Science.gov

Sample records for increased cancer risks

  1. Increased cancer risk among Swedish female alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Sigvardsson, S; Hardell, L; Przybeck, T R; Cloninger, R

    1996-03-01

    We evaluated site-specific cancer risks in alcoholic women. We identified 15,508 alcoholic women from the records of the Temperance Boards in Sweden and obtained a comparison group by selecting for each alcoholic woman one female individual matched for region and day of birth. We obtained incidence data from the Swedish Cancer Registry. We found an increased relative risk (RR) for any cancer [RR = 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-1.8]; site-specific risks were increased for tongue (RR = 8.5; 95% CI = 2.0-37), mouth (RR = 12; 95% CI = 1.6-92), tonsil (RR = 11; 95% CI = 1.4-85), hypopharynx (RR = 9.0; 95% CI = 1.1-71), larynx (RR = 7.0; 95% CI = 0.9-57), liver (RR = 4.6; 95% CI = 1.8-12), pancreas (RR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.6-4.6), lung (RR = 5.0; 95% CI = 3.3-7.5), breast (RR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.2-1.7), cervix uteri (RR = 3.9; 95% CI = 2.8-5.4), and vulva, vagina, and unspecified female genital organs (RR = 4.0; 95% CI = 1.3-12). We found a decreased risk for malignant melanoma of the skin (RR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3-1.0). Since this was a register study, the results may be confounded by differences in smoking, dietary habits, and/or other factors in the cohort of alcoholic women and the comparison group.

  2. [IBD and increased risk of cancer: what is the reality?].

    PubMed

    Beaugerie, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can favour the occurrence of colon cancer while their treatments can increase the risk of certain other cancers. The doctor's skill lies in striking the right benefit-risk balance of the treatments.

  3. Calcium intake increases risk of prostate cancer among Singapore Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Lesley M.; Wong, Alvin S.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yu, Mimi C.

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of dairy products, the primary source of calcium in Western diets, has been found to be positively associated with prostate cancer. In an Asian diet, non-dairy foods are the major contributors of calcium. Thus, a study of dietary calcium and prostate cancer in Asians can better inform on whether calcium, as opposed to other dairy components is responsible for the dairy foods-prostate cancer association. We examined calcium intake and prostate cancer risk among 27,293 men of the Singapore Chinese Health Study that was established between 1993 and 1998. As of December 31, 2007, 298 incident prostate cancer cases had been diagnosed among the cohort members. Diet was assessed at baseline with a validated 165-item food frequency questionnaire. It is hypothesized that there is greater net absorption of calcium in smaller individuals. Therefore, the calcium-prostate cancer association was also assessed in stratified analyses by median body mass index (BMI). Vegetables were the largest contributor of daily calcium intake in the study population. Overall, we observed a modest, statistically nonsignificant 25% increase in prostate cancer risk for the 4th (median = 659 mg/day) versus 1st (median=211 mg/day) quartiles of calcium intake after adjustment for potential confounders. The association became considerably stronger and achieved statistical significance (hazard ratio=2.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.34; P for trend=0.01) for men with below median (22.9 kg/m2) BMI. Dietary calcium may be a risk factor for prostate cancer even at relatively low intake. PMID:20516117

  4. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    LeRoith, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  5. Thyroid Cancer Risk Is Not Increased in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2012-01-01

    -steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs might be associated with a significantly lower risk. Conclusions There is a lack of an overall association between diabetes and thyroid cancer, but patients with diabetes duration <5 years have a significantly lower risk. Sulfonylurea may increase the risk of thyroid cancer. PMID:23300866

  6. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Cancer.gov

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  7. Literature review on cancer risk in children born after fertility treatment suggests increased risk of haematological cancers.

    PubMed

    Reigstad, Marte M; Oldereid, Nan B; Omland, Anne K; Storeng, Ritsa

    2017-01-27

    Medically assisted fertility treatment, including assisted reproductive technology (ART), is increasingly being used and the subsequent child health outcomes are of interest. Some studies have suggested an elevated risk of somatic morbidity, while others have reported an elevated cancer risk. This review summarises the literature on fertility treatments and childhood cancer, based on 23 cohort and case-control studies.

  8. Increased Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) Is Associated With Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer in Jamaican Men

    PubMed Central

    Shivappa, Nitin; Jackson, Maria D.; Bennett, Franklyn; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy; and it accounts for the most cancer deaths among Jamaican males. Diet has been implicated in the etiology of prostate cancer, including through its effects on inflammation. Method We examined the association between a newly developed dietary inflammatory index (DII) and prostate cancer in a case-control study of 40-80 year-old Jamaican males. A total of 229 incident cases and 250 controls attended the same urology out-patient clinics at 2 major hospitals and private practitioners in the Kingston, Jamaica Metropolitan area between March 2005 and July 2007. The DII was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a previously validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) that was expanded to assess diet and cancer in this Jamaican population. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios, with DII as continuous and expressed as quartiles. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, total energy intake, education, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, physical activity and family history of prostate cancer. Results Men in the highest quartile of the DII were at higher risk of prostate cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.14–5.04 (Ptrend = 0.08)] compared to men in the lowest DII quartile. Conclusion These data suggest a pro-inflammatory diet, as indicated by increasing DII score, may be a risk factor for prostate cancer in Jamaican men. PMID:26226289

  9. PSCA rs2294008 Polymorphism with Increased Risk of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Peiliang; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Ning; Ou, Juanjuan; Xie, Ganfeng; Liu, Chen; Zhao, Xiaoxin; Xiang, Lisha; Liao, Yunmei; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    Background Published data on the association between PSCA rs2294008 polymorphism and cancer risk have implicated inconclusive results. To determine the relationship and to precisely assess the effect size estimate of the association, we performed a meta-analysis. Methods We searched published literature in Embase and PubMed databases using the search terms “PSCA”, “prostate stem cell antigen”, “variants”, “polymorphism”, “polymorphisms”, and “cancer”. A total of 21 eligible articles were retrieved, with 27, 197 cancer cases and 48, 237 controls. Results On the whole, we found the association between PSCA rs2294008 polymorphism and cancer risk was statistically significant: TT vs CC: OR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.27; TT + CT vs CC: OR = 1.08, 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.10; TT vs CT + CC: OR = 1.14, 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.21; T vs C: OR = 1.10, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.14; CT vs CC: OR = 1.10, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.13. Stratified analyses in cancer type and ethnicity showed similar results. Conclusions Based on the statistical evidence, we can draw a conclusion that the rs2294008 polymorphism of PSCA gene is likely to play a role in cancer carcinogenesis, especially in gastric cancer and bladder cancer. PMID:26308216

  10. Breast cancer patients with dense breasts do not have increased death risk

    Cancer.gov

    High mammographic breast density, which is a marker of increased risk of developing breast cancer, does not seem to increase the risk of death among breast cancer patients, according to a study led by Gretchen L. Gierach, Ph.D., NCI. Image shows physician

  11. Do statins increase and Mediterranean diet decrease the risk of breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical exercise and healthy dietary habits are recommended to prevent breast cancer. Discussion Increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids associated with decreased omega-6 - resulting in higher omega-3 to omega-6 ratio compared with Western-type diet - is inversely associated with breast cancer risk. The modernized Mediterranean diet with high omega-3 to omega-6 ratio, high fiber and polyphenol intake, and consumption of low-glycemic index foods reduces overall cancer risk and specifically breast cancer risk. It has been suggested that consuming no more than one alcoholic drink per day, preferably wine, is preferable. Eliminating environmental contaminants, including endocrine disruptors, and favoring organic foods to increase polyphenol intake and the omega-3 to omega-6 ratios were also shown to be beneficial. Cholesterol-lowering statins may decrease antitumor defenses; are toxic for the mitochondria; decrease the omega-3 to omega-6 ratio; increase body mass index, insulin resistance and diabetic risk; and have been associated with an increased breast cancer risk. Summary Therefore, as well as making lifestyle changes to decrease breast cancer risk, we argue that physicians should carefully consider (and often avoid) therapies that may increase breast cancer or diabetes risk in high-risk women and women who wish to decrease their breast cancer risk. PMID:24903828

  12. Breast cancer patients with high density mammograms do not have increased risk of death | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    High mammographic breast density, which is a marker of increased risk of developing breast cancer, does not seem to increase the risk of death among breast cancer patients, according to a study led by Gretchen L. Gierach, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.  The research was conducted in collaboration with investigators from the NCI-sponsored Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC).  |

  13. Educating Older Adults about Their Increased Cancer Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keintz, Martha K.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Cancer Program for Older Citizens is a program to improve the outcome of a possible cancer diagnosis for older adults by encouraging early detection of cancer. Program has achieved positive, though modest, changes in the cancer-related knowledge and beliefs of older adult participants, with these impacts sustained for months after the program.…

  14. Normal breast physiology: the reasons hormonal contraceptives and induced abortion increase breast-cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lanfranchi, Angela

    2014-01-01

    A woman gains protection from breast cancer by completing a full-term pregnancy. In utero, her offspring produce hormones that mature 85 percent of the mother's breast tissue into cancer-resistant breast tissue. If the pregnancy ends through an induced abortion or a premature birth before thirty-two weeks, the mother's breasts will have only partially matured, retaining even more cancer-susceptible breast tissue than when the pregnancy began. This increased amount of immature breast tissue will leave the mother with more sites for cancer initiation, thereby increasing her risk of breast cancer. Hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk by their proliferative effect on breast tissue and their direct carcinogenic effects on DNA. Hormonal contraceptives include estrogen-progestin combination drugs prescribed in any manner of delivery: orally, transdermally, vaginally, or intrauterine. This article provides the detailed physiology and data that elucidate the mechanisms through which induced abortion and hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk.

  15. HFE C282Y homozygotes are at increased risk of breast and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Nicholas J.; Gurrin, Lyle C; Allen, Katrina J.; Constantine, Clare C; Delatycki, Martin B.; McLaren, Christine E.; Gertig, Dorota M; Anderson, Gregory J; Southey, Melissa C; Olynyk, John K; Powell, Lawrie W.; Hopper, John L; Giles, Graham G; English, Dallas R

    2013-01-01

    The evidence that mutations in the HFE gene are associated with increased cancer risk is inconsistent. The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study is a prospective cohort study that commenced recruitment in 1990. Participants of born in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom or Ireland (n = 28,509) were genotyped for the HFE C282Y variant. Incident cancers were ascertained from Australian cancer registries during an average of 14 years follow up. Hazard ratios, confidence intervals and p-values were obtained from separate Cox regression analyses for colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, all other solid cancers and all cancers. Compared with those with no C282Y variant, C282Y homozygotes were at increased risk of colorectal cancer (HR 2·28; 95% CI 1·22, 4·25; p = 0.01) and female C282Y homozygotes were at increased risk of developing breast cancer (HR 2·39; 95% CI 1·24, 4·61; p = 0.01) but male C282Y homozygotes were not at increased risk for prostate cancer (HR 0·96; 95% CI 0·43, 2·15; p = 0.92). C282Y/H63D compound heterozygotes were not at increased risk for colorectal cancer, (HR 1 27; 95% CI 0·80, 2·01); breast cancer, (HR 1·16; 95% CI 0·74, 1·84); or prostate cancer (HR 1·08; 95% CI 0·68, 1·70). Conclusion HFE C282Y homozygotes have twice the risk of colorectal and breast cancer compared with those without the C282Y variant. PMID:20099304

  16. Potential increased risk of cancer from commonly used medications: an umbrella review of meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Zhou, Y.; Chang, C. Q.; Schully, S. D.; Khoury, M. J.; Freedman, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Several commonly used medications have been associated with increased cancer risk in the literature. Here, we evaluated the strength and consistency of these claims in published meta-analyses. We carried out an umbrella review of 74 meta-analysis articles addressing the association of commonly used medications (antidiabetics, antihyperlipidemics, antihypertensives, antirheumatics, drugs for osteoporosis, and others) with cancer risk where at least one meta-analysis in the medication class included some data from randomized trials. Overall, 51 articles found no statistically significant differences, 13 found some decreased cancer risk, and 11 found some increased risk (one reported both increased and decreased risks). The 11 meta-analyses that found some increased risks reported 16 increased risk estimates, of which 5 pertained to overall cancer and 11 to site-specific cancer. Six of the 16 estimates were derived from randomized trials and 10 from observational data. Estimates of increased risk were strongly inversely correlated with the amount of evidence (number of cancer cases) (Spearman's correlation coefficient = −0.77, P < 0.001). In 4 of the 16 topics, another meta-analysis existed that was larger (n = 2) or included better controlled data (n = 2) and in all 4 cases there was no statistically significantly increased risk of malignancy. No medication or class had substantial and consistent evidence for increased risk of malignancy. However, for most medications we cannot exclude small risks or risks in population subsets. Such risks are unlikely to be possible to document robustly unless very large, collaborative studies with standardized analyses and no selective reporting are carried out. PMID:24310915

  17. MSH3 rs26279 polymorphism increases cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hui-Kai; Chen, Li-Ping; Cai, Dong-Ping; Kong, Wei-Ju; Xiao, Li; Lin, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the association of mutS homolog 3 (MSH3) rs26279 G > A polymorphism with the risk of different types of cancers including colorectal cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, thyroid cancer, ovarian cancer and oesophageal cancer. However, its association with cancer remains conflicting. We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of the relationship between MSH3 rs26279 G > A polymorphism and cancer susceptibility. Systematically searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases yielded 11 publications with 12 studies of 3282 cases and 6476 controls. The strength of the association was determined by crude odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, pooled risk estimates demonstrated that MSH3 rs26279 G > A was significantly associated with an increased overall cancer risk under all the genetic models (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.09-1.48, P = 0.002; AG vs. AA: OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.00-1.21, P = 0.045; GG vs. AG + AA: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.06-1.42, P = 0.005; AG + GG vs. AA: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.04-1.24, P = 0.006; G vs. A: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.05-1.20, P = 0.001). The association was more evident for colorectal cancer and breast cancer. Moreover, the significant association was also observed in the following subgroups: Europeans, Asians, population-based studies, hospital-based studies, and studies comprising relatively large sample size (≥ 200). Our meta-analysis results demonstrated that MSH3 rs26279 G > A polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of overall cancer, especially for the colorectal cancer and breast cancer. PMID:26617824

  18. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters.

    PubMed

    Regli, Stig; Chen, Jimmy; Messner, Michael; Elovitz, Michael S; Letkiewicz, Frank J; Pegram, Rex A; Pepping, T J; Richardson, Susan D; Wright, J Michael

    2015-11-17

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired power plants, conventional oil and gas extraction, textile mills, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. We estimate bladder cancer risk from potential increased bromide levels in source waters of disinfecting public drinking water systems in the United States. Bladder cancer is the health end point used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its benefits analysis for regulating disinfection byproducts in drinking water. We use estimated increases in the mass of the four regulated trihalomethanes (THM4) concentrations (due to increased bromide incorporation) as the surrogate disinfection byproduct (DBP) occurrence metric for informing potential bladder cancer risk. We estimate potential increased excess lifetime bladder cancer risk as a function of increased source water bromide levels. Results based on data from 201 drinking water treatment plants indicate that a bromide increase of 50 μg/L could result in a potential increase of between 10(-3) and 10(-4) excess lifetime bladder cancer risk in populations served by roughly 90% of these plants.

  19. Estimation of cancer risks and benefits associated with a potential increased consumption of fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Richard; Johnston, Jason; Tucker, Kevin; DeSesso, John M; Keen, Carl L

    2012-12-01

    The current paper provides an analysis of the potential number of cancer cases that might be prevented if half the U.S. population increased its fruit and vegetable consumption by one serving each per day. This number is contrasted with an upper-bound estimate of concomitant cancer cases that might be theoretically attributed to the intake of pesticide residues arising from the same additional fruit and vegetable consumption. The cancer prevention estimates were derived using a published meta-analysis of nutritional epidemiology studies. The cancer risks were estimated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methods, cancer potency estimates from rodent bioassays, and pesticide residue sampling data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The resulting estimates are that approximately 20,000 cancer cases per year could be prevented by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, while up to 10 cancer cases per year could be caused by the added pesticide consumption. These estimates have significant uncertainties (e.g., potential residual confounding in the fruit and vegetable epidemiologic studies and reliance on rodent bioassays for cancer risk). However, the overwhelming difference between benefit and risk estimates provides confidence that consumers should not be concerned about cancer risks from consuming conventionally-grown fruits and vegetables.

  20. Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased breast cancer risk: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ruchi; Kelley, George A; Hartley, Tara A; Rockett, Ian R H

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although individual metabolic risk factors are reported to be associated with breast cancer risk, controversy surrounds risk of breast cancer from metabolic syndrome (MS). We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between MS and breast cancer risk in all adult females. Methods. Studies were retrieved by searching four electronic reference databases [PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Science, and ProQuest through June 30, 2012] and cross-referencing retrieved articles. Eligible for inclusion were longitudinal studies reporting associations between MS and breast cancer risk among females aged 18 years and older. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study and pooled using random-effects models. Publication bias was assessed quantitatively (Trim and Fill) and qualitatively (funnel plots). Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I (2) statistics. Results. Representing nine independent cohorts and 97,277 adult females, eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A modest, positive association was observed between MS and breast cancer risk (RR: 1.47, 95% CI, 1.15-1.87; z = 3.13; p = 0.002; Q = 26.28, p = 0.001; I (2) = 69.55%). No publication bias was observed. Conclusions. MS is associated with increased breast cancer risk in adult women.

  1. Is a personal history of nonmelanoma skin cancer associated with increased or decreased risk of other cancers?

    PubMed

    Alberg, Anthony J; Fischer, Alexander H

    2014-03-01

    Two conflicting hypotheses have been tested concerning the association between a personal history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and risk of other malignancies. One hypothesis is that as a marker of extensive sunlight exposure and hence vitamin D status, NMSC should be inversely associated with risk of other cancers. Alternatively, under the multiple primary cancer model, NMSC is postulated to be an informative first cancer to study as a marker of increased risk of subsequent primary cancer diagnoses. In this journal issue, Ong and colleagues report the results of a large-scale study in the United Kingdom with findings that NMSC was significantly associated with increased risk of a broad spectrum of other malignancies, with the associations stronger the younger the age of onset of NMSC. These results are consistent with the larger body of evidence on this topic, which is highly asymmetrical in favor of the multiple primary cancer hypothesis. Two divergent hypotheses have been tested, with the empirical evidence unequivocally indicating that NMSC is a marker of a high cancer risk phenotype. Future research is warranted to better characterize this association, to understand why NMSC is a marker of excess risk of other cancers, and to determine whether this association is clinically relevant.

  2. The risk of colorectal cancer is not increased after a diagnosis of urothelial cancer: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Harlos, C.H.; Singh, H.; Nugent, Z.; Demers, A.; Mahmud, S.M.; Czaykowski, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The data about whether patients with a prior urothelial cancer (uca) are at increased risk of colorectal cancer (crc) are conflicting. We used a competing risks analysis to determine the risk of crc after uca. Methods Historical cohorts were assembled by record linkage of Manitoba Cancer Registry and Manitoba Health databases. The incidence of crc for individuals with uca as their first cancer between 1987 and 2009 was compared with the incidence for randomly selected age-and sex-matched individuals without a cancer diagnosis at the index date (uca diagnosis date). Three competing outcomes (crc, another primary cancer, and death) were evaluated by competing risks proportional hazards models with adjustment for relevant confounders. Results The cohorts of 4591 patients with uca and 22,312 without uca were followed for a total of 179,287 person–years (py). After uca, the rate of subsequent colon cancer in uca patients was 4.5 per 1000 py compared with 3.6 per 1000 py in the non-cancer cohort. In the multivariable analysis, no overall increase in crc risk was observed for patients first diagnosed with uca (hazard ratio: 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.70 to 1.1; p = 0.26). Conclusions Because of similar crc risk, a similar crc screening strategy should be applied for individuals with and without uca. PMID:28050135

  3. Increased risk of herpes zoster in children with cancer: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Chao, Yu-Hua; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Yen, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Yu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsueh; Wei, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Jhong-Lin; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Peng, Ching-Tien; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2016-07-01

    Herpes zoster is rare in healthy children, but immunocompromised persons have an increased risk of herpes zoster and severe diseases. Considering the very limited information on herpes zoster in children with cancer, we performed a nationwide population-based cohort study to estimate the incidence of herpes zoster in children with cancer and to explore the association between the 2 diseases.Data were obtained from the National Health Research Institutes Database in Taiwan. A total of 4432 children with newly diagnosed cancer between 2000 and 2007 were identified as the cancer cohort, and 17,653 children without cancer frequency-matched by sex and age at entry were considered the noncancer cohort. The association between herpes zoster and childhood cancer was determined.Children with cancer had a higher risk of herpes zoster. The incidence rate of herpes zoster was higher in the cancer cohort than in the noncancer cohort (20.7 vs 2.4 per 10,000 person-years; IRR = 8.6; 95% CI = 4.8-15.6). The cumulative incidence was significantly higher in the cancer cohort (P < 0.0001). Leukemia, lymphoma, and solid tumor were all associated with the increased risk, and leukemia had the highest magnitude of strength of association.This nationwide population-based cohort study demonstrated that children with cancer were associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster. In addition to early antiviral treatment, vaccination with heat-treated zoster vaccine or adjuvanted subunit vaccine could be an appropriate policy to decrease the incidence in children with cancer.

  4. Increased risk of lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and leukemia following Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, F.E.; Somers, R.; Taal, B.G.; van Heerde, P.; Coster, B.; Dozeman, T.; Huisman, S.J.; Hart, A.A.

    1989-08-01

    The risk of second cancers (SCs) was assessed in 744 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) admitted to The Netherlands Cancer Institute from 1966 to 1983. Sixty-nine SCs were observed one month or more after start of first treatment. These included 14 cases of lung cancer, nine cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 16 cases of leukemia, and six cases of the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The median interval between the diagnosis of HD and that of second lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia was 8.1, 13.3, and 5.7 years, respectively. The overall relative risks (RR) (observed/expected (O/E) ratios) of developing lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia were 4.9 (95% confidence limit (CL), 2.7 to 8.2), 31.0 (95% CL, 14.2 to 58.9) and 45.7 (95% CL, 26.1 to 74.2), respectively. At 15 years the cumulative risk of developing an SC amounted to 20.6% +/- 2.9%. The 15-year estimates of lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia were 6.2% +/- 1.9%, 5.9% +/- 2.1% and 6.3% +/- 1.7%, respectively. Increased lung cancer risk following HD has not frequently been clearly demonstrated before; that we were able to demonstrate such risk may be due to the completeness of follow-up over long periods that could be achieved in this study. Excess lung cancer risk was only noted in treatment regimens with radiotherapy (RT); also, all lung cancers arose in irradiation fields. Excess risk of leukemia was only found in treatment regimens involving chemotherapy (CT). For NHL, combined modality treatment was shown to be the most important risk factor. Risk of lung cancer and NHL increased with time since diagnosis. A time-dependent covariate analysis (Cox model) performed on leukemia and MDS showed an increasing risk with intensity of CT, age (greater than 40 years), and a splenectomy.

  5. The risk for breast cancer is not evidently increased in women with hyperprolactinemia

    PubMed Central

    Romijn, J. A.; de Boer, A.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    The question has been raised whether hyperprolactinemia in humans is associated with an excess risk for breast cancer. We aimed to assess the risk of breast cancer in a previously defined large cohort of patients treated for idiopathic hyperprolactinemia or prolactinomas. Based on the pattern of drug prescriptions we identified 11,314 subjects in the PHARMO network with at least one dispensing of dopamine agonists between 1996 and 2006. Of these, 1,607 subjects were considered to have dopamine agonist—treated hyperprolactinemia based on the prescribing pattern. For the present analysis, we included only women (n = 1,342). Patients with breast cancer were identified by hospital discharge codes. Data on breast cancer incidence in the Netherlands were derived from the Dutch cancer registry. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was the measure of outcome to assess the association between hyperprolactinemia and breast cancer. The 1,342 patients accounted for a total of 6,576 person years. Eight patients with breast cancer during follow-up were identified. Indirect standardization with incidence proportions from the general Dutch population revealed a 7.47 expected cases. The calculated SMR for breast cancer risk in patients treated hyperprolactinemia was 1.07 (95% confidence interval 0.50–2.03). In conclusion, there is no clear evidence for increased breast cancer risk in female patients treated for either idiopathic hyperprolactinemia or prolactinomas. The uncertainty about the exact risk that is due to the relatively low number of breast cancer cases, should be overcome by pooling results in a future meta-analysis. PMID:20012697

  6. Lifetime Increased Cancer Risk in Mice Following Exposure to Clinical Proton Beam–Generated Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gerweck, Leo E. Huang, Peigen; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Zhou, Yenong

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the life span and risk of cancer following whole-body exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a passively scattered clinical spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) proton beam. Methods and Materials: Three hundred young adult female FVB/N mice, 152 test and 148 control, were entered into the experiment. Mice were placed in an annular cassette around a cylindrical phantom, which was positioned lateral to the mid-SOBP of a 165-MeV, clinical proton beam. The average distance from the edge of the mid-SOBP to the conscious active mice was 21.5 cm. The phantom was irradiated with once-daily fractions of 25 Gy, 4 days per week, for 6 weeks. The age at death and cause of death (ie, cancer and type vs noncancer causes) were assessed over the life span of the mice. Results: Exposure of mice to a dose of 600 Gy of proton beam–generated neutrons, reduced the median life span of the mice by 4.2% (Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival, P=.053). The relative risk of death from cancer in neutron exposed versus control mice was 1.40 for cancer of all types (P=.0006) and 1.22 for solid cancers (P=.09). For a typical 60 Gy dose of clinical protons, the observed 22% increased risk of solid cancer would be expected to decrease by a factor of 10. Conclusions: Exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a proton dose that exceeds a typical course of radiation therapy by a factor of 10, resulted in a statistically significant increase in the background incidence of leukemia and a marginally significant increase in solid cancer. The results indicate that the risk of out-of-field second solid cancers from SOBP proton-generated neutrons and typical treatment schedules, is 6 to 10 times less than is suggested by current neutron risk estimates.

  7. Intakes of red meat, processed meat, and meat mutagens increase lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tram Kim; Cross, Amanda J; Consonni, Dario; Randi, Giorgia; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Caporaso, Neil E; Sinha, Rashmi; Subar, Amy F; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2009-02-01

    Red and processed meat intake may increase lung cancer risk. However, the epidemiologic evidence is inconsistent and few studies have evaluated the role of meat mutagens formed during high cooking temperatures. We investigated the association of red meat, processed meat, and meat mutagen intake with lung cancer risk in Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology, a population-based case-control study. Primary lung cancer cases (n = 2,101) were recruited from 13 hospitals within the Lombardy region of Italy examining approximately 80% of the cases from the area. Noncancer population controls (n = 2,120), matched to cases on gender, residence, and age, were randomly selected from the same catchment area. Diet was assessed in 1,903 cases and 2,073 controls and used in conjunction with a meat mutagen database to estimate intake of heterocyclic amines (HCA) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Multivariable odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for sex-specific tertiles of intake were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Red and processed meat were positively associated with lung cancer risk (highest-versus-lowest tertile: OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5-2.2; P trend < 0.001 and OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.1; P trend < 0.001, respectively); the risks were strongest among never smokers (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.0; P trend = 0.001 and OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.5-4.2; P trend = 0.001, respectively). HCAs and BaP were significantly associated with increased risk of lung cancer. When separated by histology, significant positive associations for both meat groups were restricted to adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma but not small cell carcinoma of the lung. In summary, red meat, processed meat, and meat mutagens were independently associated with increased risk of lung cancer.

  8. The APC I1307K allele conveys a significant increased risk for cancer.

    PubMed

    Leshno, Ari; Shapira, Shiran; Liberman, Eliezer; Kraus, Sarah; Sror, Miri; Harlap-Gat, Amira; Avivi, Doran; Galazan, Lior; David, Maayan; Maharshak, Nitsan; Moanis, Serhan; Arber, Nadir; Moshkowitz, Menachem

    2016-03-15

    This study is the first attempt to evaluate the association between the APC I1307K variant and overall cancer risk. It is unique in both its large sample size and in the reliability of data in the control group. The findings described in this article have major implications in terms of identifying asymptomatic individuals who are at increased risk to harbor cancer and therefore targeted to be enrolled in specific early detection and prevention programs. The prevalence of the APC I1307K missense mutation among Ashkenazi Jews is ∼ 6%. Carriers are at an increased risk for colorectal neoplasia. In this study, we examined the association of this variant with non-colorectal cancers. Consecutive 13,013 healthy subjects who underwent screening at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center between 2006 and 2014 were enrolled. This population was supplemented with 1,611 cancer patients from the same institution. Demographics, medical history, and pathological data were recorded. Mortality data were obtained from the Ministry of Health's registry. The prevalence of APC I1307K in cancer patients and healthy subjects was compared. The APC I1307K variant was detected in 189 (11.8%) cancer patients compared to 614 (4.7%) healthy subjects, reflecting an adjusted age and sex odds ratio (OR) of 2.53 (p < 0.0001). History of two or more cancer types was associated with a positive carrier prevalence (OR = 4.38 p < 0.0001). Males had significantly increased carrier prevalence in lung, urologic, pancreatic, and skin cancers. The carrier prevalence among females was significantly higher only in breast and skin cancers. Female carriers developed cancer at a significantly older age compared to non-carriers (average 62.7 years vs. 57.8, respectively, p = 0.027), had better survival rates (HR = 0.58, p = 0.022) and overall increased longevity (average age of death 78.8 vs. 70.4 years, respectively, p = 0.003). In conclusion, the APC I1307K variant is a reliable marker for overall cancer risk

  9. Worldwide Increasing Incidence of Thyroid Cancer: Update on Epidemiology and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Francesco; Regalbuto, Concetto; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the last decades, thyroid cancer incidence has continuously and sharply increased all over the world. This review analyzes the possible reasons of this increase. Summary. Many experts believe that the increased incidence of thyroid cancer is apparent, because of the increased detection of small cancers in the preclinical stage. However, a true increase is also possible, as suggested by the observation that large tumors have also increased and gender differences and birth cohort effects are present. Moreover, thyroid cancer mortality, in spite of earlier diagnosis and better treatment, has not decreased but is rather increasing. Therefore, some environmental carcinogens in the industrialized lifestyle may have specifically affected the thyroid. Among potential carcinogens, the increased exposure to medical radiations is the most likely risk factor. Other factors specific for the thyroid like increased iodine intake and increased prevalence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis cannot be excluded, while other factors like the increasing prevalence of obesity are not specific for the thyroid. Conclusions. The increased incidence of thyroid cancer is most likely due to a combination of an apparent increase due to more sensitive diagnostic procedures and of a true increase, a possible consequence of increased population exposure to radiation and to other still unrecognized carcinogens. PMID:23737785

  10. Does exposure to agricultural chemicals increase the risk of prostate cancer among farmers?

    PubMed

    Parent, Marie-Elise; Désy, Marie; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Several studies suggest that farmers may be at increased risk of prostate cancer. The present analysis, based on a large population-based case-control study conducted among men in the Montreal area in the early 1980's, aim at identifying occupational chemicals which may be responsible for such increases. The original study enrolled 449 prostate cancer cases, nearly 4,000 patients with other cancers, as well as 533 population controls. Subjects were interviewed about their occupation histories, and a team of industrial hygienists assigned their past exposures using a checklist of some 300 chemicals. The present analysis was restricted to a study base of men who had worked as farmers earlier in their lives. There were a total of 49 men with prostate cancers, 127 with other cancers and 56 population controls. We created a pool of 183 controls combining the patients with cancers at sites other than the prostate and the population controls. We then estimated the odds ratio for prostate cancer associated with exposure to each of 10 agricultural chemicals, i.e., pesticides, arsenic compounds, acetic acid, gasoline engine emissions, diesel engine emissions, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum, lubricating oils and greases, alkanes with >or=18 carbons, solvents, and mononuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Based on a model adjusting for age, ethnicity, education, and respondent status, there was evidence of a two-fold excess risk of prostate cancer among farmers with substantial exposure to pesticides [odds ratio (OR)=2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-5.1], as compared to unexposed farmers. There was some suggestion, based on few subjects, of increased risks among farmers ever exposed to diesel engine emissions (OR=5.7, 95% CI 1.2-26.5). The results for pesticides are particularly noteworthy in the light of findings from previous studies. Suggestions of trends for elevated risks were noted with other agricultural chemicals, but these are largely novel and need

  11. Rare, Evolutionarily Unlikely Missense Substitutions in ATM Confer Increased Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tavtigian, Sean V.; Oefner, Peter J.; Babikyan, Davit; Hartmann, Anne; Healey, Sue; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Lesueur, Fabienne; Byrnes, Graham B.; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Forey, Nathalie; Feuchtinger, Corinna; Gioia, Lydie; Hall, Janet; Hashibe, Mia; Herte, Barbara; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Thomas, Alun; Vallée, Maxime P.; Voegele, Catherine; Webb, Penelope M.; Whiteman, David C.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Andrulis, Irene L.; John, Esther M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    The susceptibility gene for ataxia telangiectasia, ATM, is also an intermediate-risk breast-cancer-susceptibility gene. However, the spectrum and frequency distribution of ATM mutations that confer increased risk of breast cancer have been controversial. To assess the contribution of rare variants in this gene to risk of breast cancer, we pooled data from seven published ATM case-control mutation-screening studies, including a total of 1544 breast cancer cases and 1224 controls, with data from our own mutation screening of an additional 987 breast cancer cases and 1021 controls. Using an in silico missense-substitution analysis that provides a ranking of missense substitutions from evolutionarily most likely to least likely, we carried out analyses of protein-truncating variants, splice-junction variants, and rare missense variants. We found marginal evidence that the combination of ATM protein-truncating and splice-junction variants contribute to breast cancer risk. There was stronger evidence that a subset of rare, evolutionarily unlikely missense substitutions confer increased risk. On the basis of subset analyses, we hypothesize that rare missense substitutions falling in and around the FAT, kinase, and FATC domains of the protein may be disproportionately responsible for that risk and that a subset of these may confer higher risk than do protein-truncating variants. We conclude that a comparison between the graded distributions of missense substitutions in cases versus controls can complement analyses of truncating variants and help identify susceptibility genes and that this approach will aid interpretation of the data emerging from new sequencing technologies. PMID:19781682

  12. Increased risk of cancer in radon-exposed miners with elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Landa, Karel; Rössner, Pavel; Juzova, Dagmar; Brabec, Marek; Zudova, Zdena; Hola, Nora; Zarska, Hana; Nevsimalova, Emilie

    2002-02-15

    In spite of the extensive use of cytogenetic analysis of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in the biomonitoring of exposure to various mutagens and carcinogens, the long-term effects of an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations in individuals are still uncertain. Few epidemiologic studies have addressed this issue, and a moderate risk of cancer in individuals with an elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations has been observed. In the present study, we analyzed data on 1323 cytogenetic assays and 225 subjects examined because of occupational exposures to radon (range of exposure from 1.7 to 662.3 working level month (WLM)). Seventy-five subjects were non-smokers. We found 36 cases of cancer in this cohort. Chromatid breaks were the most frequently observed type of aberrations (mean frequency 1.2 per 100 cells), which statistically significantly correlated with radon exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficient R=0.22, P<0.001). Also, the frequency of aberrant cells (median of 2.5%) correlated with radon exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficient R=0.16, P<0.02). Smoking and silicosis were not associated with results of cytogenetic analyses. The Cox regression models, which accounted for the age at time of first cytogenetic assay, radon exposure, and smoking showed strong and statistically significant associations between cancer incidence and frequency of chromatid breaks and frequency of aberrant cells, respectively. A 1% increase in the frequency of aberrant cells was paralleled by a 62% increase in risk of cancer (P<0.000). An increase in frequency of chromatid breaks by 1 per 100 cells was followed by a 99% increase in risk of cancer (P<0.000). We obtained similar results when we analyzed the incidence of lung cancer and the incidence other than lung cancer separately. Contrary to frequency of chromatid breaks and frequency of aberrant cells, the frequency of chromatid exchanges, and chromosome-type aberrations were not predictive of cancer.

  13. Increased risk of cancer after Bell's palsy: a 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Keller, Joseph J; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2012-11-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) type I or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) has been recognized as the most common pathomechanism underlying Bell's palsy. There is also increased reactivation of HSV or VZV in patients with immunosuppressed states and in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk for cancer during a 5-year follow-up period after diagnosis of Bell's palsy by using a population-based dataset in Taiwan. We used data from the "Longitudinal Health Insurance Database". We identified 2,618 patients with Bell's palsy as the study cohort and randomly selected 13,090 patients to be used as a comparison cohort. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to compare the 5-year risk of subsequent cancer between the study and comparison cohorts. We found that the incidence of cancer was 1.55 (95 % CI 1.35-1.78) per 100 person-years for patients with Bell's palsy and 1.09 (95 % CI 1.02-1.18) per 100 person-years for comparison patients. After censoring cases that died from non-cancer causes during the follow-up period and adjusting for urbanization, monthly income, geographic region, and diabetes, the hazard ratio (HR) for cancer during the 5-year follow-up period for patients with Bell's palsy was 1.43 times that for comparison patients (95 % CI 1.22-1.73). There was a particularly increased risk of oral cancer (HR = 2.49; 95 % CI 1.54-4.03) for patients with Bell's palsy compared with the other patients. We conclude that patients with Bell's palsy were at significant risk of cancer during a 5-year follow-up period after diagnosis.

  14. CYP2B6*6 is associated with increased breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Justenhoven, Christina; Pentimalli, Daniela; Rabstein, Sylvia; Harth, Volker; Lotz, Anne; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Häberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamilla; Liu, Janjun; Li, Jingmei; Baisch, Christian; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud

    2014-01-15

    The cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) is involved in the metabolism of testosterone. Functional changes in this enzyme may influence endogenous hormone exposure, which has been associated with risk of breast cancer. To assess potential associations between two functional polymorphisms CYP2B6_516_G>T (rs3745274) and CYP2B6_785_A>G (rs2279343) and breast cancer risk, we established a specific matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry assay. The GENICA breast cancer case-control study showed associations between the variant genotypes CYP2B6_516_TT and CYP2B6_785_GG and breast cancer risk with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.34 (p = 0.001) and 1.31 (p = 0.002), respectively. A similar effect was observed for carriers of the CYP2B6_516_T allele in a validation study including four independent studies from Germany, Sweden and USA. In a pooled analysis of all five studies involving 4,638 breast cancer cases and 3,594 controls of European ancestry, carriers of the CYP2B6_516_G and the CYP2B6_785_G variant had an increased breast cancer risk with ORs of 1.10 (p = 0.027) and 1.10 (p = 0.031), respectively. We conclude that the genetic variants CYP2B6_516_G and CYP2B6_785_G (designated CYP2B6*6), which are known to decrease activity of the CYP2B6 enzyme, contribute to an increased breast cancer risk.

  15. Polymorphisms in prostate stem cell antigen gene rs2294008 increase gastric cancer risk in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhirong; Wu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Fanggen; Yu, Jun; Xue, Ling; Hao, Yuantao; Wang, Yiming; Chen, Minhu; Sung, Joseph J Y; Hu, Pinjin

    2011-05-01

    A recent genome-wide study identified a strong association between polymorphisms in the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene and the risk of diffuse-type of gastric cancer in Japanese and Korean population. In this case-control study, we aimed to investigate the possible association between PSCA rs2294008 C/T with clinicopathological features and the prognosis of gastric cancer in a Southern Chinese population. Genotypes of 460 gastric cancer patients and 549 controls were determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing. We found that individuals with at least one copy of the rs2294008T allele (CT or TT genotype) had an increased risk for gastric cancer compared with CC genotype (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.10-1.82, P = 0.006). Further stratification analyses indicated that the effect of PSCA rs2294008T carriers was noteworthy in intestinal type (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.18-2.04, P = 0.002), poorly differentiated (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.19-2.13, P = 0.002), noncardia (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.17-2.04, P = 0.002) subtypes of gastric cancer. Cox proportional hazards analyses demonstrated that TT genotype (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.22-3.69, P = 0.008) as well as TNM staging were prognostic factors of gastric cancer patients. In conclusion, The T allele of PSCA rs2294008 is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer, especially intestinal type, poorly differentiated, early onset, and noncardia gastric cancer in Chinese population. TNM staging and TT genotype might be involved in the prognosis of gastric cancer patients.

  16. Increased risk of lung cancer mortality among residents near an asbestos product manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Shinji; Kurumatani, Norio; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yorifuji, Takashi; Suzuki, Etsuji

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether individuals exposed to asbestos by living near an asbestos-manufacturing facility experienced increased lung cancer mortality. We studied a neighborhood around such a plant in the central Japanese city of Hashima. From 1943 to 1991 this plant produced insulation and packing material using amosite- and chrysotile-type asbestos fibers. The study group was comprised of 577 households. We obtained demographic information by a questionnaire and determined the underlying cause of death for deceased household members from death certificates. Using hourly meteorological data from local observatories, we estimated relative asbestos concentrations in the plant's vicinity, determined the quartile boundaries, and designated each study subject's quartile of ambient exposure. Finally, we calculated standardized mortality ratios to evaluate the association of residential asbestos with lung cancer risk. Our findings strongly suggest that neighborhood asbestos exposure can increase the risk of lung cancer mortality in men and probably in women.

  17. Knowledge and accuracy of perceived personal risk in underserved women who are at increased risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cyrus-David, Mfon S

    2010-12-01

    The state of knowledge and personal risk perception among women who are underserved or racial minorities at increased risk of breast cancer (BC) who may be eligible for chemoprevention is limited. The BC knowledge and accuracy of perceived personal risk of a cross-sectional study population of such women residing in the greater Houston Texas area were assessed. The majority had below average knowledge scores and perceived risk inaccurately. The lesser educated were also less knowledgeable. Educational interventions targeted towards this population would enhance their knowledge of BC and empower them to make informed decisions about BC chemoprevention.

  18. Do Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) Increase the Risk of Thyroid Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yawei; Guo, Grace L.; Han, Xuesong; Zhu, Cairong; Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Zhu, Yong; Boyle, Peter; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2008-01-01

    An increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported in many parts of the world including the United States during the past several decades. Recently emerging evidence has demonstrated that polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs), particularly polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alter thyroid hormone homeostasis and cause thyroid dysfunction. However, few studies have been conducted to test whether exposure to PBDEs and other PHAHs increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Here, we hypothesize that elevated exposure to PHAHs, particularly PBDEs, increases the risk of thyroid cancer and may explain part of the increase in incidence of thyroid cancer during the past several decades. In addition, genetic and epigenetic variations in metabolic pathway genes may alter the expression and function of metabolic enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of endogenous thyroid hormones and the detoxification of PBDEs and other PHAHs. Such variation may result in different individual susceptibilities to PBDEs and other PHAHs and the subsequent development of thyroid cancer. The investigation of this hypothesis will lead to an improved understanding of the role of PBDEs and other PHAHs in thyroid tumorigenesis and may provide a real means to prevent this deadly disease. PMID:19122824

  19. Hormone Replacement Therapy: An Increased Risk of Recurrence and Mortality for Breast Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Molly; Dains, Joyce E.; Madsen, Lydia T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown an increased risk of recurrence and mortality among women who have used primarily oral HRT after breast cancer. However, many of these studies have had design flaws that may impact the findings. Numerous investigators have concluded that additional RCTs should be performed, but because of ethical issues and logistic challenges, large-scale RCTs are unlikely. Thus, the authors conducted an integrative review investigating recurrence and mortality data among breast cancer survivors who have used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). They recommend a stepwise algorithm for treating vaginal symptoms in breast cancer survivors: (1) start with nonhormonal treatments; (2) progress to a detailed discussion among patients and health-care professionals about the current known risks and benefits of vaginal estrogen; and (3) conclude with mutual decision-making between health-care providers and patients regarding the use of vaginal estrogen treatment. PMID:26705493

  20. Increased risk of lung cancer among different types of professional drivers in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J.; Raaschou-Nielsen, O.; Olsen, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study risk of lung cancer among groups of professional drivers probably exposed to different levels of traffic exhaust fumes. METHODS: A nationwide case-control study (1970-89) based on employees comprising 28,744 men with primary lung cancer and incidence density sampled matched controls (1:1). Employment histories were reconstructed back to 1964 for each study subject from the records of a nationwide pension scheme with compulsory membership. Socioeconomic status was derived from the individual job title taken from the national population registry. Information on tobacco smoking habits was available from historical surveys. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (ORs) based on conditional logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: In total 2251 of the male lung cancer cases had been employed as bus, lorry, taxi, or unspecified drivers. No significant difference in tobacco smoking habits was found among professional male Danish drivers and the total employed population. The OR for lung cancer adjusted for socioeconomic status was 1.6 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2 to 2.2) among taxi drivers, who were considered to be exposed to the highest concentrations of vehicle exhaust fumes, and 1.3 (1.2 to 1.5) for bus and lorry drivers. The OR was 1.4 (1.3 to 1.5) for unspecified drivers. The adjusted risk of lung cancer increased significantly with increasing duration of employment as a driver, and the risk was highest for long term taxi drivers with 10 years of lag time (OR 3.0; 1.2 to 6.8). CONCLUSION: Occupational factors, probably exposure to vehicle exhaust, seems to play an important part in the development of lung cancer among drivers.   PMID:9614396

  1. Trans-Resveratrol Alters Mammary Promoter Hypermethylation in Women at Increased Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weizhu; Qin, Wenyi; Zhang, Ke; Rottinghaus, George E.; Chen, Yin-Chieh; Kliethermes, Beth; Sauter, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol, present in high concentration in the skin of red grapes and red wine, has a dose-dependent antiproliferative effect in vitro, prevents the formation of mammary tumors, and has been touted as a chemopreventive agent. Based upon in vitro studies demonstrating that trans-resveratrol downregulates the expression of 1) DNA methyltransferases and 2) the cancer promoting prostaglandin (PG)E2, we determined if trans-resveratrol had a dose-related effect on DNA methylation and prostaglandin expression in humans. Thirty-nine adult women at increased breast cancer risk were randomized in double-blind fashion to placebo, 5 or 50 mg trans-resveratrol twice daily for 12 wk. Methylation assessment of 4 cancer-related genes (p16, RASSF-1α, APC, CCND2) was performed on mammary ductoscopy specimens. The predominant resveratrol species in serum was the glucuronide metabolite. Total trans-resveratrol and glucuronide metabolite serum levels increased after consuming both trans-resveratrol doses (P < .001 for both). RASSF-1α methylation decreased with increasing levels of serum trans-resveratrol (P = .047). The change in RASSF-1α methylation was directly related to the change in PGE2 (P = .045). This work provides novel insights into the effects of trans-resveratrol on the breast of women at increased breast cancer risk, including a decrease in methylation of the tumor suppressor gene RASSF-1α. Because of the limited sample size, our findings should be validated in a larger study. PMID:22332908

  2. Does fertility treatment increase the risk of uterine cancer? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Saso, Srdjan; Louis, Louay S; Doctor, Farah; Hamed, Ali Hassan; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Yazbek, Joseph; Bora, Shabana; Abdalla, Hossam; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Thum, Meen-Yau

    2015-12-01

    An ongoing debate over the last two decades has focused on whether fertility treatment in women may lead to an increased risk of developing uterine cancer over a period of time. Uterine cancer (including mainly endometrial carcinoma and the less common uterine sarcoma) is the commonest reproductive tract cancer and the fourth commonest cancer in women in the UK. Our objective was to assess the association between fertility drugs used in the treatment of female infertility (both as an independent therapy and during in vitro fertilization cycles) and the development of uterine cancer. A literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar databases for comparative studies until December 2014 to investigate a clinical significance of fertility treatment on the incidence of developing uterine cancer. General and MESH search headings, as well as the 'related articles' function were applied. All comparative studies of 'fertility treatment' versus 'non-fertility treatment' reporting the incidence of uterine cancer as an outcome were included. Uterine cancer incorporated the following terms: uterine cancer, uterine body tumours, uterine sarcomas and endometrial cancers. The primary outcome of interest was the uterine cancer incidence in all 'fertility treatment' versus 'non-fertility treatment' patient groups. Secondary outcomes of interest were: (a) uterine cancer incidence in 'IVF' versus 'non-IVF' patient groups; and (b) uterine cancer incidence according to type of fertility drug used. Odds ratio was the summary statistic. Random-effects modelling, graphical exploration and sensitivity analysis were used to evaluate the consistency of the calculated treatment effect. We included six studies in our final analysis, which comprised 776,224 patients in total. Of these, 103,758 had undergone fertility treatment and 672,466 had not. There was 100% agreement between the two reviewers regarding the data extraction. All the studies

  3. 8q24 rs6983267G variant is associated with increased thyroid cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Estrada, Ana; Lott, Paul; Martin, Lynn; Echeverry, Guadalupe Polanco; Velez, Alejandro; Neta, Gila; Takahasi, Meiko; Saenko, Vladimir; Mitsutake, Norisato; Jaeguer, Emma; Duque, Carlos Simon; Rios, Alejandro; Bohorquez, Mabel; Prieto, Rodrigo; Criollo, Angel; Echeverry, Magdalena; Tomlinson, Ian; Carvajal Carmona, Luis G.

    2015-01-01

    The G allele of the rs6983267 single nucleotide polymorphism, located on chromosome 8q24, has been associated with increased risk of several cancer types. The association between rs6983267G and thyroid cancer has been tested in different populations, mostly of European ancestry, and has led to inconclusive results. While significant associations have been reported in the British and Polish populations, no association has been detected in populations from Spain, Italy and the USA. To further investigate the role of rs6983267G in thyroid cancer susceptibility, we evaluated rs6983267 genotypes in three populations of different continental ancestry (British Isles, Colombia and Japan), providing a total of 3,067 cases and 8,575 controls. We detected significant associations between rs6983267G and thyroid cancer in the British Isles (Odds Ratio, OR= 1.19, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.11–1.27, P= 4.03 × 10−7), Japan (OR= 1.20, 95% CI: 1.03–1.41, P= 0.022) and a borderline significant association of similar effect direction and size in Colombia (OR= 1.19, 95% CI: 0.99–1.44, P= 0.069). A meta-analysis of our multi-ethnic study and previously published non-overlapping datasets, which included a total of 5,484 cases and 12,594 controls, confirmed the association between rs6983267G and thyroid cancer (P= 1.23 × 10−7, OR= 1.13, 95% CI: 1.07–1.18). Our results therefore support the notion that rs6983267G is a bona fide thyroid cancer risk variant that increases the risk of disease by ~13%. PMID:26290501

  4. Does Exposure to Agricultural Chemicals Increase the Risk of Prostate Cancer among Farmers?

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Marie-Élise; Désy, Marie; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Several studies suggest that farmers may be at increased risk of prostate cancer. The present analysis, based on a large population-based case-control study conducted among men in the Montreal area in the early 1980’s, aim at identifying occupational chemicals which may be responsible for such increases. The original study enrolled 449 prostate cancer cases, nearly 4,000 patients with other cancers, as well as 533 population controls. Subjects were interviewed about their occupation histories, and a team of industrial hygienists assigned their past exposures using a checklist of some 300 chemicals. The present analysis was restricted to a study base of men who had worked as farmers earlier in their lives. There were a total of 49 men with prostate cancers, 127 with other cancers and 56 population controls. We created a pool of 183 controls combining the patients with cancers at sites other than the prostate and the population controls. We then estimated the odds ratio for prostate cancer associated with exposure to each of 10 agricultural chemicals, i.e., pesticides, arsenic compounds, acetic acid, gasoline engine emissions, diesel engine emissions, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum, lubricating oils and greases, alkanes with ≥18 carbons, solvents, and mononuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Based on a model adjusting for age, ethnicity, education, and respondent status, there was evidence of a two-fold excess risk of prostate cancer among farmers with substantial exposure to pesticides [odds ratio (OR)=2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–5.1], as compared to unexposed farmers. There was some suggestion, based on few subjects, of increased risks among farmers ever exposed to diesel engine emissions (OR=5.7, 95% CI 1.2–26.5). The results for pesticides are particularly noteworthy in the light of findings from previous studies. Suggestions of trends for elevated risks were noted with other agricultural chemicals, but these are largely novel and

  5. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  6. Estrogen withdrawal, increased breast cancer risk and the KRAS-variant

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Terri P; Jung, Song-Yi; Kerin, Michael J; Salzman, David W; Nallur, Sunitha; Nemec, Antonio A; Dookwah, Michelle; Sadofsky, Jackie; Paranjape, Trupti; Kelly, Olivia; Chan, Elcie; Miller, Nicola; Sweeney, Karl J; Zelterman, Daniel; Sweasy, Joann; Pilarski, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2015-01-01

    The KRAS-variant is a biologically functional, microRNA binding site variant, which predicts increased cancer risk especially for women. Because external exposures, such as chemotherapy, differentially impact the effect of this mutation, we evaluated the association of estrogen exposures, breast cancer (BC) risk and tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant. Women with BC (n = 1712), the subset with the KRAS-variant (n = 286) and KRAS-variant unaffected controls (n = 80) were evaluated, and hormonal exposures, KRAS-variant status, and pathology were compared. The impact of estrogen withdrawal on transformation of isogenic normal breast cell lines with or without the KRAS-variant was studied. Finally, the association and presentation characteristics of the KRAS-variant and multiple primary breast cancer (MPBC) were evaluated. KRAS-variant BC patients were more likely to have ovarian removal pre-BC diagnosis than non-variant BC patients (p = 0.033). In addition, KRAS-variant BC patients also appeared to have a lower estrogen state than KRAS-variant unaffected controls, with a lower BMI (P < 0.001). Finally, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) discontinuation in KRAS-variant patients was associated with a diagnosis of triple negative BC (P < 0.001). Biologically confirming our clinical findings, acute estrogen withdrawal led to oncogenic transformation in KRAS-variant positive isogenic cell lines. Finally, KRAS-variant BC patients had greater than an 11-fold increased risk of presenting with MPBC compared to non-variant patients (45.39% vs 6.78%, OR 11.44 [3.42–37.87], P < 0.001). Thus, estrogen withdrawal and a low estrogen state appear to increase BC risk and to predict aggressive tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant, who are also significantly more likely to present with multiple primary breast cancer. PMID:25961464

  7. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight.

  8. Increased Cancer Mortality Risk for NASA's ISS Astronauts: The Contribution of Diagnostic Radiological Examinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, C.W.; Picco, C. E.; Gonzalez, S. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Shavers, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the radiation exposures and risks associated with long-term spaceflight on the International Space Station. NASA's risk model of cancer mortality is also presented.

