially due to low HDL-C and high triglycerides (TG) despite achievement of LDL goals with statin therapy. The NCEP ATP III guidelines reported that low HDL-C is a significant and an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and is inversely related to CHD. Epidemiologic studies have also shown a similar inverse relationship of HDL-C with CHD. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) may directly participate in the anti-atherogenic process by promoting efflux of cholesterol of the foam cells of atherogenic lesions. Many studies have demonstrated multiple anti-atherogenic actions of HDL-C and its role in promoting efflux of cholesterol from the foam cells. The residual risk by increased TG with or without low HDL-C can be assessed by calculating non-HDL-C and a reduction in TG results in decreased CHD. PMID:19812691

  8. Linkage analysis of low-density lipoprotein subclass phenotypes and the apolipoprotein B gene.

    PubMed

    LaBelle, M; Austin, M A; Rubin, E; Krauss, R M

    1991-01-01

    A common heritable phenotype has recently been identified which is characterized by a relative abundance of small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and mild elevations of plasma triglycerides and reductions in plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol. This phenotype, designated LDL subclass phenotype B, has been associated with up to a three-fold increase in coronary disease risk. Complex segregation analysis in two large family studies has demonstrated that LDL subclass phenotype B is influenced by an allele at a single genetic locus with a population frequency of 0.25-0.3, and autosomal dominant inheritance, but with full penetrance only in males age 20 and over and in postmenopausal women. Since apolipoprotein B (apoB) is the principal protein component of LDL, linkage analysis was used to investigate possible linkage between the phenotype B phenotype and the apoB gene, using a variable number of tandem repeats site located 0.5 kb from the 3' end of the apoB gene. In 6 informative families including only family members in the penetrant classes, a total LOD score of -7.49 was found at a recombination fraction of 0.001. Thus, under the assumptions of the single gene model, it is unlikely that the apoB locus controls LDL subclass phenotype B.

  9. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  10. Translation of two aggregated low-density lipoproteins within blood plasma: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Hadjinicolaou, Maria; Protopapas, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Arteriosclerosis is a disease in which the artery walls get thicker and harder. Atherosclerosis is a specific form of arteriosclerosis which allows less blood to travel through the artery and increases blood pressure. Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) and their ability to aggregate are important in atherosclerosis. In the present study we develop a mathematical model that describes the translation of two aggregated LDSs through blood plasma. We model the two aggregated LDLs as an inverted oblate spheroid and the flow as a creeping steady incompressible axisymmetric one. The mathematical tools that we used are the Kelvin inversion and the semi-separation of variables in the spheroidal coordinate systems. The stream function is given as a series expansion of even order terms of combinations of Gegenbauer functions of angular and radial dependence. The analytical solution is expected to give insight into the study of the various chemical precipitation methods used for the precipitation of lipoproteins, as this is the first step for the measurement of their concentration within blood plasma. PMID:25417024

  11. Lower Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels Are Associated with Severe Dengue Outcome.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Hope H; Gordon, Aubree; Nuñez, Andrea; Perez, Maria Angeles; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a flavivirus of worldwide importance, with approximately 4 billion people across 128 countries at risk of infection, and up to 390 million infections and 96 million clinically apparent cases estimated annually. Previous in vitro studies have shown that lipids and lipoproteins play a role in modifying virus infectivity. However, the relationship between development of severe dengue and total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), respectively, is unclear. We analyzed data from 789 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases and 447 other febrile illnesses (OFI) in a prospective pediatric hospital-based study in Managua, Nicaragua between August 2005 and January 2013, using three different classifications of dengue severity: World Health Organization (WHO) 1997, WHO 2009, and standardized intervention categories. Total serum cholesterol and LDL-C levels decreased over the course of illness and were generally lower with increasing dengue severity, regardless of classification scheme. Greater decreases in LDL-C than HDL-C were observed among dengue-positive patients compared to patients with OFI and among severe dengue compared to mild dengue cases. Furthermore, daily cholesterol levels declined with daily albumin blood levels. To examine the effect of cholesterol at presentation on subsequent risk of development of severe dengue, relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariable modified Poisson models. We found that lower total serum cholesterol and LDL-C levels at presentation were associated with subsequent risk of developing dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome using the WHO 1997 dengue severity classification, and thus that the reduction in LDL-C is likely driving the decreases observed in total serum cholesterol levels among dengue-positive patients. Our results suggest that cholesterol blood levels are important correlates of dengue

  12. Low density lipoprotein uptake by an endothelial-smooth muscle cell bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1991-03-01

    To study the interaction of endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and the means by which such interaction may affect lipid permeability of the arterial wall, cell bilayers were established by use of a transwell culture system. After confluent growth of both cell types had been achieved, iodine 125 bound to low-density lipoprotein (10 ng protein/ml) was added to the media of the upper well. After a 3-hour incubation period, the iodine 125-bound low-density lipoprotein content of the upper and lower media demonstrated an impedance to lipoprotein movement across the endothelial cell monolayer as compared to the bare porous polycarbonate filter of the transwell (p less than 10(-6)). The presence of smooth muscle cells in the bottom well significantly enhanced the permeability of the endothelial cell layer (p less than 10(-60)). This effect remained unchanged over a 9-day time course. Membrane binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells was not altered by smooth muscle cells, indicating that this change in permeability could not be easily attributed to changes in receptor-mediated transport or transcytosis. Membrane binding (p less than 0.02) and cellular uptake (p less than 10(-6)) of low-density lipoprotein by smooth muscle cells in the bilayer, when adjusted for counts available in the smooth muscle cell media, were both reduced in the early incubation period as compared to isolated smooth muscle cells. The disproportionate reduction in uptake as compared to binding would suggest that this was not entirely a receptor-dependent process.

  13. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  14. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  15. Baseline lipoprotein lipids and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to prescription omega-3 acid ethyl ester added to Simvastatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Dicklin, Mary R; Davidson, Michael H; Doyle, Ralph T; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2010-05-15

    The present post hoc analysis of data from the COMBination of prescription Omega-3 with Simvastatin (COMBOS) study investigated the predictors of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol response to prescription omega-3 acid ethyl ester (P-OM3) therapy in men and women with high (200 to 499 mg/dl) triglycerides during diet plus simvastatin therapy. Subjects (n = 256 randomized) received double-blind P-OM3 4 g/day or placebo for 8 weeks combined with diet and open-label simvastatin 40 mg/day. The percentage of changes from baseline (with diet plus simvastatin) in lipids was evaluated by tertiles of baseline LDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. The baseline LDL cholesterol tertile was a significant predictor of the LDL cholesterol response (p = 0.022 for the treatment by baseline tertile interaction). The median LDL cholesterol response in the P-OM3 group was +9.5% (first tertile, <80.4 mg/dl), -0.9% (second tertile), and -6.4% (third tertile, > or =99.0 mg/dl). Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride responses did not vary significantly by baseline LDL cholesterol tertile. The reductions in very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were greater than the increases in LDL cholesterol, where present, resulting in a net decrease in the concentration of cholesterol carried by atherogenic particles (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in all baseline LDL cholesterol tertiles. In conclusion, these results suggest that the increase in LDL cholesterol that occurred with the addition of P-OM3 to simvastatin therapy in subjects with mixed dyslipidemia was confined predominantly to those with low LDL cholesterol levels while receiving simvastatin monotherapy. PMID:20451686

  16. Studies on the structure of low density lipoproteins isolated from Macaca fascicularis fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Tall, A R; Small, D M; Atkinson, D; Rudel, L L

    1978-12-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys, Macaca fascicularis, fed cholesterol-containing saturated-fat diets develop increased levels of high molecular weight plasma low density lipoproteins (LDL), associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. To study the composition and structure of these abnormal particles, LDL from monkeys, fed atherogenic and control diets, were characterized chemically and examined by differential scanning calorimetry and low-angle X-ray scattering. LDL from animals on the experimental diet showed an increase in molecular weight (4.0 to 7.0 x 10(6), experimental diet compared with 3.0 to 3.7 x 10(6), control diet) associated with a large increase in cholesterol ester content and concomitant smaller increases in protein, phospholipid, and free cholesterol. There was a strong positive correlation between molecular weight and the number of saturated and monounsaturated cholesterol esters in the particle. In contrast, particle content of polyunsaturated cholesterol esters remained constant despite large changes in total particle cholesterol esters.When examined by calorimetry and X-ray scattering, LDL from monkeys on both diets diplayed a reversible transition of cholesterol esters from an ordered smeticlike (layered) structure to a more disordered state. For all animals on the experimental diet, the peak temperature of the cholesterol-ester transition (42-48 degrees C) was above body temperature (39 degrees C), but below body temperature on the control diet (34-38.5 degrees C). In the experimental group, the transition temperature was correlated with the LDL molecular weight. However, after thermal disruption of LDL, liquid-crystalline transitions of LDL cholesterol esters were observed in the same temperature range as in the intact lipoprotein, which shows that changes in particle size had little effect on the cholesterol-ester transition temperature. Rather, the transition temperature was determined by the degree of saturation of the LDL cholesterol ester fatty

  17. Effect of ethyl esterification of phenolic acids on low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chalas, J; Claise, C; Edeas, M; Messaoudi, C; Vergnes, L; Abella, A; Lindenbaum, A

    2001-02-01

    Inhibition of copper-induced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by phenolic acids and their ethyl esters was investigated. LDL oxidation was evaluated by the hydroperoxide concentration and the chromatographic pattern of apoprotein fractions after fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Antiradical properties against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical and 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH) were also investigated, and lipophilicity determined by thin-layer chromatography. Caffeic acid at 5 microM and sinapic acid at 10 microM protected LDL against oxidation, inhibiting both hydroperoxide formation and the increase of apoprotein negative charge. Ferulic, gallic and p-hydroxy cinnamic acids were ineffective. Ethyl esterification increased the lipophilicity of the five acids, and enhanced the antioxidant properties of caffeic, sinapic and ferulic acids. Ethyl caffeate was protective at 1 microM. In contrast, gallic and p-hydroxy cinnamic ethyl esters were ineffective. Our results indicate that ethyl esterification of phenolic acids increases lipophilicity of their ethyl esters and may enable a better incorporation into the lipid layer of the LDL particle and the exertion of their antioxidant effect in the true site of lipoperoxidation. However, increasing lipophilicity is not the only mechanism able to potentiate preexisting antioxidant properties of molecules, and probably other mechanisms are implicated.

  18. Proteome analysis of human monocytic THP-1 cells primed with oxidized low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Han; Kim, Hyun Tae; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won Ha; Huh, Tae-Lin; Park, Yong Bok; Moon, Byung Jo; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2006-02-01

    Native low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) possess a wide variety of biological properties, and play a central role in atherogenesis. In this study, we used a proteomic analysis of human monocyte THP-1 cells induced with oxLDL or with LDL, to identify proteins potentially involved in atherosclerotic processes. Of the 2500 proteins detected, 93 were differentially expressed as a result of priming with LDL or oxLDL. The proteins were unambiguously identified by comparing the masses of their tryptic peptides with those of all known proteins using MALDI-TOF MS and the NCBI database. The largest differences in expression were observed for vimentin (94-fold increase), meningioma-expressed antigen 6 (48-fold increase), serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (40-fold increase), and beta-1,3-galactosyltransferase (15-fold increase). In contrast, the abundance of an unnamed protein product and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decreased 30-fold and 25-fold, respectively. The expression of some selected proteins was confirmed by Western blot and RT-PCR analyses. The proteins identified in this study are attractive candidates for further biomarker research. This description of the altered protein profiles induced by oxLDL in human monocytes will support functional studies of the macrophage-derived foam cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:16402358

  19. Polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene and fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Gang; Gu, Mingyong; Zhou, Zhenyu; Cao, Xuecheng

    2014-01-01

    Several molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to examine the association between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP5) Ala1330Val polymorphism and fracture; however, the conclusions remained controversial. We therefore performed an extensive meta-analysis on 10 published studies with 184479 subjects. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, Elsevier Science Direct and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using random-effects models. LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of fracture (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.14; I(2) = 29%). We also found that this polymorphism increased fracture risk in Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis according to gender, women was significantly associated with risk of fracture. In the subgroup analysis by type of fracture, LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism showed increased osteoporotic fracture risk. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that an increased risk of fracture was associated with the LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism.

  20. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  1. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Affects Hyaluronan Synthesis in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N.; Hascall, Vincent C.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20–50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL. PMID:23979132

  2. Apolipoprotein E on Hepatitis C Virion Facilitates Infection through Interaction with Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David M.; Huang, Hua; Ye, Jin; Gale, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease. HCV associates with host apolipoproteins and enters hepatocytes through complex processes involving some combination of CD81, claudin-I, occludin, and scavenger receptor BI. Here we show that infectious HCV resembles very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and that entry involves co-receptor function of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R). Blocking experiments demonstrate that β-VLDL itself or anti-apolipoprotein E (apoE) antibody can block HCV entry. Knockdown of the LDL-R by treatment with 25-hydroxycholesterol or siRNA ablated ligand uptake and reduced HCV infection of cells, whereas infection was rescued upon cell ectopic LDL-R expression. Analyses of gradient-fractionated HCV demonstrate that apoE is associated with HCV virions exhibiting peak infectivity and dependence upon the LDL-R for cell entry. Our results define the LDL-R as a cooperative HCV co-receptor that supports viral entry and infectivity through interaction with apoE ligand present in an infectious HCV/lipoprotein complex comprising the virion. Disruption of HCV/LDL-R interactions by altering lipoprotein metabolism may therefore represent a focus for future therapy. PMID:19751943

  3. Lipoprotein(a) Catabolism Is Regulated by Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 through the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Romagnuolo, Rocco; Scipione, Corey A.; Boffa, Michael B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) have been identified as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Plasma Lp(a) levels are reduced by monoclonal antibodies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). However, the mechanism of Lp(a) catabolism in vivo and the role of PCSK9 in this process are unknown. We report that Lp(a) internalization by hepatic HepG2 cells and primary human fibroblasts was effectively reduced by PCSK9. Overexpression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) in HepG2 cells dramatically increased the internalization of Lp(a). Internalization of Lp(a) was markedly reduced following treatment of HepG2 cells with a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against the LDLR or the use of primary human fibroblasts from an individual with familial hypercholesterolemia; in both cases, Lp(a) internalization was not affected by PCSK9. Optimal Lp(a) internalization in both hepatic and primary human fibroblasts was dependent on the LDL rather than the apolipoprotein(a) component of Lp(a). Lp(a) internalization was also dependent on clathrin-coated pits, and Lp(a) was targeted for lysosomal and not proteasomal degradation. Our data provide strong evidence that the LDLR plays a role in Lp(a) catabolism and that this process can be modulated by PCSK9. These results provide a direct mechanism underlying the therapeutic potential of PCSK9 in effectively lowering Lp(a) levels. PMID:25778403

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Oxidized LDL) and the risk of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, C; Phung, T T T; Vadachkoria, S; Muy-Rivera, M; Sanchez, S E; Williams, M A

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. In a case-control study of 99 women with preeclampsia and 99 controls, we assessed maternal plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxidized LDL) in relation to preeclampsia risk. Logistic regression procedures were used to derive odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Plasma oxidized LDL was determined using enzyme immunoassay. Maternal plasma oxidized LDL was significantly positively correlated with lipids in both cases and controls. After adjusting for nulliparity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, physical inactivity, family history of chronic hypertension and plasma vitamin C concentrations, women who had elevated oxidized LDL concentrations ( > or = 50 U/l) experienced a 2.9-fold increased risk of preeclampsia when compared with women having lower oxidized LDL concentrations (95 % CI 1.4-5.9). The risk of preeclampsia was markedly increased in women who had both elevated oxidized LDL and elevated triglyceride concentrations (OR=8.9, 95 % CI 3.1-26.2). Women with both elevated oxidized LDL and low vitamin C concentrations experienced a 9.8-fold increased risk of preeclampsia (95 % CI 3.0-32.2). Our results confirm the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Prospective studies are needed to determine if elevated oxidized LDL concentrations can predict the occurrence of preeclampsia.

  5. The effects of ascorbate and dehydroascorbate on the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Stait, S E; Leake, D S

    1996-01-01

    Ascorbate at concentrations of 60-100 microM inhibits the modification of freshly prepared low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by macrophages. With 'moderately oxidized' LDL (produced by prolonged storage in a refrigerator), however, ascorbate does not inhibit LDL modification by macrophages and actually modifies the LDL itself in the absence of macrophages [Stait and Leake (1994) FEBS Lett. 341, 263-267]. We have now shown that dehydroascorbate can modify both 'fresh' LDL and moderately oxidized LDL in a dose-dependent manner to increase its uptake by macrophages. The modification of moderately oxidized LDL by ascorbate and dehydroascorbate or of 'fresh' LDL by dehydroascorbate is dependent on the presence of iron or copper. In 'fresh' LDL, ascorbate inhibited conjugated-diene formation by copper. In moderately oxidized LDL, the number of conjugated dienes present was decreased rapidly in the presence of copper and ascorbate. Dehydroascorbate decreased the lag phase and increased the rate of copper-induced conjugated-diene formation in 'fresh' LDL (although in some experiments it inhibited the formation of conjugated dienes). The ascorbate-modified moderately oxidized LDL was taken up by macrophages by their scavenger receptors, as the uptake was inhibited by polyinosinic acid or fucoidan. Ascorbate and dehydroascorbate therefore have the potential to increase LDL oxidation under certain conditions, but whether or not they do so in vivo is unknown. PMID:8973543

  6. Macrophage uptake of low-density lipoprotein modified by 4-hydroxynonenal. An ultrastructural study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, H.F.; Cole, T.B. )

    1991-02-01

    We have documented the ultrastructural characteristics of the uptake and processing by mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modified with 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an intermediate of lipid peroxidation. This was performed as part of a larger biochemical study assessing the role of LDL oxidation in lipid loading of macrophages during atherogenesis. Gold-labeled LDL that was modified with HNE leading to particle aggregation represented the morphologic probe used. When incubated with MPM, the probe became associated with short segments of cell membrane, probably derived from blebs or from lysed cells. At 37 degrees C there was a time-dependent increase in uptake by MPM, and at 4 hours the increase paralleled the degradation by MPM of 125I-labeled HNE-LDL-cAu. Clathrin-coated pits on the cell surface were consistently associated with probe. Uptake of probe appeared to occur via phagocytosis, because pseudopods frequently surrounded probe, and cytochalasin D quantitatively prevented probe uptake. A time-dependent increase was found in the number of gold particles per unit area within vacuoles, some of which were secondary lysosomes, based on acid phosphatase-positive staining. Thus, HNE-induced aggregation of LDL during oxidation, binding of aggregates to clathrin-coated pits on MPM, and subsequent phagocytosis may represent one of the ways lipid-laden foam cells are formed in vivo.

  7. Involvement of second messengers in regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Auwerx, J.H. . ECHEM Labs.); Chait, A.; Wolfbauer, G.; Deeb, S.S. . Dept. of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    Transcription of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene in the human monocytic leukemic cell line THP-1 and in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line Hep-G2 is regulated by second messengers of the diacylglycerol-protein kinase C (DAG-PKC), inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-Ca/sup 2+/, and cyclic AMP pathways. Exogeneous phospholipase C (which releases DAG and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate), PKC activators (phorbol esters and DAG), Ca/sup 2+/ ionophores, and a cyclic AMP analog all transiently induced accumulation of LDL-R mRNA. The effects of these three signal-transducing pathways were to a large extend additive. Furthermore, PKC stimulation effected an increase in LDL binding, which suggested that the increase in LDL-R mRNA resulted in an increase in functional cell surface receptor activity. These results suggest that uptake of cholesterol by these cells is under control of both intracellular cholesterol levels and external signals.

  8. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-04-03

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins.

  9. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins. PMID:24694979

  10. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-04-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins.

  11. Cholesterol-Dependent Anaplasma phagocytophilum Exploits the Low-Density Lipoprotein Uptake Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qingming; Lin, Mingqun; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, intracellular cholesterol homeostasis and trafficking are tightly regulated. Certain bacteria, such as Anaplasma phagocytophilum, also require cholesterol; it is unknown, however, how this cholesterol-dependent obligatory intracellular bacterium of granulocytes interacts with the host cell cholesterol regulatory pathway to acquire cholesterol. Here, we report that total host cell cholesterol increased >2-fold during A. phagocytophilum infection in a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. Cellular free cholesterol was enriched in A. phagocytophilum inclusions as detected by filipin staining. We determined that A. phagocytophilum requires cholesterol derived from low-density lipoprotein (LDL), because its replication was significantly inhibited by depleting the growth medium of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins, by blocking LDL uptake with a monoclonal antibody against LDL receptor (LDLR), or by treating the host cells with inhibitors that block LDL-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes or lysosomes. However, de novo cholesterol biosynthesis is not required, since inhibition of the biosynthesis pathway did not inhibit A. phagocytophilum infection. The uptake of fluorescence-labeled LDL was enhanced in infected cells, and LDLR expression was up-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. A. phagocytophilum infection stabilized LDLR mRNA through the 3′ UTR region, but not through activation of the sterol regulatory element binding proteins. Extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) was up-regulated by A. phagocytophilum infection, and inhibition of its upstream kinase, MEK, by a specific inhibitor or siRNA knockdown, reduced A. phagocytophilum infection. Up-regulation of LDLR mRNA by A. phagocytophilum was also inhibited by the MEK inhibitor; however, it was unclear whether ERK activation is required for LDLR mRNA up-regulation by A. phagocytophilum. These data reveal that A. phagocytophilum exploits the host LDL uptake pathway and

  12. Red grape seed extract improves lipid profiles and decreases oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with mild hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Seyed-Mostafa; Gholamin, Sharareh; Eskandari, Ali; Mohsenian, Nakta; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Delazar, Abbas; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Argani, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia can lead to atherosclerosis by lipoprotein deposition inside the vessel wall and oxidative stress induction that leads to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein particles (Ox-LDL) have a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The lipid-lowering properties and antioxidants of the grape seed can be beneficial in atherosclerosis prevention. We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial. Fifty-two mildly hyperlipidemic individuals were divided into two groups that received either 200 mg/day of the red grape seed extract (RGSE) or placebo for 8 weeks. After an 8-week washout period, the groups were crossed over for another 8 weeks. Lipid profiles and Ox-LDL were measured at the beginning and the end of each phase. RGSE consumption reduced total cholesterol (-10.68±26.76 mg/dL, P=.015), LDL cholesterol (-9.66±23.92 mg/dL, P=.014), and Ox-LDL (-5.47±12.12 mg/dL, P=.008). While triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was increased by RGSE, the changes were not statistically significant. RGSE consumption decreases Ox-LDL and has beneficial effects on lipid profile-consequently decreasing the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders-in mild hyperlipidemic individuals.

  13. l-Cystathionine Inhibits the Mitochondria-Mediated Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingzhu; Du, Junbao; Chen, Siyao; Liu, Angie Dong; Holmberg, Lukas; Chen, Yonghong; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the regulatory role of l-cystathionine in human macrophage apoptosis induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and its possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells were induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and differentiated into macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with ox-LDL after pretreatment with l-cystathionine. Superoxide anion, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening were examined. Caspase-9 activities and expression of cleaved caspase-3 were measured. The results showed that compared with control group, ox-LDL treatment significantly promoted superoxide anion generation, release of cytochrome c (cytc) from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and cell apoptosis, in addition to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential as well as increased MPTP opening. However, 0.3 and 1.0 mmol/L l-cystathionine significantly reduced superoxide anion generation, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and markedly decreased MPTP opening in ox-LDL + l-cystathionine macrophages. Moreover, compared to ox-LDL treated-cells, release of cytc from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and apoptosis levels in l-cystathionine pretreated cells were profoundly attenuated. Taken together, our results suggested that l-cystathionine could antagonize mitochondria-mediated human macrophage apoptosis induced by ox-LDL via inhibition of cytc release and caspase activation. PMID:25514411

  14. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy.

  15. Acceleration of atherogenesis by COX-1-dependent prostanoid formation in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Tillmann, C; Zhang, Z B; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2001-03-13

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) product, prostacyclin (PGI(2)), inhibits platelet activation and vascular smooth-muscle cell migration and proliferation. Biochemically selective inhibition of COX-2 reduces PGI(2) biosynthesis substantially in humans. Because deletion of the PGI(2) receptor accelerates atherogenesis in the fat-fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse, we wished to determine whether selective inhibition of COX-2 would accelerate atherogenesis in this model. To address this hypothesis, we used dosing with nimesulide, which inhibited COX-2 ex vivo, depressed urinary 2,3 dinor 6-keto PGF(1alpha) by approximately 60% but had no effect on thromboxane formation by platelets, which only express COX-1. By contrast, the isoform nonspecific inhibitor, indomethacin, suppressed platelet function and thromboxane formation ex vivo and in vivo, coincident with effects on PGI(2) biosynthesis indistinguishable from nimesulide. Indomethacin reduced the extent of atherosclerosis by 55 +/- 4%, whereas nimesulide failed to increase the rate of atherogenesis. Despite their divergent effects on atherogenesis, both drugs depressed two indices of systemic inflammation, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 to a similar but incomplete degree. Neither drug altered serum lipids and the marked increase in vascular expression of COX-2 during atherogenesis. Accelerated progression of atherosclerosis is unlikely during chronic intake of specific COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, evidence that COX-1-derived prostanoids contribute to atherogenesis suggests that controlled evaluation of the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or aspirin on plaque progression in humans is timely.

  16. Cellular uptake of a dexamethasone palmitate-low density lipoprotein complex by macrophages and foam cells.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of a dexamethasone palmitate (DP)-low density lipoprotein (LDL) complex to transport drug into foam cells, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by macrophages and foam cells was examined. The DP-LDL complex was prepared by incubation with DP and LDL, and the DP-LDL complex and murine macrophages were incubated. No cellular uptake of the DP-LDL complex by macrophages was found until 6 h after the start of incubation, but this gradually increased from 12 to 48 h. On the other hand, the cellular uptake of the oxidized DP-LDL complex was already apparent at 3 h after the start incubation, and then markedly increased until 48 h incubation along with that of the lipid emulsion (LE) containing DP (DP-LE). The cellular uptake of DP-LE by foam cells was significantly lower than that by macrophages. However, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by foam cells was similar to that by macrophages. These findings suggest that the DP-LDL complex is oxidatively modified, and then incorporated into macrophages and foam cells through the scavenger receptor pathway. Since selective delivery of drugs into foam cells in the early stage of atherosclerosis is a useful protocol for antiatherosclerosis treatment, the DP-LDL complex appears to be a potentially useful drug-carrier complex for future antiatherosclerotic therapy.

  17. Characterization of native and drug-loaded human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Westesen, K; Gerke, A; Koch, M H

    1995-02-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), the physiological vehicles for lipids, are potentially useful drug delivery devices for (hydrophobic) drugs. The physicochemical characteristics of LDL loaded with the adriamycin derivative AD 32 or the N-mustard derivative WB 4291 were compared to that of native and reconstituted LDL at different temperatures. X-ray solution scattering indicates that loading with AD 32 has no detectable effect on the particle structure at room temperature, in contrast to WB 4291. According to 19F NMR data, AD 32 molecules are located in two distinct chemical environments with restricted motional freedom of the CF3 groups in samples stored as lyophilisates. 1H NMR signals from AD 32 were not observed, while those from WB 4291 could be distinguished from those of LDL constituents. WB 4291 molecules are in an environment with a higher motional freedom than AD 32 molecules. 1H NMR data suggest a higher fluidity of the core components for the WB-loaded LDLs compared to the other LDL preparations. While the motional freedom of the phospholipid head groups seems to be temperature independent, there is an increase in the mobility of the lipid components in the core region of the LDL particles with temperature. PMID:7738790

  18. Enhanced Sphingomyelinase Activity Contributes to the Apoptotic Capacity of Electronegative Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ke, Liang-Yin; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Lu, Jonathan; Marathe, Gopal K; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Chan, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Chung-Ya; Tung, Yi-Ching; McIntyre, Thomas M; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-02-11

    Sphingomyelinase (SMase) catalyzes the degradation of sphingomyelin to ceramide. In patients with metabolic syndrome or diabetes, circulating plasma ceramide levels are significantly higher than in normal individuals. Our data indicate that electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) shows SMase activity, which leads to increased ceramide levels that can produce pro-inflammatory effects and susceptibility to aggregation. According to sequence alignment and protein structure predictions, the putative catalytic site of SMase activity is in the α2 region of apoB-100. To identify specific post-translational modifications of apoB100 near the catalytic region, we performed data-independent, parallel-fragmentation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS(E)), followed by data analysis with ProteinLynx GlobalServer v2.4. Results showed that the serine of apoB100 in electronegative LDL was highly O-glycosylated, including S(1732), S(1959), S(2378), S(2408), and S(2429). These findings may support the changing of the α-helix/β-pleated sheets ratio in protein structure analysis. Further study is necessary to confirm the activation of SMase activity by electronegative LDL. PMID:26766134

  19. Inheritance of low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns: results of complex segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Austin, M A; King, M C; Vranizan, K M; Newman, B; Krauss, R M

    1988-12-01

    Heterogeneity in the size of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles was used to identify two distinct patterns based on gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. These two phenotypes, LDL subclass pattern A and pattern B, were characterized by a predominance of large, buoyant LDL particles and small, dense LDL particles, respectively. The inheritance of these LDL subclass patterns was investigated in a sample of 61 healthy families including 301 individuals. LDL subclass pattern B was present in 31% of the subjects, with the prevalence varying by gender, age, and (in women) menopausal status. Complex segregation analysis suggested a major locus controlling LDL subclass patterns. The model providing the best fit to the data included a dominant mode of inheritance with a frequency of .25 for the allele determining LDL subclass pattern B and reduced penetrance for men under age 20 and for premenopausal women. Thus, the allele for the LDL subclass pattern characterized by a predominance of small, dense LDL particles appears to be very common in the population, although not usually expressed until adulthood in men and until after menopause in women. The presence of a major gene controlling LDL subclass could explain much of the familial aggregation of lipid and apolipoprotein levels and may be involved in increased risk of coronary heart disease.

  20. Low-density lipoprotein peptide-combined DNA nanocomplex as an efficient anticancer drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Tao, Jun; Hua, Haiying; Sun, Pengchao; Zhao, Yongxing

    2015-08-01

    DNA is a type of potential biomaterials for drug delivery due to its nanoscale geometry, loading capacity of therapeutics, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Unfortunately, DNA is easily degraded by DNases in the body circulation and has low intracellular uptake. In the present study, we selected three cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor targeted peptide (RLT), to modify DNA and improve the issues. A potent anti-tumor anthracycline-doxorubicin (DOX) was intercalated into DNA non-covalently and the DOX/DNA was then combined with PEI, CTAB, and RLT, respectively. Compact nanocomplexes were formed by electrostatic interaction and could potentially protect DNA from DNases. More importantly, RLT had the potential to enhance intracellular uptake by LDL receptor mediated endocytosis. In a series of in vitro experiments, RLT complexed DNA enhanced intracellular delivery of DOX, increased tumor cell death and intracellular ROS production, and reduced intracellular elimination of DOX. All results suggested that the easily prepared and targeted RLT/DNA nanocomplexes had great potential to be developed into a formulation for doxorubicin with enhanced anti-tumor activity.

  1. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction.

    PubMed

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost-benefit ratio.

  2. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  3. Analysis of non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein accumulation in an artery.

    PubMed

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola

    2016-06-14

    In this work, non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) transport across an artery are analyzed with a multi-layer model. Four rheological models (Carreau, Carreau-Yasuda, power-law and Newtonian) are used for the blood flow through the lumen. For the non-Newtonian cases, the arterial wall is modeled with a generalized momentum equation. Convection-diffusion equation is used for the LDL transport through the lumen, while Staverman-Kedem-Katchalsky, combined with porous media equations, are used for the LDL transport through the wall. Results are presented in terms of filtration velocity, Wall Shear Stresses (WSS) and concentration profiles. It is shown that non-Newtonian effects on mass transport are negligible for a healthy intramural pressure value. Non-Newtonian effects increase slightly with intramural pressure, but Newtonian assumption can still be considered reliable. Effects of arterial size are also analyzed, showing that Newtonian assumption can be considered valid for both medium and large arteries, in predicting LDL deposition. Finally, non-Newtonian effects are also analyzed for an aorta-common iliac bifurcation, showing that Newtonian assumption is valid for mass transport at low Reynolds numbers. At a high Reynolds number, it has been shown that a non-Newtonian fluid model can have more impact due to the presence of flow recirculation. PMID:27055766

  4. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost–benefit ratio. PMID:27143910

  5. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction.

    PubMed

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost-benefit ratio. PMID:27143910

  6. Evalution of in vitro effect of flavonoids on human low-density lipoprotein carbamylation.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Shanaki, Mehrnoosh

    2010-01-01

    The non-enzymatic carbamylation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a naturally occurring chemical modification of apolipoprotein B as a result of condensation between lysine residues and cyanate derived from urea. Carbamylated LDL is poorly recognized by LDL receptors and initiates different processes that can be considered proatherogenic. Thus, LDL carbamylation may contribute to the increased risk of atherosclerosis in patients with kidney failure. The objective of this study was to investigate in vitro effects of flavonoids on LDL carbamylation. LDL was isolated from plasma using ultracentrifuge technique with a single step discontinuous gradient. Then, cyanate was added to LDL and LDL carbamylation level was estimated in absence and presence of flavonoids by a colorimetric method at 530 nm. The results of this study showed that a number of flavonoids including rutin, catechin, morin, myricetin, kaempferol, taxifolin, luteolin, naringin and quercetin decreased LDL carbamylation in a dose dependent manner. Also, it was demonstrated that these nutrients decreased electrophoretic mobility of carbamylated LDL. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is suggested that flavonoids are able to inhibit LDL carbamylation (probably by scavenging cyanate ions) and thus, may have a role in ameliorating atherosclerotic risk of patients with kidney failure.

  7. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins induced inflammatory process during atherogenesis with aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi, Anis; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Douziech, Nadine; Guérard, Karl-Philippe; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2005-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease developing through decades with two life-threatening complications: myocardial infarction and stroke. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) produced by oxidative modifications of LDL in the subendothelial space have been demonstrated to be critically involved in atherogenesis through their intensive pro-inflammatory activity. Recently, it was shown that oxLDL have an apoptosis-inducing effect in T cells depending on time and degree of oxidation. The goal of the current study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoptotic-inducing effects of oxLDL on T lymphocytes. T cells of young and elderly subjects were incubated for various periods of time with LDL oxidized to various degrees. The proliferation, the apoptosis, the MAPK ERK1/2 activation and the expression of the Bcl-2 protein family members were measured upon different LDL treatments. Thus, more the LDL are oxidized more they induce apoptosis and this effect is highly accentuated with aging. The oxLDL decrease the activation of the surviving molecule ERK1/2 and modulate the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 towards a pro-apoptotic profile, which is also accentuated with aging. These results partly explain why atherosclerosis is increasing with aging concomitantly to its complications.

  8. Practical technique to quantify small, dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trirongjitmoah, Suchin; Iinaga, Kazuya; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Chiba, Hitoshi; Sriyudthsak, Mana; Shimizu, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of small, dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) cholesterol is clinically significant. We propose a practical technique to estimate the amount of sdLDL cholesterol using dynamic light scattering (DLS). An analytical solution in a closed form has newly been obtained to estimate the weight fraction of one species of scatterers in the DLS measurement of two species of scatterers. Using this solution, we can quantify the sdLDL cholesterol amount from the amounts of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, which are commonly obtained through clinical tests. The accuracy of the proposed technique was confirmed experimentally using latex spheres with known size distributions. The applicability of the proposed technique was examined using samples of human blood serum. The possibility of estimating the sdLDL amount using the HDL data was demonstrated. These results suggest that the quantitative estimation of sdLDL amounts using DLS is feasible for point-of-care testing in clinical practice.

  9. Amphiphilic polyvinyl alcohol adsorbent for the removal of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao Ting; Zhu, Huijun; Wang, Shenqi

    2015-04-01

    Spacer can effectively reduce the steric hindrance and synergistic effect of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands immobilized in adsorbents can improve the specific adsorption for low-density lipoprotein (LDL). In this paper, in order to improve the adsorption capacity for the Low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), specifically, amphiphilic adsorbent based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) containing cholesterol ligand and sulfonic dextran ligands was synthesized. All kinds of factors affecting the synthesis yield and adsorption properties were studied in detail. Results showed that the amphiphilic PVA adsorbent has higher adsorption capacity for total cholesterol (TC), (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), and lower adsorption capacity, and percentage for high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), while the ligand ratio of cholesterol to sulfonic ligands is 1.57:1, the adsorption percentage and adsorption capacity for TC, LDL-C, TG, and HDL-C were 54.4%, 67.6%, 42.5%, 10.4% and 4.02, 3.612, 2.154, 0.168 mg/g, respectively.

  10. Modifying plasma low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: what combinations are available in the future?

    PubMed

    Kastelein, John J P

    2005-11-01

    Despite a growing body of research on the benefit of combination drug therapy for dyslipidemia in the metabolic syndrome or diabetes mellitus, there are insufficient outcome data on the use of combination therapy as well as inadequate data to compare certain combination regimens. The focus of the therapeutic approach in treating the metabolic syndrome has been almost exclusively on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol for approximately the past 10 years, and specifically on statin therapy. Although results of epidemiologic studies as well as clinical trials using angiographic and clinical end points confirm the association of LDL cholesterol and risk of coronary artery disease, data are lacking regarding the effects of combination therapy in the management of coronary artery disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome focusing on the modification of plasma LDL as well as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is reviewed. Future management strategies with the use of novel combination therapy is also discussed. PMID:16291010

  11. Production of oxidized lipids during modification of low-density lipoprotein by macrophages or copper.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, K L; Wilkins, G M; Fussell, B; Ballantine, J A; Taylor, S E; Mitchinson, M J; Leake, D S

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is implicated in atherosclerosis. Lipids and oxidized lipids were analysed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in human LDL incubated with mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) or copper (II) sulphate in Ham's F-10 medium or medium alone (control). MPM-modification and copper-catalysed oxidation of LDL resulted in the formation of oxysterols, mainly cholest-5-en-3 beta,7 beta-diol (7 beta-OH-CHOL); 7%-19% of the initial cholesterol was converted to 7 beta-OH-CHOL in 24 h. 7 beta-OH-CHOL levels in control LDL were very low. The increase in 7 beta-OH-CHOL in MPM and copper-oxidized LDL was accompanied by decreases in linoleate and arachidonate and increases in the electrophoretic mobility and degradation of LDL protein by 'target' macrophages. The concerted occurrence of these processes and their similarity in both MPM-modification and copper-catalysed oxidation of LDL were suggested by the highly significant cross-correlations. The fall in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) was accompanied by a directly proportional increase in electrophoretic mobility of the LDL. Production of 7 beta-OH-CHOL and protein degradation by macrophages showed modest elevations during the initial steep fall in PUFA, and showed their greatest increases as the levels of PUFA slowly approached zero. The levels of 7 beta-OH-CHOL and the degradation of LDL by macrophages were directly proportional. The degradation of LDL by macrophages increased rapidly as the electrophoretic mobility of LDL was slowly approaching its maximum level. PMID:7999000

  12. Lipoprotein binding and endosomal itinerary of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, H; Takahashi, K; Hamilton, R L; Havel, R J

    1989-01-01

    The high affinity of 45Ca binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and the LDL-R-related protein (LRP) was utilized to study the subcellular distribution of these two proteins in rat liver. Like the LDL-R, LRP was manyfold enriched in rat liver endosomal membranes with a relative distribution in early and late endosomal compartments consistent with recycling between endosomes and the cell surface. The high concentration of LRP in hepatic endosomal membranes greatly facilitated demonstration of Ca-dependent binding of apolipoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins in ligand blots. LRP was severalfold more abundant than the LDL-R in hepatic parenchymal cells, showed extensive degradation in hepatic endosomes, and was found in high concentrations in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a high rate of synthesis of LRP that appeared to be unaffected by treatment of rats with estradiol. The repeating cysteine-rich A-motif found in the ligand-binding domain of LRP appeared to be responsible for Ca binding by LRP, LDL-R, and complement factor C9 and accounted for immunological cross-reactivity among these proteins. Weaker ligand-blotting properties and an extraordinary susceptibility to proteolysis most likely contribute to the difficulty of detecting LRP in conventional assays for lipoprotein receptors. Our data suggest an extensive proteolytic processing of this protein and are consistent with a functional role of LRP in lipoprotein metabolism. Images PMID:2594771

  13. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  14. Selective uptake of boronated low-density lipoprotein in melanoma xenografts achieved by diet supplementation.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Y; Moore, D E; Allen, B J

    1996-12-01

    The lipid core of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was extracted using hexane and the LDL reconstituted with the addition of n-octyl-carborane. Biodistribution studies of the boronated LDL were performed in BALB/c mice bearing subcutaneous Harding-Passey melanoma xenografts. When diet supplementation with coconut oil and cholesterol for 21 days and regular dosing with hydrocortisone for 7 days before the studies was used to down-regulate the liver LDL receptors and the adrenal receptors, respectively, the tumour-blood boron concentration ratio of 5:1 was achieved.

  15. Receptor-mediated delivery of photoprotective agents by low-density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, S.T.; Yang, Y.L.; Falck, J.R.; Anderson, R.G.W.

    1984-12-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been used to deliver toxic molecules to cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In these studies, the cholesteryl ester core of LDL was replaced with a lipophilic, toxic molecule. The authors report that photoprotective azo dyes can be stably incorporated into LDL, and that this reconstituted LDL protects cells from the photosensitizing action of pyrene methanol (PM) in a receptor-dependent process. The photoprotective action of the azo dye is due to its ability to scavenge singlet oxygen that is produced by the photosensitive agent in response to UV light.

  16. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  17. In vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into high and low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Terpstra, A.H.; Nicolosi, R.J.; Herbert, P.N. )

    1989-11-01

    We have developed and validated a method for in vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into low density (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Radiolabeled cholesteryl esters dissolved in absolute ethanol were mixed with LDL or HDL in the presence of lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS) as a source of core lipid transfer activity. The efficiency of incorporation was dependent on: (a) the core lipid transfer activity and quantity of LPDS, (b) the mass of added radiolabeled cholesteryl esters, (c) the length of incubation, and (d) the amount of acceptor lipoprotein cholesterol. The tracer incorporation was documented by repeat density gradient ultracentrifugation, agarose gel electrophoresis, and precipitation with heparin-MnCl2. The radiolabeling conditions did not affect the following properties of the lipoproteins: (1) chemical composition, (2) electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels, (3) hydrated density, (4) distribution of apoproteins on SDS gels, (5) plasma clearance rates, and (6) immunoprecipitability of HDL apoproteins A-I and A-II. Rat HDL containing radiolabeled cholesteryl esters incorporated in vitro had plasma disappearance rates identical to HDL radiolabeled in vivo.

  18. N-Succinyl-chitosan nanoparticles coupled with low-density lipoprotein for targeted osthole-loaded delivery to low-density lipoprotein receptor-rich tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-ge; Zhu, Qiao-ling; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Yang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yuan, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Shu-di; Zhou, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Ai-jun; Zhang, Xue-nong; Jin, Yong

    2014-01-01

    N-Succinyl-chitosan (NSC) was synthesized and NSC nanoparticles (NPs) with loaded osthole (Ost) (Ost/NSC-NPs) were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion. Subsequently, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-mediated NSC-NPs with loaded Ost (Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs) were obtained by coupling LDL with Ost/NSC-NPs through amide linkage. The average particle size of Ost/NSC-NPs was approximately 145 nm, the entrapment efficiency was 78.28%±2.06%, and the drug-loading amount was 18.09%±0.17%. The release of Ost from Ost/NSC-NPs in vitro showed a more evident sustained effect than the native material. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs was only 16.23% that of the free Ost at 24 hours in HepG2 cells. Ost inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation by arresting cells in the synthesis phase of the cell cycle and by triggering apoptosis. Cellular uptake and subcellular localization in vitro and near-infrared fluorescence real-time imaging in vivo showed that Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs had high targeting efficacy. Therefore, LDL-NSC-NPs are a promising system for targeted Ost delivery to liver tumor. PMID:24966673

  19. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptotic dendritic cells as a novel therapy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Wierts, Laura; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; van Santbrink, Peter J; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2015-03-01

    Modulation of immune responses may form a powerful approach to treat atherosclerosis. It was shown that clearance of apoptotic cells results in tolerance induction to cleared Ags by dendritic cells (DCs); however, this seems impaired in atherosclerosis because Ag-specific tolerance is lacking. This could result, in part, from decreased emigration of DCs from atherosclerotic lesions because of the high-cholesterol environment. Nonetheless, local induction of anti-inflammatory responses by apoptotic cell clearance seems to dampen atherosclerosis, because inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance worsens atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed whether i.v. administration of oxLDL-induced apoptotic DCs (apop(ox)-DCs) and, as a control, unpulsed apoptotic DCs could modulate atherosclerosis by inducing tolerance. Adoptive transfer of apop(ox)-DCs into low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice either before or during feeding of a Western-type diet resulted in increased numbers of CD103(+) tolerogenic splenic DCs, with a concomitant increase in regulatory T cells. Interestingly, both types of apoptotic DCs induced an immediate 40% decrease in Ly-6C(hi) monocyte numbers and a 50% decrease in circulating CCL2 levels, but only apop(ox)-DC treatment resulted in long-term effects on monocytes and CCL2 levels. Although initial lesion development was reduced by 40% in both treatment groups, only apop(ox)-DC treatment prevented lesion progression by 28%. Moreover, progressed lesions of apop(ox)-DC-treated mice showed a robust 45% increase in collagen content, indicating an enhanced stability of lesions. Our findings clearly show that apoptotic DC treatment significantly decreases lesion development, but only apop(ox)-DCs can positively modulate lesion progression and stability. These findings may translate into a safe treatment for patients with established cardiovascular diseases using patient-derived apop(ox)-DCs.

  20. Photodynamic targeting of human retinoblastoma cells using covalent low-density lipoprotein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Erfurth, U.; Diddens, H.; Birngruber, R.; Hasan, T.

    1997-01-01

    Combination of photosensitizers with carrier molecules has been shown to enhance the efficiency of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Owing to an increased expression of their receptors on some malignant and proliferating cells, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) are potential endogenous carriers. A photosensitizer, chlorin e6 (Ce6), was covalently bound to LDL via carbodiimide activation. The Ce6-LDL conjugate was evaluated on a fibroblast cell line with defined LDL receptor expression and a retinoblastoma cell line (Y79). Uptake of free Ce6 and Ce6 either covalently bound to or complexed with LDL was measured by spectrofluorimetry. Phototoxicity after irradiation at 660 nm was determined by a mitochondrial activity assay (MTT). Covalent binding to LDL significantly increased the uptake of Ce6 for both cell lines by a factor of 4-5. A Ce6: LDL binding ratio of 50:1 was optimal. A receptor-mediated uptake was demonstrated by saturability and competitive inhibition by free LDL. Binding also occurred at 2 degrees C and was attributed to non-specific associations. Irradiation with 10 J cm-2 of 660 nm light after treatment of cells with Ce6-LDL conjugate reduced the MTT activity by 80%, while free or mixed Ce6 induced a maximum of 10% reduction in the MTT activity following identical treatment conditions. These data suggest that targeting of LDL receptor-bearing cells using covalently bound carriers, such as LDL, might increase the efficiency and selectivity of PDT. Intraocular tumours such as retinoblastomas could be appropriate targets for such an approach owing to the ease of access of light sources and the need for non-invasive approaches in sensitive ocular sites. PMID:9000598

  1. Regulation of Rac1 activation by the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong; Thomas, Keena S; Webb, Donna J; Moravec, Radim; Salicioni, Ana Maria; Mars, Wendy M; Gonias, Steven L

    2002-12-23

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1) binds and mediates the endocytosis of multiple ligands, transports the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and other membrane proteins into endosomes, and binds intracellular adaptor proteins involved in cell signaling. In this paper, we show that in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and L929 cells, LRP-1 functions as a major regulator of Rac1 activation, and that this activity depends on uPAR. LRP-1-deficient MEFs demonstrated increased Rac1 activation compared with LRP-1-expressing MEFs, and this property was reversed by expressing the VLDL receptor, a member of the same gene family as LRP-1, with overlapping ligand-binding specificity. Neutralizing the activity of LRP-1 with receptor-associated protein (RAP) increased Rac1 activation and cell migration in MEFs and L929 cells. The same parameters were unaffected by RAP in uPAR-/- MEFs, prepared from uPAR gene knockout embryos, and in uPAR-deficient LM-TK- cells. Untreated uPAR+/+ MEFs demonstrated substantially increased Rac1 activation compared with uPAR-/- MEFs. In addition to Rac1, LRP-1 suppressed activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in MEFs; however, it was Rac1 (and not ERK) that was responsible for the effects of LRP-1 on MEF migration. Thus, LRP-1 regulates two signaling proteins in the same cell (Rac1 and ERK), both of which may impact on cell migration. In uPAR-negative cells, LRP-1 neutralization does not affect Rac1 activation, and other mechanisms by which LRP-1 may regulate cell migration are not unmasked.