  9. High Dietary Glycemic Load is Associated With Increased Risk of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zelenskiy, Svetlana; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Tucker, Thomas C.; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    High dietary glycemic load (GL) has been inconsistently associated with risk of colon cancer. We analyzed data for 1,093 incident cases and 1,589 controls in a population-based case-control study of colon cancer to further clarify the GL-colon cancer relationship. GL was assessed using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Cases had a significantly higher GL intake (mean = 136.4, SD = 24.5) than controls (mean = 132.8, SD = 25.2) (P = 0.0003). In a multivariate unconditional logistic regression model, the odds ratios (ORs) for colon cancer increased significantly with increasing GL: compared to the bottom quartile of GL, the ORs (95% CI) for the 2nd through the upper quartiles were 1.38 (1.06, 1.80), 1.67 (1.30, 2.13), and 1.61 (1.25, 2.07), respectively (Ptrend < 0.0001). Stratified analyses showed that the association was more pronounced among older participants [ORs (95% CI) for the 2nd through the upper quartiles were 1.35 (0.91, 2.00), 1.87 (1.29, 2.71), 2.02 (1.39, 2.95), respectively] than among younger participants [ORs were 1.46 (1.02, 2.10), 1.53 (1.09, 2.15), and 1.35 (0.96, 1.91), respectively] (Pint = 0.02). Our results provide support for the hypothesis that a diet with high GL increases the risk of colon cancer. PMID:24611536

  10. Addressing the health benefits and risks, involving vitamin D or skin cancer, of increased sun exposure

    PubMed Central

    Moan, Johan; Porojnicu, Alina Carmen; Dahlback, Arne; Setlow, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation is the main cause of skin cancers. However, it also is a main source of vitamin D for humans. Because the optimal status of vitamin D protects against internal cancers and a number of other diseases, a controversy exists: Will increased sun exposure lead to net health benefits or risks? We calculated the relative yield of vitamin D photosynthesis as a function of latitude with a radiative transfer model and cylinder geometry for the human skin surface. The annual yield of vitamin D is 3.4 and 4.8 times larger below the equator than in the U.K. and Scandinavia, respectively. In populations with similar skin types, there are clear latitude gradients of all major forms of skin cancer, indicating a north–south gradient in real sun exposure. Surprisingly, the incidence rates of major internal cancers also increase from north to south. However, the survival prognosis also improves significantly from north to south. Reasons for these findings are discussed in view of the role of vitamin D. In Norway, melanoma rates increased by a factor of 6 from 1960 to 1990, while the prognosis improved in the same period. After 1990, melanoma rates have remained constant or even decreased in age groups <50 years, whereas the prognosis has not improved further. These data, together with those for internal cancers and the beneficial effects of an optimal vitamin D status, indicate that increased sun exposure may lead to improved cancer prognosis and, possibly, give more positive than adverse health effects. PMID:18180454

  11. Paternal overweight is associated with increased breast cancer risk in daughters in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Fontelles, Camile Castilho; Carney, Elissa; Clarke, Johan; Nguyen, Nguyen M.; Yin, Chao; Jin, Lu; Cruz, M. Idalia; Ong, Thomas Prates; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; de Assis, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have shown that maternal weight and nutrition in pregnancy affects offspring’s breast cancer risk, no studies have investigated the impact of paternal body weight on daughters’ risk of this disease. Here, we show that diet-induced paternal overweight around the time of conception can epigenetically reprogram father’s germ-line and modulate their daughters’ birth weight and likelihood of developing breast cancer, using a mouse model. Increased body weight was associated with changes in the miRNA expression profile in paternal sperm. Daughters of overweight fathers had higher rates of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors which were associated with delayed mammary gland development and alterations in mammary miRNA expression. The hypoxia signaling pathway, targeted by miRNAs down-regulated in daughters of overweight fathers, was activated in their mammary tissues and tumors. This study provides evidence that paternal peri-conceptional body weight may affect daughters’ mammary development and breast cancer risk and warrants further studies in other animal models and humans. PMID:27339599

  12. Paternal overweight is associated with increased breast cancer risk in daughters in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fontelles, Camile Castilho; Carney, Elissa; Clarke, Johan; Nguyen, Nguyen M; Yin, Chao; Jin, Lu; Cruz, M Idalia; Ong, Thomas Prates; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; de Assis, Sonia

    2016-06-24

    While many studies have shown that maternal weight and nutrition in pregnancy affects offspring's breast cancer risk, no studies have investigated the impact of paternal body weight on daughters' risk of this disease. Here, we show that diet-induced paternal overweight around the time of conception can epigenetically reprogram father's germ-line and modulate their daughters' birth weight and likelihood of developing breast cancer, using a mouse model. Increased body weight was associated with changes in the miRNA expression profile in paternal sperm. Daughters of overweight fathers had higher rates of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors which were associated with delayed mammary gland development and alterations in mammary miRNA expression. The hypoxia signaling pathway, targeted by miRNAs down-regulated in daughters of overweight fathers, was activated in their mammary tissues and tumors. This study provides evidence that paternal peri-conceptional body weight may affect daughters' mammary development and breast cancer risk and warrants further studies in other animal models and humans.

  13. APOBEC3 deletion increases the risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meili; Wang, Shuyun; Zhou, Guanzhou; Sun, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a deletion in the human apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) gene cluster has been associated with a modest increased risk of breast cancer, but studies yielded inconsistent results. Therefore we performed a meta-analysis to derive a more precise conclusion. Six studies including 18241 subjects were identified by searching PubMed and Embase databases from inception to April 2016. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were evaluated under allele contrast, dominant, recessive, homozygous, and heterozygous models. All the analyses suggested a correlation of APOBEC3 deletion with increased breast cancer risk (D vs I: OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.23-1.36; D/D+I/D vs I/I: OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.26-1.43; D/D vs I/D+ I/I: OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.36-1.68; D/D vs I/I: OR = 1.75, 95% CI= 1.56-1.95; I/D vs I/I: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.19-1.36). Stratified analysis by ethnicity showed that the relationship is stronger and more stable in Asians. In summary, our current work indicated that APOBEC3 copy number variations might have a good screening accuracy for breast cancer. PMID:27602762

  14. Increased Risk of Cancer in relation to Gout: A Review of Three Prospective Cohort Studies with 50,358 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijie; Xu, Donghua; Wang, Bin; Yan, Shushan; Wang, Xiaochen; Yin, Yin; Wang, Xuehao; Sun, Beicheng; Sun, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Gout is a common inflammatory disease characterized by acute arthritis and hyperuricemia. A number of epidemiological studies have suggested the critical role of gout in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between gout and cancer risk by meta-analysis of all relevant studies published to date. A comprehensive literature search in PubMed and Embase databases from their inception up to July 1, 2014, was performed to identify eligible studies. The strength for relationship between gout and the risk of different cancers was evaluated by calculating pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). All analyses were carried out by STATA 12.0 software. Gout patients were at an increased risk of cancer, particularly urological cancers, digestive system cancers, and lung cancer. No such significant association between gout and the risk of breast or brain cancers was observed. Sensitivity analysis did not materially alter the pooled results. Gout is a risk factor of cancer, particularly that of urological cancers, digestive system cancers, and lung cancer. The pooled data further support the hypothesis of a link between gout and carcinogenesis. PMID:26504360

  15. XPC Polymorphism Increases Risk of Digestive System Cancers: Current Evidence from A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia; Zhou, Li-tao; Zhang, Shan-chun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) participates in the initial recognition of DNA damage during nucleotide excision repair process in global genomic repair. Our meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between three polymorphisms (Lys939Gln, PAT+/– and Ala499Val) of XPC gene and risk of digestive system cancers. Methods All the relevant case-control studies published to April 2011 were identified through searching PubMed. Digestive system cancer risk with the three polymorphisms was estimated for each study by odds ratio (OR) with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results We found an increased overall risk for digestive system cancers in all three models of Lys939Gln A>C (AC/CC vs. AA: OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.11–1.30; CC vs. AC/AA: OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11–1.39; CC vs. AA: OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.21–1.53). When stratified by ethnicity, results remained significant in Asian population (AC/CC vs. AA: OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02–1.37; CC vs. AC/AA: OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.1–1.51; CC vs. AA: OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.08–1.70), but not for Caucasians. However for Ala499Val C>T, a significant protective effect of T allele was only observed in the dominant model. Otherwise, no significant results were observed for PAT+/–. Conclusion XPC Lys939Gln A>C polymorphism may play an important role in digestive system cancer susceptibility. PMID:23359774

  16. A Western Dietary Pattern Increases Prostate Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fabiani, Roberto; Minelli, Liliana; Bertarelli, Gaia; Bacci, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns were recently applied to examine the relationship between eating habits and prostate cancer (PC) risk. While the associations between PC risk with the glycemic index and Mediterranean score have been reviewed, no meta-analysis is currently available on dietary patterns defined by “a posteriori” methods. A literature search was carried out (PubMed, Web of Science) to identify studies reporting the relationship between dietary patterns and PC risk. Relevant dietary patterns were selected and the risks estimated were calculated by a random-effect model. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs), for a first-percentile increase in dietary pattern score, were combined by a dose-response meta-analysis. Twelve observational studies were included in the meta-analysis which identified a “Healthy pattern” and a “Western pattern”. The Healthy pattern was not related to PC risk (OR = 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–1.04) while the Western pattern significantly increased it (OR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.08–1.65). In addition, the “Carbohydrate pattern”, which was analyzed in four articles, was positively associated with a higher PC risk (OR = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.35–2.00). A significant linear trend between the Western (p = 0.011) pattern, the Carbohydrate (p = 0.005) pattern, and the increment of PC risk was observed. The small number of studies included in the meta-analysis suggests that further investigation is necessary to support these findings. PMID:27754328

  17. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Simon L; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted). Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age. PMID:26975491

  18. The 8q24 rs6983267G variant is associated with increased thyroid cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Estrada, Ana; Lott, Paul; Martin, Lynn; Polanco Echeverry, Guadalupe; Velez, Alejandro; Neta, Gila; Takahasi, Meiko; Saenko, Vladimir; Mitsutake, Norisato; Jaeguer, Emma; Duque, Carlos Simon; Rios, Alejandro; Bohorquez, Mabel; Prieto, Rodrigo; Criollo, Angel; Echeverry, Magdalena; Tomlinson, Ian; Carmona, Luis G Carvajal

    2015-10-01

    The G allele of the rs6983267 single-nucleotide polymorphism, located on chromosome 8q24, has been associated with increased risk of several cancer types. The association between rs6983267G and thyroid cancer (TC) has been tested in different populations, mostly of European ancestry, and has led to inconclusive results. While significant associations have been reported in the British and Polish populations, no association has been detected in populations from Spain, Italy and the USA. To further investigate the role of rs6983267G in TC susceptibility, we evaluated rs6983267 genotypes in three populations of different continental ancestry (British Isles, Colombia and Japan), providing a total of 3067 cases and 8575 controls. We detected significant associations between rs6983267G and TC in the British Isles (odds ratio (OR)=1.19, 95% CI: 1.11-1.27, P=4.03×10(-7)), Japan (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 1.03-1.41, P=0.022) and a borderline significant association of similar effect direction and size in Colombia (OR=1.19, 95% CI: 0.99-1.44, P=0.069). A meta-analysis of our multi-ethnic study and previously published non-overlapping datasets, which included a total of 5484 cases and 12 594 controls, confirmed the association between rs6983267G and TC (P=1.23×10(-7), OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.08-1.18). Our results therefore support the notion that rs6983267G is a bona fide TC risk variant that increases the risk of disease by ∼13%.

  19. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases after ...

  20. Pelvic inflammatory disease increases the risk of a second primary malignancy in patients with cervical cancer treated by surgery alone.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chen, Chien-An; Lee, Moon-Sing; Lin, Hon-Yi; Li, Chung-Yi; Su, Yu-Chieh; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Hung, Shih-Kai

    2016-11-01

    As the number of long-term cervical cancer survivors continues to increase because of improvements in treatment, concerns about second primary malignancy have grown. The high-risk area of second primary cancers in cervical cancer survivors is the pelvis. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) could be a useful marker for gynecological cancers. Thus, we designed a large-scale, nationwide, controlled cohort study to investigate whether PID or other risk factors increased the risk of second primary cancers in patients with cervical cancer treated by surgery alone.Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 24,444 cervical cancer patients were identified using the Registry Data for Catastrophic Illness and the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Patients who received definite surgery were selected. To exclude the effect on second primary malignancy by treatment modalities, all cervical patients who ever having received adjuvant or definite radiotherapy or chemotherapy for primary cervical cancer were excluded. Finally, 3860 cervical cancer patients treated by surgery alone without adjuvant treatments were analyzed.Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the cumulative risks. Regarding the incidence of second primary cancers, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was used.The median follow-up time was 56.6 months. The 6-year cumulative risk of second primary cancers is 0.16% and 0.12% for PID and without PID, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, age of less than 50 years, the presence of diabetes mellitus, and PID were significantly positivity associated with the risk of second primary cancers. The hazard ratios (HRs) of age less than 50 years, diabetes mellitus, and PID were 1.38 (95% CI = 1.11-2.04), 1.40 (95% CI = 1.06-1.85), and 1.35 (95% CI = 1.00-1.81), respectively. A higher incidence of second primary cancers was observed in the genitals, bladder, and

  1. Increased polysomy of chromosome 7 in bronchial epithelium from patients at high risk for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Neft, R.E.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    Current models of carcinogenesis suggest that tissues progress through multiple genetic and epigenetic changes which ultimately lead to development of invasive cancer. Epidemiologic studies of Peto, R.R. and J.A. Doll indicate that the accumulation of these genetic changes over time, rather than any single unique genetic change, is probably responsible for development of the malignant phenotype. The bronchial epithelium of cigarette smokers is diffusely exposed to a broad spectrum of carcinogens, toxicants, and tumor promoters contained in tobacco smoke. This exposure increases the risk of developing multiple, independent premalignant foci throughout the lower respiratory tract that may contain independent gene aberrations. This {open_quotes}field cancerization{close_quotes} theory is supported by studies that have demonstrated progressive histologic changes distributed throughout the lower respiratory tract of smokers. A series of autopsy studies demonstrated that cigarette smokers exhibit premalignant histologic changes ranging from hyperplasia and metaplasia to severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ diffusely throughout the bronchial mucosa. The proximal bronchi appear to exhibit the greatest number of changes, particularly at bifurcations. The results described are the first to quantitate the frequency for a chromosome aberration in {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} bronchial epithelial cells.

  2. Recurrent HOXB13 mutations in the Dutch population do not associate with increased breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingjing; Prager–van der Smissen, Wendy J. C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Collée, J. Margriet; Cornelissen, Sten; Lamping, Roy; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Foekens, John A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Verhoef, Senno; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Martens, John W. M.; Hollestelle, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The HOXB13 p.G84E mutation has been firmly established as a prostate cancer susceptibility allele. Although HOXB13 also plays a role in breast tumor progression, the association of HOXB13 p.G84E with breast cancer risk is less evident. Therefore, we comprehensively interrogated the entire HOXB13 coding sequence for mutations in 1,250 non-BRCA1/2 familial breast cancer cases and 800 controls. We identified two predicted deleterious missense mutations, p.G84E and p.R217C, that were recurrent among breast cancer cases and further evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in a larger study. Taken together, 4,520 familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases and 3,127 controls were genotyped including the cases and controls of the whole gene screen. The concordance rate for the genotyping assays compared with Sanger sequencing was 100%. The prostate cancer risk allele p.G84E was identified in 18 (0.56%) of 3,187 cases and 16 (0.70%) of 2,300 controls (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.41–1.59, P = 0.54). Additionally, p.R217C was identified in 10 (0.31%) of 3,208 cases and 2 (0.087%) of 2,288 controls (OR = 3.57, 95% CI = 0.76–33.57, P = 0.14). These results imply that none of the recurrent HOXB13 mutations in the Dutch population are associated with breast cancer risk, although it may be worthwhile to evaluate p.R217C in a larger study. PMID:27424772

  3. Exposure to nitrosamines in thirdhand tobacco smoke increases cancer risk in non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Özel, Mustafa Z; Lewis, Alastair C; Marcé, Rosa M; Borrull, Francesc; Hamilton, Jacqueline F

    2014-10-01

    In addition to passive inhalation, non-smokers, and especially children, are exposed to residual tobacco smoke gases and particles that are deposited to surfaces and dust, known as thirdhand smoke (THS). However, until now the potential cancer risks of this pathway of exposure have been highly uncertain and not considered in public health policy. In this study, we estimate for the first time the potential cancer risk by age group through non-dietary ingestion and dermal exposure to carcinogen N-nitrosamines and tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) measured in house dust samples. Using a highly sensitive and selective analytical approach we have determined the presence of nicotine, eight N-nitrosamines and five tobacco-specific nitrosamines in forty-six settled dust samples from homes occupied by both smokers and non-smokers. Using observations of house dust composition, we have estimated the cancer risk by applying the most recent official toxicological information. Calculated cancer risks through exposure to the observed levels of TSNAs at an early life stage (1 to 6years old) exceeded the upper-bound risk recommended by the USEPA in 77% of smokers' and 64% of non-smokers' homes. The maximum risk from exposure to all nitrosamines measured in a smoker occupied home was one excess cancer case per one thousand population exposed. The results presented here highlight the potentially severe long-term consequences of THS exposure, particularly to children, and give strong evidence of its potential health risk and, therefore, they should be considered when developing future environmental and health policies.

  4. Increased Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastric Cancer Risk in the Andean Region of Colombia Is Mediated by Spermine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; de Sablet, Thibaut; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Barry, Daniel P.; Verriere, Thomas G.; Sierra, J. Carolina; Hardbower, Dana M.; Delgado, Alberto G.; Schneider, Barbara G.; Israel, Dawn A.; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Nagy, Toni A.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Bravo, Luis E.; Peek, Richard M.; Fox, James G.; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.; Correa, Pelayo; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer, the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. More than half of the world’s population is infected, making universal eradication impractical. Clinical trials suggest that antibiotic treatment only reduces gastric cancer risk in patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), and is ineffective once preneoplastic lesions of multifocal atrophic gastritis (MAG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) have occurred. Therefore, additional strategies for risk stratification and chemoprevention of gastric cancer are needed. We have implicated polyamines, generated by the rate limiting enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), in gastric carcinogenesis. During H. pylori infection, the enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX) is induced, which generates hydrogen peroxide from the catabolism of the polyamine spermine. Herein, we assessed the role of SMOX in the increased gastric cancer risk in Colombia associated with the Andean mountain region when compared to the low risk region on the Pacific coast. When co-cultured with gastric epithelial cells, clinical strains of H. pylori from the high risk region induced more SMOX expression and oxidative DNA damage, and less apoptosis than low risk strains. These findings were not attributable to differences in the CagA oncoprotein. Gastric tissues from subjects from the high risk region exhibited greater levels of SMOX and oxidative DNA damage by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, and this occurred in NAG, MAG, and IM. In Mongolian gerbils, a prototype colonizing strain from the high risk region induced more SMOX, DNA damage, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma than a colonizing strain from the low risk region. Treatment of gerbils with either α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ODC, or MDL 72527, an inhibitor of SMOX, reduced gastric dysplasia and carcinoma, as well as apoptosis-resistant cells with DNA damage. These data indicate that aberrant activation of polyamine-driven oxidative

  5. Lifetime alcohol intake is associated with an increased risk of KRAS+ and BRAF-/KRAS- but not BRAF+ colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jayasekara, Harindra; MacInnis, Robert J; Williamson, Elizabeth J; Hodge, Allison M; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Walters, Rhiannon; Room, Robin; Southey, Melissa C; Jenkins, Mark A; Milne, Roger L; Hopper, John L; Giles, Graham G; Buchanan, Daniel D; English, Dallas R

    2017-04-01

    Ethanol in alcoholic beverages is a causative agent for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease, and molecular subtypes defined by the presence of somatic mutations in BRAF and KRAS are known to exist. We examined associations between lifetime alcohol intake and molecular and anatomic subtypes of colorectal cancer. We calculated usual alcohol intake for 10-year periods from age 20 using recalled frequency and quantity of beverage-specific consumption for 38,149 participants aged 40-69 years from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Cox regression was performed to derive hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between lifetime alcohol intake and colorectal cancer risk. Heterogeneity in the HRs across subtypes of colorectal cancer was assessed. A positive dose-dependent association between lifetime alcohol intake and overall colorectal cancer risk (mean follow-up = 14.6 years; n = 596 colon and n = 326 rectal cancer) was observed (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04-1.12 per 10 g/day increment). The risk was greater for rectal than colon cancer (phomogeneity  = 0.02). Alcohol intake was associated with increased risks of KRAS+ (HR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.00-1.15) and BRAF-/KRAS- (HR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00-1.11) but not BRAF+ tumors (HR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.78-1.01; phomogeneity  = 0.01). Alcohol intake is associated with an increased risk of KRAS+ and BRAF-/KRAS- tumors originating via specific molecular pathways including the traditional adenoma-carcinoma pathway but not with BRAF+ tumors originating via the serrated pathway. Therefore, limiting alcohol intake from a young age might reduce colorectal cancer originating via the traditional adenoma-carcinoma pathway.

  6. Pioglitazone prescription increases risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Shiyao; Tang, Yu-hong; Zhao, Guobin; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Dehou; Zhang, Ye

    2014-03-01

    Pioglitazone is widely used for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but evidence regarding the association between pioglitazone and bladder cancer risk is confusing. A systematic search of databases was carried out, and other relevant papers were also identified. Then, the analyses were conducted according to the PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. After quality assessment, nine datasets from 10 available studies were included on the basis of inclusion criteria. The incidence of bladder cancer among pioglitazone ever users and never users, pooled from four cohort and one randomized studies, were 84.51 and 66.68 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Nine studies representing 2,596,856 diabetic patients were recognized as eligible for overall study; the result suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer in patients exposed to pioglitazone. A persistent significance was detected after being adjusted by age, gender, and use of other diabetes medications. Subgroup analyses indicated that the significantly increased incidence of bladder cancer was found in men, but not in women. Additionally, the analyses addressing increasing exposure to pioglitazone observed a dose-response relation between exclusive ever use of pioglitazone and bladder cancer in terms of cumulative duration of use and cumulative dosage. With some limitations, our results suggest an increased risk of bladder cancer in diabetic patients using pioglitazone, especially for men with long-term and high-dose exposure. Additional studies are needed to provide more precise evidences to support our results.

  7. Red meat intake may increase the risk of colon cancer in Japanese, a population with relatively low red meat consumption.

    PubMed

    Takachi, Ribeka; Tsubono, Yoshitaka; Baba, Keisuke; Inoue, Manami; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Iwasaki, Motoki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2011-01-01

    Asian populations have changed from traditional to Westernized diets, with increased red meat intake. They are suggested to be particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of red meat on the development of colorectal cancers, however, few prospective studies of this putative link have been conducted. We examined associations between the consumption of red and processed meat and the risk of subsite-specific colorectal cancer by gender in a large Japanese cohort. During 1995-1998, a validated food frequency questionnaire was administered to 80,658 men and women aged 45-74 years. During 758,116 person-years of follow-up until the end of 2006, 1,145 cases of colorectal cancer were identified. Higher consumption of red meat was significantly associated with a higher risk of colon cancer among women [multivariate hazard ratios (95%CIs) for the highest versus lowest quintiles (HR): 1.48 (1.01, 2.17; trend p=0.03)], as was higher consumption of total meat among men [HR=1.44 (1.06, 1.98; trend p=0.07)]. By site, these positive associations were found for the risk of proximal colon cancer among women and for distal colon cancer among men. No association was found between the consumption of processed meat and risk of either colon or rectal cancer. In conclusion, red meat intake may modestly increase the risk of colon cancer in middle-aged Japanese, although the highest quintile of red meat consumption could be considered moderate by Western standards.

  8. Increased risk of advanced prostate cancer associated with MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kucukgergin, Canan; Sanli, Oner; Tefik, Tzevat; Aydın, Makbule; Ozcan, Faruk; Seckin, Sule

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism and the initiation and/or progression of prostate cancer (PCa) as well as to evaluate its potential interactions with advanced age and smoking status. MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism was carried out in 134 (mean age 64.1±7.48) PCa patients and 159 (mean age 62.5±7.53) healthy controls with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels (<4 ng/ml) and normal digital rectal examination (DRE) findings in this prospectively designed study. PCa patients were classified as low stage disease (T1 or T2 and N0M0 stages) and high stage disease (T3 or T4 and N0M0 or N1 or M1 stages). Genotypes for MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism were identified by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFPL). Despite lack of association between different genotypes of MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism and the presence of PCa, patients with Ala/Ala genotype were at an increased risk of high stage disease compared with those with the Val/Val genotype [odds ratio (OR), 3.77; 95% CI, 1.30-10.94; P=0.012]. However, no significant difference was observed in the distribution of each genotype among PCa patients, with respect to tumor grade. On the other hand, smoking status and aging did not seem to change the association between genotypes and PCa risk. Ala/Ala genotype of MnSOD polymorphism may have an effect on adverse features of PCa such as high stage disease.

  9. Increased Risk of Pancreatic Cancer Related to Gallstones and Cholecystectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yonggang; Hu, Jie; Feng, Bing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Guoliang; Zhai, Jingming; Li, Xin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the potential roles of gallstones and cholecystectomy in pancreatic carcinogenesis, we performed the first meta-analysis of all currently published studies by pooling relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Stratified analysis by ethnicity, study design, and common adjusted factors were also conducted. Individuals with a history of gallstones and cholecystectomy were at increased risk of pancreatic cancer (RR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.28-1.52; P < 0.001). Gallstones and cholecystectomy were also associated with an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, respectively (for gallstones: RR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.30-2.21; P < 0.001; for cholecystectomy: RR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.19-1.43; P < 0.001). The positive association is observed among not only the Asian population but also whites. The pooled findings were further confirmed by sensitivity analysis and stratified analyses in case-control and cohort studies. Stratified analyses by different adjusted factors further showed that the increased risk of pancreatic cancer was independent of confounders including diabetes, obesity, smoking, and follow-up years of postcholecystectomy. A history of gallstones and cholecystectomy is a robust risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Gallstone disease or cholecystectomy alone is also an independent risk factor for pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  10. The HABP2 G534E polymorphism does not increase nonmedullary thyroid cancer risk in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Bohórquez, Mabel E; Estrada, Ana P; Stultz, Jacob; Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Williamson, John; Lott, Paul; Duque, Carlos S; Donado, Jorge; Mateus, Gilbert; Bolaños, Fernando; Vélez, Alejandro; Echeverry, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer (NMTC) has not been clearly linked to causal germline variants, despite the large role that genetic factors play in risk. Recently, HABP2 G534E (rs7080536A) has been implicated as a causal variant in NMTC. We have previously shown that the HABP2 G534E variant is not associated with TC risk in patients from the British Isles. Hispanics are the largest and the youngest minority in the United States and NMTC is now the second most common malignancy in women from this population. In order to determine if the HABP2 G534E variant played a role in NMTC risk among Hispanic populations, we analyzed 281 cases and 1105 population-matched controls from a multicenter study in Colombia, evaluating the association through logistic regression. We found that the HABP2 G534E variant was not significantly associated with NMTC risk (P=0.843) in this Hispanic group. We also stratified available clinical data by multiple available clinicopathological variables and further analyzed the effect of HABP2 on NMTC presentation. However, we failed to detect associations between HABP2 G534E and NMTC risk, regardless of disease presentation (P≥0.273 for all cases). Therefore, without any significant associations between the HABP2 G534E variant and NMTC risk, we conclude that the variant is not causal of NMTC in this Hispanic population. PMID:27097599

  11. Germline variation in NCF4, an innate immunity gene, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Bríd M; Zanetti, Krista A; Robles, Ana I; Schetter, Aaron J; Goodman, Julie; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi; Gunter, Mark J; Yeager, Meredith; Burdette, Laurie; Berndt, Sonja I; Harris, Curtis C

    2014-03-15

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal adenoma and cancer; however, few key inflammatory genes mediating this relationship have been identified. In this study, we investigated the association of germline variation in innate immunity genes in relation to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Our study was based on the analysis of samples collected from the prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We investigated the association between 196 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 20 key innate immunity genes with risk of advanced colorectal adenoma and cancer in 719 adenoma cases, 481 cancer cases and 719 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After Bonferroni correction, the AG/GG genotype of rs5995355, which is upstream of NCF4, was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.73-3.39; p < 0.0001). NCF4 is part of the NAPDH complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and the innate immune response. While not definitive, our analyses suggest that the variant allele does not affect expression of NCF4, but rather modulates activity of the NADPH complex. Additional studies on the functional consequences of rs5995355 in NCF4 may help to clarify the mechanistic link between inflammation and colorectal cancer.

  12. The Role of Oral Contraceptive Pills on Increased Risk of Breast Cancer in Iranian Populations: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soroush, Ali; Farshchian, Negin; Komasi, Saeid; Izadi, Neda; Amirifard, Nasrin; Shahmohammadi, Afshar

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the main public health issues in the world. Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among women. It is also the second cause of mortality in women. The association between the use of oral contraceptive pills and breast cancer is controversial and a main issue in public health. Some findings have shown that taking these pills does not have a significant effect in increasing the risk of breast cancer, while others have confirmed the carcinogenic effect of these products. These contradictory findings necessitated this meta-analysis, through of all correlated studies in Iran. Methods All published studies were considered from June 2000 until June 2015, using reliable Latin databases like PubMed, Google Scholar, Google search, Scopus, and Science Direct, and Persian database like SID, Irandoc, IranMedex, and Magiran. Finally, 26 papers were selected: 24 studies were case control while two were population based studies. A total of 26 papers with 46,260 participants were assessed since 2001. Results Overall estimate of OR for the effect of oral contraceptive pills on breast cancer is 1.521 (CI = 1.25–1.85), which shows that the intervention group had more chance (52%) compared to the control group (P = 0.001). Using these pills increased the risk of breast cancer up to 1.52 times. Conclusions Because of directly increasing levels of estrogen and the role of estrogen in gaining weight indirectly, oral contraceptive pills can stimulate the occurrence of breast cancer. More studies should be conducted for controlling the period of pill use. PMID:28053965

  13. Does increased cigarette consumption nullify any reduction in lung cancer risk associated with low-tar filter cigarettes?

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter N; Sanders, Edward

    2004-12-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that smoking filter and lower tar cigarettes is associated with less lung cancer risk than is smoking plain and higher tar cigarettes. A recent National Cancer Institute monograph claimed these apparent benefits of lower delivery products may be illusory if relative risks are adjusted for daily consumption, and switching leads to "compensation" for reduced nicotine intake by increasing numbers of cigarettes smoked. To investigate this, we compared relative risks unadjusted and adjusted for daily cigarette consumption. Overall estimates of the filter/plain relative risk, using random-effects meta-analysis, were 0.61 (95%confidence interval 0.54 to 0.70) for unadjusted data and 0.66 (0.58 to 0.76) for adjusted data. The lower tar/higher tar relative risk was estimated as 0.60 (0.45 to 0.81) for unadjusted data and 0.73 (0.64 to 0.83) for adjusted data. The risk reductions were clearly seen regardless of gender, study location, period, or design, and when only studies providing both unadjusted and adjusted estimates were considered. Whether or not relative risk estimates are adjusted for cigarette consumption is not crucial to the conclusion of a clear advantage to filter cigarettes and tar reduction. Data on "compensation" for amount smoked were reviewed and any increase following switching to reduced-tar-yield cigarettes was shown to be quite small. Other biases in the epidemiology are also discussed, and we conclude that the apparent advantage to reduced-tar-delivery products is real and likely to be a marked underestimate of the reduction in lung cancer risk from lifetime smoking of low-tar cigarettes.

  14. Nickel accumulation in lung tissues is associated with increased risk of p53 mutation in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Lee, Huei

    2014-10-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been associated with lung cancer. The correlation between high nickel levels and increased risk of lung cancer has been previously reported in a case-control study. This study assessed whether nickel exposure increased the occurrence of p53 mutations due to DNA repair inhibition by nickel. A total of 189 lung cancer patients were enrolled to determine nickel levels in tumor-adjacent normal lung tissues and p53 mutation status in lung tumors through atomic absorption spectrometry and direct sequencing, respectively. Nickel levels in p53 mutant patients were significantly higher than those in p53 wild-type patients. When patients were divided into high- and low-nickel subgroups by median nickel level, the high-nickel subgroup of patients had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.25 for p53 mutation risk relative to the low-nickel subgroup patients. The OR for p53 mutation risk of lifetime non-smokers, particularly females, in the high-nickel subgroup was greater than that in the low-nickel subgroup. To determine whether nickel affected DNA repair capacity, we conducted the host cell reactivation assay in A549 and H1975 lung cancer cells and showed that the DNA repair activity was reduced by nickel chloride in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with elevated production of hydrogen peroxide-induced 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. Therefore, increased risk of p53 mutation due to defective DNA repair caused by high nickel levels in lung tissues may be one mechanism by which nickel exposure contributes to lung cancer development, especially in lifetime female non-smokers.

  15. Loss of PTEN expression is associated with increased risk of recurrence after prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Peskoe, Sarah B; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Schultz, Luciana; Albadine, Roula; Hicks, Jessica; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Netto, George J

    2012-11-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) is one of the most frequently lost tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and it has been described in more than two-thirds of patients with advanced/aggressive prostate cancer. Previous studies suggest that, in prostate cancer, genomic PTEN loss is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Thus, we evaluated whether immunohistochemical PTEN expression in prostate cancer glands was associated with higher risk of recurrence, using a nested case-control study that included 451 men who recurred and 451 men who did not recur with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. Recurrence was defined as biochemical recurrence (serum prostate-specific antigen >0.2 ng/ml) or clinical recurrence (local recurrence, systemic metastases, or prostate cancer-related death). Cases and controls were matched on pathological T stage, Gleason score, race/ethnicity, and age at surgery. Odds ratios of recurrence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression to account for the matching factors and to adjust for year of surgery, preoperative prostate-specific antigen concentrations, and status of surgical margins. Men who recurred had a higher proportion of PTEN negative expression (16 vs 11%, P=0.05) and PTEN loss (40 vs 31%, P=0.02) than controls. Men with markedly decreased PTEN staining had a higher risk of recurrence (odds ratio=1.67; 95% confidence intervals 1.09, 2.57; P=0.02) when compared with all other men. In summary, in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by prostatectomy, decreased PTEN expression was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, independent of known clinicopathological factors.

  16. Study Finds Small Increase in Cancer Risk after Childhood CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    A study published in the June 6, 2012, issue of The Lancet shows that radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) scans in childhood results in very small but increased risks of leukemia and brain tumors in the first decade after exposure.

  17. The Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Polymorphism Rs10895304 Is Associated With Increased Recurrence Risk in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lopater, Zachary; Chen Heidi; Ray, Geoffrey L.; Perez, Carmen; Cai Qiuyin; Wills, Marcia L.; Lu Bo

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether selected high-risk matrix metalloproteinase-7 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence clinicopathologic outcomes in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twelve prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy were evaluated with a median follow-up of 9.8 years. Genotyping was performed using hybridization with custom-designed allele-specific probes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms within the matrix metalloproteinase-7 gene were assessed with respect to age at diagnosis, margin status, extracapsular extension, lymph node involvement, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival in paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens from patients with early-stage prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Results: Rs10895304 was the sole significant polymorphism. The A/G genotype of rs10895304 had a statistically significant association with recurrence-free survival in postprostatectomy patients (p = 0.0061, log-rank test). The frequency of the risk-reducing genotype (A/A) was 74%, whereas that of the risk-enhancing genotypes (A/G and G/G) were 20% and 6%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analyses detected a significant association between rs10895304 and recurrences after adjustment for known prognostic factors. The G allele of this polymorphism was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence (adjusted hazards ratio, 3.375; 95% confidence interval 1.567-7.269; p < 0.001). The other assayed polymorphisms were not significant, and no correlations were made to other clinical variables. Conclusions: The A/G genotype of rs10895304 is predictive of decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Our data suggest that for this subset of patients, prostatectomy alone may not be adequate for local control. This is a novel and relevant marker that should be evaluated for improved risk stratification of patients who

  18. Genetic polymorphisms (rs10636 and rs28366003) in metallothionein 2A increase breast cancer risk in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Jing; Kang, Hua-Feng; Jin, Tian-Bo; Zhang, Shu-Qun; Guan, Hai-Tao; Yang, Peng-Tao; Liu, Kang; Liu, Xing-Han; Xu, Peng; Zheng, Yi; Dai, Zhi-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of MT2A are frequently observed in many different cancers. We performed this case-control study, including 459 breast cancer (BC) patients and 549 healthy controls from Northwest China, to evaluate the associations between two common MT2A polymorphisms (rs10636 and rs28366003) and BC risk. The MT2A polymorphisms were genotyped via Sequenom MassARRAY. The individuals with the rs28366003 A/G, A/G-G/G genotypes underwent a higher risk of BC (P<0.0001). And, the minor allele G of rs28366003 was related to an increased BC risk (P<0.0001). We also found a significantly increased BC risk with rs10636 polymorphism among homozygote and recessive models (P<0.05). Further subgroup analysis by clinical characteristics of BC patients showed that Scarff, Bloom and Richardson tumor grade (SBR) 1-2 have a higher expression of the minor allele of these two MT2A loci than SBR 3. Our results indicated that the rs10636 and rs28366003 polymorphisms in MT2A increased BC risk in Northwest Chinese Han population.   PMID:28228606

  19. Less Efficient G2-M Checkpoint Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Lung Cancer in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yun-Ling; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Yu, Zhipeng; Jones, Raymond T.; Perlmutter, Donna; Enewold, Lindsey; Krasna, Mark J.; Yung, Rex; Shields, Peter G.; Harris, Curtis C.

    2006-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints play critical roles in the maintenance of genomic integrity. The inactivation of checkpoint genes by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms is frequent in all cancer types, as a less-efficient cell cycle control can lead to genetic instability and tumorigenesis. In an on-going case-control study consisting of 216 patients with non–small cell lung cancer, 226 population-based controls, and 114 hospital-based controls, we investigated the relationship of γ-radiation-induced G2-M arrest and lung cancer risk. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 90 hours, exposed to 1.0 Gy γ-radiation, and harvested at 3 hours after γ-radiation treatment. γ-Radiation-induced G2-M arrest was measured as the percentage of mitotic cells in untreated cultures minus the percentage of mitotic cells in γ-radiation-treated cultures from the same subject. The mean percentage of γ-radiation-induced G2-M arrest was significantly lower in cases than in population controls (1.18 versus 1.44, P < 0.01) and hospital controls (1.18 versus 1.40, P = 0.01). When dichotomized at the 50th percentile value in combined controls (population and hospital controls), a lower level of γ-radiation-induced G2-M arrest was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer among African Americans after adjusting for baseline mitotic index, age, gender, and pack-years of smoking [adjusted odd ratio (OR), 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.97–5.20]. A significant trend of an increased risk of lung cancer with a decreased level of G2-M arrest was observed (Ptrend = 0.02) among African Americans, with a lowest-versus-highest quartile adjusted OR of 3.74 (95% CI, 0.98–14.3). This trend was most apparent among African American females (Ptrend < 0.01), with a lowest-versus-highest quartile adjusted OR of 11.75 (95% CI, 1.47–94.04). The results suggest that a less-efficient DNA damage–induced G2-M checkpoint is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer among African

  20. Pioglitazone does not increase the risk of type II diabetes in patients with bladder cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youhong; Wang, Anping

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to analyze the effect of pioglitazone on the expression of tumor tissue inflammation factor interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of type II diabetes in bladder cancer patients. In addition, whether there was a correlation between pioglitazone and the occurrence of male bladder cancer was also investigated. In total, 42 male cases diagnosed with type II diabetes secondary to bladder cancer were selected. Forty male cases, with simplex type II diabetes but not with bladder cancer, served as the control. Tumor biopsy specimens were collected to detect the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF. The results showed that the expression of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF of the simplex diabetes group was significantly lower than that of the secondary to tumor group (P<0.05). The comparison of the two groups in terms of daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone, duration of diabetes, average fasting blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin levels, was not statistically significant. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF were independent risk factors for the occurrence of bladder cancer (P<0.05), but were not associated with daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone (P>0.05). In conclusion, oral pioglitazone may not increase the risk of type II diabetes patients with bladder cancer. However, the occurrence of bladder cancer be associated with the increasing expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF.

  1. Polymorphism of FGFR4 Gly388Arg does not confer an increased risk to breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Naidu, R; Har, Y C; Taib, N A

    2009-01-01

    The genotype analysis of the Gly and Arg allele at codon 388 of fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 (FGFR4) gene was evaluated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method in a hospital-based Malaysian population. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 387 breast cancer patients and 252 normal and healthy women who had no history of any malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism and breast cancer risk as well as clinicopathological parameters of the patients. The Gly/Gly, Gly/Arg, Arg/Arg, and Arg allele genotypes were detected in 46.3%, 44.4%, 9.3%, and 53.7% of breast cancer cases, respectively. The distribution of genotype (p = 0.204) and allele (p = 0.086) frequencies of FGFR4 polymorphism were not significantly different between the breast cancer cases and normal individuals. Women who were Arg/ Arg homozygotes (OR = 1.714, 95% CI 0.896-3.278), Gly/Arg heterozygotes (OR = 1.205, 95% CI 0.863-1.683), carriers of Arg allele genotype (OR = 1.269, 95% CI 0.921-1.750), or Arg allele (OR = 1.246, 95% CI 0.970-1.602) were not associated with breast cancer risk. The Arg allele genotype was significantly associated with lymph node metastases (p = 0.001) but not with other clinicopathological parameters. Our findings suggest that the polymorphic variant at codon 388 of FGFR4 gene does not confer increased risk to breast cancer development but it may be a potential genetic marker for tumor prognosis.

  2. Duodenal acidity may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the course of chronic pancreatitis: an etiopathogenetic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Talamini, Giorgio

    2005-03-10

    Chronic pancreatitis patients have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. The cause of this increase has yet to be fully explained but smoking and inflammation may play an important role. To these, we must now add a new potential risk factor, namely duodenal acidity. Patients with chronic pancreatitis very often present pancreatic exocrine insufficiency combined with a persistently low duodenal pH in the postprandial period. The duodenal mucosa in chronic pancreas patients with pancreatic insufficiency has a normal concentration of s-cells and, therefore, the production of secretin is preserved. Pancreatic ductal cells are largely responsible for the amount of bicarbonate and water secretion in response to secretin stimulation. When gastric acid in the duodenum is not well-balanced by alkaline pancreatic secretions, it may induce a prolonged secretin stimulus which interacts with the pancreatic ductal cells resulting in an increased rate of ductular cell activity and turnover. N-Nitroso compounds from tobacco, identified in human pancreatic juice and known to be important carcinogens, may then act on these active cells, thereby increasing the risk of cancer. Duodenal acidity is probably of particular concern in patients who have undergone a duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection, since, in this anatomic situation, pancreatic juice transits directly via the jejunal loop, bypassing the duodenum. Patients undergoing a Whipple procedure or side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy are probably less critically affected because secretions transit, at least in part, via the papilla. If the duodenal acidity hypothesis proves correct, then, in addition to stopping smoking, reduction of duodenal acid load in patients with pancreatic insufficiency may help decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer have an increased risk of depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Xirasagar, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) results in testosterone suppression, a hypothesized mechanism linking ADT to depressive symptoms. This study investigated the relationship between ADT and the risk of subsequently being diagnosed with depressive disorder (DD) during a 3-year follow-up period. The patient sample for this population-based, retrospective cohort study was retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We included all 1714 patients aged over 40 years with a first-time diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) during 2001 to 2010 who did not have an orchiectomy. Among them, we defined 868 patients who received ADT during the 3-year follow-up period as the study group, and 846 patients who did not receive ADT as the comparison group. The incidence rates of DD per 1000 person-years were 13.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.5~19.6) and 6.7 (95% CI: 3.7~11.0), respectively. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for DD for ADT recipients was 1.93 (95% CI: 1.03~3.62) relative to the comparison group. This study presents epidemiological evidence of an association between ADT and a subsequent DD diagnosis. PMID:28253340

  4. Association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer: an assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Leader, Joseph K.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We recently investigated a new mammographic image feature based risk factor to predict near-term breast cancer risk after a woman has a negative mammographic screening. We hypothesized that unlike the conventional epidemiology-based long-term (or lifetime) risk factors, the mammographic image feature based risk factor value will increase as the time lag between the negative and positive mammography screening decreases. The purpose of this study is to test this hypothesis. From a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database with 1278 cases, we collected all available sequential FFDM examinations for each case including the "current" and 1 to 3 most recently "prior" examinations. All "prior" examinations were interpreted negative, and "current" ones were either malignant or recalled negative/benign. We computed 92 global mammographic texture and density based features, and included three clinical risk factors (woman's age, family history and subjective breast density BIRADS ratings). On this initial feature set, we applied a fast and accurate Sequential Forward Floating Selection (SFFS) feature selection algorithm to reduce feature dimensionality. The features computed on both mammographic views were individually/ separately trained using two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers. The classification scores of the two ANNs were then merged with a sequential ANN. The results show that the maximum adjusted odds ratios were 5.59, 7.98, and 15.77 for using the 3rd, 2nd, and 1st "prior" FFDM examinations, respectively, which demonstrates a higher association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer in the near-term after a negative screening.

  5. Understanding why aspirin prevents cancer and why consuming very hot beverages and foods increases esophageal cancer risk. Controlling the division rates of stem cells is an important strategy to prevent cancer

    PubMed Central

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is, in essence, a stem cell disease. The main biological cause of cancer is that stem cells acquire DNA alterations during cell division. The more stem cell divisions a tissue accumulates over a lifetime, the higher is the risk of cancer in that tissue. This explains why cancer is diagnosed millions of times more often in some tissues than in others, and why cancer incidence increases so dramatically with age. It may also explain why taking a daily low-dose aspirin for several years reduces the risk of developing and dying from cancer. Since aspirin use reduces PGE2 levels and PGE2 fuels stem cell proliferation, aspirin may prevent cancer by restricting the division rates of stem cells. The stem cell division model of cancer may also explain why regular consumption of very hot foods and beverages increases the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Given that tissue injury activates stem cell division for repair, the thermal injury associated with this dietary habit will increase esophageal cancer risk by inducing the accumulation of stem cell divisions in the esophagus. Using these two examples, here I propose that controlling the division rates of stem cells is an essential approach to preventing cancer. PMID:26682276

  6. A large germline deletion in the Chek2 kinase gene is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, C; Wokołorczyk, D; Huzarski, T; Byrski, T; Gronwald, J; Górski, B; Dębniak, T; Masojć, B; Jakubowska, A; Gliniewicz, B; Sikorski, A; Stawicka, M; Godlewski, D; Kwias, Z; Antczak, A; Krajka, K; Lauer, W; Sosnowski, M; Sikorska‐Radek, P; Bar, K; Klijer, R; Zdrojowy, R; Małkiewicz, B; Borkowski, A; Borkowski, T; Szwiec, M; Narod, S A; Lubiński, J

    2006-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the Chek2 kinase gene (CHEK2) have been associated with a range of cancer types. Recently, a large deletion of exons 9 and 10 of CHEK2 was identified in several unrelated patients with breast cancer of Czech or Slovak origin. The geographical and ethnic extent of this founder allele has not yet been determined. Participants and methods We assayed for the presence of this deletion, and of three other CHEK2 founder mutations, in 1864 patients with prostate cancer and 5496 controls from Poland. Results The deletion was detected in 24 of 5496 (0.4%) controls from the general population, and is the most common CHEK2 truncating founder allele in Polish patients. The deletion was identified in 15 of 1864 (0.8%) men with unselected prostate cancer (OR 1.9; 95% CI 0.97 to 3.5; p = 0.09) and in 4 of 249 men with familial prostate cancer (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.3 to 10.8; p = 0.03). These ORs were similar to those associated with the other truncating mutations (IVS2+1G→A, 1100delC). Conclusion A large deletion of exons 9 and 10 of CHEK2 confers an increased risk of prostate cancer in Polish men. The del5395 founder deletion might be present in other Slavic populations, including Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, Baltic and Balkan countries. It will be of interest to see to what extent this deletion is responsible for the burden of prostate cancer in other populations. PMID:17085682

  7. BRCA Mutations Increase Fertility in Families at Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Arbre, Marie; Bidet, Yannick; Laquet, Claire; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bignon, Yves-Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background Deleterious mutations in the BRCA genes are responsible for a small, but significant, proportion of breast and ovarian cancers (5 - 10 %). Proof of de novo mutations in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families is rare, in contrast to founder mutations, thousands of years old, that may be carried by as much as 1 % of a population. Thus, if mutations favoring cancer survive selection pressure through time, they must provide advantages that compensate for the loss of life expectancy. Method This hypothesis was tested within 2,150 HBOC families encompassing 96,325 individuals. Parameters included counts of breast/ovarian cancer, age at diagnosis, male breast cancer and other cancer locations. As expected, well-known clinical parameters discriminated between BRCA-mutated families and others: young age at breast cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer and male breast cancer. The major fertility differences concerned men in BRCA-mutated families: they had lower first and mean age at paternity, and fewer remained childless. For women in BRCA families, the miscarriage rate was lower. In a logistic regression including clinical factors, the different miscarriage rate and men's mean age at paternity remained significant. Results Fertility advantages were confirmed in a subgroup of 746 BRCA mutation carriers and 483 non-carriers from BRCA mutated families. In particular, female carriers were less often nulliparous (9.1 % of carriers versus 16.0 %, p = 0.003) and had more children (1.8 ± 1.4 SD versus 1.5 ± 1.3, p = 0.002) as well as male carriers (1.7 ± 1.3 versus 1.4 ± 1.3, p = 0.024). Conclusion Although BRCA mutations shorten the reproductive period due to cancer mortality, they compensate by improving fertility both in male and female carriers. PMID:26047126

  8. Elevated Bone Turnover Markers after Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy in Women at Increased Risk for Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fakkert, Ingrid E.; van der Veer, Eveline; Abma, Elske Marije; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Westrik, Iris G.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Mourits, Marian J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) reduces ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Premenopausal RRSO is hypothesized to increase fracture risk more than natural menopause. Elevated bone turnover markers (BTMs) might predict fracture risk. We investigated BTM levels after RRSO and aimed to identify clinical characteristics associated with elevated BTMs. Methods Osteocalcin (OC), procollagen type I N-terminal peptide (PINP) and serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (sCTx) were measured in 210 women ≥ 2 years after RRSO before age 53. BTM Z-scores were calculated using an existing reference cohort of age-matched women. Clinical characteristics were assessed by questionnaire. Results BTMs after RRSO were higher than age-matched reference values: median Z-scores OC 0.11, p = 0.003; PINP 0.84, p < 0.001; sCTx 0.53, p < 0.001 (compared to Z = 0). After excluding women with recent fractures or BTM interfering medication, Z-scores increased to 0.34, 1.14 and 0.88, respectively. Z-scores for OC and PINP were inversely correlated to age at RRSO. No correlation was found with fracture incidence or history of breast cancer. Conclusions Five years after RRSO, BTMs were higher than age-matched reference values. Since elevated BTMs might predict higher fracture risk, prospective studies are required to evaluate the clinical implications of this finding. PMID:28060958

  9. NIH-funded study shows increased prostate cancer risk from vitamin E supplements | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Men who took 400 international units (I.U.) of vitamin E daily had more prostate cancers compared to men who took a placebo, according to an updated review of data from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT). The findings showed that, per 1,000 men, there were 76 prostate cancers in men who took only vitamin E supplements, vs. |

  10. Increase in Bloodstream Infection Due to Vancomycin-Susceptible Enterococcus faecium in Cancer Patients: Risk Factors, Molecular Epidemiology and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gudiol, Carlota; Ayats, Josefina; Camoez, Mariana; Domínguez, M. Ángeles; García-Vidal, Carolina; Bodro, Marta; Ardanuy, Carmen; Obed, Mora; Arnan, Montserrat; Antonio, Maite; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to assess the risk factors, molecular epidemiology and outcome of bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Enterococcus faecium in hospitalized cancer patients. Between 2006 and 2012, a significant increase in vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium BSI was observed among cancer patients. Comparison of 54 episodes of BSI due to E. faecium with 38 episodes of BSI due to E. faecalis showed that previous use of carbapenems was the only independent risk factor for E. faecium acquisition (OR 10.24; 95% CI, 1.35-77.66). All E. faecium isolates were susceptible to glycopeptides, whereas 97% showed high-level resistance to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. All 30 isolates available for genotyping belonged to the hospital-associated E. faecium lineages 17, 18 and 78. After 2009, most of the isolates belonged to ST117 (lineage 78). Patients with E. faecium BSI were more likely to receive inadequate initial empirical antibiotic therapy than patients with E. faecalis BSI, and time to adequate empirical antibiotic therapy was also longer in the former group. No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding early and overall case-fatality rates. Independent risk factors for overall case-fatality were current corticosteroids (OR 4.18; 95% CI, 1.34-13.01) and intensive care unit admission (OR 9.97; 95% CI, 1.96-50.63). The emergence of E. faecium among cancer patients is a concern since there are limited treatment options and it may presage the emergence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. A rationale approach that combines infection control with antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:24069339

  11. Association of the rs1346044 Polymorphism of the Werner Syndrome Gene RECQL2 with Increased Risk and Premature Onset of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Karin; Frech, Barbara; Taubenschuss, Eva; Schneeberger, Christian; Abraham, Dietmar; Schreiber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Like other RECQ helicases, WRN/RECQL2 plays a crucial role in DNA replication and the maintenance of genome stability. Inactivating mutations in RECQL2 lead to Werner syndrome, a rare autosomal disease associated with premature aging and an increased susceptibility to multiple cancer types. We analyzed the association of two coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms in WRN, Cys1367Arg (rs1346044), and Arg834Cys (rs3087425), with the risk, age at onset, and clinical subclasses of breast cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of an Austrian population of 272 breast cancer patients and 254 controls. Here we report that the rare homozygous CC genotype of rs1346044 was associated with an approximately two-fold elevated breast cancer risk. Moreover, patients with the CC genotype exhibited a significantly increased risk of developing breast cancer under the age of 55 in both recessive and log-additive genetic models. CC patients developed breast cancer at a mean age of 55.2 ± 13.3 years and TT patients at 60.2 ± 14.7 years. Consistently, the risk of breast cancer was increased in pre-menopausal patients in the recessive model. These findings suggest that the CC genotype of WRN rs1346044 may contribute to an increased risk and a premature onset of breast cancer. PMID:26690424

  12. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired powerplants, conventional oil and gas extraction, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. W...

  13. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired power plants, conventional oil and gas extraction, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. ...