  2. CD36 binds oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) in a mechanism dependent upon fatty acid binding.

    PubMed

    Jay, Anthony G; Chen, Alexander N; Paz, Miguel A; Hung, Justin P; Hamilton, James A

    2015-02-20

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  3. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 governs Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic cartilage destruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wnt ligands bind to low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) 5 or 6, triggering a cascade of downstream events that include β-catenin signaling. Here we explored the roles of LRP5 in interleukin 1β (IL-1β)- or Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage destruction in mice. Methods The expression levels of LRP5, type II collagen, and catabolic factors were determined in mouse articular chondrocytes, human OA cartilage, and mouse experimental OA cartilage. Experimental OA in wild-type, Lrp5 total knockout (Lrp5-/-) and chondrocyte-specific knockout (Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre) mice was caused by aging, destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), or intra-articular injection of collagenase. The role of LRP5 was confirmed in vitro by small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of Lrp5 or in Lrp5-/- cells treated with IL-1β or Wnt proteins. Results IL-1β treatment increased the expression of LRP5 (but not LRP6) via JNK and NF-κB signaling. LRP5 was upregulated in human and mouse OA cartilage, and Lrp5 deficiency in mice inhibited cartilage destruction. Treatment with IL-1β or Wnt decreased the level of Col2a1 and increased those of Mmp3 or Mmp13, whereas Lrp5 knockdown ameliorated these effects. In addition, we found that the functions of LRP5 in arthritic cartilage were subject to transcriptional activation by β-catenin. Moreover, Lrp5-/- and Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre mice exhibited decreased cartilage destruction (and related changes in gene expression) in response to experimental OA. Conclusions Our findings indicate that LRP5 (but not LRP6) plays an essential role in Wnt/β-catenin-signaling-mediated OA cartilage destruction in part by regulating the expression levels of type II collagen, MMP3, and MMP13. PMID:24479426

  4. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors.

  5. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors. PMID:27133571

  6. Uptake and processing of remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins by rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.L.; Hradek, G.T.; Hornick, C.; Renaud, G.; Windler, E.E.; Havel, R.J.

    1984-11-01

    In the rat, chylomicron remnants and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants are taken up into the liver by high affinity processes and appear to undergo degradation by lysosomes. The relationship of this catabolic process to the known pathways of uptake and degradation of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and the involvement of nonparenchymal cells are addressed in these studies. The authors have utilized both light and electron microscopic radioautography to determine whether the pathway of intracellular transport and catabolism resembles that established for LDL in hepatocytes. Radioiodinated plasma VLDL remnants and lymph chylomicron remnants were injected into femoral veins of rats and the livers were fixed by perfusion 3 to 30 minutes later. Quantitative light microscopic radioautography showed little or no accumulation of grains over Kupffer cells. Electromicroscopic radioautography confirmed these observations and, in addition, demonstrated that very few grains were associated with endothelial cells. The processing of the remnant particles closely resembled that of LDL. Following an initial association of grains with the parenchymal cell plasma membrane, frequently in regions in close proximity to clathrin-coated endocytic pits, the grains were found in endocytic vesicles just beneath the plasma membrane. By 15 minutes the grains were found over multivesicular bodies located in the Golgi-lysosome region of the cell. Thirty minutes after injection, radioautographic grains began to be associated with secondary lysosomes.

  7. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein is associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fangning; Qin, Xiaojian; Zhang, Guiming; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Hailiang; Dai, Bo; Shi, Guohai; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data suggest coronary artery disease shares etiology with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this work was to assess the effects of several serum markers reported in cardiovascular disease on PCa. Serum markers (oxidized low-density lipoprotein [ox-LDL], apolipoprotein [apo] B100, and apoB48) in peripheral blood samples from 50 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) with localized or lymph node metastatic PCa were investigated in this study. Twenty-five samples from normal individuals were set as controls. We first conducted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to select candidate markers that were significantly different between these patients and controls. Then, the clinical relevance between OLR1 (the ox-LDL receptor) expression and PCa was analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We also investigated the function of ox-LDL in PCa cell lines in vitro. Phosphorylation protein chips were used to analyze cell signaling pathways in ox-LDL-treated PC-3 cells. The ox-LDL level was found to be significantly correlated with N stage of prostate cancer. OLR1 expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis in the TCGA cohort. In vitro, ox-LDL stimulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of phosphoprotein microarray illustrated that ox-LDL could influence multiple signaling pathways of PC-3. Activation of proliferation promoting signaling pathways (including β-catenin, cMyc, NF-κB, STAT1, STAT3) as well as apoptosis-associating signaling pathways (including p27, caspase-3) demonstrated that ox-LDL had complicated effects on prostate cancer. Increased serum ox-LDL level and OLR1 expression may indicate advanced-stage PCa and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, ox-LDL could stimulate PCa proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro.

  8. Uptake and Accumulation of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Gopinath S.; Kirk, Natalie M.; Ackart, David F.; Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Shanley, Crystal A.; Orme, Ian M.; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2012-01-01

    The typical host response to infection of humans and some animals by M. tuberculosis is the accumulation of reactive oxygen species generating inflammatory cells into discrete granulomas, which frequently develop central caseous necrosis. In previous studies we showed that infection of immunologically naïve guinea pigs with M. tuberculosis leads to localized and systemic oxidative stress that results in a significant depletion of serum total antioxidant capacity and the accumulation of malondialdehyde, a bi-product of lipid peroxidation. Here we show that in addition, the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species in vivo resulted in the accumulation of oxidized low density lipoproteins (OxLDL) in pulmonary and extrapulmonary granulomas, serum and lung macrophages collected by bronchoalveolar lavage. Macrophages from immunologically naïve guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis also had increased surface expression of the type 1 scavenger receptors CD36 and LOX1, which facilitate the uptake of oxidized host macromolecules including OxLDL. Vaccination of guinea pigs with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) prior to aerosol challenge reduced the bacterial burden as well as the intracellular accumulation of OxLDL and the expression of macrophage CD36 and LOX1. In vitro loading of guinea pig lung macrophages with OxLDL resulted in enhanced replication of bacilli compared to macrophages loaded with non-oxidized LDL. Overall, this study provides additional evidence of oxidative stress in M. tuberculosis infected guinea pigs and the potential role OxLDL laden macrophages have in supporting intracellular bacilli survival and persistence. PMID:22493658

  9. Noninvasive imaging of 99mtechnetium-labeled low density lipoprotein uptake by tendon xanthomas in hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, H N; Goldsmith, S J; Vallabhajosula, S

    1990-01-01

    Technetium-labeled low density lipoproteins (Tc-LDL) appear to be useful for describing LDL biodistribution in normal and dyslipidemic subjects. We injected 99mTc-LDL into subjects with large tendon xanthomas secondary to homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or sitosterolemia. Rapid (4 hours) accumulation of Tc-99m activity in xanthomas was observed, and this accumulation increased over a 24-hour period. No comparable accumulations of Tc-99m activity were noted in normal subjects or in a subject with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia who had very small tendon xanthomas. These findings support previous biopsy data indicating active uptake of LDL by macrophages within xanthoma and suggest that 99mTc-LDL imaging of xanthomas may be useful in studies of the effects of diet and drugs on the accumulation of lipoproteins by atherosclerotic plaques.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells by Targeting Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors with Gd-Loaded Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles1

    PubMed Central

    Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Lanzardo, Stefania; Alberti, Diego; Belfiore, Simona; Ciampa, Anna; Giovenzana, Giovanni B; Lovazzano, Clara; Pagliarin, Roberto; Aime, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17 are lipophilic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents that display high affinity for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. However, on binding to LDL, Gd-DO3A-diph shows a decreased hydration that results in a lower enhancement of water proton relaxation rate. Conversely, Gd-AAZTAC17 displays a strong relaxation enhancement at the imaging fields. Each LDL particle can load up to 100 and 400 UNITS of Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17, respectively. Their LDL adducts are taken up by human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2) and melanoma B16 tumor cells when added to the incubation medium. T1 measurements of the labeled cells indicate that Gd-AAZTAC17 is significantly more efficient than Gd-DO3A-diph. Furthermore, it has been found that HepG2 hepatoma cells can internalize higher amounts of Gd-AAZTAC17 than B16 cells and the involvement of LDL receptors (LDLRs) has been demonstrated in competition assays with free LDL. Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct proved to be an efficient probe in the magnetic resonance (MR) visualization of subcutaneous tumors in animal models obtained by injecting B16 melanoma cells into the right flank of mice. Finally, confocal microscopy validation of the distribution of LDL-based probes in the tumor has been obtained by doping the Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct with a fluorescent phospholipid moiety. PMID:18084612

  11. Identifying the predominant peak diameter of high-density and low-density lipoproteins by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Krauss, R M; Nichols, A V; Vranizan, K M; Wood, P D

    1990-06-01

    Particle size distributions of high-density (HDL) and low-density (LDL) lipoproteins, obtained by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, exhibit apparent predominant and minor peaks within characteristic subpopulation migration intervals. In the present report, we show that identification of such peaks as predominant or minor depends on whether the particle size distribution is analyzed according to migration distance or particle size. The predominant HDL peak on the migration distance scale is frequently not the predominant HDL peak when the distribution is transformed to the particle size scale. The potential physiologic importance of correct identification of the predominant HDL peak within a gradient gel electrophoresis profile is suggested by our cross-sectional study of 97 men, in which diameters associated with the predominant peak, determined using migration distance and particle size scales, were correlated with plasma lipoprotein and lipid parameters. Plasma concentrations of HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoproteins A-I and B correlated more strongly with the predominant peak obtained using the particle size scale than the migration distance scale. The mathematical transformation from migration distance to particle diameter scale had less effect on the LDL distribution. The additional computational effort required to transform the HDL-distribution into the particle size scale appears warranted given the substantial changes it produces in the gradient gel electrophoresis profile and the strengthening of correlations with parameters relevant to lipoprotein metabolism.

  12. ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH VERY LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was utilized to examine the binding of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with drugs, using R/S-propranolol as a model. These studies indicated that two mechanisms existed for the binding of R- and S-propranolol with VLDL. The first mechanism involved non-saturable partitioning of these drugs with VLDL, which probably occurred with the lipoprotein's non-polar core. This partitioning was described by overall affinity constants of 1.2 (± 0.3) × 106 M-1 for R-propranolol and 2.4 (± 0.6) × 106 M-1 for S-propranolol at pH 7.4 and 37 °C. The second mechanism occurred through saturable binding by these drugs at fixed sites on VLDL, such as represented by apolipoproteins on the surface of the lipoprotein. The association equilibrium constants for this saturable binding at 37 °C were 7.0 (± 2.3) × 104 M-1 for R-propranolol and 9.6 (± 2.2) × 104 M-1 for S-propranolol. Comparable results were obtained at 20 °C and 27 °C for the propranolol enantiomers. This work provided fundamental information on the processes involved in the binding of R- and S-propranolol to VLDL, while also illustrating how HPAC can be used to evaluate relatively complex interactions between agents such as VLDL and drugs or other solutes. PMID:25103529

  13. The effects of weight gain after smoking cessation on atherogenic α1-antitrypsin-low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Ura, Shuichi; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Shimada, Sayaka; Akao, Masaharu; Koyama, Hiroshi; Kono, Koichi; Shimatsu, Akira; Takahashi, Yuko; Hasegawa, Koji

    2015-11-01

    Although cardiovascular risks decrease after quitting smoking, body weight often increases in the early period after smoking cessation. We have previously reported that the serum level of the α1-antitrypsin-low-density lipoprotein complex (AT-LDL)-an oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein that accelerates atherosclerosis-is high in current smokers, and that the level rapidly decreases after smoking cessation. However, the effects of weight gain after smoking cessation on this cardiovascular marker are unknown. In 183 outpatients (134 males, 49 females) who had successfully quit smoking, serum AT-LDL levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For all persons who had successfully quit smoking, body mass index (BMI) significantly increased 12 weeks after the first examination (p < 0.01). Among patients with a BMI increase smaller than the median, a significant decrease (p < 0.01) in serum AT-LDL values was found, but no significant changes in serum AT-LDL values were found in patients with a BMI increase greater than the median. The findings suggest that the decrease in serum AT-LDL levels after quitting smoking is influenced by weight gain after smoking cessation.

  14. Spanish sparkling wines (Cavas) as inhibitors of in vitro human low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Satué-Gracia, M T; Andrés-Lacueva, C; Lamuela-Raventós, R M; Frankel, E N

    1999-06-01

    Forty-seven dealcoholized sparkling wines (cava) from the Penedès area in Spain were tested for their antioxidant activity in a low-density lipoprotein system. The effect of different quality-related parameters, such as harvest year or grape variety, was investigated. Twenty-two phenolic compounds were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by comparing their retention time and their ultraviolet spectra with those of pure standards. When tested at the same total phenol concentration, the antioxidant activity of these white sparkling wines was found to be similar to that reported for red wines. This activity was positively correlated with the total phenolic content, trans-caffeic acid, coumaric acid, protocatechuic acid, and quercetin 3-glucuronide. The wines made of the classic cava wine coupage had superior antioxidant activity compared to those of other cultivars.

  15. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) impacts on erythrocyte viscoelasticity and its molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Yang, Li; Liu, Yao; Gao, Wei; Peng, Weiyan; Sung, K-L Paul; Sung, Lanping Amy

    2009-10-16

    The oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) plays an important role in atherosclerosis, yet it remains unclear if it damages circulating erythrocytes. In this study, erythrocyte deformability and its membrane proteins after Ox-LDL incubations are investigated by micropipette aspiration, thiol radical measurement, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results show that Ox-LDL incubation reduces the erythrocyte deformability, decreases free thiol radical contents in erythrocytes, and induces the cross-linking among membrane proteins. SDS-PAGE analysis reveals a high molecular weight (HMW) complex as well as new bands between spectrins and band 3 and reduced ratios between band 3 and other major membrane skeletal proteins. Analyses indicate that Ox-LDL makes erythrocytes harder to deform through a molecular mechanism by which the oxidation of free thiol radicals forms disulfide bonds among membrane skeletal proteins.

  16. Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro by ginger extracts.

    PubMed

    Gunathilake, K D Prasanna P; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Currently, there is a renewed interest in ginger because of its antioxidants and cardioprotective properties. The effects of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane solvent extracts of ginger and pure major ginger constituents on Cu(2+)-induced oxidation of human LDL in vitro were examined. The LDL oxidation inhibition by ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane extracts of ginger was 71%, 76%, 67%, and 67%, respectively, at their optimum extraction conditions. Inhibition of LDL oxidation by water extracts of ginger, which was prepared by ultrasonic-assisted extraction conditions of 52°C for 15 min, was about 43%. Phenolic bioactives of ginger-6-gingerols, 8-gingerols, 10-gingerols, and 6-shogaol-seem to be strong inhibitors of Cu(+2)-induced LDL oxidation. Overall, ginger extracts, including the water extract possess the antioxidant activities to inhibit human LDL oxidation in vitro.

  17. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Related Proteins as Regulators of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Lila M.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a highly organised structure. Many signalling systems work in concert to ensure that neural stem cells are appropriately directed to generate progenitor cells, which in turn mature into functional cell types including projection neurons, interneurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Herein we explore the role of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family, in particular family members LRP1 and LRP2, in regulating the behaviour of neural stem and progenitor cells during development and adulthood. The ability of LRP1 and LRP2 to bind a diverse and extensive range of ligands, regulate ligand endocytosis, recruit nonreceptor tyrosine kinases for direct signal transduction and signal in conjunction with other receptors, enables them to modulate many crucial neural cell functions. PMID:26949399

  18. Betanin inhibits the myeloperoxidase/nitrite-induced oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Mario; Tesoriere, Luisa; Livrea, Maria A

    2007-03-01

    Production of nitrogen dioxide by the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the presence of nitrite is now considered a key step in the pathophysiology of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. This study shows that betanin, a phytochemical of the betalain class, inhibits the production of lipid hydroperoxides in human LDL submitted to a MPO/nitrite-induced oxidation. Kinetic measurements including time-course of particle oxidation and betanin consumption, either in the presence or in the absence of nitrite, suggest that the antioxidant effect is possibly the result of various actions. Betanin scavenges the initiator radical nitrogen dioxide and can also act as a lipoperoxyl radical-scavenger. In addition, unidentified oxidation product(s) of betanin by MPO/nitrite inhibit(s) the MPO/nitrite-induced LDL oxidation as effectively as the parent compound. In the light of betanin bioavailability and post-absorbtion distribution in humans, present findings may suggest favourable in vivo activity of this phytochemical.

  19. Effects of oxidized low density lipoprotein on transformation of valvular myofibroblasts to osteoblast-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Shen, Ying-Lian; Hu, Wei-Lin; Chen, Zheng-Ping; Li, Yong-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the roles of Wnt signal pathway in transformation of cardiac valvular myofibroblasts to the osteoblast-like phenotype, the primary cultured porcine aortic valve myofibroblasts were incubated with oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL, 50 mg/L), and divided into four groups according to the ox-LDL treatment time: control group, ox-LDL 24-h group, ox-LDL 48-h group, and ox-LDL 72-h group. Wnt signal pathway blocker Dickkopf-1 (DDK-1, 100 μg/L) was added in ox-LDL 72-h group. The expression of a-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteogenic transcription factor Cbfa-1 was detected by Western blotting, and that of β-catenin, a key mediator of Wnt signal pathway by immunocytochemical staining method. The Wnt/β-catenin was observed and the transformation of myofibroblasts to the osteoblast-like phenotype was examined. The expression of α-SMA, BMP2, ALP and Cbfa-1 proteins in the control group was weaker than in the ox-LDL-treated groups. In ox-LDL-treated groups, the protein expression of a-SMA, BMP2, ALP, and Cbfa-1 was significantly increased in a time-dependent manner as compared with the control group, and there was significant difference among the three ox-LDL-treated groups (P<0.05 for all); β-catenin protein was also up-regulated in the ox-LDL-treated groups in a time-dependent manner as compared with the control group (P<0.05), and its transfer from cytoplasm to nucleus and accumulation in the nucleus were increased in the same fashion (P<0.05). After addition of DKK-1, the expression of α-SMA, bone-related proteins and β-catenin protein was significantly reduced as compared with ox-LDL 72-h group (P<0.05). The Wnt/ β-catenin signaling pathway may play an important role in transformation of valvular myofibroblasts to the osteoblast-like phenotype.

  20. Relationship between oxidized low-density lipoprotein antibodies and obesity in different glycemic situations

    PubMed Central

    Babakr, Abdullatif Taha; Elsheikh, Osman Mohamed; Almarzouki, Abdullah A; Assiri, Adel Mohamed; Abdalla, Badr Eldin Elsonni; Zaki, Hani Yousif; Fatani, Samir H; NourEldin, EssamEldin Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background Autoantibodies to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are controversially discussed to be either pathogenic or protective. Biochemical and anthropometric measurements correlated with increased levels of these antibodies are also controversial, especially in conditions of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study was conducted to evaluate levels of oxLDL antibodies and their correlation with obesity in different glycemic situations. Methods Two hundred and seventy-four adult males were classified into three subgroups: group 1 (n=125), comprising a control group of nondiabetic subjects; group 2 (n=77), comprising subjects with impaired glucose tolerance; and group 3 (n=72), comprising patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Body mass index was calculated, and measurement of oxLDL and oxLDL antibodies was performed. Results Higher mean concentrations of oxLDL were found in the type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance groups (143.5±21.9 U/L and 108.7±23.7 U/L, respectively). The mean value for the control group was 73.5±27.5 U/L (P<0.001). Higher mean concentrations of anti-oxLDL antibodies were observed in the type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance groups (55.7±17.8 U/L and 40.4±17.6 U/L, respectively). The mean value for the control group was 20.4±10 U/L (P<0.001). Levels of anti-oxLDL antibodies were found to be positively and significantly correlated with body mass index in the control group (r=0.46), impaired glucose tolerance (r=0.51), type 2 diabetes mellitus group (r=0.46), and in the whole study population (r=0.44; P<0.001). Conclusion Anti-oxLDL antibody levels were increased in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance and were positively correlated with obesity and body mass index. PMID:25368528

  1. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Protects Against Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yinyuan; Xian, Xunde; Holland, William L; Tsai, Shirling; Herz, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) is a multifunctional uptake receptor for chylomicron remnants in the liver. In vascular smooth muscle cells LRP1 controls reverse cholesterol transport through platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β) trafficking and tyrosine kinase activity. Here we show that LRP1 regulates hepatic energy homeostasis by integrating insulin signaling with lipid uptake and secretion. Somatic inactivation of LRP1 in the liver (hLRP1KO) predisposes to diet-induced insulin resistance with dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis. On a high-fat diet, hLRP1KO mice develop a severe Metabolic Syndrome secondary to hepatic insulin resistance, reduced expression of insulin receptors on the hepatocyte surface and decreased glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) translocation. While LRP1 is also required for efficient cell surface insulin receptor expression in the absence of exogenous lipids, this latent state of insulin resistance is unmasked by exposure to fatty acids. This further impairs insulin receptor trafficking and results in increased hepatic lipogenesis, impaired fatty acid oxidation and reduced very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride secretion. PMID:27322467

  2. Reliability of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B measurement.

    PubMed

    Contois, John H; Warnick, G Russell; Sniderman, Allan D

    2011-01-01

    There is little understanding of the reliability of laboratory measurements among clinicians. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) measurement is the cornerstone of cardiovascular risk assessment and prevention, but it is fraught with error. Therefore, we have reviewed issues related to accuracy and precision for the measurement of LDL-C and the related markers non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein B. Despite the widespread belief that LDL-C is standardized and reproducible, available data suggest that results can vary significantly as the result of methods from different manufacturers. Similar problems with direct HDL-C assays raise concerns about the reliability of non-HDL-C measurement. The root cause of method-specific bias relates to the ambiguity in the definition of both LDL and HDL, and the heterogeneity of LDL and HDL particle size and composition. Apolipoprotein B appears to provide a more reliable alternative, but assays for it have not been as rigorously tested as direct LDL-C and HDL-C assays.

  3. [Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via CD36.].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu-Tong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Na-Na; Kang, Li; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Song, Guo-Hua; Qin, Shu-Cun

    2010-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and the underlying mechanisms in ox-LDL-induced macrophage foam-forming process. RAW264.7 macrophages were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum, and then treated with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L), anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody+ox-LDL and tunicamycin (TM), respectively. After incubation for 24 h, the cells were collected. The cellular lipid accumulation was showed by oil red O staining and the content of cellular total cholesterol was quantified by enzymatic colorimetry. The expression of glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), a molecular marker of ERS, was determined by immunocytochemistry assay. The levels of GRP94 protein, phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in RAW264.7 cells were detected by Western blotting. The results indicated that after incubation with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L) for 24 h, a large amount of lipid droplets were found in the cytoplasm, and the contents of cellular total cholesterol were increased by 2.1, 2.8 and 3.1 folds compared with the control, respectively. Anti-CD36 antibody decreased markedly the cellular lipid accumulation induced by ox-LDL at 100 mg/L. Both ox-LDL and TM, a specific ERS inducer, could up-regulate the protein expression of GRP94 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, p-IRE1 and XBP1, two key components of the unfolded protein response, were also significantly induced by the treatment with ox-LDL. The up-regulations of the three proteins induced by ox-LDL were inhibited significantly when the macrophages were pre-incubated with anti-CD36 antibody. These results suggest that ox-LDL may induce ERS in a dose-dependent way and subsequently activate the unfolded protein response signaling pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages, which is potentially mediated by scavenger receptor CD36. PMID:20945046

  4. Anionic phospholipids inhibit apolipoprotein E--low-density lipoprotein receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Ryan, Robert O

    2007-03-16

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a ligand for members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Lipid-free apoE is not recognized by LDLR, yet interaction with lipid confers receptor recognition properties. Although lipid interaction is known to induce a conformational change in apoE, it is not known if the lipid composition of the resulting complex influences binding. Using reconstituted lipoprotein particles of apoE3 N-terminal (NT) domain and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), maximal LDLR binding was observed at DMPC:apoE3-NT ratios >2.5:1 (w/w). ApoE3-NT lipid particles prepared with egg sphingomyelin were functional as LDLR ligands while complexes formed with the anionic phospholipids dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol or dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) were not. In the case of apoE3-NT, lipid particles comprised of a mixture of DMPC and DMPS, a DMPS concentration dependent inhibition of LDLR binding activity was observed. Thus, in addition to affecting apoE conformational status, the lipid composition of ligand particles can modulate LDLR binding activity.

  5. Ethanol extract of propolis protects endothelial cells from oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced injury by inhibiting lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yongqi; Li, Jinguo; Ding, Mingde; Xu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiajun; Jiao, Peng; Han, Ping; Wang, Jiafu; Yao, Shutong

    2014-12-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), as the primary oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor on endothelial cells, plays a crucial role in endothelial injury, which is a driving force in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Our previous studies have shown that ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development. However, the protective effects of EEP against ox-LDL-induced injury in endothelial cells and the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that EEP attenuates ox-LDL-induced endothelial oxidative injury via modulation of LOX-1-mediated oxidative stress. Our results showed that exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to ox-LDL (100 mg/L) led to the decrease in cell viability and increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis, whereas pretreatment with EEP (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/L) protected against such damages in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, EEP mitigated ox-LDL uptake by HUVECs and attenuated ox-LDL-upregulated LOX-1 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, EEP suppressed the ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress as assessed by decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) generation as well as increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Similar results were observed in the anti-LOX-1 antibody or diphenyleneiodonium (DPI)-pretreated HUVECs. These data indicate that EEP may protect HUVECs from ox-LDL-induced injury and that the mechanism at least partially involves its ability to inhibit endothelial LOX-1 upregulation and subsequent oxidative stress.

  6. Studies on epitopes on low-density lipoprotein modified by 4-hydroxynonenal. Biochemical characterization and determination.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Q; Esterbauer, H; Jürgens, G

    1992-01-01

    Oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was found to be accompanied by the generation of various reactive aldehydes. One of them, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), was shown to modify LDL to a form which represents a good model of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). In order to investigate the epitopes newly formed on HNE-modified LDL, a polyvalent antiserum to HNE-LDL [anti-(HNE-LDL)] was raised in rabbits and the non-specific components were removed with native LDL coupled to CNBr-Sepharose 4B. Competitive fluorescence immunoassay analysis showed that anti-(HNE-LDL) recognized HNE-LDL, copper-oxidized LDL, HNE-albumin and to a lower extent HNE-modified high-density lipoprotein 3 (HNE-HDL3) and ox-HDL3 but not native LDL. A certain degree of cross-reactivity of the antibody with LDLs modified by either hexanal or 2,4-heptadienal was found. No reaction was obtained with LDL labelled with malondialdehyde. From the abilities of HNE-modified poly(L-amino acids) to compete with HNE-LDL for binding to anti-(HNE-LDL), it is postulated that lysine, tyrosine, arginine and histidine are involved in the formation of HNE-derived epitopes on apolipoprotein B (apo B). Using a double-sandwich fluorescence immunoassay [capture antibody: anti-(apo B); detection antibody: anti-(HNE-LDL)] we found that the HNE-derived epitopes were expressed at a far higher degree in ox-LDL and HNE-LDL than in native LDL. PMID:1280111

  7. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Funamoto, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose COPD is mainly caused by tobacco smoking and is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease. There is growing recognition that the inflammation in COPD is not only confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs, including blood vessels. α1-antitrypsin–low-density lipoprotein (AT-LDL) complex is an oxidatively modified LDL that accelerates atherosclerosis. Curcumin, one of the best-investigated natural products, is a powerful antioxidant. However, the effects of curcumin on AT-LDL remain unknown. We hypothesized that Theracurmin®, a highly absorptive curcumin with improved bioavailability using a drug delivery system, ameliorates the inflammatory status in subjects with mild COPD. Patients and methods This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Subjects with stages I–II COPD according to the Japanese Respiratory Society criteria were randomly assigned to receive 90 mg Theracurmin® or placebo twice a day for 24 weeks, and changes in inflammatory parameters were evaluated. Results There were no differences between the Theracurmin® and placebo groups in terms of age, male/female ratio, or body mass index in 39 evaluable subjects. The percent changes in blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020) lower in the Theracurmin® group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion Theracurmin® reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects.

  8. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Funamoto, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose COPD is mainly caused by tobacco smoking and is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease. There is growing recognition that the inflammation in COPD is not only confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs, including blood vessels. α1-antitrypsin–low-density lipoprotein (AT-LDL) complex is an oxidatively modified LDL that accelerates atherosclerosis. Curcumin, one of the best-investigated natural products, is a powerful antioxidant. However, the effects of curcumin on AT-LDL remain unknown. We hypothesized that Theracurmin®, a highly absorptive curcumin with improved bioavailability using a drug delivery system, ameliorates the inflammatory status in subjects with mild COPD. Patients and methods This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Subjects with stages I–II COPD according to the Japanese Respiratory Society criteria were randomly assigned to receive 90 mg Theracurmin® or placebo twice a day for 24 weeks, and changes in inflammatory parameters were evaluated. Results There were no differences between the Theracurmin® and placebo groups in terms of age, male/female ratio, or body mass index in 39 evaluable subjects. The percent changes in blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020) lower in the Theracurmin® group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion Theracurmin® reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects. PMID:27616885

  9. Low density lipoprotein metabolism by human macrophages activated with low density lipoprotein immune complexes. A possible mechanism of foam cell formation

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Human macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis and are believed to be the progenitors of the cholesteryl ester (CE)-laden foam cells present in early atherosclerotic lesions. Several mechanisms by which macrophages accumulate CE have been recently described. One involves a perturbation in LDL metabolism subsequent to macrophage activation. Thus, we decided to study the effect of macrophage activation by immune complexes on N-LDL metabolism. Initially, LDL-containing immune complexes (LDL-IC) were chosen, since increased plasma levels of these IC have been reported in patients with coronary heart disease. Human macrophages stimulated for 22 h with LDL-IC (250 micrograms/ml) and incubated afterwards for 20 h with 10 micrograms/ml 125I-N-LDL showed a six- and fourfold increase in the accumulation and degradation, respectively, of 125I-N-LDL over the values observed in nonstimulated cells. Scatchard analysis of 125I-N-LDL-specific binding suggests an increase (20-fold) in the number of LDL receptors in macrophages stimulated with LDL-IC. We studied other immune complexes varying in size and antigen composition. Some of the IC were able to stimulate, although to a lesser degree, the uptake of N-LDL by macrophages. Lipoprotein IC are more efficient and have the greatest capacity to increase N-LDL uptake and CE accumulation. We conclude that human macrophage activation by LDL-IC leads to an increase in LDL receptor activity and promotes in vitro foam cell formation. PMID:3171477

  10. Effect of concentrated red grape juice consumption on serum antioxidant capacity and low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Day, A P; Kemp, H J; Bolton, C; Hartog, M; Stansbie, D

    1997-01-01

    This study examines whether the beneficial antioxidant effects of red wine can be reproduced by nonalcoholic red grape juice concentrate. Seven subjects consumed 125 ml concentrate daily for 7 days. Following first ingestion there was a rise in serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from 441 to 478 mumol/l at 60 min (p < 0.005). On day 8, TAC was 50 mumol/l higher than at baseline (p < 0.05). There was reduced susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation. Red grape juice concentrate ingestion results in increased serum antioxidant capacity and protection of LDL from oxidation and thus nonalcoholic red grape extract may have similar beneficial effects to red wine.

  11. Mechanobiology of low-density lipoprotein transport within an arterial wall--impact of hyperthermia and coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen; Vafai, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hyperthermia, coupling attributes and property variations on Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transport within a multi-layered wall while accounting for the fluid structure interaction (FSI) is analyzed in this work. To understand the potential impact of the hyperthermia process, thermo-induced attributes are incorporated, accounting for the plasma flow, mass transfer, as well as the elastic wall structure. The coupling effect of osmotic pressure, Soret and Dufour diffusion is discussed and their influence on LDL transport is examined, demonstrating that only the Soret effect needs to be accounted for. The effect of thermal expansion on changing the behavior of flow, mass transport, and elastic structure is illustrated and analyzed while incorporating the variations in the effective LDL diffusivity and consumption rate, as well as other dominating parameters. It is shown that hyperthermia results in an enhancement in LDL transport by increasing the concentration levels within the arterial wall. PMID:24183548

  12. Spin-labeling study of the oxidative damage to low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Singh, R J; Feix, J B; Mchaourab, H S; Hogg, N; Kalyanaraman, B

    1995-06-20

    In this study, we have spin-labeled the lysine and cysteine residues of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using N-4-(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl-4-yl) maleimide (MAL-6) and succinimidyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrroline-1-oxyl-3-carboxylate (SSL), respectively. The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of SSL bound to LDL indicated that the nitroxide moiety was relatively mobile. In contrast, the ESR spectrum of MAL-6 bound to LDL showed that the nitroxide moiety was rotationally restricted. Using the continuous-wave power saturation technique in the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic paramagnetic relaxing agents, we have determined that (i) approximately 60-70% of lysine-bound SSL is exposed to the aqueous phase, (ii) approximately 30-40% of SSL-LDL is buried in a hydrophobic region, and (iii) MAL-6 bound to LDL is localized predominantly in the hydrophobic region. During Cu(2+)-initiated oxidation of spin-labeled LDL, nitroxide labels located in a hydrophobic environment were predominantly degraded. Nitroxide destruction was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, indicating the role of lipid peroxidation in this process. ESR data also showed that Cu2+ binding to lysine is essential for LDL oxidation. The spin label methodology may be useful for the investigation of site-specific radical reactions in LDL.

  13. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential. PMID:26578342

  14. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  15. Aggregation and fusion of low-density lipoproteins in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gursky, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs, also known as ‘bad cholesterol’) are the major carriers of circulating cholesterol and the main causative risk factor of atherosclerosis. Plasma LDLs are 20- to 25-nm nanoparticles containing a core of cholesterol esters surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and a single copy of apolipoprotein B (550 kDa). An early sign of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of LDL-derived lipid droplets in the arterial wall. According to the widely accepted ‘response-to-retention hypothesis’, LDL binding to the extracellular matrix proteoglycans in the arterial intima induces hydrolytic and oxidative modifications that promote LDL aggregation and fusion. This enhances LDL uptake by the arterial macrophages and triggers a cascade of pathogenic responses that culminate in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Hence, LDL aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation are important early steps in atherogenesis. In vitro, a variety of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of LDL can induce these reactions and thereby provide useful models for their detailed analysis. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the in vivo and in vitro modifications of LDLs leading to their aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation; outline the techniques used to study these reactions; and propose a molecular mechanism that underlies these pro-atherogenic processes. Such knowledge is essential in identifying endogenous and exogenous factors that can promote or prevent LDL aggregation and fusion in vivo and to help establish new potential therapeutic targets to decelerate or even block these pathogenic reactions. PMID:25197325

  16. Rspo2 suppresses CD36-mediated apoptosis in oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Zewei; Zan, Jie; Zhao, Wenting; Pan, Yanyun; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Mingjie; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-10-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced apoptosis of macrophages contributes to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. R‑spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of the cysteine‑rich secreted proteins, has been shown to be involved in the oncogenesis of several types of cancer. It has also been found to be abundantly expressed among the four R‑spondin members in macrophages. The present study was performed to determine whether Rspo2 is involved in the ox‑LDL‑induced apoptosis of macrophages. It was identified that Rspo2 inhibited oxLDL‑induced apoptosis in the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activator using flow cytometry. In addition, Rspo2 was observed to suppress oxLDL‑induced ER stress and reactive oxygen species production as demonstrated by western blotting. Furthermore, analysis of the role of Rspo2 in macrophage lipid uptake identified that Rspo2 negatively regulated the Dil‑oxLDL uptake by inhibiting the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)36, through the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)‑γ. The manipulation of Rspo2 had a direct effect on PPAR‑γ nuclear translocation. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rspo2 manipulation led to regulation of the direct binding between PPAR‑γ and CD36. In conclusion, Rspo2 was found to have a negative regulatory effect during oxLDL‑induced macrophage apoptosis by regulating lipid uptake. PMID:27571704

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of the interactions of a porphyrin with low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Stéphanie; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Morlière, Patrice; Mazière, Jean-Claude; Brault, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) play a key role in the delivery of photosensitizers to tumor cells in photodynamic therapy. The interaction of deuteroporphyrin, an amphiphilic porphyrin, with LDL is examined at equilibrium and the kinetics of association/dissociation are determined by stopped-flow. Changes in apoprotein and porphyrin fluorescence suggest two classes of bound porphyrins. The first class, characterized by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, involves four well-defined sites. The affinity constant per site is 8.75 x 10(7) M(-1) (cumulative affinity 3.5 x 10(8) M(-1)). The second class corresponds to the incorporation of up to 50 molecules into the outer lipidic layer of LDL with an affinity constant of 2 x 10(8) M(-1). Stopped-flow experiments involving direct LDL porphyrin mixing or porphyrin transfer from preloaded LDL to albumin provide kinetic characterization of the two classes. The rate constants for dissociation of the first and second classes are 5.8 and 15 s(-1); the association rate constants are 5 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) per site and 3 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Both fluorescence and kinetic analysis indicate that the first class involves regions at the boundary between lipids and the apoprotein. The kinetics of porphyrin-LDL interactions indicates that changes in the distribution of photosensitizers among various carriers could be very sensitive to the specific tumor microenvironment. PMID:12496113

  18. Antioxidant effects of 14 Chinese traditional medicinal herbs against human low-density lipoprotein oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Charles, Albert Linton; Hsieh, Chang-Wei; Lee, Ya-Chi; Ciou, Jhih-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the antioxidant activities and inhibitory effect of 14 Chinese medicinal herbs against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) formation was evaluated. Prolongation of the lag phase of LDL oxidation depended on the concentration of the herbs. The concentration of each herb that was able to prolong the lag time by about two-fold was calculated and expressed as doubling-time concentration. The lower the doubling-time concentration, the stronger the inhibitory effect exhibited toward LDL oxidation. Among them, Chrysanthemi Flos (Chrysanthemum morifolium ramat; 甘菊花 gān jú huā), Crataegi Fructus (Crataegus pinnatifida Bge. var. major N.E.Br.; 山楂 shān zhā), and Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn.; 洛神 luò shén) showed significant inhibitory effects. Correlation coefficients between doubling-time concentration and radical-scavenging activities were high; the total phenolic content was also high. In conclusion, phenolic compounds contributed not only to antioxidant activities, but also to the inhibitory effect against LDL oxidation. Chrysanthemi Flos, Crataegi Fructus, and H. sabdariffa, with lower doubling-time concentrations, could be potent phytochemical agents to reduce LDL oxidation and prevent the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26151009

  19. Low-density Lipoprotein Improves Motility and Plasma Membrane Integrity of Cryopreserved Canine Epididymal Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Prapaiwan, N; Tharasanit, T; Punjachaipornpol, S; Yamtang, D; Roongsitthichai, A; Moonarmart, W; Kaeoket, K; Manee-In, S

    2016-05-01

    Cryopreservation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa is an effective technique to conserve genetic potentials of superior dogs when it is not possible to collect ejaculated spermatozoa. Although hen egg yolk is commonly supplemented into the semen extender, active substances within the egg yolk which protect sperm against cryoinjury remain to be discovered. Among its compositions, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been reported to have a cryoprotective property for sperm cryopreservation. However, the effects of LDL on dog epididymal spermatozoa during cryopreservation have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LDL on epididymal spermatozoa quality following cryopreservation and thawing. After routine castration of 12 dogs, caudal epididymides from individuals were separated from the testes and cut into a few pieces in a Tris-buffer. Spermatozoa recovered from each sample were examined at once for sperm quality and divided into six groups of extender: no LDL, 20% egg yolk, 4%, 8%, 16%, and 24% LDL, before cryopreservation. The sperm aliquots were then equilibrated and conventionally frozen. After thawing, sperm motility, morphology, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The results revealed that 4% LDL and 20% egg yolk yielded significantly higher sperm motility (57.69% and 52.69%, respectively, p<0.05) than other LDLs. In addition, 4% LDL yielded the significantly highest plasma membrane integrity (70.54%, p<0.05). In conclusion, the supplementation of 4% LDL in Tris-glucose extender could be applied for cryopreservation of canine epididymal spermatozoa. PMID:26954170

  20. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-11-18

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  1. Novel fluorescently labeled peptide compounds for detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein at high specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Oe, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Yoji; Ebina, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    The probes for specific detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in plasma and in atherosclerotic plaques are expected to be useful for the identification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for atherosclerosis. In this study, to develop a fluorescent peptide probe for specific detection of ox-LDL, we investigated the interaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled peptides with ox-LDL using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two heptapeptides (KWYKDGD and KP6) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the N-terminus to FITC in the presence/absence of 6-amino-n-caproic acid (AC) linker to FITC--(FITC-AC)KP6 and (FITC)KP6--both bound with high specificity to ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, a tetrapeptide (YKDG) labeled with FITC at the N-terminus and a pentapeptide (YKDGK) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the C-terminus to FITC did not bind selectively to ox-LDL. Furthermore, (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 bound with high specificity to the protein in mouse plasma (probably ox-LDL fraction). These findings strongly suggest that (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 may be effective novel fluorescent probes for specific detection of ox-LDL.

  2. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Marj P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  3. Accumulation of 99mTc-low-density lipoprotein in human malignant glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Leppälä, J.; Kallio, M.; Nikula, T.; Nikkinen, P.; Liewendahl, K.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Savolainen, S.; Gylling, H.; Hiltunen, J.; Callaway, J.

    1995-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake in gliomas was studied to find out if LDL has potential as a drug carrier of boron, especially for boron neutron capture therapy. Single photon emission tomography (SPET) was performed 2 h and 20 h after intravenous injection of autologous 99mTc-labelled LDL in four patients with untreated and five patients with recurrent glioma. 99mTc-LDL uptake was compared with the uptake of 99mTc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA), an established blood pool marker. The intra- and peritumoral distributions of radioactivity in the SPET images were not identical for radiolabelled LDL and HSA. The mean LDL tumour to brain ratio, determined from transversal SPET slices at 20 h post injection, was 1.5 in untreated and 2.2 in recurrent gliomas; the corresponding ratios for HSA were 1.6 and 3.4. The brain to blood ratio remained constant at 2 h and 20 h in both types of tumours. These data are not consistent with highly selective, homogeneous uptake of LDL in gliomas. However, the different tumoral distribution and rate of uptake of 99mTc-LDL, as compared with 99mTc-HSA, indicate that the uptake of LDL is different from that of HSA and that further studies on the mechanism of LDL uptake in glioma are warranted. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7841057

  4. Prostaglandin E1 decreases the low-density-lipoprotein entry into rabbit arterial wall.

    PubMed Central

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.; Lupattelli, G.; Molinari, E.; Gerakakis, A.; Angelberger, P.

    1991-01-01

    1. In 72 male rabbits fed a 1% cholesterol supplemented diet the effect of a 4 weeks daily infusion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 20 micrograms kg-1 min-1 over 2 h) on [125I]-low density lipoprotein (LDL) accumulation (10 microCi; 0.5 mg protein ml-1) was examined versus sham-treatment after removal of the endothelium of the abdominal aorta by a Fogarthy catheter. 2. The uptake of [125I]-LDL was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher in endothelium-free aortic segments (showing the highest peak maximum at around 12 h after 125I-injection) as compared to aortic segments with endothelium intact (showing the lowest uptake of [125I]-LDL with the peak maximum at 48 h, last control time). Segments with the endothelium restored showed a similar LDL-retention curve to segments with endothelium however, being again significantly (P less than 0.01) higher. 3. PGE1-treatment caused reduction in LDL-accumulation, being significantly (P less than 0.001) pronounced in segments without endothelium and in segments with endothelium restored. 4. The findings indicate a beneficial effect of PGE1 in lipid metabolism by decreasing the LDL-influx into the arterial wall in-vivo. PMID:1933127

  5. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  6. Chitosan-modified carbon nanotubes-based platform for low-density lipoprotein detection.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Azahar; Singh, Nawab; Srivastava, Saurabh; Agrawal, Ved V; John, Renu; Onoda, M; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2014-10-01

    We have fabricated an immunosensor based on carbon nanotubes and chitosan (CNT-CH) composite for detection of low density lipoprotein (LDL) molecules via electrochemical impedance technique. The CNT-CH composite deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass electrode has been used to covalently interact with anti-apolipoprotein B (antibody: AAB) via a co-entrapment method. The biofunctionalization of AAB on carboxylated CNT-CH surface has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic and electron microscopic studies. The covalent functionalization of antibody on transducer surface reveals higher stability and reproducibility of the fabricated immunosensor. Electrochemical properties of the AAB/CNT-CH/ITO electrode have been investigated using cyclic voltammetric and impedimetric techniques. The impedimetric response of the AAB/CNT-CH/ITO immunoelectrode shows a high sensitivity of 0.953 Ω/(mg/dL)/cm(2) in a detection range of 0-120 mg/dL and low detection limit of 12.5 mg/dL with a regression coefficient of 0.996. The observed low value of association constant (0.34 M(-1)s(-1)) indicates high affinity of AAB/CNT-CH/ITO immunoelectrode towards LDL molecules. This fabricated immunosensor allows quantitative estimation of LDL concentration with distinguishable variation in the impedance signal.

  7. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Marj P

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  8. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by monoclonal antibody inhibition of PCSK9.

    PubMed

    Stein, Evan A; Raal, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Published phase I and II trials with two fully human monoclonal antibodies to PCSK9 have provided comprehensive evidence that inhibiting PCSK9 is a very effective method to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In all populations studied so far, whether on statins or LDL-C-reducing diet alone, with or without a genetic defect in the LDL receptor, and in subjects intolerant to statins, the LDL-C reductions have been large and consistent. Even the most efficacious statin, rosuvastatin, at its highest dose has not achieved such reductions. The clinical trials have established that monoclonal antibody therapy targeted to PCSK9 may be administered subcutaneously every two or four weeks. Current data suggest these drugs will provide an effective therapeutic option for LDL-C reduction and that, if proven safe in phase III trials, they will be as important to LDL-C control, and likely to cardiovascular disease risk reduction, as statins have been over the past three decades. PMID:24422577

  9. Whole-Cell Analysis of Low-Density Lipoprotein Uptake by Macrophages Using STEM Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jerome, W. Gray; Kübel, Christian; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles of heavy materials such as gold can be used as markers in quantitative electron microscopic studies of protein distributions in cells with nanometer spatial resolution. Studying nanoparticles within the context of cells is also relevant for nanotoxicological research. Here, we report a method to quantify the locations and the number of nanoparticles, and of clusters of nanoparticles inside whole eukaryotic cells in three dimensions using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Whole-mount fixed cellular samples were prepared, avoiding sectioning or slicing. The level of membrane staining was kept much lower than is common practice in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), such that the nanoparticles could be detected throughout the entire cellular thickness. Tilt-series were recorded with a limited tilt-range of 80° thereby preventing excessive beam broadening occurring at higher tilt angles. The 3D locations of the nanoparticles were nevertheless determined with high precision using computation. The obtained information differed from that obtained with conventional TEM tomography data since the nanoparticles were highlighted while only faint contrast was obtained on the cellular material. Similar as in fluorescence microscopy, a particular set of labels can be studied. This method was applied to study the fate of sequentially up-taken low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conjugated to gold nanoparticles in macrophages. Analysis of a 3D reconstruction revealed that newly up-taken LDL-gold was delivered to lysosomes containing previously up-taken LDL-gold thereby forming onion-like clusters. PMID:23383042

  10. Functional Differences of Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Splice Variants in Regulating Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Takahashi, Yusuke; Oka, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) negatively regulates Wnt signaling. VLDLR has two major alternative splice variants, VLDLRI and VLDLRII, but their biological significance and distinction are unknown. Here we found that most tissues expressed both VLDLRI and VLDLRII, while the retina expressed only VLDLRII. The shed soluble VLDLR extracellular domain (sVLDLR-N) was detected in the conditioned medium of retinal pigment epithelial cells, interphotoreceptor matrix, and mouse plasma, indicating that ectodomain shedding of VLDLR occurs endogenously. VLDLRII displayed a higher ectodomain shedding rate and a more potent inhibitory effect on Wnt signaling than VLDLRI in vitro and in vivo. O-glycosylation, which is present in VLDLRI but not VLDLRII, determined the differential ectodomain shedding rates. Moreover, the release of sVLDLR-N was inhibited by a metalloproteinase inhibitor, TAPI-1, while it was promoted by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In addition, sVLDLR-N shedding was suppressed under hypoxia. Further, plasma levels of sVLDLR-N were reduced in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic mouse models. We concluded that VLDLRI and VLDLRII had differential roles in regulating Wnt signaling and that decreased plasma levels of sVLDLR-N may contribute to Wnt signaling activation in diabetic complications. Our study reveals a novel mechanism for intercellular regulation of Wnt signaling through VLDLR ectodomain shedding. PMID:27528615

  11. Ordering and stability in lipid droplets with applications to low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Jarrett L; Antonijevic, Todor; Starobin, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we present a framework for investigating the order-disorder transition in lipid droplets using the standard Ising model. While a single lipid droplet is itself a complex system whose constituent cholesteryl esters each possesses many degrees of freedom, we present justification for using this effective approach to isolate the underlying physics. It is argued that the behavior of the esters confined within lipid droplets is significantly different from that of a bulk system of similar esters, which is adequately described by continuum mean-field theory in the thermodynamic limit. When the droplet's shell is modeled as an elastic membrane, a simple picture emerges for a transition between two ordered phases within the core which is tuned by the strength of interactions between the esters. Triglyceride concentration is proposed as a variable which strongly influences the strength of interactions between cholesteryl esters within droplets. The possible relevance of this mechanism to the well known atherogenic nature of small low-density lipoprotein particles is discussed in detail.

  12. The advantages of combining low-density lipoproteins with glutamine for cryopreservation of canine semen.

    PubMed

    Bencharif, D; Amirat, L; Pascal, O; Anton, M; Schmitt, E; Desherces, S; Delhomme, G; Langlois, M-L; Barrière, P; Larrat, M; Tainturier, D

    2010-04-01

    Twenty sperm samples from five dogs were frozen in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C in 16 different media, two control media containing 20% egg yolk and 6% low-density lipoproteins (LDL); 10 test media containing 6% LDL (the active cryoprotective ingredient of chicken egg yolk) combined with 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 mmol of glutamine respectively at 4%, 5%, 7%, and 8% LDL. Following thawing, sperm mobility was assessed using an image analyser, HAMILTON THORN CERROS 12. The percentage of mobile spermatozoa was 62.05% in the 6% LDL + 20 mmol glutamine medium compared with 48.90% in the egg yolk-based medium (p < 0.05) or 57.55% for the 6% LDL medium (p < 0.05). Furthermore, in most cases, the motility parameters (average path velocity, curvilinear velocity, straight line velocity) in the 6% LDL + 20 mmol glutamine medium, were superior, to a statistically significant extent, to those in the control media. Finally, the 6% LDL + 20 mmol glutamine combination provides spermatozoa with better protection during freezing than egg yolk or the 6% LDL medium alone in terms of acrosome integrity (fluorescein isothiocyanate--Pisum sativum agglutinin test: p < 0.05), the flagellar plasma membrane (hypo-osmotic test: p < 0.05 for 6% LDL), the DNA (acridine orange test; no significant difference) and the integrity of the acrosome (Spermac test: no significant difference).

  13. Drinking deep seawater decreases serum total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhao-Yang; Yang, Feili Lo; Hsu, Hsin-Wen; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2012-06-01

    Drinking deep seawater (DSW) with high levels of magnesium (Mg) decreased serum lipids in animal studies. Therefore the effects of drinking DSW on blood lipids and its antioxidant capacity in hypercholesterolemic subjects were investigated. DSW was first prepared by a process of filtration and reverse osmosis, and then the concentrated DSW with high levels of Mg was diluted as drinking DSW. Forty-two hypercholesterolemic volunteers were randomly divided into three groups: reverse osmotic (RO) water, DSW (Mg: 395 mg/L, hardness 1410 ppm), and magnesium-chloride fortified (MCF) water (Mg: 386 mg/L, hardness 1430 ppm). The subjects drank 1050 mL of water daily for 6 weeks, and blood samples were collected and analyzed on weeks 0, 3, and 6. Drinking DSW caused a decrease in blood total cholesterol levels and this effect was progressively enhanced with time. Serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) was also decreased by DSW. Further, total cholesterol levels of subjects in the DSW group were significantly lower than those in the MCF water or RO water groups. Compared with week 0, the DSW group had higher blood Mg level on weeks 3 and 6, but the Mg levels were within the normal range in all three groups. DSW consumption also lowered thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values in serum. In conclusion, DSW was apparently effective in reducing blood total cholesterol and LDL-C, and also in decreasing lipid peroxidation in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

  14. Tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel using low density lipoprotein-mimetic solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Youngwook; Bae, Ki Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Lee, Jung Hee; Park, Keunchil

    2015-04-01

    Water-insoluble anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, present severe clinical side effects when administered to patients, primarily associated with the toxicity of reagents used to solubilize the drugs. In efforts to develop alternative formulations of water-insoluble anticancer drugs suitable for intravenous administration, we developed biocompatible anticancer therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), mimicking the structure and composition of natural particles, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), for tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel. These therapeutic nanoparticles contained water-insoluble paclitaxel in the core with tumor-targeting ligand covalently conjugated on the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified surface (targeted PtSLNs). In preclinical human cancer xenograft mouse model studies, the paclitaxel-containing tumor-targeting SLNs exhibited pronounced in vivo stability and enhanced biocompatibility. Furthermore, these SLNs had superior antitumor activity to in-class nanoparticular therapeutics in clinical use (Taxol and Genexol-PM) and yielded long-term complete responses. The in vivo targeted antitumor activities of the SLN formulations in a mouse tumor model suggest that LDL-mimetic SLN formulations can be utilized as a biocompatible, tumor-targeting platform for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  16. Adrenal imaging with technetium-99m-labelled low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacsohn, J.L.; Lees, A.M.; Lees, R.S.; Strauss, H.W.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Moore, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    Evaluation of adrenal cortical function by external imaging is currently accomplished by injection of radiolabelled analogs of cholesterol. Although the adrenals do utilized exogenous cholesterol for steroid hormone synthesis, the cholesterol is delivered to the glands not as free cholesterol but through the uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDL), which are subsequently degraded within the adrenal cortical cells to provide cholesterol. Thus, we sought to assess the use of /sup 99m/Tc-labelled LDL injected into rabbits to obtain external images of the adrenal glands. Adrenal images of all nine rabbits tested were obtained within 18 to 21 hours after injection of /sup 99m/Tc-LDL. Seven of the rabbits were subjected to adrenal cortical suppression with dexamethasone and then all nine rabbits were imaged a second time. In the untreated animals, visualization of the adrenal glands was accompanied by normal serum cortisol concentrations and accumulation of radiolabel in the adrenals, whereas in the dexamethasone-treated animals, lack of visualization of the adrenal glands was correlated with low serum cortisols, and greatly decreased accumulation of the radionuclide in the adrenals. These findings demonstrate for the first time that LDL, when labelled with /sup 99m/Tc, can be used to evaluate adrenal cortical function by external imaging.

  17. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  18. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  19. Rspo2 suppresses CD36-mediated apoptosis in oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Zewei; Zan, Jie; Zhao, Wenting; Pan, Yanyun; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Mingjie; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced apoptosis of macrophages contributes to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of the cysteine-rich secreted proteins, has been shown to be involved in the oncogenesis of several types of cancer. It has also been found to be abundantly expressed among the four R-spondin members in macrophages. The present study was performed to determine whether Rspo2 is involved in the ox-LDL-induced apoptosis of macrophages. It was identified that Rspo2 inhibited oxLDL-induced apoptosis in the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activator using flow cytometry. In addition, Rspo2 was observed to suppress oxLDL-induced ER stress and reactive oxygen species production as demonstrated by western blotting. Furthermore, analysis of the role of Rspo2 in macrophage lipid uptake identified that Rspo2 negatively regulated the Dil-oxLDL uptake by inhibiting the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)36, through the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. The manipulation of Rspo2 had a direct effect on PPAR-γ nuclear translocation. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rspo2 manipulation led to regulation of the direct binding between PPAR-γ and CD36. In conclusion, Rspo2 was found to have a negative regulatory effect during oxLDL-induced macrophage apoptosis by regulating lipid uptake. PMID:27571704

  20. Very-low-density lipoprotein triglyceride kinetics in acute and chronic carbohydrate-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, T.; Mamo, J.; Poapst, M.; Steiner, G.

    1988-09-01

    Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) kinetics were examined in rats maintained on either chow and water (control) or chow and a 10% carbohydrate drinking solution (fructose or glucose). The hexose solutions were available for an acute (16 h) or chronic (14 day) period. The acute fructose (AF), acute glucose (AG), and chronic fructose (CF) groups were hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) compared with control. Plasma TG concentration in chronic glucose (CG)-fed rats was similar to control. VLDL-TG was endogenously radiolabeled in donor rats with (2-3H)-glycerol. The fractional catabolic rate (FCR) was then determined by monitoring the clearance of plasma (3H)VLDL-TG in recipient animals. Donors and recipients were treated in an identical manner. AF and CF groups had an FCR significantly lower than rats given glucose for comparable periods. Both fructose groups and the AG group also had a lower FCR than control. In contrast, FCR in the CG group was significantly higher than controls. TG production rate (TGPR) in both AF and CF fed rats did not significantly differ from controls, suggesting that the HTG observed in these animals was solely from a catabolic defect. AG- and CG-treated glucose animals both had TGPR significantly higher than controls. Therefore, overproduction of VLDL-TG contributed to the HTG associated with this carbohydrate.

  1. Effect of Albizia julibrissin water extracts on low-density lipoprotein oxidization.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Katherine; McClain, Colt; Carrier, Danielle Julie; Wallace, Sunny; King, Jerry; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Clausen, Edgar

    2007-06-13

    High-value phytochemicals could be extracted from biomass prior to the current cellulosic pretreatment technologies (i.e., lime, ammonia, dilute acid, or pressurized hot water treatments) provided that the extraction is performed with a solvent that is compatible with the pretreatment. This work reports on the extraction of flavonoids from Albizia julibrissin biomass. While extracting A. julibrissin foliage with 50 degrees C water, 2.227 mg/g of hyperoside and 8.134 mg/g quercitrin were obtained, which is in the realm of what was obtained with 60% methanol. A. julibrissin foliage, flower, and whole plant extracts were tested in terms of their potential to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidization. The highest inhibition was obtained with foliage water extracts, which were standardized at 2.5 microM of flavonoids. Also, the 2.5 microM foliage water extract resulted in a reduction from 43% to only 1% of the observed monocyte adherence. To have commercial application, A. julibrissin water extracts should be devoid of toxicity. The A. julibrissin foliage, flower, and whole plant water extracts were not toxic to Vero 76 cells. In summary, A. julibrissin biomass can be extracted with 50 degrees C water to yield an antioxidant stream, showing that it may be possible to couple extraction of valuable phytochemicals to the cellulosic pretreatment step. PMID:17497875

  2. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  3. Modulation of infant formula fat profile alters the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and plasma fatty acid distribution relative to those with breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, K C; Pronczuk, A; Wood, R A; Guy, D G

    1992-04-01

    The effect of breast-feeding was compared with that of two fat-modified milk formulas in 45 infants (15 per group) studied by assessing body weight gain for 4 months and plasma lipids, lipoprotein profiles, fatty acid profiles of plasma and red blood cells, and plasma tocopherol status 3 months after birth. A saturated fat formula with coconut oil/soybean oil (COCO/SOY) had a fatty acid content and polyunsaturated/saturated ratio (P/S, 0.55) comparable with that of human milk fat (P/S, 0.39) and had the same fat energy content (50% kcal). The second formula, with corn oil/soybean oil (CORN/SOY), was highly unsaturated (P/S, 4.6), with only 35% kcal from fat. Energy intake and body weight gain were similar for all groups. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels were significantly lower (greater than 20% on average) in infants fed the CORN/SOY formula than in infants fed either the COCO/SOY formula or human milk. Infants fed the CORN/SOY formula also had lower (25% to 35%) plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratios. Plasma, red blood cell, and cholesteryl ester fatty acids from infants fed COCO/SOY contained less 18:1 and more 18:2; cholesterol esters in plasma from breast-fed infants had the highest 20:4n-6 levels. Plasma tocopherol levels were higher in infants consuming formulas. The presence of cholesterol in human milk appeared to expand the low-density lipoprotein pool and exert an "unfavorable" increase in the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio. Thus modulation of infant lipoproteins by changing dietary fat and cholesterol is feasible and in keeping with the known response in adults. PMID:1560323

  4. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  5. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Contributes to Atherogenesis via Co-activation of Macrophages and Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Khismatullin, Damir B.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, due to its role in endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation. Tissue-resident cells such as macrophages and mast cells release inflammatory mediators upon activation that in turn cause endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. Two of these mediators are tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, produced by macrophages, and histamine, produced by mast cells. Static and microfluidic flow experiments were conducted to determine the number of adherent monocytes on vascular endothelium activated by supernatants of oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells or directly by oxLDL. The expression of adhesion molecules on activated endothelial cells and the concentration of TNF-α and histamine in the supernatants were measured by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. A low dose of oxLDL (8 μg/ml), below the threshold for the clinical presentation of coronary artery disease, was sufficient to activate both macrophages and mast cells and synergistically increase monocyte-endothelium adhesion via released TNF-α and histamine. The direct exposure of endothelial cells to a much higher dose of oxLDL (80 μg/ml) had less effect on monocyte adhesion than the indirect activation via oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells. The results of this work indicate that the co-activation of macrophages and mast cells by oxLDL is an important mechanism for the endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. The observed synergistic effect suggests that both macrophages and mast cells play a significant role in early stages of atherosclerosis. Allergic patients with a lipid-rich diet may be at high risk for cardiovascular events due to high concentration of low-density lipoprotein and histamine in arterial vessel walls. PMID:25811595

  6. Dietary herring improves plasma lipid profiles and reduces atherosclerosis in obese low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Britt G; Wikström, Johannes; Jakubowicz, Robert; Marmon, Sofia K; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Jansson, Nina; Gan, Li-Ming; Undeland, Ingrid; Lönn, Malin; Holmäng, Agneta; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2012-03-01

    Diet is a significant modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and high fish intake has been associated with vascular health in population studies. However, intervention studies have been inconclusive. In this study, male low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice were given 16-week high fat/high sucrose diets, supplemented with either minced herring fillets or minced beef. The diets were matched in total fat and cholesterol content; taurine content and fatty acid composition was analysed. Body weights were recorded throughout the study; plasma lipids were analysed at week 8 and 16. Body composition and adipocyte size were evaluated at study end. Atherosclerosis was evaluated at week 12 (ultrasound) and at termination (en face histology). Herring-fed mice had a higher proportion of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the hepatic triacylglycerides (TAG) and phospholipid fractions. The herring-fed mice had increased body weight (P=0.007), and reduced epididymal adipocyte size (P=0.009), despite similar food intake and body composition as the beef-fed mice. The herring-fed mice had lower plasma TAG and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-cholesterol concentrations throughout the study (TAG; P=0.0012 and 0.004, VLDL-cholesterol; P=0.006 and 0.041, week 8 and 16, respectively). At week 16, the herring-fed had higher plasma concentrations of HDL-cholesterol (P=0.004) and less atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic arch (P=0.007) compared with the beef-fed mice. In conclusion, dietary herring in comparison to beef markedly improved vascular health in this mouse model, suggesting that herring provides an added value beyond its content of macronutrients.

  7. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein and the Incidence of Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Clinically Significant Macular Edema Determined From Fundus Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Lee, Kristine E.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.

    2015-01-01

    .04 [95% CI, 0.83-1.29], P = .74; OR, 1.08 [95% CI, 0.44-2.61], P = .87), or the worsening of diabetic retinopathy (HR, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.83-1.07], P = .34; OR, 1.32 [95% CI, 0.83-2.09], P = .24). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings do not provide evidence for a relationship between increasing levels of serum oxidized low-density lipoprotein and the incidence of macular edema or the worsening of diabetic retinopathy in persons with type 1 diabetes. The potential increase in the HR for incident proliferative retinopathy, with an increase in oxidized low-density lipoprotein level over the preceding period, warrants further investigation of this relationship. PMID:26181138

  8. ApoAV reduces plasma triglycerides by inhibiting very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) production and stimulating lipoprotein lipase-mediated VLDL-TG hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Frank G; Rensen, Patrick C N; Voshol, Peter J; Vrins, Carlos; van der Vliet, Hendrik N; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Havekes, Louis M; Groen, Albert K; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2004-07-01

    ApoAV has been discovered recently as a novel modifier of triglyceride (TG) metabolism, but the pathways involved are currently unknown. To gain insight into the function of apoAV, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of murine apoa5 to C57Bl/6 mice was employed. The injection of low doses of Ad-apoa5 (1-5 x 10(8) plaqueforming units/mouse) dose-dependently reduced plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG levels. First, we evaluated whether a reduced hepatic VLDL production contributed to the TG-lowering effect. Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently diminished (29-37%) the VLDL-TG production rate without affecting VLDL particle production, suggesting that apoAV impairs the lipidation of apoB. Second, Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently reduced (68-88%) the postprandial hypertriglyceridemia following an intragastric fat load, suggesting that apoAV also stimulates the lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-dependent clearance of TG-rich lipoproteins. Indeed, recombinant apoAV was found to dose-dependently stimulate LPL activity up to 2.3-fold in vitro. Accordingly, intravenously injected VLDL-like TG-rich emulsions were cleared at an accelerated rate concomitant with the increased uptake of emulsion TG-derived fatty acids by skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue in Ad-apoa5-treated mice. From these data, we conclude that apoAV is a potent stimulator of LPL activity. Thus, apoAV lowers plasma TG by both reducing the hepatic VLDL-TG production rate and by enhancing the lipolytic conversion of TG-rich lipoproteins.

  9. Adipose tissue deficiency results in severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengyu; Gao, Mingming; Liao, Jiawei; Qi, Yanfei; Du, Ximing; Wang, Yuhui; Li, Ling; Liu, George; Yang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue can store over 50% of whole-body cholesterol; however, the physiological role of adipose tissue in cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis has not been directly assessed. Here, we examined lipoprotein metabolism and atherogenesis in a unique mouse model of severe lipodystrophy: the Seipin(-/-) mice, and also in mice deficient in both low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) and Seipin: the Ldlr(-/-)Seipin(-/-) mice. Plasma cholesterol was moderately increased in the Seipin(-/-) mice when fed an atherogenic diet. Strikingly, plasma cholesterol reached ~6000 mg/dl in the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice on an atherogenic diet, as compared to ~1000 mg/dl in the Ldlr(-/-) mice on the same diet. The Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice also developed spontaneous atherosclerosis on chow diet and severe atherosclerosis on an atherogenic diet. Rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the hypercholesterolemia of the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice, and also alleviated the severity of atherosclerosis. Our results provide direct evidence, for the first time, that the adipose tissue plays a critical role in the clearance of plasma cholesterol. Our results also reveal a previously unappreciated strong link between adipose tissue and LDLR in plasma cholesterol metabolism.

  10. Comparison of two low-density lipoprotein apheresis systems in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Drouin-Chartier, Jean-Philippe; Tremblay, André J; Bergeron, Jean; Pelletier, Maude; Laflamme, Nathalie; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis (LA) is a reliable method to decrease LDL-C concentrations and remains the gold standard therapy in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of two LA systems [heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation (HELP) vs. dextran sulfate adsorption (DS) on the reduction of lipids, inflammatory markers, and adhesion molecules in a sample of genetically defined HoFH subjects (n = 9)]. Fasting blood samples were collected before and after LA. All subjects served as their own control and were first treated with the HELP system then with DS in this single sequence study. Compared with HELP, DS led to significantly greater reductions in total cholesterol (-63.3% vs. -59.9%; P = 0.05), LDL-C (-70.5% vs. -63.0%; P = 0.02), CRP (-75.3% vs. -48.8%; P < 0.0001), and TNF-α (-23.7% vs. +14.7%; P = 0.003). Reductions in the plasma levels of PCSK9 (-45.3% vs. -63.4%; P = 0.31), lipoprotein (a) (-70.6% vs. -65.0%; P = 0.30), E-selectin (-16.6% vs. -18.3%; P = 0.65), ICAM-1 (-4.0 vs. 5.6%; P = 0.56), and VCAM-1 (8.3% vs. -1.8%; P = 0.08) were not different between the two systems. For the same volume of filtered plasma (3,000 mL), however, HELP led to greater reductions in plasma apoB (-63.1% vs. -58.3%; P = 0.04), HDL-C (-20.6% vs. -6.5%; P = 0.003), and PCSK9 (-63.4% vs. -28.5%; P = 0.02) levels. These results suggest that both LA systems are effective in reducing plasma lipids and inflammatory markers in HoFH. Compared with HELP, greater reductions in lipid levels and inflammatory markers were achieved with DS, most likely because this method allows for a larger plasma volume to be filtered. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:359-367, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26011648

  11. Modified Low Density Lipoprotein and Lipoprotein-Containing Circulating Immune Complexes as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis and Type 1 Diabetes Macrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Melnichenko, Alexandra A.; Chistiakov, Dimitry A.

    2014-01-01

    In atherosclerosis; blood low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are subjected to multiple enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications that increase their atherogenicity and induce immunogenicity. Modified LDL are capable of inducing vascular inflammation through activation of innate immunity; thus, contributing to the progression of atherogenesis. The immunogenicity of modified LDL results in induction of self-antibodies specific to a certain type of modified LDL. The antibodies react with modified LDL forming circulating immune complexes. Circulating immune complexes exhibit prominent immunomodulatory properties that influence atherosclerotic inflammation. Compared to freely circulating modified LDL; modified LDL associated with the immune complexes have a more robust atherogenic and proinflammatory potential. Various lipid components of the immune complexes may serve not only as diagnostic but also as essential predictive markers of cardiovascular events in atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that LDL-containing immune complexes can also serve as biomarker for macrovascular disease in type 1 diabetes. PMID:25050779

  12. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein, low density lipoprotein particle size and intima media thickness in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tosheska, Katerina; Labudovic, Danica; Jovanova, Silvana; Jaglikovski, Branko; Alabakovska, Sonja

    2011-08-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) plays a key role in reverse cholesterol transport and high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Predominance of small, dense LDL particles is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD).The aim of the study was to determine the potential relationship between the CETP concentration and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and their association with intima media thickness (IMT) in patients with CHD. Lipid parameters, CETP concentration and LDL particle size were determined in 100 healthy subjects (control group) and in 100 patients with CHD, aged 43 to 77 years. Plasma CETP concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay with two different monoclonal antibodies. LDL subclasses were separated by nondenaturing polyacrilamide 3-31% gradient gel electrophoresis. CETP concentration was higher in patients compared to controls (2.02 ± 0.75 mg/ml vs. 1.74 ± 0.63 mg/ml, p<0.01). Mean LDL particle size (nm) was significantly smaller in patients than in controls (24.5 ± 1.1 vs. 26.1 ± 0.9; p<0.001). There was no relation between LDL particle size and CETP concentration (r=-0.1807, p=0.072). Age, diastolic blood pressure, CETP concentration and LDL particle size were independent factors for determing IMT by multiple linear regression analysis. They accounted for 35.2 % of the observed variability in IMT. CETP is not an independent contributor of LDL particle size. CETP might play a role in determining lipoprotein distributions, but did not seem to be the sole factor in the formation of small LDL particles.

  13. Proton pump inhibitors and statins: a possible interaction that favors low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Barkas, F; Elisaf, M; Rizos, CV; Klouras, E; Kostapanos, MS; Liberopoulos, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might influence the metabolism of cholesterol and statins in the liver. Aim: The impact of PPIs on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in statin-treated patients. Methods: Retrospective observational study including consecutive statin-treated individuals followed for ≥3 years in a university hospital lipid clinic. Demographic characteristics as well as clinical and laboratory data were recorded at baseline and the most recent visit. High, moderate and low-intensity statin therapy was defined according to the expected LDL-C reduction (≥50%, 30-50%, and <30%, respectively). We compared the LDL-C reduction in subjects receiving statin + PPI with those on statin alone and assessed the overall effect of PPI administration on LDL-C lowering. Results: Of 648 statin-treated subjects, 7% were also taking a PPI. There was no difference between PPI vs. non-PPI group regarding baseline characteristics and intensity of lipid-lowering therapy. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that PPI use was significantly associated with LDL-C reduction (b =0.104, p =0.005) along with baseline LDL-C levels (b =0.482, p <0.001), treatment with ezetimibe (b =0.198, p <0.001), presence of diabetes (b =0.168, p <0.001), compliance with treatment (b =0.205, p <0.001), intensity of statin treatment (b =0.101, p =0.005) and cardiovascular risk (b =0.082, p =0.049). Subjects receiving statin + PPI had a higher LDL-C reduction by 6.4% compared with those taking a statin alone (fully adjusted p =0.005). Conclusions: PPIs may modestly boost the statin-mediated LDL-C reduction. This effect should be confirmed by prospective clinical studies. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 332-337.

  14. Serum LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) As a Risk Factor for Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Biswas, N; Sangma, M A

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main risk factor of ischaemic stroke. Dyslipidaemia is the main cause of atherosclerosis. High levels of LDL, also called "bad" cholesterol, seem to provoke stroke. This case control study was conducted in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital during the period of January 2012 to December 2012. The study was carried out to measure the level of serum LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) of ischaemic stroke patients admitted in Medicine wards of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital and the result of this study was compared with the level of LDL cholesterol in age matched controls. Sample size was 384 which had been selected by inclusion and exclusion criteria. Out of 384 samples 192 were cases and 192 were controls. Mean age ±SD was 57.0±10.85 years in cases and 57.43±10.64 years in controls. Elderly people are the most vulnerable group for developing stroke. LDL cholesterol level was more than 130mg/dl was found 88.54% among cases and 33.85% among controls, the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Mean LDL level ±SD were 145±13.59mg/dl in cases and 125.01±10.73mg/dl in controls. Odds ratio of LDL cholesterol were 15.0979 and 95% confidence limits were 8.8396 to 25.7869 among cases and controls. This study explored study population with higher LDL cholesterol was over fifteen times more likely to developed ischaemic stroke. Early detection of high LDL cholesterol in the way to prevent ischaemic stroke and thereby reduced the morbidity and mortality of ischaemic stroke. PMID:27612886

  15. Role of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and stabilins in elimination of oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruomei; Oteiza, Ana; Sørensen, Karen Kristine; McCourt, Peter; Olsen, Randi; Svistounov, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    Atherogenesis is associated with elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its oxidized form (oxLDL) in the blood. The liver is an important scavenger organ for circulating oxLDLs. The present study aimed to examine endocytosis of mildly oxLDL (the major circulating form of oxLDLs) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and the involvement of the scavenger receptors stabilin-1 and stabilin-2 in this process. Freshly isolated LSECs, Kupffer cells (KCs), and stabilin-1- and stabilin-2-transfected human embryonic kidney cells were incubated with fluorescently labeled or radiolabeled oxLDLs [oxidized for 3 h (oxLDL3), 6 h, or 24 h (oxLDL24)] to measure endocytosis. The intracellular localization of oxLDLs and stabilins in LSECs was examined by immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. Whereas oxLDL24 was endocytosed both by LSECs and KCs, oxLDL3 (mildly oxLDL) was taken up by LSECs only. The LSEC uptake of oxLDLs was significantly inhibited by the scavenger receptor ligand formaldehyde-treated serum albumin. Uptake of all modified LDLs was high in stabilin-1-transfected cells, whereas stabilin-2-transfected cells preferentially took up oxLDL24, suggesting that stabilin-1 is a more important receptor for mildly oxLDLs than stabilin-2. Double immunogold labeling experiments in LSECs indicated interactions of stabilin-1 and stabilin-2 with oxLDL3 on the cell surface, in coated pits, and endocytic vesicles. LSECs but not KCs endocytosed mildly oxLDL. Both stabilin-1 and stabilin-2 were involved in the LSEC endocytosis of oxLDLs, but experiments with stabilin-transfected cells pointed to stabilin-1 as the most important receptor for mildly oxLDL. PMID:21030611

  16. Low-Density-Lipoprotein Particle Size Predicts a Poor Outcome in Patients with Atherothrombotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae-Jin; Cho, Hyun-Ji; Chang, Yoonkyung; Youn, Minjung; Shin, Min-Jeong; Jo, Inho; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size is considered to be one of the more important cardiovascular risk factors, and small LDL particles are known to have atherogenic potential. The aim of this study was to determine whether LDL particle size is associated with stroke severity and functional outcome in patients with atherothrombotic stroke. Methods Between January 2009 and May 2011, 248 patients with first-episode cerebral infarction who were admitted to our hospital within 7 days after symptom onset were prospectively enrolled. LDL particle size was measured using the nondenaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis assay. Stroke severity was assessed by applying the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission. Functional outcome was investigated at 3 months after the index stroke using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and poor functional outcome was defined as an mRS score of ≥3. Results The LDL particle size in the 248 patients was 25.9±0.9 nm (mean±SD). LDL particle size was inversely correlated with the degree of cerebral artery stenosis (p=0.010). Multinomial multivariate logistic analysis revealed that after adjustment for age, sex, and variables with p<0.1 in univariate analysis, LDL particle size was independently and inversely associated with stroke severity (NIHSS score ≥5; reference, NIHSS score 0-2; odds ratio=0.38, p=0.028) and poor functional outcome (odds ratio=0.44, p=0.038). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that small LDL particles are independently correlated with stroke outcomes. LDL particle size is thus a potential biomarker for the prognosis of atherothrombotic stroke. PMID:25628741

  17. Carbohydrate composition of circulating multiple-modified low-density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zakiev, Emile R; Sobenin, Igor A; Sukhorukov, Vasily N; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Atherogenic modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, as modified LDL, but not native LDL, induces pronounced accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in the arterial wall. It is likely that LDL particles undergo multiple modifications in human plasma: desialylation, changes in size and density, acquisition of negative electric charge, oxidation, and complex formation. In a total LDL preparation isolated from pooled plasma of patients with coronary atherosclerosis and from healthy subjects, two subfractions of LDL could be identified: desialylated LDL bound by a lectin affinity column and normally sialylated (native) LDL that passed through the column. The desialylated LDL subfraction therefore represents circulating modified LDL. In this work, we performed a careful analysis of LDL particles to reveal changes in the composition of glycoconjugates associated with proteins and lipids. Protein fraction of LDL from atherosclerotic patients contained similar amounts of glucosamine, galactose, and mannose, but a 1.6-fold lower level of sialic acid as compared to healthy donors. Lipid-bound glycoconjugates of total LDL from patients with coronary atherosclerosis contained 1.5–2-fold less neutral monosaccharides than total LDL from healthy donors. Patient-derived LDL also contained significantly less sialic acid. Our results demonstrate that carbohydrate composition of LDL from atherosclerotic patients was altered in comparison to healthy controls. In particular, prominent decrease in the sialic acid content was observed. This strengthens the hypothesis of multiple modification of LDL particles in the bloodstream and underscores the clinical importance of desialylated LDL as a possible marker of atherosclerosis progression. PMID:27789955

  18. Cholesteryl Ester Hydroperoxides Are Biologically Active Components of Minimally Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Almazan, Felicidad; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) occurs in vivo and significantly contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. An important mechanism of LDL oxidation in vivo is its modification with 12/15-lipoxygenase (LO). We have developed a model of minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) in which native LDL is modified by cells expressing 12/15LO. This mmLDL activates macrophages inducing membrane ruffling and cell spreading, activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling, and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, we found that many of the biological activities of mmLDL were associated with cholesteryl ester (CE) hydroperoxides and were diminished by ebselen, a reducing agent. Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of many mono- and polyoxygenated CE species in mmLDL but not in native LDL. Nonpolar lipid extracts of mmLDL activated macrophages, although to a lesser degree than intact mmLDL. The macrophage responses were also induced by LDL directly modified with immobilized 12/15LO, and the nonpolar lipids extracted from 12/15LO-modified LDL contained a similar set of oxidized CE. Cholesteryl arachidonate modified with 12/15LO also activated macrophages and contained a similar collection of oxidized CE molecules. Remarkably, many of these oxidized CE were found in the extracts of atherosclerotic lesions isolated from hyperlipidemic apoE–/– mice. These results suggest that CE hydroperoxides constitute a class of biologically active components of mmLDL that may be relevant to proinflammatory activation of macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:18263582

  19. Antioxidant activities of black and yellow soybeans against low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rie; Ohmori, Reiko; Kiyose, Chikako; Momiyama, Yukihiko; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Kondo, Kazuo

    2005-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the daily intakes of soy foods were associated with a reduced cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of black soybeans on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in comparison to yellow soybeans. The extract from black soybean had a longer LDL oxidation lag time than that from yellow soybean (205 +/- 16 and 65 +/- 3 min, respectively). When both soybeans were divided into the seed coat and the mixture of the germ and cotyledon, the diluted extract solution from the black soybean seed coat prolonged the lag time significantly more than the original extract of the yellow soybean seed coat. On the other hand, antioxidant effects of the extract from the mixture of germs and cotyledons were similar in both soybeans. Regarding total polyphenol contents, the seed coat of black soybean had a higher polyphenol content than that of yellow soybean (29.0 +/- 0.56 and 0.45 +/- 0.02 mg/g, respectively). Interestingly, the mixture of the germ and cotyledon hydrolyzed by beta-glucosidase in both soybeans showed a stronger inhibitory effect on LDL oxidation than that before being hydrolyzed by beta-glucosidase. These results suggest that black soybeans may be more effective in inhibiting LDL oxidation than yellow soybeans because of total polyphenols contents in its seed coat. In addition, aglycones, which are rich in soybeans fermented or hydrolyzed by beta-glucosidase, may play a crucial role in the prevention of oxidation-related diseases. PMID:15913328

  20. Systemic Free Fatty Acid Disposal Into Very Low-Density Lipoprotein Triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Koutsari, Christina; Mundi, Manpreet S.; Ali, Asem H.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Jensen, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the incorporation of systemic free fatty acids (FFA) into circulating very low-density lipoprotein triglycerides (VLDL-TGs) under postabsorptive, postprandial, and walking conditions in humans. Fifty-five men and 85 premenopausal women with BMI 18–24 (lean) and 27–36 kg/m2 (overweight/obese) received an intravenous bolus injection of [1,1,2,3,3-2H5]glycerol (to measure VLDL-TG kinetics) and either [1-14C]palmitate or [9,10-3H]palmitate to determine the proportion of systemic FFA that is converted to VLDL-TG. Experiments started at 0630 h after a 12-h overnight fast. In the postabsorptive protocol, participants rested and remained fasted until 1330 h. In the postprandial protocol, volunteers ingested frequent portions of a fat-free smoothie. In the walking protocol, participants walked on a treadmill for 5.5 h at ∼3× resting energy expenditure. Approximately 7% of circulating FFA was converted into VLDL-TG. VLDL-TG secretion rates (SRs) were not statistically different among protocols. Visceral fat mass was the only independent predictor of VLDL-TG secretion, explaining 33–57% of the variance. The small proportion of systemic FFA that is converted to VLDL-TG can confound the expected relationship between plasma FFA concentration and VLDL-TG SRs. Regulation of VLDL-TG secretion is complex in that, despite a broad spectrum of physiological FFA concentrations, VLDL-TG SRs did not vary based on different acute substrate availability. PMID:23434937

  1. Intensive Lowering of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels for Primary Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karalis, Dean G.

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and a high concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for CAD. Current guidelines recommend the use of statins to lower LDL-C levels for the primary prevention of CAD based on an individual's risk factor profile and baseline LDL-C level. For moderaterisk individuals, those with 2 or more major risk factors for CAD and a Framingham risk score of 10% to 20%, the recommendation is to use a statin to lower LDL-C levels to less than 130 mg/dL. However, up to 40% of individuals who develop CAD have LDL-C levels lower than this cutoff. In 2004, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines were updated to include an LDL-C goal of less than 100 mg/dL for individuals at moderately high risk of developing CAD. The guidelines identified several risk factors that when present would favor the use of pharmacological therapy to achieve this more aggressive LDL-C goal. This review evaluates the evidence supporting an LDL-C target of less than 100 mg/dL for moderately high-risk individuals and reviews those risk factors that when present help identify patients who would benefit from achieving this lower LDL-C goal. English-language publications in MEDLINE and references from relevant articles published between January 1, 1980, and November 30, 2008, were reviewed. Main keywords searched were coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, statins, cardiac risk factors, inflammatory markers, metabolic syndrome, and coronary artery calcium. PMID:19339653

  2. Heparin-induced extracorporal low-density-lipoprotein precipitation (H.E.L.P.) to improve the recovery of hearing in patients with sudden idiopathic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Suckfüll, M; Wimmer, C; Jäger, B; Schorn, K; Thiery, J

    2000-01-01

    The pathogenesis of sudden hearing loss (SHL) is still not well understood. Possible causes include increased blood viscosity, microthrombosis or altered blood flow. Hypercholesterolemia, hyperfibrinogenemia and increased platelet aggregation are frequently observed in patients with SHL. The aim of this study was to investigate whether drastic lowering of plasma cholesterol and fibrinogen by selective extracorporal apheresis could have a beneficial effect on hearing recovery in these patients. Seven patients with SHL were treated with an extracorporal procedure removing fibrinogen and cholesterol from plasma. Six of the seven patients showed an immediate improvement in auditory thresholds following a single treatment of heparin-induced low-density lipoprotein precipitation. These findings indicate for the first time that acute and drastic removal of plasma fibrinogen and low-density lipoproteins may be an effective clinical method for the treatment of patients with SHL.

  3. Different responses to oxidized low-density lipoproteins in human polarized macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake by macrophages plays an important role in foam cell formation. It has been suggested the presence of heterogeneous subsets of macrophage, such as M1 and M2, in human atherosclerotic lesions. To evaluate which types of macrophages contribute to atherogenesis, we performed cDNA microarray analysis to determine oxLDL-induced transcriptional alterations of each subset of macrophages. Results Human monocyte-derived macrophages were polarized toward the M1 or M2 subset, followed by treatment with oxLDL. Then gene expression levels during oxLDL treatment in each subset of macrophages were evaluated by cDNA microarray analysis and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In terms of high-ranking upregulated genes and functional ontologies, the alterations during oxLDL treatment in M2 macrophages were similar to those in nonpolarized macrophages (M0). Molecular network analysis showed that most of the molecules in the oxLDL-induced highest scoring molecular network of M1 macrophages were directly or indirectly related to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed commonly upregulated genes in all subset of macrophages, some of which contained antioxidant response elements (ARE) in their promoter regions. A cluster of genes that were specifically upregulated in M1 macrophages included those encoding molecules related to nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NF-κB) signaling pathway. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-8 after oxLDL treatment in M2 macrophages was markedly lower than those in M0 and M1 cells. HMOX1 gene expression levels were almost the same in all 3 subsets of macrophages even after oxLDL treatment. Conclusions The present study demonstrated transcriptional alterations in polarized macrophages during oxLDL treatment. The data suggested that oxLDL uptake may affect TGF-β1- and NF

  4. [New biochemical methods for evaluation of the oxidative-antioxidative potential of low-density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Ragino, Iu I; Voevoda, M I; Kashtanova, E V; Ivanova, M V; Nikitin, Iu P

    2005-04-01

    Today one of the leading theories in the concept of atherogenesis underlines the key role of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL). This paper describes new original and easy-to-use biochemical methods for evaluating the oxidative-antioxidative potential (LDL resistance to oxidation in vitro and the LDL level of alpha-tocopherol and retinol), as well as the results of their development and testing in 2 groups (62 patients with coronary atherosclerosis and 95 healthy individuals). LDL were isolated from their sera via precipitation with heparin and MnCl2. The precipitated LDL were washed in 0.9% NaCl solution and dissolved in 1 M NaCl solution. For evaluation of the resistance of LDL to oxidation in vitro, the precipitated LDL were incubated at 37 degrees C with 50 microM of copper ions; before and 0.5 h, 1.0 h, and 2.0 h after LDL incubation, TBARS products were determined by the fluorimetric technique after Schun J. et al. (1978). For evaluation of the antioxidative potntial of LDL, the concentrations of alpha-tocopheral and retinol in the precipitated LDL were measured by using the fluorimetric technique described by Taylor S. L. et al. (1976). The new methods were found to be highly reproducible. There was a high positive correlation (r = +0.98 +/- 0.04, p < 0.001) between the oxidative resistance of the LDL isolated from sera by ultracentrifugation and that of the precipitated LDL. There was also a high positive correlation (r = +0.79 +/- 0.09, p < 0.01) between the alpha-tocopherol and retinol levels determined by the fluorimetric technique and the LDL levels measured by the authors' method. The new methods were clinically tested with success. The significantly elevated baseline level of lipid perioxidation products in the precipitated LDL, the low oxidative resistance of the precipitated LDL in vitro, and reduced concentrations of alpha-tocopherol and retinol in the precipitated LDL were recorded in the patients with coronary atherosclerosis as compared to

  5. The biology of PCSK9 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes: new and emerging therapeutics to control low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Steve; Mayer, Gaétan

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) directly binds to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A domain of low-density lipoprotein receptor and induces its degradation, thereby controlling circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 can decrease the incidence of coronary heart disease by up to 88%, owing to lifelong reduction of LDL-C. Moreover, two subjects with PCSK9 loss-of-function mutations on both alleles, resulting in a total absence of functional PCSK9, were found to have extremely low circulating LDL-C levels without other apparent abnormalities. Accordingly, PCSK9 could represent a safe and effective pharmacological target to increase clearance of LDL-C and to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Recent clinical trials using anti-PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies that block the PCSK9:low-density lipoprotein receptor interaction were shown to considerably reduce LDL-C levels by up to 65% when given alone and by up to 72% in patients already receiving statin therapy. In this review, we will discuss how major scientific breakthroughs in PCSK9 cell biology have led to the development of new and forthcoming LDL-C-lowering pharmacological agents. PMID:24115837

  6. Effect of garlic supplementation on oxidized low density lipoproteins and lipid peroxidation in patients of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Veena; Jain, Sanjay

    2004-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including hypertension. Therefore, certain compounds with antioxidative capacity are believed to be protective against such diseases. Some components of garlic are known to possess antioxidative properties. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effect of short-term garlic supplementation in essential hypertensive patients (EH) on indices of oxidative stress. Twenty patients of EH as diagnosed by JNC VI criteria (Group I) and 20 age and sex-matched normotensive controls were enrolled for the study. Both groups were given garlic pearls (GP) in a dose of 250 mg per day for 2 months. Baseline samples were obtained at start of the study, i.e. 0 day, and thereafter, 2 months (follow-up). Lipids and lipoprotein subfractions, plasma-oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL), plasma and urinary concentration of 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso-PGF2alpha) as a biomarker of oxidative stress in vivo, and the total antioxidant status (TOS) of these individuals were determined. We observed a moderate hypercholesterolemia and a significantly raised blood pressure in hypertensive patients as compared to the controls. The indices of oxidative stress, i.e. plasma ox-LDL and plasma and urinary concentration of 8-iso-PGF2alpha were significantly increased in EH group. Further, hypertensive patients had a significantly low TOS as compared to the control group. With in 2 months of GP supplementation, there was a significant decline in both systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) and a significant reduction in ox-LDL and 8-iso-PGF2alpha levels in Group I patients. Further, a moderate increase in the TOS was also observed in this group as compared to their control counterparts. These findings suggest that dietary supplementation of garlic may be beneficial in reducing blood pressure and oxidative stress in hypertensive individuals. PMID:15646031

  7. Z-Scan Analysis: a New Method to Determine the Oxidative State of Low-Density Lipoprotein and Its Association with Multiple Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Maria Camila Pruper; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Giampaoli, Viviane; da Conceição Quintaneiro Aubin, Elisete; de Araújo Lima Barbosa, Milena Maria; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira

    2016-04-01

    The great atherogenic potential of oxidized low-density lipoprotein has been widely described in the literature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the state of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human plasma measured by the Z-scan technique has an association with different cardiometabolic biomarkers. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B, paraoxonase-1, and glucose were analyzed using standard commercial kits, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was estimated using the Friedewald equation. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect electronegative low-density lipoprotein. Low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein sizes were determined by Lipoprint® system. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the non-linear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solution. Principal component analysis and correlations were used respectively to resize the data from the sample and test association between the θ parameter, measured with the Z-scan technique, and the principal component. A total of 63 individuals, from both sexes, with mean age 52 years (±11), being overweight and having high levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were enrolled in this study. A positive correlation between the θ parameter and more anti-atherogenic pattern for cardiometabolic biomarkers together with a negative correlation for an atherogenic pattern was found. Regarding the parameters related with an atherogenic low-density lipoprotein profile, the θ parameter was negatively correlated with a more atherogenic pattern. By using Z-scan measurements, we were able to find an association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein state and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers in samples from individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  8. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  9. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro. PMID:26722472

  10. Effects of saturated and polyunsaturated fat diets on the chemical composition and metabolism of low density lipoproteins in man.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J; Packard, C J; Grundy, S M; Yeshurun, D; Gotto, A M; Taunton, O D

    1980-01-01

    This study examined the effects of dietary saturated and polyunsaturated fat on the chemical composition and metabolism of low density lipoproteins (LDL) in eight normal male subjects. The influence of these diets on fecal sterol excretion was also measured in four of the subjects. When compared with the saturated fat diet, the polyunsaturated diet lowered both plasma cholesterol polyunsaturated diet lowered both plasma cholesterol (23%, P less than 0.001) and triglyceride (14%, P less than 0.001) levels. Sixty-seven percent of the reduction in the former lipid resulted from a fall in LDL cholesterol (23%, P less than 0.001), although very low density (VLDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels also fell (by 27% and 20% of their respective control value). These changes were accompanied by significant alterations in LDL composition. Specifically, during polyunsaturated fat feeding, the relative percentage cholesterol in the LDL fraction fell while that of phospholipid rose. There was no change in the percentage protein or triglyceride. The fatty acid components of LDL triglyceride, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipid were also affected by dietary fat saturation level. Overall, polyunsaturated fat feeding produced an enrichment in linoleate with reciprocal changes in palmitate, stearate, and oleate which affected triglycerides more than cholesteryl esters and phospholipids. The above changes in LDL composition were associated with alterations in the metabolism of LDL apoprotein (apoLDL). The polyunsaturated deit lowered plasma apoLDL by 13% (P less than 0.05). This resulted from an increase in the fractional catabolic rate of LDL (whether determined by plasma decay curve analysis (P less than 0.05) or urine/plasma radioactivity ratios (P less than 0.001) without significant alteration of its corporeal distribution or synthetic rate. The polyunsaturated fat diet did not cause a consistent change in fecal neutral or acidic steroid excretion. We

  11. Omega-3 fatty acid ethyl ester supplementation decreases very-low-density lipoprotein triacylglycerol secretion in obese men.

    PubMed

    Wong, Annette T Y; Chan, Dick C; Ooi, Esther M M; Ng, Theodore W K; Watts, Gerald F; Barrett, P Hugh R

    2013-07-01

    Dysregulated VLDL-TAG (very-low-density lipoprotein triacylglycerol) metabolism in obesity may account for hypertriacylglycerolaemia and increased cardiovascular disease. ω-3 FAEEs (omega-3 fatty acid ethyl esters) decrease plasma TAG and VLDL concentrations, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we carried out a 6-week randomized, placebo-controlled study to examine the effect of high-dose ω-3 FAEE supplementation (3.2 g/day) on the metabolism of VLDL-TAG in obese men using intravenous administration of d5-glycerol. We also explored the relationship of VLDL-TAG kinetics with the metabolism of VLDL-apo (apolipoprotein) B-100 and HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-apoA-I. VLDL-TAG isotopic enrichment was measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Kinetic parameters were derived using a multicompartmental model. Compared with placebo, ω-3 FAEE supplementation significantly lowered plasma concentrations of total (-14%, P<0.05) and VLDL-TAG (-32%, P<0.05), as well as hepatic secretion of VLDL-TAG (-32%, P<0.03). The FCR (fractional catabolic rate) of VLDL-TAG was not altered by ω-3 FAEEs. There was a significant association between the change in secretion rates of VLDL-TAG and VLDL-apoB-100 (r=0.706, P<0.05). However, the change in VLDL-TAG secretion rate was not associated with change in HDL-apoA-I FCR (r=0.139, P>0.05). Our results suggest that the TAG-lowering effect of ω-3 FAEEs is associated with the decreased VLDL-TAG secretion rate and hence lower plasma VLDL-TAG concentration in obesity. The changes in VLDL-TAG and apoB-100 kinetics are closely coupled. PMID:23356247

  12. Recombinant hepatitis C virus-envelope protein 2 interactions with low-density lipoprotein/CD81 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Afonso, Ana; Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Nogueira, Camila Tita; Tansini, Aline; Cappelini, Luciana Teresa Dias; Malagó, Wilson; da Silva, Flávio Henrique; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; da Costa, Paulo Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein 2 (E2) is involved in viral binding to host cells. The aim of this work was to produce recombinant E2B and E2Y HCV proteins in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris, respectively, and to study their interactions with low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and CD81 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the ECV304 bladder carcinoma cell line. To investigate the effects of human LDL and differences in protein structure (glycosylated or not) on binding efficiency, the recombinant proteins were either associated or not associated with lipoproteins before being assayed. The immunoreactivity of the recombinant proteins was analysed using pooled serum samples that were either positive or negative for hepatitis C. The cells were immunophenotyped by LDLr and CD81 using flow cytometry. Binding and binding inhibition assays were performed in the presence of LDL, foetal bovine serum (FCS) and specific antibodies. The results revealed that binding was reduced in the absence of FCS, but that the addition of human LDL rescued and increased binding capacity. In HUVEC cells, the use of antibodies to block LDLr led to a significant reduction in the binding of E2B and E2Y. CD81 antibodies did not affect E2B and E2Y binding. In ECV304 cells, blocking LDLr and CD81 produced similar effects, but they were not as marked as those that were observed in HUVEC cells. In conclusion, recombinant HCV E2 is dependent on LDL for its ability to bind to LDLr in HUVEC and ECV304 cells. These findings are relevant because E2 acts to anchor HCV to host cells; therefore, high blood levels of LDL could enhance viral infectivity in chronic hepatitis C patients. PMID:26018451

  13. Alpinetin enhances cholesterol efflux and inhibits lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-loaded human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengming; Sang, Haiqiang; Fu, Xin; Liang, Ying; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Alpinetin is a natural flavonoid abundantly present in the ginger family. Here, we investigated the effect of alpinetin on cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 macrophages and human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). After exposing THP-1 macrophages to alpinetin, cholesterol efflux was determined by liquid scintillator. The mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), liver X receptor alpha (LXR-α), ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), and ABCG1 and scavenger receptor class B member 1 were determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. Alpinetin promoted apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density-lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux and elevated PPAR-γ and LXR-α mRNA and protein expression in a dose-dependent fashion in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages and HMDMs. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of PPAR-γ or LXR-α dose dependently reversed alpinetin-increased cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages, indicating the involvement of PPAR-γ and LXR-α in alpinetin-promoted cholesterol efflux. Alpinetin inhibited ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation and enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA and protein, which was reversed by specific knockdown of PPAR-γ or LXR-α. Taken together, our results reveal that alpinetin exhibits positive effects on cholesterol efflux and inhibits ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation, which might be through PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1/ABCG1 pathway.