  14. RASSF1A promoter methylation is associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Feiyan; Xu, Feng; Li, Gang; Zhao, Zhenhua; Mao, Ying; Yang, Fangfang; Wang, Hongming; Guo, Hangyuan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have reported that Ras-associated domain family 1A (RASSF1A), the most commonly silenced tumor suppressor via promoter methylation, played vital roles in the development of carcinogenesis. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine whether RASSF1A promoter methylation increased the risk of thyroid cancer. Methods PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched to obtain eligible studies. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the strength of the associations, using Stata 12.0 software. The methodological quality of included studies was evaluated using Newcastle–Ottawa scale table. Egger’s test and Begg’s test were applied to detect publication biases. TSA 0.9 software was used to calculate the required information size and whether the result was conclusive. Results A total of 10 articles with 12 studies that included 422 thyroid cancer patients, identifying the association of RASSF1A promoter methylation with thyroid cancer risk, were collected in this meta-analysis. Overall, RASSF1A promoter methylation significantly increased the risk of thyroid cancer (total, OR=8.27, CI=4.38–15.62, P<0.05; Caucasian, OR=9.25, CI=3.97–21.56, P<0.05; Asian, OR=7.01, CI=2.68–18.38, P<0.05). In the subgroup analysis based on sample type, a significant association between thyroid cancer group and control group was found (normal tissue, OR=9.55, CI=4.21–21.67, P<0.05; adjacent tissue, OR=6.80, CI=2.49–18.56, P<0.05). The frequency of RASSF1A promoter methylation in follicular thyroid carcinoma was higher than in control group (OR=11.88, CI=5.80–24.32, P<0.05). In addition, the results indicated that the RASSF1A promoter methylation was correlated with papillary thyroid carcinoma in Caucasians and Asians (total, OR=8.07, CI=3.54–18.41, P<0.05; Caucasian, OR=11.35, CI=2.39–53.98, P<0.05; Asian, OR=6.67, CI=2.53–17

  15. Note of clarification of data in the paper entitled "Interferon gamma +874 T/A polymorphism increases the risk of cervical cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis".

    PubMed

    Yang, Haijun; Yang, Min; Wang, Yan; Huang, Xing

    2017-04-01

    We read with great interest the paper entitled "Interferon gamma +874 T/A polymorphism increases the risk of cervical cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis" published online by Sun et al. Their results suggest that interferon gamma ( IFNG) gene +874 T/A polymorphism might contribute to women's susceptibility to cervical cancer. They also found that IFNG +874 T/A polymorphism is associated with increased cervical cancer risk in Asian female population. The result is encouraging. Nevertheless, several key issues are worth noticing. We re-evaluate the association between IFNG +874 T/A polymorphism and cervical cancer risk by performing an updated meta-analysis based on 2777 cases and 2542 controls of 11 studies. We found that IFNG +874 T/A polymorphism was not significantly associated with cervical cancer risk in overall population. We also observed that the polymorphism was associated with enhanced cervical cancer risk in Asian population and was relevant to increased squamous cell cervical cancer risk.

  16. Old age at diagnosis increases risk of tumor progression in nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao-Xuan; Chen, Xiao-Di; Zhang, Guo-Ye; Li, Zhi-Kun; Hong, Jing; Xie, Dan; Cai, Mu-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Age at diagnosis has been found to be a prognostic factor of outcomes in various cancers. However, the effect of age at diagnosis on nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) progression has not been explored. We retrospectively evaluated the relationship between age and disease progression in 3,153 NPC patients who underwent radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy between 2007 and 2009. Patients were randomly assigned to either a testing cohort or a validation cohort by computer-generated random assignment. X-tile plots determined the optimal cut-point of age based on survival status to be ≤61 vs. >61 years. Further correlation analysis showed that age >61 years was significantly correlated with the tumor progression and therapeutic regimen in both testing and validation cohorts (P <0.05). In the present study, we observed that older age (>61 years) was a strong and independent predictor of poor disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Age was also found to be a significant prognostic predictor as well (P <0.05) when evaluating patients with the same disease stage. ROC analysis confirmed the predictive value of age on NPC-specific survival in both cohorts (P <0.001) and suggested that age may improve the ability to discriminate outcomes in NPCs, especially regarding tumor progression. In conclusion, our study suggests that older age at NPC diagnosis is associated with a higher incidence of tumor progression and cancer-specific mortality. Age is a strong and independent predictor of poor outcomes and may allow for more tailored therapeutic decision-making and individualized patient counseling. PMID:27463012

  17. Possible implication of environmental hormones in the recent risk increase of cancers of the skin and the liver, but not of the female breast worldwide.

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Murakami, M; Kodama, T

    1999-01-01

    The invention of 2 contrasting terms "Western type cancer" and "non-Western type cancer" implies that the progress of Westernization of life style for a given population may find its reflection in the balance of cancer risk between a Western type cancer and a non-Western type cancer. Our recent investigation presented evidence to indicate that the incidence of cancers of all sites increased by 32.1% (males) and 18.0% (females) from early 1960s to mid 1980s in the world statistics, and that the observed risk increase of cancers of the skin and liver did not fit the definition of "Westernization effect". It was suggested that the spread of environmental hormones could be related to the increased risks of 2 cancers. This study attempted to test the validity of the above statement by studying comparatively the epidemiological aspects of cancer of the skin, liver and breast, the latter being the reference tumor of the "Westernization effect". Cancer risk for each tumor was expressed in terms of the age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR). For mathematical reasons, both ASIR- and AAIR-data were transformed into their logarithms before statistical analysis. We prepared the world population model with a size of 38 population units to investigate the relation between reproductive activity and cancer risk. Results obtained are as follows: a) the log AAIR of liver cancer was positively correlated to 2 parameters of reproductive activity in the female world population, and failed to show any correlation to the same 2 parameters in the male world population. The above finding was taken as evidence to indicate that liver cancer still retained its characteristics as a cancer of non-Western type with male predominancy of cancer risk. b) The log AAIR of skin cancer was negatively correlated to 2 parameters of reproductive activity in the world populations of both sexes--reconfirmation of skin cancer as of the Western type. c) In the period of early

  18. Phenocopy breast cancer rates in Israeli BRCA1 BRCA2 mutation carrier families: is the risk increased in non-carriers?

    PubMed

    Bernholtz, Shiri; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon-Paluch, Shnai; Friedman, Eitan

    2012-04-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have an increased risk for developing breast (and ovarian) cancer. Non-carriers from within such families (=true negatives) are counseled that their risk for developing breast cancer is similar to that of the average-risk population. Breast cancer diagnosed in a non-carrier from a family with a known mutation is coined phenocopy. The rate of breast cancer phenocopy and the risk for breast cancer in true negatives are unsettled. The rate of phenocopy breast cancer was assessed in non-carriers from Jewish families with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, identified at the Sheba medical center. Analysis was performed by t test for comparison of mean age at counseling or breast cancer diagnosis, and by calculating a standardized incidence ratio (SIR). Overall, 1318 females from 884 mutation carrying families (620 with BRCA1 264 with BRCA2 mutations) were genotyped, of whom 307 women from 245 families were assigned a true negative status (mean age at counseling 43.01 ± 13.03 years (range 19.7-92.8 years). Of these true negatives, 20 women (6.51-2.26% of families) developed breast cancer at a mean age of 54.1 ± 12.9 years (range 48.1 -60.1 years). The SIR for breast cancer in true negatives was not significantly different than the expected in the average-risk Israeli population [observed 20-expected 23.8 cases SIR = 0.84, 95% CI (0.51, 1.30)]. The rate of phenocopy breast cancer in non-carriers from Israeli BRCA1 BRCA2 mutation carrier families is 2.26% with no increased breast cancer risk over the average-risk population.

  19. Double-blind, Randomized Trial of Alternative Letrozole Dosing Regimens in Postmenopausal Women with Increased Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    López, Ana Maria; Pruthi, Sandhya; Boughey, Judy C.; Perloff, Marjorie; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Lang, Julie E.; Ley, Michele; Frank, Denise; Taverna, Josephine A.; Chow, H-H Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) profoundly suppress estrogen levels in postmenopausal women and are effective in breast cancer prevention among high-risk postmenopausal women. Unfortunately, AI treatment is associated with undesirable side effects that limit patient acceptance for primary prevention of breast cancer. A double-blind, randomized trial was conducted to determine whether low and intermittent doses of letrozole can achieve effective estrogen suppression with a more favorable side effect profile. Overall, 112 postmenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer were randomized to receive letrozole at 2.5 mg once daily (QD, standard dose arm), 2.5 mg every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (Q-MWF), 1.0 mg Q-MWF or 0.25 mg Q-MWF for 24 weeks. Primary endpoint was suppression in serum estradiol levels at the end of letrozole intervention. Secondary endpoints included changes in serum estrone, testosterone, C-telopeptide (marker of bone resorption), lipid profile and quality of life measures (QoL) following treatment. Significant estrogen suppression was observed in all dose arms with an average of 75 – 78% and 86 – 93% reduction in serum estradiol and estrone levels, respectively. There were no differences among dose arms with respect to changes in C-telopeptide levels, lipid profile, adverse events (AEs) or QoL measures. We conclude that low and intermittent doses of letrozole are not inferior to standard dose in estrogen suppression and resulted in a similar side effect profile compared to standard dose. Further studies are needed to determine the feasibility of selecting an effective AI dosing schedule with better tolerability. PMID:26667449

  20. The double-edged sword of ovarian cancer information for women at increased risk who have previously taken part in screening

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Stephanie; Boivin, Jacky; Menon, Usha; Brain, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Background Women at increased risk who decide not to have, or to delay, risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy have to rely on early diagnosis through symptom awareness and presenting to primary care as soon as possible in the absence of screening. However, little is known about the acceptability to women of this strategy. We aimed to gain an in-depth understanding of women’s perceptions and previous experiences of ovarian cancer symptom management, and the influences on ovarian cancer awareness and anticipated symptom presentation. Method Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight women at increased risk of ovarian cancer who had previously taken part in ovarian cancer screening and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Results Familial experience of ovarian cancer and perceived personal risk shaped women’s perceptions and behavioural responses to disease threat. Ovarian cancer information was perceived to be a double-edged sword, regarded as either useful for increasing knowledge and confidence in discussing symptom concerns with health professionals or to be avoided due to fears about cancer. Conclusion Women may be cautious about searching for information independently and in the absence of routine ovarian screening. Practice implications Thought needs to be given to how best to create and disseminate credible ovarian cancer symptom information materials. PMID:27433283

  1. The variant allele of the rs188140481 polymorphism confers a moderate increase in the risk of prostate cancer in Polish men.

    PubMed

    Antczak, Andrzej; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Kashyap, Aniruddh; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Masojć, Bartłomiej; Górski, Bohdan; Gromowski, Tomasz; Gołąb, Adam; Sikorski, Andrzej; Słojewski, Marcin; Gliniewicz, Bartłomiej; Borkowski, Tomasz; Borkowski, Andrzej; Przybyła, Jacek; Sosnowski, Marek; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Zdrojowy, Romuald; Sikorska-Radek, Paulina; Matych, Józef; Wilkosz, Jacek; Różański, Waldemar; Kiś, Jacek; Bar, Krzysztof; Janiszewska, Hanna; Stawicka, Małgorzata; Milecki, Piotr; Lubiński, Jan; Narod, Steven A; Cybulski, Cezary

    2015-03-01

    A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome have been associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. Recently, a single SNP in the region of chromosome 8q24 (rs188140481) has been associated with a three-fold increased risk of prostate cancer in Europe and North America. To establish whether rs188140481 is associated with the risk of prostate cancer in Poland, we genotyped 3467 men with prostate cancer and 1958 controls. The A allele of rs188140481 was detected in 44 of 3467 (1.3%) men with prostate cancer and in seven of 1958 (0.4%) controls (odds ratio=3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.6-7.9; P=0.0006). The allele was present in eight of 390 (2.1%) men with familial prostate cancer (odds ratio=5.8; 95% confidence interval 2.1-16.2; P=0.001). A positive family history of cancers at sites other than the prostate was observed in 27% of men who carried the rs188140481 risk allele and in 44% of noncarriers (P=0.04). No cancer at a site other than the prostate was more common in first-degree or second-degree relatives of carriers of the rs188140481 risk allele than relatives of noncarriers. The rs188140481 polymorphism in the 8q24 region confers a moderate increase in the risk of prostate cancer in Polish men. The SNP does not appear to be associated with susceptibility to cancers of other types.

  2. Development of APE1 enzymatic DNA repair assays: low APE1 activity is associated with increase lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Pinchev, Mila; Kremer, Ran; Elinger, Dalia; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Rennert, Hedy S; Freedman, Laurence S; Rennert, Gad; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-09-01

    The key role of DNA repair in removing DNA damage and minimizing mutations makes it an attractive target for cancer risk assessment and prevention. Here we describe the development of a robust assay for apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1; APEX1), an essential enzyme involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. APE1 DNA repair enzymatic activity was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cell protein extracts using a radioactivity-based assay, and its association with lung cancer was determined using conditional logistic regression with specimens from a population-based case-control study with 96 lung cancer cases and 96 matched control subjects. The mean APE1 enzyme activity in case patients was 691 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 655-727] units/ng protein, significantly lower than in control subjects (mean = 793, 95% CI = 751-834 units/ng protein, P = 0.0006). The adjusted odds ratio for lung cancer associated with 1 SD (211 units) decrease in APE1 activity was 2.0 (95% CI = 1.3-3.1; P = 0.002). Comparison of radioactivity- and fluorescence-based assays showed that the two are equivalent, indicating no interference by the fluorescent tag. The APE1Asp148Glu SNP was associated neither with APE1 enzyme activity nor with lung cancer risk. Taken together, our results indicate that low APE1 activity is associated with lung cancer risk, consistent with the hypothesis that 'bad DNA repair', rather than 'bad luck', is involved in cancer etiology. Such assays may be useful, along with additional DNA repair biomarkers, for risk assessment of lung cancer and perhaps other cancers, and for selecting individuals to undergo early detection techniques such as low-dose CT.

  3. [Environment and cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Boffetta, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Several environmental factors, defined as pollutants present in air, water or other media, have been shown to be carcinogenic, including residential exposure to asbestos and radon, second-hand tobacco smoke, diesel engine emissions, and arsenic contamination of drinking water. Other factors, such as outdoor air pollution and water chlorination byproducts, are suspected carcinogens. In the case of pesticides and electromagnetic fields, including the use of cell phones, the available evidence does not suggest an increased risk of cancer. Overall, environmental causes of cancer are responsible for a limited proportion of the total burden of cancer in France and other high-income countries. Because of the involuntary nature of the exposure and the possibility to implement preventive measures, research into environmental cancer remains an important priority.

  4. Increased risks between Interleukin-10 gene polymorphisms and haplotype and head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yu-Ming; Du, Xin-Ya; Cai, Heng-Xing; Zhang, Chao; Yuan, Rui-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Luo, Jie

    2015-11-27

    Molecular epidemiological research suggests that interleukin-10 (IL-10) polymorphisms may be associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC), but results remain controversial. To derive a more precise evaluation, we performed a meta-analysis focused on genetic polymorphisms of IL-10. PubMed, Embase, CNKI and Wanfang databases were searched for studies that examined the relationship between IL-10 polymorphisms or haplotypes and HNC risk. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to assess the relationship strength. Publication bias, sensitivity and cumulative analyses were conducted to measure the robustness of our findings. Overall, nine related studies involving 2,258 patients and 2,887 control samples were analyzed. Significant associations between the IL-10-1082A > G polymorphism and HNC risk were observed (G vs. A: OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.27-1.92, P < 0.01, I(2) = 69.4%; AG vs. AA: OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.32-2.05, P < 0.01, I(2) = 55.6%; GG vs. AA: OR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.69-2.97, P < 0.01, I(2) = 38.5%; AG + GG vs. AA: OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.36-2.14, P = 0.02, I(2) = 61.8%; GG vs. AA + AG: OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.23-2.90, P = 0.01, I(2) = 46.3%) in the total population, as well as in subgroup analysis. Moreover, increased HNC risks were also associated with the IL-10 -819T > C polymorphism and the GCC haplotype. In conclusion, our meta-analyses suggest that IL-10 polymorphisms, specifically the -1082A > G polymorphism, may be associated with increased risk of HNC development.

  5. Telomere length shortening in gastric mucosa is a field effect associated with increased risk of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Nakano, Naoko; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Telomere shortening occurs in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by oxidative injury and rapid cell turnover. Short telomeres initiate chromosomal instability and may eventually contribute to tumorigenesis. To evaluate telomere length as potential biomarker for gastric cancer (GC) risk, we measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in GC tissues and in non-neoplastic mucosa from patients with GC and without GC. We obtained of 217 GC patients matched biopsies from the GC and adjacent tissues as well as gastric biopsies of 102 subjects without GC. Relative telomere length was measured in genomic DNA by real-time PCR. Relative telomere length decreased gradually in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and positive gastric mucosa of GC free subjects compared with adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue from GC patients (4.03 ± 0.3 vs. 2.82 ± 0.19 vs. 0.82 ± 0.07 vs. 0.29 ± 0.09, P < 0.0001). In non-neoplastic mucosa of GC patients, shorter telomeres were found significantly more often than in that of GC free subjects (age, sex, and H. pylori adjusted odds ratio = 7.81, 95 % confidence interval = 4.71-12.9, P < 0.0001). Telomere shortening in non-neoplastic mucosa was associated with chronic inflammation (P = 0.0018) and intestinal metaplasia (P < 0.0001). No significant associations were found between relative telomere length and clinicopathological features of GC and overall survival. Telomere shortening in gastric mucosa reflects a field effect in an early stage of carcinogenesis and is associated with an increased risk of GC. Telomere length in GC is not associated with clinicopathological features or prognosis.

  6. Telomere Length Polymorphisms: A Potential Factor Underlying Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer in African American Men and Familial Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Defective chromosome segregation and telomere dysfunction in aggressive Wilms ’ tumors . Clinical Cancer Research. 13:6593-6602. 2007. 5. Bechan GI...cell tumors reveals evidence of telomere length heterogeneity and non-telomerase mediated telomere maintenance in tumor subsets. Modern Pathology 20...163A-163A 739 Suppl. 2 Mar. 2007. 4. Meeker AK, Bova GS, Hicks JL, De Marzo AM. Direct in situ analysis of telomere lengths in primary tumors and

  7. A novel polymorphism in human cytosine DNA-methyltransferase-3B promoter is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongbing; Wang, Luo; Spitz, Margaret R; Hong, Waun K; Mao, Li; Wei, Qingyi

    2002-09-01

    DNA repair is central to genomic integrity. Reduced expression of several nucleotide excision repair genes has been demonstrated to be associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Because methylation of gene promoters is one of the major regulatory mechanisms of gene expression and most nucleotide excision repair gene promoters have not been fully characterized, we hypothesized that genetic variants of the genes that are responsible for regulating genomic methylation are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Recently, we identified a C-->T transition at a novel promoter region of cytosine DNA-methyltransferase-3B (DNMT3B) and found that this polymorphic transition significantly increases the promoter activity. In this hospital-based case-control study of 319 patients with incident lung cancer and 340 healthy controls frequency matched on age (+/-5 years), sex, ethnicity, and smoking status, we genotyped subjects for this DNMT3B promoter polymorphism to determine the association between this genetic variant and risk of lung cancer. Compared with CC homozygotes, CT heterozygotes had a >2-fold increased risk of lung cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.47-3.08] and TT homozygotes an OR of 1.42 (95% CI, 0.91-2.21). The combined variant genotype (CT + TT) was associated with a nearly 2-fold increased risk (adjusted OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.32-2.66). These results suggest that this novel variant of DNMT3B is associated with increased risk of lung cancer and may contribute to identifying individuals genetically susceptible to tobacco-induced cancers. Additional studies on the underlying molecular mechanism of this polymorphism are warranted.

  8. The HOXB13 G84E Mutation is Associated with an Increased Risk for Prostate Cancer and other Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L; Hathcock, Matthew; Yee, Cecilia; Okoth, Linda A.; Ewing, Charles M; Isaacs, William B.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background A rare non-conservative substitution (G84E) in the HOXB13 gene has been shown to be associated with risk of prostate cancer. DNA samples from male patients included in the Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) were genotyped to determine the frequency of the G84E mutation and its association with various cancers. Methods Subjects were genotyped using a custom TaqMan (Applied Biosystems) assay for G84E (rs138213197). In addition to donating a blood specimen, all MCB participants completed a baseline questionnaire to collect information on medical history and family history of cancer. Results Forty-nine of 9,012 male patients were carriers of G84E (0.5%). Thirty-one percent (n=2,595) of participants had been diagnosed with cancer, including 51.1% of G84E carriers compared to just 30.6% of non-carriers (p=0.004). G84E was most frequently observed among men with prostate cancer compared to men without cancer (p<0.0001). However, the mutation was also more commonly observed in men with bladder cancer (p=0.06) and leukemia (p=0.01). G84E carriers were more likely to have a positive family history of prostate cancer in a first degree relative compared to non-carriers (36.2% v. 16.0%, p=0.0003). Conclusions Our study confirms the association between the HOXB13 G84E variant and prostate cancer and suggests a novel association between G84E and leukemia and a suggestive association with bladder cancer. Future investigation is warranted to confirm these associations in order to improve our understanding of the role of germline HOXB13 mutations in human cancer. Impact The associations between HOXB13 and prostate, leukemia and bladder suggest that this gene is important in carcinogenesis. PMID:26108461

  9. Insulin therapy contributes to the increased risk of colorectal cancer in diabetes patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiological studies suggest that treatment with insulin may promote cancer growth. The present systematic review and meta-analysis of published observational studies was conducted to assess the risk of cancer during treatment with insulin. Materials and methods A compressive search was conducted through MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Chinese Biomedical Literature databases (CBM). Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with a random-effects model. Results A total of four studies with one case-controls study and three cohort studies comparing the insulin therapy and colorectal cancer susceptibility were identified. When all four studies were analyzed, the summary RRs were 1.61 (95% CI = 1.18–1.35) in a random-effects model for individuals with insulin therapy, compared with individuals without insulin therapy, which suggests a statistically significant association between insulin use and colorectal cancer. Conclusions Our findings provides the evidence that insulin therapy may contribute to the risk of colorectal cancer. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/9339731010859509 PMID:24175949

  10. Avoiding Cancer Risk Information

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, Amber S.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Howell, Jennifer L.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Waters, Erika A.; Orom, Heather; Shepperd, James A.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Perceived risk for health problems such as cancer is a central construct in many models of health decision making and a target for behavior change interventions. However, some portion of the population actively avoids cancer risk information. The prevalence of, explanations for, and consequences of such avoidance are not well understood. OBJECTIVE We examined the prevalence and demographic and psychosocial correlates of cancer risk information avoidance preference in a nationally representative sample. We also examined whether avoidance of cancer risk information corresponds with avoidance of cancer screening. RESULTS Based on our representative sample, 39% of the population indicated that they agreed or strongly agreed that they would “rather not know [their] chance of getting cancer.” This preference was stronger among older participants, female participants, and participants with lower levels of education. Preferring to avoid cancer risk information was stronger among participants who agreed with the beliefs that everything causes cancer, that there’s not much one can do to prevent cancer, and that there are too many recommendations to follow. Finally, the preference to avoid cancer risk information was associated with lower levels of screening for colon cancer. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that cancer risk information avoidance is a multi-determined phenomenon that is associated with demographic characteristics and psychosocial individual differences and also relates to engagement in cancer screening. PMID:26560410

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase 677TT Genotype may be Associated with an Increased Lung Cancer Risk in North China: An Updated Meta

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-Bo; Li, Jun; Qi, Jia-Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Zhong; Wu, Xu; Zhang, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Although many epidemiology studies have investigated the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and their associations with lung cancer (LC), definite conclusions cannot be drawn. To clarify the effects of MTHFR polymorphisms on the risk of LC, we performed a meta-analysis in Chinese populations. Material/Methods Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) until 16 February 2014. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the associations. Results A total of 11 studies with 2487 LC cases and 3228 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was found between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and LC risk when all studies in Chinese populations were pooled into this meta-analysis. In subgroup analyses stratified by geographical location and source of controls, significantly increased risk was found in North China (T vs. C: OR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.14–1.44; TT vs. CC: OR=1.67, 95% CI: 1.33–2.10; TT + CT vs. CC, OR=1.39, 95% CI=1.15–1.69; TT vs. CC + CT: OR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.03–2.06) and in population-based studies (TT vs. CC: OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.14–1.65; TT vs. CC + CT: OR=1.25, 95% CI: 1.07–1.45). Conclusions This meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR C677T polymorphism may contribute to LC development in North China. Studies with larger sample sizes and wider spectrum of populations are warranted to verify this finding. PMID:25544260

  12. Does postmenopausal estrogen administration increase the risk of breast cancer? Contributions of animal, biochemical, and clinical investigative studies to a resolution of the controversy.

    PubMed

    Zumoff, B

    1998-01-01

    Despite nearly six decades of epidemiological studies, meta-analyses, and reviews, there is still considerable controversy in the literature about the question, does postmenopausal estrogen administration increase the risk of breast cancer? In an effort to resolve the controversy, a number of animal, biochemical, and clinical investigative studies in this field have been reviewed. The following summary formulation is proposed: 1. Administration of estrogen is inherently capable of promoting the growth of breast cancer, and therefore of increasing the incidence of clinical breast cancer. 2. Human response to estrogen is like that of the low-cancer-incidence strains of mice studied by Lacassagne, in that large doses and prolonged administration are required to induce clinical breast cancer. 3. The blood levels of estradiol produced by the usual doses of postmenopausal estrogen are relatively low, equivalent to those of the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. These levels may be near the threshold for producing breast-cancer-promoting effects; therefore, the tumor response will vary greatly in different populations, depending on genetic susceptibility factors: a. The prevalence of a family history of premenopausal breast cancer in a first-degree relative. b. The prevalence of abnormal BRCA1, BRCA2, and p53 genes. c. The prevalence of increased 16 alpha-hydroxylation of estradiol. d. The prevalence of smokers who are slow acetylators. 4. Consumption of alcohol (5 grams or more daily) along with the postmenopausal estrogen administration results in elevation of blood estradiol levels to values equivalent to those of the periovulatory peak of the menstrual cycle, which may be well above the threshold for producing breast-cancer-promoting effects in all women. The risk for cancer will therefore be uniformly increased in women who use alcohol and take estrogen. 5. Increased risk of breast cancer from postmenopausal estrogen administration can be eliminated by taking

  13. MiR-27a rs895819 is involved in increased atrophic gastritis risk, improved gastric cancer prognosis and negative interaction with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Tie-jun; He, Cai-yun; Sun, Li-ping; Liu, Jing-wei; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    MiR-27a rs895819 is a loop-stem structure single nucleotide polymorphism affecting mature miR-27a function. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis about the association of rs895819 with gastric cancer risk and prognosis, atrophic gastritis risk, as well as the interactions with environmental factors. A total of 939 gastric cancer patients, 1,067 atrophic gastritis patients and 1,166 healthy controls were screened by direct sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS. The association of rs895819 with clinical pathological parameters and prognostic survival in 357 gastric cancer patients was also been analyzed. The rs895819 variant genotype increased the risk for atrophic gastritis (1.58-fold) and gastric cancer (1.24-fold). While in stratified analysis, the risk effect was demonstrated more significantly in the female, age >60y, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and non-drinker subgroups. Rs895819 and H. pylori showed an interaction effect for atrophic gastritis risk. In the survival analysis, the rs895819 AG heterozygosis was associated with better survival than the AA wild-type in the TNM stage I–II subgroup. In vitro study by overexpressing miR-27a, cells carrying polymorphic-type G allele expressed lower miR-27a than wild-type A allele. In conclusion, miR-27a rs895819 is implicated as a biomarker for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk, and interacts with H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:28150722

  14. Perineural invasion associated with increased cancer-specific mortality after external beam radiation therapy for men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Clair . E-mail: cbeard@lroc.harvard.edu; Schultz, Delray; Loffredo, Marian; Cote, Kerri; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Hurwitz, Mark D.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an association between perineural invasion (PNI) and cancer-specific survival in patients with prostate cancer after standard-dose external beam radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 517 consecutive patients who underwent RT (median dose, 70.5 Gy) between 1989 and 2003 for low-risk or intermediate-risk prostate cancer were studied. A genitourinary pathologist (AAR) scored presence or absence of PNI on all prostate needle-biopsy specimens. A Cox regression multivariable analysis was performed to assess whether the presence of PNI was associated with risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality after RT when the recognized risk-group variables were factored into the model. Estimates of cancer-specific mortality were made using a cumulative incidence method. Comparisons of survival were made using a two-tailed log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 84 patients (16%) have died, 15 of 84 (18%) from prostate cancer. PNI was the only significant predictor of prostate cancer-specific mortality after RT (p = 0.012). The estimated prostate cancer-specific mortality was 14% at 8 years for PNI+ patients vs. 5% for PNI- patients (p = 0.0008). Conclusions: Patients with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer who have PNI on prostate needle biopsy have a significantly higher rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality after standard-dose radiation therapy than patients without PNI. Although this analysis is retrospective, this association argues for consideration of the use of more aggressive therapy, such as hormonal therapy with RT or dose escalation, in these select patients.

  15. Excessive milk production during breast-feeding prior to breast cancer diagnosis is associated with increased risk for early events.

    PubMed

    Gustbée, Emma; Anesten, Charlotte; Markkula, Andrea; Simonsson, Maria; Rose, Carsten; Ingvar, Christian; Jernström, Helena

    2013-12-01

    Breast-feeding is a known protective factor against breast cancer. Breast-feeding duration is influenced by hormone levels, milk production, and lifestyle factors. The aims were to investigate how breast-feeding duration and milk production affected tumor characteristics and risk for early breast cancer events in primary breast cancer patients. Between 2002 and 2008, 634 breast cancer patients in Lund, Sweden, took part in an ongoing prospective cohort study. Data were extracted from questionnaires, pathology reports, and patients' charts from 592 patients without preoperative treatment. Breast-feeding duration ≤12 months of the first child was associated with higher frequency of ER+/PgR+ tumors (P=0.02). Median follow-up time was 4.9 years. Higher risk for early events was observed for breast-feeding duration of first child >12 months (LogRank P=0.001), total breast-feeding duration >12 months (LogRank P=0.008), as well as 'excessive milk production' during breast-feeding of the first child (LogRank P=0.001). Patients with 'almost no milk production' had no events. In a multivariable model including both 'excessive milk production' and breast-feeding duration of the first child >12 months, both were associated with a two-fold risk for early events, adjusted HRs 2.33 (95% CI: 1.25-4.36) and 2.39 (0.97-5.85), respectively, while total breast-feeding duration was not. 'Excessive milk production' was associated with a two-fold risk of early distant metastases, adjusted HR 2.59 (1.13-5.94), but not duration. In conclusion, 'excessive milk production' during breast-feeding was associated with higher risk for early events independent of tumor characteristics, stressing the need to consider host factors in the evaluation of prognostic markers.

  16. Gender and plasma iron biomarkers, but not HFE gene mutations, increase the risk of colorectal cancer and polyps.

    PubMed

    Castiella, Agustin; Múgica, Fernando; Zapata, Eva; Zubiaurre, Leire; Iribarren, Arantxa; de Juan, M Dolores; Alzate, Luis; Gil, Ines; Urdapilleta, Gregorio; Otazua, Pedro; Emparanza, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    A cohort study of patients included in the Basque Country colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme was carried out to assess the risk of adenomatous polyps and CRC (P-CRC) associated with HFE gene mutations, with gender and with iron biomarkers (serum ferritin (SF), iron (Fe) and transferrin saturation index (TSI)). Among 432 included patients (mean age 59.8 years), 263 were men (60.9 %) and 169 women (39.1 %). P-CRC were identified in 221 patients (51.2 %) and no polyps (NP) in 211 patients (48.8 %). HFE mutations were identified in 43.8 % of the patients. C282Y/wt genotypic frequency was 6.8 % in the P-CRC group and 1.4 % in the NP group (p < 0.05). The allelic frequency was 3.8 versus 1.2 % (p < 0.05). For laboratory, all three iron biomarkers showed a statistically significant difference: mean Fe, 91.29 ± 34 for P-CRC and 80.81 ± 30.59 for NP group. Mean TSI for P-CRC was 24.95 ± 8.90 and 22.74 ± 8.79 for NP group. Mean SF 308.09 ± 536.32 for P-CRC and 177.55 ± 159.95 for NP group. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, only male gender (odds ratio (OR) = 2.04, 1.29-3.22), SF (OR = 1.001, 1.0004-1.003) and Fe (OR = 1.01, 1.004-1.02) were related with the presence of CRC and adenoma. Men gender and raised serum iron biomarkers increase the risk of P-CRC.

  17. Genetic Variations in the Flanking Regions of miR-101-2 Are Associated with Increased Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiaping; Qin, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Yue; Wang, Yanru; He, Yisha; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin; Yin, Yongmei; Shen, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants in human microRNA (miRNA) genes may alter mature miRNA processing and/or target selection, and likely contribute to cancer susceptibility and disease progression. Previous studies have suggested that miR-101 may play important roles in the development of cancer by regulating key tumor-associated genes. However, the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of miR-101 in breast cancer susceptibility remains unclear. In this study, we genotyped 11 SNPs of the miR-101 genes (including miR-101-1 and miR-101-2) in a case-control study of 1064 breast cancer cases and 1073 cancer-free controls. The results revealed that rs462480 and rs1053872 in the flank regions of pre-miR-101-2 were significantly associated with increased risk of breast cancer (rs462480 AC/CC vs AA: adjusted OR = 1.182, 95% CI: 1.030–1.357, P = 0.017; rs1053872 CG/GG vs CC: adjusted OR = 1.179, 95% CI: 1.040–1.337, P = 0.010). However, the remaining 9 SNPs were not significantly associated with risk of breast cancer. Additionally, combined analysis of the two high-risk SNPs revealed that subjects carrying the variant genotypes of rs462480 and rs1053872 had increased risk of breast cancer in a dose-response manner (Ptrend = 0.002). Compared with individuals with “0–1” risk allele, those carrying “2–4” risk alleles had 1.29-fold risk of breast cancer. In conclusion, these findings suggested that the SNPs rs462480 and rs1053872 residing in miR-101-2 gene may have a solid impact on genetic susceptibility to breast cancer, which may improve our understanding of the potential contribution of miRNA SNPs to cancer pathogenesis. PMID:24475105

  18. Red meat-derived heterocyclic amines increase risk of colon cancer: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Drew S; Thompson, Cheryl L; Zelenskiy, Svetlana; Tucker, Thomas C; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    Formation of mutagenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is one pathway believed to drive the association of colon cancer with meat consumption. Limited data exist on the associations of individual HCAs and PAHs in red or white meat with colon cancer. Analyzing data from a validated meat preparation questionnaire completed by 1062 incident colon cancer cases and 1645 population controls from an ongoing case-control study, risks of colon cancer were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models, comparing the fourth to the first quartile of mutagen estimates derived from a CHARRED based food frequency questionnaire. Total dietary intake of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.44-2.44, P(trend) < 0.0001], 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) (aOR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.29-2.17, P(trend) = 0.001) and meat-derived mutagenic activity (aOR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.36-2.30, P(trend) < 0.0001) were statistically significantly associated with colon cancer risk. Meat type specific analyses revealed statistically significant associations for red meat-derived MeIQx, DiMeIQx, and mutagenic activity but not for the same mutagens derived from white meat. Our study adds evidence supporting red meat-derived, but not white-meat derived HCAs and PAHs, as an important pathway for environmental colon cancer carcinogenesis.

  19. Familial risk for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Madiha; Ding, Xiao-Ji; Cao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer, which has a low survival rate, is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Smoking and air pollution are the major causes of lung cancer; however, numerous studies have demonstrated that genetic factors also contribute to the development of lung cancer. A family history of lung cancer increases the risk for the disease in both smokers and never-smokers. This review focuses on familial lung cancer, in particular on the familial aggregation of lung cancer. The development of familial lung cancer involves shared environmental and genetic factors among family members. Familial lung cancer represents a good model for investigating the association between environmental and genetic factors, as well as for identifying susceptibility genes for lung cancer. In addition, studies on familial lung cancer may help to elucidate the etiology and mechanism of lung cancer, and may identify novel biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis, targeted therapy and improved prevention strategies. This review presents the aetiology and molecular biology of lung cancer and then systematically introduces and discusses several aspects of familial lung cancer, including the characteristics of familial lung cancer, population-based studies on familial lung cancer and the genetics of familial lung cancer. PMID:28356926

  20. Asbestos and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Category Cancer A-Z What Causes Cancer? Asbestos and Cancer Risk What is asbestos? Asbestos is a group of minerals that occur ... in some countries. How are people exposed to asbestos? People can be exposed to asbestos in different ...

  1. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) Haplotypes are Associated with Increased Risk of Gastric Cancer in Kashmir Valley

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Manzoor A.; Srivastava, Priya; Zargar, Showkat A.; Mittal, Balraj

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) plays a crucial role in carcinogenesis and progression of several types of cancers. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs2274223) in PLCE1 has been identified as a novel susceptibility locus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of three potentially functional SNPs (rs2274223A > G, rs3765524C > T, and rs7922612C > T) of PLCE1 in gastric cancer patients from Kashmir Valley. Patients and Methods: The study was conducted in 108 GC cases and 195 healthy controls from Kashmir Valley. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Data were statistically analyzed using χ2 test and logistic regression models. A P value of less than 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. Results: The frequency of PLCE1 A2274223C3765524T7922612, G2274223C3765524T7922612, and G2274223T3765524C7922612 haplotypes were higher in patients compared with controls, conferred high risk for GC [odds ratio (OR) =6.29; P = 0.001; Pcorr = 0.003], (OR = 3.23; P = 0.011; Pcorr = 0.033), and (OR = 5.14; P = 0.011; Pcorr = 0.033), respectively. Smoking and salted tea are independent risk factors for GC, but we did not find any significant modulation of cancer risk by PLCE1 variants with smoking or excessive consumption of salted tea. Conclusion: These results suggest that variation in PLCE1 may be associated with GC risk in Kashmir Valley. PMID:25434319

  2. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  3. The LSP1 rs3817198 T > C polymorphism contributes to increased breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of twelve studies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianzhou; Li, Hui; Luo, Jiashun; Mei, Hua; Peng, Liang; Li, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    The association between the LSP1 rs3817198 T > C polymorphism and breast cancer risk has been widely investigated, but remains controversial. We therefore undertook a comprehensive meta-analysis to provide a high-quality evaluation of this association. A literature search was performed among Pubmed, EMBASE and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases prior to July 31, 2016, and the strength of the association between the LSP1 rs3817198 T > C polymorphism and breast cancer risk was assessed based on odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). In total, 12 studies with 50,525 cases and 54,302 controls were included. Pooled risk estimates indicated a significant association between the LSP1 rs3817198 T > C polymorphism and breast cancer risk. Analysis of cases stratified based on ethnicity suggested that the association was significant in both Caucasian and Asian populations. Stratification based on source of controls revealed an association only in population-based studies. These findings indicate the LSP1 rs3817198 T > C polymorphism is associated with increased risk of breast cancer, especially in Caucasian and Asian populations. Large, well-designed studies with different ethnicities are still needed to verify our findings. PMID:27590509

  4. Breast cancer screening in women at increased risk according to different family histories: an update of the Modena Study Group experience

    PubMed Central

    Cortesi, Laura; Turchetti, Daniela; Marchi, Isabella; Fracca, Antonella; Canossi, Barbara; Rachele, Battista; Silvia, Ruscelli; Rita, Pecchi Anna; Pietro, Torricelli; Massimo, Federico

    2006-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) detection in women with a genetic susceptibility or strong family history is considered mandatory compared with BC screening in the general population. However, screening modalities depend on the level of risk. Here we present an update of our screening programs based on risk classification. Methods We defined different risk categories and surveillance strategies to identify early BC in 1325 healthy women recruited by the Modena Study Group for familial breast and ovarian cancer. Four BC risk categories included BRCA1/2 carriers, increased, intermediate, and slightly increased risk. Women who developed BC from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 2005 (N = 44) were compared with the number of expected cases matched for age and period. BRCA1/2 carriers were identified by mutational analysis. Other risk groups were defined by different levels of family history for breast or ovarian cancer (OC). The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was used to evaluate the observed and expected ratio among groups. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results After a median follow-up of 55 months, there was a statistically significant difference between observed and expected incidence [SIR = 4.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6 to 7.6; p < 0.001]. The incidence observed among BRCA carriers (SIR = 20.3; 95% CI = 3.1 to 83.9; P < 0.001), women at increased (SIR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.5 to 8.3; P < 0.001) or intermediate risk (SIR = 7.0, 95% CI = 2.0 to 17.1; P = 0.0018) was higher than expected, while the difference between observed and expected among women at slightly increased risk was not statistically significant (SIR = 2.4, 95% CI = 0.9 to 8.3; P = .74). Conclusion The rate of cancers detected in women at high risk according to BRCA status or strong family history, as defined according to our operational criteria, was significantly higher than expected in an age-matched general population. However, we failed to identify a greater incidence of BC in

  5. What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

  6. Haplotypes of the MTHFR gene are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in a Han Chinese population in Gansu province.

    PubMed

    Song, Ailing; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yumin; Wu, Li; Li, Yu; Liu, Xiaokang; Lan, Shen

    2016-07-01

    Elevated homocysteine levels are a risk factor for breast cancer, although the mechanism underlying this effect is unknown. Genome-wide association studies were used to systematically identify genetic variants which were significantly associated with the circulating homocysteine concentration. To examine the role of homocysteine-related variants in the occurrence of breast cancer, we investigated the association between these variants and breast cancer in a Han Chinese population. Five variants of genome-wide significant homocysteine-related genes were selected for the analysis in a case-control study, with a total of 487 patients with breast cancer and 605 controls. We found that none of the studied polymorphisms were related to the altered breast cancer risk. In the haplotypic analysis, the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) haplotypes rs12085006A/rs1999594G/rs1801133C (OR = 3.44, 95% CI = 1.58-7.50, P = 0.0019) and rs12085006A/rs1999594G/rs1801133T (OR = 16.21, 95% CI = 2.19- 120.32, P = 0.0065) were significantly associated with an increased breast cancer risk when compared with the wild-type haplotype. Both of the risky MTHFR haplotypes were correlated with decreased MTHFR gene expression and elevated homocysteine concentrations, indicating a genetic component for hyperhomocysteinemia. The MTHFR haplotypes reconstructed with homocysteine-related variants were associated with the occurrence of breast cancer. This finding further emphasizes the importance of homocysteine metabolism genes in breast carcinogenesis and highlights the interplay of diet, genetics, and human cancers. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(7):526-534, 2016.

  7. Increased micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes contributes to cancer risk in the methyl isocyanate-affected population of Bhopal.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Chinnu Sugavanam; Akhter, Sameena; Malla, Tahir Mohiuddin; Sah, Nand Kishore; Ganesh, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    The Bhopal gas tragedy involving methyl isocyanate (MIC) is one of the most horrific industrial accidents in recent decades. We investigated the genotoxic effects of MIC in long-term survivors and their offspring born after the 1984 occurrence. There are a few cytogenetic reports showing genetic damage in the MIC-exposed survivors, but there is no information about the associated cancer risk. The same is true about offspring. For the first time, we here assessed the micronucleus (MN) frequency using cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay to predict cancer risk in the MIC-affected population of Bhopal. A total of 92 healthy volunteers (46 MIC- affected and 46 controls) from Bhopal and various regions of India were studied taking gender and age into consideration. Binucleated lymphocytes with micronuclei (BNMN), total number of micronuclei in lymphocytes (MNL), and nuclear division index (NDI) frequencies and their relationship to age, gender and several lifestyle variabilities (smoking, alcohol consumption and tobacco-chewing) were investigated. Our observations showed relatively higher BNMN and MNL (P<0.05) in the MIC-affected than in the controls. Exposed females (EF) exhibited significantly higher BNMN and MNL (P<0.01) than their unexposed counterparts. Similarly, female offspring of the exposed (FOE) also suffered higher BNMN and MNL (P<0.05) than in controls. A significant reduction in NDI (P<0.05) was found only in EF. The affected group of non-smokers and non-alcoholics featured a higher frequency of BNMN and MNL than the control group of non-smokers and non-alcoholics (P<0.01). Similarly, the affected group of tobacco chewers showed significantly higher BNMN and MNL (P<0.001) than the non-chewers. Amongst the affected, smoking and alcohol consumption were not associated with statistically significant differences in BNMN, MNL and NDI. Nevertheless, tobacco-chewing had a preponderant effect with respect to MNL. A reasonable correlation between MNL and

  8. From Observation to Intervention: Development of a Psychoeducational Intervention to Increase Uptake of BRCA Genetic Counseling Among High-Risk Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Teri L.; Nam, Kelli M.; Nelson, Alison; de la Cruz, Cara Z.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a psychoeducational intervention (PEI) to increase uptake of genetic counseling targeted to high-risk breast cancer survivors. Based on previous research, scientific literature, and a review of cancer education websites, we identified potential PEI content. We then assessed the initial acceptability and preference of two booklets of identical content but different layouts, by presenting the booklets to individuals with a personal or family history of breast cancer (n=57). The preferred booklet was evaluated by two focus groups of ten breast cancer patients who had not attended genetic counseling. The booklet was refined based on participants' feedback at each stage. Focus group participants generally found the booklet visually appealing, informative, and helpful, but some thought that it was too long. Final changes were made based on learner verification principles of attraction, comprehension, cultural acceptability, and persuasion. This project produced an interventional tool to present key constructs that may facilitate decision making about risk-appropriate genetic counseling uptake among high-risk breast cancer survivors. The process described for creating, testing, and adapting materials from a patient perspective can be used for developing other PEIs. This newly developed, unique PEI can be used in many clinical settings. PMID:24706196

  9. From observation to intervention: development of a psychoeducational intervention to increase uptake of BRCA genetic counseling among high-risk breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Malo, Teri L; Nam, Kelli M; Nelson, Alison; de la Cruz, Cara Z; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2014-12-01

    We describe the development of a psychoeducational intervention (PEI) to increase uptake of genetic counseling targeted to high-risk breast cancer survivors. Based on previous research, scientific literature, and a review of cancer education websites, we identified potential PEI content. We then assessed the initial acceptability and preference of two booklets of identical content but different layouts, by presenting the booklets to individuals with a personal or family history of breast cancer (n = 57). The preferred booklet was evaluated by two focus groups of ten breast cancer patients who had not attended genetic counseling. The booklet was refined based on participants' feedback at each stage. Focus group participants generally found the booklet visually appealing, informative, and helpful, but some thought that it was too long. Final changes were made based on learner verification principles of attraction, comprehension, cultural acceptability, and persuasion. This project produced an interventional tool to present key constructs that may facilitate decision making about risk-appropriate genetic counseling uptake among high-risk breast cancer survivors. The process described for creating, testing, and adapting materials from a patient perspective can be used for developing other PEIs. This newly developed, unique PEI can be used in many clinical settings.

  10. Pernicious anaemia and cancer risk in Denmark.

    PubMed Central

    Mellemkjaer, L.; Gridley, G.; Møller, H.; Hsing, A. W.; Linet, M. S.; Brinton, L. A.; Olsen, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    A cohort of 5072 patients with pernicious anaemia was identified in the Danish Hospital Discharge Register from 1977 to 1989 and, through linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry, the occurrence of cancer in the cohort was determined up to 1991. Observed numbers of cancer cases during 1-15 years of follow-up were compared with expected numbers based on national incidence rates. Besides the well-established increased risk for stomach cancer, the analysis also revealed a 2-fold increase in the relative risk for cancer of the buccal cavity and pharynx among pernicious anaemia patients in accordance with previous studies; previously reported elevated risks for other digestive tract cancers were not confirmed. There was a non-significantly increased risk for lymphatic and haematological malignancy but the risk tended to disappear after 5 years of follow-up, indicating a possible selection bias. Decreased risks for cervical cancer and non-melanoma skin cancer were also seen. PMID:8611439

  11. Estimating Radiogenic Cancer Risks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA's estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures developed in light of information that has become available, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

  12. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... common than normal in children who lived near Chernobyl, the site of a 1986 nuclear plant accident ... exposure was much, much lower than that around Chernobyl. A higher risk of thyroid cancer has not ...

  13. Diabetes mellitus: influences on cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus and cancer are common conditions, and their co-diagnosis in the same individual is not infrequent. The relative risks associated with type 2 diabetes are greater than twofold for hepatic, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The relative risk is somewhat lower, at 1.2-1.5-fold for colorectal, breast, and bladder cancers. In comparison, the relative risk of lung cancer is less than 1. The evidence for other malignancies (e.g. kidney, non-Hodgkin lymphoma) is inconclusive, whereas prostatic cancer occurs less frequently in male patients with diabetes. The potential biologic links between the two diseases are incompletely understood. Evidence from observational studies suggests that some medications used to treat hyperglycemia are associated with either increased or reduced risk of cancer. Whereas anti-diabetic drugs have a minor influence on cancer risk, drugs used to treat cancer may either cause diabetes or worsen pre-existing diabetes. If hyperinsulinemia acts as a critical link between the observed increased cancer risk and type 2 diabetes, one would predict that patients with type 1 diabetes would have a different cancer risk pattern than patients with type 2 diabetes because the former patients are exposed to lower levels of exogenous administered insulin. Obtained results showed that patients with type 1 diabetes had elevated risks of cancers of the stomach, cervix, and endometrium. Type 1 diabetes is associated with a modest excess cancer risk overall and risks of specific cancers that differ from those associated with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Increased Risk of Lung Cancer Associated with a Functionally Impaired Polymorphic Variant of the Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL2

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanjib; Maiti, Amit K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hegde, Pavana M; Boldogh, Istvan; Sarkar, Partha S; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Sarker, Altaf H.; Hang, Bo; Xie, Jingwu; Tomkinson, Alan E; Zhou, Mian; Shen, Binghui; Wang, Guanghai; Wu, Chen; Yu, Dianke; Lin, Dongxin; Cardenas, Victor; Hazra, Tapas K

    2012-01-01

    Human NEIL2, one of five oxidized base-specific DNA glycosylases, is unique in preferentially repairing oxidative damage in transcribed genes. Here we show that depletion of NEIL2 causes a 6- to 7-fold increase in spontaneous mutation frequency in the HPRT gene of the V79 Chinese hamster lung cell line. This prompted us to screen for NEIL2 variants in lung cancer patients’ genomic DNA. We identified several polymorphic variants, among which R103Q and R257L were frequently observed in lung cancer patients. We then characterized these variants biochemically, and observed a modest decrease in DNA glycosylase activity relative to the wild type (WT) only with the R257L mutant protein. However, in reconstituted repair assays containing WT NEIL2 or its R257L and R103Q variants together with other DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins (PNKP, Polβ, Lig IIIα and XRCC1) or using NEIL2-FLAG immunocomplexes, an ~ 5-fold decrease in repair was observed with the R257L variant compared to WT or R103Q NEIL2, apparently due to the R257L mutant’s lower affinity for other repair proteins, particularly Polβ. Notably, increased endogenous DNA damage was observed in NEIL2 variant (R257L)-expressing cells relative to WT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the decreased DNA repair capacity of the R257L variant can induce mutations that lead to lung cancer development. PMID:22497777

  15. Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yong; Ai, Min; Wang, Jun; Jin, Bo; Teng, Zhaowei; Wang, Yansheng; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background This study sought to appraise the association between raised body mass index (BMI) and the risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC) by performing a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies. Materials/Methods Eligible cohort studies were selected by searching PubMed and EMBASE from their inception to May 26, 2016, and the reference lists of retrieved articles were also consulted. The information was screened by two authors separately. We used a fixed-effects model to calculate the overall pooled risk estimates. A random-effects model was used to identify heterogeneity. Results The meta-analysis incorporated 14 cohort studies. Nine papers were deemed to be of high quality based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), the overall pooled relative risks (RR) of GBC was 1.45 (95% CI 1.30–1.61) for excess body weight individuals (BMI ≥25 kg/m2); 1.10 (95% CI 1.02–1.18) for overweight persons (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) and 1.69(95% CI 1.54–1.86) for obese folks (BMI ≥30 kg/m2). A higher risk of GBC was presented in obese women (women: RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.59–1.99; men: RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.25–1.79). And a positive relationship between overweight and GBC risk was also displayed in female (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.11–1.40), but not in male (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.93–1.11). The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed. Conclusions This meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies demonstrated that raised BMI has a dramatic association with risk of GBC, especially in women. But, no association between overweight and GBC in men was found. PMID:27899789

  16. Second Malignancies After Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer: Is There Increased Risk With Addition of Regional Radiation to Local Radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Sarah Nicole; Tyldesley, Scott; Li, Dongdong; Olson, Robert; McBride, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an increased risk of second malignancies (SM), particularly lung cancer, in early stage breast cancer patients treated with the addition of nodal fields to breast and/or chest wall radiation therapy (RT). Materials and Methods: Subjects were stage I/II female breast cancer patients 20 to 79 years of age, diagnosed between 1989 and 2005 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. Patients were included if they survived and did not have SM within 3 years of diagnosis. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to compare SM incidence to cancer incidence in the general sex- and age-matched populations. Secondary malignancy risks in patients treated with local RT (LRT) to the breast/chest wall were compared to those in patients treated with locoregional RT (LRRT) to the breast/chest wall and regional nodes, using multivariate regression analysis (MVA) to account for covariates. Results: The cohort included 12,836 patients with a median follow-up of 8.4 years. LRRT was used in 18% of patients. The SIR comparing patients treated with LRT to the general population was 1.29 (CI: 1.21-1.38). No statistically significant increased incidence of in-field malignancies (SIR, 1.04; CI: 0.87-1.23) and lung cancers (SIR, 1.06; CI: 0.88-1.26) was detected. The SIR comparing patients treated with LRRT to the general population was 1.39 (CI: 1.17-1.64). No statistically significant increased incidence of in-field malignancies (SIR, 1.26; CI: 0.77-1.94) and lung cancers (SIR, 1.27; CI: 0.76-1.98) was detected. On MVA comparing LRRT to LRT, the adjusted hazard ratio was 1.20 for in-field malignancies (CI: 0.68-2.16) and 1.26 for lung cancer (CI: 0.67-2.36). The excess attributable risk (EAR) to regional RT was 3.1 per 10,000 person years (CI: −8.7 to 9.9). Conclusions: No statistically significant increased risk of second malignancy was detected after LRRT relative to

  17. Cancer Risk Assessment Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidala, Jim

    1985-01-01

    Describes the scientific basis of cancer risk assessment, outlining the dominant controversies surrounding the use of different methods for identifying carcinogens (short-term tests, animal bioassays, and epidemiological studies). Points out that risk assessment is as much an art as it is a science. (DH)

  18. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000931.htm Understanding your prostate cancer risk To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Are you at risk for developing prostate cancer in your lifetime? Learn about the risk factors ...

  19. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000830.htm Understanding your breast cancer risk To use the sharing features on this page, ... you can do to help prevent breast cancer. Risk Factors You Cannot Control Risk factors you cannot ...