  14. Effects of a 12-week healthy-life exercise program on oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and carotid intima-media thickness in obese elderly women.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Hyuntae; Lim, Seung-Taek; Park, Jin-Kee

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a 12-week exercise program on plasma level of oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in obese elderly women, who are at increased risk of heart disease morbidity. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty participants were assigned into either a control (n = 10) or a supervised exercise program (n = 10) group. The 12-week exercise intervention was performed 3 days per week and involved combined aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and traditional Korean dance. [Results] Two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant group × time interactions for body mass, diastolic blood pressure, appendicular muscle mass. For high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the ratio of oxidized low-/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant interactions (group × time), indicating responses differed significantly between the control and exercise groups after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] A 12-week low- to moderate-intensity exercise program appears to be beneficial for obese elderly women by improving risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  15. Glucose oxidation and low-density lipoprotein-induced macrophage ceroid accumulation: possible implications for diabetic atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J V; Bottoms, M A; Clare, K; Skamarauskas, J T; Mitchinson, M J

    1994-01-01

    The exposure of proteins to high concentrations of glucose in vitro is widely considered a relevant model of the functional degeneration of tissue occurring in diabetes mellitus. In particular, the enhanced atherosclerosis in diabetes is often discussed in terms of glycation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the non-enzymic attachment of glucose to apolipoprotein amino groups. However, glucose can undergo transition-metal-catalysed oxidation under near-physiological conditions in vitro, producing oxidants that possess a reactivity similar to the hydroxyl radical. These oxidants can fragment protein, hydroxylate benzoic acid and induce lipid peroxidation in human LDL. In this study, glycation of LDL in vitro is accompanied by such oxidative processes. However, the oxidation of LDL varies with glucose concentration in a manner which does not parallel changes in protein glycation. Glycation increases in proportion to glucose concentration, whereas in our studies maximal oxidation occurs at a glucose concentration of approx. 25 mM. The modification of LDL resulting from exposure to glucose alters macrophage ceroid accumulation, a process which occurs in the human atherosclerotic plaque. The accumulation of ceroid in macrophages is shown to be related to LDL oxidation rather than LDL glycation, per se, as it too occurs at a maximum of approx. 25 mM. Oxidative sequelae of protein glycation appear to be a major factor in LDL-macrophage interactions, at least with respect to ceroid accumulation. Our observations are discussed in the context of the observed increase in the severity of atherosclerosis in diabetes. PMID:8198540

  16. Copper supplementation in humans does not affect the susceptibility of low density lipoprotein to in vitro induced oxidation (FOODCUE project).

    PubMed

    Turley, E; McKeown, A; Bonham, M P; O'Connor, J M; Chopra, M; Harvey, L J; Majsak-Newman, G; Fairweather-Tait, S J; Bügel, S; Sandström, B; Rock, E; Mazur, A; Rayssiguier, Y; Strain, J J

    2000-12-01

    The oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Copper (Cu) is essential for antioxidant enzymes in vivo and animal studies show that Cu deficiency is accompanied by increased atherogenesis and LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Nevertheless, Cu has been proposed as a pro-oxidant in vivo and is routinely used to induce lipid peroxidation in vitro. Given the dual role of Cu as an in vivo antioxidant and an in vitro pro-oxidant, a multicenter European study (FOODCUE) was instigated to provide data on the biological effects of increased dietary Cu. Four centers, Northern Ireland (coordinator), England, Denmark, and France, using different experimental protocols, examined the effect of Cu supplementation (3 or 6 mg/d) on top of normal Cu dietary intakes or Cu-controlled diets (0.7/1.6/6.0 mg/d), on Cu-mediated and peroxynitrite-initiated LDL oxidation in apparently healthy volunteers. Each center coordinated its own supplementation regimen and all samples were subsequently transported to Northern Ireland where lipid peroxidation analysis was completed. The results from all centers showed that dietary Cu supplementation had no effect on Cu- or peroxynitrite-induced LDL susceptibility to oxidation. These data show that high intakes (up to 6 mg Cu) for extended periods do not promote LDL susceptibility to in vitro-induced oxidation. PMID:11121720

  17. Oxidative susceptibility of low density lipoprotein from rabbits fed atherogenic diets containing coconut, palm, or soybean oils.

    PubMed

    Yap, S C; Choo, Y M; Hew, N F; Yap, S F; Khor, H T; Ong, A S; Goh, S H

    1995-12-01

    The oxidative susceptibilities of low density lipoproteins (LDL) isolated from rabbits fed high-fat atherogenic diets containing coconut, palm, or soybean oil were investigated. New Zealand white rabbits were fed atherogenic semisynthetic diets containing 0.5% cholesterol and either (i) 13% coconut oil and 2% corn oil (CNO), (ii) 15% refined, bleached, and deodorized palm olein (RBDPO), (iii) 15% crude palm olein (CPO), (iv) 15% soybean oil (SO), or (v) 15% refined, bleached, and deodorized palm olein without cholesterol supplementation [RBDPO(wc)], for a period of twelve weeks. Total fatty acid compositions of the plasma and LDL were found to be modulated (but not too drastically) by the nature of the dietary fats. Cholesterol supplementation significantly increased the plasma level of vitamin E and effectively altered the plasma composition of long-chain fatty acids in favor of increasing oleic acid. Oxidative susceptibilities of LDL samples were determined by Cu2(+)-catalyzed oxidation which provide the lag times and lag-phase slopes. The plasma LDL from all palm oil diets [RBDPO, CPO, and RBDPO(wc)] were shown to be equally resistant to the oxidation, and the LDL from SO-fed rabbits were most susceptible, followed by the LDL from the CNO-fed rabbits. These results reflect a relationship between the oxidative susceptibility of LDL due to a combination of the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E.

  18. Olmesartan Attenuates the Impairment of Endothelial Cells Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein through Downregulating Expression of LOX-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Ma, Genshan; Yao, Yuyu; Qian, Huidong; Li, Weizhang; Chen, Xinjun; Jiang, Wenlong; Zheng, Ruolong

    2012-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and its receptor, lectin-Like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), play important roles in the development of endothelial injuries. Olmesartan can protect endothelial cells from the impairment caused by various pathological stimulations. In the present study we investigated whether olmesartan decreased the impairment of endothelial cells induced by ox-LDL by exerting its effects on LOX-1 both in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of cultured endothelial cells of neonatal rats with ox-LDL for 24 h or infusion of ox-LDL in mice for 3 weeks led to the remarkable impairment of endothelial cells, including increased lactate dehydrogenase synthesis, phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) and expression of apoptotic genes such as B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3. Simultaneously, the cell vitality and expression of Bcl-2 gene were greatly reduced. All these effects, however, were significantly suppressed by the treatment with olmesartan. Furthermore, ox-LDL promoted up-regulation of LOX-1 expression either in cultured endothelial cells or in the aortas of mice, which was reversed with the administration of olmesartan. Our data indicated that olmesartan may attenuate the impairment of endothelial cell via down-regulation of the increased LOX-1 expression induced by ox-LDL. PMID:22408405

  19. Berberine as a photosensitizing agent for antitumoral photodynamic therapy: Insights into its association to low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Luiza Andreazza, Nathalia; Vevert-Bizet, Christine; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève; Sureau, Franck; José Salvador, Marcos; Bonneau, Stephanie

    2016-08-20

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in Berberine, a phytochemical with multispectrum therapeutic activities, as anti-tumoral agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this context, low density lipoproteins (LDL) play a key role in the delivery of the photosensitizer in tumor cells. We correlate the physicochemical parameters of the berberine association to LDL with the influence of LDL-delivery on its accumulation in a glioma cell line and on its photo-induced activity in view of antitumor PDT. Our results evidence an important binding of 400 berberine molecules per LDL. Changes in berberine and apoprotein fluorescence suggest different fixation types, involving various LDL compartments including the vicinity of the apoprotein. The berberine association to LDL does not affect their recognition by the specific B/E receptors, of which over-expression increases the cellular uptake of LDL-preloaded berberine. Fluorescence microscopy evidences the mitochondrial labeling of the glioma model cells, with no significant modification upon LDL-delivery. Moreover, the cellular delivery of berberine by LDL increases its photocytotoxic effects on such cells. So, this research illustrates the potential of berberine as a photosensitizing agent for PDT, in particular due to their behavior towards LDL as plasma vehicles, and gives insights into its mechanisms of cell uptake. PMID:27282536

  20. Oxidation of Plasmalogen, Low-Density Lipoprotein, and RAW 264.7 Cells by Photoactivatable Atomic Oxygen Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Bourdillon, Max T.; Ford, Benjamin A.; Knulty, Ashley T.; Gray, Colleen N.; Zhang, Miao; Ford, David A.; McCulla, Ryan D.

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of lipids by endogenous or environmental reactive oxygen species (ROS) generates a myriad of different lipid oxidation products that have important roles in disease pathology. The lipid oxidation products obtained in these reactions is dependent upon the identity of the reacting ROS. The photoinduced deoxygenation of various aromatic heterocyclic oxides has been suggested to generate ground state atomic oxygen (O(3P)) as an oxidant; however, very little is known about reactions between lipids and O(3P). To identify lipid oxidation products arising from the reaction of lipids with O(3P), photoactivatable precursors of O(3P) were irradiated in the presence of lysoplasmenylcholine, low-density lipoprotein, and RAW 264.7 cells under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Four different aldehyde products consistent with the oxidation of plasmalogens were observed. The four aldehydes were: tetradecanal, pentadecanal, 2-hexadecenal, and hexadecanal. Depending upon the conditions, either pentadecanal or 2-hexadecenal was the major product. Increased amounts of the aldehyde products were observed in aerobic conditions. PMID:27096146

  1. Molecular Imaging of Native Low-Density Lipoprotein by Near-Infrared Fluorescent Angioscopy in Human Coronary Plaques.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasumi; Yoshida, Tomoe; Shimoyama, Ei; Uchida, Yasuto

    2016-03-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease, but its localization within the human coronary arterial wall is poorly understood. Imaging of LDL in 30 coronary arteries excised from 15 subjects who underwent autopsy was performed using near-infrared fluorescent angioscopy system and using indocyanine green dye as a biomarker of LDL. The percentage incidence of LDL in 28 normal segments, 24 white plaques (early stage of plaque growth), and 21 yellow plaques (mature stage of plaque) classified by conventional angioscopy, was 14.2, 79.1 (p <0.01 vs normal segments and p <0.05 vs yellow plaques), and 28.5, respectively. Coronary near-infrared fluorescent angioscopy showed similar results in 7 patients in vivo. Our results suggested that LDL begins to deposit in the human coronary arterial wall in the early stage of atherosclerosis, increasingly deposits with plaque growth and decreases in the mature stage; and therefore, molecular therapy targeting LDL should be started before plaque maturation.

  2. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: a physiological Aβ homeostatic mechanism with multiple therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Sagare, Abhay P.; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) is the main cell surface receptor involved in brain and systemic clearance of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) toxin amyloid-beta (Aβ). In plasma, a soluble form of LRP1 (sLRP1) is the major transport protein for peripheral Aβ. LRP1 in brain endothelium and mural cells mediates Aβ efflux from brain by providing a transport mechanism for A across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). sLRP1 maintains a plasma ‘sink’ activity for Aβ through binding of peripheral Aβ which in turn inhibits re-entry of free plasma Aβ into the brain. LRP1 in the liver mediates systemic clearance of Aβ. In AD, LRP1 expression at the BBB is reduced and Aβ binding to circulating sLRP1 is compromised by oxidation. Cell surface LRP1 and circulating sLRP1 represent druggable targets which can be therapeutically modified to restore the physiological mechanisms of brain Aβ homeostasis. In this review, we discuss how increasing LRP1 expression at the BBB and liver with lifestyle changes, statins, plant-based active principles and/or gene therapy on one hand, and how replacing dysfunctional plasma sLRP1 on the other regulate Aβ clearance from brain ultimately controlling the onset and/or progression of AD. PMID:22820095

  3. [Antibodies against modified low-density lipoproteins and their complexes in blood of patients with various manifestations of atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Belik, I V; Ivantsova, A A; Mamedova, Z E; Denisenko, A D

    2016-05-01

    The study included 79 patients with coronary artery disease, 25 individuals with preclinical atherosclerosis and 59 healthy controls. Key lipid parameters were examined in all the participants. Levels of antibodies (Abs) against (IgG and IgM) LDL modified by malondialdehyde (MDA), acetic anhydride and hypochlorite, were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Abs specificity was tested by competitive ELISA. Circulating immune complexes (CIC) were isolated by precipitation in polyethylene glycol. Abs to hypochlorite-modified low density lipoprotein (hypochlorite-LDL) were detected in the serum samples. These Abs did not demonstrate cross-reactivity with MDA-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) and acetylated LDL (acetyl-LDL). Patients with coronary artery disease had increased levels of CIC (p<0.0001) and decreased levels of Abs (IgM) to hypochlorite-LDL, compared with healthy controls and patients with preclinical atherosclerosis (p=0.006). A correlation between the levels of Abs (IgG) to the hypochlorite-LDL and Abs to MDA- and acetyl-LDL was found. There was a correlation between the content of the Abs (IgM) to MDA- and acetyl-LDL and the concentration of CIC-cholesterol. Lipid parameters did not correlate with Abs levels. PMID:27563003

  4. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  5. Effects of retinoids on differentiation, lipid metabolism, epidermal growth factor, and low-density lipoprotein binding in squamous carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ponec, M.; Weerheim, A. ); Havekes, L. ); Boonstra, J. )

    1987-08-01

    The relationship among keratinocyte differentiation capacity, lipid synthesis, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, plasma membrane composition, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding has been studied in SCC-12F2 cells. The differentiation capacity of the cells, i.e., ionophore-induced cornified envelope formation, was inhibited by various retinoids and stimulated by hydrocortisone. Retinoids that caused a significant reduction of cornified envelope formation, i.e., retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid, caused only minor changes in lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Arotinoid ethylsulfone, having a minor effect on cornified envelope formation, caused a drastic inhibition of cholesterol synthesis resulting in changes in the plasma membrane composition. Hydrocortisone stimulated cornified envelope formation but had only minor effects on lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Of all retinoids tested, only arotinoid ethylsulfone caused a drastic increase in EGF binding, while hydrocortisone had no effect. These results clearly demonstrate that the plasma membrane composition is not related to keratinocyte differentiation capacity, but most likely does determine EGF binding. Furthermore, EGF binding does not determine keratinocyte differentiation capacity.

  6. Protective effect of rosuvastatin treatment by regulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein expression in a rat model of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuiping; Zhou, Xueling; Hou, Bingzong; Tang, Bo; Li, Jian; Zhang, Baimeng

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of rosuvastatin treatment on the mechanism of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) in rats with liver fibrosis. In total, 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: 24 in the control group (A), 24 in the obstructive jaundice models group (B) and 24 in the rosuvastatin group (C). Each group was further divided into four subgroups for assessment at different time-points. The obstructive jaundice models were established and rosuvastatin was administered by gavage. Liver fibrosis indicators, Ox-LDL, malonaldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were measured and liver pathological changes were observed at weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 after model induction. In groups B and C, the rat models were successfully established, and there were significant changes in the expression of Ox-LDL and the three liver fibrosis indicators when compared to group A (P<0.01). However, the expression of Ox-LDL and the three liver fibrosis indicators in group C were decreased compared with group B (P<0.05), while SOD increased (P<0.05) and MDA decreased (P<0.05). The three liver fibrosis indicators were different in comparison to group B (P<0.05). Thus, there appeared to be an association between the expression of Ox-LDL and liver fibrosis. Treatment with rosuvastatin could regulate the expression of Ox-LDL and improve liver fibrosis in rat models with obstructive jaundice. PMID:27588174

  7. Hepatitis C virus G1b infection decreases the number of small low-density lipoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Chika; Nagano, Tomohisa; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Tomita, Yoichi; Sugita, Tomonori; Aida, Yuta; Itagaki, Munenori; Satoh, Kenichi; Sutoh, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Akihito; Aizawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how hepatitis C virus (HCV) G1b infection influences the particle number of lipoproteins. METHODS: The numbers of lipoprotein particles in fasting sera from 173 Japanese subjects, 82 with active HCV G1b infection (active HCV group) and 91 with cleared HCV infection (SVR group), were examined. Serum lipoprotein was fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography into twenty fractions. The cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in each fraction were measured using LipoSEARCH. The number of lipoprotein particles in each fraction was calculated using a newly developed algorithm, and the relationship between chronic HCV G1b infection and the lipoprotein particle number was determined by multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The median number of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles was significantly lower in the active HCV group [1182 nmol/L, interquartile range (IQR): 444 nmol/L] than in the SVR group (1363 nmol/L, IQR: 472 nmol/L, P < 0.001), as was that of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles (14168 nmol/L vs 15054 nmol/L, IQR: 4114 nmol/L vs 3385 nmol/L, P = 0.042). The number of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles was similar between the two groups. Among the four LDL sub-fractions, the number of large LDL particles was similar between the two groups. However, the numbers of medium (median: 533.0 nmol/L, IQR: 214.7 nmol/L vs median: 633.5 nmol/L, IQR: 229.6 nmol/L, P < 0.001), small (median: 190.9 nmol/L, IQR: 152.4 nmol/L vs median: 263.2 nmol/L, IQR: 159.9 nmol/L; P < 0.001), and very small LDL particles (median: 103.5 nmol/L, IQR: 66.8 nmol/L vs median: 139.3 nmol/L, IQR: 67.3 nmol/L, P < 0.001) were significantly lower in the active HCV group than in the SVR group, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated an association between HCV G1b infection and the decreased numbers of medium, small, and very small LDL particles. However, active HCV infection did not affect the number of large LDL

  8. Low-density lipoprotein apheresis using the Liposorber dextran sulfate cellulose system for patients with hypercholesterolemia refractory to medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B R; Saal, S D

    1996-01-01

    A subset of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) have an inadequate lipid-lowering response to diet and drug treatment and should be considered for low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis therapy. This procedure selectively removes apolipoprotein B-containing particles [LDL, very-low-density lipoprotein, lipoprotein(a)] from plasma independent of diet and drug therapy. Methods for performing LDL-apheresis include dextran sulfate cellulose adsorption, immunoadsorption, and heparin-induced extracorporeal precipitation. The Liposorber Study Group evaluated LDL removal using the Liposorber LA-15 LDL-apheresis System in 64 patients with FH who had not responded adequately to diet and maximal drug therapy. Mean acute reductions in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) were 76% in heterozygous FH (HtFH) patients and 81% in homozygous FH (HoFH) patients. Time-averaged levels of LDL-C were lowered 41% in HtFH and 53% in HoFH patients. Hypotension was the most frequent side effect, occurring in 3% of procedures. The Liposorber LA-15 System has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and is recommended for 1) patients with functional homozygous FH (LDL-C level > 500 mg/dL; 2) patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and LDL-C levels > or = 200 mg/dL; 3) patients without CAD, but an LDL-C level > or = 300 mg/dL. PMID:8915816

  9. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  10. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other lipids: a review.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Terry A; Glickstein, Sara B; Rowe, Jonathan D; Soni, Paresh N

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory, hypothesis-generating literature review, we evaluated potentially differential effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and non-HDL-C in published studies of ω-3 fatty acid supplementation or prescription ω-3 fatty acid ethyl esters. Placebo-adjusted changes in mean lipid parameters were compared in randomized, controlled trials in subjects treated for ≥ 4 weeks with DHA or EPA. Of 22 studies identified, 6 compared DHA with EPA directly, 12 studied DHA alone (including 14 DHA-treated groups), and 4 examined EPA alone. In studies directly comparing EPA with DHA, a net increase in LDL-C of 3.3% was observed with DHA (DHA: +2.6%; EPA: -0.7%). In such head-to-head comparative studies, DHA treatment was associated with a net decrease in TG by 6.8% (DHA: -22.4%; EPA: -15.6%); a net increase in non-HDL-C by 1.7% (DHA: -1.2%; EPA -2.9%); and a net increase in HDL-C by 5.9% (DHA: +7.3%; EPA: +1.4%). Increases in LDL-C were also observed in 71% of DHA-alone groups [with demonstrated statistical significance (P < .05) in 67% (8 of 12) DHA-alone studies] but not in any EPA-alone studies. Changes in LDL-C significantly correlated with baseline TG for DHA-treated groups. The range of HDL-C increases documented in DHA-alone vs EPA-alone studies further supports the fact that HDL-C is increased more substantially by DHA than EPA. In total, these findings suggest that DHA-containing supplements or therapies were associated with more significant increases in LDL-C and HDL-C than were EPA-containing supplements or therapies. Future prospective, randomized trials are warranted to confirm these preliminary findings, determine the potential effects of these fatty acids on other clinical outcomes, and evaluate the generalizability of the data to larger and more heterogeneous patient populations. PMID:22264569

  11. Effects of dietary fat on high-density-lipoprotein subclasses are influenced by both apolipoprotein E isoforms and low-density-lipoprotein subclass patterns.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Dreon, D M; Krauss, R M

    1995-06-01

    We examined the effects of replacing dietary fat with carbohydrates on high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses as measured by nondenaturing polyacrylamide-gradient-gel electrophoresis. One hundred five men received a 6-wk low-fat diet (24% of total energy) and a 6-wk high-fat diet (46% of energy) in a crossover design. Absorbency of protein stain was measured within five HDL subclasses: HDL3c (7.2-7.8 nm), HDL3b (7.8-8.2 nm), HDL3a (8.2-8.8 nm), HDL2a (8.8-9.7 nm), and HDL2b (9.7-12 nm). The low-density-lipoprotein-(LDL) subclass pattern was determined by gradient-gel electrophoresis, with pattern B men defined as having an LDL-predominant peak diameter < or = 25.5 nm and an LDL distribution skewed toward larger size particles. On the high-fat diet, 18 men exhibited LDL-subclass pattern B and 87 men exhibited the alternative LDL pattern A. Twelve men had the apolipoprotein (apo) epsilon 2 allele. Replacing dietary fat with carbohydrates 1) significantly decreased HDL3a, HDL2a, and HDL2b; 2) reduced HDL2b significantly more in pattern A than in pattern B men; and 3) increased plasma HDL3b concentrations significantly more in those men with the epsilon 2 allele. Our results suggest that unfavorable HDL changes were significantly more likely to occur in men who had LDL-subclass pattern A or the apo epsilon allele than in men who had pattern B or lacked the epsilon 2 allele.

  12. In silico modeling of the dynamics of low density lipoprotein composition via a single plasma sample.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Martin; Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Hoffmann, Michael M; Puetz, Gerhard; Winkler, Karl

    2016-05-01

    Lipoproteins play a key role in the development of CVD, but the dynamics of lipoprotein metabolism are difficult to address experimentally. This article describes a novel two-step combined in vitro and in silico approach that enables the estimation of key reactions in lipoprotein metabolism using just one blood sample. Lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation from fasting plasma stored at 4°C. Plasma incubated at 37°C is no longer in a steady state, and changes in composition may be determined. From these changes, we estimated rates for reactions like LCAT (56.3 µM/h), β-LCAT (15.62 µM/h), and cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer protein-mediated flux of CE from HDL to IDL/VLDL (21.5 µM/h) based on data from 15 healthy individuals. In a second step, we estimated LDL's HL activity (3.19 pools/day) and, for the very first time, selective CE efflux from LDL (8.39 µM/h) by relying on the previously derived reaction rates. The estimated metabolic rates were then confirmed in an independent group (n = 10). Although measurement uncertainties do not permit us to estimate parameters in individuals, the novel approach we describe here offers the unique possibility to investigate lipoprotein dynamics in various diseases like atherosclerosis or diabetes. PMID:27015744

  13. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters the effect of matrix stiffness on the formation of endothelial networks and capillary lumens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Formation of new blood vessels is essential for vascular repair and remodeling, and it is known that biomechanical properties of extracellular matrix play a major role in this process. Our earlier studies have also shown that exposing endothelial cells to oxidized modification of low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) increases endothelial stiffness and facilitates their ability to form cellular networks, suggesting that it facilitates endothelial angiogenic potential. The goal of this study, therefore, was to test the interrelationship between matrix stiffness and oxLDL in the regulation of angiogenesis. Our results show that, as expected, an increase in matrix stiffness inhibited endothelial network formation and that exposure to oxLDL significantly facilitated this process. We also show, however, that oxLDL-induced facilitation of endothelial networks was observed only in stiff (3 mg/mL) but not in soft (1 mg/mL) collagen gels, resulting in blunting the effect of matrix stiffness. Also unexpectedly, we show that an increase in matrix stiffness results in a significant increase in the number of capillary lumens that are formed by single cells or pairs of cells, suggesting that while endothelial connectivity is impaired, formation of single-cell lumens is facilitated. oxLDL facilitates lumen formation, but this effect is also matrix dependent and is observed only in soft gels and not in stiff gels. Finally, an increase in both matrix stiffness and oxLDL exposure results in changes in capillary morphology, with the formation of larger capillary lumens. Overall, our study suggests that oxLDL plays an important role in formation of new capillaries and their morphology and that this effect is critically dependent on the extracellular environment’s compliance, thereby underlining the importance of the interdependence of these parameters. PMID:24618546

  14. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters the effect of matrix stiffness on the formation of endothelial networks and capillary lumens.

    PubMed

    Gundavaram, Madhu S; Shentu, Tzu Pin; Kowalsky, Gregory B; Volkov, Suncica; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Levitan, Irena

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Formation of new blood vessels is essential for vascular repair and remodeling, and it is known that biomechanical properties of extracellular matrix play a major role in this process. Our earlier studies have also shown that exposing endothelial cells to oxidized modification of low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) increases endothelial stiffness and facilitates their ability to form cellular networks, suggesting that it facilitates endothelial angiogenic potential. The goal of this study, therefore, was to test the interrelationship between matrix stiffness and oxLDL in the regulation of angiogenesis. Our results show that, as expected, an increase in matrix stiffness inhibited endothelial network formation and that exposure to oxLDL significantly facilitated this process. We also show, however, that oxLDL-induced facilitation of endothelial networks was observed only in stiff (3 mg/mL) but not in soft (1 mg/mL) collagen gels, resulting in blunting the effect of matrix stiffness. Also unexpectedly, we show that an increase in matrix stiffness results in a significant increase in the number of capillary lumens that are formed by single cells or pairs of cells, suggesting that while endothelial connectivity is impaired, formation of single-cell lumens is facilitated. oxLDL facilitates lumen formation, but this effect is also matrix dependent and is observed only in soft gels and not in stiff gels. Finally, an increase in both matrix stiffness and oxLDL exposure results in changes in capillary morphology, with the formation of larger capillary lumens. Overall, our study suggests that oxLDL plays an important role in formation of new capillaries and their morphology and that this effect is critically dependent on the extracellular environment's compliance, thereby underlining the importance of the interdependence of these parameters.

  15. Associations of age, adiposity, menopause, and alcohol intake with low-density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Krauss, R M

    1997-06-01

    We used nondenaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis to examine the associations of age, adiposity, menopause, and alcohol intake with LDL subclasses in 355 individuals. The absorbency of protein stain was used as an index of mass concentrations at intervals of 0.05 nm within seven LDL subclasses: LDL-IVB (22.0 to 23.2 nm), LDL-IVA (23.3 to 24.1 nm), LDL-IIIB (24.2 to 24.6 nm), LDL-IIIA (24.7 to 25.5 nm), LDL-II (25.5 to 26.4 nm), LDL-I (26.0 to 28.5 nm), and intermediate-size lipoproteins (ISL, 28.0 to 32.0 nm). Age and alcohol intake were obtained from questionnaires, and body mass index was computed from clinic measurements of weight and height. In adult men, body mass index correlated positively with LDL-III, and alcohol intake correlated positively with larger LDL-I. Age was positively correlated with LDL-IIIA and ISL in both men and women and with LDL-IIIB and LDL-II in women. Postmenopausal women had higher LDL-IIIA, LDL-II, and ISL than both premenopausal and premenarchal females. Adult males, > or = 18 years old, had higher levels of LDL-IIIA and LDL-II than younger males. Adjustment for fasting plasma triglyceride levels eliminated the significant associations between age and LDL-IIIA in both men and women and between age and LDL-II in women. Partial correlation analyses showed that reductions in the LDL peak diameter associated with increasing age, male sexual maturation, menopause, and adiposity are attributable to increases in the LDL-IIIA subclass. Thus, densitometric measurements of protein-stained gradient gels reveal specific relationships between LDL subclasses and age, adiposity, and alcohol intake beyond those identified by the LDL peak or average diameter.

  16. In vitro studies of PBT Nonwoven Fabrics adsorbent for the removal of low density lipoprotein from hyperlipemia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Hong; Yang, Chao; Zhong, Rui; Lei, Yu; Sun, Kang; Liu, Jiaxin

    2011-06-01

    Polyanion ligands such as acrylic acid (AA) and heparin were grafted on PBT Nonwoven Fabrics (PBTNF) to study their effect on the adsorption of low density lipoprotein (LDL). These modified PBTNFs were characterized by Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy. The blood compatibilities of the modified PBTNFs were examined using in vitro hemolysis rate (HR), platelet adhesion, total protein (TP) and activated partial thromboplastin time. The results showed that direct immobilized heparin could improve PBTNF-PAA's blood compatibility and decrease the adsorption capability of useful high density lipoprotein, but would possess so low bioactivity that could not further improve the absorption of LDL and TC. Since the PBTNF-PAA55-Heparin adsorbent had quite good adsorption selectivity for these proteins, it can be an excellent candidate for depletion of LDL with good blood compatibility.

  17. Low-density lipoprotein transport through an arterial wall under hyperthermia and hypertension conditions--An analytical solution.

    PubMed

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola

    2016-01-25

    An analytical solution for Low-Density Lipoprotein transport through an arterial wall under hyperthermia conditions is established in this work. A four-layer model is used to characterize the arterial wall. Transport governing equations are obtained as a combination between Staverman-Kedem-Katchalsky membrane equations and volume-averaged porous media equations. Temperature and solute transport fields are coupled by means of Ludwig-Soret effect. Results are in excellent agreement with numerical and analytical literature data under isothermal conditions, and with numerical literature data for the hyperthermia case. Effects of hypertension combined with hyperthermia, are also analyzed in this work.

  18. Withania somnifera reverses Alzheimer's disease pathology by enhancing low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in liver

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Neha; Gupta, Alok; Valli, Rupanagudi Khader; Joshi, Shanker Datt; Mills, Jessica T.; Hamel, Edith; Khanna, Pankaj; Jain, Subhash Chand; Thakur, Suman S.; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    A 30-d course of oral administration of a semipurified extract of the root of Withania somnifera consisting predominantly of withanolides and withanosides reversed behavioral deficits, plaque pathology, accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and oligomers in the brains of middle-aged and old APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice. It was similarly effective in reversing behavioral deficits and plaque load in APPSwInd mice (line J20). The temporal sequence involved an increase in plasma Aβ and a decrease in brain Aβ monomer after 7 d, indicating increased transport of Aβ from the brain to the periphery. Enhanced expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) in brain microvessels and the Aβ-degrading protease neprilysin (NEP) occurred 14–21 d after a substantial decrease in brain Aβ levels. However, significant increase in liver LRP and NEP occurred much earlier, at 7 d, and were accompanied by a rise in plasma sLRP, a peripheral sink for brain Aβ. In WT mice, the extract induced liver, but not brain, LRP and NEP and decreased plasma and brain Aβ, indicating that increase in liver LRP and sLRP occurring independent of Aβ concentration could result in clearance of Aβ. Selective down-regulation of liver LRP, but not NEP, abrogated the therapeutic effects of the extract. The remarkable therapeutic effect of W. somnifera mediated through up-regulation of liver LRP indicates that targeting the periphery offers a unique mechanism for Aβ clearance and reverses the behavioral deficits and pathology seen in Alzheimer's disease models. PMID:22308347

  19. Effect of the combination of methyltestosterone and esterified estrogens compared with esterified estrogens alone on apolipoprotein CIII and other apolipoproteins in very low density, low density, and high density lipoproteins in surgically postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Chiuve, Stephanie E; Martin, Lisa A; Campos, Hannia; Sacks, Frank M

    2004-05-01

    Androgens are known to lower plasma triglycerides, an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Triglycerides are carried in plasma on very low density (VLDL) and low density (LDL) lipoprotein particles. Apolipoprotein CIII (apoCIII), a strong predictor of CHD, impairs the metabolism of VLDL and LDL, contributing to increased triglycerides. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of oral methyltestosterone (2.5 mg/d), added to esterified estrogens (1.25 mg/d), on concentrations of apolipoproteins and lipoproteins, specifically those containing apoCIII, compared with esterified estrogens alone in surgically postmenopausal women. The women in the methyltestosterone plus esterified estrogen group had significant decreases in total triglycerides, apoCI, apoCII, apoCIII, apoE, and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol compared with those in the esterified estrogen group. The decreases in apoCIII concentrations occurred in VLDL (62%; P = 0.02), LDL (35%; P = 0.001), and HDL (17%; P < 0.0001). There were also decreases in cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations of apoCIII containing LDL, and apoCI concentration of apoCIII containing VLDL. There was no effect on VLDL and LDL particles that did not contain apoCIII or on apoB concentrations. In conclusion, methyltestosterone, when administered to surgically postmenopausal women taking esterified estrogen, has a selective effect to reduce the apoCIII concentration in VLDL and LDL, a predictor of CHD. Methyltestosterone may lower plasma triglycerides through a reduction in apoCIII.

  20. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Rahman, I.U.; Donnelly, T.M.; Parker, T.S.; Weinrauch, M.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused /sup 111/In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t/sub 1/2/) for clearance of /sup 111/In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits. By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue sores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was > 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative ..gamma.. camera imaging, hepatic trapping of /sup 111/In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance. Aortic uptake of /sup 111/In was < 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, the results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia.

  1. Rapid and simple profiling of lipoproteins by polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis to determine the heterogeneity of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) including small, dense LDL.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Seo, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Awata, Takuya; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis (PAGE) for lipoprotein profiling in clinical practice. Blood samples were collected from 146 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid parameters were assayed by PAGE, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (n = 41), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol (n = 37). We also used a commercial kit to measure small, dense LDL (n = 41). By PAGE, we obtained the percentage of the area under the curve (AUC %) of each peaks and calculated respective AUC% x total cholesterol (AUC%xTC) values. The calculated values of LDL-AUC%xTC, small LDL-AUC%xTC, and HDL-AUC%xTC values were correlated well with values from homogeneous assay for LDL-cholesterol, small, dense LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol assays (r = 0.94, 0.81, and 0.89, respectively). PAGE combined with measurement of total cholesterol and triglycerides provides a rapid evaluation of anti- or pro-atherogenic lipoproteins and a simple profiling system for both the "quantity" and "quality" of lipoproteins, allowing a better assessment of the risk of coronary artery diseases. This article discusses several methods for simple and rapid lipid profiling and outlines some recent patents relevant to the methods.

  2. Ceruloplasmin enhances smooth muscle cell- and endothelial cell-mediated low density lipoprotein oxidation by a superoxide-dependent mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Ehrenwald, E.; Fox, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC) stimulate low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by free radical-mediated, transition metal-dependent mechanisms. The physiological source(s) of metal ions is not known; however, purified ceruloplasmin, a plasma protein containing 7 coppers, oxidizes LDL in vitro. We now show that ceruloplasmin also increases LDL oxidation by vascular cells. In metal ion-free medium, human ceruloplasmin increased bovine aortic SMC- and EC-mediated LDL oxidation by up to 30- and 15-fold, respectively. The maximal response was at 100-300 microg ceruloplasmin/ml, a level at or below the unevoked physiological plasma concentration. Oxidant activity was dependent on protein structure as a specific proteolytic cleavage or removal of one of the seven ceruloplasmin copper atoms inhibited activity. Three lines of evidence indicated a critical role for cellular superoxide (O2.) in ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation. First, the rate of production of O2. by cells correlated with their rates of LDL oxidation. Second, superoxide dismutase effectively blocked ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation by both cell types. Finally, O2. production by SMC quantitatively accounted for the observed rate of LDL oxidation. To show this, the course of O2. production by SMC was simulated by repeated addition of xanthine and xanthine oxidase to culture medium under cell-free conditions. Neither ceruloplasmin nor O2. alone increased LDL oxidation, but together they completely reconstituted the oxidation rate of ceruloplasmin-stimulated SMC. These results are the first to show that ceruloplasmin stimulates EC- and SMC-mediated oxidation of LDL and that cell-derived O2. accounts quantitatively for metal-dependent, free radical-initiated oxidation of LDL by these cells.

  3. Unique structural properties of apolipoprotein B in low-density lipoproteins produced by several human hepatoma-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    La Belle, M; McCall, M R; Krauss, R M; Forte, T M

    1990-10-01

    Previous work has shown that low-density lipoproteins (LDL) secreted by hepatoma-derived cell lines have an unusual composition compared to plasma LDL; rather than cholesteryl ester, the hepatoma cell-secreted LDL have a triacylglycerol core. We have found that they also have an increased negative charge, as judged by agarose electrophoresis. Since apolipoprotein B is a glycoprotein containing carbohydrate chains terminated with negatively charged sialic acid residues, we examined whether increased glycosylation of the apolipoprotein B from three hepatoma cell lines (Hep G2, Hep 3B and Huh 7) might account for the differences in LDL charge. The weight percent carbohydrate for Hep G2, Hep 3B and Huh 7 LDL-protein (1.1 +/- 0.2; 1.7 +/- 0.8; 0.4 +/- 0.1) was found to be extremely low compared with the 2.8-9% range we found for plasma LDL-protein, while the amount of LDL-lipid associated carbohydrate from hepatoma LDL was similar to that we found in plasma LDL. Furthermore, desialation of hepatoma cell-secreted LDL with neuraminidase did not normalize the negative charge to that of neuraminidase-treated plasma LDL. Western blots of thrombin proteolytic fragments indicated that, in addition to the T1-T4 fragments seen in plasma apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B of hepatoma-derived LDL produced four to five new fragments (T5-T9), suggesting increased exposure of proteolytic sites. Western blotting of the new fragments with antibodies specific for known apolipoprotein B sequences suggests that many of the new cleavage sites cluster in or near the putative LDL receptor recognition site.

  4. Low-density lipoprotein stimulated peroxide production and endocytosis in cultured human endothelial cells: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Holland, J A; Meyer, J W; Schmitt, M E; Sauro, M D; Johnson, D K; Abdul-Karim, R W; Patel, V; Ziegler, L M; Schillinger, K J; Small, R F; Lemanski, L F

    1997-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid metabolism and NADPH oxidase inhibitor on the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and endocytotic activity of cultured human endothelial cells (EC) exposed to atherogenic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels have been investigated. EC were incubated with 240 mg/dl LDL cholesterol and cellular H2O2 production and endocytotic activity measured in the presence and absence of the arachidonic acid metabolism inhibitors, indomethacin, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and SKF525A, and NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin. All inhibitors, with the exception of indomethacin, markedly reduced high LDL-induced increases in EC H2O2 generation and endocytotic activity. EC exposed to exogenously applied arachidonic acid had cellular functional changes similar to those induced by high LDL concentrations. EC incubated with 1-25 uM arachidonic acid had increased H2O2 production and heightened endocytotic activity. Likewise, EC pre-loaded with [3H]arachidonic acid when exposed to increasing LDL levels (90-330 mg/dl cholesterol) had a dose-dependent rise in cytosolic [3H]arachidonic acid. The phospholipase A2 inhibitors, 4-bromophenacyl bromide and 7,7-dimethyleicosadienoic acid, markedly inhibited H2O2 production in EC exposed to 240 mg/dl LDL cholesterol. These findings suggest that arachidonic acid contributes mechanistically to high LDL-perturbed EC H2O2 generation and heightened endocytosis. Such cellular functional changes add to our understanding of endothelial perturbation, which has been hypothesized to be a major contributing factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  5. Oxidative susceptibility of low density lipoprotein subfractions is related to their ubiquinol-10 and alpha-tocopherol content.

    PubMed

    Tribble, D L; van den Berg, J J; Motchnik, P A; Ames, B N; Lewis, D M; Chait, A; Krauss, R M

    1994-02-01

    The conjugated polyene fatty acid parinaric acid (PnA) undergoes a stoichiometric loss in fluorescence upon oxidation and can be used to directly monitor peroxidative stress within lipid environments. We evaluated the course of potentially atherogenic oxidative changes in low density lipoproteins (LDL) by monitoring the oxidation of PnA following its incorporation into buoyant (p = 1.026-1.032 g/ml) and dense (p = 1.040-1.054 g/ml) LDL subfractions. Copper-induced oxidation of LDL-associated PnA exhibited an initial lag phase followed by an increased rate of loss until depletion. Increased PnA oxidation occurred immediately after the antioxidants ubiquinol-10 and alpha-tocopherol were consumed but before there were marked elevations in conjugated dienes. Despite differences in sensitivity to early oxidation events, PnA oxidation and conjugated diene lag times were correlated (r = 0.582; P = 0.03), and both indicated a greater susceptibility of dense than buoyant LDL in accordance with previous reports. The greater susceptibility of PnA in dense LDL was attributed to reduced levels of ubiquinol-10 and alpha-tocopherol, which were approximately 50% lower than in buoyant LDL (mol of antioxidant/mol of LDL) and together accounted for 80% of the variation in PnA oxidation lag times. These results suggest that PnA is a useful probe of LDL oxidative susceptibility and may be superior to conjugated dienes for monitoring the initial stages of LDL lipid peroxidation. Differences in oxidative susceptibility among LDL density subfractions are detected by the PnA assay and are due in large part to differences in their antioxidant content.

  6. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) inhibits low density lipoprotein-induced signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Relou, Ingrid A M; Gorter, Gertie; Ferreira, Irlando Andrade; van Rijn, Herman J M; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N

    2003-08-29

    At physiological concentrations, low density lipoprotein (LDL) increases the sensitivity of platelets to aggregation- and secretion-inducing agents without acting as an independent activator of platelet functions. LDL sensitizes platelets by inducing a transient activation of p38MAPK, a Ser/Thr kinase that is activated by the simultaneous phosphorylation of Thr180 and Tyr182 and is an upstream regulator of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). A similar transient phosphorylation of p38MAPK is induced by a peptide mimicking amino acids 3359-3369 in apoB100 called the B-site. Here we report that the transient nature of p38MAPK activation is caused by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), a receptor with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. PECAM-1 activation by cross-linking induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and a fall in phosphorylated p38MAPK and cPLA2. Interestingly, LDL and the B-site peptide also induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1, and studies with immunoprecipitates indicate the involvement of c-Src. Inhibition of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A (okadaic acid) makes the transient p38MAPK activation by LDL and the B-site peptide persistent. Inhibition of Tyr-phosphatases (vanadate) increases Tyr-phosphorylated PECAM-1 and blocks the activation of p38MAPK. Together, these findings suggest that, following a first phase in which LDL, through its B-site, phosphorylates and thereby activates p38MAPK, a second phase is initiated in which LDL activates PECAM-1 and induces dephosphorylation of p38MAPK via activation of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A. PMID:12775720

  7. Proliferation of macrophages due to the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis by oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Monika; Gruber, Miriam; Schmid, Diethart; Baran, Halina; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is assumed to be a major causal agent in hypercholesteraemia-induced atherosclerosis. Because the proliferation of lipid-loaden macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions has been described, we investigated the dependence of macrophage proliferation on the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by hypochlorite oxidized LDL. Ox-LDL induces a dose dependent inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-interferon stimulated mouse macrophages (J774.A1) with concomitant macrophage proliferation as assayed by cell counting, tritiated-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cell protein. Native LDL did not influence macrophage proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthesis. iNOS protein and mRNA was reduced by HOCl-oxidized LDL (0-40 µg/ml) as revealed by immunoblotting and competitive semiquantitative PCR. Macrophage proliferation was increased by the addition of the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME. The addition of ox-LDL to L-NAME containing incubations induced no further statistically significant increase in cell number. Nitric oxide donors decreased ox-LDL induced macrophage proliferation and nitric oxide scavengers restored macrophage proliferation to the initial values achieved by ox-LDL. The decrease of cytosolic DNA fragments in stimulated macrophages incubated with ox-LDL demonstrates that the proliferative actions of ox-LDL are associated with a decrease of NO-induced apoptosis. Our data show that inhibition of iNOS dependent nitric oxide production caused by hypochlorite oxidized LDL enhances macrophage proliferation. This might be a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26600745

  8. Effect of nutritional counseling on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol among Thai HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Chotivichien, Saipin; Arab, Lenore; Prasithsirikul, Wisit; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Sinawat, Sangsom; Detels, Roger

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy have increased risk of metabolic syndrome, including dyslipidemia. In this study, we determined whether individual nutritional counseling reduced dyslipidemia, particularly low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, among HIV-infected patients with dyslipidemia not currently taking lipid-lowering medication. We conducted a randomized 24-week trial among HIV-infected patients with dyslipidemia who were on antiretroviral therapy and were eligible to initiate therapeutic lifestyle changes according to the Thai National Cholesterol Education Program. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention group that received individual counseling with a nutritionist for seven sessions (baseline, weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24) and a control group that received standard verbal diet information at baseline and nutritional counseling only at week 24. A 24-h recall technique was used to assess dietary intake for both groups at baseline and week 24. Lipid profile (total cholesterol, LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride) was measured at baseline and after 12 and 24 weeks of therapy. An intention-to-treat and linear mixed model were used. Seventy-two patients were randomly assigned, and 62 (86%) participants completed their lipid profile test. After 12 weeks of follow-up, there were significant reductions in the intervention group for total cholesterol (-14.4 ± 4.6 mg/dL, P = .002), LDL cholesterol (-13.7 ± 4.1 mg/dL, P = .001), and triglyceride (-30.4 ± 13.8 mg/dL, P = .03). A significant reduction in LDL cholesterol was also observed in the control group (-7.7 ± 3.8 mg/dL, P = .04), but there were no significant differences in change of mean lipid levels between the groups at 12 weeks of follow-up. After 24 weeks, participants assigned to the intervention group demonstrated significantly greater decreases in serum total cholesterol (-19.0 ± 4.6 vs. 0.2

  9. Effect of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) on placental low density lipoprotein uptake and degradation in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, M.C.; Babischkin, J.S.; Pepe, G.J.; Albrecht, E.D.

    1988-05-01

    The present study determined if the decline in placental progesterone (P4) production that results from administration of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) to pregnant baboons results from a change in placental low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and/or degradation. Pregnant baboons (Papio anubis) were untreated (n = 10) or received MER-25 (25 mg/kg BW, orally; n = 10) daily on days 140-170 of gestation (term, 184 days). Placentas were removed by cesarean section on day 170 of gestation, and villous tissue was dispersed with 0.1% collagenase at 37 C for 40 min. Placental cells (10(6)) were incubated in medium 199 (pH 7.2) for 12 h at 37 C with increasing amounts (5-100 micrograms) of (125I)LDL, with or without a 100-fold excess of unlabeled baboon LDL. Mean (+/- SE) peripheral serum P4 concentrations on days 140-170 of gestation were 51% lower (P less than 0.01) in MER-25-treated (5.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) than in untreated (11.6 +/- 0.5 ng/ml) baboons. The uptake of LDL was 56% lower (P less than 0.01) in placental cells from antiestrogen-treated (6.3 +/- 1.6 ng/micrograms cell protein) than in those from untreated (14.4 +/- 1.9 ng/micrograms cell protein) baboons. The dissociation constants for placental LDL uptake, as assessed by Scatchard analysis, however, were similar in untreated (0.80 microgram/ml) and MER-25-treated (0.76 microgram/ml) animals. The amount of (125I)LDL concomitantly degraded by cells from baboons that received MER-25 was 54% of that degraded by cells from untreated controls. The relative decline in LDL degradation by cells of antiestrogen-treated baboons was proportionate to the decline in overall LDL uptake. The results indicate, therefore, that antiestrogen treatment decreased the amount of placental LDL uptake, but did not change the affinity for the lipoprotein.

  10. Endothelial NOS-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)- terminal kinase by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Levonen, A. L.; Moellering, D.; Ramachandran, A.; Patel, R. P.; Jo, H.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to activate a number of signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. Among these are the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinase) determine cell survival in response to environmental stress. Interestingly, JNK signaling involves redox-sensitive mechanisms and is activated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both NADPH oxidases, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), peroxides, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The role of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the activation of JNK in response to oxLDL has not been examined. Herein, we show that on exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL, both ERK and JNK are activated through independent signal transduction pathways. A key role of eNOS activation through a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent mechanism leading to phosphorylation of eNOS is demonstrated for oxLDL-dependent activation of JNK. Moreover, we show that activation of ERK by oxLDL is critical in protection against the cytotoxicity of oxLDL.

  11. Characterization of binding sites for acetylated low density lipoprotein in the rat liver in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Dresel, H A; Friedrich, E; Via, D P; Schettler, G; Sinn, H

    1985-01-01

    Acetylated low density lipoprotein (acetyl-LDL) binding to hepatic membrane proteins of rats was analysed in vitro by ligand blotting. Specific binding could be demonstrated to two hepatic proteins with an apparent mol. wt. of 250 kd and 220 kd. Polyanionic competitors and maleylated bovine serum albumin inhibited the binding of acetyl-LDL effectively. To determine the sites of the catabolism of acetyl-LDL, [131I]-acetyl-LDL was injected intravenously into control rats and rats pre-treated with the known competitors of the acetyl-LDL binding. Distribution of the radiolabelled acetyl-LDL was followed by a scintillation camera. Six minutes after injection, the radioactivity was concentrated in the liver. The competitors and unlabelled acetyl-LDL but not native LDL reduced the hepatic uptake of [131I]acetyl-LDL dramatically. Thus, the sensitivity of the 220- and 250-kd membrane binding sites to the competitors for the acetyl-LDL binding resembled that of the hepatic compartment in vivo. Finally, an application of scintigraphy with radiolabelled low density lipoproteins for diagnostic evaluation of tumor compartments is presented. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:4006910

  12. Association between soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 levels and coronary slow flow phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Caglar, Ilker Murat; Ozde, Cem; Caglar, Fatma Nihan Turhan; Akturk, Ibrahim Faruk; Ugurlucan, Murat; Karakaya, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) has been associated with myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, life-threatening arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and increased cardiovascular mortality similar to coronary artery disease (CAD). Possible underlying mechanisms of CSFP are endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation, microvascular dysfunction and diffuse atherosclerosis. Soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (sLOX-1) seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that sLOX-1 might be associated with CSFP, and aimed to research the relationship between sLOX-1 and CSFP. Material and methods Forty patients with angiographically proven CSFP and 43 patients with a normal coronary flow pattern (NCFP) were included in this study. Coronary blood flow was measured according to the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) frame count method. sLOX-1 levels were measured in all study subjects. Results Serum levels of sLOX-1 were significantly higher in the CSFP group than the NCFP group (1061.80 ±422.20 ng/ml vs. 500.043 ±282.97 ng/ml, p < 0.001, respectively). Multivariate logistic regression analysis including sLOX-1, MPV, GGT and uric acid levels revealed a significant association between sLOX-1 levels and CSFP (Exp (B)/OR: 1.006, 95% CI: 1.002–1.010, p = 0.001). Conclusions The present study demonstrated that serum sLOX-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with CSFP and there was a strong association between high sLOX-1 levels and CSFP. High serum sLOX-1 levels may have an important role in the pathogenesis of CSFP. Future studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:26925116

  13. Beneficial effect of Lisosan G on cultured human microvascular endothelial cells exposed to oxidised low density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Baldi, Simona; Napoli, Debora; Longo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Nutritional compounds which display anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects have specific applications in preventing oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. In this study we evaluated the effect of Lisosan G (powder of Triticum sativum grains) on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) exposed to oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Methods: The protective effects of Lisosan G were evaluated on human microvascular endothelial cells exposed to ox-LDL. Intercellular adhesion molecular-1 (ICAM-1), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations and the expression of the respective genes were evaluated in response to incubation with ox-LDL, after co-incubation with ox-LDL and Lisosan G or exposed to Lisosan G alone. The analysis of LOX-1 gene was performed with RT-PCR semi quantitative method. The degree of oxidation induced in relation to control, was established by measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Results: The incubation with ox-LDL induced a significant increase in ICAM-1, IL-6 and ET-1 levels compared to the basal condition (P<0.01, P<0.05, and P<0.01, respectively), while in presence of Lisosan G, ICAM-1 levels showed a significant reduction both compared to the cultures treated with ox-LDL and control (P<0.01). IL-6 levels did not show any difference; ET-1 levels showed a partial reduction after co-treatment with Lisosan G, and also with Lisosan G alone, reduced the concentration below control (P<0.01). The modulation of these markers was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. An association between MDA formation and the three markers production was observed. Semi-quantitative analysis of LOX-1 gene expression showed a significant up-regulation only after ox-LDL exposure. Interpretation & conclusions: The results demonstrate that Lisosan G may have an important role in the prevention of microcirculatory dysfunction. PMID:22885268

  14. Small Dense Low Density Lipoprotein Particles Are Associated with Poor Outcome after Angioplasty in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mosimann, Kathrin; Husmann, Marc; Thalhammer, Christoph; Wilkinson, Ian; Berneis, Kaspar; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In patients suffering from symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), percutaneous revascularization is the treatment of choice. However, restenosis may occur in 10 to 60% in the first year depending on a variety of factors. Small dense low density lipoprotein (sdLDL) particles are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events, but their role in the process of restenosis is not known. We conducted a prospective study to analyze the association of sdLDL particles with the outcome of balloon angioplasty in PAD. The composite primary endpoint was defined as improved walking distance and absence of restenosis. Methods Patients with angiographically documented PAD of the lower extremities who were scheduled for lower limb revascularization were consecutively recruited for the study. At baseline and at three month follow-up triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL size and subclasses and HDL cholesterol and ankle-brachial index (ABI) were measured. Three months after the intervention duplex sonography was performed to detect restenosis. Results Sixty-four patients (53% male) with a mean age of 68.6±9.9 years were included. The proportion of small- dense LDL particles (class III and IV) was significantly lower (33.1±11.0% vs. 39.4±12.1%, p = 0.038) in patients who reached the primary end-point compared with those who did not. Patients with improved walking distance and without restenosis had a significantly higher LDL size at baseline (26.6±1.1 nm vs. 26.1±1.1 nm, p = 0.046) and at follow-up (26.7±1.1 nm vs. 26.2±0.9 nm, p = 0.044) than patients without improvement. Conclusions Small-dense LDL particles are associated with worse early outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization for symptomatic PAD. PMID:25265512

  15. Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shutong; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Sang, Hui; Tian, Hua; Miao, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Shucun

    2012-07-01

    Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein (mm-LDL) induces intimal foam cell formation, which is promoted by endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a cross-point to link cellular processes with multiple risk factors that exist in all stages of atherosclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether mm-LDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages involves ERS and its underlying mechanisms. We showed that mm-LDL induced the accumulation of lipid droplets in RAW264.7 macrophages with increased free cholesterol in the endoplasmic reticulum, which was markedly attenuated by pretreatment with an antibody against toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Additionally, mm-LDL stimulated the transport of Cy3-labeled activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), a key sensor to the unfolded protein response (UPR), from cytoplasm into nucleus. The expression of phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1), another sensor to the UPR, and its two downstream molecules, X box binding protein 1 and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), were significantly upregulated by mm-LDL. The alterations induced by mm-LDL were all significantly inhibited by antibodies against TLR4 or CD36. In addition, the upregulation of p-IRE1 and GRP78 and the nuclear translocation of ATF6 induced by mm-LDL were significantly attenuated by TLR4 siRNA. These results suggest that mm-LDL may induce free cholesterol accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequently stimulate ERS and activate the UPR signaling pathway mediated by ATF6 and IRE1 in macrophages, a process that is potentially mediated by TLR4. PMID:22480542

  16. Cell membrane damage is involved in the impaired survival of bone marrow stem cells by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Cui, Yuqi; Tan, Tao; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Hao, Hong; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhang, Jia; He, Guanglong; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Lei, Minxiang; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-12-01

    Cell therapy with bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) remains a viable option for tissue repair and regeneration. A major challenge for cell therapy is the limited cell survival after implantation. This study was to investigate the effect of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL, naturally present in human blood) on BMSC injury and the effect of MG53, a tissue repair protein, for the improvement of stem cell survival. Rat bone marrow multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) were treated with ox-LDL, which caused significant cell death as reflected by the increased LDH release to the media. Exposure of MAPCs to ox-LDL led to entry of fluorescent dye FM1-43 measured under confocal microscope, suggesting damage to the plasma membrane. Ox-LDL also generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. While antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely blocked ROS production from ox-LDL, it failed to prevent ox-LDL-induced cell death. When MAPCs were treated with the recombinant human MG53 protein (rhMG53) ox-LDL induced LDH release and FM1-43 dye entry were significantly reduced. In the presence of rhMG53, the MAPCs showed enhanced cell survival and proliferation. Our data suggest that membrane damage induced by ox-LDL contributed to the impaired survival of MAPCs. rhMG53 treatment protected MAPCs against membrane damage and enhanced their survival which might represent a novel means for improving efficacy for stem cell-based therapy for treatment of diseases, especially in setting of hyperlipidemia.

  17. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein inhibits THP-1-derived macrophage autophagy via TET2 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Peng, Juan; Liu, Yanhui; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Qin; Li, Yongqing; Tang, Zhihan; Wang, Zuo; Jiang, Zhisheng; Wei, Dangheng

    2015-02-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying its pro-atherosclerosis roles has not yet been well explored. DNA demethylation modification, via DNA methyltransferases or ten-eleven-translocation (TET) family, is a crisis epigenetic regulation for various biological and pathological processes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on macrophage autophagy and its potential epigenetic mechanism. Results showed that after treatment with 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg/L ox-LDL for 24 h, the autophagy markers Beclin 1 and LC3 expression were obviously decreased at protein levels (P < 0.05). The mRNA and protein expression of TET2 was evidently decreased (P < 0.05). After pre-treatment with TET2 siRNA, the mRNA and protein levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 decreased compared with the 80 mg/L treatment group (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein levels of Beclin 1 and LC3-II were up-regulated (P < 0.05) in the 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor) of pretreatment group. Consistent with the Western blot results, cell immunofluorescence showed that the protein concentration of LC3-II decreased in the TET2 siRNA group and increased in the 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine group. Taken together, these results showed that DNA demethylation modifications regulate ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages autophagy and TET2 might be a novel regulator.

  18. Chronic Aerobic Exercise Decreases Lectin-Like Low Density Lipoprotein (LOX-1) Receptor Expression in Heart of Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Simin; Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Sobhani, Vahid; Ababzadeh, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of lectin-like low density lipoprotein (LOX-1) receptor plays an important role in hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications such as atherosclerosis. Based on the beneficial effects of exercise on preventing cardiovascular complications of diabetes, we aimed to examine the protective effects of aerobic exercise on expression of LOX-1 receptor and production of free radicals in the heart of diabetic rats. Methods: Four groups of rats were used: (n = 5 per group): sedentary normal, trained normal, sedentary diabetes and trained diabetes. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). The exercise protocol was consisted of swimming 30 min/day, 5 days/week for eight weeks. Plasma glucose was evaluated at initiation, weeks 4 and 8 of experiment. At the end of experiment, rats were sacrificed and the heart was removed for determination of nitrate, malondialdehyde, and LOX-1 gene expression. Results: In normal non-diabetic rats, the blood glucose level was <150 mg/dl; however, the induction of diabetes resulted in levels more than >400 mg/dl. Gene expression of LOX-1 was increased in the heart of diabetic rats. Exercise reduced the gene expression of this protein in diabetic states without reducing the blood glucose. Finally, swimming exercise decreased the malondialdehyde and nitrate levels in heart tissue both in control and diabetic rats. Conclusion: Swimming exercise reduces heart expression of the LOX-1 receptor in accompany with reduction of free radicals production. Since these parameters are important in generation of diabetic complications, swimming exercise is a good candidate for reducing these complications. PMID:26432573

  19. Antioxidant Effects of Vitamins C and E on the Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation Mediated by Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Samsam Shariat, Seyed Ziyae Aldin; Mostafavi, Sayed Abolfazl; Khakpour, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) appears to be an early step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Meanwhile, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-catalyzed reaction is one of the potent pathways for LDL oxidation in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antioxidant effects of vitamins C and E on LDL oxidation mediated by MPO. Methods: MPO was isolated from fresh plasma by sequential centrifugation using density ultracentrifugation. It was incubated with LDL and the LDL oxidation level was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring conjugated diene absorbance at 234 nm. Furthermore, vitamin C (50-200 mM) and vitamin E (10-40 mM) were added and the LDL oxidation level was determined. Results: The purity index of MPO and its enzymatic activity were 0.69 and 1127 U/mg protein, respectively. It was demonstrated that vitamin C in vitro inhibited LDL oxidation mediated by MPO; however, vitamin E was unable to act in the same way. The protection by vitamin C was concentration dependent and maximum protective effect of vitamin C was observed at 150 mM, where about 64% of the LDL oxidation was inhibited. Vitamin C increased lag time of LDL oxidation mediated by MPO up to 2.4 times. Conclusion: It can be concluded from our results that vitamin C is able to improve LDL resistance to oxidative modification in vitro. In addition, vitamin C might be effective in LDL oxidation mediated by MPO in vivo, resulting in reduction of atherosclerosis process rate. PMID:23279831

  20. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Adam R.; Atkinson, Rachel L.; Reddy, Jay P.; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li; Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae; Atkinson, Bradley J.; Brewster, Abeena; Ueno, Naoto T.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  1. [Possibility of New Circulating Atherosclerosis-Related Lipid Markers Measurement in Medical and Complete Medical Checkups: Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Lipase].

    PubMed

    Sumino, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-03-01

    Small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDL-C) concentrations correlate more strongly with cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other LDL-C and large LDL particle concentrations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein particles and is a useful biomarker in diagnosing Type I, Type IV, and Type V hyperlipidemia. Therefore, the measurement of circulating sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations contributes to the assessment of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers. However, the measurement of these lipids has not been fully adopted in medical and complete medical checkups. Recently, novel automated homogenous assay for measuring sdLDL-C and latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (LTIA) for measuring LPL have been developed, respectively. Using these new assays, sdLDL-C values showed excellent agreement with those obtained by isolation of the d = 1.044 - 1.063 g/mL plasma fraction by sequential ultracentrifugation, and LPL values measured with and without heparin injection were highly correlated with the values measured by the LPL-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These assays may be superior to the previous assays for the measurement of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations due their simplicity and reproducibility. The measurements of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations may be useful as lipid markers in the assessment of the development and progression of atherosclerosis and the detection of pathological conditions and diseases if these markers are measured in medical and complete medical checkups. We have introduced the possibility of the novel measurement of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers such as sdLDL-C and LPL in medical and complete medical checkups. Further studies are needed to clarify whether sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations are related to the development and progression of

  2. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 on the assembly and secretion of very low-density lipoproteins in cow hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinwei; Guan, Yuan; Li, Ying; Wu, Dianjun; Liu, Lei; Deng, Qinghua; Li, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Guowen

    2016-01-15

    Fatty liver is a major metabolic disorder of dairy cows. One important reason is that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) assembly was significant decreased in dairy cows with fatty liver. In addition, the impairment of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 synthesis was involved in the development of fatty liver. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of IGF-1 on the VLDL assembly in cow hepatocytes. In this study, cow hepatocytes were cultured and then transfected with Ad-GFP-IGF-1 (inhibited the IGF-1 expression) and Ad-GFP (negative control), and treated with different concentrations of IGF-1, respectively. The results showed that IGF-1 increased the mRNA abundance of apolipoprotein B100 (ApoB100), apolipoprotein E (ApoE), microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP), and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and then increased the VLDL assembly in cow hepatocytes. Nevertheless, impairment of IGF-1 expression by Ad-GFP-IGF-1 could inhibit above genes expression and VLDL assembly in hepatocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that IGF-1 increases the VLDL assembly and impairment of IGF-1 expression decreases the VLDL assembly in cow hepatocytes.

  3. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, and Apolipoprotein B and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients With Manifest Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, M Johanneke; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Borst, Gert Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-09-15

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) only partly represents the atherogenic lipid burden, and a growing body of evidence suggests that non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B (apoB) are more accurate in estimating lipid-related cardiovascular disease risk. Our objective was to compare the relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, triglycerides, and apoB and the occurrence of future vascular events and mortality in patients with manifest arterial disease. This is a prospective cohort study of 7,216 patients with clinically manifest arterial disease in the Secondary Manifestations of Arterial Disease Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to quantify the risk of major cardiovascular events (MACE; i.e., stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality. Interaction was tested for type of vascular disease at inclusion. MACE occurred in 1,185 subjects during a median follow-up of 6.5 years (interquartile range 3.4 to 9.9 years). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of MACE per 1 SD higher were for LDL-C (HR 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 1.22), for non-HDL-C (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.23), for log(triglycerides) (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.19), and for apoB HR (1.12, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.28). The relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and cardiovascular events was comparable in patients with cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, or polyvascular disease and absent in those with aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease. In conclusion, in patients with a history of cerebrovascular, coronary artery, or polyvascular disease, but not aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease, higher levels of LDL-C and non-HDL-C are related to increased risk of future MACE and of comparable magnitude.

  4. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, and Apolipoprotein B and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients With Manifest Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, M Johanneke; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Borst, Gert Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-09-15

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) only partly represents the atherogenic lipid burden, and a growing body of evidence suggests that non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B (apoB) are more accurate in estimating lipid-related cardiovascular disease risk. Our objective was to compare the relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, triglycerides, and apoB and the occurrence of future vascular events and mortality in patients with manifest arterial disease. This is a prospective cohort study of 7,216 patients with clinically manifest arterial disease in the Secondary Manifestations of Arterial Disease Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to quantify the risk of major cardiovascular events (MACE; i.e., stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality. Interaction was tested for type of vascular disease at inclusion. MACE occurred in 1,185 subjects during a median follow-up of 6.5 years (interquartile range 3.4 to 9.9 years). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of MACE per 1 SD higher were for LDL-C (HR 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 1.22), for non-HDL-C (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.23), for log(triglycerides) (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.19), and for apoB HR (1.12, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.28). The relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and cardiovascular events was comparable in patients with cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, or polyvascular disease and absent in those with aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease. In conclusion, in patients with a history of cerebrovascular, coronary artery, or polyvascular disease, but not aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease, higher levels of LDL-C and non-HDL-C are related to increased risk of future MACE and of comparable magnitude. PMID:27471056

  5. Accelerated decline in renal function after acute myocardial infarction in patients with high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Satoshi; Sakakibara, Masaki; Hayashida, Ryo; Jinno, Yasushi; Tanaka, Akihito; Okada, Koji; Hayashi, Mutsuharu; Ishii, Hideki; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2014-01-01

    High low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (L/H) ratio is associated with progressions of coronary arteriosclerosis and chronic kidney disease. On the other hand, renal function markedly declined after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aims of the present study were (1) to identify what type of patients with AMI would have high L/H ratio at follow-up and (2) to evaluate whether decline in renal function after AMI had accelerated or not in patients with high L/H ratio. The 190 eligible AMI patients who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and received atorvastatin (10 mg) were divided into one of two groups according to the L/H ratio at 6-month follow-up: L/H >2 group (n = 81) or L/H ≤2 group (n = 109). The characteristics on admission in the two groups were examined. Furthermore, changes in serum creatinine (sCr) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) during 1- and 6-month follow-up were compared between the two groups. L/H >2 group were significantly younger and had greater body mass index (BMI) and worse lipid profile on admission compared with L/H ≤2 group. Percentage increase in sCr and percentage decrease in eGFR during 1-month follow-up in L/H >2 group tended to be greater than in L/H ≤2 group, and those during 6-month follow-up were significantly greater (16.5 ± 2.77 vs. 9.79 ± 2.23 %, p = 0.03 and 11.8 ± 1.93 vs. 2.75 ± 3.85 %, p = 0.04, respectively). In AMI patients undergoing primary PCI, those who were young and had large BMI and poor lipid profile on admission were likely to have a high L/H ratio at follow-up despite statin therapy. In addition, the decline in renal function after AMI had significantly accelerated in patients with high L/H ratio.

  6. Uptake of low density lipoproteins by human leukemic cells in vivo: relation to plasma lipoprotein levels and possible relevance for selective chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Vitols, S; Angelin, B; Ericsson, S; Gahrton, G; Juliusson, G; Masquelier, M; Paul, C; Peterson, C; Rudling, M; Söderberg-Reid, K

    1990-01-01

    The success of cancer chemotherapy is dependent on the possibility to utilize biological differences between malignant and normal cells to selectively destroy the tumor cells. One such difference may be that of receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs). Previous studies have shown that leukemic cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia have elevated receptor-mediated uptake and degradation rates of plasma LDL in vitro compared to normal white blood and bone marrow cells, and that plasma cholesterol levels at diagnosis are inversely correlated with the LDL receptor activity of the malignant cells. An important question is whether the uptake of LDL by the leukemic cells is also increased in vivo. To evaluate the in vivo uptake of LDL, 11 adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia received an i.v. injection of [14C]-sucrose-labeled LDL. On degradation of [14C]sucrose-LDL, the radiolabeled sucrose moiety is known to remain trapped in the lysosomal compartment of the cells. After injection, radioactivity accumulated progressively for at least 12 hr in the leukemic cells. The uptake of radioactivity in vivo correlated with the rate of receptor-mediated degradation of 125I-labeled LDL by the leukemic cells assayed in vitro (r = +0.88, P less than 0.001). An inverse correlation between plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations and the in vivo cellular uptake of [14C]sucrose-LDL in whole blood (r = -0.76, P less than 0.01) indicates that the hypocholesterolemia is due to elevated LDL uptake by the leukemic cells. Postmortem biopsies from virtually all tissues were obtained from one patient, and the distribution of radioactivity revealed that the liver and bone marrow had accumulated most radioactivity; the adrenals had the highest uptake of label per gram of tissue weight. The results indicate that LDL may be used as a carrier targeting lipophilic cytotoxic drugs to leukemic cells. PMID:2320578

  7. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K J; Vallabhajosula, S; Rahman, I U; Donnelly, T M; Parker, T S; Weinrauch, M; Goldsmith, S J

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused 111In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t1/2) for clearance of 111In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits (means +/- SEM; n = 4). By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue stores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was greater than 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative gamma camera imaging, hepatic trapping of 111In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance, acquiring 22.0% +/- 1.7% (WHHL) and 16.8% +/- 1.0% (normal of total 111In. Aortic uptake of 111In was less than 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, our results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:3422421

  8. A common factor suppresses thickening in young women with malar area port wine stains and delays low density lipoprotein elevation: is it estrogen?

    PubMed

    Klapman, M H; Sosa, V B; Yao, J F

    2014-06-01

    Port wine stains in the malar area of the face can develop thickening in early adult life. We began a study with a hypothesis that this thickening can be associated with elevation of low density lipoprotein. In a retrospective review, we divided 53 subjects with malar port wine stains into 4 groups, adults 25-39 years of age with thickening, that age group without thickening, adults 40+ years of age with thickening, and that age group without thickening. Low density lipoprotein levels in the subjects were compared to age and sex matched controls randomly selected from the general Dermatology clinic. The younger subjects with thickening demonstrated significantly higher low density lipoprotein levels than their controls (p .0082) and without thickening lower low density lipoprotein levels than their controls with great significance (p .00058). The subjects without thickening also consisted mainly of women. The low density lipoprotein levels in the older age groups, whether thickened or not, demonstrated no significant difference in low density lipoprotein levels between subjects and controls. This led to a new hypothesis that there is a factor in a subgroup of young adult women with malar port wine stains that suppresses thickening and delays the elevation of low density lipoprotein and that this factor might be estrogen. The implications of this hypothesis are that it could define a marker for a subset of the population that might be protected from the diseases associated with early elevation of low density lipoprotein and provide a source of cutaneous tissue for studying the basic science of this protection (although limited by cosmetic considerations). Future laboratory research to test the new hypothesis might include testing blood of women with malar port wine stains with or without thickening for estrogen and other sex hormones. It might also include skin biopsies to study receptors for estrogen, other sex hormones, and angiogenic factors in malar port wine

  9. Effects of flow on LOX-1 and oxidized low-density lipoprotein interactions in brain endothelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoou; Xie, Lin; Greenberg, David A

    2015-12-01

    Fluid shear stress and uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) into the vessel wall both contribute to atherosclerosis, but the relationship between shear stress and ox-LDL uptake is unclear. We examined the effects of flow, induced by orbital rotation of bEnd.3 brain endothelial cell cultures for 1 wk, on ox-LDL receptor (LOX-1) protein expression, ox-LDL uptake and ox-LDL toxicity. Orbitally rotated cultures showed no changes in LOX-1 protein expression, ox-LDL uptake or ox-LDL toxicity, compared to stationary cultures. Flow alone does not modify ox-LDL/LOX-1 signaling in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells in vitro, suggesting that susceptibility of atheroprone vascular sites to lipid accumulation is not due solely to effects of altered flow on endothelium. PMID:26462413

  10. Protection by polyphenols of postprandial human plasma and low-density lipoprotein modification: the stomach as a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Joseph; Gorelik, Shlomit; Roman, Sirota; Kohen, Ron

    2012-09-12

    Recent studies dramatically showed that the removal of circulating modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) results in complete prevention of atherosclerosis. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to food, some of it containing oxidized compounds. Lipid oxidation in the stomach was demonstrated by ingesting heated red meat in rats. Red wine polyphenols added to the rats' meat diet prevented lipid peroxidation in the stomach and absorption of malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat plasma. In humans, postprandial plasma MDA levels rose by 3-fold after a meal of red meat cutlets. MDA derived from meat consumption caused postprandial plasma LDL modification in human. The levels of plasma MDA showed a 75% reduction by consumption of red wine polyphenols during the meat meal. Locating the main biological site of action of polyphenols in the stomach led to a revision in the understanding of how antioxidants work in vivo and may help to elucidate the mechanism involved in the protective effects of polyphenols in human health.

  11. Effects of flow on LOX-1 and oxidized low-density lipoprotein interactions in brain endothelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoou; Xie, Lin; Greenberg, David A

    2015-12-01

    Fluid shear stress and uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) into the vessel wall both contribute to atherosclerosis, but the relationship between shear stress and ox-LDL uptake is unclear. We examined the effects of flow, induced by orbital rotation of bEnd.3 brain endothelial cell cultures for 1 wk, on ox-LDL receptor (LOX-1) protein expression, ox-LDL uptake and ox-LDL toxicity. Orbitally rotated cultures showed no changes in LOX-1 protein expression, ox-LDL uptake or ox-LDL toxicity, compared to stationary cultures. Flow alone does not modify ox-LDL/LOX-1 signaling in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells in vitro, suggesting that susceptibility of atheroprone vascular sites to lipid accumulation is not due solely to effects of altered flow on endothelium.

  12. Expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) gene in the mouse germ cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yasuka L; Tanaka, Satomi S; Kasa, Miyuki; Yasuda, Kunio; Tam, Patrick P L; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2006-08-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 gene (Lrp4) was identified by subtractive screening of cDNAs of the migratory primordial germ cells (PGCs) of E8.5-9.5 embryo and E3.5 blastocysts. Lrp4 is expressed in PGCs in the hindgut and the dorsal mesentery of E9.5 embryos, and in germ cells in the genital ridges of male and female E10.5-13.5 embryos. Lrp4 is also expressed in spermatogonia of the neonatal and adult testes and in the immature oocytes and follicular cells of the adult ovary. The absence of Lrp4 expression in the blastocyst, embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells suggests the Lrp4 is a molecular marker that distinguishes the germ cells from embryo-derived pluripotent stem cells. PMID:16434236

  13. Statin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment and effect of statin potency

    PubMed Central

    Chinwong, Dujrudee; Patumanond, Jayanton; Chinwong, Surarong; Siriwattana, Khanchai; Gunaparn, Siriluck; Hall, John Joseph; Phrommintikul, Arintaya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Current guidelines recommend an LDL-C target of <70 mg/dL (<1.8 mmol/L) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, and the first-line treatment to lower lipids is statin therapy. Despite current guidelines and the efficacious lipid-lowering agents available, about half of patients at very high risk, including ACS patients, fail to achieve their LDL-C goal. This study assessed LDL-C goal attainment according to use of high and low potency statins in routine practice in Thailand. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed by retrieving data from medical records and the electronic hospital database for a tertiary care hospital in Thailand between 2009 and 2011. Included were ACS patients treated with statins at baseline and with follow-up of LDL-C levels. Patients were divided into high or low potency statin users, and the proportion reaching the LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL was determined. A Cox proportional hazard model was applied to determine the relationship between statin potency and LDL-C goal attainment. Propensity score adjustment was used to control for confounding by indication. Results Of 396 ACS patients (60% males, mean age 64.3±11.6 years), 229 (58%) were treated with high potency statins and 167 (42%) with low potency statins. A quarter reached their target LDL-C goal (25% for patients on high potency statins and 23% on low potency statins). High potency statins were not associated with increased LDL-C goal attainment (adjusted hazards ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.79–1.88; P=0.363). Conclusion There was no significant effect of high potency statins on LDL-C goal attainment. Moreover, this study showed low LDL-C goal attainment for patients on either low or high potency statins. The reasons for the low LDL-C goal attainment rate warrants further investigation. PMID:25670902

  14. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Low Density Lipoprotein Particle Size in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Already under Statin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Won; Park, Jeong Kyung; Hong, Jae Won; Kim, Kwang Joon; Shin, Dong Yeob; Ahn, Chul Woo; Song, Young Duk; Cho, Hong Keun; Park, Seok Won; Lee, Eun Jig

    2013-06-01

    Beyond statin therapy for reducing low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve more optimal reduction in cardiovascular risk among diabetic patients with dyslipidemia. To evaluate the effects and the safety of combined treatment with omega-3 fatty acids and statin in dyslipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes, we conducted a randomized, open-label study in Korea. Patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia (≥200 mg/dL) while taking statin for at least 6 weeks were eligible. Fifty-one patients were randomized to receive either omega-3 fatty acid 4, 2 g, or no drug for 8 weeks while continuing statin therapy. After 8 weeks of treatment, the mean percentage change of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and triglyceride (TG) level was greater in patients who were prescribed 4 g of omega-3 fatty acid with statin than in patients receiving statin monotherapy (2.8%±3.1% vs. 2.3%±3.6%, P=0.024; -41.0%±24.1% vs. -24.2%±31.9%, P=0.049). Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with statin increased LDL particle size and decreased TG level in dyslipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes. The therapy was well tolerated without significant adverse effects.

  15. Low density lipoprotein subclasses and response to a low-fat diet in healthy men

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.; Dreon, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    Lipid and lipoprotein response to reduced dietary fat intake was investigated in relation to differences in distribution of LDL subclasses among 105 healthy men consuming high-fat (46%) and low-fat (24%) diets in random order for six weeks each. On high-fat, 87 subjects had predominantly large, buoyant LDL as measured by gradient gel electrophoresis and confirmed by analytic ultracentrifugation (pattern A), while the remainder had primarily smaller, denser LDL (pattern B). On low-fat, 36 men changed from pattern A to B. Compared with the 51 men in the stable A group, men in the stable B group (n = 18) had a three-fold greater reduction in LDL cholesterol and significantly greater reductions in plasma apoB and mass of intermediate (LDL II) and small (LDL III) LDL subtractions measured by analytic ultracentrifugation. In both stable A and change groups, reductions in LDL-cholesterol were not accompanied by reduced plasma apoB, consistent with the observation of a shift in LDL particle mass from larger, lipid-enriched (LDL I and II) to smaller, lipid-depleted (LDL III and IV) subfractions, without significant change in particle number. Genetic and environmental factors influencing LDL subclass distributions thus may also contribute substantially to interindividual variation in response to a low-fat diet.

  16. Scavenger receptor-independent stimulation of cholesterol esterification in macrophages by low density lipoprotein extracted from human aortic intima.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, U P; Lougheed, M

    1992-05-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the artery wall may contribute to atherogenesis. A number of physiologically plausible modifications have been studied in vitro, including oxidation, aggregation, formation of complexes with glycosaminoglycans, and generation of LDL-immune complexes. Several studies of the properties of LDL extracted from the aortic intima have been published, but these indicate disagreement about both the nature and the extent of modification of LDL in the artery wall. The objectives of the present study were to determine the nature and extent of modification of LDL extracted from both normal and diseased human aortic intimas and to correlate this with the rate of LDL uptake in cultured cells. Analyses were performed on LDLs isolated from aortic intimas obtained at autopsy or at the time of organ harvest from 33 subjects. LDL from normal intima showed no clear evidence of oxidation but had slightly increased electrophoretic mobility compared with native plasma LDL, whereas LDL from plaques or fatty streaks exhibited variable but usually modest signs of oxidative change. Aortic LDL was more rapidly degraded by cultured macrophages than was plasma LDL and resulted in a greater stimulation of cholesterol esterification. The degree of stimulation of cholesterol esterification was correlated with the extent of modification of LDL as reflected by the degree of apolipoprotein B fragmentation. However, in all aortic LDLs the extent of oxidative change, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility or other physical parameters, was less than that required for scavenger receptor-mediated uptake. In all cases where sufficient amounts of LDL were recovered to permit degradation experiments, the uptake of aortic LDL was nonsaturable and could not be inhibited by polyinosinic acid or acetylated LDL. Chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B showed that most LDLs isolated from plaque contained a fraction

  17. Visualization of the binding, endocytosis, and transcytosis of low- density lipoprotein in the arterial endothelium in situ

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We investigated the interaction and transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) through the arterial endothelium in rat aorta and coronary artery, by perfusing in situ native, untagged human, and rat LDL. The latter was rendered electron-opaque after it interacted with the endothelial cell and was subsequently fixed within tissue. We achieved LDL electron-opacity by an improved fixation procedure using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine, and mordanting with tannic acid. The unequivocal identification of LDL was implemented by reacting immunocytochemically the perfused LDL with anti LDL-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Results indicate that LDL is taken up and internalized through two parallel compartmented routes. (a) A relatively small amount of LDL is taken up by endocytosis via: (i) a receptor-mediated process (adsorptive endocytosis) that involved coated pits/vesicles, and endosomes, and, probably, (ii) a receptor-independent process (fluid endocytosis) carried out by a fraction of plasmalemmal vesicles. Both mechanisms bringing LDL to lysosomes supply cholesterol to the endothelial cell itself. (b) Most circulating LDL is transported across the endothelial cell by transcytosis via plasmalemmal vesicles which deliver LDL to the other cells of the vessel wall. Endocytosis is not enhanced by increasing LDL concentration, but the receptor-mediated internalization decreases at low temperature. Transcytosis is less modified by low temperature but is remarkably augmented at high concentration of LDL. While the endocytosis of homologous (rat) LDL is markedly more pronounced than that of heterologous (human) LDL, both types of LDL are similarly transported by transcytosis. These results indicate that the arterial endothelium possesses a dual mechanism for handling circulating LDL: by a high affinity process, endocytosis secures the endothelial cells' need for cholesterol; by a low-affinity nonsaturable uptake process, transcytosis supplies cholesterol to the other cells of the

  18. Low Density Lipoproteins Promote Unstable Calcium Handling Accompanied by Reduced SERCA2 and Connexin-40 Expression in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Nuria; Llach, Anna; Vallmitjana, Alexander; Benítez, Raúl; Badimon, Lina; Cinca, Juan; Llorente-Cortés, Vicenta; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2013-01-01

    The damaging effects of high plasma levels of cholesterol in the cardiovascular system are widely known, but little attention has been paid to direct effects on cardiomyocyte function. We therefore aimed at testing the hypothesis that Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol affects calcium dynamics and signal propagation in cultured atrial myocytes. For this purpose, mRNA and protein expression levels were determined by real time PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, and intracellular calcium was visualized in fluo-4 loaded atrial HL-1 myocyte cultures subjected to field stimulation. At low stimulation frequencies all cultures had uniform calcium transients at all tested LDL concentrations. However, 500 µg LDL/mL maximally reduced the calcium transient amplitude by 43% from 0.30±0.04 to 0.17±0.02 (p<0.05). Moreover, LDL-cholesterol dose-dependently increased the fraction of alternating and irregular beat-to-beat responses observed when the stimulation interval was shortened. This effect was linked to a concurrent reduction in SERCA2, RyR2, IP3RI and IP3RII mRNA levels. SERCA2 protein levels were also reduced by 43% at 200 µg LDL/mL (p<0.05) and SR calcium loading was reduced by 38±6% (p<0.001). By contrast, HDL-cholesterol had no significant effect on SERCA expression or SR calcium loading. LDL-cholesterol also slowed the conduction velocity of the calcium signal from 3.2+0.2 mm/s without LDL to 1.7±0.1 mm/s with 500 µg LDL/mL (p<0.05). This coincided with a reduction in Cx40 expression (by 44±3%; p<0.05 for mRNA and by 79±2%; p<0.05 for Cx40 protein at 200 µg/ml LDL) whereas the Cx-43 expression did not significantly change. In conclusion, LDL-cholesterol destabilizes calcium handling in cultured atrial myocytes subjected to rapid pacing by reducing SERCA2 and Cx40 expression and by slowing the conduction velocity of the calcium signal. PMID:23516438

  19. Pericoronary Adipose Tissue as Storage and Supply Site for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Human Coronary Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Yasumi; Uchida, Yasuto; Shimoyama, Ei; Hiruta, Nobuyuki; Kishimoto, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Objectives It is generally believed that low-density lipoprotein enters the vascular wall from its lumen and oxidized (oxLDL), after which it plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Because voluminous epicardial adipose tissue is a risk factor for coronary events, there is a possibility that the pericoronary adipose tissue (PCAT), which is a part of epicardial adipose tissue, acts as a risk factor by supplying oxLDL to the coronary arterial wall. The present study was performed whether PCAT stores and supplies oxLDL to the coronary wall. Methods Localization of oxLDL in PCAT and its relation to plaque morphology were examined by immunohistochemical techniques in 27 epicardial coronary arteries excised from 9 human autopsy cases. Results OxLDL deposited in all PCAT of the studied cases. The percent (%) incidence of oxLDL in the intima of 25 normal segment, 19 white plaques, 15 yellow plaques without necrotic core (NC) and 10 yellow plaques with NC, was 32, 84, 93 (p<0.05 vs normal segments and yellow plaques with NC), and 30, respectively. OxLDL deposited either in dotted or diffuse pattern. Double immunohistochemical staining revealed that the dotted oxLDL was that contained in CD68(+)-macrophages. The oxLDL-containing macrophages were observed in the interstitial space but not inside of the vasa vasorum, and they traversed PCAT, adventitia, external and internal elastic laminae, suggesting their migration towards the intima. Diffuse oxLDL deposits were observed in 17 preparations, the majority of which were co-localized with the vasa vasorum in outer or in both inner and outer halves of intima, and rarely in the inner half alone. Conclusions The results suggested that PCAT is a supply source of oxLDL to coronary intima and acts as a risk factor for coronary events, that oxLDL increasingly deposits in the intima with plaque growth and decreases after plaque maturation, and therefore molecular therapies targeting the PCAT before plaque growth could be effective

  20. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  1. Initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is unaffected but endocytosis is delayed in mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herz, J; Qiu, S Q; Oesterle, A; DeSilva, H V; Shafi, S; Havel, R J

    1995-01-01

    Two endocytic receptors, the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein (LRP), are thought to act in concert in the hepatic uptake of partially metabolized dietary lipoproteins, the chylomicron remnants. We have evaluated the role of these two receptors in the hepatic metabolism of chylomicron remnants in normal mice and in LDLR-deficient [LDLR (-/-)] mice. The rate of chylomicron remnant removal by the liver was normal up to 30 min after intravenous injection of chylomicrons into LDLR (-/-) mice and was unaffected by receptor-associated protein (RAP), a potent inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP. In contrast, endocytosis of the remnants by the hepatocytes, measured by their accumulation in the endosomal fraction and by the rate of hydrolysis of component cholesteryl esters, was dramatically reduced in the absence of the LDLR. Coadministration of RAP prevented the continuing hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants in LDL (-/-) mice after 30 min, consistent with blockade of the slow endocytosis by a RAP-sensitive process. Taken together with previous studies, our results are consistent with a model in which the initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is primarily mediated by mechanisms that do not include LDLR or LRP, possibly involving glycosaminoglycan-bound hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein E. After the remnants bind to these alternative sites on the hepatocyte surface, endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the LDLR and also by a slower and less efficient backup process that is RAP sensitive and therefore most likely involves LRP. PMID:7753850

  2. Low-density lipoprotein and noncalcified coronary plaque composition in patients with newly diagnosed coronary artery disease on computed tomographic angiography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Victor Y; Wolak, Arik; Gutstein, Ariel; Gransar, Heidi; Wong, Nathan D; Dey, Damini; Thomson, Louise E J; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Slomka, Piotr J; Berman, Daniel S

    2010-03-15

    We sought to determine significant relations between atherogenic lipoproteins and the contribution of calcified plaque (CP), mixed plaque (MP), and noncalcified plaque (NCP) to the total plaque (TP) burden in patients without previous coronary artery disease. From 823 adult patients without previously established coronary artery disease (52% receiving statin therapy, 34% asymptomatic) but with visible coronary plaque on coronary computed tomographic angiography, we obtained segmental CP, MP, NCP, and TP counts from contrast-enhanced, electrocardiographic-gated computed tomography. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine the associations of clinical factors and lipoprotein levels to CP, MP, and NCP counts and CP/TP, MP/TP, and NCP/TP count ratios. Age, male gender, diabetes, smoking, and statin therapy were significantly associated with the CP count (p <0.001, p <0.001, p = 0.049, p = 0.016, and p = 0.003, respectively). Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol was significantly associated with MP and NCP counts (all p values lipoprotein cholesterol in place of LDL cholesterol yielded similar results. In conclusion, among the traditional clinical factors used to estimate cardiovascular event risk, LDL cholesterol is associated with an increased MP and NCP burden and is the sole variable that independently predicted relative predominance of CP, MP, and NCP, suggesting a potentially important role for lipoprotein levels in modulating the type of detectable coronary arterial plaque.

  3. Immunoregulation by low density lipoproteins in man. Inhibition of mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation by interference with transferrin metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A; Lipsky, P E

    1984-01-01

    Human low density lipoprotein (LDL, d = 1.020-1.050 g/ml) inhibits mitogen-stimulated T lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Because both LDL and transferrin bind to specific cell surface receptors and enter cells by the similar means of receptor-mediated endocytosis, and because transferrin is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis, we investigated the possibility that LDL may inhibit mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL inhibited mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in a concentration-dependent manner. The degree of inhibition was most marked in serum-free cultures, but was also observed in serum-containing cultures. The addition of transferrin not only augmented mitogen-induced lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in serum-free medium but also completely reversed the inhibitory effect of LDL in both serum-free and serum-containing media. Similar results were obtained when lymphocyte proliferation was assayed by counting the number of cells in culture. Transferrin also reversed the inhibition of lymphocyte responses caused by very low density lipoproteins and by cholesterol. The ability of transferrin to reverse the inhibitory effect of lipoproteins was specific, in that native but not denatured transferrin was effective whereas a variety of other proteins were ineffective. These results indicate that LDL inhibits mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL only inhibited lymphocyte responses after a 48-h incubation if present from the initiation of the culture. By contrast, transferrin reversed inhibition when added after 24 h of the 48-h incubation. LDL did not inhibit lymphocyte responses by nonspecifically associating with transferrin. In addition, the acquisition of specific lymphocyte transferrin receptors was not blocked by LDL. Moreover, transferrin did not prevent the binding and uptake of fluorescent-labeled LDL by activated lymphocytes

  4. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosis and low-density lipoproteins in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Petta, S; Bellia, C; Mazzola, A; Cabibi, D; Cammà, C; Caruso, A; Di Marco, V; Craxì, A; Ciaccio, M

    2012-07-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase status, homocysteine and lipoproteins levels have been associated with severity of disease and both rapid and sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We aimed to assess the association of homocysteine and MTHFR status with serum cholesterol levels and their potential links to both histological findings and virological response, in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). A total of 119 consecutive patients were evaluated by biopsy and metabolic measurements. A total of 103 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Serum homocysteine and MTHFR C677T mutation were also evaluated. All patients underwent antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN alfa-2a plus ribavirin. HCV-RNA was assessed at baseline, week 4, week 12, at the end of therapy and after 6 months of follow-up. Mean serum values of homocysteine were higher in patients than in controls (15.8 ± 5.8 μg/L vs 12.5 ± 5.8 μg/L; P < 0.001), with a similar CC, CT and TT MTHFR distribution (23.6%, 48.7% and 27.7% in G1-CHC vs 34%, 48.5% and 17.5% in controls; P = 0.14). In genotype 1, HCV MTHFR TT homozygosis was independently linked to higher LDL (OR 1.016; CI 1.002-1.031; P = 0.03), but not to homocysteine. No association were found between homocysteine, MTHFR and histological features or both rapid virological response (RVR) and SVR. Low cholesterol (OR 0.988, 95%CI 0.975-0.999, P = 0.04) was independently linked to severe fibrosis, and high LDL was the only independent positive predictors of both RVR and SVR (OR 1.036; 95%CI 1.017-1.055; P < 0.001; and OR 1.016; 95%CI 1.001-1.031; P = 0.04 respectively). In patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C, showing higher homocysteine serum levels than controls, MTHFR C677T homozygosis, via modulating cholesterol levels, could interfere with liver fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy. PMID:22676358

  5. Photochemiluminescent detection of antiradical activity. VI. Antioxidant characteristics of human blood plasma, low density lipoprotein, serum albumin and amino acids during in vitro oxidation.

    PubMed

    Popov, I; Lewin, G

    1999-01-01

    During investigation of the mechanism of therapeutic efficacy of UV (254 nm)-irradiated autologous blood, the antioxidant capacity (AC) of plasma, serum albumin, 20 amino acids, uric acid, ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol was measured after irradiation in vitro. AC of plasma demonstrated a biphasic time course (decrease to in a minimum (greater zero) followed by an increase). AC of uric acid, ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol diminished under irradiation to zero. In contrast, albumin and seven amino acids developed AC following irradiation. During the Cu(+2)-induced oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the AC measured in a system for water-soluble substances appeared, after a lag-phase, to be comparable to that of the conjugated diene formation; AC of LDL measured in a system for lipid-soluble substances demonstrated a biphasic course. Our results suggest that: (a) the oxidized products of some amino acids and proteins acquire antiradical properties at the same time that they are being produced; (b) the biphasic character of changes of antioxidant properties of blood plasma during UV irradiation represents the overlapping of two processes: disappearing of antioxidants and acquisition of AC by (lipo)proteins; and (c) the measurement of AC of blood plasma (lipo)proteins can possibly serve to detect the existence and extent of oxidative stress in human organism.

  6. Nigerian propolis improves blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c, very low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein levels in rat models of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Oladayo, Mustafa Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: According to our previous studies, propolis of Nigerian origin showed some evidence of hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities in addition to its ability to ameliorate oxidative-stress-induced organ dysfunction. This study was carried out to determine whether an ethanolic extract of Nigerian propolis (EENP) improves glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations in rats that have alloxan diabetes. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced with alloxan (110 mg/kg). Animals were divided into 5 groups (n = 5); Group 1 was non-diabetic receiving normal saline and Group 2 was diabetic but also received only normal saline. Groups 3, 4, and 5 were diabetic receiving 200 mg/kg propolis, 300 mg/kg propolis, and 150 mg/kg metformin, respectively, for 42 days. Results: Hyperglycemia, elevated serum level of VLDL, elevated plasma level of HbA1c, and decreased levels of HDL were observed in the diabetic untreated animals. Nigerian propolis decreased blood glucose level and serum level of VLDL but elevated HDL level. These changes were significant (P < 0.05). The levels of plasma HbA1c were also reduced in the propolis-treated groups, and the reduction was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Nigerian propolis contains compounds exhibiting hypoglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and HbA1c reducing activities. PMID:27366348

  7. Lovastatin stimulates human vascular smooth muscle cell expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein-stimulated cell growth.

    PubMed

    Emmanuele, Luca; Ortmann, Jana; Doerflinger, Tim; Traupe, Tobias; Barton, Matthias

    2003-02-28

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulate ectopic bone formation in skeletal muscle. Here we show that human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) abundantly express mRNA encoding for BMP receptor type II, BMP-2, and BMP-7 proteins. Treatment with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitor lovastatin (34 microM) increased BMP-2 gene transcription >14-fold as measured by real-time PCR analysis (P<0.05 vs. solvent control). Moreover, VSMC proliferation stimulated with native low-density lipoprotein (100 microg of protein/mL) was prevented by either human recombinant BMP-2 or BMP-7 at concentrations of 100 ng/mL (P<0.05). Both BMPs also inhibited basal cell proliferation (P<0.05). Induction of BMPs and subsequent inhibition of VSMC growth and/or induction of vascular bone formation could contribute to the mechanisms by which statins increase plaque stability in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:12593849

  8. Particle size interconversion of human low density lipoproteins during incubation of plasma with phosphatidylcholine vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrokh, Z.; Nichols, A.V.

    1982-09-30

    Incubation of plasma (37/sup 0/C, 6hr) in the presence of increasing amounts of phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles, above a threshold concentration, results in an increase in particle diameter of LDL relative to that from nonincubated plasma. With further PC addition, the major peak of LDL in the gradient gel electrophoretic pattern is transformed, first, into a bimodal and, subsequently, into a single peak distribution. PC-induced interconversion of LDL requires factor(s) in the d > 1.20 g/ml fraction and, at PC concentrations below approximately 2 mg/ml, is not inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid. Plasma incubation with increasing PC levels also leads to characteristic particle size transformations in HDL/sub 3/ species, with the transformation products ultimately converging to form a single peak pattern within the HDL/sub 2a/ size interval. In certain subjects, incubation of plasma, in the absence of added PC, shifts the particle size distribution of LDL towards smaller species; this can be prevented by addition of PC. We propose that incubation-induced shifts of LDL towards larger or smaller species result from changes in phospholipid (PL) content of LDL.

  9. Modified low density lipoproteins suppress production of a platelet-derived growth factor-like protein by cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, P L; DiCorleto, P E

    1986-01-01

    Cultured endothelial cells (EC) produce a platelet-derived growth factor-like protein (PDGF-c) that stimulates the growth of cultured cells of mesenchymal origin. We have examined the effect of native plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) and chemically modified LDL on production of PDGF-c by EC. Acetyl-LDL, but not native LDL, suppressed the production of PDGF-c by bovine aortic EC. Half-maximal inhibition was observed at a concentration of 25-75 micrograms of cholesterol per ml, and maximal inhibition (0-25% of control) at 150 micrograms of cholesterol per ml. EC treated with acetyl-LDL showed no morphological damage, there was no change in cell number, and the effect on production of PDGF-c was substantially reversed upon removal of the acetyl-LDL. The observed inhibition of PDGF-c production was specific, since total cellular and secreted protein synthesis were unaffected by acetyl-LDL. Acetyl-LDL suppressed PDGF-c production in both bovine aortic and human umbilical vein EC, but not in rat heart EC. This cell specificity correlated with the presence of scavenger receptors as measured by degradation of 125I-labeled acetyl-LDL and uptake of fluorescently labeled acetyl-LDL. Dimethylpropanediamine-LDL, a cationic modified lipoprotein, also inhibited PDGF-c production. The inhibition by both types of modified LDL was accompanied by significant intracellular cholesterol accumulation, suggesting a role for EC lipid composition in the regulation of production of PDGF-c. PMID:3460071

  10. Both poor cardiorespiratory and weak muscle fitness are related to a high concentration of oxidized low-density lipoprotein lipids.