  20. Poor Metabolizers at the Cytochrome P450 2C19 Loci Is at Increased Risk of Developing Cancer in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zenggan; Yu, Yanmin

    2013-01-01

    Background CYP2C19 encodes a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes, which play a central role in activating and detoxifying many carcinogens and endogenous compounds thought to be involved in the development of cancer. In the past decade, two common polymorphisms among CYP2C19 (CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3) that are responsible for the poor metabolizers (PMs) phenotype in humans and cancer susceptibility have been investigated extensively; however, these studies have yielded contradictory results. Methods and Results To investigate this inconsistency, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 11,554 cases and 16,592 controls from 30 case-control studies. Overall, the odds ratio (OR) of cancer was 1.52 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23–1.88, P<10-4] for CYP2C19 PMs genotypes. However, this significant association vanished when the analyses were restricted to 5 larger studies (no. of cases ≥ 500 cases). In the subgroup analysis for different cancer types, PMs genotypes had an effect of increasing the risks of esophagus cancer, gastric cancer, lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma as well as head neck cancer. Significant results were found in Asian populations when stratified by ethnicity; whereas no significant associations were found among Caucasians. Stratified analyses according to source of controls, significant associations were found only in hospital base controls. Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that the CYP2C19 PMs genotypes most likely contributes to cancer susceptibility, particularly in the Asian populations. PMID:24015291

  1. Exposure to welding fumes increases lung cancer risk among light smokers but not among heavy smokers: evidence from two case-control studies in Montreal.

    PubMed

    Vallières, Eric; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Parent, Marie-Élise; Rachet, Bernard; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-08-01

    We investigated relationships between occupational exposure to gas and arc welding fumes and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to these agents throughout the spectrum of industries. Two population-based case-control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979-1986) included 857 cases and 1066 controls, and Study II (1996-2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 controls. Detailed job histories were obtained by interview and evaluated by an expert team of chemist-hygienists to estimate degree of exposure to approximately 300 substances for each job. Gas and arc welding fumes were among the agents evaluated. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer using logistic regression, adjusting for smoking history and other covariates. The two studies provided similar results, so a pooled analysis was conducted. Among all subjects, no significant association was found between lung cancer and gas welding fumes (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.9-1.4) or arc welding fumes (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2). However, when restricting attention to light smokers, there was an increased risk of lung cancer in relation to gas welding fumes (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.7-4.8) and arc welding fumes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3-3.8), with even higher OR estimates among workers with the highest cumulative exposures. In conclusion, there was no detectable excess risk of lung cancer due to welding fumes among moderate to heavy smokers; but among light smokers we found an excess risk related to both types of welding fumes.

  2. Increased Risk for Invasive Breast Cancer Associated with Hormonal Therapy: A Nation-Wide Random Sample of 65,723 Women Followed from 1997 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jung-Nien; Wu, Chien-Tung; Chen, Pau-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chow, Song-Nan; Wang, Jung-Der

    2011-01-01

    Background Hormonal therapy (HT) either estrogen alone (E-alone) or estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) appears to increase the risk for breast cancer in Western countries. However, limited information is available on the association between HT and breast cancer in Asian women characterized mainly by dietary phytoestrogens intake and low prevalence of contraceptive pills prescription. Methodology A total of 65,723 women (20–79 years of age) without cancer or the use of Chinese herbal products were recruited from a nation-wide one-million representative sample of the National Health Insurance of Taiwan and followed from 1997 to 2008. Seven hundred and eighty incidents of invasive breast cancer were diagnosed. Using a reference group that comprised 40,052 women who had never received a hormone prescription, Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to determine the hazard ratios for receiving different types of HT and the occurrence of breast cancer. Conclusions 5,156 (20%) women ever used E+P, 2,798 (10.8%) ever used E-alone, and 17,717 (69%) ever used other preparation types. The Cox model revealed adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.05 (95% CI 1.37–3.07) for current users of E-alone and 8.65 (95% CI 5.45–13.70) for current users of E+P. Using women who had ceased to take hormonal medication for 6 years or more as the reference group, the adjusted HRs were significantly elevated and greater than current users and women who had discontinued hormonal medication for less than 6 years. Current users of either E-alone or E+P have an increased risk for invasive breast cancer in Taiwan, and precautions should be taken when such agents are prescribed. PMID:21998640

  3. Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in colonic mucosa of humans at normal and increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Turgeon, Danielle K; Wright, Benjamin D; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Ruffin, Mack T; Brenner, Dean E; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M

    2013-09-01

    Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2, produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as cancer preventives, in the inhibition of COX activity; however, side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pose unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated whether consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes that control prostaglandin E2 production, COX-1 and NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Thirty participants at normal and 20 participants at increased risk for CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and the end of the study. Tissue levels of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using western blotting. After ginger consumption, participants at increased risk for CRC had a significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8±41%) compared with the placebo group (18.9±52%; P=0.03). Protein levels of 15-PGDH in the colon were unchanged. In participants who were at normal risk for CRC, neither protein levels of COX-1 nor 15-PGDH in the colon were altered by ginger consumption. Ginger significantly lowered COX-1 protein expression in participants at increased risk for CRC but not in those at normal risk for CRC. Ginger did not alter 15-PGDH protein expression in either increased or normal-risk participants. Further investigation, in larger studies with a longer ginger intervention, is needed to examine the ability of ginger to impact tissue levels of prostaglandin.

  4. Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia: A report from the Female Lung Cancer Consortium in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Seow, Wei Jie; Wang, Zhaoming; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hong, Yun-Chul; Seow, Adeline; Wu, Chen; Hosgood, H Dean; Chen, Kexin; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wen, Wanqing; Cawthon, Richard; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil E; Park, Jae Yong; Chen, Chien-Jen; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Chang, I-Shou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Kim, Hee Nam; Chang, Gee-Chen; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Fusheng; Yin, Zhihua; An, She-Juan; Qian, Biyun; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Kim, Jin Hee; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Wen-Chang; Klein, Robert J; Chung, Charles C; Oh, In-Jae; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Berndt, Sonja I; Wu, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Junwen; Zhao, Xueying; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Su, Wu-Chou; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Pao, William; Kim, Young-Chul; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Su, Jian; Wang, Chih-Liang; Li, Haixin; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Zhao, Zhenhong; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Kohno, Takashi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Yokota, Jun; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Kunitoh, Hideo; Wu, Guoping; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Shiraishi, Kouya; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Wu, Tangchun; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zhou, Baosen; Shin, Min-Ho; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Dongxin; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by examining a panel of 7 telomere-length associated genetic variants in a large study of 5,457 never-smoking female Asian lung cancer cases and 4,493 never-smoking female Asian controls using data from a previously reported genome-wide association study. Using a group of 1,536 individuals with phenotypically measured telomere length in WBCs in the prospective Shanghai Women’s Health study, we demonstrated the utility of a genetic risk score (GRS) of 7 telomere-length associated variants to predict telomere length in an Asian population. We then found that GRSs used as instrumental variables to predict longer telomere length were associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.51 (95% CI=1.34–1.69) for upper vs. lower quartile of the weighted GRS, P-value=4.54×10−14) even after removing rs2736100 (P-value=4.81×10−3), a SNP in the TERT locus robustly associated with lung cancer risk in prior association studies. Stratified analyses suggested the effect of the telomere-associated GRS is strongest among younger individuals. We found no difference in GRS effect between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell subtypes. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase lung cancer risk, which is consistent with earlier prospective studies relating longer telomere length with increased lung cancer risk. PMID:25516442

  5. Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia: a report from the female lung cancer consortium in Asia.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Seow, Wei Jie; Wang, Zhaoming; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hong, Yun-Chul; Seow, Adeline; Wu, Chen; Hosgood, H Dean; Chen, Kexin; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wen, Wanqing; Cawthon, Richard; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil E; Park, Jae Yong; Chen, Chien-Jen; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Chang, I-Shou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Kim, Hee Nam; Chang, Gee-Chen; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Fusheng; Yin, Zhihua; An, She-Juan; Qian, Biyun; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Kim, Jin Hee; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Wen-Chang; Klein, Robert J; Chung, Charles C; Oh, In-Jae; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Berndt, Sonja I; Wu, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Junwen; Zhao, Xueying; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Su, Wu-Chou; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Pao, William; Kim, Young-Chul; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Su, Jian; Wang, Chih-Liang; Li, Haixin; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Zhao, Zhenhong; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Kohno, Takashi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Yokota, Jun; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Kunitoh, Hideo; Wu, Guoping; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Shiraishi, Kouya; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Wu, Tangchun; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zhou, Baosen; Shin, Min-Ho; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Dongxin; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2015-07-15

    Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by examining a panel of seven telomere-length associated genetic variants in a large study of 5,457 never-smoking female Asian lung cancer cases and 4,493 never-smoking female Asian controls using data from a previously reported genome-wide association study. Using a group of 1,536 individuals with phenotypically measured telomere length in WBCs in the prospective Shanghai Women's Health study, we demonstrated the utility of a genetic risk score (GRS) of seven telomere-length associated variants to predict telomere length in an Asian population. We then found that GRSs used as instrumental variables to predict longer telomere length were associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.34-1.69) for upper vs. lower quartile of the weighted GRS, p value = 4.54 × 10(-14) ) even after removing rs2736100 (p value = 4.81 × 10(-3) ), a SNP in the TERT locus robustly associated with lung cancer risk in prior association studies. Stratified analyses suggested the effect of the telomere-associated GRS is strongest among younger individuals. We found no difference in GRS effect between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell subtypes. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase lung cancer risk, which is consistent with earlier prospective studies relating longer telomere length with increased lung cancer risk.

  6. The TP53 codon 72 Pro/Pro genotype may be associated with an increased lung cancer risk in North China: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Hao, Li-Ran; Yue, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Background: The polymorphism of TP53 codon 72, a transversion of G to C (Arg to Pro), has been demonstrated to be associated with the risk for lung cancer. However, individual studies conducted in Chinese have provided conflicting and inconclusive findings. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis by pooling all currently available case-control studies to estimate the effect of TP53 codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism on the development of lung cancer in the Chinese population. Material/Methods: Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) till 10 October 2014. Pooled ORs and 95% CIs were used to assess the strength of the associations. Results: A total of 12 case-control studies including 3681 lung cancer cases and 4358 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was found between TP53 codon 72 variation and lung cancer risk when all studies in the Chinese population pooled into this meta-analysis. However, in the subgroup analysis by geographical locations, significantly increased risk was found in the population from North China under all genetic models (Allele model, OR=1.22, 95% CI: 1.04-1.43; Dominant model, OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.01-1.25; Recessive model, OR=1.41, 95% CI: 1.07-1.87; Homozygous model, OR=1.47, 95% CI: 1.09-1.99; Heterozygous model, OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.04-1.89). Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides the evidence that TP53 codon 72 polymorphism may contribute to the lung cancer development in North China and studies with large sample size and gene-gene (gene-environment) interactions are warranted to verify this finding. PMID:26064201

  7. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Your risk of getting colorectal cancer increases as you get older. More than 90% ...

  8. Effects of a walking intervention using mobile technology and interactive voice response on serum adipokines among postmenopausal women at increased breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Adana A.M.; Krok, Jessica L.; Peng, Juan; Pennell, Michael L.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Degraffinreid, Cecilia R.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2014-01-01

    Practical methods to reduce the risk of obesity-related breast cancer among high-risk subgroups are lacking. Few studies have investigated the effects of exercise on circulating adipokines, which have been shown to be associated with obesity and breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a walking intervention on serum adiponectin, leptin and the adiponectin-to-leptin ratio (A/L). Seventy-one overweight and obese postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer were stratified by BMI (25-30 kg/m2 or >30 kg/m2) and randomized to a 12-week, 2-arm walking intervention administered through interactive voice response (IVR) and mobile devices. The intervention arms were: IVR + coach and IVR + no coach condition. Pre-post changes in serum adiponectin, leptin and the A/L ratio were examined using mixed regression models, with ratio estimates (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) corresponding to post-intervention adipokine concentrations relative to pre-intervention concentrations. While post-intervention effects included statistically significant improvements in anthropometric measures, the observed decreases in adiponectin and leptin (Ratio=0.86, 95% CI 0.74-1.01 and Ratio=0.94, 95% CI 0.87-1.01, respectively) and increase in A/L (Ratio=1.09, 95% CI 0.94-1.26) were not significant. Thus, these findings do not support significant effects of the walking intervention on circulating adipokines among overweight and obese postmenopausal women. Additional studies are essential to determine the most effective and practical lifestyle interventions that can promote beneficial modification of serum adipokine concentrations, which may prove useful for obesity-related breast cancer prevention. PMID:24435584

  9. Effects of a walking intervention using mobile technology and interactive voice response on serum adipokines among postmenopausal women at increased breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Adana A M; Krok, Jessica L; Peng, Juan; Pennell, Michael L; Vitolins, Mara Z; Degraffinreid, Cecilia R; Paskett, Electra D

    2014-04-01

    Practical methods to reduce the risk of obesity-related breast cancer among high-risk subgroups are lacking. Few studies have investigated the effects of exercise on circulating adipokines, which have been shown to be associated with obesity and breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a walking intervention on serum adiponectin, leptin, and the adiponectin-to-leptin ratio (A/L). Seventy-one overweight and obese postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer were stratified by BMI (25-30 kg/m(2) or >30 kg/m(2)) and randomized to a 12-week, two-arm walking intervention administered through interactive voice response (IVR) and mobile devices. The intervention arms were IVR + coach and IVR + no-coach condition. Pre-post changes in serum adiponectin, leptin, and the A/L ratio were examined using mixed regression models, with ratio estimates (and 95 % confidence intervals [CI]) corresponding to postintervention adipokine concentrations relative to preintervention concentrations. While postintervention effects included statistically significant improvements in anthropometric measures, the observed decreases in adiponectin and leptin (ratio = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.74-1.01, and ratio = 0.94, 95 % CI 0.87-1.01, respectively) and increase in A/L ratio = 1.09, 95 % CI 0.94-1.26) were not significant. Thus, these findings do not support significant effects of the walking intervention on circulating adipokines among overweight and obese postmenopausal women. Additional studies are essential to determine the most effective and practical lifestyle interventions that can promote beneficial modification of serum adipokine concentrations, which may prove useful for obesity-related breast cancer prevention.

  10. Cancer risk assessment of toxaphene.

    PubMed

    Buranatrevedh, Surasak

    2004-07-01

    The primary purpose is to do cancer risk assessment of toxaphene by using four steps of risk assessment proposed by the United States National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council (NAS/NRC). Four steps of risk assessment including hazard identification, dose-response relationship, exposure assessment, and risk characterization were used to evaluate cancer risk of toxaphene. Toxaphene was the most heavily used insecticide in many parts of the world before it was banned in 1982. It increased incidence of neoplasms of liver and uterus in mice and increased incidence of neoplasms of endocrine organs, thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, mammary glands, and reproductive systems in rats. From mice's and rats' study, slope factor for toxaphene is 0.8557 (mg/ kg/day)(-1). Lifetime average daily dose (LADD) of toxaphene from ambient air, surface water, soil, and fish were 1.08 x 10(-6), 5.71 x 10(-6), 3.43 x 10(-7), and 7.96 x 10(-5) mg/kg/day, respectively. Cancer risk of toxaphene for average exposure is 7.42 x 10(-5). From this study, toxaphene might have carcinogenic risk among humans.

  11. Increased Risk of Urinary Tract Cancer in ESRD Patients Associated with Usage of Chinese Herbal Products Suspected of Containing Aristolochic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lai, Ming-Nan; Wei, Alan; Chen, Ya-Yin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Both end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and urothelial cancer (UC) are associated with the consumption of Chinese herbal products containing aristolochic acid (AA) by the general population. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of UC associated with AA-related Chinese herbal products among ESRD patients. Methods We conducted a cohort study using the National Health Insurance reimbursement database to enroll all ESRD patients in Taiwan from 1998–2002. Cox regression models were constructed and hazard ratios and confidence intervals were estimated after controlling for potential confounders, including age, sex, residence in region with endemic black foot disease, urinary tract infection, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen. Results A total of 38,995 ESRD patients were included in the final analysis, and 320 patients developed UC after ESRD. Having been prescribed Mu Tong that was adulterated with Guan Mu Tong (Aristolochia manshuriensis) before 2004, or an estimated consumption of more than 1–100 mg of aristolochic acid, were both associated with an increased risk of UC in the multivariable analyses. Analgesic consumption of more than 150 pills was also associated with an increased risk of UC, although there was little correlation between the two risk factors. Conclusion Consumption of aristolochic acid-related Chinese herbal products was associated with an increased risk of developing UC in ESRD patients. Regular follow-up screening for UC in ESRD patients who have consumed Chinese herbal products is thus necessary. PMID:25170766

  12. Traditional Dietary Pattern Increases Risk of Prostate Cancer in Argentina: Results of a Multilevel Modeling and Bias Analysis from a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Niclis, Camila; Román, María D.; Osella, Alberto R.; Eynard, Aldo R.; Díaz, María del Pilar

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that dietary habits play a role in prostate cancer (PC) occurrence. Argentinean cancer risk studies require additional attention because of the singular dietary pattern of this population. A case-control study (147 PC cases, 300 controls) was conducted in Córdoba (Argentina) throughout 2008–2013. A principal component factor analysis was performed to identify dietary patterns. A mixed logistic regression model was applied, taking into account family history of cancer. Possible bias was evaluated by probabilistic bias analysis. Four dietary patterns were identified: Traditional (fatty red meats, offal, processed meat, starchy vegetables, added sugars and sweets, candies, fats, and vegetable oils), Prudent (nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains), Carbohydrate (sodas/juices and bakery products), and Cheese (cheeses). High adherence to the Traditional (OR 2.82, 95%CI: 1.569–5.099) and Carbohydrate Patterns (OR 2.14, 95%CI: 1.470–3.128) showed a promoting effect for PC, whereas the Prudent and Cheese Patterns were independent factors. PC occurrence was also associated with family history of PC. Bias adjusted ORs indicate that the validity of the present study is acceptable. High adherence to characteristic Argentinean dietary patterns was associated with increased PC risk. Our results incorporate original contributions to knowledge about scenarios in South American dietary patterns and PC occurrence. PMID:26649040

  13. Prior colonization is associated with increased risk of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia in cancer patients☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberg, Michael; Sorkin, John D.; Netzer, Giora; Johnson, Jennifer K.; Shardell, Michelle; Thom, Kerri A.; Harris, Anthony D.; Roghmann, Mary-Claire

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that prior colonization with antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is associated with increased risk of subsequent antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia among cancer patients. We performed a matched case-control study. Cases were cancer patients with a blood culture positive for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Controls were cancer patients with a blood culture not positive for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Prior colonization was defined as any antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in surveillance or non-sterile-site cultures obtained 2–365 days before the bacteremia. Thirty-two (37%) of 86 cases and 27 (8%) of 323 matched controls were previously colonized by any antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Prior colonization was strongly associated with antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] 7.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5–14.7) after controlling for recent treatment with piperacillin-tazobactam (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–4.8). In these patients with suspected bacteremia, prior cultures may predict increased risk of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:24582582

  14. Traditional Dietary Pattern Increases Risk of Prostate Cancer in Argentina: Results of a Multilevel Modeling and Bias Analysis from a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Niclis, Camila; Román, María D; Osella, Alberto R; Eynard, Aldo R; Díaz, María Del Pilar

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that dietary habits play a role in prostate cancer (PC) occurrence. Argentinean cancer risk studies require additional attention because of the singular dietary pattern of this population. A case-control study (147 PC cases, 300 controls) was conducted in Córdoba (Argentina) throughout 2008-2013. A principal component factor analysis was performed to identify dietary patterns. A mixed logistic regression model was applied, taking into account family history of cancer. Possible bias was evaluated by probabilistic bias analysis. Four dietary patterns were identified: Traditional (fatty red meats, offal, processed meat, starchy vegetables, added sugars and sweets, candies, fats, and vegetable oils), Prudent (nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains), Carbohydrate (sodas/juices and bakery products), and Cheese (cheeses). High adherence to the Traditional (OR 2.82, 95%CI: 1.569-5.099) and Carbohydrate Patterns (OR 2.14, 95%CI: 1.470-3.128) showed a promoting effect for PC, whereas the Prudent and Cheese Patterns were independent factors. PC occurrence was also associated with family history of PC. Bias adjusted ORs indicate that the validity of the present study is acceptable. High adherence to characteristic Argentinean dietary patterns was associated with increased PC risk. Our results incorporate original contributions to knowledge about scenarios in South American dietary patterns and PC occurrence.

  15. Lifestyle and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2010-11-01

    The main behavioural and environmental risk factors for cancer mortality in the world are related to diet and physical inactivity, use of addictive substances, sexual and reproductive health, exposure to air pollution and use of contaminated needles. The population attributable fraction for all cancer sites worldwide considering the joint effect of these factors is about 35% (34 % for low-and middle-income countries and 37% for high-income countries). Seventy-one percent(71%) of lung cancer deaths are caused by tobacco use (lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death globally). The combined effects of tobacco use, low fruit and vegetable intake, urban air pollution, and indoor smoke from household use of solid fuels cause 76% of lung cancer deaths. Exposure to these behavioural and environmental factors is preventable; modifications in lifestyle could have a large impact in reducing the cancer burden worldwide (WHO, 2009). The evidence of association between lifestyle factors and cancer, as well as the main international recommendations for prevention are briefly reviewed and commented upon here.

  16. PD-1 inhibitors increase the incidence and risk of pneumonitis in cancer patients in a dose-independent manner: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiaying; Hong, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xiangnan; Lu, Xiaoyang; Miao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Therapies that targeted PD-1 have shown remarkable rates of durable clinical responses in patients with various tumor types. However, the extent and knowledge of pulmonary toxicities associated with PD-1 blockade, mainly manifested as pneumonitis, remains obscure. In this study, a total of 6360 subjects from 16 phase II/III clinical trials were pooled for meta-analysis to evaluate the overall incidence and risk of PD-1 inhibitors-related pneumonitis in cancer patients. The incidence of pneumonitis during anti-PD-1 immunotherapy was 2.92% (95%CI: 2.18–3.90%) for all-grade and 1.53% (95%CI: 1.15–2.04%) for high-grade pneumonitis. Compared with routine chemotherapy, PD-1 inhibitors were associated with a significant increased risk of pneumonitis. Moreover, among the types of tumor treated with PD-1 inhibitors, the melanoma patients have the lowest incidence of pneumonitis, while the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients have the highest. Furthermore, no significant differences were detected in the incidences of all- and high-grade pneumonitis between high-dose and low-dose groups of PD-1 inhibitors. In conclusion, PD-1 inhibitors were probably associated with an increased risk of pneumonitis in a dose-independent manner, compared with routine chemotherapeutic agents. The frequency and severity of treatment-mediated pneumonitis was quite different in patients with various tumor types. PMID:28272463

  17. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... continue reading this guide. ‹ Salivary Gland Cancer - Medical Illustrations up Salivary Gland Cancer - Screening › f t k ... Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Subtypes ...

  18. Identification of a dietary pattern characterized by high-fat food choices associated with increased risk of breast cancer: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Mandy; Hoffmann, Kurt; Weikert, Cornelia; Nöthlings, Ute; Schulze, Matthias B; Boeing, Heiner

    2008-11-01

    Epidemiological studies conducted thus far have mainly used a single-nutrient approach which may not be sufficient in detecting diet-cancer relationships. The aim of the study was to examine the association of a food pattern based on explained variations in fatty acid intake by means of reduced rank regression with breast cancer risk. Study participants were female subjects (n 15,351) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study free of cancer at baseline and with complete dietary and outcome information followed for an average of 6.0 years. Among those, 137 incident cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. We identified a food pattern characterized by low consumption of bread, and fruit juices, and high consumption of processed meat, fish, butter and other animal fats, and margarine explaining >42 % of total variation in fatty acid intake (SFA, MUFA, n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA). Intake of all four fatty acid fractions was positively associated with the pattern score. Adherence to this food pattern adjusted for covariates was associated with a two-fold risk (hazard ratio 2.00; 95 % CI 1.30, 3.09) of breast cancer comparing extreme tertiles of the pattern score. There was no evidence of effect modification by menopausal status, overweight status and use of hormone replacement therapy, respectively. In conclusion, a food pattern characterized by high-fat food choices was significantly associated with increased risk of breast cancer. Given that the food pattern was high in all fatty acid fractions, we found evidence for total dietary fat rather than for specific fatty acids to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  19. Cancer Risk Prediction and Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer prediction models provide an important approach to assessing risk and prognosis by identifying individuals at high risk, facilitating the design and planning of clinical cancer trials, fostering the development of benefit-risk indices, and enabling estimates of the population burden and cost of cancer.

  20. Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation presents major challenges to astronauts on the International Space Station and for future missions to the Earth s moon or Mars. Methods used to project risks on Earth need to be modified because of the large uncertainties in projecting cancer risks from space radiation, and thus impact safety factors. We describe NASA s unique approach to radiation safety that applies uncertainty based criteria within the occupational health program for astronauts: The two terrestrial criteria of a point estimate of maximum acceptable level of risk and application of the principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) are supplemented by a third requirement that protects against risk projection uncertainties using the upper 95% confidence level (CL) in the radiation cancer projection model. NASA s acceptable level of risk for ISS and their new lunar program have been set at the point-estimate of a 3-percent risk of exposure induced death (REID). Tissue-averaged organ dose-equivalents are combined with age at exposure and gender-dependent risk coefficients to project the cumulative occupational radiation risks incurred by astronauts. The 95% CL criteria in practice is a stronger criterion than ALARA, but not an absolute cut-off as is applied to a point projection of a 3% REID. We describe the most recent astronaut dose limits, and present a historical review of astronaut organ doses estimates from the Mercury through the current ISS program, and future projections for lunar and Mars missions. NASA s 95% CL criteria is linked to a vibrant ground based radiobiology program investigating the radiobiology of high-energy protons and heavy ions. The near-term goal of research is new knowledge leading to the reduction of uncertainties in projection models. Risk projections involve a product of many biological and physical factors, each of which has a differential range of uncertainty due to lack of data and knowledge. The current model for projecting space radiation

  1. Activation of LINE-1 Retrotransposon Increases the Risk of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Metastasis in Epithelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, D.; Lenka, N.; Ohms, S.; Dahlstrom, J.E.; Blackburn, A.C.; Board, P.G.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cancers comprise 80-90% of human cancers. During the process of cancer progression, cells lose their epithelial characteristics and acquire stem-like mesenchymal features that are resistant to chemotherapy. This process, termed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), plays a critical role in the development of metastases. Because of the unique migratory and invasive properties of cells undergoing the EMT, therapeutic control of the EMT offers great hope and new opportunities for treating cancer. In recent years, a plethora of genes and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, have been linked to the EMT and the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. Despite these advances, questions remain unanswered about the molecular processes underlying such a cellular transition. In this article, we discuss how expression of the normally repressed LINE-1 (or L1) retrotransposons activates the process of EMT and the development of metastases. L1 is rarely expressed in differentiated stem cells or adult somatic tissues. However, its expression is widespread in almost all epithelial cancers and in stem cells in their undifferentiated state, suggesting a link between L1 activity and the proliferative and metastatic behaviour of cancer cells. We present an overview of L1 activity in cancer cells including how genes involved in proliferation, invasive and metastasis are modulated by L1 expression. The role of L1 in the differential expression of the let-7 family of miRNAs (that regulate genes involved in the EMT and metastasis) is also discussed. We also summarize recent novel insights into the role of the L1-encoded reverse transcriptase enzyme in epithelial cell plasticity that suggest it might be a potential therapeutic target that could reverse the EMT and the metastasis-associated stem cell-like properties of cancer cells. PMID:26321759

  2. Human melanomas and ovarian cancers overexpressing mechanical barrier molecule genes lack immune signatures and have increased patient mortality risk

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Elise P.; Bedognetti, Davide; Mauldin, Ileana S.; Deacon, Donna H.; Shea, Sofia M.; Obeid, Joseph M.; Coukos, George; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have identified eight genes whose expression in human melanoma metastases and ovarian cancers is associated with a lack of Th1 immune signatures. They encode molecules with mechanical barrier function in the skin and other normal tissues and include filaggrin (FLG), tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2), and six desmosomal proteins (DST, DSC3, DSP, PPL, PKP3, and JUP). This association has been validated in an independent series of 114 melanoma metastases. In these, DST expression alone is sufficient to identify melanomas without immune signatures, while FLG and the other six putative barrier molecules are overexpressed in a different subset of melanomas lacking immune signatures. Similar associations have been identified in a set of 186 ovarian cancers. RNA-seq data from 471 melanomas and 307 ovarian cancers in the TCGA database further support these findings and also reveal that overexpression of barrier molecules is strongly associated with early patient mortality for melanoma (p = 0.0002) and for ovarian cancer (p < 0.01). Interestingly, this association persists for FLG for melanoma (p = 0.012) and ovarian cancer (p = 0.006), whereas DST overexpression is negatively associated with CD8+ gene expression, but not with patient survival. Thus, overexpression of FLG or DST identifies two distinct patient populations with low immune cell infiltration in these cancers, but with different prognostic implications for each. These data raise the possibility that molecules with mechanical barrier function in skin and other tissues may be used by cancer cells to protect them from immune cell infiltration and immune-mediated destruction. PMID:28123876

  3. Human melanomas and ovarian cancers overexpressing mechanical barrier molecule genes lack immune signatures and have increased patient mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Elise P; Bedognetti, Davide; Mauldin, Ileana S; Deacon, Donna H; Shea, Sofia M; Pinczewski, Joel; Obeid, Joseph M; Coukos, George; Wang, Ena; Gajewski, Thomas F; Marincola, Francesco M; Slingluff, Craig L

    2016-01-01

    We have identified eight genes whose expression in human melanoma metastases and ovarian cancers is associated with a lack of Th1 immune signatures. They encode molecules with mechanical barrier function in the skin and other normal tissues and include filaggrin (FLG), tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2), and six desmosomal proteins (DST, DSC3, DSP, PPL, PKP3, and JUP). This association has been validated in an independent series of 114 melanoma metastases. In these, DST expression alone is sufficient to identify melanomas without immune signatures, while FLG and the other six putative barrier molecules are overexpressed in a different subset of melanomas lacking immune signatures. Similar associations have been identified in a set of 186 ovarian cancers. RNA-seq data from 471 melanomas and 307 ovarian cancers in the TCGA database further support these findings and also reveal that overexpression of barrier molecules is strongly associated with early patient mortality for melanoma (p = 0.0002) and for ovarian cancer (p < 0.01). Interestingly, this association persists for FLG for melanoma (p = 0.012) and ovarian cancer (p = 0.006), whereas DST overexpression is negatively associated with CD8(+) gene expression, but not with patient survival. Thus, overexpression of FLG or DST identifies two distinct patient populations with low immune cell infiltration in these cancers, but with different prognostic implications for each. These data raise the possibility that molecules with mechanical barrier function in skin and other tissues may be used by cancer cells to protect them from immune cell infiltration and immune-mediated destruction.

  4. Impact of Increasing Age on Cause-Specific Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Competing Risks Analysis.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Takashi; Bains, Sarina; Lee, Ming-Ching; Tan, Kay See; Hristov, Boris; Buitrago, Daniel H; Bains, Manjit S; Downey, Robert J; Huang, James; Isbell, James M; Park, Bernard J; Rusch, Valerie W; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2017-01-20

    Purpose To perform competing risks analysis and determine short- and long-term cancer- and noncancer-specific mortality and morbidity in patients who had undergone resection for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Of 5,371 consecutive patients who had undergone curative-intent resection of primary lung cancer at our institution (2000 to 2011), 2,186 with pathologic stage I NSCLC were included in the analysis. All preoperative clinical variables known to affect outcomes were included in the analysis, specifically, Charlson comorbidity index, predicted postoperative (ppo) diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, and ppo forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Cause-specific mortality analysis was performed with competing risks analysis. Results Of 2,186 patients, 1,532 (70.1%) were ≥ 65 years of age, including 638 (29.2%) ≥ 75 years of age. In patients < 65, 65 to 74, and ≥ 75 years of age, 5-year lung cancer-specific cumulative incidence of death (CID) was 7.5%, 10.7%, and 13.2%, respectively (overall, 10.4%); noncancer-specific CID was 1.8%, 4.9%, and 9.0%, respectively (overall, 5.3%). In patients ≥ 65 years of age, for up to 2.5 years after resection, noncancer-specific CID was higher than lung cancer-specific CID; the higher noncancer-specific, early-phase mortality was enhanced in patients ≥ 75 years of age than in those 65 to 74 years of age. Multivariable analysis showed that low ppo diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide was an independent predictor of severe morbidity ( P < .001), 1-year mortality ( P < .001), and noncancer-specific mortality ( P < .001), whereas low ppo forced expiratory volume in 1 second was an independent predictor of lung cancer-specific mortality ( P = .002). Conclusion In patients who undergo curative-intent resection of stage I NSCLC, noncancer-specific mortality is a significant competing event, with an increasing impact as patient age increases.

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer: A veteran administration registry study

    PubMed Central

    Makhoul, Issam; Yacoub, Abdulraheem; Siegel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The etiology of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. Several studies have suggested a role for diabetes mellitus, but the magnitude of its contribution remains controversial. Objectives: Utilizing a large administrative database, this retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer. Patients and design: Using the Veterans Integrated Services Network 16 database, 322,614 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 110,919 with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 211,695 diabetes-free controls matched by gender, year of birth and healthcare facility. Results: A significantly higher incidence of pancreatic cancer was observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with an adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.17 (1.70–2.77) for type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to controls (p < 10−9) after controlling for the matching factors. Conclusion: The association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer was statistically significant and may, in part, explain the rising incidence of pancreatic cancer. PMID:28348740

  6. Association of RAD 51 135 G/C, 172 G/T and XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphisms with increased risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kayani, Mahmood Akhtar; Khan, Sumeera; Baig, Ruqia Mehmood; Mahjabeen, Ishrat

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays an important role in protection against carcinogenic factors. Genes regulating the HRR mechanisms may impair their functions and consequently result in increased cancer susceptibility. RAD 51 and XRCC3 are key regulators of the HRR pathway and genetic variability in these may contribute to the appearance and progression of various cancers including head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of the present study was to compare the distribution of genotypes of RAD51 (135G/C, 172 G/T) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) polymorphisms between HNC patients and controls. Each polymorphism was genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP) technique in 200 pathologically confirmed HNC patients along with 150 blood samples from normal, disease free healthy individuals. We observed that homozygous variant CC genotype of RAD51 135G/C was associated with a 2.5 fold increased HNC risk (OR=2.5; 95%CI=0.69-9.53; p<0.02), while second polymorphism of RAD 51 172 G/T, heterozygous variant GT genotype was associated with a 1.68 fold (OR=1.68; 95%CI=1.08-2.61; p<0.02) elevation when compared with controls. In the case of the Thr241Met polymorphism of XRCC3, we observed a 16 fold (OR=16; 95% CI= 3.78-69.67; p<0.0002) increased HNC risk in patients compared to controls. These results further suggested that RAD51 (135G/C, 172 G/T) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) polymorphisms may be effective biomarkers for genetic susceptibility to HNC. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings and identify the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zick, Suzanna M; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T; Wright, Benjamin D; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.

  8. Smoking increases risks of all-cause and breast cancer specific mortality in breast cancer individuals: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies involving 39725 breast cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Zhuyue; Li, Hongyuan

    2016-12-13

    Smoking is associated with the risks of mortality from breast cancer (BC) or all causes in BC survivors. Two-stage dose-response meta-analysis was conducted. A search of PubMed and Embase was performed, and a random-effect model was used to yield summary hazard ratios (HRs). Eleven prospective cohort studies were included. The summary HR per 10 cigarettes/day, 10 pack-years, 10 years increase were 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.16), 1.09 (95% CI = 1.06-1.12), 1.10 (95% CI = 1.06-1.14) for BC specific mortality, and 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10-1.19), 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10-1.20), 1.17 (95% CI = 1.11-1.23) for all-cause mortality, respectively. The linear or non-linear associations between smoking and risks of mortality from BC or all causes were revealed. Subgroup analyses suggested a positive association between ever or former smoking and the risk of all-cause mortality in BC patients, especially in high doses consumption. In conclusion, higher smoking intensity, more cumulative amount of cigarettes consumption and longer time for smoking is associated with elevated risk of mortality from BC and all causes in BC individuals. The results regarding smoking cessation and "ever or former" smokers should be treated with caution due to limited studies.

  9. Short-term salivary acetaldehyde increase due to direct exposure to alcoholic beverages as an additional cancer risk factor beyond ethanol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence now implicates acetaldehyde as a major underlying factor for the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages and especially for oesophageal and oral cancer. Acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption is regarded as 'carcinogenic to humans' (IARC Group 1), with sufficient evidence available for the oesophagus, head and neck as sites of carcinogenicity. At present, research into the mechanistic aspects of acetaldehyde-related oral cancer has been focused on salivary acetaldehyde that is formed either from ethanol metabolism in the epithelia or from microbial oxidation of ethanol by the oral microflora. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of the acetaldehyde that is found as a component of alcoholic beverages as an additional factor in the aetiology of oral cancer. Methods Salivary acetaldehyde levels were determined in the context of sensory analysis of different alcoholic beverages (beer, cider, wine, sherry, vodka, calvados, grape marc spirit, tequila, cherry spirit), without swallowing, to exclude systemic ethanol metabolism. Results The rinsing of the mouth for 30 seconds with an alcoholic beverage is able to increase salivary acetaldehyde above levels previously judged to be carcinogenic in vitro, with levels up to 1000 μM in cases of beverages with extreme acetaldehyde content. In general, the highest salivary acetaldehyde concentration was found in all cases in the saliva 30 sec after using the beverages (average 353 μM). The average concentration then decreased at the 2-min (156 μM), 5-min (76 μM) and 10-min (40 μM) sampling points. The salivary acetaldehyde concentration depends primarily on the direct ingestion of acetaldehyde contained in the beverages at the 30-sec sampling, while the influence of the metabolic formation from ethanol becomes the major factor at the 2-min sampling point. Conclusions This study offers a plausible mechanism to explain the increased risk for oral cancer associated with

  10. Experiencing discrimination increases risk taking.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Jeremy P; Koslov, Katrina; Nock, Matthew K; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2013-02-01

    Prior research has revealed racial disparities in health outcomes and health-compromising behaviors, such as smoking and drug abuse. It has been suggested that discrimination contributes to such disparities, but the mechanisms through which this might occur are not well understood. In the research reported here, we examined whether the experience of discrimination affects acute physiological stress responses and increases risk-taking behavior. Black and White participants each received rejecting feedback from partners who were either of their own race (in-group rejection) or of a different race (out-group rejection, which could be interpreted as discrimination). Physiological (cardiovascular and neuroendocrine) changes, cognition (memory and attentional bias), affect, and risk-taking behavior were assessed. Significant participant race × partner race interactions were observed. Cross-race rejection, compared with same-race rejection, was associated with lower levels of cortisol, increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, greater anger, increased attentional bias, and more risk-taking behavior. These data suggest that perceived discrimination is associated with distinct profiles of physiological reactivity, affect, cognitive processing, and risk taking, implicating direct and indirect pathways to health disparities.

  11. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  12. Obesity and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  13. Impact of NGS in the medical sciences: Genetic syndromes with an increased risk of developing cancer as an example of the use of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Lapunzina, Pablo; López, Rocío Ortiz; Rodríguez-Laguna, Lara; García-Miguel, Purificación; Martínez, Augusto Rojas; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    The increased speed and decreasing cost of sequencing, along with an understanding of the clinical relevance of emerging information for patient management, has led to an explosion of potential applications in healthcare. Currently, SNP arrays and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are relatively new techniques used to scan genomes for gains and losses, losses of heterozygosity (LOH), SNPs, and indel variants as well as to perform complete sequencing of a panel of candidate genes, the entire exome (whole exome sequencing) or even the whole genome. As a result, these new high-throughput technologies have facilitated progress in the understanding and diagnosis of genetic syndromes and cancers, two disorders traditionally considered to be separate diseases but that can share causal genetic alterations in a group of developmental disorders associated with congenital malformations and cancer risk. The purpose of this work is to review these syndromes as an example of a group of disorders that has been included in a panel of genes for NGS analysis. We also highlight the relationship between development and cancer and underline the connections between these syndromes.

  14. Impact of NGS in the medical sciences: Genetic syndromes with an increased risk of developing cancer as an example of the use of new technologies

    PubMed Central

    Lapunzina, Pablo; López, Rocío Ortiz; Rodríguez-Laguna, Lara; García-Miguel, Purificación; Martínez, Augusto Rojas; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The increased speed and decreasing cost of sequencing, along with an understanding of the clinical relevance of emerging information for patient management, has led to an explosion of potential applications in healthcare. Currently, SNP arrays and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are relatively new techniques used to scan genomes for gains and losses, losses of heterozygosity (LOH), SNPs, and indel variants as well as to perform complete sequencing of a panel of candidate genes, the entire exome (whole exome sequencing) or even the whole genome. As a result, these new high-throughput technologies have facilitated progress in the understanding and diagnosis of genetic syndromes and cancers, two disorders traditionally considered to be separate diseases but that can share causal genetic alterations in a group of developmental disorders associated with congenital malformations and cancer risk. The purpose of this work is to review these syndromes as an example of a group of disorders that has been included in a panel of genes for NGS analysis. We also highlight the relationship between development and cancer and underline the connections between these syndromes. PMID:24764758

  15. Dietary fat and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Binukumar, Bhaskarapillai; Mathew, Aleyamma

    2005-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems among women worldwide. A number of epidemiological studies have been carried out to find the role of dietary fat and the risk of breast cancer. The main objective of the present communication is to summarize the evidence from various case-control and cohort studies on the consumption of fat and its subtypes and their effect on the development of breast cancer. Methods A Pubmed search for literature on the consumption of dietary fat and risk of breast cancer published from January 1990 through December 2003 was carried out. Results Increased consumption of total fat and saturated fat were found to be positively associated with the development of breast cancer. Even though an equivocal association was observed for the consumption of total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and the risk of breast cancer, there exists an inverse association in the case of oleic acid, the most abundant MUFA. A moderate inverse association between consumption of n-3 fatty acids and breast cancer risk and a moderate positive association between n-6 fatty acids and breast cancer risk were observed. Conclusion Even though all epidemiological studies do not provide a strong positive association between the consumption of certain types of dietary fat and breast cancer risk, at least a moderate association does seem to exist and this has a number of implications in view of the fact that breast cancer is an increasing public health concern. PMID:16022739

  16. The Thr241Met polymorphism in the XRCC3 gene is associated with increased risk of cancer in Chinese mainland populations.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Xiong, Tianyuan; He, Qing; Wang, Yayi; Shen, Jiani; Peng, Yuanling; Jia, Qingyi; Yang, Jiqiao; Zhang, Yonggang; Huang, Jin

    2014-02-01

    The Thr241Met polymorphism in XRCC3 gene may affect the DNA repair pathways and be associated with the risk of cancer. However, the results of previous studies are inconsistent in Chinese mainland populations. The objective of this study is to investigate the association between the Thr241Met polymorphism in XRCC3 gene and risk of cancer for the Chinese Mainland populations by meta-analysis. We searched PubMed database, Embase database, CNKI database, and Wanfang database, and the last search was updated on July 24, 2013. Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan4.2 and Stata10.0 software. Finally, a total of 23 case-control studies in 23 articles were included. The results suggested a significant association between the Thr241Met polymorphism in XRCC3 gene and cancer risk in Chinese mainland populations (Met/Met + Thr/Met vs. Thr/Thr: OR = 1.25, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.54, P = 0.04). In the subgroup analyses by cancer types, significant associations were found in cervical cancer and nasopharyngeal cancer. The current meta-analysis suggested that the Thr241Met polymorphism in the XRCC3 gene may be a risk factor for cancer in Chinese mainland populations. In the future, more case-control studies are needed to validate these results.

  17. Environmental cancer risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In a long-awaited report (‘Assessment of Technologies for Determining Cancer Risks From the Environment’), the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) has evaluated the role of environmental factors in cancer diseases. Environment is interpreted broadly as encompassing anything that interacts with humans, including the natural environment, food, radiation, the workplace, etc. Geologic factors range from geographic location to radiation and specific minerals. The report, however, is based on an inadequate data base in most instances, and its major recommendations are related to the establishment of a national cancer registry to record cancer statistics, as is done for many other diseases. Presently, hard statistics are lacking in the establishment of some association between the cause-effect relationship of most environmental factors and most carcinogens. Of particular interest, but unfortunately based on unreliable data, are the effects of mineral substances such as ‘asbestos.’ USGS mineralogist Malcolm Ross will review asbestos and its effects on human health in the forthcoming Mineralogical Society of America's Short Course on the Amphiboles (Reviews in Mineralogy, 9, in press, 1981).

  18. The c-MET Network as Novel Prognostic Marker for Predicting Bladder Cancer Patients with an Increased Risk of Developing Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Phildu; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seon-Young; Yan, Chunri; Seo, Sung Phil; Lee, Sang Keun; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that c-MET is overexpressed in cases of aggressive bladder cancer (BCa). Identification of crosstalk between c-MET and other RTKs such as AXL and PDGFR suggest that c-MET network genes (c-MET-AXL-PDGFR) may be clinically relevant to BCa. Here, we examine whether expression of c-MET network genes can be used to identify BCa patients at increased risk of developing aggressive disease. In vitro analysis, c-MET knockdown suppressed cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and increased sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, c-MET network gene (c-MET, AXL, and PDGFR) expression allowed discrimination of BCa tissues from normal control tissues and appeared to predict poor disease progression in non-muscle invasive BCa patients and poor overall survival in muscle invasive BCa patients. These results suggest that c-MET network gene expression is a novel prognostic marker for predicting which BCa patients have an increased risk of developing aggressive disease. These genes might be a useful marker for co-targeting therapy, and are expected to play an important role in improving both response to treatment and survival of BCa patients. PMID:26225770

  19. The c-MET Network as Novel Prognostic Marker for Predicting Bladder Cancer Patients with an Increased Risk of Developing Aggressive Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Won; Yun, Seok Joong; Jeong, Phildu; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seon-Young; Yan, Chunri; Seo, Sung Phil; Lee, Sang Keun; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that c-MET is overexpressed in cases of aggressive bladder cancer (BCa). Identification of crosstalk between c-MET and other RTKs such as AXL and PDGFR suggest that c-MET network genes (c-MET-AXL-PDGFR) may be clinically relevant to BCa. Here, we examine whether expression of c-MET network genes can be used to identify BCa patients at increased risk of developing aggressive disease. In vitro analysis, c-MET knockdown suppressed cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and increased sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, c-MET network gene (c-MET, AXL, and PDGFR) expression allowed discrimination of BCa tissues from normal control tissues and appeared to predict poor disease progression in non-muscle invasive BCa patients and poor overall survival in muscle invasive BCa patients. These results suggest that c-MET network gene expression is a novel prognostic marker for predicting which BCa patients have an increased risk of developing aggressive disease. These genes might be a useful marker for co-targeting therapy, and are expected to play an important role in improving both response to treatment and survival of BCa patients.

  20. Effects of Vitamin E Supplements and Diet on Colonic α- and γ-tocopherol Concentrations In Persons at Increased Colon Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiting; Sen, Ananda; Ren, Jianwei; Askew, Leah M.; Sidahmed, ElKhansa; Brenner, Dean E.; Ruffin, Mack T.; Turgeon, D. Kim; Djuric, Zora

    2014-01-01

    The available evidence indicates that γ-tocopherol has more potential for colon cancer prevention than α-tocopherol, but little is known about the effects of foods and supplements on tocopherol levels in human colon. This study randomized 120 subjects at increased colon cancer risk to either a Mediterranean or a Healthy Eating diet for six months. Supplement use was reported by 39% of the subjects, and vitamin E intake from supplements was 2-fold higher than that from foods. Serum α-tocopherol at baseline was positively predicted by dietary intakes of synthetic vitamin E in foods and supplements but not by natural α-tocopherol from foods. For serum γ-tocopherol, dietary γ-tocopherol was not a predictor, but dietary α-tocopherol was a negative predictor. Unlike with serum, the data supported a role for metabolic factors, and not a direct effect of diet, in governing concentrations of both α- and γ-tocopherol in colon. The Mediterranean intervention increased intakes of natural α-tocopherol, which is high in nuts, and decreased intakes of γ-tocopherol, which is low in olive oil. These dietary changes had no significant effects on colon tocopherols. The impact of diet on colon tocopherols therefore appears to be limited. PMID:25372556

  1. Effects of vitamin E from supplements and diet on colonic α- and γ-tocopherol concentrations in persons at increased colon cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiting; Sen, Ananda; Ren, Jianwei; Askew, Leah M; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Brenner, Dean E; Ruffin, Mack T; Turgeon, D Kim; Djuric, Zora

    2015-01-01

    The available evidence indicates that γ-tocopherol has more potential for colon cancer prevention than α-tocopherol, but little is known about the effects of foods and supplements on tocopherol levels in human colon. This study randomized 120 subjects at increased colon cancer risk to either a Mediterranean or a Healthy Eating diet for 6 mo. Supplement use was reported by 39% of the subjects, and vitamin E intake from supplements was twofold higher than that from foods. Serum α-tocopherol at baseline was positively predicted by dietary intakes of synthetic vitamin E in foods and supplements but not by natural α-tocopherol from foods. For serum γ-tocopherol, dietary γ-tocopherol was not a predictor, but dietary α-tocopherol was a negative predictor. Unlike with serum, the data supported a role for metabolic factors, and not a direct effect of diet, in governing concentrations of both α- and γ-tocopherol in colon. The Mediterranean intervention increased intakes of natural α-tocopherol, which is high in nuts, and decreased intakes of γ-tocopherol, which is low in olive oil. These dietary changes had no significant effects on colon tocopherols. The impact of diet on colon tocopherols therefore appears to be limited.

  2. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  3. Smoking increases risks of all-cause and breast cancer specific mortality in breast cancer individuals: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies involving 39725 breast cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Zhuyue; Li, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is associated with the risks of mortality from breast cancer (BC) or all causes in BC survivors. Two-stage dose-response meta-analysis was conducted. A search of PubMed and Embase was performed, and a random-effect model was used to yield summary hazard ratios (HRs). Eleven prospective cohort studies were included. The summary HR per 10 cigarettes/day, 10 pack-years, 10 years increase were 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.16), 1.09 (95% CI = 1.06–1.12), 1.10 (95% CI = 1.06–1.14) for BC specific mortality, and 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10–1.19), 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10–1.20), 1.17 (95% CI = 1.11–1.23) for all-cause mortality, respectively. The linear or non-linear associations between smoking and risks of mortality from BC or all causes were revealed. Subgroup analyses suggested a positive association between ever or former smoking and the risk of all-cause mortality in BC patients, especially in high doses consumption. In conclusion, higher smoking intensity, more cumulative amount of cigarettes consumption and longer time for smoking is associated with elevated risk of mortality from BC and all causes in BC individuals. The results regarding smoking cessation and “ever or former” smokers should be treated with caution due to limited studies. PMID:27863414

  4. Exposure to excess estradiol or leptin during pregnancy increases mammary cancer risk and prevents parity-induced protective genomic changes in rats.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Sonia; Wang, Mingyue; Jin, Lu; Bouker, Kerrie B; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena A

    2013-11-01

    Using a preclinical model, we investigated whether excess estradiol (E2) or leptin during pregnancy affects maternal mammary tumorigenesis in rats initiated by administering carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) on day 50. Two weeks later, rats were mated, and pregnant dams were treated daily with 10 μg of 17β-estradiol, 15 μg of leptin, or vehicle from gestation day 8 to 19. Tumor development was assessed separately during weeks 1 to 12 and 13 to 22 after DMBA administration, because pregnancy is known to induce a transient increase in breast cancer risk, followed by a persistent reduction. Parous rats developed less (32%) mammary tumors than nulliparous rats (59%, P < 0.001), and the majority (93%) of tumors in the parous rats appeared before week 13 (vs. 41% in nulliparous rats), indicating that pregnancy induced a transient increase in breast cancer risk. Parous rats exposed to leptin (final tumor incidence 65%) or E2 (45%) during pregnancy developed mammary tumors throughout the tumor-monitoring period, similar to nulliparous control rats, and the incidence was significantly higher in both the leptin- and E2-exposed dams after week 12 than in the vehicle-exposed parous dams (P < 0.001). The mammary glands of the exposed parous rats contained significantly more proliferating cells (P < 0.001). In addition, the E2- or leptin-treated parous rats did not exhibit the protective genomic signature induced by pregnancy and seen in the parous control rats. Specifically, these rats exhibited downregulation of genes involved in differentiation and immune functions and upregulation of genes involved in angiogenesis, growth, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  5. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients.

  6. Being Overweight or Obese Increases the Risk of Progression in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer after Surgical Resection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yunseon; Park, Sung Kwang; Ahn, Ki Jung; Cho, Heunglae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yoon, Hye Kyoung; Lee, Yun-Han

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between body mass index (BMI) and progression in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 50 patients with TNBC who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy between 2007 and 2014. All patients were classified according to BMI (median 23.5 kg/m(2), range 17.2-31.6 kg/m(2)): 31 patients (62%) were classified as being overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 23 kg/m(2)) and 19 patients (38%) were classified as having a normal body weight (BMI < 23 kg/m(2)). The median follow-up for patients was 31.1 months (range, 6.7-101.9 months). Progression occurred in 7 patients (14%), including 5 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences, 2 regional lymph node metastases, and 5 distant metastases. Progression was significantly correlated with overweight or obese patients (P = 0.035), while none of the normal weight patients showed progression. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85.0% and 87.7%, respectively. DFS was significantly reduced in overweight or obese patients compared to that in normal weight patients (P = 0.035). However, OS was not significantly compromised by being overweight or obese (P = 0.134). In conclusion, being overweight or obese negatively affects DFS in TNBC patients.

  7. Increased risk of severe infections in cancer patients treated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Gu, Li-Yan; Ren, Yao-Yao; Zeng, Li-Li; Gong, Ting; Zhong, Dian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) have been widely used in a variety of solid malignancies. Concerns have arisen regarding the risk of severe infections (≥grade 3) with use of these drugs, but the contribution of VEGFR-TKIs to infections is still unknown. Methods The databases of PubMed and abstracts presented at oncology conferences’ proceedings were searched for relevant studies from January 2000 to December 2014. Summary incidences, Peto odds ratio (Peto OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by using either random-effects or fixed-effects models according to the heterogeneity of included studies. Results A total of 16,488 patients from 27 randomized controlled trials were included. The risk of developing severe (Peto OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.45–1.96, P<0.001) and fatal infections (Peto OR 1.78, 95% CI: 1.13–2.81, P=0.013) was significantly increased in patients treated with VEGFR-TKIs when compared to controls. Exploratory subgroup analysis showed no effect of tumor types, phase of trials, or agent used on the Peto OR of severe infections. When stratified according to specific infectious events, the risks of high-grade febrile neutropenia, pneumonia, fever, and sepsis were increased compared with controls, with Peto ORs of 1.57 (95% CI: 1.30–1.88, P<0.001), 1.79 (95% CI: 1.29–2.49, P<0.001), 5.35 (95% CI: 1.47–19.51, P=0.011), and 3.68 (95% CI: 1.51–8.99, P=0.004), respectively. Additionally, VEGFR-TKIs significantly increased the risk of fatal sepsis (OR 3.66, 95% CI: 1.47–9.13, P=0.005) but not fatal pneumonia (OR 1.34, 95% CI: 0.80–2.25, P=0.26). Conclusion The use of VEGFR-TKIs significantly increases the risk of developing severe and fatal infectious events in cancer patients. A close monitoring for any signs of infections is recommended for patients treated with VEGFR-TKIs. PMID:26355897

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC. PMID:27517300

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC.

  10. Cancer: a family at risk

    PubMed Central

    Iżycki, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of cancer is a family experience that changes the lives of all its members, bringing an immense amount of stress and many challenging situations. The daily routine, common activities and distribution of duties all have to change. Family members follow the phases of the disease, very often suffering comparable or greater distress than the patient. They use various coping methods which aim at helping both the sick relative and themselves. These methods, together with emotional responses, change over time according to the phase of the disease. Cancer puts the family at risk since it imposes an alternation in the relations among family members. It affects the couple's relationship, their sex life, and it can also be a cause of major trauma among their children and adolescents. The diagnosis of cancer brings also individual risks for the family members in terms of psychological and physical health impairment. Family caregivers often feel overloaded with the additional obligations and roles they have to pick up. They find it increasingly burdening to care full-time for the household and provide emotional support for the patient. The family's problems and the way family members regard the disease may be also a result of the family system they are in. This article describes the nature of caregiving to a patient with cancer and the biggest concerns for the family. PMID:26327863

  11. Coffee and cancer risk: a summary overview.

    PubMed

    Alicandro, Gianfranco; Tavani, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-03-10

    We reviewed available evidence on coffee drinking and the risk of all cancers and selected cancers updated to May 2016. Coffee consumption is not associated with overall cancer risk. A meta-analysis reported a pooled relative risk (RR) for an increment of 1 cup of coffee/day of 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-1.01] for all cancers. Coffee drinking is associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. A meta-analysis of cohort studies found an RR for an increment of consumption of 1 cup/day of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.81-0.90) for liver cancer and a favorable effect on liver enzymes and cirrhosis. Another meta-analysis showed an inverse relation for endometrial cancer risk, with an RR of 0.92 (95% CI: 0.88-0.96) for an increment of 1 cup/day. A possible decreased risk was found in some studies for oral/pharyngeal cancer and for advanced prostate cancer. Although data are mixed, overall, there seems to be some favorable effect of coffee drinking on colorectal cancer in case-control studies, in the absence of a consistent relation in cohort studies. For bladder cancer, the results are not consistent; however, any possible direct association is not dose and duration related, and might depend on a residual confounding effect of smoking. A few studies suggest an increased risk of childhood leukemia after maternal coffee drinking during pregnancy, but data are limited and inconsistent. Although the results of studies are mixed, the overall evidence suggests no association of coffee intake with cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung, breast, ovary, and prostate overall. Data are limited, with RR close to unity for other neoplasms, including those of the esophagus, small intestine, gallbladder and biliary tract, skin, kidney, brain, thyroid, as well as for soft tissue sarcoma and lymphohematopoietic cancer.

  12. Correlation between NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 C609T polymorphism and increased risk of esophageal cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jingfang; Bao, Jie; Peng, Jianxin; Mo, Jiaqiang; Ye, Qing; He, Junming

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) C609T gene polymorphisms have been reported to influence the risk for esophageal cancer (EC) in many studies. However, the results remain controversial and ambiguous. We performed a meta-analysis, which included 13 independent studies with a total of 2357 subjects, to examine the association between NQO1 C609T polymorphism and EC. The association was assessed by five different gene models. The overall analysis suggested that the variant allele and genotypes were significantly related to increased risk of EC (odds ratio [OR] T versus C = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95–1.40, probability of rejection [POR] = 0.014; OR TT versus CC = 1.32, 95% CI 1.01–1.73, POR = 0.045; OR TC versus CC = 1.32, 95% CI 0.98–1.21, POR = 0.128; OR TT + TC versus CC = 1.10, 95% CI 1.00–1.20, POR = 0.05; OR TT versus CC + TC = 1.26, 95% CI 0.95–1.57, POR = 0.103). Sensitivity analysis confirmed the reliability of these findings. Our study shows that individuals carrying the NQO1 C609T variant allele and genotypes are more susceptible to EC. PMID:28203294

  13. Impact of radiotherapy in the risk of esophageal cancer as subsequent primary cancer after breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Eeva K. . E-mail: eevsal@utu.fi; Pukkala, Eero; Kiel, Krys D.; Hakulinen, Timo T.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk of esophageal cancer as second cancer among breast-cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The records of the Finnish Cancer Registry from 1953 to 2000 were used to assess the risk of esophageal cancer as second cancer among 75,849 breast-cancer patients. Patients were treated with surgery (n = 33,672), radiotherapy (n = 35,057), chemotherapy and radiotherapy (n = 4673), or chemotherapy (n = 2,447). The risk of a new primary cancer was expressed as standardized incidence ratio (SIR), defined as the ratio of observed to expected cases. Results: By the end of 2000, the number of observed cases esophageal cancers was 80 vs. 72 expected cases (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.1, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.9 to 1.5). Among patients followed for 15 years and treated with radiotherapy, the SIR for esophageal cancer was 2.3 (95% CI = 1.4 to 5.4). No increase in risk was seen for patients treated without radiotherapy. The risk of esophageal cancer was increased among patients diagnosed during 1953 to 1974, although age at the treatment did not have marked effect on the risk estimate. Conclusion: Increased risk of second cancer in the esophagus was observed for breast-cancer patients in Finland, especially among patients with over 15 years of follow-up and treated in the earliest period, which may relate to the type of radiotherapy.

  14. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fenga, Concettina

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer.

  15. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer. PMID:26998264

  16. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  18. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  19. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  1. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Testicular Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of testicular cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing ovarian cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Liver Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing liver cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  7. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  8. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk: 2003 Workshop In ... cancer risk, including studies of induced and spontaneous abortions. They concluded that having an abortion or miscarriage ...

  9. Risk determination and prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Howell, Anthony; Anderson, Annie S; Clarke, Robert B; Duffy, Stephen W; Evans, D Gareth; Garcia-Closas, Montserat; Gescher, Andy J; Key, Timothy J; Saxton, John M; Harvie, Michelle N

    2014-09-28

    Breast cancer is an increasing public health problem. Substantial advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer, but the introduction of methods to predict women at elevated risk and prevent the disease has been less successful. Here, we summarize recent data on newer approaches to risk prediction, available approaches to prevention, how new approaches may be made, and the difficult problem of using what we already know to prevent breast cancer in populations. During 2012, the Breast Cancer Campaign facilitated a series of workshops, each covering a specialty area of breast cancer to identify gaps in our knowledge. The risk-and-prevention panel involved in this exercise was asked to expand and update its report and review recent relevant peer-reviewed literature. The enlarged position paper presented here highlights the key gaps in risk-and-prevention research that were identified, together with recommendations for action. The panel estimated from the relevant literature that potentially 50% of breast cancer could be prevented in the subgroup of women at high and moderate risk of breast cancer by using current chemoprevention (tamoxifen, raloxifene, exemestane, and anastrozole) and that, in all women, lifestyle measures, including weight control, exercise, and moderating alcohol intake, could reduce breast cancer risk by about 30%. Risk may be estimated by standard models potentially with the addition of, for example, mammographic density and appropriate single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This review expands on four areas: (a) the prediction of breast cancer risk, (b) the evidence for the effectiveness of preventive therapy and lifestyle approaches to prevention, (c) how understanding the biology of the breast may lead to new targets for prevention, and (d) a summary of published guidelines for preventive approaches and measures required for their implementation. We hope that efforts to fill these and other gaps will lead to considerable advances in our

  10. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Setiawan, Veronica W.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schumacher, Fredrick; Yu, Herbert; Delahanty, Ryan; Bernstein, Leslie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; Friedenreich, Christine; Garcia-Closas, Monserrat; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ursin, Giske; Yang, Hannah P.; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI), an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS) based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002). For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%). However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78). Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06), and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58). In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10−5). Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26606540

  11. The MDM4 SNP34091 (rs4245739) C-allele is associated with increased risk of ovarian-but not endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Gansmo, Liv B; Bjørnslett, Merete; Halle, Mari Kyllesø; Salvesen, Helga B; Dørum, Anne; Birkeland, Einar; Hveem, Kristian; Romundstad, Pål; Vatten, Lars; Lønning, Per Eystein; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-08-01

    The MDM4 protein (also known as MDMX or HDMX) is a negative regulator of p53, not only by direct interaction but also through its interaction with MDM2. Further, MDM4 overexpression and amplification have been observed in several cancer forms. Recently, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 3' untranslated region of the MDM4 gene, SNP34091A > C (rs4245739) was reported to alter MDM4 messenger RNA (mRNA) stability by modulating a microRNA binding site, thereby leading to decreased MDM4 levels. In this case-control study, we aimed to evaluate the possible association between MDM4 SNP34091 status and cancer risk by comparing the genotype frequencies in large hospital-based cohorts of endometrial- (n = 1404) and ovarian (n = 1385) cancer patients with healthy female controls (n = 1870). Genotype frequencies were compared by odds ratio (OR) estimates and Fisher exact tests. We found that individuals harboring the MDM4 SNP34091AC/CC genotypes had a significantly elevated risk for serous ovarian cancer (SOC) in general and high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) in particular (SOC: OR = 1.18., 95 % CI = 1.01-1.39; HGSOC: OR = 1.25, CI = 1.02-1.53). No association between SNP34091 genotypes and endometrial cancer risk was observed. Our data indicate the MDM4 SNP34091AC/CC genotypes to be associated with an elevated risk for SOC and in particular the HGSOC type.

  12. Risk of cancer among paper recycling workers.

    PubMed Central

    Rix, B A; Villadsen, E; Engholm, G; Lynge, E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies in traditional paper mills have indicated an excess cancer risk, and mutagenic compounds have been identified in the industry. No studies have reported on risk of cancer in paper recycling. Therefore the cancer incidence in Danish paper recycling mills was investigated. METHODS: 5377 employees in five paper recycling plants were included in a historical cohort study. The workers had been employed in paper recycling in 1965-90, and the cohort was followed up until 31 December 1993. The expected number of cancer cases was calculated from national rates. RESULTS: There was significantly more pharyngeal cancer among male workers (seven observed (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 3.33, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.34 to 6.87)). There was slightly more lung cancer among male workers in production (39 observed, SIR 1.21, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.65). Risk of Hodgkin's disease was doubled in male production worker (four observed, SIR 1.90, 95% CI 0.51 to 4.85). CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk of pharyngeal cancer found in this study is interesting but may be influenced by confounders such as smoking and alcohol intake. This study also indicates an excess risk of Hodgkin's disease, which is in accordance with some studies in the traditional paper mills. As this is the first report on risk of cancer in paper recycling, further studies are needed. PMID:9404320

  13. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk.

  14. Interaction between Red Meat Intake and NAT2 Genotype in Increasing the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Japanese and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansong; Iwasaki, Motoki; Haiman, Christopher A; Kono, Suminori; Wilkens, Lynne R; Keku, Temitope O; Berndt, Sonja I; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines formed in cooked meat may be an underlying mechanism for the red meat-colorectal cancer (CRC) association. These compounds require bioactivaction by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). An interaction effect between red meat consumption and NAT2 in increasing CRC risk has been inconsistently reported in whites. We investigated this interaction in two populations in which the high-activity rapid NAT2 phenotype is 10- and 2-fold more common than in whites. We meta-analyzed four studies of Japanese (2,217 cases, 3,788 controls) and three studies of African Americans (527 cases, 4,527 controls). NAT2 phenotype was inferred from an optimized seven-SNP genotyping panel. Processed and total red meat intakes were associated with an increased CRC risk in Japanese and in both ethnic groups combined (P's ≤ 0.002). We observed an interaction between processed meat intake and NAT2 in Japanese (P = 0.04), African Americans (P = 0.02), and in both groups combined (P = 0.006). The association of processed meat with CRC was strongest among individuals with the rapid NAT2 phenotype (combined analysis, OR for highest vs. lowest quartile: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.28-2.05; Ptrend = 8.0×10-5), intermediate among those with the intermediate NAT2 phenotype (1.29, 95% CI: 1.05-1.59; Ptrend = 0.05) and null among those with the slow phenotype (Ptrend = 0.45). A similar interaction was found for NAT2 and total red meat (Pinteraction = 0.03). Our findings support a role for NAT2 in modifying the association between red meat consumption and CRC in Japanese and African Americans.

  15. Infective Endocarditis and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Wu, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Day, Jen-Der; Liang, Ji-An; Liou, Li-Ren; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the possible relationship between endocarditis and overall and individual cancer risk among study participants in Taiwan. We used data from the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan to conduct a population-based, observational, and retrospective cohort study. The case group consisted of 14,534 patients who were diagnosed with endocarditis between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010. For the control group, 4 patients without endocarditis were frequency matched to each endocarditis patient according to age, sex, and index year. Competing risks regression analysis was conducted to determine the effect of endocarditis on cancer risk. A large difference was noted in Charlson comorbidity index between endocarditis and nonendocarditis patients. In patients with endocarditis, the risk for developing overall cancer was significant and 119% higher than in patients without endocarditis (adjusted subhazard ratio = 2.19, 95% confidence interval = 1.98–2.42). Regarding individual cancers, in addition to head and neck, uterus, female breast and hematological malignancies, the risks of developing colorectal cancer, and some digestive tract cancers were significantly higher. Additional analyses determined that the association of cancer with endocarditis is stronger within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis. This population-based cohort study found that patients with endocarditis are at a higher risk for colorectal cancer and other cancers in Taiwan. The risk was even higher within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis. It suggested that endocarditis is an early marker of colorectal cancer and other cancers. The underlying mechanisms must still be explored and may account for a shared risk factor of infection in both endocarditis and malignancy. PMID:27015220

  16. Iron and the risk of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1989-09-01

    Four epidemiological studies have been performed that are generally consistent with the hypothesis that increased available body iron stores increase the risk of cancer or of general mortality. In a study based on the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in the United States (NHANES), 232 men who developed cancer over a ten year period had a mean transferrin saturation of 33.1% at least 4 years before diagnosis, whereas 3113 men who did not develop cancer had a transferrin saturation of 30.7% (p = 0.002). The hypothesis is based on two possible biological mechanisms. First, iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals and these may be proximate carcinogens. Second, iron may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and replication of a cancer cell. There are at least five areas of potential research related to iron and cancer based on these biological mechanisms: etiology of cancer; etiology of radiation-induced cancer; prognosis after cancer diagnosis; cancer risk resulting from therapy; and interactions with other biochemical factors. An unexpected finding of the human studies done to date has been a highly significant negative association of serum albumin and long term cancer risk. Serum albumin is lower in smokers and older people, however, the negative association persists after controlling for these factors. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  18. Low risk papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Brito, Juan P; Hay, Ian D; Morris, John C

    2014-06-16

    Thyroid cancer is one of the fastest growing diagnoses; more cases of thyroid cancer are found every year than all leukemias and cancers of the liver, pancreas, and stomach. Most of these incident cases are papillary in origin and are both small and localized. Patients with these small localized papillary thyroid cancers have a 99% survival rate at 20 years. In view of the excellent prognosis of these tumors, they have been denoted as low risk. The incidence of these low risk thyroid cancers is growing, probably because of the use of imaging technologies capable of exposing a large reservoir of subclinical disease. Despite their excellent prognosis, these subclinical low risk cancers are often treated aggressively. Although surgery is traditionally viewed as the cornerstone treatment for these tumors, there is less agreement about the extent of surgery (lobectomy v near total thyroidectomy) and whether prophylactic central neck dissection for removal of lymph nodes is needed. Many of these tumors are treated with radioactive iodine ablation and thyrotropin suppressive therapy, which-although effective for more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer-have not been shown to be of benefit in the management of these lesions. This review offers an evidence based approach to managing low risk papillary thyroid cancer. It also looks at the future of promising alternative surgical techniques, non-surgical minimally localized invasive therapies (ethanol ablation and laser ablation), and active surveillance, all of which form part of a more individualized treatment approach for low risk papillary thyroid tumors.

  19. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  20. Population Based Assessment of MHC Class 1 Antigens Down Regulation as Marker in Increased Risk for Development and Progression of Breast Cancer From Benign Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Risk for Development and Progression of Breast Cancer from Benign Breast Lesions” antigen retrieval solution in the microwave . Lastly, tissue... Microwave and citrate buffer antigen-retrieval substitutions yielded comparable results. Lab 2 demonstrated that a negative control is useful as an...the infiltrating lymphocytes in germinal centers and dendritic cells as seen in case 1. Microsatellite Analysis Labs 1, 2, and 4 performed

  1. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body's largest organ . It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection . Skin also helps control body ... cancer risk factors include: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  2. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    PubMed

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-05

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  3. Cancer risks after radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Voelz, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    A general overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on cancer induction is presented. The relationship between the degree of risk and absorbed dose is examined. Mortality from radiation-induced cancer in the US is estimated and percentages attributable to various sources are given. (ACR)

  4. Dietary Fat, Eicosanoids and Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    risk of sex. hormone mediated cancer, such as breast canoer. A high intake oftotal fat and omega -6 fatty acids increases risk while omega -3 (03...Era ofHope meeting. No manuscripts have yet been gtmm’ated. dietary fat, omega -3 fatty acids ,. eicosanoids, sex ho~nes 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF... fatty acids are associated with risk reduction. Our proposal is testi~g the effect ofdietary fat and fatty acids on sex homwne . concentrations in post

  5. Frequency of Propionibacterium acnes Infection in Prostate Glands with Negative Biopsy Results Is an Independent Risk Factor for Prostate Cancer in Patients with Increased Serum PSA Titers

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takashi; Uchida, Keisuke; Sekine, Masaki; Nakajima, Yutaka; Furukawa, Asuka; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Kumagai, Jiro; Akashi, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    Background Propionibacterium acnes has recently been implicated as a cause of chronic prostatitis and this commensal bacterium may be linked to prostate carcinogenesis. The occurrence of intracellular P. acnes infection in prostate glands and the higher frequency of P. acnes-positive glands in radical prostatectomy specimens from patients with prostate cancer (PCa) than in those from patients without PCa led us to examine whether the P. acnes-positive gland frequency can be used to assess the risk for PCa in patients whose first prostate biopsy, performed due to an increased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) titer, was negative. Methods We retrospectively collected the first and last prostate biopsy samples from 44 patients that were diagnosed PCa within 4 years after the first negative biopsy and from 36 control patients with no PCa found in repeated biopsy for at least 3 years after the first biopsy. We evaluated P. acnes-positive gland frequency and P. acnes-positive macrophage number using enzyme-immunohistochemistry with a P. acnes-specific monoclonal antibody (PAL antibody). Results The frequency of P. acnes-positive glands was higher in PCa samples than in control samples in both first biopsy samples and in combined first and last biopsy samples (P < 0.001). A frequency greater than the threshold (18.5 and 17.7, respectively) obtained by each receiver operating characteristic curve was an independent risk factor for PCa (P = 0.003 and 0.001, respectively) with odds ratios (14.8 and 13.9, respectively) higher than those of serum PSA titers of patients just before each biopsy (4.6 and 2.3, respectively). The number of P. acnes-positive macrophages did not differ significantly between PCa and control samples. Conclusions These results suggested that the frequency of P. acnes-positive glands in the first negative prostate biopsy performed due to increased PSA titers can be supportive information for urologists in planning repeated biopsy or follow-up strategies

  6. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: essential tools for a better approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary cancer risk assessment (HCRA) is a multidisciplinary process of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer, based on personal and family history. It includes genetic counseling, testing and management of at-risk individuals so that they can make well-informed choices about cancer surveillance, surgical treatment and chemopreventive measures, including biomolecular cancer therapies. Providing patients and family members with an appropriate HCRA will contribute to a better process of making decisions about their personal and family risks of cancer. Following individuals at high risk through screening protocols, reassuring those at low risk, and referring those at increased risk of hereditary cancer to a cancer genetics center may be the best suitable approach of HCRA. PMID:24165150

  7. A Common SNP of IL-10 (-1082A/G) is Associated With Increased Risk of Premenopausal Breast Cancer in South Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Cingeetham; Jyothy, Akka; Vijay kumar, Malladi; Raman, Ramaiyer Raghu; Nallari, Pratibha; Venkateshwari, Ananthapur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evading the immune destruction and angiogenesis has been the two hallmarks of cancer. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with immune suppressing (pro-tumorigenic) and anti-angiogenic (anti-tumorigenic) properties, thus making the role of IL-10 in tumorigenesis enigmatic. Previous studies have suggested a critical role of IL10 altered expression in complex process of tumor-microenvironment, co-evolution and tumorigenesis. Objectives: Evaluating the role of IL10 (-1082A/G) gene promoter polymorphism in breast cancer patients from South India. Patients and Methods: A case-control study was conducted with a total of 285 individuals, these include 125 histologically confirmed breast cancer patients and 160 age and sex matched controls. Genotypes were determined by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR), followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Statistical analysis was done to test the significance of results obtained. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that AA genotype of the Il-10 -1082A/G polymorphism is significantly associated with breast cancer (AA vs. AG: χ2 = 14.46, P = 0.0001432, OR = 2.854, 95% CI = 1.68 - 4.849). Up on stratifying subjects based on cancer stage, age at onset, menopausal status, AA genotype has associated with all the sub groups, except for post-menopausal women. There was no significant association which was observed with respected to hormonal status (ER, PR) and Her2/neu status. Conclusions: The present study suggests that IL-10 AA genotype as a risk factor in the etiology of breast cancer in the South Indian population. PMID:26478792

  8. Association with pregnancy increases the risk of local recurrence but does not impact overall survival in breast cancer: A case-control study of 87 cases.

    PubMed

    Genin, A S; De Rycke, Y; Stevens, D; Donnadieu, A; Langer, A; Rouzier, R; Lerebours, F

    2016-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) constitutes 7% of all BCs in young women. The prognosis of PABC remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the association of pregnancy with BC on the rates of overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant and local recurrence-free survival. We conducted a retrospective unicenter case-control study. We enrolled PABC patients treated at our institution between 1992 and 2009. For each case, 2 BC controls were matched for age and year of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the parameters associated with prognosis. Eighty-seven PABC patients were enrolled and matched with 174 controls. The univariate analysis did not reveal any significant differences in OS, DFS or distant recurrence rates between the 2 groups. Pregnancy associated status, a tumor larger than T2 and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as the primary treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of local relapse. The multivariate analysis showed that the pregnancy associated status and the tumor size were strong prognostic factors of local recurrence. Pregnancy associated status negates the prognostic value of tumor size, as both T0-T2 and T3-T4 PABC patients have the same poor prognosis as control BC patients with T3-T4 tumors. Interestingly, although PABC patients have more locally advanced tumors, they did not have a higher rate of radical surgery than the control BC patients. Pregnancy associated status is a strong prognostic factor of local relapse in BC. In PABC patients, when possible, radical surgery should be the preferred first treatment step.

  9. Skin cancer: increasing awareness and screening in primary care.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Randy

    2014-05-12

    Skin cancer screening (SCS) promotes early detection and improves treatment. Primary care providers are strategically positioned to provide screenings, yet the frequency is low. Strategies to improve SCS include increasing skin cancer awareness, targeting high-risk patient populations, and advocating for primary care providers to conduct screenings.

  10. Worldwide trends show oropharyngeal cancer rates increasing

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer significantly increased during the period 1983-2002 among people in countries that are economically developed. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs primarily in the middle part of the throat behind t

  11. Occupational risk for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Flanders, W D; Rothman, K J

    1982-04-01

    In a case-control analysis, we studied the effects of type of employment on laryngeal cancer risk using the interview data from the Third National Cancer Survey. Effects were measured relative to the risk for those employed in a group of arbitrarily defined industries and occupations with low risk. We excluded females and controlled for age, tobacco use, alcohol use, and race in the analysis. We found ratio estimates above 3.0 for workers in the railroad industry and the lumber industry; and for sheetmetal workers, grinding wheel operators, and automobile mechanics.

  12. What Are the Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased risk of urothelial cancers, including bladder cancer. Arsenic in drinking water Arsenic in drinking water has been linked with a ... the world. The chance of being exposed to arsenic depends on where you live and whether you ...

  13. Venous thromboembolism and cancer: risks and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Agnes Y Y; Levine, Mark N

    2003-06-17

    Cancer and its treatments are well-recognized risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Evidence suggests that the absolute risk depends on the tumor type, the stage or extent of the cancer, and treatment with antineoplastic agents. Furthermore, age, surgery, immobilization, and other comorbid features will also influence the overall likelihood of thrombotic complications, as they do in patients without cancer. The role of hereditary thrombophilia in patients with cancer and thrombosis is still unclear, and screening for this condition in cancer patients is not indicated. The most common malignancies associated with thrombosis are those of the breast, colon, and lung, reflecting the prevalence of these malignancies in the general population. When adjusted for disease prevalence, the cancers most strongly associated with thrombotic complications are those of the pancreas, ovary, and brain. Idiopathic thrombosis can be the first manifestation of an occult malignancy. However, intensive screening for cancer in patients with VTE often does not improve survival and is not generally warranted. Independently of the timing of cancer diagnosis (before or after the VTE), the life expectancy of cancer patients with VTE is relatively short, because of both deaths from recurrent VTE and the cancer itself. Patients with cancer and acute VTE who take anticoagulants for an extended period are at increased risk of recurrent VTE and bleeding. A recent randomized trial, the Randomized Comparison of Low Molecular Weight Heparin versus Oral Anticoagulant Therapy for Long-Term Anticoagulation in Cancer Patients with Venous Thromboembolism (CLOT) study, showed that low molecular weight heparin may be a better treatment option for this group of patients. The antineoplastic effects of anticoagulants are being actively investigated with promising preliminary results.

  14. Glucocorticoid therapy and risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, K; Schned, A; Fortuny, J; Heaney, J; Marsit, C; Kelsey, K T; Karagas, M R

    2009-01-01

    Background: Use of immunosuppressive drugs post organ transplantation, and prolonged use of glucorticoids for other conditions have been associated with subsequent risk of certain malignancies, that is, skin cancers and lymphoma. There is evidence that the incidence of bladder cancer is also elevated among organ transplant recipients, however, it is unknown whether other groups of patients, that is, those taking oral glucocorticoids, likewise are at an increased risk. Methods: In a population-based case–control study in New Hampshire, USA, we compared the use of glucocorticoids in 786 bladder cancer cases and in 1083 controls. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis to compute adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associated with oral glucocorticoid use. Results: In our analysis, the risk of bladder cancer was related to a history of prolonged oral glucocorticoid use (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.24–2.76, adjusted for age, gender and smoking). Associations with oral glucocorticoid use were stronger for invasive tumours (OR=2.12, 95% CI=1.17–3.85) and tumours with high (3+) p53 staining intensity (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.26–4.36). Conclusion: Our results raise the possibility of an increased risk of bladder cancer from systemic use of glucocorticoids, and a potential role of immune surveillance in bladder cancer aetiology. PMID:19773763

  15. Alcohol and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral cavity (excluding the lips), pharynx (throat), and larynx (voice box) ( 4 ). People who consume 50 or ... developing cancers of the oral cavity , pharynx (throat), larynx , and esophagus than people who use either alcohol ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... would like to unsubscribe/opt out from our communications, please follow this link: http://www.cancer.org/ ...

  17. Increased risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among upstream petroleum workers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Riise, Trond; Bjørge, Tone; Moen, Bente E; Bråtveit, Magne; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate cancer risk, particularly oesophageal cancer, among male upstream petroleum workers offshore potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents. Methods Using the Norwegian Registry of Employers and Employees, 24 765 male offshore workers registered from 1981 to 2003 was compared with 283 002 male referents from the general working population matched by age and community of residence. The historical cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Results Male offshore workers had excess risk of oesophageal cancer (RR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.8) compared with the reference population. Only the adenocarcinoma type had a significantly increased risk (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0 to 7.0), mainly because of an increased risk among upstream operators (RR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 to 14.5). Upstream operators did not have significant excess of respiratory system or colon cancer or mortality from any other lifestyle-related diseases investigated. Conclusion We found a fourfold excess risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among male workers assumed to have had the most extensive contact with crude oil. Due to the small number of cases, and a lack of detailed data on occupational exposure and lifestyle factors associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, the results must be interpreted with caution. Nevertheless, given the low risk of lifestyle-related cancers and causes of death in this working group, the results add to the observations in other low-powered studies on oesophageal cancer, further suggesting that factors related to the petroleum stream or carcinogenic agents used in the production process might be associated with risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:19858535

  18. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed.

  19. Breast Cancer Risk Among Klinefelter Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate male breast cancer (MBC) risk among Klinefelter Syndrome (KS) patients and relate this to possible biologic explanations. Methods A literature review was conducted to identify case series and epidemiologic studies that have evaluated MBC risk among KS patients. Results Case reports without expected values have often led to false impressions of risk. Problems include that a diagnosis of cancer can prompt a karyotypic evaluation and that many cases of KS are unrecognized, resulting in incomplete denominators. Few carefully conducted epidemiologic studies have been undertaken given that both KS and male breast cancer are rare events. The largest study found 19.2- and 57.8-fold increases in incidence and mortality, respectively, with particularly high risks among 47,XXY mosaics. These risks were still approximately 30% lower than among females, contradicting case reports that KS patients have breast cancer rates similar to females. Altered hormone levels (especially the ratio of estrogens to androgens), administration of exogenous androgens, gynecomastia, and genetic factors have been offered as possible explanations for the high risks. Conclusions Additional well-designed epidemiologic studies are needed to clarify which KS patients are at a high risk of developing MBC and to distinguish between possible predisposing factors, including altered endogenous hormones. PMID:21241366

  20. Lung Cancer Risk Models for Screening (R package: lcrisks)

    Cancer.gov

    In both the absence and presence of screening, the R package lcrisks, calculates individual risks of lung cancer and lung cancer death based on covariates: age, education, sex, race, smoking intensity/duration/quit-years, Body Mass Index, family history of lung-cancer, and self-reported emphysema. In the presence of CT screening akin to the NLST (3 yearly screens, 5 years of follow-up), it uses the covariates to estimate risk of false-positive CT screen as well as the reduction in risk of lung cancer death and increase in risk of lung cancer screening.

  1. Breast cancer and spaceflight: risk and management.

    PubMed

    Barr, Yael R; Bacal, Kira; Jones, Jeffrey A; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2007-04-01

    Spaceflight exposes astronauts to a host of environmental factors which could increase their risk for cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown an increased incidence of breast cancer in female commercial flight attendants, with occupational risk factors as one of the proposed mechanisms for the higher incidence in this cohort. Since female astronauts are exposed to similar occupational conditions as flight attendants, they too may be at an increased risk for breast cancer. With the planning of exploration class missions to the Moon and to Mars it is important to assess and minimize the risk for breast malignancy, and to have a well-defined protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of a breast mass discovered during a mission. Risk factors for development of breast cancer in the female astronaut include ionizing radiation, disrupted melatonin homeostasis secondary to circadian shifting, chemical exposure, and changes in immune function. Preflight, in-flight, and postflight screening and management modalities include imaging and fine needle aspiration (FNA). Employing such a strategy may provide a viable management approach in the case of a newly diagnosed breast mass inflight.

  2. Primary care physicians' cancer screening recommendation practices and perceptions of cancer risk of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians' perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information.

  3. Assessing the cancer risk from environmental PCBs.

    PubMed Central

    Cogliano, V J

    1998-01-01

    A new approach to assessing the cancer risk from environmental polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) considers both toxicity and environmental processes to make distinctions among environmental mixtures. New toxicity information from a 1996 cancer study of four commercial mixtures strengthens the case that all PCB mixtures can cause cancer, although different mixtures have different potencies. Environmental processes alter PCB mixtures through partitioning, chemical transformation, and preferential bioaccumulation; these processes can increase or decrease toxicity considerably. Bioaccumulated PCBs are of greatest concern because they appear to be more toxic than commercial PCBs and more persistent in the body. The new approach uses toxicity studies of commercial mixtures to develop a range of cancer potency estimates and then considers the effect of environmental processes to choose appropriate values for representative classes of environmental mixtures. Guidance is given for assessing risks from different exposure pathways, less-than-lifetime and early-life exposures, and mixtures containing dioxinlike compounds. PMID:9618347

  4. Failure to Achieve a Complete Response to Induction BCG Therapy is Associated with Increased Risk of Disease Worsening and Death in Patients with High Risk Non–Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Seth P.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Sucharew, Heidi; Wood, David; Crawford, E. David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The Southwest Oncology Group conducted a randomized trial of induction BCG with or without maintenance BCG. In these additional retrospective analyses, our goal was to evaluate the association of a complete response (CR) or remaining with no evidence of disease (NED) versus no CR during induction therapy with subsequent survival after adjusting for other potential confounders. Among all patients randomized to maintenance treatment, we also wanted to identify combinations of baseline covariates in order to define prognostic groups for subsequent worsening-free survival. Methods Outcome measures of worsening-free and overall survival were assessed using Kaplan Meier estimates and proportional hazards regression models. For the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis, 434 patients randomized to maintenance vs. no therapy with complete covariate information were included. Results Of the 593 evaluable patients, 341 were not randomized to maintenance BCG. Patients who achieved a prior complete response during induction BCG had a 5-year survival probability of 77% compared to 62% for patients who did not [Hazard ratio (HR) 0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44, 0.81; p= 0.0008]. Prior CR retained significance when adjusted for age, gender, prior intravesical chemotherapy, and papillary disease versus CIS (HR=0.63; 95% CI: .46, .86; p=0.003). CART analysis identified 4 prognostic groups. Older patients (≥ 62 years old) previously treated with intravesical chemotherapy who failed to achieve a CR had a 5-fold higher risk of a worsening event relative to those who are younger (< 67 years old) and achieve a CR (HR=5.09; 95% CI: 3.37, 7.68; p<0.0001). Conclusion Failure to achieve a complete response after induction BCG is associated with a significant risk of a worsening event and death for patients with CIS or Ta or T1 bladder cancer at increased risk of recurrence. PMID:18367117

  5. Fruit and vegetables and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Key, T J

    2011-01-04

    The possibility that fruit and vegetables may help to reduce the risk of cancer has been studied for over 30 years, but no protective effects have been firmly established. For cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, epidemiological studies have generally observed that people with a relatively high intake of fruit and vegetables have a moderately reduced risk, but these observations must be interpreted cautiously because of potential confounding by smoking and alcohol. For lung cancer, recent large prospective analyses with detailed adjustment for smoking have not shown a convincing association between fruit and vegetable intake and reduced risk. For other common cancers, including colorectal, breast and prostate cancer, epidemiological studies suggest little or no association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk. It is still possible that there are benefits to be identified: there could be benefits in populations with low average intakes of fruit and vegetables, such that those eating moderate amounts have a lower cancer risk than those eating very low amounts, and there could also be effects of particular nutrients in certain fruits and vegetables, as fruit and vegetables have very varied composition. Nutritional principles indicate that healthy diets should include at least moderate amounts of fruit and vegetables, but the available data suggest that general increases in fruit and vegetable intake would not have much effect on cancer rates, at least in well-nourished populations. Current advice in relation to diet and cancer should include the recommendation to consume adequate amounts of fruit and vegetables, but should put most emphasis on the well-established adverse effects of obesity and high alcohol intakes.

  6. Cancer risks in the optical manufacturing industry.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J D; Wegman, D H; Smith, T J

    1983-01-01

    A mortality odds ratio (MOR) study has been conducted to explore the cancer risks of exposures experienced in the production of optical lenses and metal spectacle frames. Male death certificates were obtained from a Massachusetts town where a large optical industry is located. Craftsmen, foremen, and operatives of non-optical industries, such as woollen textile workers and workers in the optical company with short-term or no exposure, were chosen as reference workers their incomes were similar to those of the exposed workers. Cardiovascular disease (total 714) is chosen as the reference disease to explore cancers (total 232). An excess risk of total cancers observed = 70, expected = 48) has formed among lens workers. The excess may be accounted for mainly by the excess risk of gastrointestinal cancers; the standardised MORs (sMOR) for medium and long-term exposure were 2.2 and 2.5. The excess was especially evident for colorectal cancers; the sMORs for medium and long-term exposures were 3.2 and 2.6. Excess risks of gastrointestinal cancers (sMOR = 2.9) and colorectal cancers (sMOR = 3.4) were found among metal frame workers with long-term (employed for more than 29 years) exposure, but the number of exposed cases was small (9 and 6 respectively). These results suggest that exposure to abrasives or cutting oil mists or both, possibly by ingestion, might increase the risk of gastrointestinal (especially colorectal) cancers among lens and metal spectacle frame manufacturers. PMID:6830714

  7. Circulating Adiponectin and Risk of Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiaoli; Wu, Haijian; Cao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Adiponectin is an insulin-sensitizing hormone produced by adipocytes. It has been suggested to be involved in endometrial tumorigenesis. Published data have shown inconsistent results for the association between circulating adiponectin levels and endometrial cancer. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive value of circulating adiponectin levels on the development of endometrial cancer. Methods PubMed, Embase, ISI web of knowledge, and Cochrane databases were searched for all eligible studies, and the summary relative risk (SRR) was calculated. Additionally, we performed dose-response analysis with eight eligible studies. Results A total of 1,955 cases and 3,458 controls from 12 studies were included. The SRR for the ‘highest’ vs ‘lowest’ adiponectin levels indicated high adiponectin level reduced the risk of endometrial cancer [SRR = 0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.33–0.66]. Results from the subgroup analyses were consistent with the overall analysis. The SRR for each 1 µg/ml increase of adiponectin indicated a 3% reduction in endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 2%–4%), and a 14% reduction for each increase of 5 µg/ml (95% CI: 9%–19%). No evidence of publication bias was found. Conclusions This meta-analysis demonstrates that low level of circulating adiponectin is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. PMID:26030130

  8. Genetic counseling for prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Nieder, A M; Taneja, S S; Zeegers, M P A; Ostrer, H

    2003-03-01

    Major risk factors for developing prostate cancer, including positive family history and African-American ethnicity, can be quantified for genetic counseling. Factors increasing familial risk for prostate cancer are closer degree of kinship, number of affected relatives, and early age of onset (< 50 years) among the affected relatives. Genetic testing may be useful for modification of risk, but currently should be performed only within the context of a well-designed research study that will determine penetrance and genotype-phenotype correlation of specific mutations. Even in the absence of genetic testing, African-American men and men with a strong family history of prostate cancer may opt to initiate screening by prostate specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal exam (DRE) screening at age 40.

  9. Both serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcium levels may increase the risk of incident prostate cancer in Caribbean men of African ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Maria D; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Lindsay, Carole M; Smith, Garrett; Bennett, Franklyn I; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma; Aiken, William; Coard, Kathleen C M

    2015-01-01

    Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations have been associated with both higher and lower risk of prostate cancer (PCa), whereas elevated levels of circulating calcium has been related to higher risks. However, there are few studies that account for effects of both calcium and 25(OH)D concentrations on incident PCa in a black population. We examined these relationships in a case–control study of men 40–80 years old with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed PCa in Jamaica, a tropical country. Mean serum calcium concentrations was higher among cases (2.32 ± 0.19 mmol/L) than controls, (2.27 ± 0.30 mmol/L) (P = 0.023) however, there were no differences in 25(OH)D by cancer status (cases, 33.67 ± 12.71 ng/mL; controls (32.25 ± 12.59 ng/mL). Serum calcium was not correlated with 25(OH)D (partial correlation: r, 0.06; P = 0.287). Multivariable-adjusted models showed a positive linear relationship between PCa and serum calcium (OR, 1.12; CI, 1.00–1.25 per 0.1 nmol/L). Serum 25(OH)D concentration also showed a positive association with PCa (OR, 1.23; CI, 1.01–1.49 per 10 ng/mL). The odds of PCa in men with serum 25(OH)D tertile 2 was OR, 2.18; CI, 1.04–4.43 and OR, 2.47 CI, 1.20–4.90 for tertile 3 (Ptrend = 0.013). Dietary intakes of calcium showed no relationship with PCa. Despite the strong relationship between serum calcium and vitamin D the mechanism by which each affects prostate cancer risk in men of African ancestry needs additional investigation. PMID:25858172

  10. Lifetime growth and risk of testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Lorenzo; Vizzini, Loredana; Pastore, Guido; Segnan, Nereo; Gillio-Tos, Anna; Fiano, Valentina; Grasso, Chiara; Ciuffreda, Libero; Lista, Patrizia; Pearce, Neil; Merletti, Franco

    2014-08-01

    Adult height is associated with testicular cancer risk. We studied to what extent this association is explained by parental height, childhood height and age at puberty. We conducted a case-control study on germ-cell testicular cancer patients diagnosed in 1997-2008 and resident in the Province of Turin. Information was collected using mailed questionnaires in 2008-2011. Specifically, we asked for adult height (in cm), height at age 9 and 13 (compared to peers) and age at puberty (compared to peers). We also asked for paternal and maternal height (in cm) as indicators of genetic components of adult height. The analysis included 255 cases and 459 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) of testicular cancer were estimated for the different anthropometric variables. Adult height was associated with testicular cancer risk [OR: 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.31 per 5-cm increase]. The risk of testicular cancer was only slightly increased for being taller vs. shorter than peers at age 9 (OR: 1.55, 95% CI: 0.91-2.64) or age 13 (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 0.78-2.01), and parental height was not associated with testicular cancer risk. The OR for adult height was 1.32 (95% CI: 1.12-1.56) after adjustment for parental height. Among participants with small average parental height (<167 cm or less), the OR of testicular cancer for tall (>180 cm) vs. short (<174 cm) subjects was 3.47 (95% CI: 1.60-7.51). These results suggest that the association between height and testicular cancer is likely to be explained by environmental factors affecting growth in early life, childhood and adolescence.

  11. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    one or both breasts were affected. Family Member (e.g. grandmother, aunt) Paternal or Maternal Type or Location of Cancer (e.g. breast...breast cancer who previously participated in an ongoing parent project and are at least 3 months post-treatment. Participants were to be assigned to... parent study also awaiting approval (“Behavior, Estrogen Metabolism, and Breast Cancer Risk: A Molecular Epidemiologic Study” HSRRB Log Number A

  12. Psychosocial factors influencing breast cancer risk appraisal among older women.

    PubMed

    Wood, Robin Y; Della-Monica, Nola R

    2011-06-01

    Although the incidence of breast cancer increases with age, many older women are uninformed about the increased risk and have lower mammography screening rates than younger women. Understanding older women's perceptions of risk might assist health care providers in offering appropriate resources that result in screening. In this study, we explored psychosocial components influencing older women's breast cancer risk appraisal. To identify key psychosocial components of breast cancer risk appraisal, we conducted focus group interviews. Data saturation occurred with four groups (N = 36) of older Black (58%) and White (42%) women with no prior history of breast cancer. On analysis of the data, we found three themes representing psychosocial factors influencing breast cancer risk appraisal with this cohort. Our findings revealed that worry/fear/anxiety, self-regulating empowerment, and realistic optimism were psychosocial mechanisms older Black and White women in this sample used in appraising breast cancer risk.

  13. Polymorphism of CYP3A4 and ABCB1 genes increase the risk of neuropathy in breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Kus, Tulay; Aktas, Gokmen; Kalender, Mehmet Emin; Demiryurek, Abdullah Tuncay; Ulasli, Mustafa; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Sevinc, Alper; Kul, Seval; Camci, Celaletdin

    2016-01-01

    Background Interindividual variability of pharmacogenetics may account for unpredictable neurotoxicities of taxanes. Methods From March 2011 to June 2015, female patients with operable breast cancer who had received docetaxel- or paclitaxel-containing adjuvant chemotherapy were included in this study. All patients were treated with single-agent paclitaxel intravenously (IV) 175 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for four cycles, or IV 80 mg/m2 weekly for 12 cycles, and IV 100 mg/m2 docetaxel for four cycles as adjuvant treatment. We evaluated the relationship between neurotoxicity of taxanes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms of ABCB1, CYP3A4, ERCC1, ERCC2, FGFR4, TP53, ERBB2, and CYP2C8 genes. Taxane-induced neurotoxicity during the treatment was evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4.03 prior to each cycle. Chi-squared tests were used to compare the two groups, and multivariate binary logistic regression models were used for determining possible risk factors of neuropathy. Results Pharmacogenetic analysis was performed in 219 females. ABCB1 3435 TT genotype had significantly higher risk for grade ≥2 neurotoxicity (odds ratio [OR]: 2.759, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.172–6.493, P: 0.017) compared to TC and CC genotype, and also CYP3A4 392 AA and AG genotype had significantly higher risk for grade ≥2 neurotoxicity (OR: 2.259, 95% CI: 1.033–4.941, P: 0.038) compared to GG genotype. For FDGF4 gene with AG and GG genotype, OR was 1.879 (95% CI: 1.001–3.525, P: 0.048) compared to AA genotype with regard to any grade of neuropathy risk. We could not find any other association of other genotypes with neurotoxicity grades. Conclusion ABCB1 3435 TT genotype and CYP3A4 392 AA/AG genotypes may be used as predictors of neurotoxicity during taxane chemotherapy. PMID:27574448

  14. CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CHLOROFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloroform is a common chlorination by-product in drinking water. EPA has regulated chloroform as a probable human carcinogen under the Safe Drinking Water Act. The cancer risk estimate via ingestion was based on the 1985 Jorgenson study identifying kidney tumors in male Osborne ...

  15. Family history and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lesko, S M; Rosenberg, L; Shapiro, S

    1996-12-01

    The authors examined the relation between family history of prostate cancer and the risk of this cancer in a population-based case-control study conducted in Massachusetts between December 1992 and October 1994. Cases were all incident cases of prostate cancer in men younger than 70 years (n = 563); controls were men with no history of the disease matched to the cases on age and town of residence (n = 703). Prostate cancer risk was increased among men who reported a history of this cancer in either their fathers or brothers (odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3). Risk varied with the number of relatives affected and their relationship to the case. For a history of prostate cancer in one relative, the OR was 2.2 (95% CI 1.5-3.2); if two or more relatives were affected, it was 3.9 (95% CI 1.7-5.2). For prostate cancer in the father, the OR was 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-3.0); for prostate cancer in a brother, it was 3.0 (95% CI 1.8-4.9). Risk was inversely related to the subject's age and to age at diagnosis of prostate cancer in his affected relative. Among probands younger than 60 years, the OR was 5.3 (95% CI 2.5-12); for those 60-64 years of age, the OR was 2.7 (95% CI 1.3-5.5); and for those 65 years of age and older, the OR was 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.5). For prostate cancer diagnosed in a relative before age 65, the OR was 4.1 (95% CI 2.3-7.3); for detection of the disease after age 74, the OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.38-1.5). The association was present both among men with local and advanced stage disease and among men whose prostate cancer was detected either by screening or because of symptoms. These data provide evidence that after controlling for diet and other potential confounders, familial factors are significantly associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

  16. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Cancer.gov

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  17. Melatonin, sleep disturbance and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Blask, David E

    2009-08-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin is involved in the circadian regulation and facilitation of sleep, the inhibition of cancer development and growth, and the enhancement of immune function. Individuals, such as night shift workers, who are exposed to light at night on a regular basis experience biological rhythm (i.e., circadian) disruption including circadian phase shifts, nocturnal melatonin suppression, and sleep disturbances. Additionally, these individuals are not only immune suppressed, but they are also at an increased risk of developing a number of different types of cancer. There is a reciprocal interaction and regulation between sleep and the immune system quite independent of melatonin. Sleep disturbances can lead to immune suppression and a shift to the predominance in cancer-stimulatory cytokines. Some studies suggest that a shortened duration of nocturnal sleep is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer development. The relative individual contributions of sleep disturbance, circadian disruption due to light at night exposure, and related impairments of melatonin production and immune function to the initiation and promotion of cancer in high-risk individuals such as night shift workers are unknown. The mutual reinforcement of interacting circadian rhythms of melatonin production, the sleep/wake cycle and immune function may indicate a new role for undisturbed, high quality sleep, and perhaps even more importantly, uninterrupted darkness, as a previously unappreciated endogenous mechanism of cancer prevention.

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... Cancer? Can Thymus Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. Ethnic Differences in Knowledge and Attitudes about BRCA1 Testing in Women at Increased Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Chanita; Gomez-Caminero, Andres; Benkendorf, Judith; Kerner, Jon; Isaacs, Claudine; Barter, James; Lerman, Caryn

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge about the inheritance of breast cancer and attitudes about genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility in women at increased risk were studied in Caucasian and African-American women (N=407). Participants had at least one first-degree relative with cancer. Differences in knowledge and attitudes toward risk may be attributed…

  20. Epidemiology and risk factors for kidney cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Dong, Linda M.; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    After over two decades of increasing rates, kidney cancer incidence trends worldwide show signs of plateauing or decreases in recent years. In the United States, rates for renal cell cancer, the predominant form of kidney cancer in adults, continue to rise but mainly for early stage tumors. Incidence rates for renal pelvis cancer have declined, while kidney cancer mortality rates overall have leveled. These patterns are consistent with reports of incidental diagnosis and downward shift of tumor stage and size in clinical series. The changing prevalence of known risk factors for renal cell cancer, including cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension, may also be influencing the incidence trends, although their relative impact may differ in various populations,. Evidence is accumulating to suggest an etiologic role for physical activity, alcohol consumption, occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, and high parity among women, but causal conclusions are not yet supported. Genetic susceptibility and its interaction with environmental exposures are believed to influence renal cell cancer risk, but limited studies based on candidate gene approaches have not produced conclusive results. Large consortium efforts employing genome-wide scanning technology are underway, which hold promise for novel discoveries in renal carcinogenesis. PMID:20448658

  1. Low RBM3 Protein Expression Correlates with Clinical Stage, Prognostic Classification and Increased Risk of Treatment Failure in Testicular Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Sven-Erik; Nodin, Björn; Gaber, Alexander; Eberhard, Jakob; Uhlén, Mathias; Jirström, Karin; Jerkeman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has been shown to correlate with favourable clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in several cancer diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and prognostic ability of RBM3 in patients with testicular non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT). Patients and Methods Immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was analysed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 206 patients. Chi-square test was applied to analyze associations between RBM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess the impact of RBM3 expression on cancer-specific survival (CSS) and failure-free survival (FFS). Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to estimate the relative risk for failure. Results In the entire cohort, there was a significant association between clinical stage (p=0.044) and RBM3 expression. Weak RBM3 expression correlated with a significantly reduced FFS [79.3% versus 90.4% (p=0.019)] and CSS [87.5% versus 97.3% (p=0.047)]. For patients with metastatic disease (n = 88), significant associations were found between RBM3 expression and IGCCC group (p=0.007). The FFS was significantly inferior for patients with low tumour-specific RBM3 expression [59.3% versus 79.0% (p=0.013)], and this association remained significant in a multivariable model for patients with metastatic disease (HR=3.67; 95% CI 1.14, 11.89). Conclusion Low RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of treatment failure in metastatic NSGCT, in relation to the prognostic factors included in the International Germ Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC). These findings suggest that RBM3 may be a potential biomarker for treatment stratification in patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours, and therefore merit further validation. PMID:25811459

  2. Light pollution, reproductive function and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N

    2006-01-01

    At present, light pollution (exposure to light-at-night) both in the form of occupational exposure during night work and as a personal choice and life style, is experienced by numerous night-active members of our society. Disruption of the circadian rhythms induced by light pollution has been associated with cancer in humans. There are epidemiological evidences of increased breast and colon cancer risk in shift workers. An inhibition of the pineal gland function with exposure to the constant light (LL) regimen promoted carcinogenesis whereas the light deprivation inhibits the carcinogenesis. Treatment with pineal indole hormone melatonin inhibits carcinogenesis in pinealectomized rats or animals kept at the standard light/dark regimen (LD) or at the LL regimen. These observations might lead to use melatonin for cancer prevention in groups of humans at risk of light pollution.

  3. Bone metastasis risk factors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Catarina; Vendrell, Inês; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Casimiro, Sandra; Mansinho, André; Alho, Irina; Costa, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Bone is the single most frequent site for bone metastasis in breast cancer patients. Patients with bone-only metastasis have a fairly good prognosis when compared with patients with visceral disease. Nevertheless, cancer-induced bone disease carries an important risk of developing skeletal related events that impact quality of life (QoL). It is therefore particularly important to stratify patients according to their risk of developing bone metastasis. In this context, several risk factors have been studied, including demographic, clinicopathological, genetic, and metabolic factors. Most of them show conflicting or non-definitive associations and are not validated for clinical use. Nonetheless, tumour intrinsic subtype is widely accepted as a major risk factor for bone metastasis development and luminal breast cancer carries an increased risk for bone disease. Other factors such as gene signatures, expression of specific cytokines (such as bone sialoprotein and bone morphogenetic protein 7) or components of the extracellular matrix (like bone crosslinked C-telopeptide) might also influence the development of bone metastasis. Knowledge of risk factors related with bone disease is of paramount importance as it might be a prediction tool for triggering the use of targeted agents and allow for better patient selection for future clinical trials. PMID:28194227

  4. Human Papillomavirus-16 Infection in Advanced Oral Cavity Cancer Patients Is Related to an Increased Risk of Distant Metastases and Poor Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yang, Shu-Li; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Chang, Yu-Liang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an oncogenic virus causing oropharyngeal cancers and resulting in a favorable outcome after the treatment. The role of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains ambiguous. Objective This study aimed to examine the effect of HPV infection on disease control among patients with OSCC following radical surgery with radiation-based adjuvant therapy. Patients and Method We prospectively followed 173 patients with advanced OSCC (96% were stage III/IV) who had undergone radical surgery and adjuvant therapy between 2004 and 2006. They were followed between surgery and death or up to 60 months. Surgical specimens were examined using a PCR-based HPV blot test. The primary endpoints were the risk of relapse and the time to relapse; the secondary endpoints were disease-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Results The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCC was 22%; HPV-16 (9%) and HPV-18 (7%) were the genotypes most commonly encountered. Solitary HPV-16 infection was a poor predictor of 5-year distant metastases (hazard ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4–8.0; P = 0.005), disease-free survival (P = 0.037), disease-specific survival (P = 0.006), and overall survival (P = 0.010), whereas HPV-18 infection had no impact on 5-year outcomes. The rate of 5-year distant metastases was significantly higher in the HPV-16 or level IV/V metastasis group compared with both the extracapsular spread or tumor depth ≥11-mm group and patients without risk factors (P<0.001). Conclusions HPV infections in advanced OSCC patients are not uncommon and clinically relevant. Compared with HPV-16-negative advanced OSCC patients, those with a single HPV-16 infection are at higher risk of distant metastases and poor survival despite undergoing radiation-based adjuvant therapy and require a more aggressive adjuvant treatment and a more thorough follow-up. PMID:22808258

  5. Oral cancer risk factors in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Yakin, Muhammed; Gavidi, Ratu Osea; Cox, Brian; Rich, Alison

    2017-03-03

    Oral cancer constitutes the majority of head and neck cancers, which are the fifth most common malignancy worldwide, accounting for an estimated 984,430 cases in 2012. Between 2000 and 2010, there were 1,916 cases of OSCC in New Zealand with a male to female ratio of 1.85:1, and an age-standardised incidence rate of 42 persons per 1,000,000 population. This article presents an overview of the main risk factors for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and their prevalence in New Zealand. Alcohol consumption is the most prevalent risk factor in New Zealand, followed by tobacco. Given the high prevalence of these two risk factors and their synergistic effect, it is important for doctors and dentists to encourage smoking cessation in smokers and to recommend judicious alcohol intake. Research is needed to determine the prevalence of use of oral preparations of tobacco and water-pipe smoking in New Zealand, especially due to changing demography and increases in migrant populations. UV radiation is also an important risk factor. Further investigations are also needed to determine the prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal cancers attributable to oncogenic HPV infection.