    PubMed

    Kosola, J; Ahotupa, M; Kyröläinen, H; Santtila, M; Vasankari, T

    2012-12-01

    Good physical fitness is associated with favorable serum lipids. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) could be even more atherogenic than serum lipids. We studied the association of ox-LDL and serum lipids with physical fitness. Healthy young (mean age 25 years) men (n=846) underwent maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and muscle fitness index (MFI) tests and completed a leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) questionnaire. Age (ANCOVA1), age+waist circumference+systolic blood pressure+fasting blood glucose+smoking (ANCOVA3) were used as covariates. The groups with the lowest VO(2max), MFI and LTPA had 23%, 16% and 8% higher concentrations of ox-LDL than the groups with the highest VO(2max) (P<0.0001), MFI (P=0.022) and LTPA (P=0.039) groups, respectively. Subjects with poor fitness (low VO(2max) or low MFI) or low LTPA had elevated levels of ox-LDL/high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and a low level of HDL-cholesterol (ANCOVA1, in all, P<0.05). Furthermore, low VO(2max) is associated with a high level of ox-LDL/HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, and with a low level of HDL-cholesterol (ANCOVA3, in all, P<0.05). Also, subjects with low LTPA had a high ratio of ox-LDL/HDL-cholesterol (ANCOVA1, P=0.001). In conclusion, both poor fitness (both low VO(2max) and low MFI) and low LTPA are associated with a higher concentration of ox-LDL lipids and serum lipids, which may indicate a higher risk for atherosclerosis.

  11. Effect of ETC-1002 on Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Hypercholesterolemic Patients Receiving Statin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Christie M; McKenney, James M; MacDougall, Diane E; Margulies, Janice R; Robinson, Paula L; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lalwani, Narendra D

    2016-06-15

    ETC-1002 is an oral, once-daily medication that inhibits adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase, an enzyme upstream of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, to reduce cholesterol biosynthesis. ETC-1002 monotherapy has demonstrated significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared with placebo in phase 2 studies. The objective of this study was to compare the lipid-lowering efficacy of ETC-1002 versus placebo when added to ongoing statin therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia. This phase 2b, multicenter, double-blind trial (NCT02072161) randomized 134 hypercholesterolemic patients (LDL-C, 115 to 220 mg/dl) on stable background statin therapy to 12 weeks of add-on treatment with ETC-1002 120 mg, ETC-1002 180 mg, or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the percent change in calculated LDL-C from baseline to week 12. For LDL-C, the least-squares mean percent change ± standard error from baseline to week 12 was significantly greater with ETC-1002 120 mg (-17 ± 4%, p = 0.0055) and ETC-1002 180 mg (-24 ± 4%, p <0.0001) than placebo (-4 ± 4%). ETC-1002 also dose dependently reduced apolipoprotein B by 15% to 17%, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 14% to 17%, total cholesterol by 13% to 15%, and LDL particle number by 17% to 21%. All these reductions in ETC-1002-treated cohorts were significantly greater than those with placebo. Rates of adverse events (AEs), muscle-related AEs, and discontinuations for AEs with ETC-1002 were similar to placebo. In conclusion, ETC-1002 120 mg or 180 mg added to stable statin therapy significantly reduced LDL-C compared to placebo and has a similar tolerability profile. PMID:27138185

  12. IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS OF STEREOSELECTIVE DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Columns containing immobilized low density lipoprotein (LDL) were prepared for the analysis of drug interactions with this agent by high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC). R/S-Propranolol was used as a model drug for this study. The LDL columns gave reproducible binding to propranolol over 60 h of continuous use in the presence of pH 7.4, 0.067 M potassium phosphate buffer. Experiments conducted with this type of column through frontal analysis indicated that two types of interactions were occurring between R-propranolol and LDL, while only a single type of interaction was observed between S-propranolol and LDL. The first type of interaction, which was seen for both enantiomers, involved non-saturable binding; this interaction had an overall affinity (nKa) of 1.9 (± 0.1) × 105 M-1 for R-propranolol and 2.7 (± 0.2) × 105 M-1 for S-propranolol at 37 °C. The second type of interaction was observed only for R-propranolol and involved saturable binding that had an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 5.2 (± 2.3) × 105 M-1 at 37 °C. Similar differences in binding behavior were found for the two enantiomers at 20 °C and 27 °C. This is the first known example of stereoselective binding of drugs by LDL or other lipoproteins. This work also illustrates the ability of HPAC to be used as a tool for characterizing mixed-mode interactions that involve LDL and related binding agents. PMID:22354572

  13. RRR- and SRR-alpha-tocopherols are secreted without discrimination in human chylomicrons, but RRR-alpha-tocopherol is preferentially secreted in very low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Traber, M.G.; Burton, G.W.; Ingold, K.U.; Kayden, H.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Five subjects ingested in a single oral dose containing 50 mg each of 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5,7-(C2H3)2)tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) with natural stereochemistry, and of 2S,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5-C2H3)tocopheryl acetate (d3-SRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate). These are two of eight stereoisomers in synthetic vitamin E. By day 1 the plasma and red blood cells were enriched fourfold with d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (P less than 0.004). The ratio of d6-RRR-/d2-SRR- further increased over the succeeding 4 days, because the d3-SRR- decreased at a faster rate than did the d6-RRR-stereoisomer. Plasma and lipoproteins were isolated at intervals during the first day, and daily for 3 days, from four additional subjects fed a mixture of equal amounts of the deuterated tocopherols. The plasma contained similar concentrations of the two forms until 11 h, when the d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol concentration became significantly greater (P less than 0.05). The chylomicrons contained similar concentrations of the two deuterated tocopherols, but the VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) became preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol by 11 h. The pattern of the deuterated tocopherols shows that during chylomicron catabolism all of the plasma lipoproteins were labeled equally with both tocopherols, but that during the subsequent VLDL catabolism the low and high density lipoproteins became enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These results suggest the existence of a mechanism in the liver for assembling VLDL preferentially enriched in RRR- relative to SRR-alpha-tocopherol.

  14. [THE SPIRIT CHOLESTEROL, BIOLOGICA L ROLE AT STAGES OF PHYLOGENESIS, MECHANISMS OF INHIBITION OF SYNTHESIS OF STEROL BY STATINS, FACTORS OF PHARMACOGENOMICS AND DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Kotlovskii, M Yu; Pokrovskii, A A; Kotlovskaia, O S; Osedko, A V; Titova, N M; Kotlovskii, Yu V; Digaii, A M

    2015-04-01

    The hypolipidemic effect of statins is realized by inhibition of synthesis of local pool of cholesterol spirit in endoplasmic net of hepatocytes. The cholesterol spirit covers all hydrophobic medium of triglycerides with polar mono layer of phosphatidylcholines and cholesterol spirit prior to secretion of lipoproteins of very low density into hydrophilic medium. The lesser mono layer between lipase enzyme and triglycerides substrate contains of cholesterol spirit the higher are the parameters of hydrolysis of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density. The sequence of effect of statins is as follows: blocking of synthesis in hepatocytes and decreasing of content of unesterified cholesterol spirit in blood plasma; activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density; formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells by force of apoB-100 endocytosis; decreasing in blood of content of polyenoic fatty acids, equimolar esterified by cholesterol spirit, polyethers of cholesterol spirit and decreasing of level of cholesterol spirit-lipoproteins of very low density. There is no way to eliminate aphysiological effect of disordered biological function of trophology (nutrition) on metabolism of fatty acids in population by means of pharmaceuticals intake. It is necessary to eliminate aphysiological effect of environment. To decrease rate of diseases of cardiovascular system one has to decrease in food content of saturated fatty acids and in the first instance palmitic saturated fatty acid, trans-form fatty acid, palmitoleic fatty acids up to physiological values and increase to the same degree the content of polyenoic fatty acids. The saturated fatty acids block absorption of polyenoic fatty acids by cells. The atherosclerosis is a deficiency of polyenoic fatty acids under surplus of palmitic saturated fatty acid. PMID:26189285

  15. Role of Lectin-Like Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein-1 in Fetoplacental Vascular Dysfunction in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga, Felipe A.; Ormazabal, Valeska; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Aguilera, Valeria; Radojkovic, Claudia; Veas, Carlos; Escudero, Carlos; Lamperti, Liliana; Aguayo, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) represents a key marker in vascular health. A decrease in NO induces a pathological condition denominated endothelial dysfunction, syndrome observed in different pathologies, such as obesity, diabetes, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and preeclampsia (PE). PE is one of the major risks for maternal death and fetal loss. Recent studies suggest that the placenta of pregnant women with PE express high levels of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), which induces endothelial dysfunction by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreasing intracellular NO. Besides LOX-1 activation induces changes in migration and apoptosis of syncytiotrophoblast cells. However, the role of this receptor in placental tissue is still unknown. In this review we will describes the physiological roles of LOX-1 in normal placenta development and the potential involvement of this receptor in the pathophysiology of PE. PMID:25110674

  16. Resolving Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) on the Human Aortic Surface Using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts

    2011-11-01

    The prediction and understanding of the genesis of vascular diseases is one of the grand challenges in biofluid engineering. The progression of atherosclerosis is correlated to the build- up of LDL on the arterial surface, which is affected by the blood flow. A multi-physics simulation of LDL mass transport in the blood and through the arterial wall of a subject specific human aorta was performed, employing a LES turbulence model to resolve the turbulent flow. Geometry and velocity measurements from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were incorporated to assure physiological relevance of the simulation. Due to the turbulent nature of the flow, consecutive cardiac cycles are not identical, neither in vivo nor in the simulations. A phase average based on a large number of cardiac cycles is therefore computed, which is the proper way to get reliable statistical results from a LES simulation. In total, 50 cardiac cycles were simulated, yielding over 2.5 Billion data points to be post-processed. An inverse relation between LDL and WSS was found; LDL accumulated on locations where WSS was low and vice-versa. Large temporal differences were present, with the concentration level decreasing during systolic acceleration and increasing during the deceleration phase. This method makes it possible to resolve the localization of LDL accumulation in the normal human aorta with its complex transitional flow.

  17. Fermentation with Aspergillus awamori enhanced contents of amino nitrogen and total phenolics as well as the low-density lipoprotein oxidation inhibitory activity of black soybeans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Fei; Lee, Shiow-Ling; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2011-04-27

    A solid fermentation was performed on black soybeans with Aspergillus awamori. The effects of fermentation on the contents of total phenolics and amino nitrogen and on the inhibitory effect on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation of black soybeans were examined. Results revealed that fermentation significantly enhanced the LDL oxidation inhibitory activity and total phenolics and amino nitrogen contents of black soybeans. The increased content of amino nitrogen was closely related to the enhanced LDL oxidation inhibitory activity of fermented black soybeans and its water extract. Fermentation temperature and length affected the LDL oxidation inhibitory effect exerted by the prepared fermented black soybeans. The A. awamori-fermented black soybean prepared at 30 °C for 3 days exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on LDL oxidation. The bioactive principles related to the inhibitory effect on LDL oxidation in black soybeans, regardless of fermentation, could be most efficiently extracted with water rather than 80% methanol or 80% ethanol.

  18. Two neglected biologic risk factors in bone grafting and implantology: high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low serum vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Choukroun, Joseph; Khoury, Georges; Khoury, Fouad; Russe, Philippe; Testori, Tiziano; Komiyama, Yataro; Sammartino, Gilberto; Palacci, Patrick; Tunali, Mustafa; Choukroun, Elisa

    2014-02-01

    Following a failure of a bone graft or an implant placement, the hypothesis of a biological abnormality is rarely considered as a possible cause. A systematic search of peer-reviewed literature for dyslipidemia or vitamin D deficiency may explain this lack of consideration. Excess low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (dyslipidemia) is responsible for a slower bone metabolism or lower dental implant osseointegration. In addition, vitamin D is a key factor for linking innate and adaptive immunity. Both of these factors are compromised under the conditions of vitamin D deficiency. Therefore, vitamin D deficiency slows implant osseointegration and increases the risk of graft infection. Vitamin D is also involved in immune function and therefore allergic reactions.

  19. Hepatic metabolism of colloidal gold-low-density lipoprotein complexes in the rat: evidence for bulk excretion of lysosomal contents into bile

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, G.; Hamilton, R.L.; Havel, R.J.

    1989-03-01

    Rats were treated with 17 alpha-ethinyl estradiol to induce high levels of low-density lipoprotein receptors in hepatocytes. When these rats were given intravenous injections of low-density lipoprotein-colloidal gold complexes, most of the gold (labeled with /sup 195/Au) appeared to be taken up by Kupffer cells, as were complexes of colloidal gold with albumin or polyvinylpyrrolidone. However, when these rats were also administered gadolinium chloride, which blocks Kupffer cell activity, most of the low-density lipoprotein-gold (but not gold complexed with albumin or polyvinylpyrrolidone) was taken up into hepatocytes by receptor-mediated endocytosis and concentrated in peribiliary lysosomes, as determined by electron microscopy. Colloidal gold taken up as a complex with low-density lipoprotein was excreted into the feces via the common bile duct at a maximal rate of about 5% daily, 4 to 12 days after injection. Thereafter, the rate of gold excretion fell off until reaching a plateau after 3 weeks. At this late time, most of the colloidal gold was shown by electron microscopy to be in Kupffer cells, whereas earlier (6 days after injection) it was contained mainly in older hepatocytic lysosomes, identified by lipofuscin granules. It is concluded that, in rats, hepatocytic lysosomes empty most of their contents into bile every week or two, apparently by exocytosis.

  20. New utility of an old marker: serum low-density lipoprotein predicts histopathological response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji-Chun; Guo, Ju-Feng; Teng, Rong-Yue; Wang, Qin-Chuan; Wang, Ji; Wei, Qun; Li, Zi-Duo; Shen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Lin-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the correlation between metabolic abnormality and gastric cancer has been extensively investigated, the question of whether metabolic parameters might influence the efficacy of chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer is still unanswered. In our present study, we investigated the relationship between serum fasting glucose, lipid levels, and histopathological response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in locally advanced gastric cancers. Patients and methods A total of 128 patients were identified from a prospectively maintained database of patients with locally advanced gastric cancer who received NAC between July 2004 and December 2012. Histopathological response after NAC was analyzed according to Becker’s tumor-regression grade. Univariate analyses and multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine the correlation between tumor size, differentiation, fasting glucose, lipid levels, and tumor histopathological response after NAC. Results Univariate analysis revealed that low-density lipoprotein level and total cholesterol, as well as tumor size and differentiation, correlated significantly with histopathological response. Low-density lipoprotein levels and tumor size were found to be independent predictors for histopathological response, according to multivariable regression analyses. Conclusion In this observational, hypothesis-generating study, serum low-density lipoprotein measurement was found to be useful in predicting chemosensitivity to locally advanced gastric cancer patients undergoing NAC. Incorporation of serum low-density lipoprotein levels into individualized treatment protocols could be considered in clinical practice. PMID:27574445

  1. Genetic variation at the SLCO1B1 gene locus and low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was to determine whether genetic variation at genes affecting statin metabolism or targets of statin therapy would influence low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering with pravastatin, baseline heart disease, or cardiac endpoints on trial. We examined associations of single nucleot...

  2. KIF6, LPA, TAS2R50, and VAMP8 genetic variation, low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin, and heart disease risk reduction in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the KIF6 (kinesin like protein 6, rs20455 or 719Arg), LPA (lipoprotein(a), rs3798220), TAS2R50 (taste receptor type 2, member 50, rs1376251) and VAMP8 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 8, rs1010) have previously been associated with low density lipoprotei...

  3. Capsaicin protects endothelial cells and macrophage against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced injury by direct antioxidant action.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Lin, Chin-Yin; Lee, Yi-Hsun; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2015-02-25

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. It is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, leukocyte activation, and the production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Capsaicin, a biologically active compound of the red pepper and chili pepper, has several anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and hypolipidemic biological effects. However, its protective effects on foam cell formation and endothelial injury induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin, and determined the mechanism by which capsaicin rescues human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from oxLDL-mediated dysfunction. The anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin was defined by Apo B fragmentation and conjugated diene production of the copper-mediated oxidation of LDL. Capsaicin repressed ROS generation, as well as subsequent mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, cytochrome c expression, chromosome condensation, and caspase-3 activation induced by oxLDL in HUVECs. Capsaicin also protected foam cell formation in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Our results suggest that capsaicin may prevent oxLDL-induced cellular dysfunction and protect RAW 264.7 cells from LDL oxidation. PMID:25603234

  4. Investigation of serum oxidized low-density lipoprotein IgG levels in patients with angiographically defined coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Moohebati, Mohsen; Kabirirad, Vahid; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Esmaily, Habibollah; Tavallaie, Shima; Akhavan Rezayat, Amir; Pourghadamyari, Hossein; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that antioxidized low-density lipoprotein (anti-oxLDL) antibodies play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to measure serum ox-LDL IgG levels in 31 patients with angiographically defined coronary artery disease (CAD) (≥50% stenosis in at least one major coronary artery; CAD(+) group) and compare these levels with those of 32 subjects with <50% coronary stenosis (CAD(-) group) and 24 healthy age- and sex-matched controls using ELISA. We did not find any significant difference between CAD(+), CAD(-), and control groups in regard to oxLDL IgG levels (P = 0.83). Serum oxLDL IgG levels did not differ between 1VD (one vessel disease), 2VD (2 vessels disease), and 3VD (3 vessels disease) subgroups of CAD(+) patients (P = 0.20). Serum anti-oxLDL titers were only significantly correlated with LDL-C in the CAD(+) group (P < 0.05) and waist and hip circumference (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, resp.) in the CAD(-) group. In stepwise regression analysis, none of the conventional cardiovascular risk factors was associated with serum ox-LDL IgG levels. The present results suggest that serum levels of ox-LDL IgG are neither associated with the presence and severity of CAD nor with the conventional cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and amyloid-β clearance in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain trigger the development of progressive neurodegeneration and dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Perturbation in Aβ clearance, rather than Aβ production, is likely the cause of sporadic, late-onset AD, which accounts for the majority of AD cases. Since cellular uptake and subsequent degradation constitute a major Aβ clearance pathway, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of Aβ has been intensely investigated. Among Aβ receptors, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is one of the most studied receptors. LRP1 is a large endocytic receptor for more than 40 ligands, including apolipoprotein E, α2-macroglobulin and Aβ. Emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that LRP1 is critically involved in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 is highly expressed in a variety of cell types in the brain including neurons, vascular cells and glial cells, where LRP1 functions to maintain brain homeostasis and control Aβ metabolism. LRP1-mediated endocytosis regulates cellular Aβ uptake by binding to Aβ either directly or indirectly through its co-receptors or ligands. Furthermore, LRP1 regulates several signaling pathways, which also likely influences Aβ endocytic pathways. In this review, we discuss how LRP1 regulates the brain Aβ clearance and how this unique endocytic receptor participates in AD pathogenesis. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying LRP1-mediated Aβ clearance should enable the rational design of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:24904407

  6. Protection by polyphenols of postprandial human plasma and low-density lipoprotein modification: the stomach as a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Joseph; Gorelik, Shlomit; Roman, Sirota; Kohen, Ron

    2012-09-12

    Recent studies dramatically showed that the removal of circulating modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) results in complete prevention of atherosclerosis. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to food, some of it containing oxidized compounds. Lipid oxidation in the stomach was demonstrated by ingesting heated red meat in rats. Red wine polyphenols added to the rats' meat diet prevented lipid peroxidation in the stomach and absorption of malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat plasma. In humans, postprandial plasma MDA levels rose by 3-fold after a meal of red meat cutlets. MDA derived from meat consumption caused postprandial plasma LDL modification in human. The levels of plasma MDA showed a 75% reduction by consumption of red wine polyphenols during the meat meal. Locating the main biological site of action of polyphenols in the stomach led to a revision in the understanding of how antioxidants work in vivo and may help to elucidate the mechanism involved in the protective effects of polyphenols in human health. PMID:22530973

  7. Surface glycosylation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) membrane for selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lan, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of constructing a glycosylated surface on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] membrane surface for the selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was developed, which involved the photoinduced graft polymerization of acrylic acid followed by the chemical binding of carboxyl groups with glucosamine in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxy-succinimide. The chemical structures of the fabricated membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Zeta potential and water contact angle measurements were performed to investigate the surface charge and wettability of the membranes, respectively. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the LDL adsorption on the plain and modified membrane surfaces. It was found that the surface glycosylation of P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane greatly enhanced the affinity interactions with LDL and the absorbed LDL could be easily desorbed with eluents, indicating a specific and reversible binding of LDL to the surface. Furthermore, the hemocompatibility of glycosylated membrane was improved as examined by platelet adhesion. The results suggest that the glycosylated P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane is promising for application in LDL apheresis therapy.

  8. Plasma clearance of human low-density lipoprotein in human apolipoprotein B transgenic mice is related to particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Berneis, Kaspar; Shames, David M; Blanche, Patricia J; La Belle, Michael; Rizzo, Manfredi; Krauss, Ronald M

    2004-04-01

    To test for intrinsic differences in metabolic properties of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as a function of particle size, we examined the kinetic behavior of 6 human LDL fractions ranging in size from 251 to 265 A injected intravenously into human apolipoprotein (apo) B transgenic mice. A multicompartmental model was formulated and fitted to the data by standard nonlinear regression using the Simulation, Analysis and Modeling (SAAM II) program. Smaller sized LDL particles (251 to 257 A) demonstrated a significantly slower fractional catabolic rate (FCR) (0.050 +/- 0.045 h(-1)) compared with particles of larger size (262 to 265 A) (0.134 +/- -0.015 h(-1), P <.03), and there was a significant correlation between FCR and the peak LDL diameter of the injected fractions (R(2) =.71, P <.034). The sum of the equilibration parameters, k(2,1) and k(1,2), for smaller LDL (0.255 h(-1) and 0.105 h(-1), respectively) was significantly smaller than that for larger LDL (0.277 h(-1) and 0.248 h(-1), respectively; P <.01), indicative of slower intravascular-extravascular exchange for smaller LDL. Therefore in this mouse model, smaller LDL particles are cleared more slowly from plasma than larger LDL and are exchanged more slowly with the extravascular space. This might be due to compositional or structural features of smaller LDL that lead to retarded clearance.

  9. Dysregulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Pathway Is Involved in Lipid Disorder-Mediated Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ma, Kun Ling; Ruan, Xiong Zhong; Liu, Bi Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is a negative feedback system that plays important roles in the regulation of plasma and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. To maintain a cholesterol homeostasis, LDLR expression is tightly regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in transcriptional level and by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in posttranscriptional level. The dysregulation of LDLR expression results in abnormal lipid accumulation in cells and tissues, such as vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatic cells, renal mesangial cells, renal tubular cells and podocytes. It has been demonstrated that inflammation, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation, and hyperglycemia induce the disruption of LDLR pathway, which might contribute to lipid disorder-mediated organ injury (atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, kidney fibrosis, etc). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical mediator in the disruption of LDLR pathway caused by pathogenic factors. The mTOR complex1 activation upregulates LDLR expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, consequently resulting in lipid deposition. This paper mainly reviews the mechanisms for the dysregulation of LDLR pathway and its roles in lipid disorder-mediated organ injury under various pathogenic conditions. Understanding these mechanisms leading to the abnormality of LDLR expression contributes to find potential new drug targets in lipid disorder-mediated diseases. PMID:27019638

  10. Low-density lipoprotein antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds and polyphenol oxidase activity in selected clingstone peach cultivars.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Tan, C; Frankel, E N; Barrett, D M

    2000-02-01

    The antioxidant potential of eight clingstone peach cultivars was investigated by determining phenolic compounds and inhibition of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. Cultivars low in polyphenol oxidase (PPO) were also selected to minimize enzymatic browning. Inhibition of LDL oxidation varied from 17.0 to 37.1% in peach flesh extract, from 15.2 to 49.8% in whole peach extract, and from 18.2 to 48.1% in peel extract. Total phenols were 432.8-768.1 mg/kg in flesh extract, 483.3-803.0 mg/kg in whole extract, and 910.9-1922.9 mg/kg in peel extract. The correlation coefficient between relative LDL antioxidant activity and concentration of total phenols was 0.76. Peel PPO activity was higher than flesh activity in most cultivars. The lowest PPO and specific activities were found in the Walgant cultivar, followed by Kakamas and 18-8-23. These three cultivars combine the desirable characteristics of strong antioxidant activity, low PPO activity, and lower susceptibility to browning reactions.

  11. Tartaric Acid-based Amphiphilic Macromolecules with Ether Linkages Exhibit Enhanced Repression of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Dalia; Zhang, Yingue; Lewis, Daniel R.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Welsh, William J.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease initiates with the atherogenic cascade of scavenger receptor- (SR-) mediated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. Resulting foam cell formation leads to lipid-rich lesions within arteries. We designed amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) to inhibit these processes by competitively blocking oxLDL uptake via SRs, potentially arresting atherosclerotic development. In this study, we investigated the impact of replacing ester linkages with ether linkages in the AM hydrophobic domain. We hypothesized that ether linkages would impart flexibility for orientation to improve binding to SR binding pockets, enhancing anti-atherogenic activity. A series of tartaric acid-based AMs with varying hydrophobic chain lengths and conjugation chemistries were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for bioactivity. 3-D conformations of AMs in aqueous conditions may have significant effects on anti-atherogenic potency and were simulated by molecular modeling. Notably, ether-linked AMs exhibited significantly higher levels of inhibition of oxLDL uptake than their corresponding ester analogues, indicating a dominant effect of linkage flexibility on pharmacological activity. The degradation stability was also enhanced for ether-linked AMs. These studies further suggested that alkyl chain length (i.e., relative hydrophobicity), conformation (i.e., orientation), and chemical stability play a critical role in modulating oxLDL uptake, and guide the design of innovative cardiovascular therapies. PMID:25890704

  12. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction improves the low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression in HepG{sub 2} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Dongping; Li Xiaoyu; Sun, Ping; Tang Yibo; Chen Xiuying; Chen Qi; Fan Leming . E-mail: lmfan@njmu.edu.cn; Zang Bin; Shao Lizheng; Li Xiaorong

    2006-05-05

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction had been employed in gene delivery and promised great potential. Liver has unique features that make it attractive for gene therapy. However, it poses formidable obstacles to hepatocyte-specific gene delivery. This study was designed to test the efficiency of therapeutic gene transfer and expression mediated by ultrasound/microbubble strategy in HepG{sub 2} cell line. Air-filled albumin microbubbles were prepared and mixed with plasmid DNA encoding low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and green fluorescent protein. The mixture of the DNA and microbubbles was administer to cultured HepG{sub 2} cells under variable ultrasound conditions. Transfection rate of the transferred gene and cell viability were assessed by FACS analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot analysis and Trypan blue staining. The result demonstrated that microbubbles with ultrasound irradiation can significantly elevate exogenous LDLR gene expression and the expressed LDLRs were functional and active to uptake their ligands. We conclude that ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction has the potential to promote safe and efficient LDLR gene transfer into hepatocytes. With further refinement, it may represent an effective nonviral avenue of gene therapy for liver-involved genetic diseases.

  13. Single Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis Does Not Improve Vascular Endothelial Function in Chronically Treated Hypercholesterolemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D.; Mah, Eunice; Guo, Yi; Bruno, Richard S.; Taylor, Beth A.; Beam, Jo Ellen; Polk, Donna M.; Thompson, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate vascular endothelial function (VEF) responses to a single low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis session in hypercholesterolemic patients undergoing chronic treatment. Methods. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), plasma lipids, vitamin E (α- and γ-tocopherol), markers of oxidative/nitrative stress (malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitro-γ-tocopherol (NGT)), and regulators of NO metabolism (arginine (ARG) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) prior to (Pre) and immediately following (Post) LDL apheresis and at 1, 3, 7, and 14 d Post in 5 hypercholesterolemic patients (52 ± 11 y). Results. Relative to Pre, total cholesterol (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) and LDL-cholesterol (6.2 ± 1.2 mmol/L) were 61% and 70% lower (P < 0.01), respectively, at Post and returned to Pre levels at 14 d. Brachial FMD responses (6.9 ± 3.6%) and plasma MDA, ARG, and ADMA concentrations were unaffected by LDL apheresis. Plasma α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and NGT concentrations were 52–69% lower at Post (P < 0.01), and α-tocopherol remained 36% lower at 1 d whereas NGT remained 41% lower at d 3. Conclusions. Acute cholesterol reduction by LDL apheresis does not alter VEF, oxidative stress, or NO homeostasis in patients treated chronically for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26998360

  14. Characterization of a receptor for oxidized low-density lipoproteins on rat Kupffer cells: similarity to macrosialin.

    PubMed Central

    Van Velzen, A G; Da Silva, R P; Gordon, S; Van Berkel, T J

    1997-01-01

    Rat liver Kupffer cell membranes contain a protein that recognizes specifically oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Visualization after blotting under reducing conditions indicates that the receptor is a monomeric protein, with an estimated molecular mass of 115-120 kDa. N-Glycosidase F and endoglycosidase F treatment resulted in a fall in estimated molecular mass of 24 and 11 kDa respectively, whereas O-glycosidase was ineffective. No effect on the extent of interaction with oxLDL was noticed, suggesting that glycans are not essential for ligand recognition. Using a polyclonal antibody to mouse macrosialin, we visualized macrosialin on blot, and compared this glycoprotein with the oxLDL-binding protein. It appears that the two glycoproteins have a similar molecular mass and are comparably affected by treatment with the different glycosidases. Incubation with trypsin resulted in a reduction in the estimated molecular mass of about 25 kDa for both the oxLDL-binding protein and macrosialin. These results indicate that the oxLDL-binding protein and macrosialin are identical, suggesting a role for macrosialin in modified LDL catabolism. PMID:9065757

  15. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J.; Mootoosamy, Roy C.; Ford, Melanie J.; Warley, Alice; Liu, Qiang; Bu, Guojun; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Moestrup, Søren; McGuinness, Lindsay; Emptage, Nigel; Morris, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    For infectious prion protein (designated PrPSc) to act as a template to convert normal cellular protein (PrPC) to its distinctive pathogenic conformation, the two forms of prion protein (PrP) must interact closely. The neuronal receptor that rapidly endocytoses PrPC is the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We show here that on sensory neurons LRP1 is also the receptor that binds and rapidly endocytoses smaller oligomeric forms of infectious prion fibrils, and recombinant PrP fibrils. Although LRP1 binds two molecules of most ligands independently to its receptor clusters 2 and 4, PrPC and PrPSc fibrils bind only to receptor cluster 4. PrPSc fibrils out-compete PrPC for internalization. When endocytosed, PrPSc fibrils are routed to lysosomes, rather than recycled to the cell surface with PrPC. Thus, although LRP1 binds both forms of PrP, it traffics them to separate fates within sensory neurons. The binding of both to ligand cluster 4 should enable genetic modification of PrP binding without disrupting other roles of LRP1 essential to neuronal viability and function, thereby enabling in vivo analysis of the role of this interaction in controlling both prion and LRP1 biology. PMID:20048341

  16. The effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux on concentration polarization of low density lipoprotein in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Peter E; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2009-04-22

    Uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by the arterial wall is likely to play a key role in atherogenesis. A particular process that may cause vascular scale heterogeneity in the rate of transendothelial LDL transport is the formation of a flow-dependent LDL concentration polarization layer on the luminal surface of the arterial endothelium. In this study, the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux (that traverses the endothelium only via interendothelial cell clefts) on such concentration polarization is investigated numerically. Unlike in previous investigations, realistic intercellular cleft dimensions are used here and several values of LDL diffusivity are considered. Particular attention is paid to the spatially averaged LDL concentration adjacent to different regions of the endothelial surface, as such measures may be relevant to the rate of transendothelial LDL transport. It is demonstrated in principle that a heterogeneous transmural water flux can act to enhance such measures, and cause them to develop a shear dependence (in addition to that caused by vascular scale flow features, affecting the overall degree of LDL concentration polarization). However, it is shown that this enhancement and additional shear dependence are likely to be negligible for a physiologically realistic transmural flux velocity of 0.0439 mum s(-1) and an LDL diffusivity (in blood plasma) of 28.67 mum(2) s(-1). Hence, the results imply that vascular scale studies of LDL concentration polarization are justified in ignoring the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux.

  17. Amino acid sequence and domain structure of entactin. Homology with epidermal growth factor precursor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Entactin (nidogen), a 150-kD sulfated glycoprotein, is a major component of basement membranes and forms a highly stable noncovalent complex with laminin. The complete amino acid sequence of mouse entactin has been derived from sequencing of cDNA clones. The 5.9-kb cDNA contains a 3,735-bp open reading frame followed by a 3'- untranslated region of 2.2 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 1,245- residue polypeptide with an unglycosylated Mr of 136,500, a 28-residue signal peptide, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and two potential Ca2+-binding sites. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicts that the molecule consists of two globular domains of 70 and 36 kD separated by a cysteine-rich domain of 28 kD. The COOH-terminal globular domain shows homology to the EGF precursor and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Entactin contains six EGF-type cysteine-rich repeat units and one copy of a cysteine-repeat motif found in thyroglobulin. The Arg-Gly-Asp cell recognition sequence is present in one of the EGF-type repeats, and a synthetic peptide from the putative cell-binding site of entactin was found to promote the attachment of mouse mammary tumor cells. PMID:3264556

  18. Oxidised low density lipoprotein causes human macrophage cell death through oxidant generation and inhibition of key catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Katouah, Hanadi; Chen, Alpha; Othman, Izani; Gieseg, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is thought to be a significant contributor to the death of macrophage cells observed in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Using human-derived U937 cells we have examined the effect of cytotoxic oxLDL on oxidative stress and cellular catabolism. Within 3h of the addition of oxLDL, there was a rapid, concentration dependent rise in cellular reactive oxygen species followed by the loss of cellular GSH, and the enzyme activity of both glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and aconitase. The loss of these catabolic enzymes was accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP and lower lactate generation. Addition of the macrophage antioxidant 7,8-dihydroneopterin inhibited the ROS generation, glutathione loss and catabolic inactivation. NOX was shown to be activated by oxLDL addition while apocynin inhibited the loss of GSH and cell viability. The data suggests that oxLDL triggers an excess of ROS production through NOX activation, and catabolic failure through thiol oxidation resulting in cell death.

  19. A review of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, treatment strategies, and its impact on cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Rishi K; Steen, Dylan L; Khan, Irfan; Giugliano, Robert P; Foody, JoAnne M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for approximately 31.4% of deaths globally in 2012. It is estimated that, from 1980 to 2000, reduction in total cholesterol accounted for a 33% decrease in coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths in the United States. In other developed countries, similar decreases in CHD deaths (ranging from 19%-46%) have been attributed to reduction in total cholesterol. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has now largely replaced total cholesterol as a risk marker and the primary treatment target for hyperlipidemia. Reduction in LDL-C levels by statin-based therapies has been demonstrated to result in a reduction in the risk of nonfatal CV events and mortality in a continuous and graded manner over a wide range of baseline risk and LDL-C levels. This article provides a review of (1) the relationship between LDL-C and CV risk from a biologic, epidemiologic, and genetic standpoint; (2) evidence-based strategies for LDL-C lowering; (3) lipid-management guidelines; (4) new strategies to further reduce CV risk through LDL-C lowering; and (5) population-level and health-system initiatives aimed at identifying, treating, and lowering lifetime LDL-C exposure. PMID:27206934

  20. Hydroxytyrosol in functional hydroxytyrosol-enriched biscuits is highly bioavailable and decreases oxidised low density lipoprotein levels in humans.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Raquel; Martínez-López, Sara; Baeza Arévalo, Gema; Amigo-Benavent, Miryam; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo-Clemente, Laura

    2016-08-15

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) and its derivatives in olive oil protect low-density lipoproteins (LDL) against oxidation. Biscuits could be a convenient alternative to broaden consumers' choice of HT-rich foods, although the biscuit matrix could affect HT bioavailability. We performed a crossover, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate HT bioavailability in HT-enriched biscuits (HT-B) versus non-enriched biscuits (C-B), and the effects on oxidative postprandial status. On two separate days, 13 subjects consumed 30 g of C-B or HT-B (5.25mg HT) after overnight-fasting. Blood and urine were collected at different intervals and analysed by LC-MS-QToF. After HT-B consumption, plasma metabolites peaked between 0.5 and 1h and were extensively excreted in urine. HT-sulphate and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)-sulphate were the main metabolites, followed by DOPAC and homovanillic acid (HVA). HT-glucuronide, DOPAC-glucuronide, HVA-glucuronide and HVA-sulphate were also detected. Postprandial oxidised-LDL concentrations decreased with HT-B. HT is a promising functional ingredient and, in biscuits, it is highly bioavailable and lowers postprandial oxidised-LDL levels. PMID:27006237

  1. Capsaicin protects endothelial cells and macrophage against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced injury by direct antioxidant action.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Lin, Chin-Yin; Lee, Yi-Hsun; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2015-02-25

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. It is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, leukocyte activation, and the production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Capsaicin, a biologically active compound of the red pepper and chili pepper, has several anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and hypolipidemic biological effects. However, its protective effects on foam cell formation and endothelial injury induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin, and determined the mechanism by which capsaicin rescues human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from oxLDL-mediated dysfunction. The anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin was defined by Apo B fragmentation and conjugated diene production of the copper-mediated oxidation of LDL. Capsaicin repressed ROS generation, as well as subsequent mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, cytochrome c expression, chromosome condensation, and caspase-3 activation induced by oxLDL in HUVECs. Capsaicin also protected foam cell formation in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Our results suggest that capsaicin may prevent oxLDL-induced cellular dysfunction and protect RAW 264.7 cells from LDL oxidation.

  2. Measurement of /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein uptake in selected tissues of the squirrel monkey by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, R.G.; Schnitzer, J.J.; Yarmush, M.L.; Colton, C.K.; Smith, K.A.

    1988-09-01

    A recently developed technique of absolute quantitative light microscopic autoradiography of /sup 125/I-labeled proteins in biologic specimens was used to measure /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein (/sup 125/I-LDL) concentration levels in various tissues of the squirrel monkey after 30 minutes of in vivo LDL circulation. Liver and adrenal cortex exhibited high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations, presumably because of binding to specific cell surface receptors and/or internalization in vascular beds with high permeability to LDL. High tissue concentrations of LDL were associated with the zona fasciculata and reticularis of the adrenal cortex and the interstitial cells of Leydig in the testis; significantly lower levels of /sup 125/I-LDL were observed in the adrenal medulla, the zona glomerulosa, and germinal centers of the testis. Contrary to previous reports, low /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were observed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and in lymph nodes. In addition, multiple arterial intramural focal areas of high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were identified in arteries supplying the adrenal gland, lymph node, small bowel, and liver.

  3. Duration of Type 2 Diabetes and Very Low Density Lipoprotein Levels Are Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yogi-Morren, Divya; Galioto, Rachel; Strandjord, Sarah Elizabeth; Kennedy, L.; Manroa, Pooja; Kirwan, John P.; Kashyap, Sangeeta; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is now recognized as an independent risk factor for accelerated cognitive decline and neurological conditions like Alzheimer's disease. Less is known about the neurocognitive function of T2D patients with comorbid metabolic syndrome, despite their elevated risk for impairment. Computerized testing in 47 adults with T2D that met criteria for NCEP metabolic syndrome revealed that cognitive impairment was prevalent, including 13% in tests of memory, 50% in attention, and 35% in executive function. Partial correlations showed that longer duration of diabetes was associated with poorer performance on tests of basic attention (r = −0.43), working memory (r = 0.43), and executive function (r = 0.42). Strong associations between very low density lipoprotein and poor cognitive function also emerged, including tests of set shifting (r = 0.47) and cognitive inhibition (r = −0.51). Findings suggest that patients with T2D that meet criteria for metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cognitive impairment. Prospective studies should look to replicate these findings and examine the possible neuroprotective effects of lipid-lowering medication in this population. PMID:25057411

  4. Effects of low-density lipoproteins extracted from different avian yolks on boar spermatozoa quality following freezing-thawing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Chun-Wei; Bu, Shu-Hai; Hu, Jian-Hong; Li, Qing-Wang; Pang, Wei-Jun; Yang, Gong-She

    2014-05-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) is known to protect boar sperm during freezing-thawing, but little information is known about the effects of LDL extracted from different avian egg yolks on post-thaw boar semen quality. The purpose of this study was to compare and analyze the effects of LDL at various concentrations and different species on boar sperm quality after freezing-thawing. LDL extracted from the yolk of hen egg, duck egg, quail egg, pigeon egg or ostrich egg was added to the extender at the concentrations of 0.06, 0.07, 0.08, 0.09 and 0.1 g/ml, respectively, and their effects on frozen-thawed boar sperm quality were assessed. According to all measured parameters, the results showed that sperm motility, acrosome integrity and plasma membrane integrity were 43.20%, 52.57% and 48.13%, respectively, after being frozen-thawed with 0.09 g/ml LDL extracted from pigeon egg yolk. All these quality parameters were higher than that of other groups (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our results confirmed that LDL extracted from pigeon egg yolk had the best cryoprotective effects on frozen-thawed boar sperm among all of the groups supplemented with LDL from five kinds of avian egg in extender. The optimum concentration of LDL extracted from pigeon egg in boar semen freezing extender was 0.09 g/ml.

  5. mRNA for low density lipoprotein receptor in brain and spinal cord of immature and mature rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.L.; Russell, D.W.; Goldstein, J.L.; Brown, M.S.

    1987-09-01

    Hybridization studies with (/sup 32/P)cDNA probes revealed detectable amounts of mRNA for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in the central nervous system (CNS) of rabbits. mRNA levels were highest in the medulla/pons and spinal cord, which were the most heavily myelinated regions that were studied. Lower, but detectable levels were present in cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, and cerebellum. In the medulla/pons and spinal cord, the levels of receptor mRNA were in a range comparable to that detected in the liver. The levels of receptor mRNA in whole brain were constant from 3 days of age to adulthood and, thus, did not vary in proportion to the rate of myelin synthesis. LDL receptor mRNA in the CNS was produced by the same gene that produced the liver and adrenal mRNA as revealed by the demonstration of a deletion in the neural mRNA of Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits identical to the deletion in the LDL receptor gene of these mutant animals. Using antibodies directed against the bovine LDL receptor, the authors showed that LDL receptor protein is present in the medulla/pons of adult cows. The cell types that express LDL receptors in the CNS and the functions of these receptors are unknown.

  6. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Induces Differentiation and Adhesion of Human Monocytes and the Monocytic Cell Line U937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostegard, Johan; Nilsson, Jan; Haegerstrand, Anders; Hamsten, Anders; Wigzell, Hans; Gidlund, Magnus

    1990-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for development of atherosclerosis. In experimental animals fed a high-cholesterol diet, monocytes adhere to the arterial endothelium and penetrate into the intima where they differentiate into macrophages and ingest lipids thus giving rise to fatty streaks, the earliest type of atherosclerotic plaque. Macrophages express few receptors for normal low density lipo-protein (LDL) but can take up oxidized LDL by way of a scavenger receptor. The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of oxidized LDL in recruitment of resident intimal macrophages. We found that oxidized LDL induced enhanced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on human monocytes and U937 cells, a well-established system for studies of monocytic differentiation. Oxidized LDL also induced enhanced expression of the surface antigen LEuM3 but caused decreased expression of CD4 antigen, a pattern compatible with expression of a more differentiated macrophage-like phenotype. Oxidized LDL also initiated aggregation of monocytes and U937 cells and stimulated adhesion of U937 cells to cultured endothelial cells. The results indicate that oxidized LDL may contribute to development of atherosclerosis by inducing adhesion of monocytes to the arterial intima and by stimulating intimal monocytes to differentiate into resident macrophages.

  7. Mutations in the very low-density lipoprotein receptor VLDLR cause cerebellar hypoplasia and quadrupedal locomotion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Tayfun; Akarsu, Nurten; Uz, Elif; Caglayan, Safak; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Onat, Onur Emre; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner

    2008-01-01

    Quadrupedal gait in humans, also known as Unertan syndrome, is a rare phenotype associated with dysarthric speech, mental retardation, and varying degrees of cerebrocerebellar hypoplasia. Four large consanguineous kindreds from Turkey manifest this phenotype. In two families (A and D), shared homozygosity among affected relatives mapped the trait to a 1.3-Mb region of chromosome 9p24. This genomic region includes the VLDLR gene, which encodes the very low-density lipoprotein receptor, a component of the reelin signaling pathway involved in neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Sequence analysis of VLDLR revealed nonsense mutation R257X in family A and single-nucleotide deletion c2339delT in family D. Both these mutations are predicted to lead to truncated proteins lacking transmembrane and signaling domains. In two other families (B and C), the phenotype is not linked to chromosome 9p. Our data indicate that mutations in VLDLR impair cerebrocerebellar function, conferring in these families a dramatic influence on gait, and that hereditary disorders associated with quadrupedal gait in humans are genetically heterogeneous. PMID:18326629

  8. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter-2 (ABCA2) Regulates Cholesterol Homeostasis and Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Metabolism in N2a Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter-2 (ABCA2) has been identified as a possible regulator of lipid metabolism. ABCA2 is most highly expressed in the brain but its effects on cholesterol homeostasis in neuronal-type cells have not been characterized. It is important to study the role of ABCA2 in regulating cholesterol homeostasis in neuronal-type cells because ABCA2 has been identified as a possible genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, the effects of ABCA2 expression on cholesterol homeostasis were examined in mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells. ABCA2 reduced total, free- and esterified cholesterol levels as well as membrane cholesterol but did not perturb cholesterol distribution in organelle or lipid raft compartments. ABCA2 did not modulate de novo cholesterol biosynthesis from acetate. Cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane was not affected by ABCA2 but efflux to the physiological acceptor ApoE3 and mobilization of plasma membrane cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum for esterification were reduced by ABCA2. ABCA2 reduced esterification of serum and low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol but not 25-hydroxycholesterol. ABCA2 decreased low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA and protein levels and increased its turnover rate. The surface expression of LDLR as well as the uptake of fluroresecent DiI-LDL was also reduced by ABCA2. Reduction of endogenous ABCA2 expression by RNAi treatment of N2a cells and rat primary cortical neurons produced the opposite effects of over-expression of ABCA2, increasing LDLR protein levels. This report identifies ABCA2 as a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis and LDLR metabolism in neuronal cells. PMID:21810484

  9. Rapamycin Inhibits Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via mTOR/NF-κB/LOX-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 (LOX-1) is the major receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Previously, we found that rapamycin inhibited ox-LDL accumulation in HUVECs, and this effect was related to its role in increasing the activity of autophagy-lysosome pathway. In this study, we determined whether rapamycin could also reduce ox-LDL uptake in HUVECs and investigated the underlying signaling mechanisms. Results Flow cytometry and live cell imaging showed that rapamycin reduced Dil-ox-LDL accumulation in HUVECs. Furthermore, rapamycin reduced the ox-LDL-induced increase in LOX-1 mRNA and protein levels. Western blotting showed that rapamycin inhibited mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70s6k and IκBα phosphorylation triggered by ox-LDL. Flow cytometry implied that mTOR, NF-κB knockdown and NF-κB inhibitors significantly reduced Dil-ox-LDL uptake. Moreover, immunofluorescent staining showed that rapamycin reduced the accumulation of p65 in the nucleus after ox-LDL treatment for 30 h. mTOR knockdown decreased LOX-1 protein production and IκBα phosphorylation induced by ox-LDL. NF-κB knockdown and NF-κB inhibitors reduced LOX-1 protein production, but did not inhibit mTOR phosphorylation stimulated by ox-LDL. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that rapamycin reduce mTOR phosphorylation and subsequently inhibit NF-κB activation and suppresses LOX-1, resulting in a reduction in ox-LDL uptake in HUVECs. PMID:26752047

  10. Phenolic-extract from argan oil (Argania spinosa L.) inhibits human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and enhances cholesterol efflux from human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Cloutier, Martin; Isabelle, Maxim; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2006-02-01

    Argan oil is rich in unsaturated fatty acids, tocopherol and phenolic compounds. These protective molecules make further study of its cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) action interesting. Furthermore, no previous study has explored the antioxidant activity of argan oil in comparison with olive oil. The present study was conducted to evaluate the beneficial properties of Virgin argan oil phenolic extracts (VAO-PE) towards CVD by: (A) protecting human (low-density lipoprotein, LDL) against lipid peroxidation and (B) promoting high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated cholesterol efflux. Human LDLs were oxidized by incubation with CuSO(4) in the presence of different concentrations of VAO-PE (0-320mug/ml). LDL lipid peroxidation was evaluated by conjugated diene and MDA formation as well as Vitamin E disappearance. Incubation of LDL with VAO-PE significantly prolonged the lag-phase and lowered the progression rate of lipid peroxidation (P<0.01) and reduced the disappearance of Vitamin E in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of HDL with VAO-PE significantly increased the fluidity of the HDL phospholipidic bilayer (P=0.0004) and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages. These results suggest that Virgin argan oil provides a source of dietary phenolic antioxidants, which prevent cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting LDL-oxidation and enhancing reverse cholesterol transport. These properties increase the anti-atherogenic potential of HDL. PMID:16019008

  11. Phenolic-extract from argan oil (Argania spinosa L.) inhibits human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and enhances cholesterol efflux from human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Cloutier, Martin; Isabelle, Maxim; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2006-02-01

    Argan oil is rich in unsaturated fatty acids, tocopherol and phenolic compounds. These protective molecules make further study of its cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) action interesting. Furthermore, no previous study has explored the antioxidant activity of argan oil in comparison with olive oil. The present study was conducted to evaluate the beneficial properties of Virgin argan oil phenolic extracts (VAO-PE) towards CVD by: (A) protecting human (low-density lipoprotein, LDL) against lipid peroxidation and (B) promoting high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated cholesterol efflux. Human LDLs were oxidized by incubation with CuSO(4) in the presence of different concentrations of VAO-PE (0-320mug/ml). LDL lipid peroxidation was evaluated by conjugated diene and MDA formation as well as Vitamin E disappearance. Incubation of LDL with VAO-PE significantly prolonged the lag-phase and lowered the progression rate of lipid peroxidation (P<0.01) and reduced the disappearance of Vitamin E in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of HDL with VAO-PE significantly increased the fluidity of the HDL phospholipidic bilayer (P=0.0004) and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages. These results suggest that Virgin argan oil provides a source of dietary phenolic antioxidants, which prevent cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting LDL-oxidation and enhancing reverse cholesterol transport. These properties increase the anti-atherogenic potential of HDL.