  6. Effect of Psychosocial Factors on Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors such as personality traits and depression may alter immune and endocrine function, with possible effects on cancer incidence and survival. Although these factors have been extensively studied as risk and prognostic factors for cancer, the associations remain unclear. The author used data from prospective cohort studies in population-based and clinical databases to investigate these relations. The findings do not support the hypotheses that personality traits and depression are direct risk factors for cancer and cancer survival. Some researchers have recently reported that cancer affects the psychological status of the partners and family members of cancer patients. The mechanisms underlying this hypothesis imply the existence of not only psychological distress from caregiving and grief but also a shared unhealthy lifestyle. Only a few studies have suggested that major psychosocial problems develop in partners of cancer patients. The present study used nationwide population-based data to investigate depression risk among male partners of women with breast cancer. The results support the hypothesis that such men are at increased risk of depression. In conclusion, the effects of personality traits and depression on cancer risk and survival appear to be extremely small. In addition, partners of cancer patients were at increased risk of depression. Screening partners and family members of cancer patients for depressive symptoms is therefore an important concern for research in psycho-oncology. PMID:24270060

  7. Tea, Coffee, and Milk Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Green, Chadwick John; de Dauwe, Palina; Boyle, Terry; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the effects of tea, coffee, and milk on the risk of colorectal cancer are inconsistent. We investigated associations of tea, coffee, and milk consumption with colorectal cancer risk and attempted to determine if these exposures were differentially associated with the risks of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers. Methods Data from 854 incident cases and 948 controls were analyzed in a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia during 2005–07. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the associations of black tea (with and without milk), green tea, herbal tea, hot coffee, iced coffee, and milk with colorectal cancer. Results Consumption of 1 or more cups of herbal tea per week was associated with a significantly decreased risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16–0.82; PTrend = 0.044), and consumption of 1 or more cups of iced coffee per week was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91–2.54; PTrend = 0.004). Neither herbal tea nor iced coffee was associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. Hot coffee was associated with a possible increased risk of distal colon cancer. Black tea (with or without milk), green tea, decaffeinated coffee, and milk were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Conclusions Consumption of herbal tea was associated with reduced risk of distal colon cancer, and consumption of iced coffee was associated with increased rectal cancer risk. PMID:24531002

  8. GSTM1 null genotype may be associated with an increased nasopharyngeal cancer risk in South China: an updated meta-analysis and review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanni; Wan, Wuhanhui; Li, Ting; Cao, Jing; Xu, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Although many epidemiologic studies investigated the GSTM1 gene polymorphism and its association with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Chinese, definite conclusions cannot be drawn. To assess the impact of of GSTM1 polymorphism on the risk of NPC, an updated meta-analysis was performed in a Chinese population. A total of nine studies including 1,291 cases and 2,135 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of those nine studies showed that GSTM1 null genotype was associated with an increased risk of NPC in South China (odds ratio [OR] =1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.27–1.70). In subgroup analyses stratified by source of controls, it revealed significant results in population-based studies (OR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.19–1.64). Additionally, a significant association was found in smokers (OR =3.16, 95% CI: 1.76–5.67). This meta-analysis indicated a marked association of GSTM1 with NPC risk in South China, and there might be an interaction between the polymorphism and smoking on NPC. However, further studies with gene–gene and gene–environment interactions are required for definite conclusions. PMID:26392774

  9. Tailored telephone counseling increases colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were randomly assigned to receive one of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening. Participants received either a tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention or a non-tailored print brochures intervention. Data were collected at baseline and 3 months post-baseline. Group differences and the effect of the interventions on adherence and stage movement for colorectal cancer screening were examined using t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression. Individuals in the tailored telephone counseling plus brochures group were significantly more likely to complete colorectal cancer screening and to move forward on stage of change for fecal occult blood test, any colorectal cancer test stage and stage of the risk-appropriate test compared with individuals in the non-tailored brochure group at 3 months post-baseline. A tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention successfully promoted forward stage movement and colorectal cancer screening adherence among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. PMID:26025212

  10. Risk factors for male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, K; Bross, D S; Kessler, I I

    1985-02-01

    To investigate risk factors in male breast cancer, a case-control study of 52 histologically diagnosed cases and 52 controls--matched for age, race, marital status, and hospital--was conducted in 5 U.S. metropolitan areas. Cases were significantly more likely to be Jewish than were the controls, supporting earlier suggestions of an increased risk in Jewish males. A significant association of male breast cancer with mumps infections at age 20 years or older, along with the possible association with antecedent testicular injury and the excess frequency of mumps orchitis among cases, suggests that testicular factors may be important in the development of breast cancer among males. An increased frequency of breast cancer among persons who have worked in blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling mills is of interest because of the possible testicular effect of high environmental temperatures. The observed association between breast cancer and a prior history of swollen breast is difficult to interpret because of potential recall bias, and a possible relationship with military service needs further confirmation.

  11. Early Life and Risk of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    birth weight and of growth during childhood and adolescence on risk of breast cancer. We used a unique material of school charts with information on...childhood and adolescence influence breast cancer risk. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Epidemiology, Etiology, Risk Factors, Weight, Growth 132 16...childhood and adolescence on risk of breast cancer in a cohort of more than 150,000 girls on whom information on birth weight and between 6 and 8

  12. MO-E-17A-09: Has Cancer Risk for Pediatric CT Increased Or Decreased? An Analysis of Cohort Data From 2004-2013

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Kaufman, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze CT radiation dosimetry trends in a pediatric population imaged with modern (2004-2013) CT technology Methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective review. Two cohorts of pediatric patients that received CT scans for treatment or surveillance for Wilms tumor (n=73) or Neuroblastoma (n=74) from 2004–2013 were included in this study. Patients were scanned during this time period on a GE Ultra (8 slice; 2004–2007), a GE VCT (2008–2011), or a GE VCT-XTe (2011–2013). Each patient's individual or combined chest, abdomen, and pelvic CT exams (n=4138) were loaded onto a PACS workstation (Intelerad, Canada) and measured to calculate their effective diameter and SSDE. Patient SSDE was used to estimate patient organ dosimetry based on previously published data. Patient's organ dosimetry were sorted by gender, weight, age, scan protocol (i.e., chest, abdomen, or pelvis), and CT scanner technology and averaged accordingly to calculate population averaged absolute and effective dose values. Results: Patient radiation dose burden calculated for all genders, weights, and ages decreased at a rate of 0.2 mSv/year (4.2 mGy/year; average organ dose) from 2004–2013; overall levels decreased by 50% from 3.0 mSv (60.0 mGy) to 1.5 mSv (25.9 mGy). Patient dose decreased at equal rates for both male and female, and for individual scan protocols. The greatest dose savings was found for patients between 0–4 years old (65%) followed by 5-9 years old (45%), 10–14 years old (30%), and > 14 years old (21%). Conclusion: Assuming a linear-nothreshold model, there always will be potential risk of cancer induction from CT. However, as demonstrated among these patient populations, effective and organ dose has decreased over the last decade; thus, potential risk of long-term side effects from pediatric CT examinations has also been reduced.

  13. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    predictors of surveillance and follow-up care is Baldwin’s Afrocentric model for describing AA women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer screening...African American women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer early detection and screening. Adv Nurs Sci. 1996;19(2):27Y42. 28. Marin G. Subjective...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  14. Ego depletion increases risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Asal, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how the availability of self-control resources affects risk-taking inclinations and behaviors. We proposed that risk-taking often occurs from suboptimal decision processes and heuristic information processing (e.g., when a smoker suppresses or neglects information about the health risks of smoking). Research revealed that depleted self-regulation resources are associated with reduced intellectual performance and reduced abilities to regulate spontaneous and automatic responses (e.g., control aggressive responses in the face of frustration). The present studies transferred these ideas to the area of risk-taking. We propose that risk-taking is increased when individuals find themselves in a state of reduced cognitive self-control resources (ego-depletion). Four studies supported these ideas. In Study 1, ego-depleted participants reported higher levels of sensation seeking than non-depleted participants. In Study 2, ego-depleted participants showed higher levels of risk-tolerance in critical road traffic situations than non-depleted participants. In Study 3, we ruled out two alternative explanations for these results: neither cognitive load nor feelings of anger mediated the effect of ego-depletion on risk-taking. Finally, Study 4 clarified the underlying psychological process: ego-depleted participants feel more cognitively exhausted than non-depleted participants and thus are more willing to take risks. Discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  15. Rapid Increase of the Serum PSA Level in Response to High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy may be a Potential Indicator of Biochemical Recurrence of Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Watsuji, Toshikazu; Azuma, Haruhito

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence and magnitude of the rapid increase in the serum PSA (riPSA) level after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for prostate cancer, and its correlation with clinical factors. Methods: A total of 176 patients with localized prostate cancer underwent HIFU therapy. Serum riPSA was determined on the basis of the same criteria as those for “PSA bounce”, ie, an increase of ≥0.2 ng/ml with a spontaneous return to the prebounce level or lower. Patients were stratified according to neoadjuvant PSA level, T stage, risk group, age, Gleason score, pretreatment PSA level, post-treatment PSA nadir, and number of HIFU sessions. Results: riPSA was seen in 53% of patients during a median follow-up period of 43 months. A PSA nadir was achieved within 3 months for 85.1% of the treatments. In all cases, onset of riPSA was seen two days after HIFU therapy, and the median magnitude was 23.69 ng/ml. A magnitude of >2 ng/ml was seen in 89.4% of cases. Univariate analysis revealed that patients with riPSA were associated with usage of hormonal therapy and the post-treatment PSA nadir level. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that riPSA and the number of HIFU sessions were predictors of biochemical recurrence. A significant statistical association was found between the presence of riPSA and the risk of biochemical failure only in the low- and intermediate-risk group. Conclusion: Patients treated with HIFU who experience post-treatment riPSA may have an increased risk of biochemical recurrence, especially in non-high-risk patients. PMID:21603245

  16. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect

    Boukheris, Houda; Stovall, Marilyn; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Stratton, Kayla L.; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita; Hammond, Sue; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies.

  17. Breast cancer risk and the BRCA1 interacting protein CTIP.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Choong, David Y H; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Visvader, Jane E; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 predispose to breast cancer. CTIP interacts with BRCA1 and so could also be associated with increased risk. We screened CTIP for germline mutations in 210 probands of breast cancer families including 129 families with no mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. No coding variants were detected in CTIP, therefore, it is unlikely to be involved in breast cancer risk.

  18. PALB2 and the risks for cancer: implications for clinical care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edith C

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the PALB2 gene are responsible for a small but significant percentage of cancer risks in familial breast and pancreatic cancer families. PALB2 mutations may be associated with an increase in other cancer risks as well. This article will provide an overview of the PALB2 gene, cancer risks associated with carrying a PALB2 mutation, and implications for patient care.

  19. Epidemiology of endocrine-related risk factors for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    Ovarian and other hormones are major determinants of breast cancer risk. Particularly important is the accumulative exposure of the breast to circulating levels of the ovarian hormones estradiol and progesterone. A number of breast cancer risk factors can be understood in light of how they affect women's hormone profiles. Age is a marker for the onset and cessation of ovarian activity. Racial differences in hormone profiles correlate with breast cancer incidence patterns. Age at menarche not only serves as the chronological indicator of the onset of ovarian activity, but as a predictor of ovulatory frequency during adolescence and hormone levels in young adults, and has a long-lasting influence on risk. Age at menopause, another established breast cancer risk factor, marks the cessation of ovarian activity. Pregnancy history and lactation experience also are hormonal markers of breast cancer risk. Postmenopausal obesity, which is associated with higher levels of estrogen following cessation of ovarian activity, increases breast cancer risk, whereas physical activity, which can limit menstrual function, reduces risk. A relatively recent area of investigation is prenatal exposures like preeclampsia and low birth weight; both may be associated with lower in utero exposure to estrogen and also may predict lower breast cancer risk as an adult. Improved understanding of these exposures and their potential interactions with breast cancer susceptibility genes may, in the future, improve our prospects for breast cancer prevention.

  20. Cancer Risks in Aluminum Reduction Plant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Labrèche, France

    2014-01-01

    Objective and Methods: This review examines epidemiological evidence relating to cancers in the primary aluminum industry where most of what is known relates to Söderberg operations or to mixed Söderberg/prebake operations. Results and Conclusions: Increased lung and bladder cancer risks have been reported in Söderberg workers from several countries, but not in all. After adjustment for smoking, these cancer risks still increase with cumulative exposure to benzo(a)pyrene, used as an index of coal tar pitch volatiles exposure. Limited evidence has been gathered in several cohorts for an increased risk of tumors at other sites, including stomach, pancreas, rectum/rectosigmoid junction, larynx, buccal cavity/pharynx, kidney, brain/nervous system, prostate, and lymphatic/hematopoietic tissues (in particular non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, and leukemia). Nevertheless, for most of these tumor sites, the relationship with specific exposures has not been demonstrated clearly and further follow-up of workers is warranted. PMID:24806725

  1. Trajectory of body shape across the lifespan and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingyang; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B; Spiegelman, Donna; Must, Aviva; Wu, Kana; Chan, Andrew T; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-05-15

    The influence of adiposity over life course on cancer risk remains poorly understood. We assessed trajectories of body shape from age 5 up to 60 using a group-based modeling approach among 73,581 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 32,632 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. After a median of approximately 10 years of follow-up, we compared incidence of total and obesity-related cancers (cancers of the esophagus [adenocarcinoma only], colorectum, pancreas, breast [after menopause], endometrium, ovaries, prostate [advanced only], kidney, liver and gallbladder) between these trajectories. We identified five distinct trajectories of body shape: lean-stable, lean-moderate increase, lean-marked increase, medium-stable, and heavy-stable/increase. Compared with women in the lean-stable trajectory, those in the lean-marked increase and heavy-stable/increase trajectories had a higher cancer risk in the colorectum, esophagus, pancreas, kidney, and endometrium (relative risk [RR] ranged from 1.22 to 2.56). Early life adiposity was inversely while late life adiposity was positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. In men, increased body fatness at any life period was associated with a higher risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma and colorectal cancer (RR ranged from 1.23 to 3.01), and the heavy-stable/increase trajectory was associated with a higher risk of pancreatic cancer, but lower risk of advanced prostate cancer. The trajectory-cancer associations were generally stronger for non-smokers and women who did not use menopausal hormone therapy. In conclusion, trajectories of body shape throughout life were related to cancer risk with varied patterns by sex and organ, indicating a role for lifetime adiposity in carcinogenesis.

  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer.

  3. Association of Breast Cancer Risk loci with Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E.; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J.; Joshi, Amit D.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele=0.70; 95% CI: 0.58–0.85; Ptrend=2.84×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.71; 95% CI: 0.55–0.92; HRhomozygotes=0.48; 95% CI: 0.31–0.76; P2DF=1.45×10−3). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.15; Ptrend=6.6×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.96 95% CI: 0.90–1.03; HRhomozygotes= 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35; P2DF=1.25×10−4). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  4. Evaluation of skin cancer risk for lunar and Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. Y.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Methods for estimating the probability of excess incidence of skin cancer from space radiation exposure, must consider the variability of skin doses at specific anatomical areas, and the individual factors that may contribute to risk projection models, including skin pigment, and synergistic effects from combined ionizing radiation and UV exposure. Using the multiplicative risk model for transferring the Japanese survivor data to the US population, epidemiological data for the increased risk for skin locations exposed to combined UV and ionizing radiation, and models of space radiation environments, transport, and anatomical shielding, we estimate the skin cancer risk for future lunar and Mars missions. Our model projects that individual variations in the probability for increased skin cancer risk varies more than 10-fold and that an excess cancer risk greater than 1% could occur for astronauts with light skin and hair color exposed to medium class solar particle events during future lunar base operations, or from galactic cosmic rays on Mars missions.

  5. The relation of vasectomy to the risk of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, L; Palmer, J R; Zauber, A G; Warshauer, M E; Strom, B L; Harlap, S; Shapiro, S

    1994-09-01

    We previously reported a strong positive association between vasectomy and the risk of prostatic cancer that arose in multiple comparisons made within data collected from 1976 to 1988 in an ongoing hospital-based surveillance study of many exposures and diseases. We have reassessed this association with data collected in the surveillance study during 1988-1992 from a new set of patients (355 cases of prostatic cancer and 2,048 controls with nonmalignant conditions). Because some studies have reported increased relative risks of lung cancer and testicular cancer in vasectomized men, we also used the surveillance database (4,126 men with various cancers, 7,027 men with nonmalignant conditions) to assess the relation of vasectomy to the risk of these and other cancers. In the newly collected data, the multivariate relative risk estimate for prostatic cancer in vasectomized men was 1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6-2.7). For lung cancer and testicular cancer, the relative risk estimates were 1.3 (95% CI 0.8-2.1) and 0.8 (95% CI 0.4-1.9), respectively; for lung cancer occurring > or = 15 years after vasectomy, the relative risk estimate was 1.9 but it was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.7-5.0). For pancreatic cancer, the relative risk estimate was 1.8 (95% CI 1.0-3.1). For each of the other cancers considered--malignant melanoma, large bowel cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, and other cancers--the relative risk estimate was 1.3 or less and compatible with a value of 1.0. The present data provide little support for an association of vasectomy with the risk of prostatic cancer or other cancers. In addition, the data from two sets of cases of prostatic cancer and controls interviewed consecutively illustrate that increased relative risks detected in screening for statistically significant associations may tend to have an upward bias and to be lower in subsequent data.

  6. Individualized Risk Prediction Model for Lung Cancer in Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sohee; Nam, Byung-Ho; Yang, Hye-Ryung; Lee, Ji An; Lim, Hyunsun; Han, Jun Tae; Park, Il Su; Shin, Hai-Rim; Lee, Jin Soo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Korea. The objective of the present study was to develop an individualized risk prediction model for lung cancer in Korean men using population-based cohort data. Methods From a population-based cohort study of 1,324,804 Korean men free of cancer at baseline, the individualized absolute risk of developing lung cancer was estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. We checked the validity of the model using C statistics and the Hosmer–Lemeshow chi-square test on an external validation dataset. Results The risk prediction model for lung cancer in Korean men included smoking exposure, age at smoking initiation, body mass index, physical activity, and fasting glucose levels. The model showed excellent performance (C statistic = 0.871, 95% CI = 0.867–0.876). Smoking was significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer in Korean men, with a four-fold increased risk in current smokers consuming more than one pack a day relative to non-smokers. Age at smoking initiation was also a significant predictor for developing lung cancer; a younger age at initiation was associated with a higher risk of developing lung cancer. Conclusion This is the first study to provide an individualized risk prediction model for lung cancer in an Asian population with very good model performance. In addition to current smoking status, earlier exposure to smoking was a very important factor for developing lung cancer. Since most of the risk factors are modifiable, this model can be used to identify those who are at a higher risk and who can subsequently modify their lifestyle choices to lower their risk of lung cancer. PMID:23408946

  7. Does Occupational Exposure to Solvents and Pesticides in Association with Glutathione S-Transferase A1, M1, P1, and T1 Polymorphisms Increase the Risk of Bladder Cancer? The Belgrade Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Savic-Radojevic, Ana R.; Bulat, Petar V.; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija S.; Dragicevic, Dejan P.; Djukic, Tatjana I.; Simic, Tatjana P.; Pekmezovic, Tatjana D.

    2014-01-01

    glutathione S-transferase A1, T1, and P1 did not contribute independently towards the risk of bladder cancer in males. However, in association with occupational exposure, low activity glutathione S-transferase A1 and glutathione S-transferase M1-null as well as glutathione S-transferase T1-active genotypes increase individual susceptibility to bladder cancer. PMID:24914957

  8. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  9. Milk and the risk and progression of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rock, Cheryl L

    2011-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that nutritional factors contribute to a substantial proportion of cancer cases, and milk contains numerous bioactive substances that could affect risk and progression of cancer. Cancer results from multiple genetic and epigenetic events over time, so demonstrating a specific effect of nutrients or other bioactive food components in human cancer is challenging. Epidemiological evidence consistently suggests that milk intake is protective against colorectal cancer. Calcium supplements have been shown to reduce risk for recurrence of adenomatous polyps. Calcium supplementation has not been observed to reduce risk for colon cancer, although long latency and baseline calcium intake affect interpretation of these results. High calcium intake from both food and supplements is associated with increased risk for advanced or fatal prostate cancer. Results from epidemiological studies examining the relationship between intake of dairy foods and breast or ovarian cancer risk are not consistent. Animal studies have suggested that galactose may be toxic to ovarian cells, but results from epidemiological studies that have examined ovarian cancer risk and milk and/or lactose intakes are mixed. Dietary guidelines for cancer prevention encourage meeting recommended levels of calcium intake primarily through food choices rather than supplements, and choosing low-fat or nonfat dairy foods.

  10. Population Based Assessment of MHC Class I Antigens Down Regulation as Markers of Increased Risk for Development and Progression of Breast Cancer from Benign Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Manuscript attached: Appendix A- 2 C: EXPRESSION OF MHC CLASS I AND II EXPRESSION SIGNIFICANTLY DISCRIMINATES AMONG BENIGN, CARCINOMA IN SITU, AND...Tumor aggressiveness and MHC class I and II antigens in laryngeal and breast cancer. Semin Cancer Biol. 2 :47-54; 1991. 5. Sawtell, NM., DiPersio, L... 2 , 3). In breast lesions examined for expression of MHC class I, approximately half (51%) of carcinomas had an abnormally low content of HLA-A, -B

  11. Young women's responses to smoking and breast cancer risk information.

    PubMed

    Bottorff, Joan L; McKeown, Stephanie Barclay; Carey, Joanne; Haines, Rebecca; Okoli, Chizimuzo; Johnson, Kenneth C; Easley, Julie; Ferrence, Roberta; Baillie, Lynne; Ptolemy, Erin

    2010-08-01

    Current evidence confirms that young women who smoke or who have regular long-term exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) have an increased risk of developing premenopausal breast cancer. The aim of this research was to examine the responses of young women to health information about the links between active smoking and SHS exposure and breast cancer and obtain their advice about messaging approaches. Data were collected in focus groups with 46 women, divided in three age cohorts: 15-17, 18-19 and 20-24 and organized according to smoking status (smoking, non-smoking and mixed smoking status groups). The discussion questions were preceded by information about passive and active smoking and its associated breast cancer risk. The study findings show young women's interest in this risk factor for breast cancer. Three themes were drawn from the analysis: making sense of the information on smoking and breast cancer, personal susceptibility and tobacco exposure and suggestions for increasing awareness about tobacco exposure and breast cancer. There was general consensus on framing public awareness messages about this risk factor on 'protecting others' from breast cancer to catch smokers' attention, providing young women with the facts and personal stories of breast cancer to help establish a personal connection with this information and overcome desensitization related to tobacco messages, and targeting all smokers who may place young women at risk. Cautions were also raised about the potential for stigmatization. Implications for raising awareness about this modifiable risk factor for breast cancer are discussed.

  12. Skin cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Gumaste, P V; Penn, L A; Cymerman, R M; Kirchhoff, T; Polsky, D; McLellan, B

    2015-06-01

    Women with BRCA1/2 mutations have an elevated risk of breast and ovarian cancer. These patients and their clinicians are often concerned about their risk for other cancers, including skin cancer. Research evaluating the association between BRCA1/2 mutations and skin cancer is limited and has produced inconsistent results. Herein, we review the current literature on the risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. No studies have shown a statistically significant risk of melanoma in BRCA1 families. BRCA2 mutations have been linked to melanoma in large breast and ovarian cancer families, though a statistically significant elevated risk was reported in only one study. Five additional studies have shown some association between BRCA2 mutations and melanoma, while four studies did not find any association. With respect to nonmelanoma skin cancers, studies have produced conflicting results. Given the current state of medical knowledge, there is insufficient evidence to warrant increased skin cancer surveillance of patients with a confirmed BRCA1/2 mutation or a family history of a BRCA1/2 mutation, in the absence of standard risk factors. Nonetheless, suspected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers should be counselled about skin cancer risks and may benefit from yearly full skin examinations.

  13. Skin cancer: causes and groups at risk.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Rachel Louise

    This second in a two-part series focuses on the causes and risk factors of skin cancer, highlighting risk factors among the general population as well as in high-risk groups. Part 1, published last week, outlined the main types of skin cancer and the treatment options available for each type; this article stresses the importance of early identification and patient education to prevent skin cancer.

  14. Study finds increases in risk of leukemias related to treatment

    Cancer.gov

    A new study describes the pattern of risk for chemotherapy-related acute myeloid leukemia among adult cancer survivors over the past three decades who have previously been treated with chemotherapy for other cancers. These patterns coincide with major shi

  15. Smokers May Be Prone to Risks from Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smokers May Be Prone to Risks From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy Long-term chances of heart attack, ... 29, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who smoke have an increased risk for ...

  16. Risk factors for subsequent endocrine-related cancer in childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Wijnen, M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Medici, M; Peeters, R P; van der Lely, A J; Neggers, S J C M M

    2016-06-01

    Long-term adverse health conditions, including secondary malignant neoplasms, are common in childhood cancer survivors. Although mortality attributable to secondary malignancies declined over the past decades, the risk for developing a solid secondary malignant neoplasm did not. Endocrine-related malignancies are among the most common secondary malignant neoplasms observed in childhood cancer survivors. In this systematic review, we describe risk factors for secondary malignant neoplasms of the breast and thyroid, since these are the most common secondary endocrine-related malignancies in childhood cancer survivors. Radiotherapy is the most important risk factor for secondary breast and thyroid cancer in childhood cancer survivors. Breast cancer risk is especially increased in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma who received moderate- to high-dosed mantle field irradiation. Recent studies also demonstrated an increased risk after lower-dose irradiation in other radiation fields for other childhood cancer subtypes. Premature ovarian insufficiency may protect against radiation-induced breast cancer. Although evidence is weak, estrogen-progestin replacement therapy does not seem to be associated with an increased breast cancer risk in premature ovarian-insufficient childhood cancer survivors. Radiotherapy involving the thyroid gland increases the risk for secondary differentiated thyroid carcinoma, as well as benign thyroid nodules. Currently available studies on secondary malignant neoplasms in childhood cancer survivors are limited by short follow-up durations and assessed before treatment regimens. In addition, studies on risk-modifying effects of environmental and lifestyle factors are lacking. Risk-modifying effects of premature ovarian insufficiency and estrogen-progestin replacement therapy on radiation-induced breast cancer require further study.

  17. Risk of Recurrence in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sørum Falk, Ragnhild; Folkvard Evensen, Jan; Boysen, Morten; Brøndbo, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    A cohort study was undertaken to analyze the risk of recurrence among 1616 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx from 1983 to 2010 at a single, tertiary academic center in Oslo, Norway. The cohort was followed from the date of diagnosis to September 2011. Competing risk regression analysis assessed the association between various risk factors and the risk of recurrence, where death was considered a competing event. Recurrence was observed in 368 patients (23%) during the study period. The majority (71%) of recurrences involved the location of the primary tumor. The overall risk of recurrence during the first three years after initiating treatment was 20.5%. Increased risk of recurrence was observed in patients with supraglottic cancer, younger patients, those with T2–T3 tumors and in patients treated in the earlier part of the study period. Significant factors for recurrence in glottic carcinomas were age, treatment in the earlier part of the study and T-status, whereas age was a significant factor in supraglottic cancer. N-status appeared less significant. In conclusion, follow-up of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma should place particular emphasis on the site of the primary tumor, younger patients, cases of supraglottic cancer and T2-T4 primary tumors, especially during the first three years after treatment. More studies are needed to assess the impact of surgical versus non-surgical treatment, and eventually the significance of recurrence, for disease-specific and overall survival in cases of advanced laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27716797

  18. Immorally obtained principal increases investors’ risk preference

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiaxin; He, Guibing

    2017-01-01

    Capital derived from immoral sources is increasingly circulated in today’s financial markets. The moral associations of capital are important, although their impact on investment remains unknown. This research aims to explore the influence of principal source morality on investors’ risk preferences. Three studies were conducted in this regard. Study 1 finds that investors are more risk-seeking when their principal is earned immorally (through lying), whereas their risk preferences do not change when they invest money earned from neutral sources after engaging in immoral behavior. Study 2 reveals that guilt fully mediates the relationship between principal source morality and investors’ risk preferences. Studies 3a and 3b introduce a new immoral principal source and a new manipulation method to improve external validity. Guilt is shown to the decrease the subjective value of morally flawed principal, leading to higher risk preference. The findings show the influence of morality-related features of principal on people’s investment behavior and further support mental account theory. The results also predict the potential threats of “grey principal” to market stability. PMID:28369117

  19. Breast cancer risk following radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma: modification by other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deirdre A.; Gilbert, Ethel; Dores, Graça M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Holowaty, Eric; Glimelius, Bengt; Andersson, Michael; Wiklund, Tom; Lynch, Charles F.; van't Veer, Mars; Storm, Hans; Pukkala, Eero; Stovall, Marilyn; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Allan, James M.; Boice, John D.; Travis, Lois B.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of genetic and other risk factors in the development of breast cancer after radiotherapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has not been determined. We analyzed data from a breast cancer case-control study (105 patients, 266 control subjects) conducted among 3 817 survivors of HL diagnosed at age 30 years or younger in 6 population-based cancer registries. Odds ratios (ORs) and excess relative risks (ERRs) were calculated using conditional regression. Women who received RT exposure (≥ 5 Gy radiation dose to the breast) had a 2.7-fold increased breast cancer risk (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-5.2), compared with those given less than 5 Gy. RT exposure (≥ 5 Gy) was associated with an OR of 0.8 (95% CI, 0.2-3.4) among women with a first- or second-degree family history of breast or ovarian cancer, and 5.8 (95% CI, 2.1-16.3) among all other women (interaction P = .03). History of a live birth appeared to increase the breast cancer risk associated with RT among women not treated with ovarian-damaging therapies. Breast cancer risk following RT varied little according to other factors. The additional increased relative risk of breast cancer after RT for HL is unlikely to be larger among women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer than among other women. PMID:16051739

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Is Associated with Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wang, Renwei; Nelson, Heather; Barcelo, Helene; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood is associated with increased risk of several cancers. However, data from prospective studies on mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk are lacking. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study of 183 breast cancer cases with pre-diagnostic blood samples and 529 individually matched controls among participants of the Singapore Chinese Health Study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real time PCR. Conditional logistic regression analyses showed that there was an overall positive association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.01). The elevated risk for higher mtDNA copy numbers was primarily seen for women with <3 years between blood draw and cancer diagnosis; ORs (95% CIs) for 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th quintile of mtDNA copy number were 1.52 (0.61, 3.82), 2.52 (1.03, 6.12), 3.12 (1.31, 7.43), and 3.06 (1.25, 7.47), respectively, compared with the 1st quintile (Ptrend = 0.004). There was no association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk among women who donated a blood sample ≥3 years before breast cancer diagnosis (Ptrend = 0.41). This study supports a prospective association between increased mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk that is dependent on the time interval between blood collection and breast cancer diagnosis. Future studies are warranted to confirm these findings and to elucidate the biological role of mtDNA copy number in breast cancer risk. PMID:23776581

  1. Racial/ethnic differences in cancer risk after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hall, E C; Segev, D L; Engels, E A

    2013-03-01

    Transplant recipients have elevated cancer risk, but it is unknown if cancer risk differs across race and ethnicity as in the general population. US kidney recipients (N = 87,895) in the Transplant Cancer Match Study between 1992 and 2008 were evaluated for racial/ethnic differences in risk for six common cancers after transplantation. Compared to white recipients, black recipients had lower incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 0.60, p<0.001) and higher incidence of kidney (aIRR 2.09, p<0.001) and prostate cancer (aIRR 2.14, p<0.001); Hispanic recipients had lower incidence of NHL (aIRR 0.64, p = 0.001), lung (aIRR 0.41, p < 0.001), breast (aIRR 0.53, p = 0.003) and prostate cancer (aIRR 0.72, p = 0.05). Colorectal cancer incidence was similar across groups. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) measured the effect of transplantation on cancer risk and were similar for most cancers (p≥0.1). However, black and Hispanic recipients had larger increases in kidney cancer risk with transplantation (SIRs: 8.96 in blacks, 5.95 in Hispanics vs. 4.44 in whites), and only blacks had elevated prostate cancer risk following transplantation (SIR: 1.21). Racial/ethnic differences in cancer risk after transplantation mirror general population patterns, except for kidney and prostate cancers where differences reflect the effects of end-stage renal disease or transplantation.

  2. Erlotinib and the Risk of Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    William, William N.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lee, J. Jack; Mao, Li; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Lin, Heather Y.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Martin, Jack W.; Lingen, Mark W.; Boyle, Jay O.; Shin, Dong M.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Shinn, Nancy; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Tang, Ximing; Kim, Edward S.; Saintigny, Pierre; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Meiller, Timothy; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Myers, Jeffrey; El-Naggar, Adel; Lippman, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Standard molecularly based strategies to predict and/or prevent oral cancer development in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) are lacking. OBJECTIVE To test if the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib would reduce oral cancer development in patients with high-risk OPLs defined by specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) profiles. Secondary objectives included prospective determination of LOH as a prognostic marker in OPLs. DESIGN The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-bind trial. Accrual occurred from November 2006 through July 2012, with a median follow-up time of 35 months in an ambulatory care setting in 5 US academic referral institutions. Patients with OPLs were enrolled in the protocol, and each underwent LOH profiling (N = 379); they were classified as high-risk (LOH-positive) or low-risk (LOH-negative) patients based on their LOH profiles and oral cancer history. The randomized sample consisted of 150 LOH-positive patients. INTERVENTIONS Oral erlotinib treatment (150mg/d) or placebo for 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Oral cancer–free survival (CFS). RESULTS A total of 395 participants were classified with LOH profiles, and 254 were classified LOH positive. Of these, 150 (59%) were randomized, 75 each to the placebo and erlotinib groups. The 3-year CFS rates in placebo- and erlotinib-treated patients were 74%and 70%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95%CI, 0.68–2.38; P = .45). The 3-year CFS was significantly lower for LOH-positive compared with LOH-negative groups (74%vs 87%, HR, 2.19; 95%CI, 1.25–3.83; P = .01). Increased EGFR gene copy number correlated with LOH-positive status (P < .001) and lower CFS (P = .01). The EGFR gene copy number was not predictive of erlotinib efficacy. Erlotinib-induced skin rash was associated with improved CFS (P = .01). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this trial, LOH was validated as a marker of oral cancer risk and

  3. Increasing tsunami risk awareness via mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leelawat, N.; Suppasri, A.; Latcharote, P.; Imamura, F.; Abe, Y.; Sugiyasu, K.

    2017-02-01

    In the information and communication technology era, smartphones have become a necessity. With the capacity and availability of smart technologies, a number of benefits are possible. As a result, designing a mobile application to increase tsunami awareness has been proposed, and a prototype has been designed and developed. The application uses data from the 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami. Based on the current location determined by a GPS function matched with the nearest point extracted from the detailed mesh data of that earlier disaster, the application generates the inundation depth at the user’s location. Thus, not only local people but also tourists visiting the affected areas can understand the risks involved. Application testing has been conducted in an evacuation experiment involving both Japanese and foreign students. The proposed application can be used as a supplementary information tool in tsunami evacuation drills. It also supports the idea of smart tourism: when people realize their risks, they possess risk awareness and hence can reduce their risks. This application can also be considered a contribution to disaster knowledge and technology, as well as to the lessons learned from the practical outcome.

  4. Shared Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koene, Ryan J.; Prizment, Anna E.; Blaes, Anne; Konety, Suma H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer are the two leading causes of death worldwide. Although commonly thought of as two separate disease entities, CVD and cancer possess various similarities and possible interactions, including a number of similar risk factors (e.g. obesity, diabetes), suggesting a shared biology for which there is emerging evidence. While chronic inflammation is an indispensible feature of the pathogenesis and progression of both CVD and cancer, additional mechanisms can be found at their intersection. Therapeutic advances, despite improving longevity, have increased the overlap between these diseases, but there are now millions of cancer survivors at risk of developing CVD. Cardiac risk factors have a major impact on subsequent treatment-related cardiotoxicity. In this review, we explore the risk factors common to both CVD and cancer, highlighting the major epidemiologic studies and potential biological mechanisms that account for them. PMID:26976915

  5. Factors Predicting Adherence to Risk Management Behaviors of Women at Increased Risk for Developing Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kerry A.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Roussi, Pagona; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lymphedema affects 20-30% of women following breast cancer treatment. However, even when women are informed, they do not necessarily adhere to recommended lymphedema self-management regimens. Utilizing the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework, we assessed cognitive and emotional factors influencing adherence to lymphedema risk management. Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone breast and lymph node surgery were recruited through the Fox Chase Cancer Centre breast clinic. Participants (N=103) completed measures of lymphedema-related perceived risk, beliefs and expectancies, distress, self-regulatory ability to manage distress, knowledge, and adherence to risk management behaviors. They then received the American Cancer Society publication “Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know”. Cognitive and affective variables were reassessed at 6- and 12-months post-baseline. Results Maximum likelihood multilevel model analyses indicated that overall adherence increased over time, with significant differences between baseline and 6- and 12- month assessments. Adherence to wearing gloves was significantly lower than that for all other behaviors except electric razor use. Distress significantly decreased, and knowledge significantly increased, over time. Greater knowledge, higher self-efficacy to enact behaviors, lower distress, and higher self-regulatory ability to manage distress were associated with increased adherence. Conclusions Women who understand lymphedema risk management and feel confident in managing this risk are more likely to adhere to recommended strategies. These factors should be rigorously assessed as part of routine care to ensure that women have the self-efficacy to seek treatment and the self-regulatory skills to manage distress, which may undermine attempts to seek medical assistance. PMID:24970542

  6. Tobacco and lung cancer: risks, trends, and outcomes in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Warren, Graham W; Cummings, K Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use, primarily associated with cigarette smoking, is the largest preventable cause of cancer mortality, responsible for approximately one-third of all cancer deaths. Approximately 85% of lung cancers result from smoking, with an additional fraction caused by secondhand smoke exposure in nonsmokers. The risk of lung cancer is dose dependent, but can be dramatically reduced with tobacco cessation, especially if the person discontinues smoking early in life. The increase in lung cancer incidence in different countries around in the world parallels changes in cigarette consumption. Lung cancer risks are not reduced by switching to filters or low-tar/low-nicotine cigarettes. In patients with cancer, continued tobacco use after diagnosis is associated with poor therapeutic outcomes including increased treatment-related toxicity, increased risk of second primary cancer, decreased quality of life, and decreased survival. Tobacco cessation in patients with cancer may improve cancer treatment outcomes, but cessation support is often not provided by oncologists. Reducing the health related effects of tobacco requires coordinated efforts to reduce exposure to tobacco, accurately assess tobacco use in clinical settings, and increase access to tobacco cessation support. Lung cancer screening and coordinated international tobacco control efforts offer the promise to dramatically reduce lung cancer mortality in the coming decades.

  7. [Risk factors of main cancer sites].

    PubMed

    Uleckiene, Saule; Didziapetriene, Janina; Griciūte, Liudvika Laima; Urbeliene, Janina; Kasiulevicius, Vytautas; Sapoka, Virginijus

    2008-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a system of various measures devoted to avoid this disease. Primary cancer prevention means the identification, avoidance, or destruction of known risk factors. The main risk factors are smoking, diet, alcohol consumption, occupational factors, environmental pollution, electromagnetic radiation, infection, medicines, reproductive hormones, and lack of physical activity. Approximately one-third of cancers can be avoided by implementing various preventive measures. The aim of this article was to acquaint medical students, family doctors with risk factors of main cancer sites (lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate).

  8. DNA Repair and Ethnic Differences in Prostate Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    The questionnaire asked about demographic information, reproductive history , tobacco use, alcohol consumption, general medical history and family... history , occupational exposures, residential history , exercise, and education (see Appendix). This information was entered into an Epi Info databases...cancer develops and what the factors are that help increase cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to learn about the natural history of prostate

  9. DNA Repair and Ethnic Differences in Prostate Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    with collection of biological specimen as described below. The questionnaire asks about demographic information, reproductive history , tobacco use...alcohol consumption, general medical history and family history , occupational exposures, residential history , exercise, and education (see Appendix...increase cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to learn about the natural history of prostate cancer and its causes and treatments. This research is

  10. Long-Term Survival and Risk of Second Cancers After Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Sato, Shinichiro; Fukuhisa, Kenjiro; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Arai, Tatsuo

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of second cancers after cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy for Asian populations. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 2,167 patients with cervical cancer undergoing radiotherapy between 1961 and 1986. Intracavitary brachytherapy was performed with high-dose rate source (82%) or low-dose rate source (12%). Relative risk (RR), absolute excess risk (AR), and cumulative risk of second cancer were calculated using the Japanese disease expectancy table. For 1,031 patients, the impact of smoking habit on the increasing risk of second cancer was also evaluated. Results: The total number of person-years of follow-up was 25,771, with 60 patients being lost to follow-up. Among the 2,167 patients, 1,063 (49%) survived more than 10 years. Second cancers were observed in 210 patients, representing a significant 1.2-fold risk (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.4) of developing second cancer compared with the general population, 1.6% excess risk per person per decade of follow-up, and elevating cumulative risk up to 23.8% (95% CI, 20.3-27.3) at 30 years after radiotherapy. The RR of second cancer was 1.6-fold for patients with the smoking habit and 1.4-fold for those without. Conclusions: Small but significant increased risk of second cancer was observed among Japanese women with cervical cancer mainly treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy. Considering the fact that about half of the patients survived more than 10 years, the benefit of radiotherapy outweighs the risk of developing second cancer.

  11. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths due to cervical cancer since 1950. Cervical dysplasia ... for cervical cancer helps decrease the number of deaths from the disease. Regular screening of women between ...

  12. What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... not cancer). Other risk factors Family history of kidney cancer People with a strong family history of ...

  13. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Risk and Prevention Aromatase Inhibitors for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  14. Physical Activity, Body Size, Intentional Weight Loss and Breast Cancer Risk: Fellowship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    Incident cases of invasive endome - mine whether the relation between diabetes and endo- trial cancer (diagnosed between 1991 and 1994) were metrial cancer...with an increased risk of endome - increase in risk above that attributed to body size trial cancer that decreased as duration increased (p alone

  15. Risk of Skin Cancer from Space Radiation. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; George, Kerry A.; Wu, Hong-Lu

    2003-01-01

    We review the methods for estimating the probability of increased incidence of skin cancers from space radiation exposure, and describe some of the individual factors that may contribute to risk projection models, including skin pigment, and synergistic effects of combined ionizing and UV exposure. The steep dose gradients from trapped electrons, protons, and heavy ions radiation during EVA and limitations in EVA dosimetry are important factors for projecting skin cancer risk of astronauts. We estimate that the probability of increased skin cancer risk varies more than 10-fold for individual astronauts and that the risk of skin cancer could exceed 1 % for future lunar base operations for astronauts with light skin color and hair. Limitations in physical dosimetry in estimating the distribution of dose at the skin suggest that new biodosimetry methods be developed for responding to accidental overexposure of the skin during future space missions.

  16. Nutrients and risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinfu; La Vecchia, Carlo; Gibbons, Laurrie; Negri, Eva; Mery, Les

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the association between intake of protein, fats, cholesterol, and carbohydrates and the risk of prostate cancer (PCa). Between 1994 and 1997, in 8 Canadian provinces, mailed questionnaires were completed by 1,797 incident, histologically confirmed cases of PCa and 2,547 population controls. Information was collected on socioeconomic status, lifestyle habits, and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire provided data on eating habits 2 yr before the study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using unconditional logistic regression, including terms for sociodemographic factors, body mass index, alcohol, and total energy intake. Intake of trans fat was associated with the risk of PCa; the OR for the highest vs. the lowest quartile was 1.45 (95% CI = 1.16-1.81); the association was apparently stronger in subjects aged less than 65, normal weight men, and ever smokers. An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose and disaccharides. In contrast, men in the highest quartile of cholesterol intake were at lower risk of PCa. No association was found with intake of total proteins, total fat, monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats, monosaccharides, and total carbohydrates. The findings provide evidence that a diet low in trans fat could reduce PCa risk.

  17. [Cancer screening and risk communication].

    PubMed

    Wegwarth, Odette

    2013-04-01

    In most psychological and medical research, patients are assumed to have difficulties with health statistics but clinicians not. However, studies indicate that most doctors have problems in understanding health statistics, including those of their own speciality. For example, only two out of 20 urologists knew the information relevant for a patient to make an informed decision about whether to take PSA screening for prostate cancer, just 14 out of 65 physicians in internal medicine understood that 5-year survival rates do not tell anything about screening's benefit, and merely 34 out of 160 gynecologists were able to interpret the meaning of a positive test result. This statistical illiteracy has a direct effect on patients understanding and interpretation of medical issues. Not rarely their own limited health literacy and their doctors' misinformation make them suffer through a time of emotional distress and unnecessary anxiety. The main reasons for doctors' statistical illiteracy are medical schools that ignore the importance of teaching risk communication. With little effort doctors could taught the simple techniques of risk communication, which would make most of their statistical confusion disappear.

  18. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A. Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-01-01

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of adolescent total red meat was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs lowest quintiles, RR, 1.42; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend=0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent poultry intake was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.75; 95%CI, 0.59-0.96; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 16% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.84; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 24% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). Higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  19. Multigenerational Breast Cancer Risk Factors in African-American Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    psychosocial, reproductive, genetic and lifestyles ) related to disease risk. Cases were matched by ethnicity and age to two cancer-free women participating in a...Breast Cancer; African American, Lifestyles , Psychosocial 24 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY...have shown risk factors such as age; socio-economic class; race/ethnicity; lifestyle ; and reproductive factors increase a woman’s chance of developing

  20. Food groups and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F; Pasche, C; La Vecchia, C; Lucchini, F; Franceschi, S

    1999-01-01

    Most studies of diet and colorectal cancer have considered nutrients and micronutrients, but the role of foods or food groups remains open to debate. To elucidate the issue, we examined data from a case–control study conducted between 1992 and 1997 in the Swiss canton of Vaud. Cases were 223 patients (142 men, 81 women) with incident, histologically confirmed colon (n = 119) or rectal (n = 104) cancer (median age 63 years), linked with the Cancer Registry of the Swiss Canton of Vaud, and controls were 491 subjects (211 men, 280 women, median age 58 years) admitted to the same university hospital for a wide spectrum of acute non-neoplastic conditions unrelated to long-term modifications of diet. Odds ratios (OR) were obtained after allowance for age, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity and total energy intake. Significant associations were observed for refined grain (OR = 1.32 for an increase of one serving per day), and red meat (OR = 1.54), pork and processed meat (OR = 1.27), alcohol (OR = 1.28), and significant protections for whole grain (OR = 0.85), raw (OR = 0.85) and cooked vegetables (OR = 0.69), citrus (OR = 0.86) and other fruits (OR = 0.85), and for coffee (OR = 0.73). Garlic was also protective (OR = 0.32 for the highest tertile of intake). These findings in a central European population support the hypothesis that a diet rich in refined grains and red meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer; they, therefore, support the recommendation to substitute whole grains for refined grain, to limit meat intake, and to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098773

  1. Tool Weighs Benefits, Risks of Raloxifene or Tamoxifen to Prevent Breast Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have developed a benefit-risk index to help guide decisions on whether postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer should take raloxifene or tamoxifen to reduce that risk. |

  2. Increased incidence of gallstones and prior cholecystectomy in patients with large bowel cancer.

    PubMed

    Paul, J; Gessner, F; Wechsler, J G; Kuhn, K; Orth, K; Ditschuneit, H

    1992-09-01

    In a retrospective study, the frequency of occurrence of gallstones and cholecystectomy in 479 patients with colorectal cancer was compared with that of 483 matched control patients with other malignancies. The mean interval between cholecystectomy and colon cancer diagnosis was 15.1 +/- 9.9 yr (range 2-53 yr), and there was no statistically significant difference, compared with the control group at 13.9 +/- 8.2 yr (range 2-31 yr). In patients with colon cancer, the general increased relative risk of concomitant diagnosed gallstones (relative risk 1.73, p = 0.0123) and the relative risk of cholecystectomy (relative risk 2.08, p = 0.0074) was statistically significant. However, when the data with regard to sex were analyzed, significant differences were observed only in women. Women affected by right colon cancer also had a statistically significant higher incidence of previous cholecystectomy (relative risk 2.86, p = 0.0096), but no significantly higher incidence of concomitant gallstones. The general increased relative risk in patients with right colon cancer and decreased risk in patients with left colon cancer of concomitant gallstones and prior cholecystectomy was statistically significant. Our data provide evidence for the hypothesis that both gallstones and cholecystectomy increase the general risk of large bowel cancer. Therefore, they are also compatible with the possibility that common risk factors causes the association between gallstones and large bowel cancer.

  3. Risk of lung cancer among former chromium smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, K D; Stanbury, M

    1996-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen. Previous epidemiologic studies in the 1950s of United States workers from seven facilities producing chromium compounds from chromite ore have reported a markedly increased risk for dying from lung cancer. As part of a high risk notification project of workers from four of these facilities, a mortality study was performed. The cohort was assembled in 1990-1991 from the Social Security records of four former chromate producing facilities in northern New Jersey. The study subjects were known to have worked at these facilities some time between 1937 and 1971. Proportionate mortality and proportionate cancer mortality ratios (PCMR) were calculated. The overall risk for lung cancer was a PCMR of 1.51 (confidence limits [CL] 1.29-1.74) for white men and 1.34 (CL 1.00-1.75) for black men. These risks increased with increasing duration of employment and latency since time of first employment. The PCMR for greater than 20 years duration of work and more than 20 years since first exposure was 1.94 (CL 1.15-3.06) for white men and 3.08 (CL 1.13-6.71) for black men. The risk for lung cancer for white men remains elevated more than 20 years after exposure has ceased (PCMR, 1.29; CL 1.03-1.60). The PCMR for nasal cavity/sinus cancer was also found to be a significantly increased, 5.18 (CL 2.37-11.30). A cluster of bladder cancer was seen among black workers from one facility, (PCMR, 3.30; CL 1.42-6.51). Despite the cessation of exposure, former chromium workers remain at significantly increased risk of lung cancer. Although there have been case reports of nasal cavity/ sinus cancer in association with chromium exposure, this is the first epidemiologic study to report a significant increase in these cancers. Limitations in this study include lack of exposure data and lack of information on smoking habits. The lack of increase in other smoking-related diseases besides lung cancer indicates that the increase in lung cancer cannot be

  4. Radiation and cancer risk in atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Kodama, K; Ozasa, K; Okubo, T

    2012-03-01

    With the aim of accurately assessing the effects of radiation exposure in the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has, over several decades, conducted studies of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, comprising 93 000 atomic-bomb survivors and 27 000 controls. Solid cancer: the recent report on solid cancer incidence found that at age 70 years following exposure at age 30 years, solid cancer rates increase by about 35%  Gy(-1) for men and 58% Gy(-1) for women. Age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. In the case of lung cancer, cigarette smoking has been found to be an important risk modifier. Radiation has similar effects on first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. Finally, radiation-associated increases in cancer rates appear to persist throughout life. Leukaemia: the recent report on leukaemia mortality suggests that radiation effects on leukaemia mortality persisted for more than 50 years. Moreover, significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in Nagasaki LSS members even 40-60 years after radiation exposure. Future perspective: given the continuing solid cancer increase in the survivor population, the LSS will likely continue to provide important new information on radiation exposure and solid cancer risks for another 15-20 years, especially for those exposed at a young age.

  5. Douching, Talc Use, and Risk of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, NL; O’Brien, KM; D’Aloisio, AA; Sandler, DP; Weinberg, CR

    2016-01-01

    Background Douching was recently reported to be associated with elevated levels of urinary metabolites of endocrine disrupting phthalates, but there is no literature on douching in relation to ovarian cancer. Numerous case-control studies of genital talc use have reported an increased risk of ovarian cancer, but prospective cohort studies have not uniformly confirmed this association. Behavioral correlation between talc use and douching could produce confounding. Methods The Sister Study (2003–2009) enrolled and followed 50,884 women in the US and Puerto Rico who had a sister diagnosed with breast cancer. At baseline participants were asked about douching and talc use during the previous 12 months. During follow-up (median of 6.6 years) 154 participants reported a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. We computed adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for ovarian cancer risk using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results There was little association between baseline perineal talc use and subsequent ovarian cancer (HR: 0.73 CI: 0.44, 1.2). Douching was more common among talc users (OR: 2.1 CI: 2.0, 2.3), and douching at baseline was associated with increased subsequent risk of ovarian cancer (HR: 1.9 CI: 1.2, 2.8). Conclusions Douching but not talc use was associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer in the Sister Study. PMID:27327020

  6. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels.

  7. Cancer risks associated with external radiation from diagnostic imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Linet, Martha S; Slovis, Thomas L; Miller, Donald L; Kleinerman, Ruth; Lee, Choonsik; Rajaraman, Preetha; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The 600% increase in medical radiation exposure to the US population since 1980 has provided immense benefit, but increased potential future cancer risks to patients. Most of the increase is from diagnostic radiologic procedures. The objectives of this review are to summarize epidemiologic data on cancer risks associated with diagnostic procedures, describe how exposures from recent diagnostic procedures relate to radiation levels linked with cancer occurrence, and propose a framework of strategies to reduce radiation from diagnostic imaging in patients. We briefly review radiation dose definitions, mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis, key epidemiologic studies of medical and other radiation sources and cancer risks, and dose trends from diagnostic procedures. We describe cancer risks from experimental studies, future projected risks from current imaging procedures, and the potential for higher risks in genetically susceptible populations. To reduce future projected cancers from diagnostic procedures, we advocate the widespread use of evidence-based appropriateness criteria for decisions about imaging procedures; oversight of equipment to deliver reliably the minimum radiation required to attain clinical objectives; development of electronic lifetime records of imaging procedures for patients and their physicians; and commitment by medical training programs, professional societies, and radiation protection organizations to educate all stakeholders in reducing radiation from diagnostic procedures.

  8. MAD1L1 Arg558His and MAD2L1 Leu84Met interaction with smoking increase the risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Rong; Chen, Xiaohua; Chen, Xueqin; Zhu, Beibei; Lou, Jiao; Li, Jiaoyuan; Shen, Na; Yang, Yang; Gong, Yajie; Zhu, Ying; Yuan, Jing; Xia, Xiaoping; Miao, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) has been established as an important mechanism of driving aneuploidy, which occurs at a high frequency in the colorectal tumorigenesis. Two important components of SAC are MAD1L1 and MAD2L1, which function together in an interactive manner to initiate the checkpoint signal. We hypothesize that genetic variants in the binding domains of MAD1L1 and MAD2L1 may modulate protein structures and eventually contribute to CRC susceptibility. A case-control study including 710 CRC cases and 735 controls was performed to examine MAD1L1 Arg558His and MAD2L1 Leu84Met’s conferring susceptibility to CRC. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assays were applied to assess the effect of two functional variants on chromosomal instability (CIN). Significant associations with CRC risk were observed for MAD1L1 Arg558His (OR = 1.38,95% CI: 1.09–1.75) and MAD2L1 Leu84Met in a dominant model (OR = 1.48,95% CI: 1.09–2.01). Moreover, significant multiplicative gene-smoking interactions were found in MAD1L1 Arg558His (P = 0.019) and MAD2L184 Leu/Met (P = 0.016) to enhance CRC risk. Additionally, the frequencies of lymphocytic micro-nucleated binucleated cells for MAD1L1 Arg558His polymorphism were significantly different in the exposed group (P = 0.013), but not in the control group. The study emphasized that MAD1L1 Arg558His and MAD2L1 Leu84Met can significantly interact with smoking to enhance CRC risk, and the genetic effects of MAD1L1Arg558His on CIN need to be further clarified in follow-up studies. PMID:26183163

  9. Breast Cancer Risk – Genes, Environment and Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Fasching, P. A.; Ekici, A. B.; Adamietz, B. R.; Wachter, D. L.; Hein, A.; Bayer, C. M.; Häberle, L.; Loehberg, C. R.; Jud, S. M.; Heusinger, K.; Rübner, M.; Rauh, C.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.

    2011-01-01

    The information available about breast cancer risk factors has increased dramatically during the last 10 years. In particular, studies of low-penetrance genes and mammographic density have improved our understanding of breast cancer risk. In addition, initial steps have been taken in investigating interactions between genes and environmental factors. This review concerns with actual data on this topic. Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) with a case–control design, as well as large-scale validation studies, have identified and validated more than a dozen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer risk. They are located not only in or close to genes known to be involved in cancer pathogenesis, but also in genes not previously associated with breast cancer pathogenesis, or may even not be related to any genes. SNPs have also been identified that alter the lifetime risk in BRCA mutation carriers. With regard to nongenetic risk factors, studies of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have revealed important information on how to weigh up the risks and benefits of HRT. Mammographic density (MD) has become an accepted and important breast cancer risk factor. Lifestyle and nutritional considerations have become an integral part of most studies of breast cancer risk, and some improvements have been made in this field as well. More than 10 years after the publication of the first breast cancer prevention studies with tamoxifen, other substances such as raloxifene and aromatase inhibitors have been investigated and have also been shown to have preventive potential. Finally, mammographic screening systems have been implemented in most Western countries during the last decade. These may be developed further by including more individualized methods of predicting the patientʼs breast cancer risk. PMID:25253900

  10. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and associations with cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Goode, Ellen L; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Potter, John D

    2002-12-01

    Common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may alter protein function and an individual's capacity to repair damaged DNA; deficits in repair capacity may lead to genetic instability and carcinogenesis. To establish our overall understanding of possible in vivo relationships between DNA repair polymorphisms and the development of cancer, we performed a literature review of epidemiological studies that assessed associations between such polymorphisms and risk of cancer. Thirty studies of polymorphisms in OGG1, XRCC1, ERCC1, XPC, XPD, XPF, BRCA2, and XRCC3 were identified in the April 30, 2002 MEDLINE database (National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubMed Database: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez). These studies focused on adult glioma, bladder cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer (melanoma and nonmelanoma), squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and stomach cancer. We found that a small proportion of the published studies were large and population-based. Nonetheless, published data were consistent with associations between: (a) the OGG1 S326C variant and increased risk of various types of cancer; (b) the XRCC1 R194W variant and reduced risk of various types of cancer; and (c) the BRCA2 N372H variant and increased risk of breast cancer. Suggestive results were seen for polymorphisms in other genes; however, small sample sizes may have contributed to false-positive or false-negative findings. We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of cancer in the presence of reduced DNA repair capacity.

  11. Sexual behaviour, STDs and risks for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, R B; Pottern, L M; Strickler, H; Rabkin, C; Pope, V; Swanson, G M; Greenberg, R S; Schoenberg, J B; Liff, J; Schwartz, A G; Hoover, R N; Fraumeni, J F

    2000-01-01

    A population-based case-control study was carried out among 981 men (479 black, 502 white) with pathologically confirmed prostate cancer and 1315 controls (594 black, 721 white). In-person interviews elicited information on sexual behaviour and other potential risk factors for prostate cancer. Blood was drawn for serologic studies in a subset of the cases (n = 276) and controls (n = 295). Prostate cancer risk was increased among men who reported a history of gonorrhoea or syphilis (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6; 95% confidence internal (CI) 1.2–2.1) or showed serological evidence of syphilis (MHA-TP) (OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.0–3.5). Patterns of risk for gonorrhoea and syphilis were similar for blacks (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.2–2.2) and whites (OR = 1.6; 95% CI 0.8–3.2). Risks increased with increasing occurrences of gonorrhoea, rising to OR = 3.3 (95% CI 1.4–7.8) among subjects with three or more events (Ptrend= 0.0005). Frequent sexual encounters with prostitutes and failure to use condoms were also associated with increased risk. Syphilis, gonorrhoea, sex with prostitutes and unprotected sexual intercourse may be indicators of contact with a sexually transmissible factor that increases the risk of prostate cancer. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682688

  12. Cancer Risk Assessment for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. This is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within any given clinically normal individual. The radiation health research priorities for enabling long-duration human exploration of space were established in the 1996 NRC Report entitled "Radiation Hazards to Crews of Interplanetary Missions: Biological Issues and Research Strategies". This report emphasized that a 15-fold uncertainty in predicting radiation-induced cancer incidence must be reduced before NASA can commit humans to extended interplanetary missions. That report concluded that the great majority of this uncertainty is biologically based, while a minority is physically based due to uncertainties in radiation dosimetry and radiation transport codes. Since that report, the biologically based uncertainty has remained large, and the relatively small uncertainty associated with radiation dosimetry has increased due to the considerations raised by concepts of microdosimetry. In a practical sense, however, the additional uncertainties introduced by microdosimetry are encouraging since they are in a direction of lowered effective dose absorbed through infrequent interactions of any given cell with the high energy particle component of space radiation. The biological uncertainty in predicting cancer risk for space radiation derives from two primary facts. 1) One animal tumor study has been reported that includes a relevant spectrum of particle radiation energies, and that is the Harderian gland model in mice. Fact #1: Extension of cancer risk from animal models, and especially from a single study in an animal model, to humans is inherently uncertain. 2) One human database

  13. Tool Weighs Benefits, Risks of Raloxifene or Tamoxifen to Prevent Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have developed a benefit-risk index to help guide decisions on whether postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer should take raloxifene or tamoxifen to reduce that risk.

  14. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wook Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, the incidence of thyroid cancer has rapidly increased worldwide. Thyroid cancer incidence is relatively high in regions where the population's daily iodine intake is insufficient. While low dietary iodine has been considered as a risk factor for thyroid cancer development, previous studies found controversial results across different food types. Among different ethnic groups, dietary factors are influenced by various dietary patterns, eating habits, life-styles, nutrition, and other environmental factors. This review reports the association between dietary factors and thyroid cancer risk among ethnic groups living in different geologic regions. Iodine-rich food such as fish and shellfish may provide a protective role in populations with insufficient daily iodine intake. The consumption of goitrogenic food, such as cruciferous vegetables, showed a positive association with risk. While considered to be a risk factor for other cancers, alcohol intake showed a protective role against thyroid cancer. High consumption of meat such as chicken, pork, and poultry showed a positive association with the risk, but dairy products showed no significant association. Regular use of multivitamins and dietary nitrate and nitrite also showed a positive association with thyroid cancer risk. However, the study results are inconsistent and investigations into the mechanism for how dietary factors change thyroid hormone levels and influence thyroid function are required. PMID:25136535

  15. Communicating cancer risk in print journalism.

    PubMed

    Brody, J E

    1999-01-01

    The current barrage of information about real and potential cancer risks has created undue fears and misplaced concerns about cancer hazards faced by Americans. Most members of the general public are far more worried about minuscule, hypothetical risks presented by environmental contaminants than about the far greater well-established hazards that they inflict on themselves, for example, through smoking, dietary imbalance, and inactivity. It is the job of the print media to help set the record straight and to help place in perspective the myriad cancer risks that are aired almost weekly in 30-second radio and television broadcasts.

  16. Stomach Cancer Risk After Treatment for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Dores, Graça M.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Lynch, Charles F.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hall, Per; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Hodgson, David C.; Storm, Hans H.; Johannesen, Tom Børge; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Andersson, Michael; Fossa, Sophie D.; Hauptmann, Michael; Holowaty, Eric J.; Joensuu, Heikki; Kaijser, Magnus; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Langmark, Frøydis; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Travis, Lois B.; Aleman, Berthe M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear. Patients and Methods We conducted an international case-control study of stomach cancer nested in a cohort of 19,882 HL survivors diagnosed from 1953 to 2003, including 89 cases and 190 matched controls. For each patient, we quantified cumulative doses of specific alkylating agents (AAs) and reconstructed radiation dose to the stomach tumor location. Results Stomach cancer risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach (Ptrend < .001) and with increasing number of AA-containing chemotherapy cycles (Ptrend = .02). Patients who received both radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy and high-dose procarbazine (≥ 5,600 mg/m2) had strikingly elevated stomach cancer risk (25 cases, two controls; odds ratio [OR], 77.5; 95% CI, 14.7 to 1452) compared with those who received radiation < 25 Gy and procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m2 (Pinteraction < .001). Risk was also elevated (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.4) among patients who received radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy but procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m2; however, no procarbazine-related risk was evident with radiation < 25 Gy. Treatment with dacarbazine also increased stomach cancer risk (12 cases, nine controls; OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 2.1 to 46.6), after adjustment for radiation and procarbazine doses. Conclusion Patients with HL who received subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy had dose-dependent increased risk of stomach cancer, with marked risks for patients who also received chemotherapy containing high-dose procarbazine. For current patients, risks and benefits of exposure to both procarbazine and subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy should be weighed carefully. For patients treated previously, GI symptoms should be evaluated promptly. PMID:23980092

  17. Height-related risk factors for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Norrish, A E; McRae, C U; Holdaway, I M; Jackson, R T

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that adult height is positively associated with the risk of prostate cancer. The authors carried out a population-based case-control study involving 317 prostate cancer cases and 480 controls to further investigate the possibility that height is more strongly associated with advanced, compared with localized forms of this disease. Since the inherited endocrine factors, which in part determine height attained during the growing years, may influence the risk of familial prostate cancer later in life, the relationship with height was also investigated for familial versus sporadic prostate cancers. Adult height was not related to the risk of localized prostate cancer, but there was a moderate positive association between increasing height and the risk of advanced cancer (relative risk (RR) = 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-2.73, upper versus lowest quartile, P-trend = 0.07). Height was more strongly associated with the risk of prostate cancer in men with a positive family history compared with those reporting a negative family history. The RR of advanced prostate cancer for men in the upper height quartile with a positive family history was 7.41 (95% CI 1.68-32.67, P-trend = 0.02) compared with a reference group comprised of men in the shortest height quartile with a negative family history. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels did not correlate with height amongst men with familial or sporadic prostate cancers. These findings provide evidence for the existence of growth-related risk factors for prostate cancer, particularly for advanced and familial forms of this disease. The possible existence of inherited mechanisms affecting both somatic and tumour growth deserves further investigation.

  18. Gastric cancer risk factors in subjects with family history.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S E; Ferraroni, M; La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A

    1997-02-01

    Until now, it has been unclear whether there are differences in various risk factor profiles for familial gastric cancer, i.e., gastric cancer among subjects with a family history of the disease. A total of 722 gastric cancer patients and 2024 controls were admitted between 1985 and 1992 to a network of hospitals in the Greater Milan area. Of these, 88 cases and 103 controls who reported a family history of gastric cancer in first degree relatives were considered in the present analysis. There was no relationship between gastric cancer risk and tobacco smoking or alcohol drinking. Shorter duration of electrical refrigerator use was related to a nonsignificant increased risk and a high daily meal frequency was associated with an increased gastric cancer risk. Significant direct trends of risk were observed for pasta (odds ratio, OR = 4.20 for the highest versus the lowest tertile), bread (OR, 2.86), red meat (OR, 3.38), and preserved meat (OR, 1.90). Inverse associations were observed for increasing consumption of selected vegetables and fruits, chiefly peppers (OR = 0.31), total fruits (OR, 0.47), and citrus fruits (OR, 0.38). With reference to selected micronutrients, a significant inverse trend in risk with increasing consumption for beta-carotene (OR, 0.27) and ascorbic acid (OR, 0.20) was observed. These results suggest that dietary risk factors for subjects with a family history of gastric cancer in first-degree relatives are not appreciably different from well-established risk factors of the disease in the general population.

  19. Variation in female breast cancer risk by occupation.

    PubMed

    Coogan, P F; Clapp, R W; Newcomb, P A; Mittendorf, R; Bogdan, G; Baron, J A; Longnecker, M P

    1996-10-01

    Data from a population-based case control study were used to estimate occupation-specific relative risks for female breast cancer, adjusted for established breast cancer risk factors. Breast cancer cases under age 75 were identified from tumor registries in four states. Controls were randomly selected from driver's license and Medicare beneficiary lists. Information on usual occupation and risk factors was obtained by telephone interview. Odds ratios from logistic regression adjusted for age, state, body mass index, benign breast disease, family history of breast cancer, menopausal status, age at menarche, parity, age of first birth, lactation history, education, and alcohol consumption were calculated for each of 26 occupational groups. Complete occupational information was obtained for 6,835 cases and 9,453 controls. Of 26 occupational groups, only "administrative support occupations" had a statistically significantly increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.06-1.24). In these data, no specific occupational group had an unusual risk of breast cancer. Increased risks reported elsewhere for nurses and teachers were not corroborated.

  20. Cancer Risks Associated with External Radiation From Diagnostic Imaging Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Linet, Martha S.; Slovis, Thomas L.; Miller, Donald L.; Kleinerman, Ruth; Lee, Choonsik; Rajaraman, Preetha; de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington

    2012-01-01

    The 600% increase in medical radiation exposure to the US population since 1980 has provided immense benefit, but potential future cancer risks to patients. Most of the increase is from diagnostic radiologic procedures. The objectives of this review are to summarize epidemiologic data on cancer risks associated with diagnostic procedures, describe how exposures from recent diagnostic procedures relate to radiation levels linked with cancer occurrence, and propose a framework of strategies to reduce radiation from diagnostic imaging in patients. We briefly review radiation dose definitions, mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis, key epidemiologic studies of medical and other radiation sources and cancer risks, and dose trends from diagnostic procedures. We describe cancer risks from experimental studies, future projected risks from current imaging procedures, and the potential for higher risks in genetically susceptible populations. To reduce future projected cancers from diagnostic procedures, we advocate widespread use of evidence-based appropriateness criteria for decisions about imaging procedures, oversight of equipment to deliver reliably the minimum radiation required to attain clinical objectives, development of electronic lifetime records of imaging procedures for patients and their physicians, and commitment by medical training programs, professional societies, and radiation protection organizations to educate all stakeholders in reducing radiation from diagnostic procedures. PMID:22307864

  1. An analysis of occupational risks for brain cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, R C; Reif, J S; Chang, J C; Davis, J R

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the risks of brain cancer in relation to employment history in a case-control study of 312 cases and 1,248 cancer controls. Subjects were identified through the Missouri Cancer Registry for the period 1984 through 1988. Job classification was based on data routinely abstracted from hospital records. Elevated risks were identified for certain white collar occupations: for men employed in engineering, the odds ratio (OR) = 2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.4, 10.3; for social science professionals, the OR = 6.1; 95% CI = 1.5, 26.1. Among occupations with potential exposure to occupational carcinogens, increased risks were observed for men employed in agricultural crop production (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 2.4), printing and publishing (OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.0, 8.3), and brickmasons and tilesetters (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 0.5, 11.5). Most of elevated brain cancer risks were due to astrocytic cancers, but the excess among agricultural workers occurred in other cell types. No increase in risk was noted for current cigarette smokers (OR = 0.9; 95% CI = 0.7, 1.5) or ex-smokers (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.7, 1.5). This exploratory study indicates a need for further studies of occupational risks of brain cancer. PMID:2297060

  2. Dietary Patterns and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Ying; Shu, Long; Shen, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xu-Jiao; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2017-01-05

    A number of studies have examined the associations between dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk, but the findings have been inconclusive. Herein, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of pancreatic cancer. MEDLINE (provided by the National Library of Medicine) and EBSCO (Elton B. Stephens Company) databases were searched for relevant articles published up to May 2016 that identified common dietary patterns. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were finally included in this meta-analysis. A reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy patterns (odds ratio, OR = 0.86; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.77-0.95; p = 0.004) and light-moderate drinking patterns (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83-0.98; p = 0.02). There was evidence of an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in the highest compared with the lowest categories of western-type pattern (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06-1.45; p = 0.008) and heavy drinking pattern (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.10-1.48; p = 0.002). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that healthy and light-moderate drinking patterns may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas western-type and heavy drinking patterns may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Alcohol Consumption and Gastric Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Baloch, Zulqarnain; He, Ting-Ting; Xia, Xueshan

    2017-01-01

    Background We sought to determine by meta-analysis the relationship between drinking alcohol and the risk of gastric cancer. Material/Methods A systematic Medline search was performed to identify all published reports of drinking alcohol and the associated risk of gastric cancer. Initially we retrieved 2,494 studies, but after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, only ten studies were found to be eligible for our meta-analysis. Results Our meta-analysis showed that alcohol consumption elevated the risk of gastric cancer with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.39 (95% CI 1.20–1.61). Additionally, subgroup analysis showed that only a nested case-control report from Sweden did not support this observation. Subgroup analysis of moderate drinking and heavy drinking also confirmed that drinking alcohol increased the risk of gastric cancer. Publication bias analysis (Begg’s and Egger’s tests) showed p values were more than 0.05, suggesting that the 10 articles included in our analysis did not have a publication bias. Conclusions The results from this meta-analysis support the hypothesis that alcohol consumption can increase the risk of gastric cancer; suggesting that effective moderation of alcohol drinking may reduce the risk of gastric cancer. PMID:28087989

  4. Serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhigang; Liu, Dezhong; Liu, Chun; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Some observational studies have shown that elevated serum selenium levels are associated with reduced prostate cancer risk; however, not all published studies support these results. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Medline, and the Cochrane Library up until September 2016 identified 17 studies suitable for further investigation. A meta-analysis was conducted on these studies to investigate the association between serum selenium levels and subsequent prostate cancer risk. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the overall OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus the lowest levels of serum selenium. We found a pooled OR (95% CI) of 0.76 (0.64, 0.91; P < 0.05). In subgroup analysis, an inverse association between serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk was found in each of case–control studies, current and former smokers, high-grade cancer cases, advanced cancer cases, and different populations. Such correlations were not found for subgroups containing each of cohort studies, nonsmokers, low-grade cancer cases, and early stage cancer cases. In conclusion, our study suggests an inverse relationship between serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk. However, further cohort studies and randomized control trials based on non-Western populations are required. PMID:28151881

  5. Risk of breast cancer in a cohort of infertile women.

    PubMed

    Rossing, M A; Daling, J R; Weiss, N S; Moore, D E; Self, S G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess: (1) the risk of breast cancer associated with use of ovulation-inducing agents (such as clomiphene citrate) as treatment for infertility; and (2) the risk associated with ovulatory abnormalities that result in infertility. We performed a case-cohort study among 3837 women evaluated for infertility at clinics in Seattle, Washington, at some time during 1974-1985. Computer linkage with a population-based tumor registry was used to identify women diagnosed with breast cancer before January 1, 1992. Data regarding infertility testing and treatment were abstracted from the infertility clinic medical records for women who developed breast cancer and a randomly selected subcohort. Twenty-seven women in the cohort developed in situ or invasive breast cancer, in comparison with an expected number of 28.8 cases (standardized incidence ratio, 0.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), ).6-1.4). Infertile women with evidence of an ovulatory abnormality were at a risk of breast cancer similar to that of women whose infertility was believed to be due to other causes. The risk among women who had taken clomiphene was reduced relative to infertile women who had not used this drug (adjusted relative risk, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.2-1.2), but the reduction in risk did not increase with duration of use. The possibility that use of clomiphene as treatment for infertility lowers the risk of breast cancer should be examined in other, larger studies.

  6. Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous ... Information Legislative Activities Hearings & Testimonies Current Congress Legislative History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws ...

  7. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  8. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical care even if there are symptoms. False-positive test results can occur. Screening test results may ... even though no cancer is present. A false-positive test result (one that shows there is cancer ...

  9. Risks of Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical care even if she has symptoms. False-positive test results can occur. Screening test results may ... even though no cancer is present. A false-positive test result (one that shows there is cancer ...

  10. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical care even if there are symptoms. False-positive test results can occur. Screening test results may ... even though no cancer is present. A false-positive test result (one that shows there is cancer ...

  11. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers ...

  12. HIV Infection and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... some subtypes of non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma . Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and some types of anal , penile , vaginal , vulvar , and head and neck cancer . Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and ...

  13. Risk factors for skin cancer among Finnish airline cabin crew.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Katja; Helminen, Mika; Pukkala, Eero; Auvinen, Anssi

    2013-07-01

    Increased incidence of skin cancers among airline cabin crew has been reported in several studies. We evaluated whether the difference in risk factor prevalence between Finnish airline cabin crew and the general population could explain the increased incidence of skin cancers among cabin crew, and the possible contribution of estimated occupational cosmic radiation exposure. A self-administered questionnaire survey on occupational, host, and ultraviolet radiation exposure factors was conducted among female cabin crew members and females presenting the general population. The impact of occupational cosmic radiation dose was estimated in a separate nested case-control analysis among the participating cabin crew (with 9 melanoma and 35 basal cell carcinoma cases). No considerable difference in the prevalence of risk factors of skin cancer was found between the cabin crew (N = 702) and the general population subjects (N = 1007) participating the study. The mean risk score based on all the conventional skin cancer risk factors was 1.43 for cabin crew and 1.44 for general population (P = 0.24). Among the cabin crew, the estimated cumulative cosmic radiation dose was not related to the increased skin cancer risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57-1.00]. The highest plausible risk of skin cancer for estimated cosmic radiation dose was estimated as 9% per 10 mSv. The skin cancer cases had higher host characteristics scores than the non-cases among cabin crew (adjusted OR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.01-2.04). Our results indicate no difference between the female cabin crew and the general female population in the prevalence of factors generally associated with incidence of skin cancer. Exposure to cosmic radiation did not explain the excess of skin cancer among the studied cabin crew in this study.

  14. [Night shift work and cancer risk: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Brudnowska, Joanna; Pepłońska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    About 15-20% of the employees in Europe and in the USA are engaged in shift work that involves night work. Some experimental and observational data indicate that this type of work might lead to circadian disruption, including disruption in the melatonin synthesis - a hormone of anticarcinogenic and antioxidative properties. A hypothesis that there is a potential link between exposure to light at night and the risk of breast cancer was formulated for the first time by Stevens in 1987. Since then, relatively few epidemiological studies have been carried out in this area (15 studies including 8 cohort and 7 case-control studies). All of them are reviewed in this article. The majority of the epidemiological studies performed to date have focused on the association between shift work and breast cancer risk, few studies have reported an increased risk of other cancers, including colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, prostate cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In six out of ten studies, a statistically significant association between night shift work and risk of breast cancer has been shown (OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.5 in nurses in Norway with > 30 years of night shift work). The increased cancer risk has been reported in nurses, radio-telephone operators, flight attendants, and women employed in the enterprises, in which 60% of employees work at night. Most of the analyses have been based on the data from the registries, with limited potential for the exposure assessment and confounders adjustment. Although some epidemiological studies suggest an increased risk of breast cancer among nurses, we are still far from drawing final conclusions. Therefore, further epidemiological studies are warranted.

  15. Cancer Risk Map for the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss calculations of the median and 95th percentile cancer risks on the surface of Mars for different solar conditions. The NASA Space Radiation Cancer Risk 2010 model is used to estimate gender and age specific cancer incidence and mortality risks for astronauts exploring Mars. Organ specific fluence spectra and doses for large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) at various levels of solar activity are simulated using the HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code, and the 2010 version of the Badhwar and O Neill GCR model. The NASA JSC propensity model of SPE fluence and occurrence is used to consider upper bounds on SPE fluence for increasing mission lengths. In the transport of particles through the Mars atmosphere, a vertical distribution of Mars atmospheric thickness is calculated from the temperature and pressure data of Mars Global Surveyor, and the directional cosine distribution is implemented to describe the spherically distributed atmospheric distance along the slant path at each elevation on Mars. The resultant directional shielding by Mars atmosphere at each elevation is coupled with vehicle and body shielding for organ dose estimates. Astronaut cancer risks are mapped on the global topography of Mars, which was measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter. Variation of cancer risk on the surface of Mars is due to a 16-km elevation range, and the large difference is obtained between the Tharsis Montes (Ascraeus, Pavonis, and Arsia) and the Hellas impact basin. Cancer incidence risks are found to be about 2-fold higher than mortality risks with a disproportionate increase in skin and thyroid cancers for all astronauts and breast cancer risk for female astronauts. The number of safe days on Mars to be below radiation limits at the 95th percent confidence level is reported for several Mission design scenarios.

  16. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Donkena, Krishna Vanaja; Young, Charles Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention. PMID:21991434

  17. Estimating cancer risks to adults undergoing body CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; He, Wenjun

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to estimate cancer risks from the amount of radiation used to perform body computed tomography (CT) examination. The ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator was used to compute values of organ doses for adult body CT examinations. The radiation used to perform each examination was quantified by the dose-length product (DLP). Patient organ doses were converted into corresponding age and sex dependent cancer risks using data from BEIR VII. Results are presented for cancer risks per unit DLP and unit effective dose for 11 sensitive organs, as well as estimates of the contribution from 'other organs'. For patients who differ from a standard sized adult, correction factors based on the patient weight and antero-posterior dimension are provided to adjust organ doses and the corresponding risks. At constant incident radiation intensity, for CT examinations that include the chest, risks for females are markedly higher than those for males, whereas for examinations that include the pelvis, risks in males were slightly higher than those in females. In abdominal CT scans, risks for males and female patients are very similar. For abdominal CT scans, increasing the patient age from 20 to 80 resulted in a reduction in patient risks of nearly a factor of 5. The average cancer risk for chest/abdomen/pelvis CT examinations was ∼26 % higher than the cancer risk caused by 'sensitive organs'. Doses and radiation risks in 80 kg adults were ∼10 % lower than those in 70 kg patients. Cancer risks in body CT can be estimated from the examination DLP by accounting for sex, age, as well as patient physical characteristics.

  18. Cancer risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Cote, I L; Bayard, S P

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene. The assessment focuses on estimation of increased cancer risk to populations living near industrial sources of 1,3-butadiene emissions rather than occupationally exposed populations. Incremental cancer risk estimates based on extrapolation from laboratory animal data are presented. Pharmacokinetic data published since the EPA's 1985 assessment are incorporated, which somewhat alters the earlier assessment of cancer risk. Characterization of emission sources, estimates of ambient air concentrations, and population exposure are also discussed. The estimate presented in this paper of excess cancer cases resulting from point source exposure to 1,3-butadiene is decreased to approximately 40% of the estimate published in 1985 from 6.4 in 10 to 2.5 chances in 10 for a lifetime exposure to 1 ppm. The current estimate is no more than eight additional cancer incidences in the general population. Increased risk to the most exposed individuals is not anticipated to be greater than 1 in 10. This reduction in the risk estimate is due to a change in the estimate of 1,3-butadiene potency (i.e., incremental unit risk estimate) based on incorporation of new pharmacokinetic data. PMID:2205485

  19. Insulin-Sensitizers, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Gynaecological Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lauretta, Rosa; Lanzolla, Giulia; Vici, Patrizia; Mariani, Luciano; Moretti, Costanzo

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical, early phase clinical trials and epidemiological evidence support the potential role of insulin-sensitizers in cancer prevention and treatment. Insulin-sensitizers improve the metabolic and hormonal profile in PCOS patients and may also act as anticancer agents, especially in cancers associated with hyperinsulinemia and oestrogen dependent cancers. Several lines of evidence support the protection against cancer exerted by dietary inositol, in particular inositol hexaphosphate. Metformin, thiazolidinediones, and myoinositol postreceptor signaling may exhibit direct inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. AMPK, the main molecular target of metformin, is emerging as a target for cancer prevention and treatment. PCOS may be correlated to an increased risk for developing ovarian and endometrial cancer (up to threefold). Several studies have demonstrated an increase in mortality rate from ovarian cancer among overweight/obese PCOS women compared with normal weight women. Long-term use of metformin has been associated with lower rates of ovarian cancer. Considering the evidence supporting a higher risk of gynaecological cancer in PCOS women, we discuss the potential use of insulin-sensitizers as a potential tool for chemoprevention, hypothesizing a possible rationale through which insulin-sensitizers may inhibit tumourigenesis. PMID:27725832

  20. Use of mobile phones and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ayanda, Olushola S; Baba, Alafara A; Ayanda, Omolola T

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phones work by transmitting and receiving radio frequency microwave radiation. The radio frequency (RF) emitted by mobile phones is stronger than FM radio signal which are known to cause cancer. Though research and evidence available on the risk of cancer by mobile phones does not provide a clear and direct support that mobile phones cause cancers. Evidence does not also support an association between exposure to radio frequency and microwave radiation from mobile phones and direct effects on health. It is however clear that lack of available evidence of cancer as regards the use of mobile phone should not be interpreted as proof of absence of cancer risk, so that excessive use of mobile phones should be taken very seriously and with caution to prevent cancer.

  1. Occupation and risk of stomach cancer in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Krstev, S; Dosemeci, M; Lissowska, J; Chow, W; Zatonski, W; Ward, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: In spite of the dramatic decline in the incidence of stomach cancer in the twentieth century, Poland has one of the highest rates in the world. Aims: To evaluate the risk of stomach cancer by grouped occupations and industries, as well as by some specific occupational exposures. Methods: Cases (n = 443) were newly diagnosed with stomach adenocarcinomas between 1994 and 1996. Controls (n = 479) were randomly selected from the general population in Warsaw. Results: Only a few occupations and industries were associated with significantly increased risks of stomach cancer. The most suggestive finding was for work in the leather goods industry. Risk was also significantly increased among men working in fabricated metal production and among women ever employed as managers and governmental officials. Men ever employed as teaching professionals and women employed as technical and science professionals had significantly decreased risks of stomach cancer. Among men, a significant positive trend in risk with duration of employment was observed for work in the leather industry and special trade construction. No significantly increased risks were observed for specific exposures assessed by a job-exposure matrix or by self-reports. However among men there were non-significantly increased risks with 10 or more years exposure to asbestos, metal dust, and nitrosamines assessed by a job-exposure matrix. Conclusions: Employment in the leather goods industry, special trade construction, and metal fabrication was associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer among men. However, there were only weak associations with specific exposures. Occupational exposures do not contribute substantially to the high rates of stomach cancer in Poland. PMID:15837853

  2. What is breast cancer risk with Depo-Provera?

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    A recent World Health Organization (WHO) study found that women using Depo-Provera have only a slight increased risk of breast cancer. WHO examined case-control data from 5 hospitals in Africa, Mexico, and Thailand. The study revealed a 1.21 relative risk of breast cancer among all women in the study who had used Depo-Provera (a relative risk of 1.0 means that there is neither an increased or decreased likelihood to develop the disease in question). A relative risk of 1.21 indicates that there is a 21% increased likelihood of developing the disease, but any relative risk of less than 2.0 is considered slight. The study also found that among the diagnosed breast cancer cases, 12.5% had ever used Depo-Provera, compared to 12.2% among the control patients. Although an increased risk of breast cancer among women--especially women under 35--within the first 4 years of exposure to Depo-Provera was found, the risk did not increase with the duration of use, and it did not increase among women who had used the drug for more than 5 years. WHO explains that the risk of breast cancer among Depo-Provera user is similar to that found among oral contraceptives users, whose relative risk ranges from 1.0-1.42. Based on their findings, WHO investigators estimate that there would be 7-8 new cases of breast cancer per 100,000 Depo-Provera users annually, compared to 5 new cases annually among women who had not used the drug. As a recent commentary by Family Health International (FHI) points out, this increased risk of breast cancer must be weighted against the benefits provided by Depo-Provera. FHI concludes that there is a net gain for women using Depo-Provera, since despite the slight risk of breast cancer, it would result in a higher life expectancy compared to women not using contraception.

  3. Cancer risks related to electricity production.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, P; Cardis, E; Vainio, H; Coleman, M P; Kogevinas, M; Nordberg, G; Parkin, D M; Partensky, C; Shuker, D; Tomatis, L

    1991-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has previously evaluated the cancer risks associated with fossil fuel-based industrial processes such as coal gastification and coke production, substances and mixtures such as coal tars, coal tar pitch and mineral oils, and a number of substances emitted from fossil-fuelled plants such as benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, nickel, lead and formaldehyde. Based on these evaluations and other evidence from the literature, the carcinogenic risks to the general population and occupational groups from the fossil fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle and renewable cycles are reviewed. Cancer risks from waste disposal, accidents and misuses, and electricity distribution are also considered. No cycle appears to be totally free from cancer risk, but the quantification of the effects of such exposures (in particular of those involving potential exposure to large amounts of carcinogens, such as coal, oil and nuclear) requires the application of methods which are subject to considerable margins of error. Uncertainties due to inadequate data and unconfirmed assumptions are discussed. Cancer risks related to the operation of renewable energy sources are negligible, although there may be some risks from construction of such installations. The elements of knowledge at our disposal do not encourage any attempt toward a quantitative comparative risk assessment. However, even in the absence of an accurate quantification of risk, qualitative indication of carcinogenic hazards should lead to preventive measures.

  4. The readability of online breast cancer risk assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Sarah; Milbrandt, Melissa; Kaphingst, Kimberly; James, Aimee; Colditz, Graham

    2015-11-01

    Numerous breast cancer risk assessment tools that allow users to input personal risk information and obtain a personalized breast cancer risk estimate are available on the Internet. The goal of these tools is to increase screening awareness and identify modifiable health behaviors; however, the utility of this risk information is limited by the readability of the material. We undertook this study to assess the overall readability of breast cancer risk assessment tools and accompanying information, as well as to identify areas of suggested improvement. We searched for breast cancer risk assessment tools, using five search terms, on three search engines. All searches were performed on June 12, 2014. Sites that met inclusion criteria were then assessed for readability using the suitability assessment of materials (SAM) and the SMOG readability formula (July 1, 2014–January 31, 2015). The primary outcomes are the frequency distribution of overall SAM readability category (superior, adequate, or not suitable) and mean SMOG reading grade level. The search returned 42 sites were eligible for assessment, only 9 (21.4 %) of which achieved an overall SAM superior rating, and 27 (64.3 %) were deemed adequate. The average SMOG reading grade level was grade 12.1 (SD 1.6, range 9–15). The readability of breast cancer risk assessment tools and the sites that host them is an important barrier to risk communication. This study demonstrates that most breast cancer risk assessment tools are not accessible to individuals with limited health literacy skills. More importantly, this study identifies potential areas of improvement and has the potential to heighten a physician’s awareness of the Internet resources a patient might navigate in their quest for breast cancer risk information.

  5. Alcohol intake and cigarette smoking and risk of a contralateral breast cancer: The Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julia A; Bernstein, Leslie; Largent, Joan; Capanu, Marinela; Begg, Colin B; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Lynch, Charles F; Malone, Kathleen E; Reiner, Anne S; Liang, Xiaolin; Haile, Robert W; Boice, John D; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2009-04-15

    Women with primary breast cancer are at increased risk of developing second primary breast cancer. Few studies have evaluated risk factors for the development of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer in women with breast cancer. In the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study (1985-2001), the roles of alcohol and smoking were examined in 708 women with asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (cases) compared with 1,399 women with unilateral breast cancer (controls). Cases and controls aged less than 55 years at first breast cancer diagnosis were identified from 5 population-based cancer registries in the United States and Denmark. Controls were matched to cases on birth year, diagnosis year, registry region, and race and countermatched on radiation treatment. Risk factor information was collected by telephone interview. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by using conditional logistic regression. Ever regular drinking was associated with an increased risk of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (rate ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.0, 1.6), and the risk increased with increasing duration (P = 0.03). Smoking was not related to asynchronous contralateral breast cancer. In this, the largest study of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer to date, alcohol is a risk factor for the disease, as it is for a first primary breast cancer.

  6. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer...and that this risk differed between men who took finasteride versus those who took the placebo. The strongest association was seen for a cluster of 9...SNPs in NPAS2, which was associated with total prostate cancer risk in the finasteride group but not in the placebo group. The most significant NPAS2

  7. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer. In Year 3 of the...risk. Our study is nested within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride

  8. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer – either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents. PMID:25520574

  9. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco.

    PubMed

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Qadir, M Imran; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer - either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents.

  10. Alcohol and risk of breast cancer in Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Jeannette M.; Coronado, Gloria D.; Livaudais, Jennifer; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Romieu, Isabelle; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the relationship between alcohol intake and breast cancer risk among Mexican women. This association may be modified by folate and Vitamin B12. METHODS A population-based case control study conducted in Mexico recruited 1000 incident breast cancer cases aged 35–69 and 1074 controls matched on age, region, and health care system. In-person interviews were conducted to assess breast cancer risk factors and recent diet using a food frequency questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression models estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Over one-half (57%) of cases and less than one-half of controls (45%) reported any lifetime alcohol consumption. Compared with never drinkers, women reporting ever drinking (Adjusted OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.99–1.58) had a greater odds of breast cancer. There was evidence for interaction in the association between ever consuming any alcohol and breast cancer by folate (p for interaction=0.04) suggesting women with lower folate intake had a higher odds of breast cancer (Adjusted OR=1.99, 95% CI= 1.26–3.16) compared to women with higher folate intake (OR=1.12, 95% CI = 0.69–1.83). CONCLUSIONS Our findings support emerging evidence that any alcohol intake increases risk of breast cancer. Insufficient intake of folate may further elevate risk for developing breast cancer among women who consume alcohol. PMID:20155314

  11. Coffee and cancer risk, epidemiological evidence, and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2014-05-01

    Although early studies suggested that coffee consumption might increase risk of some cancers, more comprehensive epidemiological and experimental data now generally indicate either neutral or beneficial effects. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for associations between breast, prostate, colorectal, and liver cancers and the consumption of coffee, and discuss the experimental evidence for potential chemopreventive mechanisms of coffee and coffee constituents. The epidemiological evidence consistently indicates that coffee protects against liver cancer, and also point toward protective effects for risk of colorectal cancers (with relative risks of 0.50 (95% CI: 0.42-0.59) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75-0.92), respectively, in the most recent meta-analyses). There seems to be no association between the overall risk of breast and prostate cancer and coffee intake. However, for subgroups such as postmenopausal breast cancers, advanced prostate cancers, and breast and prostate cancer survivors, an inverse association with coffee intake is indicated. Potential mechanisms for chemopreventive effects of coffee phytochemicals includes inhibition of oxidative stress and oxidative damage, regulation of DNA repair, phase II enzymatic activity, apoptosis, inflammation, as well as having antiproliferative, antiangiogenetic effects and antimetastatic effects. The experimental evidence for effects of coffee and coffee constituents on each of these processes is discussed.

  12. Young women's responses to smoking and breast cancer risk information

    PubMed Central

    Bottorff, Joan L.; McKeown, Stephanie Barclay; Carey, Joanne; Haines, Rebecca; Okoli, Chizimuzo; Johnson, Kenneth C.; Easley, Julie; Ferrence, Roberta; Baillie, Lynne; Ptolemy, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Current evidence confirms that young women who smoke or who have regular long-term exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) have an increased risk of developing premenopausal breast cancer. The aim of this research was to examine the responses of young women to health information about the links between active smoking and SHS exposure and breast cancer and obtain their advice about messaging approaches. Data were collected in focus groups with 46 women, divided in three age cohorts: 15–17, 18–19 and 20–24 and organized according to smoking status (smoking, non-smoking and mixed smoking status groups). The discussion questions were preceded by information about passive and active smoking and its associated breast cancer risk. The study findings show young women's interest in this risk factor for breast cancer. Three themes were drawn from the analysis: making sense of the information on smoking and breast cancer, personal susceptibility and tobacco exposure and suggestions for increasing awareness about tobacco exposure and breast cancer. There was general consensus on framing public awareness messages about this risk factor on ‘protecting others’ from breast cancer to catch smokers’ attention, providing young women with the facts and personal stories of breast cancer to help establish a personal connection with this information and overcome desensitization related to tobacco messages, and targeting all smokers who may place young women at risk. Cautions were also raised about the potential for stigmatization. Implications for raising awareness about this modifiable risk factor for breast cancer are discussed. PMID:20080807

  13. The Distinct Role of Comparative Risk Perceptions in a Breast Cancer Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Amanda J.; Ubel, Peter A.; Smith, Dylan M.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Nair, Vijay; Derry, Holly A.; Zhang, Aijun; Pitsch, Rosemarie K.; Alford, Sharon Hensley; McClure, Jennifer B.; Fagerlin, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparative risk perceptions may rival other types of information in terms of effects on health behavior decisions. Purpose We examined associations between comparative risk perceptions, affect, and behavior while controlling for absolute risk perceptions and actual risk. Methods Women at an increased risk of breast cancer participated in a program to learn about tamoxifen which can reduce the risk of breast cancer. Women reported comparative risk perceptions of breast cancer and completed measures of anxiety, knowledge, and tamoxifen-related behavior intentions. Three months later, women reported their behavior. Results Comparative risk perceptions were positively correlated with anxiety, knowledge, intentions, and behavior three months later. After controlling for participants’ actual risk of breast cancer and absolute risk perceptions, comparative risk perceptions predicted anxiety and knowledge, but not intentions or behavior. Conclusions Comparative risk perceptions can affect patient outcomes like anxiety and knowledge independently of absolute risk perceptions and actual risk information. PMID:21698518

  14. [Risk of cancer among Danish electricity workers. A cohort study].

    PubMed

    Johansen, C; Olsen, J H

    1999-04-05

    We report the incidence of cancer in a large cohort of employees identified from all 99 Danish utility companies. Personal data, and information on employment and exposure to magnetic fields and asbestos were obtained from manual files at the companies, the Danish Supplementary Pension Fund and the public payroll administration. A total of 32,006 individuals with more than three months of employment were linked with the files of the Danish Cancer Registry. Overall, 3008 cancers were observed, with 2825 expected, yielding a small but significantly increased risk of 1.06 (95% CI, 1.03-1.10). No excess was observed for all leukemias or for cancers of the brain or breast among men or women. There was no association of electromagnetic field exposure with risk of these cancers even when the level and length of exposure to magnetic fields were taken into account. Increased risks for cancers of the lung and pleural cavity were seen mainly for workers whose jobs involve exposure to asbestos. Our results do not support the hypothesis of an association between occupational exposures to magnetic fields in the electric utility industry and the risk for cancer.

  15. Visceral adiposity, insulin resistance and cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a well established link between obesity and cancer. Emerging research is characterising this relationship further and delineating the specific role of excess visceral adiposity, as opposed to simple obesity, in promoting tumorigenesis. This review summarises the evidence from an epidemiological and pathophysiological perspective. Methods Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Results Numerous epidemiological studies consistently identify increased risk of developing carcinoma in the obese. Adipose tissue, particularly viscerally located fat, is metabolically active and exerts systemic endocrine effects. Putative pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and carcinogenesis include the paracrine effects of adipose tissue and systemic alterations associated with obesity. Systemic changes in the obese state include chronic inflammation and alterations in adipokines and sex steroids. Insulin and the insulin-like growth factor axis influence tumorigenesis and also have a complex relationship with adiposity. There is evidence to suggest that insulin and the IGF axis play an important role in mediating obesity associated malignancy. Conclusions There is much evidence to support a role for obesity in cancer progression, however further research is warranted to determine the specific effect of excess visceral adipose tissue on tumorigenesis. Investigation of the potential mechanisms underpinning the association, including the role of insulin and the IGF axis, will improve understanding of the obesity and cancer link and may uncover targets for intervention. PMID:21696633

  16. CLPTM1L polymorphism and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Bian, Xiaonian; Zhao, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    The association of Cleft Lip and Palate Transmembrane Protein 1 (CLPTM1L) rs31489 polymorphism with risk of lung cancer has been evaluated in many studies; however, the results from these studies are controversial. Thus, further analysis on association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and risk of lung cancer is needed among a larger study population. A literature search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Science Direct, SpringerLink, EBSCO, Wanfang, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases was carried out to identify studies investigating the association between lung cancer risk and CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism. The strength of the association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and lung cancer risk was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In the overall analysis, there was significant association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and lung cancer risk under an allele model (OR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.18; P < 0.00001; I(2) = 57%). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity was performed. Stratified analysis by ethnicity showed that a statistically increased cancer risk was found in the Caucasian population (OR = 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10-1.21; P < 0.00001; I(2) = 22%), but there was no significant association between lung cancer risk and CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism in the Asian population (OR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.08; P = 0.37; I(2) = 15%). In conclusion, this meta-analysis demonstrates that CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism significantly modified the risk of lung cancer.

  17. CLPTM1L polymorphism and lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Min; Bian, Xiaonian; Zhao, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    The association of Cleft Lip and Palate Transmembrane Protein 1 (CLPTM1L) rs31489 polymorphism with risk of lung cancer has been evaluated in many studies; however, the results from these studies are controversial. Thus, further analysis on association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and risk of lung cancer is needed among a larger study population. A literature search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Science Direct, SpringerLink, EBSCO, Wanfang, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases was carried out to identify studies investigating the association between lung cancer risk and CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism. The strength of the association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and lung cancer risk was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In the overall analysis, there was significant association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and lung cancer risk under an allele model (OR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.18; P < 0.00001; I2 = 57%). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity was performed. Stratified analysis by ethnicity showed that a statistically increased cancer risk was found in the Caucasian population (OR = 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10-1.21; P < 0.00001; I2 = 22%), but there was no significant association between lung cancer risk and CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism in the Asian population (OR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.08; P = 0.37; I2 = 15%). In conclusion, this meta-analysis demonstrates that CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism significantly modified the risk of lung cancer. PMID:26064290

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Vulvar Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is anything that changes a person's chance of getting a disease such as cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. For example, exposing skin to strong sunlight is a risk factor for skin cancer. Smoking ...

  19. Temporal distributions of risk for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Land, C E

    1987-01-01

    Observations of cancer risk in irradiated human populations over time after exposure suggest that there are at least two, and perhaps more, very different patterns of temporal distribution of risk for radiation-induced cancer. The first, exemplified by bone sarcoma following therapeutic injection of 224Ra and chronic granulocytic leukemia in Japanese A-bomb survivors, is an early, wave-like pulse consisting of an increase in risk followed by a gradual decline back to baseline levels. The second, exemplified by breast cancer following a brief exposure to external gamma ray or X ray, and by lung cancer and stomach cancer in A-bomb survivors, is an increase in relative risk over about 10 years to a value which appears to remain constant over time thereafter. The first pattern suggests that tumor growth kinetics may play a central role in the temporal distribution of risk following exposure, while the second seems more consistent with multi-event models for carcinogenesis, in which radiation or some other cause of early events must be followed by one or more later events whose frequencies depend mainly on attained age. There are, however, other data that appear to conform to neither of the two models just mentioned. Influences of other cancer causes, like tobacco smoking, are potentially serious confounding factors in studies of induction period.

  20. Breast cancer risk and participation in mammographic screening.

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, S; Anderman, C; Grothaus, L

    1989-01-01

    Within the context of an organized breast cancer screening program we conducted a prospective evaluation of the relation between breast cancer risk and participation in mammographic screening. The influence on participation of known breast cancer risk factors, as well as a summary risk label, (i.e. "high", or "moderate") were examined. The overall participation rate was 71 percent among 2,422 women, 50 to 79 years of age, invited to a centralized clinic. Multivariate analyses showed participation to be somewhat decreased among women with late menopause and definitely increased among women with any of the following factors: 1) increased age; 2) a family history of breast cancer; and 3) a previous breast biopsy. Women in the high-risk group were most likely to participate but the effect of the label was stronger among women ages 50 to 59 compared to women ages 60 to 79. The study results are generally consistent with previous findings that participants in screening programs have higher rates of breast cancer. The results also suggest the possibility that providing breast cancer risk information may encourage participation in screening. PMID:2817159

  1. Increased risk of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis in cystic fibrosis carriers.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jonathan A; Neoptolemos, John P; Feng, Jinong; Yan, Jin; Jiang, Zefei; Greenhalf, William; McFaul, Christopher; Mountford, Roger; Sommer, Steve S

    2005-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease caused by mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The risk of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) is increased in individuals who have CFTR genotypes containing a CF-causing mutation plus a second pathogenic allele. It is unknown whether the risk of ICP is increased in CF carriers who have one CF-causing mutation plus one normal allele. In this study, 52 sporadic cases of ICP were ascertained through the European Registry of Hereditary Pancreatitis and Familial Pancreatic Cancer. Individuals with pathogenic cationic trypsinogen mutations were excluded. DNA was comprehensively tested for CFTR mutations using a robotically enhanced, multiplexed, and highly redundant form of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by DNA sequencing. Fifteen subjects had a total of 18 pathogenic CFTR alleles. Eight subjects had common CF-causing mutations. This group included seven CF carriers in whom the second CFTR allele was normal (4.3 times the expected frequency, P=0.0002). Three subjects had compound heterozygotes genotypes containing two pathogenic alleles (31 times the expected frequency, P<0.0001). A variant allele of uncertain significance (p.R75Q) was detected in eight of the 52 ICP subjects and at a similar frequency (13/96) in random donors. ICP differs from other established CFTR-related conditions in that ICP risk is increased in CF carriers who have one documented normal CFTR allele. Having two CFTR mutations imparts a higher relative risk, while having only one mutation imparts a higher attributable risk.

  2. Non-dietary environmental risk factors in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrís-i-Tortajada, J; Berbel-Tornero, O; Garcia-i-Castell, J; López-Andreu, J.A.; Sobrino-Najul, E; Ortega-García, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim is to update and disclose the main environmental risk factors, excluding dietary factors, involved in the etiopathology of prostate cancer. Materials and methods Bibliographic review of the last 25 years of non-dietary environmental risk factors associated with prostate cancer between 1985 and 2010, obtained from MedLine, CancerLit, Science Citation Index and Embase. The search profiles were Environmental Risk Factors/Tobacco/Infectious-Inflammatory Factors/Pesticides/Vasectomy/Occupational Exposures/ Chemoprevention Agents/Radiation and Prostate Cancer. Results While some non-dietary environmental risk factors increase the risk of acquiring the disease, others decrease it. Of the former, it is worth mentioning exposal to tobacco smoke, chronic infectious-inflammatory prostatic processes and occupational exposure to cadmium, herbicides and pesticides. The first factors that reduce the risk are the use of chemopreventive drugs (Finasterida, Dutasteride) and exposure to ultraviolet solar radiation. With the current data, a vasectomy does not influence the risk of developing the disease. Conclusions The slow process of prostate carcinogenesis is the final result of the interaction of constitutional risk and environmental factors. Non-dietary environmental factors play an important role in the etiopathology of this disease. To appropriately assess the risk factors, extensive case studies that include all the possible variables must be analyzed. PMID:21439685

  3. Obesity and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of 21 Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Li; Ye, Wei; Tong, Yan; Wang, Hanmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have evaluated the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. However, the results remain uncertain. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Material/Methods Published literature from PubMed, EMBASE, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) were retrieved before 10 August 2014. We included all studies that reported adjusted risk ratios (RRs), hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of thyroid cancer risk. Results Thirty-two studies (n=12 620 676) were included in this meta-analysis. Obesity was associated with a significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer (adjusted RR=1.33; 95% CI, 1.24–1.42; I2=25%). In the subgroup analysis by study type, increased risk of thyroid cancer was found in cohort studies and case-control studies. In subgroup analysis by sex, both obese men and women were at significantly greater risk of thyroid cancer than non-obese subjects. When stratified by ethnicity, significantly elevated risk was observed in Caucasians and in Asians. In the age subgroup analysis, both young and old populations showed increased thyroid cancer risk. Subgroup analysis on smoking status showed that increased thyroid cancer risks were found in smokers and in non-smokers. In the histology subgroup analyses, increased risks of papillary thyroid cancer, follicular thyroid cancer, and anaplastic thyroid cancer were observed. However, obesity was associated with decreased risk of medullary thyroid cancer. Conclusions Our results indicate that obesity is associated with an increased thyroid cancer risk, except medullary thyroid cancer. PMID:25612155

  4. Perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations: relationship to perceptions of cancer preventability, risk, and worry.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul K J; Moser, Richard P; Klein, William M P

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we apply the concept of "ambiguity," as developed in the decision theory literature, to an analysis of potential psychological consequences of uncertainty about cancer prevention recommendations. We used Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2003 data to examine how perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations relates to three other cognitive variables known to influence cancer-protective behavior: perceived cancer preventability, perceived cancer risk, and cancer-related worry. Using logistic regression analyses, we tested several predictions derived from a review of literature on the effects of ambiguity perceptions on decision making, cognitions, and emotions. We found perceived ambiguity to have a strong negative relationship with perceived cancer preventability, consistent with "ambiguity aversion"-a pessimistic bias in the interpretation of ambiguity. Cancer worry moderated this relationship; ambiguity aversion increased with higher levels of worry. At the same time, perceived ambiguity was positively related to both perceived cancer risk and cancer worry. Furthermore, perceived risk partially mediated the relationship between perceived ambiguity and worry. These findings suggest that perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations may have broad and important effects on other health cognitions. We discuss ethical implications of these findings for health communication efforts, and propose a tentative causal model to guide future research.