  12. The influence of medium components on Cu(2+)-dependent oxidation of low-density lipoproteins and its sensitivity to superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C E

    1992-09-22

    The extent of in vitro Cu(2+)-dependent oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been reported to vary widely depending upon reaction conditions. In this study, the effect of proteins and amino acids on Cu(2+)-induced LDL oxidation was examined. Treatment of LDL with 5 microM CuSO4 for 18 h in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or Ham's F-10 medium resulted in extensive oxidation as determined by the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by increased lipoprotein electronegativity. In PBS, oxidation was entirely blocked by histidine and the tripeptide, gly-his-lys (GHK). Oxidation was also prevented by bovine serum albumin, but superoxide dismutase (SOD) provided only 20% protection. Both proteins bound similar amounts of Cu2+, but albumin appeared to be a more effective peroxyl radical trap as evidenced by its ability to prevent LDL oxidation induced by 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride). In F-10 medium, SOD had marked inhibitory effects, in contrast to PBS. The addition of disulfides to PBS markedly enhanced the ability of SOD to inhibit oxidation. These results indicate that medium components which affect Cu2+ availability influence LDL oxidation and suggest that albumin is ideally suited as a plasma antioxidant to prevent oxidative modification of LDL. Furthermore, in certain instances, the inhibitory effects of SOD may be attributable to effects such as Cu2+ binding rather than dismutation of superoxide. PMID:1390878

  13. Efficacy and safety of ezetimibe co-administered with ongoing atorvastatin therapy in achieving low-density lipoprotein goal in patients with hypercholesterolemia and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Fernández, J M; Bedarida, G V; Adgey, J; Allen, C; Johnson-Levonas, A O; Massaad, R

    2005-06-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of ezetimibe (EZE) co-administered with ongoing atorvastatin (ATV) therapy in 450 hypercholesterolemic patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) who had not achieved their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal < or =2.60 mmol/l while on a stable dose of ATV 10 or 20 mg/day for > or =6 weeks. After a 4-week diet/baseline active run-in period, patients with LDL-C >2.60 mmol/l and < or =4.20 mmol/l were stratified by ATV dose and randomised (1 : 1) to EZE 10 mg or PBO for 6 weeks while continuing open-label ATV. Significantly more patients achieved an LDL-C goal < or =2.6 mmol/l with EZE than PBO (81.3 vs. 21.8%; p < or = 0.001). Compared to PBO, co-administration of EZE with ongoing ATV led to significantly (p < or = 0.001) greater reductions in LDL-C, total cholesterol, triglycerides, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), and apolipoprotein B; HDL-C was significantly (p < or = 0.05) increased. Co-administration of EZE and ATV was well tolerated, with an overall safety profile similar to ATV alone.

  14. Identification of the Best Anthropometric Predictors of Serum High- and Low-Density Lipoproteins Using Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bum Ju; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2015-09-01

    Serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are associated with risk factors for various diseases and are related to anthropometric measures. However, controversy remains regarding the best anthropometric indicators of the HDL and LDL cholesterol levels. The objectives of this study were to identify the best predictors of HDL and LDL cholesterol using statistical analyses and two machine learning algorithms and to compare the predictive power of combined anthropometric measures in Korean adults. A total of 13,014 subjects participated in this study. The anthropometric measures were assessed with binary logistic regression (LR) to evaluate statistically significant differences between the subjects with normal and high LDL cholesterol levels and between the subjects with normal and low HDL cholesterol levels. LR and the naive Bayes algorithm (NB), which provides more reasonable and reliable results, were used in the analyses of the predictive power of individual and combined measures. The best predictor of HDL was the rib to hip ratio (p =< 0.0001; odds ratio (OR) = 1.895; area under curve (AUC) = 0.681) in women and the waist to hip ratio (WHR) (p =< 0.0001; OR = 1.624; AUC = 0.633) in men. In women, the strongest indicator of LDL was age (p =< 0.0001; OR = 1.662; AUC by NB = 0.653 ; AUC by LR = 0.636). Among the anthropometric measures, the body mass index (BMI), WHR, forehead to waist ratio, forehead to rib ratio, and forehead to chest ratio were the strongest predictors of LDL; these measures had similar predictive powers. The strongest predictor in men was BMI (p =< 0.0001; OR = 1.369; AUC by NB = 0.594; AUC by LR = 0.595 ). The predictive power of almost all individual anthropometric measures was higher for HDL than for LDL, and the predictive power for both HDL and LDL in women was higher than for men. A combination of anthropometric measures slightly improved the predictive power for both HDL and LDL cholesterol

  15. Biodistribution of AAV8 Vectors Expressing Human Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor in a Mouse Model of Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Jen; Sanmiguel, Julio; Lock, Martin; McMenamin, Deirdre; Draper, Christine; Limberis, Maria P.; Kassim, Sadik H.; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Bell, Peter; Johnston, Julie C.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors based on serotype 8 (AAV8) transduce liver with superior tropism following intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies conducted by our lab demonstrated that AAV8-mediated transfer of the human low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene driven by a strong liver-specific promoter (thyroxin-binding globulin [TBG]) leads to high level and persistent gene expression in the liver. The approach proved efficacious in reducing plasma cholesterol levels and resulted in the regression of atherosclerotic lesions in a murine model of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (hoFH). Prior to advancing this vector, called AAV8.TBG.hLDLR, to the clinic, we set out to investigate vector biodistribution in an hoFH mouse model following IV vector administration to assess the safety profile of this investigational agent. Although AAV genomes were present in all organs at all time points tested (up to 180 days), vector genomes were sequestered mainly in the liver, which contained levels of vector 3 logs higher than that found in other organs. In both sexes, the level of AAV genomes gradually declined and appeared to stabilize 90 days post vector administration in most organs although vector genomes remained high in liver. Vector loads in the circulating blood were high and close to those in liver at the early time point (day 3) but rapidly decreased to a level close to the limit of quantification of the assay. The results of this vector biodistribution study further support a proposed clinical trial to evaluate AAV8 gene therapy for hoFH patients. PMID:24070336

  16. Biodistribution of AAV8 vectors expressing human low-density lipoprotein receptor in a mouse model of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Jen; Sanmiguel, Julio; Lock, Martin; McMenamin, Deirdre; Draper, Christine; Limberis, Maria P; Kassim, Sadik H; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Bell, Peter; Johnston, Julie C; Rader, Daniel J; Wilson, James M

    2013-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors based on serotype 8 (AAV8) transduce liver with superior tropism following intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies conducted by our lab demonstrated that AAV8-mediated transfer of the human low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene driven by a strong liver-specific promoter (thyroxin-binding globulin [TBG]) leads to high level and persistent gene expression in the liver. The approach proved efficacious in reducing plasma cholesterol levels and resulted in the regression of atherosclerotic lesions in a murine model of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (hoFH). Prior to advancing this vector, called AAV8.TBG.hLDLR, to the clinic, we set out to investigate vector biodistribution in an hoFH mouse model following IV vector administration to assess the safety profile of this investigational agent. Although AAV genomes were present in all organs at all time points tested (up to 180 days), vector genomes were sequestered mainly in the liver, which contained levels of vector 3 logs higher than that found in other organs. In both sexes, the level of AAV genomes gradually declined and appeared to stabilize 90 days post vector administration in most organs although vector genomes remained high in liver. Vector loads in the circulating blood were high and close to those in liver at the early time point (day 3) but rapidly decreased to a level close to the limit of quantification of the assay. The results of this vector biodistribution study further support a proposed clinical trial to evaluate AAV8 gene therapy for hoFH patients. PMID:24070336

  17. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: Oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo . E-mail: jouilo@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  18. Development of Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis Model Using Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knock-Out Swine with Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Onishi, Akira; Tsuboi, Shuta; Wada, Hideki; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Kojima, Yuko; Schwartz, Robert S.; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Several animal models have facilitated the evaluation and pathological understanding of atherosclerosis, but a definitive animal model of coronary atherosclerosis is not available. We therefore developed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-KO) pigs with hypercholesterolemia, a model which rapidly developed coronary atherosclerosis following balloon injury. Methods and Results We deleted LDLR exon regions from cultured porcine fetal fibroblasts and cloned LDLR knockout (LDLR-KO) embryos microinjecting fetal fibroblast nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Twelve LDLR-KO pigs were fed a 2.0% cholesterol and 20% fat diet. Baseline serum LDL cholesterol level was 510.0±86.1 mg/dL. Balloon injury was created in 46 coronary segments and necropsy were obtained 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Coronary artery sections were reviewed to evaluate lesion progression. We found lipid accumulation with foam cells and inflammatory cells beginning four weeks after balloon injury. The mean ratio of macrophages to plaque area was significantly higher in the four- weeks and eight-week animals compared with those at 2-weeks (8.79% ± 5.98% and 17.00% ± 10.38% vs. 1.14% ± 1.88%, P < 0.0001). At 12 weeks the ratio decreased toward the level at 2 week level (4.00% ± 4.56%, P = 0.66 vs. baseline). Advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions contained lipid pools at eight-weeks with fibrous components beginning at 12 weeks. Conclusions We developed a model of rapid coronary atherosclerosis using LDLR KO pigs with balloon injury. This model may be useful for preclinical evaluation of medication or devices, and may also help investigate mechanisms of plaque progression. PMID:27631974

  19. Interaction between SCO-spondin and low density lipoproteins from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid modulates their roles in early neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vera, América; Recabal, Antonia; Saldivia, Natalia; Stanic, Karen; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    During early stages of development, encephalic vesicles are composed by a layer of neuroepithelial cells surrounding a central cavity filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF). This fluid contains several morphogens that regulate proliferation and differentiation of neuroepithelial cells. One of these neurogenic factors is SCO-spondin, a giant protein secreted to the eCSF from early stages of development. Inhibition of this protein in vivo or in vitro drastically decreases the neurodifferentiation process. Other important neurogenic factors of the eCSF are low density lipoproteins (LDL), the depletion of which generates a 60% decrease in mesencephalic explant neurodifferentiation. The presence of several LDL receptor class A (LDLrA) domains (responsible for LDL binding in other proteins) in the SCO-spondin sequence suggests a possible interaction between both molecules. This possibility was analyzed using three different experimental approaches: (1) Bioinformatics analyses of the SCO-spondin region, that contains eight LDLrA domains in tandem, and of comparisons with the LDL receptor consensus sequence; (2) Analysis of the physical interactions of both molecules through immunohistochemical colocalization in embryonic chick brains and through the immunoprecipitation of LDL with anti-SCO-spondin antibodies; and (3) Analysis of functional interactions during the neurodifferentiation process when these molecules were added to a culture medium of mesencephalic explants. The results revealed that LDL and SCO-spondin interact to form a complex that diminishes the neurogenic capacities that both molecules have separately. Our work suggests that the eCSF is an active signaling center with a complex regulation system that allows for correct brain development. PMID:26074785

  20. The transport of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol to the plasma membrane is defective in NPC1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wojtanik, Kari M; Liscum, Laura

    2003-04-25

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is characterized by lysosomal storage of cholesterol and gangliosides, which results from defects in intracellular lipid trafficking. Most studies of NPC1 have focused on its role in intracellular cholesterol movement. Our hypothesis is that NPC1 facilitates the egress of cholesterol from late endosomes, which are where active NPC1 is located. When NPC1 is defective, cholesterol does not exit late endosomes; instead, it is carried along to lysosomal storage bodies, where it accumulates. In this study, we addressed whether cholesterol is transported from endosomes to the plasma membrane before reaching NPC1-containing late endosomes. Our study was conducted in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines that display the classical NPC biochemical phenotype and belong to the NPC1 complementation group. We used three approaches to test whether low density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol en route to NPC1-containing organelles passes through the plasma membrane. First, we used cyclodextrins to measure the arrival of LDL cholesterol at the plasma membrane and found that the arrival of LDL cholesterol in a cyclodextrin-accessible pool was significantly delayed in NPC1 cells. Second, the movement of LDL cholesterol to NPC1-containing late endosomes was assessed and found to be normal in Chinese hamster ovary mutant 3-6, which exhibits defective movement of plasma membrane cholesterol to intracellular membranes. Third, we examined the movement of plasma membrane cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum and found that this pathway is intact in NPC1 cells, i.e. it does not pass through NPC1-containing late endosomes. Our data suggest that in NPC1 cells LDL cholesterol traffics directly through endosomes to lysosomes, bypassing the plasma membrane, and is trapped there because of dysfunctional NPC1. PMID:12591922

  1. Reduced uptake of oxidized low density lipoproteins in monocyte-derived macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, S; Kashiwagi, H; Yamashita, S; Nakagawa, T; Kostner, B; Tomiyama, Y; Nakata, A; Ishigami, M; Miyagawa, J; Kameda-Takemura, K

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the physiological roles of CD36 as an oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) receptor, we analyzed the monocyte-derived macrophages from normal and two CD36-deficient subjects, since we identified the molecular abnormalities (Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, Y. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, R. H. Lipsky, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa 1994. Blood. 83:3545-3552; and Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, S. Honda, S. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, N. Nagao, S. Sekiguchi, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa. 1995. J. Clin. Invest. 95:1040-1046). Scatchard analysis of 125I-OxLDL binding showed a linear plot and the maximum binding was lower by approximately 40% in the macrophages from subjects with CD36 deficiency than those from normal controls. Competition studies showed that the uptake of 125I-OxLDL was suppressed by OKM5, an antibody against CD36, by 53% in normal control macrophages, but not in the CD36-deficient macrophages. After incubation with OxLDL for 24 h, cholesteryl ester mass accumulation was reduced by approximately 40% in the macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects than those from normal controls. These results suggest that CD36 is one of the physiological receptors for OxLDL. Since specific binding of OxLDL was only reduced by approximately 40% in spite of the complete deficiency of CD36, several other receptors also may have some role in OxLDL uptake. Further studies will be needed to assess the quantitative role of CD36 in foam cell formation in vivo. Images PMID:7560077

  2. Structure and chromosomal assignment of the human lectin-like oxidized low-density-lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, T; Sawamura, T; Furutani, Y; Matsuoka, R; Yoshida, M C; Fujiwara, H; Masaki, T

    1999-01-01

    We have reported the cDNA cloning of a modified low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, designated lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), which is postulated to be involved in endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we determined the organization of the human LOX-1 gene, including the 5'-regulatory region. The 5'-regulatory region contained several potential cis-regulatory elements, such as GATA-2 binding element, c-ets-1 binding element, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-responsive element and shear-stress-responsive elements, which may mediate the endothelium-specific and inducible expression of LOX-1. The major transcription-initiation site was found to be located 29 nucleotides downstream of the TATA box and 61 nucleotides upstream from the translation-initiation codon. The minor initiation site was found to be 5 bp downstream from the major site. Most of the promoter activity of the LOX-1 gene was ascribed to the region (-150 to -90) containing the GC and CAAT boxes. The coding sequence was divided into 6 exons by 5 introns. The first 3 exons corresponded to the different functional domains of the protein (cytoplasmic, transmembrane and neck domains), and the residual 3 exons encoded the carbohydrate-recognition domain similar to the case of other C-type lectin genes. The LOX-1 gene was a single-copy gene and assigned to the p12.3-p13.2 region of chromosome 12. Since the locus for a familial hypertension has been mapped to the overlapping region, LOX-1 might be the gene responsible for the hypertension. PMID:10085242

  3. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Statin Treatment by HIV Status Among Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study Men

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Zikusoka, Michelle N.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Witt, Mallory D.; Palella, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Post, Wendy S.; Brown, Todd T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Treating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including dyslipidemia, is important in HIV care. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) target achievement is a readily available benchmark for dyslipidemia control, although use of this target is not uniformly endorsed by professional societies. We examined whether HIV serostatus is associated with not achieving LDL-c target. Among Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants completing visit 56 (10/1/2011–3/31/2012), we categorized each man as on or off statin therapy and used NCEP ATP III guidelines to determine if each man was at LDL-c target or not at target. We compared proportions of men not at target and determined predictors using multivariate logistic regression. Sixty of 543 (11.1%) HIV-infected men and 87 of 585 (14.9%) HIV-uninfected men not receiving statin therapy were not at target (p=0.07), while 31 of 230 (13.5%) HIV-infected and 29 of 204 (14.2%) HIV-uninfected men receiving statin therapy were not at target (p=0.82). Factors associated with not being at target (among men not receiving statin therapy) included current smoking (OR=2.31, 95% CI 1.31, 4.06) and a diagnosis of hypertension (OR=4.69, 95% CI 2.68, 8.21). Factors associated with not being at target (among men receiving statin therapy) included current smoking (OR=2.72, 95% CI 1.30, 5.67) and diabetes (OR=5.31, 95% CI 2.47, 11.42). HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men receiving statin therapy demonstrated similar nonachievement of LDL-c targets. Comorbidities (e.g., diabetes) lowered targets and may explain why goals were less likely to be met. PMID:25664922

  4. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins in a Novel Mechanism of Axon Guidance and Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Lila M; Pavez, Macarena; Brown, Lachlan S; Gasperini, Robert; Taylor, Bruce V; West, Adrian K; Foa, Lisa

    2016-01-15

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein receptors 1 and 2 (LRP1 and LRP2) are emerging as important cell signaling mediators in modulating neuronal growth and repair. We examined whether LRP1 and LRP2 are able to mediate a specific aspect of neuronal growth: axon guidance. We sought to identify LRP1 and LRP2 ligands that could induce axonal chemoattraction, which might have therapeutic potential. Using embryonic sensory neurons (rat dorsal root ganglia) in a growth cone turning assay, we tested a range of LRP1 and LRP2 ligands for the ability to guide growth cone navigation. Three ligands were chemorepulsive: α-2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, and metallothionein III. Conversely, only one LRP ligand, metallothionein II, was found to be chemoattractive. Chemoattraction toward a gradient of metallothionein II was calcium-dependent, required the expression of both LRP1 and LRP2, and likely involves further co-receptors such as the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor. The potential for LRP-mediated chemoattraction to mediate axonal regeneration was examined in vivo in a model of chemical denervation in adult rats. In these in vivo studies, metallothionein II was shown to enhance epidermal nerve fiber regeneration so that it was complete within 7 days compared with 14 days in saline-treated animals. Our data demonstrate that both LRP1 and LRP2 are necessary for metallothionein II-mediated chemotactic signal transduction and that they may form part of a signaling complex. Furthermore, the data suggest that LRP-mediated chemoattraction represents a novel, non-classical signaling system that has therapeutic potential as a disease-modifying agent for the injured peripheral nervous system.

  5. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  6. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins in a Novel Mechanism of Axon Guidance and Peripheral Nerve Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Lila M.; Pavez, Macarena; Brown, Lachlan S.; Gasperini, Robert; Taylor, Bruce V.; West, Adrian K.; Foa, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein receptors 1 and 2 (LRP1 and LRP2) are emerging as important cell signaling mediators in modulating neuronal growth and repair. We examined whether LRP1 and LRP2 are able to mediate a specific aspect of neuronal growth: axon guidance. We sought to identify LRP1 and LRP2 ligands that could induce axonal chemoattraction, which might have therapeutic potential. Using embryonic sensory neurons (rat dorsal root ganglia) in a growth cone turning assay, we tested a range of LRP1 and LRP2 ligands for the ability to guide growth cone navigation. Three ligands were chemorepulsive: α-2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, and metallothionein III. Conversely, only one LRP ligand, metallothionein II, was found to be chemoattractive. Chemoattraction toward a gradient of metallothionein II was calcium-dependent, required the expression of both LRP1 and LRP2, and likely involves further co-receptors such as the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor. The potential for LRP-mediated chemoattraction to mediate axonal regeneration was examined in vivo in a model of chemical denervation in adult rats. In these in vivo studies, metallothionein II was shown to enhance epidermal nerve fiber regeneration so that it was complete within 7 days compared with 14 days in saline-treated animals. Our data demonstrate that both LRP1 and LRP2 are necessary for metallothionein II-mediated chemotactic signal transduction and that they may form part of a signaling complex. Furthermore, the data suggest that LRP-mediated chemoattraction represents a novel, non-classical signaling system that has therapeutic potential as a disease-modifying agent for the injured peripheral nervous system. PMID:26598525

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator suppresses activated stellate cells through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang-I; Isse, Kumiko; Koral, Kelly; Bowen, William C; Muratoglu, Selen; Strickland, Dudley K; Michalopoulos, George K; Mars, Wendy M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and trans-differentiation into myofibroblast (MFB)-like cells is key for fibrogenesis after liver injury and a potential therapeutic target. Recent studies demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent signaling by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a pro-fibrotic regulator of the MFB phenotype in kidney. This study investigated whether LRP1 signaling by t-PA is also relevant to HSC activation following injury. Primary and immortalized rat HSCs were treated with t-PA and assayed by western blot, MTT, and TUNEL. In vitro results were then verified using an in vivo, acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injury model that examined the phenotype and recovery kinetics of MFBs from wild-type animals vs mice with a global (t-PA) or HSC-targeted (LRP1) deletion. In vitro, in contrast to kidney MFBs, exogenous, proteolytically inactive t-PA suppressed, rather than induced, activation markers in HSCs following phosphorylation of LRP1. This process was mediated by LRP1 as inhibition of t-PA binding to LRP1 blocked the effects of t-PA. In vivo, following acute injury, phosphorylation of LRP1 on activated HSCs occurred immediately prior to their disappearance. Mice lacking t-PA or LRP1 retained higher densities of activated HSCs for a longer time period compared with control mice after injury cessation. Hence, t-PA, an FDA-approved drug, contributes to the suppression of activated HSCs following injury repair via signaling through LRP1. This renders t-PA a potential target for exploitation in treating patients with fibrosis.

  8. Association of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity measured as a serum cholesterol esterification rate and low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity with cardiovascular risk: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The cholesterol-esterifying enzyme, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), is believed to play a key role in reverse cholesterol transport. However, recent investigations have demonstrated that higher LCAT activity levels increase the formation of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and atherogenesis. We hypothesized that higher LCAT activity measured as a serum cholesterol esterification rate by the endogenous substrate method might increase the formation of TRLs and thereby alter low-density lipoprotein (LDL) heterogeneity. The estimated LDL particle size [relative LDL migration (LDL-Rm)] was measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the LipoPhor system (Joko, Tokyo, Japan) in 538 consecutive patients with at least risk factor for atherosclerosis. Multivariate regression analysis after adjustments for traditional risk factors identified elevated TRL-related marker (TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, apolipoprotein C-II, and apolipoprotein C-III) levels as independent predictors of smaller-sized LDL particle size, both in the overall subject population and in the subset of patients with serum LDL cholesterol levels of <100 mg/dL. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the LCAT activity (0.79; sensitivity 60 %; specificity 84.8 %) was observed for the evaluation of the indicators of an LDL-Rm value of ≥0.40, which suggests the presence of large amounts of small-dense LDL. The results lend support to the hypothesis that increased LCAT activity may be associated with increased formation of TRLs, leading to a reduction in LDL particle size. Therefore, to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, it may be of importance to pay attention not only to a quantitative change in the serum LDL-C, but also to the LCAT activity which is possibly associated with LDL heterogeneity. PMID:25894629

  9. Electric field-induced redistribution and postfield relaxation of low density lipoprotein receptors on cultured human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The lateral mobility of unliganded low density lipoprotein-receptor (LDL-R) on the surface of human fibroblasts has been investigated by studying the generation and relaxation of concentration differences induced by exposure of the cultured cells to steady electric fields. The topographic distribution of receptors was determined by fluorescence microscopy of cells labeled with the intensely fluorescent, biologically active LDL derivative dioctadecylindolcarbocyanine LDL (dil(3)-LDL), or with native LDL and anti-LDL indirect immunofluorescence. Exposure of the LDL-receptor- internalization defective J. D. cells (GM2408A) to an electric field of 10 V/cm for 1 h at 22 degrees C causes greater than 80% of the cells to have an asymmetric distribution of LDL-R; receptors accumulate at the more negative pole of the cell. In contrast, only 20% of LDL- internalization normal GM3348 cells exposed to identical conditions have asymmetrical distributions. Phase micrographs taken during electric-field exposure rule out cell movement as the responsible mechanism for the effect. In both cell types, postfield labeling with the F-actin-specific fluorescent probe nitrobenzoxadiazole-phallacidin shows that no topographic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton accompanies the redistribution of cell surface LDL-Rs, and indirect immunofluorescence labeling of the coat protein clathrin shows that coated pits do not redistribute asymmetrically. Measurements of the postfield relaxation in the percentage of GM2408A cells showing an asymmetric distribution allow an estimate of the effective postfield diffusion coefficient of the unliganded LDL-R. At 37 degrees C, D = 2.0 X 10(-9) cm2/s, decreasing to 1.1 X 10(-9) cm2/s at 22 degrees C, and D = 3.5 X 10(-10) cm2/s at 10 degrees C. These values are substantially larger than those measured by photobleaching methods for the LDL-R complexed with dil(3)-LDL on intact cells, but are comparable to those measured on membrane blebs, and are consistent

  10. Effect of lycopene on the copper-induced oxidation of low-density lipoprotein in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Woo; Choo, Won-Don; Kang, Chang-Won; An, Byoung-Ki

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether dietary lycopene (LP) could prevent the copper-mediated oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL), and affect growth performance, relative organ weights, plasma and meat lipid profiles, and LP contents in plasma and tissues in broiler chickens. A total of 160 day-old male broiler chicks were randomly allotted into 16 pens with rice husk as a bedding material. Each experiment had 4 replicates, 10 chicks per replicate (n = 4 per treatment). A corn-soybean meal base diet was used as a control diet (CONT). To formulate the experimental diets, the base diet was added with LP at the levels of 10 (LP10) or 20 mg/kg (LP20), or 17 g/kg of tomato paste (TP17) which was equivalent to 5 ppm of LP. The experiment lasted 4 weeks. Growth performance and relative organ weights were not affected (p > 0.05) by any of dietary treatments. Dietary LP significantly lowered (p < 0.05) triglyceride and LDL cholesterol at 2 weeks of age, but did not affect them at 4 weeks of age. Total cholesterol in thigh meats was not altered by dietary treatments. LP was not detected in leg meats in all chicks, nor in liver or plasma of the CONT group. LP was found in liver and plasma, being the former greater in the concentration, of the chicks fed diets containing LP10, LP20, or TP17. At 2 and 4 weeks, the copper-mediated oxidation of LDL was delayed (p < 0.05) in either LP- or TP-fed chickens compared with the CONT group. In conclusion, LP lowers triglyceride and LDL cholesterol, is deposited into serum and liver, and prevents the LDL oxidation in broiler chickens, confirming the role of LP in the lipid-lowering and antioxidant properties in broiler chickens. PMID:27047715

  11. Preliminary Analysis of Modified Low-Density Lipoproteins in the Serum of Healthy and Obese Dogs and Cats

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Nobuko; Okada, Yuki; Tsuchida, Naoto; Hatano, Yutaka; Habara, Makoto; Ishikawa, Shingo; Yamamoto, Ichiro; Arai, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to play an important role in the inflammatory response associated with human obesity. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine oxidized LDL concentrations in healthy dogs and cats, and to evaluate whether obesity affects oxidized LDL concentration, using 39 cats and 19 dogs that had visited two different veterinary clinics in Japan. We hypothesized that oxidized LDL concentrations measured against body condition score (BCS) may have a potential value in evaluating the qualities of accumulated or circulating lipids in obese dogs and cats that do not show signs of metabolic diseases. The mean oxidized LDL value in BCS3 dogs (2.4 ± 0.9 μg/dl) was very similar to that of BCS5 dogs (2.2 ± 0.3 μg/dl). The mean oxidized LDL value of BCS4 dogs was 7.2 ± 10.3 μg/dl and the highest among three groups. BCS4 dogs included two dogs whose oxidized LDL values were higher than the mean oxidized LDL value of healthy humans (11.2 ± 0.3 μg/dl). On the other hand, the mean oxidized LDL value of BCS3 cats was 2.5 ± 0.9 μg/dl, and those of BCS4 and 5 cats were higher than that of BCS3, but there was no significant difference. The BCS4 cat group included one cat with a higher oxidized LDL value, and the BCS5 group also included two cats with oxidized LDL values higher than the mean oxidized LDL value of healthy humans. Interestingly, the oxidized LDL values in two obese dogs and three obese cats were indeed higher than the mean oxidized LDL value of humans with coronary artery disease (20.1 ± 1.1 μg/dl). In conclusion, this preliminary study showed reference ranges of oxidized dogs and cats against BCS. Obesity alone does not appear to have any direct effect on serum oxidized LDL values in healthy dogs and cats. PMID:26664963

  12. α-Defensins Induce a Post-translational Modification of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) That Promotes Atherosclerosis at Normal Levels of Plasma Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Abu-Fanne, Rami; Maraga, Emad; Abd-Elrahman, Ihab; Hankin, Aviel; Blum, Galia; Abdeen, Suhair; Hijazi, Nuha; Cines, Douglas B; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof

    2016-02-01

    Approximately one-half of the patients who develop clinical atherosclerosis have normal or only modest elevations in plasma lipids, indicating that additional mechanisms contribute to pathogenesis. In view of increasing evidence that inflammation contributes to atherogenesis, we studied the effect of human neutrophil α-defensins on low density lipoprotein (LDL) trafficking, metabolism, vascular deposition, and atherogenesis using transgenic mice expressing human α-defensins in their polymorphonuclear leukocytes (Def(+/+)). Accelerated Def(+/+) mice developed α-defensin·LDL complexes that accelerate the clearance of LDL from the circulation accompanied by enhanced vascular deposition and retention of LDL, induction of endothelial cathepsins, increased endothelial permeability to LDL, and the development of lipid streaks in the aortic roots when fed a regular diet and at normal plasma levels of LDL. Transplantation of bone marrow from Def(+/+) to WT mice increased LDL clearance, increased vascular permeability, and increased vascular deposition of LDL, whereas transplantation of WT bone marrow to Def(+/+) mice prevented these outcomes. The same outcome was obtained by treating Def(+/+) mice with colchicine to inhibit the release of α-defensins. These studies identify a potential new link between inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:26518877

  13. Differential regulation of acid sphingomyelinase in macrophages stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL immune complexes: role in phagocytosis and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Al Gadban, Mohammed M; Smith, Kent J; Jenkins, Russell W; Mayroo, Nalini; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Bielawska, Alicja; Hannun, Yusuf A; Hammad, Samar M

    2012-05-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) contribute to the formation of lipid-laden macrophages (foam cells). Fcγ receptors mediate uptake of oxLDL-IC, whereas scavenger receptors internalize oxLDL. We have previously reported that oxLDL-IC, but not free oxLDL, activate macrophages and prolong their survival. Sphingomyelin is a major constituent of cell membranes and lipoprotein particles and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) hydrolyses sphingomyelin to generate the bioactive lipid ceramide. ASMase exists in two forms: lysosomal (L-ASMase) and secretory (S-ASMase). In this study we examined whether oxLDL and oxLDL-IC regulate ASMase differently, and whether ASMase mediates monocyte/macrophage activation and cytokine release. The oxLDL-IC, but not oxLDL, induced early and consistent release of catalytically active S-ASMase. The oxLDL-IC also consistently stimulated L-ASMase activity, whereas oxLDL induced a rapid transient increase in L-ASMase activity before it steadily declined below baseline. Prolonged exposure to oxLDL increased L-ASMase activity; however, activity remained significantly lower than that induced by oxLDL-IC. Further studies were aimed at defining the function of the activated ASMase. In response to oxLDL-IC, heat-shock protein 70B' (HSP70B') was up-regulated and localized with redistributed ASMase in the endosomal compartment outside the lysosome. Treatment with oxLDL-IC induced the formation and release of HSP70-containing and IL-1β-containing exosomes via an ASMase-dependent mechanism. Taken together, the results suggest that oxLDL and oxLDL-IC differentially regulate ASMase activity, and the pro-inflammatory responses to oxLDL-IC are mediated by prolonged activation of ASMase. These findings may contribute to increased understanding of mechanisms mediating macrophage involvement in atherosclerosis.

  14. Inhibition of Glutathione Production Induces Macrophage CD36 Expression and Enhances Cellular-oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Uptake.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Hui; Chen, Yuanli; Sun, Lei; Li, Yan; Ma, Xingzhe; Duan, Shengzhong; Li, Xiaoju; Xiang, Rong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2015-09-01

    The glutathione (GSH)-dependent antioxidant system has been demonstrated to inhibit atherosclerosis. Macrophage CD36 uptakes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) thereby facilitating foam cell formation and development of atherosclerosis. It remains unknown if GSH can influence macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake directly. Herein we report that treatment of macrophages with l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) decreased cellular GSH production and ratios of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) while increasing production of reactive oxygen species. Associated with decreased GSH levels, macrophage CD36 expression was increased, which resulted in enhanced cellular oxLDL uptake. In contrast, N-acetyl cysteine and antioxidant enzyme (catalase or superoxide dismutase) blocked BSO-induced CD36 expression as well as oxLDL uptake. In vivo, administration of mice with BSO increased CD36 expression in peritoneal macrophages and kidneys. BSO had no effect on CD36 mRNA expression and promoter activity but still induced CD36 protein expression in macrophages lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression, suggesting it induced CD36 expression at the translational level. Indeed, we determined that BSO enhanced CD36 translational efficiency. Taken together, our study demonstrates that cellular GSH levels and GSH/GSSG status can regulate macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake and demonstrate an important anti-atherogenic function of the GSH-dependent antioxidant system by providing a novel molecular mechanism.

  15. Association of Serum Cholesterol, Triglyceride, High and Low Density Lipoprotein (HDL and LDL) Levels in Chronic Periodontitis Subjects with Risk for Cardiovascular Disease (CVD): A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sandi, R.M.; Pol, K.G.; Basavaraj, P.; Khuller, Nitin; Singh, Shilpi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess serum cholesterol, triglycerides, high and low density lipoprotein (HDL and LDL) levels (serum lipid profile) in subjects with chronic periodontitis and the possible association for risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Materials and Methods: Total of 80 participants (42 males and 38 females) who were in the age range of 30-65 years were divided into test group (group I- 40 subjects with chronic periodontitis) and control group (group II- 40 subjects with healthy periodontium), based on their periodontal disease statuses. Three ml of venous blood samples were taken for measurement of parameters of lipid metabolism [serum cholesterol (chol); triglycerides (Tg); HDL and LDL. Results: Significant increase in serum cholesterol and LDL (P<0.05) were observed in test group (group I), whereas serum triglycerides and HDL (P>0.66) showed no significant increase in test group (group I) as compared to their values in the control group (group II). A P-value of < 0.05 was considered for statistical significance. Conclusions: Subjects with chronic periodontitis showed increased serum cholesterol and LDL levels. This may suggest that these subjects are potentially at a risk of getting CVD. PMID:24596778

  16. Inhibition of Glutathione Production Induces Macrophage CD36 Expression and Enhances Cellular-oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Hui; Chen, Yuanli; Sun, Lei; Li, Yan; Ma, Xingzhe; Duan, Shengzhong; Li, Xiaoju; Xiang, Rong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    The glutathione (GSH)-dependent antioxidant system has been demonstrated to inhibit atherosclerosis. Macrophage CD36 uptakes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) thereby facilitating foam cell formation and development of atherosclerosis. It remains unknown if GSH can influence macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake directly. Herein we report that treatment of macrophages with l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) decreased cellular GSH production and ratios of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) while increasing production of reactive oxygen species. Associated with decreased GSH levels, macrophage CD36 expression was increased, which resulted in enhanced cellular oxLDL uptake. In contrast, N-acetyl cysteine and antioxidant enzyme (catalase or superoxide dismutase) blocked BSO-induced CD36 expression as well as oxLDL uptake. In vivo, administration of mice with BSO increased CD36 expression in peritoneal macrophages and kidneys. BSO had no effect on CD36 mRNA expression and promoter activity but still induced CD36 protein expression in macrophages lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression, suggesting it induced CD36 expression at the translational level. Indeed, we determined that BSO enhanced CD36 translational efficiency. Taken together, our study demonstrates that cellular GSH levels and GSH/GSSG status can regulate macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake and demonstrate an important anti-atherogenic function of the GSH-dependent antioxidant system by providing a novel molecular mechanism. PMID:26187465

  17. The P2Y2 receptor mediates uptake of matrix-retained and aggregated low density lipoprotein in primary vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Dissmore, Tixieanna; Seye, Cheikh I.; Medeiros, Denis M.; Weisman, Gary A.; Bardford, Barry; Mamedova, Laman

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The internalization of aggregated low-density lipoproteins (agLDL) mediated by low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP1) may involve the actin cytoskeleton in ways that differ from the endocytosis of soluble LDL by the LDL receptor (LDLR). This study aims to define novel mechanisms of agLDL uptake through modulation of the actin cytoskeleton, to identify molecular targets involved in foam cell formation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The critical observation that formed the basis for these studies is that under pathophysiological conditions, nucleotide release from blood-derived and vascular cells activates SMC P2Y2 receptors (P2Y2Rs) leading to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and cell motility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that P2Y2R activation mediates agLDL uptake by VSMCs. Methods Primary VSMCs were isolated from aortas of wild type (WT) C57BL/6 and.P2Y2R−/− mice to investigate whether P2Y2R activation modulates LRP1 expression. Cells were transiently transfected with cDNA encoding a hemagglutinin-tagged (HA-tagged) WT P2Y2R, or a mutant P2Y2R that unlike the WT P2Y2R does not bind the cytoskeletal actin-binding protein filamin-A (FLN-A). Results P2Y2R activation significantly increased agLDL uptake, and LRP1 mRNA expression decreased in P2Y2R−/− VSMCs versus WT. SMCs, expressing P2Y2R defective in FLN-A binding, exhibit 3-fold lower LDLR expression levels than SMCs expressing WT P2Y2R, while cells transfected with WT P2Y2R show greater agLDL uptake in both WT and P2Y2R−/− VSMCs versus cells transfected with the mutant P2Y2R. Conclusions Together, these results show that both LRP1 and LDLR expression and agLDL uptake are regulated by P2Y2R in VSMCs, and that agLDL uptake due to P2Y2R activation is dependent upon cytoskeletal reorganization mediated by P2Y2R binding to FLN-A. PMID:27522265

  18. Effects of a carbohydrate-restricted diet with and without supplemental soluble fiber on plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other clinical markers of cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard J; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Sharman, Matthew J; Silvestre, Ricardo; Greene, Christine M; Zern, Tosca L; Shrestha, Sudeep; Judelson, Daniel A; Gomez, Ana L; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2007-01-01

    Carbohydrate-restricted diets (CRDs) promote weight loss, reductions in plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) levels, and increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels but may cause undesirable low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) responses in some people. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of adding soluble fiber to a CRD on plasma LDL-C and other traditionally measured markers of cardiovascular disease. Using a parallel-arm, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 30 overweight and obese men (body mass index, 25-35 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to supplement a CRD with soluble fiber (Konjac-mannan, 3g/d) (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). Plasma lipids, anthropometrics, body composition, blood pressure, and nutrient intake were evaluated at baseline and at 6 and 12 weeks. Compliance was excellent as assessed by 7-day weighed dietary records and ketonuria. Both groups experienced decreases in (P < .01) body weight, percent body fat, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and plasma glucose levels. After 12 weeks, HDL-C and TAG improved significantly in the fiber (10% and -34%) and placebo (14%, -43%) groups. LDL-C decreased by 17.6% (P < .01) at week 6 and 14.1% (P < .01) at week 12 in the fiber group. Conversely, LDL-C reductions were significant in the placebo group only after 12 weeks (-6.0%, P < .05). We conclude that although clearly effective at lowering LDL-C, adding soluble fiber to a CRD during active and significant weight loss provides no additional benefits to the diet alone. Furthermore, a CRD led to clinically important positive alterations in cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  19. Effect of weight loss resulting from a combined low-fat diet/exercise regimen on low-density lipoprotein particle size and distribution in obese women.

    PubMed

    Varady, Krista A; Lamarche, Benoît; Santosa, Sylvia; Demonty, Isabelle; Charest, Amélie; Jones, Peter J H

    2006-10-01

    Weight loss resulting from diet interventions has been shown to favorably affect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and distribution, and, hence, decrease cardiovascular disease risk. However, the effect of a dietary weight loss strategy when combined with exercise, on LDL electrophoretic characteristics, has yet to be tested. This study examined the effect of a weight loss intervention that combined a low-fat diet with moderate endurance training, on LDL particle size and distribution in obese women. Thirty obese, hypercholesterolemic women participated in a controlled longitudinal weight loss trial, which consisted of (1) a 2-week pre-stabilization phase, (2) a 20-week weight loss phase, and (3) a 2-week post-stabilization phase. Weight reduction resulted from a low-fat diet (<30% fat, 50%-60% carbohydrate, 20% protein) combined with an endurance training program (>40 minutes moderate training, 3 times per week). Mean weight loss was 14.8% (P < .01) of initial body weight. Total, LDL cholesterol, and triacylglycerol concentrations decreased (P < .01) by 8.9%, 7.5%, and 27.1%, respectively, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations increased (P < .01) by 9.9%. No significant differences were noted for LDL peak or integrated particle size. The relative proportion of small, medium, and large particles was not significantly different posttreatment. Estimated cholesterol concentrations in large- and medium-sized LDL particles decreased (P < .05) by 15.3% and 5.9%, respectively, as a result of weight loss. No effect was noted for estimated cholesterol concentrations in small size LDL particles. In conclusion, these findings suggest that weight loss, resulting from a low-fat diet/exercise program, has only a minimal effect on LDL particle size and distribution.

  20. Comparison of Formulas for Calculating Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in General Population and High-risk Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hansol; Shim, Jee-Seon; Lee, Myung Ha; Yoon, Young Mi; Choi, Dong Phil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), an established cardiovascular risk factor, can be generally determined by calculation from total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations. The aim of this study was to compare LDL-C estimations using various formulas with directly measured LDL-C in a community-based group and hospital-based group among the Korean population. Subjects and Methods A total of 1498 participants were classified into four groups according to triglyceride concentrations as follows: <100, 100–199, 200–299, and ≥300 mg/dL. LDL-C was calculated using the Friedewald, Chen, Vujovic, Hattori, de Cordova, and Anandaraja formulas and directly measured using a homogenous enzymatic method. Pearson's correlation coefficients, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Passing & Bablok regression, and Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate the performance of six formulas. Results The Friedewald formula had the highest accuracy (ICC=0.977; 95% confidence interval 0.974-0.979) of all the triglyceride ranges, while the Vujovic formula had the highest accuracy (ICC=0.876; 98.75% confidence interval 0.668–0.951) in people with triglycerides ≥300 mg/dL. The mean difference was the lowest for the Friedewald formula (0.5 mg/dL) and the percentage error was the lowest for the Vujovic formula (30.2%). However, underestimation of the LDL-C formulas increased with triglyceride concentrations. Conclusion The accuracy of the LDL-C formulas varied considerably with differences in triglyceride concentrations. The Friedewald formula outperformed other formulas for estimating LDL-C against a direct measurement and the Vujovic formula was suitable for hypertriglyceridemic samples; it could be used as an alternative cost-effective tool to measure LDL-C when the direct measurement cannot be afforded.

  1. Inhibition of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Enhances the Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Tie, Guodong; Yan, Jinglian; Messina, Julia A; Raffai, Robert L; Messina, Louis M

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is an important risk factor in the development of atherosclerosis. oxLDL has been shown to decrease endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) number by inducing apoptosis. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was shown to be activated by oxLDL and participated in the regulation of EPC number and function. However, the role of p38 remains unknown. Here, we show that oxLDL-induced p38 phosphorylation in EPCs is time and dose dependent. Treatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine restored oxLDL-induced p38 phosphorylation to basal levels. LOX-1-blocking antibody also significantly decreased oxLDL-induced p38 phosphorylation. Interestingly, TUNEL staining showed that pretreatment with the p38 inhibitor SB203580 further increased oxLDL-induced apoptosis in EPCs. In accordance with these findings, pretreatment with SB203580 further attenuated Akt phosphorylation in EPCs challenged with oxLDL, indicating an interaction between Akt and p38 MAPK pathways. In agreement, inhibition of p38 MAPK further attenuated Akt phosphorylation and increased apoptosis in EPCs isolated from hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- mice. In conclusion, p38 MAPK serves as an anti-apoptotic pathway by supporting Akt activity when EPCs are challenged with oxLDL. PMID:27031525

  2. Effects of Bulbus allii macrostemi on clinical outcomes and oxidized low-density lipoprotein and plasminogen in unstable angina/non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yun-Fang; Yan, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Yu-Xia

    2008-11-01

    Unstable angina (UA)/non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) is associated with an increased risk of cardiac death and an efficacious drug with few side effects is necessary. The study aimed to evaluate the effects of Bulbus allii macrostemi (B. macrostemi) on UA/NSTEMI patients as well as to elucidate possible mechanisms. 79 patients were randomly divided into two groups: the trial group received B. macrostemi plus baseline therapy, the control group was given placebo plus baseline therapy. The trial lasted 8 weeks. The evaluation involved main clinical symptoms, changes of electrocardiogram and biochemical examination. After treatment, the trial group showed more significant improvement on clinical manifestation. The plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) level decreased significantly in the trial group (p < 0.01); the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) level decreased in both groups and it decreased more significantly in the trial group (p < 0.01). In contrast, the activity of plasminogen (PLG) increased in both groups and the change was more marked in the trial group (p < 0.01). The results suggested that B. macrostemi combined with baseline therapy could improve clinical symptoms of UA/NSTEMI patients by decreasing the ox-LDL and PAI-1 levels and enhancing the activity of PLG. PMID:18688814

  3. Lysophosphatidylcholine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein and cardiovascular disease in Korean hemodialysis patients: analysis at 5 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ki; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Jin Kyung; Park, Min-Jeong; Yan, Ji-Jing; Song, Dong-Keun; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Noh, Jung-Woo

    2013-02-01

    Although oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) have been proposed as important mediators of the atherosclerosis, the long-term contribution to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in hemodialysis patients has not been evaluated. This study investigated the relation between oxidized LDL and LPC levels with long term risk of CVD. Plasma oxidized LDL and LPC levels were determined in 69 Korean hemodialysis patients as a prospective observational study for 5 yr. During the observation period, 18 cardiovascular events (26.1%) occurred including 6 deaths among the hemodialysis patients. The low LPC level group (≤ 254 µM/L, median value) had much more increased risk of CVD compared to the high LPC level group (> 254 µM/L) (P = 0.01). However, serum levels of oxidized LDL were not significantly different between groups with and without CVD. In adjusted Cox analysis, previous CVD, (hazard ratio [HR], 5.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94-16.63, P = 0.002) and low LPC level (HR, 3.45; 95% CI, 1.04-11.42, P = 0.04) were significant independent risk factors for development of CVD. It is suggested that low LPC, but not oxidized LDL, is associated with increased risk of CVD among a group of Korean hemodialysis patients.

  4. Behavior of the thermal diffusivity of native and oxidized human low-density lipoprotein solutions studied by the Z-scan technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Priscila R.; Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C.; Monteiro, Andrea M.; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio M.

    2012-10-01

    Modifications in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) have emerged as a major pathogenic factor of atherosclerosis, which is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Measurements of the heat diffusivity of human LDL solutions in their native and in vitro oxidized states are presented by using the Z-Scan (ZS) technique. Other complementary techniques were used to obtain the physical parameters necessary to interpret the optical results, e.g., pycnometry, refractometry, calorimetry, and spectrophotometry, and to understand the oxidation phase of LDL particles. To determine the sample's thermal diffusivity using the thermal lens model, an iterative one-parameter fitting method is proposed which takes into account several characteristic ZS time-dependent and the position-dependent transmittance measurements. Results show that the thermal diffusivity increases as a function of the LDL oxidation degree, which can be explained by the increase of the hydroperoxides production due to the oxidation process. The oxidation products go from one LDL to another, disseminating the oxidation process and caring the heat across the sample. This phenomenon leads to a quick thermal homogenization of the sample, avoiding the formation of the thermal lens in highly oxidized LDL solutions.

  5. [Composition and metabolism of extremely low-density lipoproteins in normal rabbits of different age and under experimental atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Chaialo, P P

    1981-01-01

    The lipid composition and protein content in extremely low-density lipoproteids. lipoproteid-lypase activity and breakdown dynamics of the mentioned [3H]cholesterol-labelled lipoproteids are studied in blood of young and old rabbits in norm and under experimental atherosclerosis. It is shown that in normal animals the content of all lipid components and protein decreases with ageing in the fraction of extremely low-density lipoproteids isolated from blood serum. The activity of lipoproteid lypase and breakdown of intravenously injected labelled extremely low-density lipoproteids are lowered in old animals as well. Under experimental atherosclerosis in extremely low-density lipoproteids there occurs accumulation of cholesterol esters in considerable amounts, the breakdown of the class lipoproteids is slown down. The enzymic activity manifests no significant changes in comparison with the norm. Disturbances in the composition of lipoproteids and their metabolism with the studied pathology are more pronounced in old rabbits than in young ones.