  5. Perceived Ambiguity About Cancer Prevention Recommendations: Relationship to Perceptions of Cancer Preventability, Risk, and Worry

    PubMed Central

    Han, Paul K. J.; Moser, Richard P.; Klein, William M. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we apply the concept of “ambiguity,” as developed in the decision theory literature, to an analysis of potential psychological consequences of uncertainty about cancer prevention recommendations. We used Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2003 data to examine how perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations relates to three other cognitive variables known to influence cancer-protective behavior: perceived cancer preventability, perceived cancer risk, and cancer-related worry. Using logistic regression analyses, we tested several predictions derived from a review of literature on the effects of ambiguity perceptions on decision making, cognitions, and emotions. We found perceived ambiguity to have a strong negative relationship with perceived cancer preventability, consistent with “ambiguity aversion”—a pessimistic bias in the interpretation of ambiguity. Cancer worry moderated this relationship; ambiguity aversion increased with higher levels of worry. At the same time, perceived ambiguity was positively related to both perceived cancer risk and cancer worry. Furthermore, perceived risk partially mediated the relationship between perceived ambiguity and worry. These findings suggest that perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations may have broad and important effects on other health cognitions. We discuss ethical implications of these findings for health communication efforts, and propose a tentative causal model to guide future research. PMID:16641074

  6. Cancer risk and residential proximity to cranberry cultivation in Massachusetts.

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, A; Ozonoff, D; Coogan, P; Vezina, R; Heeren, T; Zhang, Y

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the relationship between cancer risk and residential proximity to cranberry cultivation. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted. Cases, diagnosed during 1983 through 1986 among residents of the Upper Cape Cod area of Massachusetts, involved incident cancers of the lung (n = 252), breast (n = 265), colon-rectum (n = 326), bladder (n = 63), kidney (n = 35), pancreas (n = 37), and brain (n = 37), along with leukemia (n = 35). Control subjects were randomly selected from among telephone subscribers (n = 184), Medicare beneficiaries (n = 464), and deceased individuals (n = 723). RESULTS: No meaningful increases in risk were seen for any of the cancer sites except for the brain. When latency was considered, subjects who had ever lived within 2600 ft (780 m) of a cranberry bog had a twofold increased risk of brain cancer overall (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.8, 4.9) and a 6.7-fold increased risk of astrocytoma (95% CI = 1.6, 27.8). CONCLUSIONS: Residential proximity to cranberry bog cultivation was not associated with seven of the eight cancers investigated; however, an association was observed with brain cancer, particularly astrocytoma. Larger, more detailed studies are necessary to elucidate this relationship. PMID:8806382

  7. Population Cancer Risks Associated with Coal Mining: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Wiley D.; Christian, W. Jay; Mueller, Georgia; Robbins, K. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Coal is produced across 25 states and provides 42% of US energy. With production expected to increase 7.6% by 2035, proximate populations remain at risk of exposure to carcinogenic coal products such as silica dust and organic compounds. It is unclear if population exposure is associated with increased risk, or even which cancers have been studied in this regard. Methods We performed a systematic review of English-language manuscripts published since 1980 to determine if coal mining exposure was associated with increased cancer risk (incidence and mortality). Results Of 34 studies identified, 27 studied coal mining as an occupational exposure (coal miner cohort or as a retrospective risk factor) but only seven explored health effects in surrounding populations. Overall, risk assessments were reported for 20 cancer site categories, but their results and frequency varied considerably. Incidence and mortality risk assessments were: negative (no increase) for 12 sites; positive for 1 site; and discordant for 7 sites (e.g. lung, gastric). However, 10 sites had only a single study reporting incidence risk (4 sites had none), and 11 sites had only a single study reporting mortality risk (2 sites had none). The ecological study data were particularly meager, reporting assessments for only 9 sites. While mortality assessments were reported for each, 6 had only a single report and only 2 sites had reported incidence assessments. Conclusions The reported assessments are too meager, and at times contradictory, to make definitive conclusions about population cancer risk due to coal mining. However, the preponderance of this and other data support many of Hill’s criteria for causation. The paucity of data regarding population exposure and risk, the widespread geographical extent of coal mining activity, and the continuing importance of coal for US energy, warrant further studies of population exposure and risk. PMID:23977014

  8. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y; Hayes, Richard B

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through chronic inflammation. High-throughput genetic-based assays now make it possible to comprehensively survey the human oral microbiome, the totality of bacteria in the oral cavity. Establishing the association of the oral microbiome with cancer risk may lead to significant advances in understanding of cancer etiology, potentially opening a new research paradigm for cancer prevention.

  9. Risk of second primary cancers after testicular cancer in East and West Germany: a focus on contralateral testicular cancers.

    PubMed

    Rusner, Carsten; Streller, Brigitte; Stegmaier, Christa; Trocchi, Pietro; Kuss, Oliver; McGlynn, Katherine A; Trabert, Britton; Stang, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Testicular cancer survival rates improved dramatically after cisplatin-based therapy was introduced in the 1970s. However, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are potentially carcinogenic. The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of developing second primary cancers including the risk associated with primary histologic type (seminoma and non-seminoma) among testicular cancer survivors in Germany. We identified 16 990 and 1401 cases of testicular cancer in population-based cancer registries of East Germany (1961-1989 and 1996-2008) and Saarland (a federal state in West Germany; 1970-2008), respectively. We estimated the risk of a second primary cancer using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). To determine trends, we plotted model-based estimated annual SIRs. In East Germany, a total of 301 second primary cancers of any location were observed between 1961 and 1989 (SIR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.7-2.1), and 159 cancers (any location) were observed between 1996 and 2008 (SIR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4-2.0). The SIRs for contralateral testicular cancer were increased in the registries with a range from 6.0 in Saarland to 13.9 in East Germany. The SIR for seminoma, in particular, was higher in East Germany compared to the other registries. We observed constant trends in the model-based SIRs for contralateral testicular cancers. The majority of reported SIRs of other cancer sites including histology-specific risks showed low precisions of estimated effects, likely due to small sample sizes. Testicular cancer patients are at increased risk especially for cancers of the contralateral testis and should receive intensive follow-ups.

  10. Risk stratification in prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Roobol, Monique J; Carlsson, Sigrid V

    2013-01-01

    Screening for prostate cancer is a controversial topic within the field of urology. The US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial did not demonstrate any difference in prostate-cancer-related mortality rates between men screened annually rather than on an 'opportunistic' basis. However, in the world's largest trial to date--the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer--screening every 2-4 years was associated with a 21% reduction in prostate-cancer-related mortality rate after 11 years. Citing the uncertain ratio between potential harm and potential benefit, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended against serum PSA screening. Although this ratio has yet to be elucidated, PSA testing--and early tumour detection--is undoubtedly beneficial for some individuals. Instead of adopting a 'one size fits all' approach, physicians are likely to perform personalized risk assessment to minimize the risk of negative consequences, such as anxiety, unnecessary testing and biopsies, overdiagnosis, and overtreatment. The PSA test needs to be combined with other predictive factors or be used in a more thoughtful way to identify men at risk of symptomatic or life-threatening cancer, without overdiagnosing indolent disease. A risk-adapted approach is needed, whereby PSA testing is tailored to individual risk.

  11. Risk of lung cancer in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xin; Luo, Xiaoguang; Xie, Mingliang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Recently, growing evidence has revealed the significant association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and cancer. However, controversy still exists concerning the association between PD and lung cancer. A comprehensive article search for relevant studies published was performed using the following online databases: PubMed, Web of Science and Embase up to August 31, 2016. The pooled risk ratio (RR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using the method of inverse variance with the random-effects model. Fifteen studies comprising 348,780 PD patients were included in this study. The pooled result indicated that patients with PD were significantly associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer (RR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.41−0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, subgroup analyses performed in Western population also confirmed the significant inverse relationship between PD and risk of lung cancer (RR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.39−0.60, P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, a reduced risk of lung cancer in PD patients from Western population was consistent regardless of study design, gender, or study quality. In conclusion, PD patients were significantly associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer in Western population. The relationship between them in Asian population needs to be confirmed by future studies. PMID:27801674

  12. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  13. Association Between Cd Exposure and Risk of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ju-Kun, Song; Yuan, Dong-Bo; Rao, Hao-Fu; Chen, Tian-Fei; Luan, Bo-Shi; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Jiang, Fu-Neng; Zhong, Wei-De; Zhu, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several observational studies on the association between Cd exposure and risk of prostate cancer have yielded inconsistent results. To address this issue, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the correlation between Cd exposure and risk of prostate cancer. Relevant studies in PubMed and Embase databases were retrieved until October 2015. We compared the highest and lowest meta-analyses to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between Cd exposure and risk of prostate cancer. Summary estimates were obtained using a random-effects model. In the general population, high Cd exposure was not associated with increased prostate cancer (OR 1.21; 95% CI 0.91–1.64), whereas the combined standardized mortality ratio of the association between Cd exposure and risk of prostate cancer was 1.66 (95% CI 1.10–2.50) in populations exposed to occupational Cd. In addition, high D-Cd intake (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.96–1.20) and U-Cd concentration (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.48–1.55) among the general population was not related to the increased risk of prostate cancer. In the dose analysis, the summary relative risk was 1.07 (95% CI 0.73–1.57) for each 0.5 μg/g creatinine increase in U-Cd and 1.02 (95% CI 0.99–1.06) for each 10 μg/day increase of dietary Cd intake. However, compared with nonoccupational exposure, high occupational Cd exposure may be associated with the increased risk of prostate cancer. This meta-analysis suggests high Cd exposure as a risk factor for prostate cancer in occupational rather than nonoccupational populations. However, these results should be carefully interpreted because of the significant heterogeneity among studies. Additional large-scale and high-quality prospective studies are needed to confirm the association between Cd exposure and risk of prostate cancer. PMID:26871808

  14. Occupation and lung cancer risk in Leningrad Province, Russia.

    PubMed

    Baccarelli, A; Tretiakova, Maria; Gorbanev, S; Lomtev, A; Klimkina, Irina; Tchibissov, V; Averkina, Olga; Dosemeci, M

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the association between occupation and lung cancer risk in Leningrad Province, Russia, we identified 540 pathologically diagnosed lung cancer cases (474 males and 66 females) and 582 controls (453 males and 129 females) from the 1993-1998 autopsy records of the 88 state hospitals of the Province. Lifetime occupational histories were obtained from personal records coded according to the standard Russian occupational classification system. Lung cancer risk was increased in workers in the manufacturing industry, particularly in the food industry and wholesale/retail trade and in the miscellaneous manufacturing industry. An increased risk was also found in subjects employed in chemical and metal production for 10 years or more. When we considered the association between specific occupations and lung cancer, waste incineration operators and loaders exhibited an excess risk that increased with employment duration. The present study, which is the first to evaluate the risk of lung cancer by occupation in Russia, suggests the presence in Leningrad Province of exposure in the workplace to lung carcinogens that require further characterization to develop targeted and effective preventive measures.

  15. NIH Study Offers Insight into Why Cancer Incidence Increases with Age

    MedlinePlus

    ... increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA methylation, or the binding of chemical tags, called methyl groups, onto DNA, may be involved. Methyl groups activate or silence ...

  16. Risk and Surveillance of Cancers in Primary Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hrad, Valery; Abebe, Yoftahe; Ali, Syed Haris; Velgersdyk, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary diseases have been associated in several studies with various malignancies. Understanding the risk and optimizing surveillance strategy of these malignancies in this specific subset of patients are an important facet of clinical care. For instance, primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk for cholangiocarcinoma (which is very challenging to diagnose) and when IBD is present for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, primary biliary cirrhosis patients with cirrhosis or not responding to 12 months of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review we will discuss in detail the risks and optimal surveillance strategies for patients with primary biliary diseases. PMID:27413366

  17. Identification of cancer risk lncRNAs and cancer risk pathways regulated by cancer risk lncRNAs based on genome sequencing data in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiran; Li, Wan; Liang, Binhua; Li, Liansheng; Wang, Li; Huang, Hao; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; He, Yuehan; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. The complexity of cancer can be reduced to a small number of underlying principles like cancer hallmarks which could govern the transformation of normal cells to cancer. Besides, the growth and metastasis of cancer often relate to combined effects of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Here, we performed comprehensive analysis for lncRNA expression profiles and clinical data of six types of human cancer patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and identified six risk pathways and twenty three lncRNAs. In addition, twenty three cancer risk lncRNAs which were closely related to the occurrence or development of cancer had a good classification performance for samples of testing datasets of six cancer datasets. More important, these lncRNAs were able to separate samples in the entire cancer dataset into high-risk group and low-risk group with significantly different overall survival (OS), which was further validated in ten validation datasets. In our study, the robust and effective cancer biomarkers were obtained from cancer datasets which had information of normal-tumor samples. Overall, our research can provide a new perspective for the further study of clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:27991568

  18. Identification of cancer risk lncRNAs and cancer risk pathways regulated by cancer risk lncRNAs based on genome sequencing data in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiran; Li, Wan; Liang, Binhua; Li, Liansheng; Wang, Li; Huang, Hao; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; He, Yuehan; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-12-19

    Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. The complexity of cancer can be reduced to a small number of underlying principles like cancer hallmarks which could govern the transformation of normal cells to cancer. Besides, the growth and metastasis of cancer often relate to combined effects of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Here, we performed comprehensive analysis for lncRNA expression profiles and clinical data of six types of human cancer patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and identified six risk pathways and twenty three lncRNAs. In addition, twenty three cancer risk lncRNAs which were closely related to the occurrence or development of cancer had a good classification performance for samples of testing datasets of six cancer datasets. More important, these lncRNAs were able to separate samples in the entire cancer dataset into high-risk group and low-risk group with significantly different overall survival (OS), which was further validated in ten validation datasets. In our study, the robust and effective cancer biomarkers were obtained from cancer datasets which had information of normal-tumor samples. Overall, our research can provide a new perspective for the further study of clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  19. Increased platelet reactivity in patients with late-stage metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Niamh M; Egan, Karl; McFadden, Siobhan; Grogan, Liam; Breathnach, Oscar S; O'Leary, John; Hennessy, Bryan T; Kenny, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Platelet hyperreactivity is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of thrombosis, a risk that increases with disease progression. While cancer patients show evidence of platelet activation in vivo, few studies have extensively assessed whether these patients display platelet hyperreactivity. We hypothesized that patients with metastatic cancer would display platelet hyperreactivity, reflecting their associated high risk of thrombosis. In a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13), we assessed platelet function using well-established assays of platelet reactivity (agonist-induced platelet aggregation, spontaneous platelet aggregation, and agonist-induced P-selectin expression). In comparison with healthy controls (n = 10), patients with metastatic cancer displayed global platelet hyperreactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation responses to ADP (adenosine diphosphate), epinephrine, collagen, arachidonic acid, and PAR-1 (protease-activated receptor-1) activating peptide, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, were significantly increased in patients with metastatic cancer. Furthermore, agonist-induced platelet P-selectin expression was also significantly increased within the patient cohort. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. We assessed platelet function in a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13) using well-established assays of platelet reactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation and activation in response to platelet agonists, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, was significantly increased in cancer patients compared with healthy controls. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. PMID

  20. Cancer trends and risk factors in Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    Farazi, Paraskevi A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyprus, a European Union member state, is a small island in the Mediterranean with a population approaching 900,000 people. Cancer is the second leading cause of death; more therapeutic options for any patient with the disease are available in a central oncology centre in the capital of the island (Nicosia) and fewer therapeutic options (e.g. chemotherapy and hormone therapy only) in a few other public hospitals. Palliative care is offered in several hospices and hospitals, although the field needs improvement. With regards to screening, a national breast cancer screening programme has been in place countrywide since 2007 and is offered free of charge to women between the ages of 50 and 69 years, while colorectal and prostate cancer screening is performed on an individual basis (a pilot programme for colorectal cancer screening was recently initiated). Genetic testing is available for breast and colon cancer. To improve understanding of the causes of cancer in the country, a cancer research centre was established in 2010 (Mediterranean Centre for Cancer Research). Recent epidemiologic work has revealed increasing cancer trends in Cyprus; prostate cancer is the most common in men and breast cancer is the most common in women. Interestingly, thyroid cancer incidence in women has been rising from 1998 to 2008. Cancer of the colon and rectum is also on the rise affecting both sexes. Overall, cancer incidence in Cyprus is lower than other EuroMed countries with similar lifestyle and geography. PMID:24678344

  1. Screening for Psychosocial Risk in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kazak, Anne E.; Brier, Moriah; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Reilly, Anne; Parker, Stephanie Fooks; Rogerwick, Stephanie; Ditaranto, Susan; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2012-01-01

    Major professional organizations have called for psychosocial risk screening to identify specific psychosocial needs of children with cancer and their families and facilitate the delivery of appropriate evidence-based care to address these concerns. However, systematic screening of risk factors at diagnosis is rare in pediatric oncology practice. Subsequent to a brief summary of psychosocial risks in pediatric cancer and the rationale for screening, this review identified three screening models and two screening approaches (Distress Thermometer [DT], Psychosocial Assessment Tool [PAT]), among many more papers calling for screening. Implications of broadly implemented screening for all patients across treatment settings are discussed. PMID:22492662

  2. Screening for psychosocial risk in pediatric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kazak, Anne E; Brier, Moriah; Alderfer, Melissa A; Reilly, Anne; Fooks Parker, Stephanie; Rogerwick, Stephanie; Ditaranto, Susan; Barakat, Lamia P

    2012-11-01

    Major professional organizations have called for psychosocial risk screening to identify specific psychosocial needs of children with cancer and their families and facilitate the delivery of appropriate evidence-based care to address these concerns. However, systematic screening of risk factors at diagnosis is rare in pediatric oncology practice. Subsequent to a brief summary of psychosocial risks in pediatric cancer and the rationale for screening, this review identified three screening models and two screening approaches [Distress Thermometer (DT), Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT)], among many more articles calling for screening. Implications of broadly implemented screening for all patients across treatment settings are discussed.

  3. Cancer risks from exposure to radon in homes.

    PubMed Central

    Axelson, O

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products in mines is a well recognized risk of lung cancer in miners. A large number of epidemiologic studies from various countries are quite consistent in this respect even it the magnitude of the risk differs according to exposure levels. Indoor radon became a concern in the 1970s and about a dozen studies have been conducted since 1979, mainly of the case-control design. From first being of a simple pilot character, the designs have become increasingly sophisticated, especially with regard to exposure assessment. Crude exposure estimates based on type of house, building material and geological features have been supplemented or replaced by quite extensive measurements. Still, exposure assessment remains a difficult and uncertain issue in these studies, most of which indicate a lung cancer risk from indoor radon. Also a recent large scale study has confirmed a lung cancer risk from indoor radon. More recently there are also some studies, mainly of the correlation type, suggesting other cancers also to be related to indoor radon, especially leukemia, kidney cancer, and malignant melanoma, and some other cancers as well. The data are less consistent and much more uncertain than for indoor radon and lung cancer, however; and there is no clear support from studies of miners in this respect. PMID:7614945

  4. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA variant interactions modify breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Daniel; Bai, Ren-Kui; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Leal, Suzanne M

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) variants and the risk of developing breast cancer were investigated using DNA samples collected from non-Jewish European American breast cancer patients and ethnically age-matched female controls. Logistic regression was used to evaluate two-way interactions between 17 mtDNA variants. To control for multiple testing, empirical P values were calculated using permutation. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to measure the contribution of variants in modifying the risk of developing breast cancer. A highly significant interaction was identified between variants 12308G and 10398G (empirical P value = 0.0028), with results suggesting these variants increase the risk of a woman developing breast cancer (OR = 3.03; 95% CI 1.53-6.11). Nominal significant P values were also observed for interactions between mtDNA variants 709A and 16189C; 4216C and 10398G; 4216C and 16189C; 10398G and 16159C; 13368A and 16189C; and 14766T and 16519C. However, after adjusting for multiple testing, the P values did not remain significant. Although it is important to elucidate the main effect of mtDNA variants on the risk of developing breast cancer, understanding gene x gene interactions will give a greater knowledge of disease etiology and aid in interpreting a woman's risk of developing breast cancer.

  6. Epidemiologic review of marijuana use and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hashibe, Mia; Straif, Kurt; Tashkin, Donald P; Morgenstern, Hal; Greenland, Sander; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2005-04-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the United States and is considered by young adults to be the illicit drug with the least risk. On the other hand, marijuana smoke contains several of the same carcinogens and co-carcinogens as the tar from tobacco, raising concerns that smoking of marijuana may be a risk factor for tobacco-related cancers. We reviewed two cohort studies and 14 case-control studies with assessment of the association of marijuana use and cancer risk. In the cohort studies, increased risks of lung or colorectal cancer due to marijuana smoking were not observed, but increased risks of prostate and cervical cancers among non-tobacco smokers, as well as adult-onset glioma among tobacco and non-tobacco smokers, were observed. The 14 case-control studies included four studies on head and neck cancers, two studies on lung cancer, two studies on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, one study on anal cancer, one study on penile cancer, and four studies on childhood cancers with assessment of parental exposures. Zhang and colleagues reported that marijuana use may increase risk of head and neck cancers in a hospital-based case-control study in the United States, with dose-response relations for both frequency and duration of use. However, Rosenblatt and co-workers reported no association between oral cancer and marijuana use in a population-based case-control study. An eightfold increase in risk among marijuana users was observed in a lung cancer study in Tunisia. However, there was no assessment of the dose response, and marijuana may have been mixed with tobacco. Parental marijuana use during gestation was associated with increased risks of childhood leukemia, astrocytoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, but dose-response relations were not assessed. In summary, sufficient studies are not available to adequately evaluate marijuana impact on cancer risk. Several limitations of previous studies include possible underreporting where marijuana use is illegal, small

  7. Germline Mutations in HOXB13 and Prostate-Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Charles M.; Ray, Anna M.; Lange, Ethan M.; Zuhlke, Kimberly A.; Robbins, Christiane M.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Wiley, Kathleen E.; Isaacs, Sarah D.; Johng, Dorhyun; Wang, Yunfei; Bizon, Chris; Yan, Guifang; Gielzak, Marta; Partin, Alan W.; Shanmugam, Vijayalakshmi; Izatt, Tyler; Sinari, Shripad; Craig, David W.; Zheng, S. Lilly; Walsh, Patrick C.; Montie, James E.; Xu, Jianfeng; Carpten, John D.; Isaacs, William B.; Cooney, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Family history is a significant risk factor for prostate cancer, although the molecular basis for this association is poorly understood. Linkage studies have implicated chromosome 17q21-22 as a possible location of a prostate-cancer susceptibility gene. METHODS We screened more than 200 genes in the 17q21-22 region by sequencing germline DNA from 94 unrelated patients with prostate cancer from families selected for linkage to the candidate region. We tested family members, additional case subjects, and control subjects to characterize the frequency of the identified mutations. RESULTS Probands from four families were discovered to have a rare but recurrent mutation (G84E) in HOXB13 (rs138213197), a homeobox transcription factor gene that is important in prostate development. All 18 men with prostate cancer and available DNA in these four families carried the mutation. The carrier rate of the G84E mutation was increased by a factor of approximately 20 in 5083 unrelated subjects of European descent who had prostate cancer, with the mutation found in 72 subjects (1.4%), as compared with 1 in 1401 control subjects (0.1%) (P = 8.5×10−7). The mutation was significantly more common in men with early-onset, familial prostate cancer (3.1%) than in those with late-onset, nonfamilial prostate cancer (0.6%) (P = 2.0×10−6). CONCLUSIONS The novel HOXB13 G84E variant is associated with a significantly increased risk of hereditary prostate cancer. Although the variant accounts for a small fraction of all prostate cancers, this finding has implications for prostate-cancer risk assessment and may provide new mechanistic insights into this common cancer. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:22236224

  8. Gallstones, cholecystectomy, and risk of digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Leticia; Freedman, Neal D; Engels, Eric A; Warren, Joan L; Castro, Felipe; Koshiol, Jill

    2014-03-15

    Gallstones and cholecystectomy may be related to digestive system cancer through inflammation, altered bile flux, and changes in metabolic hormone levels. Although gallstones are recognized causes of gallbladder cancer, associations with other cancers of the digestive system are poorly established. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database (1992-2005), which includes 17 cancer registries that cover approximately 26% of the US population, to identify first primary cancers (n = 236,850) occurring in persons aged ≥66 years and 100,000 cancer-free population-based controls frequency-matched by calendar year, age, and gender. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression analysis, adjusting for the matching factors. Gallstones and cholecystectomy were associated with increased risk of noncardia gastric cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.21 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11, 1.32) and OR = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.40), respectively), small-intestine carcinoid (OR = 1.27 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.60) and OR = 1.78 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.25)), liver cancer (OR = 2.35 (95% CI: 2.18, 2.54) and OR = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.41)), and pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.24 (95% CI: 1.16, 1.31) and OR = 1.23 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.33)). Colorectal cancer risk associated with gallstones and cholecystectomy decreased with increasing distance from the common bile duct (P-trend < 0.001). Hence, gallstones and cholecystectomy are associated with the risk of cancers occurring throughout the digestive tract.

  9. Evaluation of skin cancer risk for lunar and Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Methods used to estimate the probability of excess incidence of skin cancer from space radiation exposure must take into consideration the variability of dose to different areas of the body and the individual factors that may contribute to increased risk, including skin pigment and synergistic effects from combined ionizing and UV exposure. We have estimated the skin cancer risk for future lunar and Mars missions using: (1) the multiplicative risk model for transferring the Japanese survivor data to the US population, (2) epidemiological data for the increased risk for skin locations exposed to combined UV and ionizing radiation, and (3) models of space radiation environments, transport, and anatomical shielding for 5260 skin loci. We have estimated that the probability for increased skin cancer risk from solar particle events varies more than 10-fold depending on the individual and area of skin exposed. We show that a skin cancer risk greater than 1% could occur for astronauts with light skin and hair color following exposure to medium or large class solar particle events during future lunar base operations, or from exposure to galactic cosmic rays during Mars missions.

  10. What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... or no known risk factors. Risk factors for eye melanoma Race/ethnicity The risk of intraocular melanoma ...

  11. Clinical implications of genomics for cancer risk genetics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; James, Paul A; Ballinger, Mandy L

    2015-06-01

    The study of human genetics has provided substantial insight into cancer biology. With an increase in sequencing capacity and a reduction in sequencing costs, genomics will probably transform clinical cancer genetics. A heritable basis for many cancers is accepted, but so far less than half the genetic drivers have been identified. Genomics will increasingly be applied to populations irrespective of family history, which will change the framework of phenotype-directed genetic testing. Panel testing and whole genome sequencing will identify novel, polygenic, and de-novo determinants of cancer risk, often with lower penetrance, which will challenge present binary clinical classification systems and management algorithms. In the future, genotype-stratified public screening and prevention programmes could form part of tailored population risk management. The integration of research with clinical practice will result in so-called discovery cohorts that will help identify clinically significant genetic variation.

  12. Adolescent and adult risk factors for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Katherine A; Trabert, Britton

    2012-04-17

    The incidence of testicular cancer has been increasing over the past several decades in many developed countries. The reasons for the increases are unknown because the risk factors for the disease are poorly understood. Some research suggests that in utero exposures, or those in early childhood, are likely to be important in determining an individual's level of risk. However, other research suggests that exposure to various factors in adolescence and adulthood is also linked to the development of testicular cancer. Of these, two adult occupational exposures-fire fighting and aircraft maintenance--and one environmental exposure (to organochlorine pesticides) are likely to be associated with increased risk of developing testicular cancer. By contrast, seven of the identified factors--diet, types of physical activity, military service, police work as well as exposure to ionizing radiation, electricity and acrylamide--are unlikely to increase the risk of developing testicular cancer. Finally, seven further exposures--to heat, polyvinyl chloride, nonionizing radiation, heavy metals, agricultural work, pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls as well as marijuana use--require further study to determine their association with testicular cancer.

  13. Adolescent and adult risk factors for testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Katherine A.; Trabert, Britton

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of testicular cancer has been increasing over the past several decades in many developed countries. The reasons for the increases are unknown because risk factors for the disease are poorly understood. Some research suggests that exposures in utero or in early childhood are likely to be important in determining an individual's level of risk. However, other research suggests that exposure to various factors in adolecence and adulthood are also linked to the development of testicular cancer. Of these, two occupational exposures—firefighting and aircraft maintenance—and one environmental exposure (to organochloride pesticides) are likely to be associated with increased risk of developing testicular cancer. By contrast, six of the identified factors—diet, types of physical activity, military service as well as exposure to ionizing radiation, electricity and acrylamide—are unlikely to increase the risk of developing testicular cancer. Finally, seven further exposures—to heat, polyvinylchloride, nonionizing radiation, heavy metals, agricultural work, pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls as well as marijuana use—require further study to determine their association with testicular cancer. PMID:22508459

  14. Cancer risk in close relatives of women with early-onset breast cancer – a population-based incidence study

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, J H; Seersholm, N; Boice Jr, J D; Kjær, S Krüger; Jr, J F Fraumeni

    1999-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to breast cancer is associated with an early onset and bilateral disease. The extent of familial risks has not, however, been fully assessed in population-based incidence studies. The purpose of the study was to quantify the risks for cancers of the breast, ovary and other sites of close relatives of women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed at an early age. Records collected between 1943 and 1990 at the Danish Cancer Registry were searched, and 2860 women were found in whom breast cancer was diagnosed before age 40. Population registers and parish records were used to identify 14 973 parents, siblings and offspring of these women. Cancer occurrence through to 31 December 1993 was determined within the Cancer Registry's files and compared with national incidence rates. Women with early-onset breast cancer were at a nearly fourfold increased risk of developing a new cancer later in life (268 observed vs 68.9 expected). The excess risk was most evident for second cancer of the breast (181 vs 24.5) and for ovarian cancer (20 vs 3.3). For mothers and sisters, risks for cancers of the breast and ovary were significantly increased by two- to threefold. Bilateral breast cancer and breast–ovarian cancer were very strong predictors of familial risks, with one in four female relatives predicted to develop breast and/or ovarian cancer by age 75. Mothers had a slightly increased risk of colon cancer, but not endometrial cancer. The risk for breast cancer was also increased among fathers (standardized incidence ratio 2.5; 95% CI 0.5–7.4) and especially brothers (29; 7.7–74), although based on small numbers. The risk for prostatic cancer was unremarkable. In this large population-based survey, the first-degree relatives of women who developed breast cancer before age 40 were prone to ovarian cancer as well as male and female breast cancer, but not other tumours that may share susceptibility genes with breast cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign

  15. HEALTHY EATING INDEX AND OVARIAN CANCER RISK

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.; Williams-King, Melony G.; Paddock, Lisa E.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Lu, Shou-En; Faulkner, Shameka; Pulick, Katherine; Olson, Sara H.

    2011-01-01

    The evidence for a role of diet on ovarian cancer prevention remains inconclusive. While many studies have evaluated individual foods and food groups, the evaluation of a comprehensive dietary quality index for predicting cancer risk has received little attention. This study investigates the association between the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), which reflects adherence to the current USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and ovarian cancer risk in a population-based case-control study in New Jersey. A total of 205 cases and 390 controls completed the Block 98.2 Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) in addition to reporting on potential risk factors for ovarian cancer. FFQ data were then utilized to calculate the HEI score, and cup, ounce, gram, or caloric equivalents for the 12 different food groups comprising the index. In multivariate models the OR for the highest tertile of the HEI score compared to the lowest (reflecting a better diet compared to a worse diet) was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.55–1.47). There was limited evidence for a statistically significant association between any of the 12 individual food components and ovarian cancer risk. Based on this study’s results, neither individual food groups nor dietary quality showed potential for preventing ovarian cancer. PMID:21286802

  16. Dysthymia increases the risk of temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shang-Lun; Wu, Shang-Liang; Ko, Shun-Yao; Lu, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Diew-Wei; Ben, Ren-Jy; Horng, Chi-Ting; Yang, Jung-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between depression and temporomandibular disorders (TMD), but the conclusions remain vague. The aim of this study was to examine the causal effect between depression and TMD. The reporting of this study conforms to the STROBE statement. In this retrospective cohort study, all samples were recruited from a representative subdataset of 1 million insured persons for the year 2005 Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, who were randomly selected from all beneficiaries enrolled in the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan. We used a propensity score and stratified 926,560 patients into 2 groups (propensity1 = 588,429 and propensity2 = 338,131) and 4 cohorts (propensity1 with depression = 18,038, propensity1 without depression = 570,391, propensity2 with depression = 38,656, propensity2 without depression = 299,475) to detect the development of TMD among the depressive and nondepressive patients between 2004 and 2013. The positive correlative factors of TMD included female, total number of times seeking medical advice (TTSMA) for anxiety state, TTSMA for generalized anxiety disorder, TTSMA for mandible fracture, and TTSMA for unspecified anomaly of jaw size. The propensity2 group was represented by elder and female-predominant patients who used more psychiatric health resources. Among 3 types of depression, only dysthymia (so-called chronic depression) had a causal impact on TMD in the propensity 2 group. In the propensity 2 group, the hazard ratio of dysthymia for TMD measured by Cox's regression was 1.64 (95% confidence interval 1.28–2.09), after adjusting for demographic factors, psychiatric comorbidities, and maxillofacial confounders. The first-onset mean time of TMD as the consequence of dysthymia was 3.56 years (sd = 2.74, min = 0.08, median = 2.99, max = 9.73). This study demonstrates that dysthymia increases the risk of TMD in elderly and female

  17. Erythrocyte selenium and breast cancer risk: brief reports

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.; Verreault, R.

    1987-05-01

    Animal experiments and ecologic studies suggest that low dietary selenium intake is associated with an increased risk of some types of cancer. However, studies assessing the relation of indicators of selenium intake in subjects to site-specific cancer incidence are few. This paper reports the results of a case-control study of erythrocyte selenium in relation to breast carcinoma in premenopausal women. 1 figure, 1 table.

  18. Long Term Mortality and Cancer Risk in Irradiated Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    higher surface doses to induce lethality during the acute radiation sickness phase (within 100 days postirradiation); however, the relationship of...similar to the human disease (18), irradiated females have a higher incidence than the controls. Whether it is spontaneous or radiation - induced ...due to cancer. If the same genetic factors that predispose individuals to radiation - induced cancer are also associated with increased risk of

  19. A Risk Model for Lung Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Hoggart, Clive; Brennan, Paul; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla; Overvad, Kim; Østergaard, Jane Nautrup; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Johansson, Mattias; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Panico, Salvatore; Boshuizen, Hendriek; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Lund, Eiliv; Gram, Inger Torhild; Braaten, Tonje; Rodríguez, Laudina; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Arriola, Larraitz; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Rasmuson, Torgny; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Allen, Naomi E.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Risk models for lung cancer incidence would be useful for prioritizing individuals for screening and participation in clinical trials of chemoprevention. We present a risk model for lung cancer built using prospective cohort data from a general population which predicts individual incidence in a given time period. We build separate risk models for current and former smokers using 169,035 ever smokers from the multicenter European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and considered a model for never smokers. The data set was split into independent training and test sets. Lung cancer incidence was modeled using survival analysis, stratifying by age started smoking, and for former smokers, also smoking duration. Other risk factors considered were smoking intensity, 10 occupational/environmental exposures previously implicated with lung cancer, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at two loci identified by genome-wide association studies of lung cancer. Individual risk in the test set was measured by the predicted probability of lung cancer incidence in the year preceding last follow-up time, predictive accuracy was measured by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Using smoking information alone gave good predictive accuracy: the AUC and 95% confidence interval in ever smokers was 0.843 (0.810–0.875), the Bach model applied to the same data gave an AUC of 0.775 (0.737–0.813). Other risk factors had negligible effect on the AUC, including never smokers for whom prediction was poor. Our model is generalizable and straightforward to implement. Its accuracy can be attributed to its modeling of lifetime exposure to smoking. PMID:22496387

  20. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    the Witness model will be tailored for breast cancer survivors and the peer interventionists (breast cancer survivors and lay health advisors) will be...by a lay health advisor; 4) discussion of concerns and myths about breast cancer and screening /surveillance that are prevalent among AAW; 5) review...Breast cancer screening surveillance Breast cancer screening Treatment/Time of Treatment intention /adherence & physician recommendation

  1. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    PubMed

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-28

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  2. Cancer risks in naval divers with multiple exposures to carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elihu D; Friedman, Lee S; Tamir, Yuval; Berman, Tamar; Levy, Or; Westin, Jerome B; Peretz, Tamar

    2003-01-01

    We investigated risks for cancer and the case for a cause-effect relationship in five successive cohorts of naval commando divers (n = 682) with prolonged underwater exposures (skin, gastrointestinal tract, and airways) to many toxic compounds in the Kishon River, Israel's most polluted waterway, from 1948 to 1995. Releases of industrial, ship, and agricultural effluents in the river increased substantially, fish yields decreased, and toxic damage to marine organisms increased. Among the divers (16,343 person-years follow-up from 18 years of age to year 2000), the observed/expected ratio for all tumors was 2.29 (p<0.01). Risks increased in cohorts first diving after 1960 compared to risks in earlier cohorts, notably for hematolymphopoietic, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, and skin cancer; induction periods were often brief. The findings suggest that the increases in risk for cancer and short induction periods resulted from direct contact with and absorption of multiple toxic compounds. Early toxic effects in marine life predicted later risks for cancer in divers. PMID:12676624

  3. Risk of colorectal cancer and other cancers in patients with gall stones.

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, C; Chow, W H; Jørgensen, T; Mellemkjaer, L; Engholm, G; Olsen, J H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The occurrence of gall stones has repeatedly been associated with an increased risk for cancer of the colon, but risk associated with cholecystectomy remains unclear. AIMS: To evaluate the hypothesis in a nationwide cohort of more than 40,000 gall stone patients with complete follow up including information of cholecystectomy and obesity. PATIENTS: In the population based study described here, 42,098 patients with gall stones in 1977-1989 were identified in the Danish Hospital Discharge Register. METHODS: These patients were linked to the Danish Cancer Registry to assess their risks for colorectal and other cancers during follow up to the end of 1992. RESULTS: The analysis showed a modest increase in the number of cancers at all sites combined (n = 3940; RR, 1.07; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.0 to 1.1). A weak association was found for cancer of the colon (n = 360; RR, 1.09; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.2), which remained unchanged when analysed by sex, anatomical subsite, and duration of follow up. Multivariate analysis with adjustment for cholecystectomy and clinically defined obesity did not change these estimates to any significant extent. Excess risks were found for cancers of the pancreas and the small intestine. A non-significant increased risk for breast cancer was seen in women five years after initial discharge for gall stones. CONCLUSION: A borderline significant association was seen between gall stones and cancer of the colon, and for cancer of pancreas and small intestine as well as for breast cancer in women. PMID:8949651

  4. Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0493 TITLE: Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and...SUBTITLE Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Perceived Stress...relationship between stress and ovarian cancer has never been evaluated in humans. In our analysis of self-reported stress and risk of ovarian cancer , we

  5. Breast Cancer Risk in Childhood Cancer Survivors Without a History of Chest Radiotherapy: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Neglia, Joseph Phillip; Dang, Chau T.; Onel, Kenan; Novetsky Friedman, Danielle; Bhatia, Smita; Strong, Louise C.; Stovall, Marilyn; Kenney, Lisa B.; Barnea, Dana; Lorenzi, Elena; Hammond, Sue; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Diller, Lisa R.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the breast cancer risk among childhood cancer survivors who did not receive chest radiotherapy. We sought to determine the magnitude of risk and associated risk factors for breast cancer among these women. Patients and Methods We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 3,768 female childhood cancer survivors without a history of chest radiotherapy who were participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Results With median follow up of 25.5 years (range, 8 to 39 years), 47 women developed breast cancer at a median age of 38.0 years (range, 22 to 47 years) and median of 24.0 years (range, 10 to 34 years) from primary cancer to breast cancer. A four-fold increased breast cancer risk (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 4.0; 95% CI, 3.0 to 5.3) was observed when compared with the general population. Risk was highest among sarcoma and leukemia survivors (SIR = 5.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.8 and SIR = 4.1; 95% CI, 2.4 to 6.9, respectively). By the age of 45 years, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer in sarcoma and leukemia survivors was 5.8% (95% CI, 3.7 to 8.4) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.0 to 11.3), respectively. No other primary cancer diagnosis was associated with an elevated risk. Alkylators and anthracyclines were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner (P values from test for trend were both < .01). Conclusions Women not exposed to chest radiotherapy who survive childhood sarcoma or leukemia have an increased risk of breast cancer at a young age. The data suggest high-dose alkylator and anthracycline chemotherapy increase the risk of breast cancer. This may suggest a possible underlying gene-environment interaction that warrants further study. PMID:26700127

  6. Reproductive factors associated with breast cancer risk in northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Hajian-Tilaki, K O; Kaveh-Ahangar, T

    2011-06-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy for women in most parts of the world and the incidence in Iranian women is growing. The patients are relatively younger than their western counterparts. The aim of study was to investigate the roles of reproductive factors for breast cancer in Babol. In a case-control study in Babol, we recruited a total of 100 new patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer and 200 age-matched controls selected from outpatient clinics. Demographic and reproductive factors were ascertained by in-person interview using a constructed questionnaire. Several potential confounding factors were adjusted using multiple logistic model. The adjusted odds ratio showed that having higher age at first pregnancy and abortion were associated with increased breast cancer risk (the adjusted OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 1.3-13.2 and 2.93, 95% CI: 1.64-5.24, respectively). By increasing parity, the risk had reduced significantly; among women with parity ≥ 5, the adjusted OR was 0.09 (95% CI 0.01-0.7) compared with nulliparous women, and also for each additional parity, the risk reduced by 50% (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.34-0.71). The duration of breast feeding was inversely associated with breast cancer risk, while after additional adjustment for parity, no longer the protective effect of breast feeding was observed. Nulliparity, late age at first birth and abortion were the most important reproductive factors associated with breast cancer risk; therefore, it is recommended to women with these risk factors to perform breast cancer screening tests earlier.

  7. Bullying increased suicide risk: prospective study of Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Shin; Leventhal, Bennett L; Koh, Yun-Joo; Boyce, W Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the independent impact of bullying on suicide risk. Bullying was assessed by peer nomination in a prospective study of 1,655 7th and 8th grade Korean students, and suicide by youth self-report. Odds Ratios (ORs) of bullying for suicidal risks were computed, controlling for other suicide risk factors. Victim-Perpetrators and female Victims at baseline showed increased risk for persistent suicidality (OR: 2.4-9.8). Male Incident Victims exhibited increased risk for suicidal behaviors and ideations (OR = 4.4, 3.6). Female Persistent Perpetrators exhibited increased risks for suicidal behaviors; male Incident Perpetrators had increased risk for suicidal ideations (OR = 2.7, 2.3). Baseline-only male Victim-Perpetrators showed increased risk for suicidal ideations. (OR = 6.4). Bullying independently increased suicide risks.

  8. Effects of ginger supplementation on cell-cycle biomarkers in the normal-appearing colonic mucosa of patients at increased risk for colorectal cancer: results from a pilot, randomized, and controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Citronberg, Jessica; Bostick, Roberd; Ahearn, Thomas; Turgeon, D Kim; Ruffin, Mack T; Djuric, Zora; Sen, Ananda; Brenner, Dean E; Zick, Suzanna M

    2013-04-01

    To estimate the effects of ginger on apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation in the normal-appearing colonic mucosa, we randomized 20 people at increased risk for colorectal cancer to 2.0 g of ginger or placebo daily for 28 days in a pilot trial. Overall expression and distributions of Bax, Bcl-2, p21, hTERT, and MIB-1 (Ki-67) in colorectal crypts in rectal mucosa biopsies were measured using automated immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis. Relative to placebo, Bax expression in the ginger group decreased 15.6% (P = 0.78) in the whole crypts, 6.6% (P = 0.95) in the upper 40% (differentiation zone) of crypts, and 21.7% (P = 0.67) in the lower 60% (proliferative zone) of crypts; however, there was a 19% increase (P = 0.14) in Bax expression in the upper 40% relative to the whole crypt. While p21 and Bcl-2 expression remained relatively unchanged, hTERT expression in the whole crypts decreased by 41.2% (P = 0.05); the estimated treatment effect on hTERT expression was larger in the upper 40% of crypts (-47.9%; P = 0.04). In the ginger group, MIB-1 expression decreased in the whole crypts, upper 40% of crypts, and lower 60% of crypts by 16.9% (P = 0.39), 46.8% (P = 0.39), and 15.3% (P = 0.41), respectively. These pilot study results suggest that ginger may reduce proliferation in the normal-appearing colorectal epithelium and increase apoptosis and differentiation relative to proliferation--especially in the differentiation zone of the crypts and support a larger study to further investigate these results.

  9. Perceived and objective breast cancer risk assessment in Chilean women living in an underserved area

    PubMed Central

    Banegas, Matthew P.; Püschel, Klaus; Martinez, Javiera; Anderson, Jennifer C.; Thompson, Beti

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy among Chilean women and an increasingly significant public health threat. This study assessed the accuracy of breast cancer risk perception among underserved, Chilean women. Methods Women aged 50 to 70 years, with no mammogram during the last two years, were randomly selected from a community clinic registry in Santiago, Chile (n=500). Perceived risk was measured using three methods: absolute risk, comparative risk and numerical risk. Risk comprehension was measured by comparing women’s perceived and objective risk estimates. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess overestimation of perceived risk. Results Women at high risk of breast cancer were more likely than average risk women to perceive themselves at high or higher risk, using absolute and comparative risk approaches (p<0.001). The majority of participants (67%) overestimated their breast cancer risk, based on risk comprehension; although, participants achieved higher accuracy with comparative risk (40%) and absolute risk (31.6%) methods. [Age, breast cancer knowledge and Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) 5-year risk were significantly associated (p<0.01) with accuracy of perceived risk]. Conclusion Chilean women residing in an underserved community may not accurately assess their breast cancer risk, though risk perception and level of accuracy differed between perceived risk measures. Comparative and absolute risk methods may better reflect women’s interpretation and accuracy of risk perception. Impact Improving our understanding of Chilean women’s perceptions of developing breast cancer may lead to the development of culturally relevant efforts to reduce the breast cancer burden in this population. PMID:22837144

  10. Cumulative Family Risk Predicts Sibling Adjustment to Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kristin A.; Marsland, Anna L.; Alderfer, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolonged, intensive treatment regimens often disrupt families of children with cancer. Siblings are at increased risk for distress, but factors underlying this risk have received limited empirical attention. This study examined associations between the family context and sibling distress. Methods Siblings of children with cancer (ages 8–18, N=209) and parents (186 mothers, 70 fathers) completed measures of sibling distress, family functioning, parenting, and parent posttraumatic stress. Associations between sibling distress and each family risk factor were evaluated. Then, family risks were considered simultaneously by calculating cumulative family risk index scores. Results After controlling for socio-demographic covariates, greater sibling distress was associated with more sibling-reported problems with family functioning and parental psychological control, lower sibling-reported maternal acceptance, and lower paternal self-reported acceptance. When risk factors were considered together, results supported a quadratic model in which associations between family risk and sibling distress were stronger at higher levels of risk. Conclusions Findings support a contextual model of sibling adjustment to childhood cancer in which elevated distress is predicted by family risk factors, alone and in combination. PMID:23576115

  11. Occupation-related risks for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Spiegelman, D; Wegman, D H

    1985-11-01

    Several population data bases were used to generate hypotheses about associations between colorectal cancer and workplace exposures. The Third National Cancer Survey interview sample was used to select 343 male and 208 female cases and 626 male and 1,235 female cancer controls. Potential work exposures were assigned with the use of data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health National Occupational Hazard Survey. Dietary factors were modeled from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Work-related stress was considered with the use of a model based on the U.S. Department of Labor's Quality of Employment Survey. Other risk factors included age, race, ponderosity, and menopausal status. Logistic analysis yielded hypotheses for colon cancer risk in males with potentially high exposure to solvents, abrasives, and fuel oil and in those in jobs with high demand and low control (high "stress"). Hypotheses emerged for females with potentially high exposure to dyes, solvents, and grinding wheel dust.

  12. Quality of Life Factor as Breast Cancer Risks

    PubMed Central

    Gledo, Ibrahim; Pranjic, Nurka; Parsko, Subhija

    2012-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have observed risk factors for breast cancer. We investigated the association between quality life factors as breast cancer risks in a case-control study in industrial Zenica- Doboj Canton in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods: The case-control study was included 200 women, 100 without (control subjects) and 100 women with diagnosed breast cancer. We used questionnaires about breast cancer risks“ as study tool. Logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and a full assessment of confounding was included in analysis. Results: Breast cancer was positive associated with increasing age of life (from 45 years and more; OR= 1.25); further relative breast cancer history (OR= 4.42; 95%CI, 0.483-4.043); exposure to CT (OR=2.02; 95%CI, 1,254-3.261); never birth child (OR= 1.394; 95%CI, 0.808-2,407); used replacement hormonal therapy (OR= 1.826; 95%CI, 1.637-10.590); arrival time of menstruation (OR=2.651; 95%CI, 1.303-1.571); length of smoking status (OR=1.534; 95%CI, 0.756-3.098), alcohol consumption (OR=1.728; 95% CI, 0.396-7.533); exposure to CT per year (p=0.009), routine physical inactivity (p=0.009) and replacement hormones treatment (p=0.036). Conclusion: Inverse associations of breast cancer and poverty, arival time of menopause were observed. The link between breast cancer and a distant-cousin- degree family history of breast cancer was inverse association with breast cancer too. These results provide further evidence that, for most women, physical activity may reduce the risk of invasive breast cancer. PMID:23922526

  13. Oxidative stress: a new risk factor for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a state of excessive free radicals and reactive metabolites among which the most important class is reactive oxygen species (ROS) - radicals derived from oxygen - as represented by the superoxide anion radical (O2(·-)) and its reactive metabolites, hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). In essence, OS represents an imbalance between the production of oxidants - ROS - and their elimination by antioxidative systems in the body. Many studies have linked OS to thyroid cancer by showing its association with abnormally regulated oxidative or antioxidative molecules. The study by Wang et al. in the December 2011 issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer (18, 773-782) further supports this relationship by demonstrating a high total oxidant status and OS index in thyroid cancer patients. The origin of ROS in thyroid cancer patients has not been defined, but thyroid cancer itself can be one since inflammation, a major event in it, is a classical source of ROS. ROS may in turn enhance the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, forming a vicious cycle propelling thyroid tumorigenesis. Regardless of the mechanism, the clinical implication of the association of OS with thyroid cancer is severalfold: one, OS is a new risk factor for thyroid cancer; two, OS confers thyroid cancer patients an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, degenerative neurological disorders, and other cancers that are classically associated with OS; and three, interference with OS may reduce this risk and be therapeutically beneficial to thyroid cancer itself in thyroid cancer patients. These interesting possibilities deserve further studies.

  14. Meat and fish consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Linseisen, Jakob; Nöthlings, Ute; Overvad, Kim; Egeberg, Rikke; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cottet, Vanessa; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Vineis, Paolo; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias; Grote, Verena; Teucher, Birigit; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Crowe, Francesca L; Goufa, Ioulia; Orfanos, Philippos; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Jeurnink, Suzanne M; Siersema, Peter D; Peeters, Petra H M; Brustad, Magritt; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Duell, Eric J; Amiano, Pilar; Barricarte, Aurelio; Molina-Montes, Esther; Rodríguez, Laudina; Tormo, María-José; Sund, Malin; Ye, Weimin; Lindkvist, Björn; Johansen, Dorthe; Ferrari, Pietro; Jenab, Mazda; Slimani, Nadia; Ward, Heather; Riboli, Elio; Norat, Teresa; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas

    2013-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death worldwide with large geographical variation, which implies the contribution of diet and lifestyle in its etiology. We examined the association of meat and fish consumption with risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). A total of 477,202 EPIC participants from 10 European countries recruited between 1992 and 2000 were included in our analysis. Until 2008, 865 nonendocrine pancreatic cancer cases have been observed. Calibrated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using multivariable-adjusted Cox hazard regression models. The consumption of red meat (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.93-1.14) and processed meat (RR per 50 g increase per day = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.71-1.23) were not associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk. Poultry consumption tended to be associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.04-2.84); however, there was no association with fish consumption (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.92-1.62). Our results do not support the conclusion of the World Cancer Research Fund that red or processed meat consumption may possibly increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. The positive association of poultry consumption with pancreatic cancer might be a chance finding as it contradicts most previous findings.

  15. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  16. Epigenetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk Stratification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    no detectable methylation in lymphocytes. As part of this project we obtained RP-FNA samples from Carol Fabian. Dr. Fabian expels her RP-FNA samples...1943. 8. Lewis CM, Cler LR, Bu DW, et al. Promoter hypermethylation in benign breast epithelium in relation to predicted breast cancer risk. Clin...American Society of Preventive Oncology. May 2008;17(5):1051-1059. 10. Bu D, Lewis CM, Sarode V, et al. Identification of breast cancer DNA methylation

  17. Dietary Fat, Eicosanoids and Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    eicosanoid balance, and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. The study objectives are to: 1) evaluate the effects of total fat and omega -3 fatty acid ...Dietary fat, omega -3 fatty acids , eicosanoids, sex hormones 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...Eicosanoids, and Breast Cancer Risk”, is a dietary intervention aimed at evaluating the effects of total fat intake and omega -3 fatty acids on breast

  18. Risk of Second Cancers According to Radiation Therapy Technique and Modality in Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Wong, Jeannette; Kleinerman, Ruth; Kim, Clara; Morton, Lindsay; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2015-02-01

    cancer risks in prostate cancer survivors by approximately 3 cases per 1000 after 15 years. Despite concerns about the neutron doses, we did not find evidence that higher energy therapy was associated with increased second cancer risks.

  19. A Matched Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Risk in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, J.; Le, Q. H.; Duong, B. H.; Sun, P.; Pham, H. T.; Ta, V. T.; Kotsopoulos, J.; Narod, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vietnam has a low age-standardized incidence of breast cancer, but the incidence is rising rapidly with economic development. We report data from a matched case-control study of risk factors for breast cancer in the largest cancer hospital in Vietnam. Methods. 492 incident breast cancer cases unselected for family history or age at diagnosis and 1306 control women age 25–75 were recruited from the National Cancer Hospital (BVK), Hanoi. Structured interviews were conducted and pathology data was centrally reported at the National Cancer Hospital of Vietnam, in Hanoi. Results. Our analysis included 294 matched pairs. Mean age at diagnosis was 46.7 years. Lower mean parity, older age at first parity, increasing weight and BMI at age 18, and increasing BMI at diagnosis were positively correlated with breast cancer cases compared to controls. Age at first menarche and duration of breastfeeding were not statistically different between cases and controls. Conclusions. In this study we demonstrate that breast cancer in Vietnam is associated with some but not all of the published risk factors from Western populations. Our data is consistent with other studies of breast cancer in Asian populations. PMID:28070424

  20. Polyunsaturated fatty acid content is increased in the milk of women with pregnancy associated breast cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Pregnancy associated breast cancer (PABC) is aggressive and difficult to diagnose. High intake of most types of dietary fat is thought to increase breast cancer risk, however results in humans supporting this premise remain equivocal. Fatty acid (FA) concentrations in the body comprise b...