  6. Low-density lipoprotein receptor genetic polymorphism in chronic hepatitis C virus Egyptian patients affects treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mazen; Amin, Mona; Algendy, Dina; Elbadry, Ahmed; Fawzi, May; Foda, Ayman; Esmat, Serag; Sabry, Dina; Rashed, Laila; Gabal, Samia; Kamal, Manal

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To correlate a genetic polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor with antiviral responses in Egyptian chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS: Our study included 657 HCV-infected patients with genotype 4 who received interferon-based combination therapy. Patients were divided into two groups based on their response to therapy: 356 were responders, and 301 were non-responders. Patients were compared to 160 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent a thorough physical examination, measurement of body mass index (BMI) and the following laboratory tests: serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, prothrombin time, prothrombin concentration, INR, complete blood count, serum creatinine, fasting blood sugar, HCV antibody, and hepatitis B surface antigen. All HCV patients were further subjected to the following laboratory tests: HCV-RNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antinuclear antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone, an LDL receptor (LDLR) genotype study of LDLR exon8c.1171G>A and exon10c.1413G>A using real-time PCR-based assays, abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonographic-guided liver biopsy, and histopathological examination of liver biopsies. Correlations of LDL receptor polymorphisms with HAI, METAVIR score, presence of steatosis, and BMI were performed in all cases. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in response rates between the different types of interferon used or LDLR exon10c.1413G>A. However, there was a significant difference in the frequency of the LDL receptor exon8c.1171G>A genotype between cases (AA: 25.9%, GA: 22.2%, GG: 51.9%) and controls (AA: 3.8%, GA: 53.1% and GG: 43.1%) (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the LDLR exon 8C:1171 G>A polymorphism between responders (AA: 3.6%, GA: 15.2%, GG: 81.2%) and non-responders (AA: 52.2%, GA: 30

  7. Lupin Peptides Modulate the Protein-Protein Interaction of PCSK9 with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in HepG2 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Aiello, Gilda; Arnoldi, Anna; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been recently identified as a new useful target for hypercholesterolemia treatment. This work demonstrates that natural peptides, deriving from the hydrolysis of lupin protein and absorbable at intestinal level, are able to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between PCSK9 and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In order to sort out the best potential inhibitors among these peptides, a refined in silico model of the PCSK9/LDLR interaction was developed. Docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and peptide binding energy estimations, by MM-GBSA approach, permitted to select the two best candidates among tested peptides that were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. The most active was P5 that induced a concentration dependent inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR binding, with an IC50 value equal to 1.6 ± 0.33 μM. Tested at a 10 μM concentration, this peptide increased by 66 ± 21.4% the ability of HepG2 cells to take up LDL from the extracellular environment.

  8. Lysosomes are involved in induction of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression and progesterone synthesis through low-density lipoprotein in cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-You; Wu, Yi; Zhao, Shuan; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Zeng, Shen-Ming; Zhang, Gui-Xue

    2015-09-15

    Progesterone is an important steroid hormone in the regulation of the bovine estrous cycle. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is an indispensable component for transporting cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, which is one of the rate-limiting steps for progesterone synthesis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) supplies cholesterol precursors for progesterone formation, and the lysosomal degradation pathway of LDL is essential for progesterone biosynthesis in granulosa cells after ovulation. However, it is currently unknown how LDL and lysosomes coordinate the expression of the StAR gene and progesterone production in bovine granulosa cells. Here, we investigated the role of lysosomes in LDL-treated bovine granulosa cells. Our results reported that LDL induced expression of StAR messenger RNA and protein as well as expression of cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (CYP11A1) messenger RNA and progesterone production in cultured bovine granulosa cells. The number of lysosomes in the granulosa cells was also significantly increased by LDL; whereas the lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine, strikingly abolished these LDL-induced effects. Our results indicate that LDL promotes StAR expression, synthesis of progesterone, and formation of lysosomes in bovine granulosa cells, and lysosomes participate in the process by releasing free cholesterol from hydrolyzed LDL.

  9. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Induces Apoptosis in Cultured Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes by Modulating the TLR4/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiantao; Sun, Yuhan; Yang, Huafeng; Lu, Yuanxi; Li, Lang

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and explore the possible mechanisms. We evaluated whether ox-LDL-induced apoptosis depended in part on the activation of toll-like receptor-4(TLR4)/Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. Cells were cultivated with and without ox-LDL. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescence, western blot analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were conducted to assess protein or mRNA expressions. Resatorvid (TAK-242), an exogenous synthetic antagonist for TLR4, was used to inhibit TLR4 signal transduction. Dose- and time-dependent apoptotic index of cardiomyocytes occurred after ox-LDL treatment. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with ox-LDL (50 μg/mL) for 24 hours increased TLR4 and NF-κB expressions significantly. Decrease of Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio, activation of caspase-3 and 9 were also detected. Ox-LDL-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, TLR4 and NF-κB expressions were attenuated by pretreatment with TAK-242. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the apoptosis induced by ox-LDL in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes at least in part by modulating the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27279424

  10. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma viscosity, and whole blood viscosity by the application of pulsed corona discharges and filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jin M.; Fridman, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J.; Cho, Young I.

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of applying pulsed corona discharges to blood plasma to reduce the viscosity of blood plasma and whole blood. Blood plasma was separated from blood cells, treated with corona discharges, and filtered before it was re-mixed with blood cells. Plasma viscosity (PV), whole blood viscosity (WBV), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-c concentration were measured before and after the corona treatment and filtration. Both PV and WBV increased in the case of the corona treatment only, whereas both of them decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration. In particular, the LDL-c decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration by 31.5% from the baseline value. The effect of the corona treatment on the reduction of the WBV was significant at low shear rates, but not at high shear rates, suggesting that the precipitation of the molecules in blood plasma by the corona treatment and subsequent removal may suppress the aggregation of erythrocytes and improve rheological properties of blood.

  11. Notoginsenoside R1 inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced inflammatory cytokines production in human endothelial EA.hy926 cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping; Du, Shijing; Li, Hang; Li, Zhi; Xin, Wenfeng; Zhang, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Notoginsenoside R1 (NG-R1), a unique and main active ingredient of Panax notoginseng, has been described to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. However, its protective effects against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced inflammatory injury in vascular endothelial cells have not been clarified. In the present study, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of NG-R1 on oxLDL-induced endothelial cells and its possible molecular mechanism of action. Our results showed that NG-R1 treatment significantly attenuated oxLDL-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β. These effects were accompanied with suppression of oxLDL-induced activation of NF-κB and Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Moreover, NG-R1 also increased in Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) protein expression and transcription levels, and attenuated oxLDL-induced suppression of PPARγ expression. The inhibition of NG-R1 on oxLDL-induced TNF-α and IL-1β productions can be reversed by PPARγ antagonist GW9662. In conclusion, these data suggested that NG-R1 could suppress oxLDL-induced inflammatory cytokines production via activating PPARγ, which subsequently inhibiting oxLDL-induced NF-κB and MAPK activation.

  12. ORMDL3 contributes to the risk of atherosclerosis in Chinese Han population and mediates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced autophagy in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaochun; Qiu, Rongfang; Dang, Jie; Li, Jiangxia; Hu, Qin; Shan, Shan; Xin, Qian; Pan, Wenying; Bian, Xianli; Yuan, Qianqian; Long, Feng; Liu, Na; Li, Yan; Gao, Fei; Zou, Chengwei; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2015-11-25

    ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3 (ORMDL3) is a universally confirmed susceptibility gene for asthma and has recently emerged as a crucial modulator in lipid metabolism, inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-the mechanisms also closely involved in atherosclerosis (AS). Here we first presented the evidence of two single nucleotide polymorphisms regulating ORMDL3 expression (rs7216389 and rs9303277) significantly associated with AS risk and the evidence of increased ORMDL3 expression in AS cases compared to controls, in Chinese Han population. Following the detection of its statistical correlation with AS, we further explored the functional relevance of ORMDL3 and hypothesized a potential role mediating autophagy as autophagy is activated upon modified lipid, inflammation and ER stress. Our results demonstrated that in endothelial cells oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) up-regulated ORMDL3 expression and knockdown of ORMDL3 alleviated not only ox-LDL-induced but also basal autophagy. BECN1 is essential for autophagy initiation and silencing of ORMDL3 suppressed ox-LDL-induced as well as basal BECN1 expression. In addition, deletion of ORMDL3 resulted in greater sensitivity to ox-LDL-induced cell death. Taken together, ORMDL3 might represent a causal gene mediating autophagy in endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of AS.

  13. Lupin Peptides Modulate the Protein-Protein Interaction of PCSK9 with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Aiello, Gilda; Arnoldi, Anna; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been recently identified as a new useful target for hypercholesterolemia treatment. This work demonstrates that natural peptides, deriving from the hydrolysis of lupin protein and absorbable at intestinal level, are able to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between PCSK9 and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In order to sort out the best potential inhibitors among these peptides, a refined in silico model of the PCSK9/LDLR interaction was developed. Docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and peptide binding energy estimations, by MM-GBSA approach, permitted to select the two best candidates among tested peptides that were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. The most active was P5 that induced a concentration dependent inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR binding, with an IC50 value equal to 1.6 ± 0.33 μM. Tested at a 10 μM concentration, this peptide increased by 66 ± 21.4% the ability of HepG2 cells to take up LDL from the extracellular environment. PMID:27424515

  14. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma viscosity, and whole blood viscosity by the application of pulsed corona discharges and filtration.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin M; Fridman, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J; Cho, Young I

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of applying pulsed corona discharges to blood plasma to reduce the viscosity of blood plasma and whole blood. Blood plasma was separated from blood cells, treated with corona discharges, and filtered before it was re-mixed with blood cells. Plasma viscosity (PV), whole blood viscosity (WBV), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-c concentration were measured before and after the corona treatment and filtration. Both PV and WBV increased in the case of the corona treatment only, whereas both of them decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration. In particular, the LDL-c decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration by 31.5% from the baseline value. The effect of the corona treatment on the reduction of the WBV was significant at low shear rates, but not at high shear rates, suggesting that the precipitation of the molecules in blood plasma by the corona treatment and subsequent removal may suppress the aggregation of erythrocytes and improve rheological properties of blood.

  15. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 mediates endocytic clearance of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 and promotes its cytokine-like activities.

    PubMed

    Thevenard, Jessica; Verzeaux, Laurie; Devy, Jerôme; Etique, Nicolas; Jeanne, Albin; Schneider, Christophe; Hachet, Cathy; Ferracci, Géraldine; David, Marion; Martiny, Laurent; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) regulates the extracellular matrix turnover by inhibiting the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). TIMP-1 also displays MMP-independent activities that influence the behavior of various cell types including neuronal plasticity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain mostly unknown. The trans-membrane receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) consists of a large extracellular chain with distinct ligand-binding domains that interact with numerous ligands including TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 and a short transmembrane chain with intracellular motifs that allow endocytosis and confer signaling properties to LRP-1. We addressed TIMP-1 interaction with recombinant ligand-binding domains of LRP-1 expressed by CHO cells for endocytosis study, or linked onto sensor chips for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Primary cortical neurons bound and internalized endogenous TIMP-1 through a mechanism mediated by LRP-1. This resulted in inhibition of neurite outgrowth and increased growth cone volume. Using a mutated inactive TIMP-1 variant we showed that TIMP-1 effect on neurone morphology was independent of its MMP inhibitory activity. We conclude that TIMP-1 is a new ligand of LRP-1 and we highlight a new example of its MMP-independent, cytokine-like functions. PMID:25075518

  16. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Mediates Endocytic Clearance of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-1 and Promotes Its Cytokine-Like Activities

    PubMed Central

    Devy, Jerôme; Etique, Nicolas; Jeanne, Albin; Schneider, Christophe; Hachet, Cathy; Ferracci, Géraldine; David, Marion; Martiny, Laurent; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) regulates the extracellular matrix turnover by inhibiting the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). TIMP-1 also displays MMP-independent activities that influence the behavior of various cell types including neuronal plasticity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain mostly unknown. The trans-membrane receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) consists of a large extracellular chain with distinct ligand-binding domains that interact with numerous ligands including TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 and a short transmembrane chain with intracellular motifs that allow endocytosis and confer signaling properties to LRP-1. We addressed TIMP-1 interaction with recombinant ligand-binding domains of LRP-1 expressed by CHO cells for endocytosis study, or linked onto sensor chips for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Primary cortical neurons bound and internalized endogenous TIMP-1 through a mechanism mediated by LRP-1. This resulted in inhibition of neurite outgrowth and increased growth cone volume. Using a mutated inactive TIMP-1 variant we showed that TIMP-1 effect on neurone morphology was independent of its MMP inhibitory activity. We conclude that TIMP-1 is a new ligand of LRP-1 and we highlight a new example of its MMP-independent, cytokine-like functions. PMID:25075518

  17. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Willecke, Florian; Yuan, Chujun; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Hu, Yunying; Barnhart, Shelley; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD) containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR). After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD), showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states. PMID:26046657

  18. Low-density lipoprotein accumulation within a carotid artery with multilayer elastic porous wall: fluid-structure interaction and non-Newtonian considerations.

    PubMed

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza

    2015-09-18

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is recognized as bad cholesterol, typically has been regarded as a main cause of atherosclerosis. LDL infiltration across arterial wall and subsequent formation of Ox-LDL could lead to atherogenesis. In the present study, combined effects of non-Newtonian fluid behavior and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on LDL mass transfer inside an artery and through its multilayer arterial wall are examined numerically. Navier-Stokes equations for the blood flow inside the lumen and modified Darcy's model for the power-law fluid through the porous arterial wall are coupled with the equations of mass transfer to describe LDL distributions in various segments of the artery. In addition, the arterial wall is considered as a heterogeneous permeable elastic medium. Thus, elastodynamics equation is invoked to examine effects of different wall elasticity on LDL distribution in the artery. Findings suggest that non-Newtonian behavior of filtrated plasma within the wall enhances LDL accumulation meaningfully. Moreover, results demonstrate that at high blood pressure and due to the wall elasticity, endothelium pores expand, which cause significant variations on endothelium physiological properties in a way that lead to higher LDL accumulation. Additionally, results describe that under hypertension, by increasing angular strain, endothelial junctions especially at leaky sites expand more dramatic for the high elastic model, which in turn causes higher LDL accumulation across the intima layer and elevates atherogenesis risk. PMID:26300402

  19. Low Density Lipoprotein-Receptor Related Protein 1 Is Differentially Expressed by Neuronal and Glial Populations in the Developing and Mature Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Auderset, Loic; Cullen, Carlie L.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein-receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic cell surface receptor that is known to interact with a variety of ligands, intracellular adaptor proteins and other cell surface receptors to regulate cellular behaviours ranging from proliferation to cell fate specification, migration, axon guidance, and lipid metabolism. A number of studies have demonstrated that LRP1 is expressed in the brain, yet it is unclear which central nervous system cell types express LRP1 during development and in adulthood. Herein we undertake a detailed study of LRP1 expression within the mouse brain and spinal cord, examining a number of developmental stages ranging from embryonic day 13.5 to postnatal day 60. We report that LRP1 expression in the brain peaks during postnatal development. On a cellular level, LRP1 is expressed by radial glia, neuroblasts, microglia, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), astrocytes and neurons, with the exception of parvalbumin+ interneurons in the cortex. Most cell populations exhibit stable expression of LRP1 throughout development; however, the proportion of OPCs that express LRP1 increases significantly from ~69% at E15.5 to ~99% in adulthood. We also report that LRP1 expression is rapidly lost as OPCs differentiate, and is absent from all oligodendrocytes, including newborn oligodendrocytes. While LRP1 function has been primarily examined in mature neurons, these expression data suggest it plays a more critical role in glial cell regulation–where expression levels are much higher. PMID:27280679

  20. NADPH oxidase 2 plays a critical role in dysfunction and apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells induced by very low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Juan; Dou, Lin; Li, Miao; Lu, Yonggang; Guo, Han-Bang; Man, Yong; Wang, Shu; Li, Jian

    2012-11-01

    In type 2 diabetes, pancreatic β-cells cannot secret enough insulin compensate for insulin resistance, which are often accompanied by abnormality in lipid metabolism such as hypertriglyceridemia. It is reported that oxidative stress is involved in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. However, molecular mechanisms linking between excessive generations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis induced by high levels of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) are poorly understood. In this study, we test the hypothesis that NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-derived ROS may play a key role in dysfunction and apoptosis of pancreatic β-cell induced by VLDL. Our results show that the ApoCIII transgenic mice displayed increased serum TG levels, enhanced generation of ROS and impaired insulin content in pancreatic β-cells. In vitro, the treatment of pancreatic NIT-1 cells with 1 mg/ml VLDL for 12 h stimulated NOX2-derived ROS generation, decreased expression and secretion of insulin. Furthermore, we found that VLDL induced dysfunction and apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells through JNK and p53 pathways, which were rescued by siRNA-mediated NOX2 reduction. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a critical role of NOX2-derived ROS in dysfunction and apoptosis through JNK and p53 pathways in pancreatic β-cells induced by VLDL. PMID:22911512

  1. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  2. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pires, L A; Hegg, R; Freitas, F R; Tavares, E R; Almeida, C P; Baracat, E C; Maranhão, R C

    2012-06-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy.

  3. ORMDL3 contributes to the risk of atherosclerosis in Chinese Han population and mediates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced autophagy in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaochun; Qiu, Rongfang; Dang, Jie; Li, Jiangxia; Hu, Qin; Shan, Shan; Xin, Qian; Pan, Wenying; Bian, Xianli; Yuan, Qianqian; Long, Feng; Liu, Na; Li, Yan; Gao, Fei; Zou, Chengwei; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2015-01-01

    ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3 (ORMDL3) is a universally confirmed susceptibility gene for asthma and has recently emerged as a crucial modulator in lipid metabolism, inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-the mechanisms also closely involved in atherosclerosis (AS). Here we first presented the evidence of two single nucleotide polymorphisms regulating ORMDL3 expression (rs7216389 and rs9303277) significantly associated with AS risk and the evidence of increased ORMDL3 expression in AS cases compared to controls, in Chinese Han population. Following the detection of its statistical correlation with AS, we further explored the functional relevance of ORMDL3 and hypothesized a potential role mediating autophagy as autophagy is activated upon modified lipid, inflammation and ER stress. Our results demonstrated that in endothelial cells oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) up-regulated ORMDL3 expression and knockdown of ORMDL3 alleviated not only ox-LDL-induced but also basal autophagy. BECN1 is essential for autophagy initiation and silencing of ORMDL3 suppressed ox-LDL-induced as well as basal BECN1 expression. In addition, deletion of ORMDL3 resulted in greater sensitivity to ox-LDL-induced cell death. Taken together, ORMDL3 might represent a causal gene mediating autophagy in endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:26603569

  4. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pires, L.A.; Hegg, R.; Freitas, F.R.; Tavares, E.R.; Almeida, C.P.; Baracat, E.C.; Maranhão, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy. PMID:22570085

  5. Kinetic analysis of thermal stability of human low density lipoproteins: a model for LDL fusion in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mengxiao; Gantz, Donald L; Herscovitz, Haya; Gursky, Olga

    2012-10-01

    Fusion of modified LDL in the arterial wall promotes atherogenesis. Earlier we showed that thermal denaturation mimics LDL remodeling and fusion, and revealed kinetic origin of LDL stability. Here we report the first quantitative analysis of LDL thermal stability. Turbidity data show sigmoidal kinetics of LDL heat denaturation, which is unique among lipoproteins, suggesting that fusion is preceded by other structural changes. High activation energy of denaturation, E(a) = 100 ± 8 kcal/mol, indicates disruption of extensive packing interactions in LDL. Size-exclusion chromatography, nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, and negative-stain electron microscopy suggest that LDL dimerization is an early step in thermally induced fusion. Monoclonal antibody binding suggests possible involvement of apoB N-terminal domain in early stages of LDL fusion. LDL fusion accelerates at pH < 7, which may contribute to LDL retention in acidic atherosclerotic lesions. Fusion also accelerates upon increasing LDL concentration in near-physiologic range, which likely contributes to atherogenesis. Thermal stability of LDL decreases with increasing particle size, indicating that the pro-atherogenic properties of small dense LDL do not result from their enhanced fusion. Our work provides the first kinetic approach to measuring LDL stability and suggests that lipid-lowering therapies that reduce LDL concentration but increase the particle size may have opposite effects on LDL fusion.

  6. Low-density lipoprotein upregulate SR-BI through Sp1 Ser702 phosphorylation in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Du, Yu; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Zhibo; Wang, Li; Hong, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is one of the key proteins in the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and its major function is to uptake high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol from plasma into liver cells. The regulation of SR-BI expression is important for controlling serum lipid content and reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases. Here we found that SR-BI expression was significantly increased by LDL in vivo and in vitro, and the transcription factor specific protein 1 (Sp1) plays a critical role in this process. Results from co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the activation of SR-BI was associated with Sp1-recruited protein complexes in the promoter region of SR-BI, where histone acetyltransferase p300 was recruited and histone deacetylase HDAC1 was dismissed. As a result, histone acetylation increased, leading to activation of SR-BI transcription. With further investigation, we found that LDL phosphorylated Sp1 through ERK1/2 pathway, which affected Sp1 protein complexes formation in SR-BI promoter. Using mass spectrometry and site directed mutagenesis, a new Sp1 phosphorylation site Ser702 was defined to be associated with Sp1-HDAC1 interaction and may be important in SR-BI activation, shedding light on the knowledge of delicate mechanism of hepatic HDL receptor SR-BI gene modulation by LDL. PMID:27320013

  7. Specific binding of human low-density lipoprotein to the surface of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni and ingestion by the parasite.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M. W.; Caulfield, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) may be important in human schistosomiasis because LDL bound to the surface of the parasite inhibits the binding of anti-schistosomal antibodies. Low-density lipoproteins also may serve as a source of lipids for the parasite membrane synthesis. Here LDL fluorescently labeled with carbocyanine dye (DiI-LDL) was used to measure the specificity of binding of LDL to the surface of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni and to examine the distribution of the LDL particles over time. DiI-LDL binding was saturable and specific, with strong inhibition by unlabeled LDL and apoB but not by apoA1, bovine serum albumin, or IgG, and only weak inhibition by high-density lipoproteins. Half of the bound DiI-LDL was displaced by unlabeled LDL. DiI-LDL remained bound on the surface of schistosomula for up to 36 hours in culture. However parasites also ingested both DiI-LDL and a second fluorescent LDL, Bodipy-LDL. Over time, both fluorophores appeared throughout the worm tissues, suggesting the LDL particles were breaking down and that the fluorophores and lipids originally contained within the LDL particle were partitioning throughout the worm. Thus human LDL appears to bind to the surface of schistosomula specifically. Ingested LDL appears to be broken down and may serve as a source of host lipids for the parasite. Images Figure 1 Figure 9 PMID:2024706

  8. Inhibition of triacylglycerol and apoprotein B secretion and of low density lipoprotein binding in Hep G2 cells by eicosapentaenoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.H.; Nestel, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    The consumption of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of fish oils leads to profound lowering of plasma triacylglyercol (TAG) but not of plasma cholesterol. Reasons for this were investigated with the human hepatoma cell line, the Hep G2 cell. Incubations with oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid (LA) and the characteristic marine fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) enriched cellular TAG mass, though least with EPA. However, secretion of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TAG and apoprotein B (apo B), measured from (/sup 3/H)-glycerol and (/sup 3/H)-leucine was markedly inhibited by EPA. Preincubation with LA reduced VLDL-TAG but not apo B secretion in comparison with OA which stimulated both. A possible effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) removal was studied by measuring (/sup 125/I)-LDL binding. Preincubation with either EPA or LA inhibited the saturable binding of LDL, observed with OA and control incubations. The binding of lipoproteins containing chylomicron remnants was not affected by any of the fatty acids.

  9. Cilostazol prevents remnant lipoprotein particle-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by suppression of adhesion molecules and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression via lectin-like receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, Chi Dae; Rhim, Byung Yong; Lee, Won Suk; Hong, Ki Whan

    2005-03-01

    This study shows cilostazol effect to prevent remnant lipoprotein particle (RLP)-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Upon incubation of HUVECs with RLP (50 microg/ml), adherent monocytes significantly increased by 3.3-fold with increased cell surface expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Cilostazol ( approximately 1-100 microM) concentration dependently repressed these variables as did (E)3-[(4-t-butylphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (BAY 11-7085) (10 microM), a specific nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor. Cilostazol effects were significantly antagonized by iberiotoxin (1 microM), a maxi-K channel blocker. RLP significantly increased expression of lectin-like receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (LOX-1) receptor protein. Upon transfection with antisense LOX-1 oligodeoxynucleotide (As-LOX-1), LOX-1 receptor expression was reduced, whereas HUVECs with sense LOX-1 oligodeoxynucleotide did express high LOX-1 receptor. RLP-stimulated superoxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were significantly lowered with decreased expression of VCAM-1 and MCP-1 by transfection with As-LOX-1 as did polyinosinic acid (10 microg/ml, a LOX-1 receptor inhibitor). RLP significantly degraded inhibitory kappaBalpha in the cytoplasm and activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) p65 in the nucleus of HUVECs with increased luciferase activity of NF-kappaB, all of which were reversed by cilostazol (10 microM), BAY 11-7085, and polyinosinic acid. Together, cilostazol suppresses RLP-stimulated increased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs by suppression of LOX-1 receptor-coupled NF-kappaB-dependent nuclear transcription via mediation of the maxi-K channel opening.

  10. Serum Lectin-Like Oxidized-Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1 and Adiponectin Levels Are Associated With Coronary Artery Disease Accompanied With Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Md Sayed, Ali Sheikh; Zhao, Zhenyu; Guo, Lanyan; Li, Fei; Deng, Xu; Deng, Hai; Xia, Ke; Yang, Tianlun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major public health problem for developed and developing countries and is the single leading cause of death worldwide. Objectives: There is very few evidence regarding changes of both serum Lectin-like oxidized-low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and adiponectin in patients with CAD accompanied with metabolic syndrome (MS). Here we aimed to evaluate serum levels of LOX-1 and adiponectin in patients with CAD accompanied with MS. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients with coronary artery disease without metabolic syndrome, 30 patients with coronary artery disease and metabolic syndrome, 30 ones with metabolic syndrome and 30 healthy subjects were enrolled. For all subjects, a questionnaire was filled to collect data, and peripheral blood samples were collected aseptically from the antecubital vein to measure serum Lectin-like oxidized-low density lipoprotein receptor-1 and adiponectin levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Serum LOX-1 level was highest in CAD + MS group; the difference between control and disease groups was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Adiponectin level had the lowest value in CAD + MS group; the difference between control and disease groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in serum Lectin-like oxidized-low density lipoprotein receptor-1and adiponectin in patients with different ages and gender. Serum LOX-1 level was changed negatively and linearly (R2 = 0.721) correlated with adiponectin level in different groups. Conclusions: Patient with CAD and MS had higher risk than those with only CAD because of lipid and glucose metabolism abnormalities. Combination measurements of serum LOX-1 and adiponectin levels may be helpful to evaluate the severity of CAD together with MS. PMID:25389471

  11. Cilostazol reduces atherosclerosis by inhibition of superoxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha formation in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice fed high cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Oh, Goo Taeg; Park, So Youn; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Gil; Kim, Chi Dae; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Shin, Yung Woo; Hong, Ki Whan

    2005-05-01

    This study shows that 6-[4-(1-cyclohexyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl) butoxy]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (cilostazol) suppresses the atherosclerotic lesion formation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr)-null mice. Ldlr-null mice fed a high cholesterol diet showed multiple plaque lesions in the proximal ascending aorta including aortic sinus, accompanied by increased macrophage accumulation with increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Supplementation of cilostazol (0.2% w/w) in diet significantly decreased the plaque lesions with reduced macrophage accumulation and suppression of VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in situ. Increased superoxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production were significantly lowered by cilostazol in situ as well as in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). TNF-alpha-induced increased inhibitory kappaBalpha degradation in the cytoplasm and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) p65 activation in the nuclei of HUVECs were reversed by cilostazol (1 approximately 100 microM) as well as by (E)-3[(4-t-butylphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (BAY 11-7085) (10 microM), suggesting that cilostazol strongly inhibits NF-kappaB activation and p65 translocation into the nuclei. Furthermore, in gel shift and DNA-binding assay, cilostazol inhibited NF-kappaB/DNA complex and nuclear DNA-binding activity of the NF-kappaB in the nuclear extracts of the RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, it is suggested that the anti-atherogenic effect of cilostazol in cholesterol-fed Ldlr-null mice is ascribed to its property to suppress superoxide and TNF-alpha formation, and thereby reducing NF-kappaB activation/transcription, VCAM-1/MCP-1 expressions, and monocyte recruitments.

  12. Fatty acid synthase/oxidized low-density lipoprotein as metabolic oncogenes linking obesity to colon cancer via NF-kappa B in Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Keshk, Walaa Arafa; Zineldeen, Doaa Hussein; Wasfy, Rania E L-sayed; El-Khadrawy, Osama Helmy

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a major health problem which heightens the risk of several chronic illnesses including cancer development particularly colon cancer. The underlying pathophysiology of obesity associated colon cancer remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this current study was to determine fatty acid synthase (FASN) activity/expression, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) level and redox status under the context of anthropometric measurements and lipid profile to find their potential role as interacting biomarkers relating obesity to colon cancer initiation and progression via nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling. This study was conducted upon Egyptian individuals; 30 obese subjects with colon cancer, 11 nonobese and 11 obese subjects without colon cancer. FASN gene expression, NF-κB immunoreactivity, and serum ox-LDL level were estimated by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoassay, respectively. FASN activity, glycemic status, obesity, and oxidative stress indices were also assessed. It was found that FASN expression and activity were statistically increased in obese with colon cancer (P=0.021 and 0.018, respectively), with statistically significant increase in patients with advanced grading. Moreover, NF-κB immunoreactivity and serum ox-LDL level were significantly increased in obese colon cancer patients with significantly higher levels in those with advanced grading (all P<0.05). Dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress indices were worsened in obese patients with colon cancer. These results revealed that FASN and ox-LDL as well as oxidative stress may increase the risk of obesity related colon cancer, particularly via NF-κB signaling and could be used as potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers for obesity complicated with colon cancer.

  13. The lupus susceptibility locus Sle3 is not sufficient to accelerate atherosclerosis in lupus-susceptible low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wade, N S; Stevenson, B G; Dunlap, D S; Major, A S

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk is increased in individuals suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus. Understanding the mechanism(s) of systemic lupus erythematosus-accelerated atherosclerosis is critical for the development of effective therapies. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that radiation chimeras of systemic lupus erythematosus-susceptible B6.Sle1.2.3 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr)(-/-) mice have augmented atherosclerosis, which is associated with increased T-cell burden and activation in the lesion. The goals of this study were to further define specific immune mechanisms that mediate accelerated atherosclerosis and to determine whether the gene interval Sle3, which is linked to lupus-associated T-cell dysregulation, was sufficient to modulate atherogenesis. We transferred B6.Sle3 or C57Bl/6-derived bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated LDLr( -/-) mice (hereafter referred to as LDLr.Sle3 and LDLr.B6, respectively). Sixteen weeks after transplantation, the mice were placed on a western-type diet for 8 weeks. Our analyses revealed that LDLr.Sle3 mice had increased auto-antibody production against double-stranded DNA and cardiolipin compared with LDLr.B6 controls. We also found an increase in atherosclerosis-associated oxLDL antibodies. Antibody isotypes and serum cytokine analysis suggested that the humoral immune response in LDLr.Sle3 mice was skewed toward a Th2 phenotype. This finding is consistent with lupus-associated immune dysregulation. Additionally, LDLr.Sle3 mice had decreased serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels. However, there was no difference in lesion area or cellular composition of lesions between the two groups. These data demonstrate that, despite no change in lesion area, transfer of Sle3-associated T-cell dysregulation alone to LDLr-deficient mice is sufficient to decrease serum cholesterol and to exacerbate humoral immune responses that are frequently associated with atherosclerosis.

  14. Baculovirus-mediated expression of human apolipoprotein E in Manduca sexta larvae generates particles that bind to the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gretch, D G; Sturley, S L; Friesen, P D; Beckage, N E; Attie, A D

    1991-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a ligand for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and mediates the catabolism of several classes of lipoprotein particles. Binding of apoE to the LDL receptor requires association of apoE with lipid in a vesicle or a lipoprotein particle. Because of this requirement, purified apoE or apoE derived directly from bacterial expression systems does not bind to the LDL receptor. To overcome this problem and to facilitate analysis of apoE structure, recombinant baculoviruses containing the human apoE cDNA fused to the polyhedrin promoter of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus were constructed. The recombinant viruses were used to infect larvae of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta in vivo. High levels of lipoprotein particles containing human apoE were present in the hemolymph of infected larvae. In contrast to apoE produced by recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells in vitro, these particles were excellent ligands for the LDL receptor. Images PMID:1924311

  15. Differential influence of different dietary fatty acids on very low-density lipoprotein secretion when delivered to hepatocytes in chylomicron remnants.

    PubMed

    López-Soldado, Iliana; Avella, Michael; Botham, Kathleen M

    2009-02-01

    The influence of dietary fats carried in chylomicron remnants on the hepatic secretion of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) was investigated using chylomicron remnant-like particles (CRLPs) and cultured rat hepatocytes as the experimental model. Chylomicron remnant-like particles containing triacylglycerol (TG) from palm, olive, or corn (enriched in saturated, monounsaturated, or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids) oil, respectively, were incubated with cultured hepatocytes for 5 hours. The medium was then removed and replaced with medium without CRLPs; and the secretion of TG, cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B48 during the following 16 hours was determined. Secretion of TG into the d less than 1.050-g/mL fraction containing VLDL was unaffected by olive CRLPs, but was significantly increased in cells exposed to palm or corn CRLPs in comparison with both olive CRLPs and control incubations without CRLPs. Secretion of apolipoprotein B48, however, was not changed by any of the CRLP types. Apolipoprotein B messenger RNA levels were decreased by olive and corn CRLPs, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase messenger RNA abundance was increased by palm CRLPs; but expression of other genes involved in the regulation of VLDL secretion was unaffected. These findings demonstrate that CRLPs enriched in saturated fatty acids or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase the secretion of TG in VLDL, possibly because of the secretion of larger particles, whereas those enriched in monounsaturated fatty acids have no effect. Thus, different dietary fats have differential effects on VLDL secretion directly when delivered to the liver in chylomicron remnants.

  16. Tanshinone IIA Modulates Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake via Down-Regulation of PCSK9 Gene Expression in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Tai, Mi-Hsueh; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA, one of the most pharmacologically bioactive phytochemicals isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, possesses several biological activities such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, neuroprotection and hypolipidemic activities. In this study, we aim to investigate the hypocholesterolemic effect of tanshinone IIA in hepatic cells. We demonstrated that tanshinone IIA significantly increased the amount of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and LDL uptake activity in HepG2 cells at the post-transcriptional regulation. We further demonstrated that tanshinone IIA inhibited the expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) mRNA and mature protein, which may lead to an increase the cell-surface LDLR in hepatic cells. We further identified a regulatory DNA element involved in the tanshinone IIA-mediated PCSK9 down-regulation, which is located between the -411 and -336 positions of the PCSK9 promoter. Moreover, we found that tanshinone IIA markedly increased the nuclear forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) level, enhanced FoxO3a/PCSK9 promoter complexes formation and decreased the PCSK9 promoter binding capacity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF-1α), resulting in suppression of PCSK9 gene expression. Finally, we found that the statin-induced PCSK9 overexpression was attenuated and the LDLR activity was elevated in a synergic manner by combination of tanshinone IIA treatment in HepG2 cells. Overall, our results reveal that the tanshinone IIA modulates LDLR level and activity via down-regulation of PCSK9 expression in hepatic cells. Our current findings provide a molecular basis of tanshinone IIA to develop PCSK9 inhibitors for cholesterol management. PMID:27617748

  17. Paeonol suppresses oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis via activation of LOX-1/p38MAPK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Mei-Hua; Zhang, Yi-Wen; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2013-03-27

    Paeonol is an active compound isolated from traditional Chinese medicine, and has been shown to have anti-atherosclerosis, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effects. The present investigation was undertaken to determine the suppression effects of paeonol on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell line HUVEC apoptosis and to uncover some of the underlying mechanisms of these effects. Cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured to evaluate the cell injuries. Apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33342 staining and flow cytometry. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was detected by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Real-time PCR was used to confirm the expression of LOX-1 mRNA. Western blotting was used to evaluate the protein expression of LOX-1 and Bcl-2, as well as caspase-3 cleavage, p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) phosphorylation. NF-κB nuclear translocation was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Caspase-3 activity was measured using a colorimetric protease assay kit. The results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and increased the LDH release, as well as the apoptotic rate (P<0.01). Pre-treatment of paeonol resulted in remarkable increase of cell viability, decrease of LDH release and cell apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Besides, ox-LDL caused the up-regulation of LOX-1, the down-regulation of Bcl-2, the phosphorylation of p38MAPK, the translocation of NF-κB and the activation of caspase-3. Paeonol pre-treatment reversed these effects introduced by ox-LDL. Moreover, paeonol also showed its inhibition effects on ox-LDL induced ROS overproduction. These results indicate the preventive effects of paeonol on ox-LDL induced endothelial cell apoptosis. The effects might, at least partly, be obtained via inhibition of LOX-1-ROS- p38MAPK-NF-κB signaling pathway.

  18. Degree of oxidation of low density lipoprotein affects expression of CD36 and PPARgamma, but not cytokine production, by human monocyte-macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Ian C; Symes, Carole E; Renaudin, Pauline; Nova, Esther; Mesa, Maria Dolores; Boukouvalas, George; Leake, David S; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2003-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) exhibits many atherogenic effects, including the promotion of monocyte recruitment to the arterial endothelium and the induction of scavenger receptor expression. However, while atherosclerosis involves chronic inflammation within the arterial intima, it is unclear whether oxLDL alone provides a direct inflammatory stimulus for monocyte-macrophages. Furthermore, oxLDL is not a single, well-defined entity, but has structural and physical properties which vary according to the degree of oxidation. We tested the hypothesis that the biological effects of oxLDL will vary according to its degree of oxidation and that some species of oxLDL will have atherogenic properties, while other species may be responsible for its inflammatory activity. The atherogenic and inflammatory properties of LDL oxidized to predetermined degrees (mild, moderate and extensive oxidation) were investigated in a single system using human monocyte-derived macrophages. Expression of CD36 mRNA was up-regulated by mildly- and moderately-oxLDL, but not highly-oxLDL. The expression of the transcription factor, proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), which has been proposed to positively regulate the expression of CD36, was increased to the greatest degree by highly-oxLDL. However, the DNA binding activity of PPARgamma was increased only by mildly- and moderately-oxLDL. None of the oxLDL species appeared to be pro-inflammatory towards monocytes, either directly or indirectly through mediators derived from lymphocytes, regardless of the degree of oxidation.

  19. Regulation of placental low-density lipoprotein uptake in baboons by estrogen: Dose-dependent effects of the anti-estrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25)

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, M.C.; Pepe, G.J.; Albrecht, E.D. )

    1991-07-01

    In the present study, increasing amounts of the anti-estrogen 1-(p-2-diethylaminoethoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-2-p-methoxyphenoletha nol (MER-25) were administered to pregnant baboons (Papio anubis) to block the action of endogenous estrogen and to determine effect on placental low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake. Pregnant baboons were untreated (n = 8) or received MER-25 orally at a dosage of 25 (n = 10), 50 (n = 8), or 75 (n = 4) mg/kg BW daily on Days 140-170 of gestation (term = 184 days). Placentas were removed on Day 170 of gestation and villous tissue was dispersed with 0.1% collagenase. Placental cells were incubated in Medium 199 for 12 h at 37{degrees} C with increasing amounts of 125I-LDL, with or without a 100-fold excess of unlabeled baboon LDL. Mean ({plus minus} SEM) placental uptake (ng/micrograms cell protein) of 125I-LDL was 55% (6.4 {plus minus} 1.0), 75% (3.6 {plus minus} 0.7), and 81% (2.7 {plus minus} 0.2) lower (p less than 0.001) in baboons that received MER-25 in doses of 25, 50, and 75 mg/kg BW, respectively, than in untreated baboons (14.2 {plus minus} 1.3 ng/micrograms cell protein). Maximal effect occurred with 50 mg MER-25, because LDL uptake was not further decreased with greater levels of MER-25. Dissociation constants for placental LDL uptake, as determined by Scatchard analysis, were unaltered by anti-estrogen treatment. The amount of 125I-LDL degradation by placental cells of untreated and MER-25-treated baboons was proportional to LDL uptake.

  20. Two novel susceptibility loci for non-small cell lung cancer map to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yongjun; Fang, Meiyu; Bao, Wenglong; Deng, Dehou

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) on the risk of developing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 500 NSCLC patients and 500 healthy controls were recruited for genotyping of 11 SNPs of LRP5. The association between genotype and NSCLC risk was evaluated by computing the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) from multivariate unconditional logistic regression analyses. Eleven Tag SNPs were detected. The frequency of the LRP5 rs3736228 T allele (18.9% in male NSCLC cases and 23.9% in male controls) was statistically different between male NSCLCs and male controls (P=0.03), and the T allele was associated with a lower risk of NSCLC (OR=0.74; 95% CI, 0.56–0.67), whereas the C/C homozygous genotype and the LRP5 rs64843 T/T genotype were associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively (OR=1.43 and 1.77, respectively). Using Haploview software, the frequency of the haplotypes of rs312009/rs3120015/rs3120014 CCC was was significantly higher in female SCC cases compared with female controls (0.064 vs. 0.009, P=0.04). LRP5 rs3736228 and rs64843 SNPs were significantly associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and SCC, respectively. Further studies are required to investigate the functional changes in LRP5 expression and activity in NSCLC in vitro.

  1. Two novel susceptibility loci for non-small cell lung cancer map to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yongjun; Fang, Meiyu; Bao, Wenglong; Deng, Dehou

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) on the risk of developing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 500 NSCLC patients and 500 healthy controls were recruited for genotyping of 11 SNPs of LRP5. The association between genotype and NSCLC risk was evaluated by computing the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) from multivariate unconditional logistic regression analyses. Eleven Tag SNPs were detected. The frequency of the LRP5 rs3736228 T allele (18.9% in male NSCLC cases and 23.9% in male controls) was statistically different between male NSCLCs and male controls (P=0.03), and the T allele was associated with a lower risk of NSCLC (OR=0.74; 95% CI, 0.56–0.67), whereas the C/C homozygous genotype and the LRP5 rs64843 T/T genotype were associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively (OR=1.43 and 1.77, respectively). Using Haploview software, the frequency of the haplotypes of rs312009/rs3120015/rs3120014 CCC was was significantly higher in female SCC cases compared with female controls (0.064 vs. 0.009, P=0.04). LRP5 rs3736228 and rs64843 SNPs were significantly associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and SCC, respectively. Further studies are required to investigate the functional changes in LRP5 expression and activity in NSCLC in vitro. PMID:27698794

  2. Recognition of oxidized low density lipoprotein by the scavenger receptor of macrophages results from derivatization of apolipoprotein B by products of fatty acid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, U P; Lougheed, M; Kwan, W C; Dirks, M

    1989-09-15

    Uptake of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins by macrophages in the arterial intima is believed to be an important step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. There are a number of possible mechanisms by which macrophages might accumulate cholesterol, and one that has attracted much interest recently involves the uptake of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (LDL) via a specific cell surface receptor, termed the scavenger or acetyl-LDL receptor. Previous studies have shown that chemical derivatization of LDL with reagents that result in neutralization of the charge of lysine amino groups also allows recognition by this receptor. As well, it has been shown that oxidation of LDL is accompanied by a decrease in free lysine groups and binding of lipid products to apolipoprotein B. The present studies were done to further characterize the receptor-binding domain on oxidized LDL. It was found that LDL could be modified by incubation with water-soluble products derived from autoxidized unsaturated fatty acids under conditions that inhibited oxidation of the LDL itself. The LDL modified in this way had increased electrophoretic mobility but showed no evidence of the oxidative damage that typifies LDL oxidized by exposure to metal ions. Furthermore, the oxidation product-modified LDL was rapidly degraded by cultured macrophages through the scavenger receptor pathway. Bovine albumin modified by oxidation products also showed greatly accelerated degradation by macrophages. When analyzed by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography, the reactive oxidation products appeared less polar than fatty acids or simple medium-chain aldehydes. When treated with the carbonyl reagent 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, the reactive fractions yielded derivatives, some of which were identified by mass spectrometry as hydrazones of nonenal, heptenal, pentenal, and crotonaldehyde. A series of 2-unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein to 2-nonenal) were all found to modify LDL, but none of

  3. Protective Effect of Antioxidant Extracts from Grey Oyster Mushroom, Pleurotus pulmonarius (Agaricomycetes), Against Human Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Aortic Endothelial Cell Damage.

    PubMed

    Abidin, Mohamad Hamdi Zainal; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Abidin, Nurhayati Zainal

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro antioxidant capacities of extracts from Pleurotus pulmonarius via Folin-Ciocalteu, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging, metal chelating, cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays. Extract compositions were determined by phenol-sulfuric acid; Coomassie Plus (Bradford) protein; Spectroquant zinc, copper, and manganese test assays; and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Methanol-dichloromethane extract, water fraction, hot water, aqueous extract and hexane fraction exhibited the most potent extracts in the antioxidant activities. LC/MS/MS and GC/MS showed that the extracts contained ergothioneine, ergosterol, flavonoid, and phenolic compounds. The selected potent extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effect against oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins and protective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxic injury in human aortic endothelial cells. The crude aqueous extract was deemed most potent for the prevention of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation and endothelial membrane damage. Ergothioneine might be the compound responsible for the activities, as supported by previous reports. Thus, P. pulmonarius may be a valuable antioxidant ingredient in functional foods or nutraceuticals. PMID:27279533

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ligand-binding domain of human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Tomoko; Ohki, Izuru; Oyama, Takuji; Machida, Sachiko; Morikawa, Kousuke; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2005-05-01

    Two different fragments of the ligand-binding domain of LOX-1, the major receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on endothelial cells, have been crystallized in different forms. Two different fragments of the ligand-binding domain of LOX-1, the major receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on endothelial cells, have been crystallized in different forms. One crystal form contains the disulfide-linked dimer, which is the form of the molecule present on the cell surface; the other contains a monomeric form of the receptor that lacks the cysteine residue necessary to form disulfide-linked homodimers. The crystal of the monomeric ligand-binding domain belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.79, b = 67.57, c = 79.02 Å. The crystal of the dimeric form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.86, b = 49.56, c = 76.73 Å, β = 98.59°. Data for the dimeric form of the LOX-1 ligand-binding domain have been collected to 2.4 Å. For the monomeric form of the ligand-binding domain, native, heavy-atom derivative and SeMet-derivative crystals have been obtained; their diffraction data have been measured to 3.0, 2.4 and 1.8 Å resolution, respectively.

  5. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6) Is a Novel Nutritional Therapeutic Target for Hyperlipidemia, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Go, Gwang-woong

    2015-06-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and has a unique structure, which facilitates its multiple functions as a co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and as a ligand receptor for endocytosis. The role LRP6 plays in metabolic regulation, specifically in the nutrient-sensing pathway, has recently garnered considerable interest. Patients carrying an LRP6 mutation exhibit elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose, which cooperatively constitute the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Since the discovery of this mutation, the general role of LRP6 in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and atherosclerosis has been thoroughly researched. These studies have demonstrated that LRP6 plays a role in LDL receptor-mediated LDL uptake. In addition, when the LRP6 mutant impaired Wnt-LRP6 signaling, hyperlipidemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis developed. LRP6 regulates lipid homeostasis and body fat mass via the nutrient-sensing mechanistic target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, the mutant LRP6 triggers atherosclerosis by activating platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. This review highlights the exceptional opportunities to study the pathophysiologic contributions of LRP6 to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, which implicate LRP6 as a latent regulator of lipid metabolism and a novel therapeutic target for nutritional intervention. PMID:26046396

  6. Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces bone morphogenetic protein-2 in coronary artery endothelial cells via Toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Ao, Lihua; Shi, Yi; Johnson, Thomas R; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2011-04-01

    Vascular calcification is a common complication in atherosclerosis. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) plays an important role in atherosclerotic vascular calcification. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on BMP-2 protein expression in human coronary artery endothelial cells (CAECs), the roles of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 in oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression, and the signaling pathways involved. Human CAECs were stimulated with oxLDL. The roles of TLR2 and TLR4 in oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression were determined by pretreatment with neutralizing antibody, siRNA, and overexpression. Stimulation with oxLDL increased cellular BMP-2 protein levels in a dose-dependent manner (40-160 μg/ml). Pretreatment with neutralizing antibodies against TLR2 and TLR4 or silencing of these two receptors reduced oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression. Overexpression of TLR2 and TLR4 enhanced the cellular BMP-2 response to oxLDL. Furthermore, oxLDL was co-localized with TLR2 and TLR4. BMP-2 expression was associated with activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Inhibition of NF-κB and ERK1/2 reduced BMP-2 expression whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In conclusion, oxLDL induces BMP-2 expression through TLR2 and TLR4 in human CAECs. The NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in the signaling mechanism. These findings underscore an important role for TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the BMP-2 response to oxLDL in human CAECs and indicate that these two immunoreceptors contribute to the mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic vascular calcification. PMID:21325271

  7. Glycation and glycoxidation of low-density lipoproteins by glucose and low-molecular mass aldehydes. Formation of modified and oxidized particles.