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Sample records for increased cell death

  1. Increased Mitochondrial Activity in Anthrax-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chi

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenesis of anthrax lethal toxin (LT) is attributed to its ability to cause death of infected cells. New work has demonstrated that increase of mitochondrial F1F0 ATPase activity and subsequent depletion of cellular ATP level are critical early events during LT-induced cell death. PMID:26124679

  2. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  3. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF.

    PubMed

    Polacchini, Alessio; Albani, Clara; Baj, Gabriele; Colliva, Andrea; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-07-15

    Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5'UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3'UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3'UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism.

  4. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF.

    PubMed

    Polacchini, Alessio; Albani, Clara; Baj, Gabriele; Colliva, Andrea; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5'UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3'UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3'UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism. PMID:27256407

  5. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Polacchini, Alessio; Albani, Clara; Baj, Gabriele; Colliva, Andrea; Carpinelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5′UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3′UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3′UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism. PMID:27256407

  6. Juglone induces cell death of Acanthamoeba through increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2015-12-01

    Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a major chemical constituent of Juglans mandshruica Maxim. Recent studies have demonstrated that juglone exhibits anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic properties. However, its effect against Acanthamoeba has not been defined yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juglone on Acanthamoeba. We demonstrate that juglone significantly inhibits the growth of Acanthamoeba castellanii at 3-5 μM concentrations. Juglone increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caused cell death of A. castellanii. Inhibition of ROS by antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) restored the cell viability. Furthermore, our results show that juglone increased the uptake of mitochondrial specific dye. Collectively, these results indicate that ROS played a significant role in the juglone-induced cell death of Acanthamoeba.

  7. Juglone induces cell death of Acanthamoeba through increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2015-12-01

    Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a major chemical constituent of Juglans mandshruica Maxim. Recent studies have demonstrated that juglone exhibits anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic properties. However, its effect against Acanthamoeba has not been defined yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juglone on Acanthamoeba. We demonstrate that juglone significantly inhibits the growth of Acanthamoeba castellanii at 3-5 μM concentrations. Juglone increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caused cell death of A. castellanii. Inhibition of ROS by antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) restored the cell viability. Furthermore, our results show that juglone increased the uptake of mitochondrial specific dye. Collectively, these results indicate that ROS played a significant role in the juglone-induced cell death of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26358271

  8. Increased plasma levels of CK-18 as potential cell death biomarker in patients with HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    John, K; Wielgosz, S; Schulze-Osthoff, K; Bantel, H; Hass, R

    2013-01-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome represents a life-threatening pregnancy disorder with high fetal and maternal mortality, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Although apoptosis has been implicated in HELLP syndrome, its pathogenic role remains largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether the detection of apoptosis by novel plasma biomarkers is of diagnostic value in HELLP patients. For this purpose, we analyzed two biomarkers that specifically detect apoptosis or overall cell death of epithelial cells, such as hepatocytes or placental trophoblasts, through the release of caspase-cleaved or total (caspase-cleaved and uncleaved) cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) in plasma of HELLP patients compared with pregnant as well as non-pregnant healthy women. In addition, caspase activation and cell death were determined in placental tissues of HELLP patients and individuals with normal pregnancy. In contrast to pregnant or non-pregnant healthy controls, we observed significantly increased levels of both caspase-cleaved and total CK-18 in plasma of HELLP patients. Following delivery, CK-18 levels rapidly decreased in HELLP patients. Caspase activation and cell death were also elevated in placental tissues from HELLP patients compared with healthy pregnant women. These data demonstrate not only that apoptosis is increased in HELLP syndrome, but also that caspase-cleaved or total CK-18 are promising plasma biomarkers to identify patients with HELLP syndrome. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate the utility of these biomarkers for monitoring disease activity in HELLP syndrome. PMID:24157880

  9. Rotenone induces cell death in primary dopaminergic culture by increasing ROS production and inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Radad, Khaled; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Gille, Gabriele

    2006-09-01

    Although the definite etiology of Parkinson's disease is still unclear, increasing evidence has suggested an important role for environmental factors such as exposure to pesticides in increasing the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. In the present study, primary cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were applied to investigate the toxic effects and underlying mechanisms of rotenone-induced neuronal cell death relevant to Parkinson's disease. Results revealed that rotenone destroyed dopaminergic neurons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Consistent with the cytotoxic effect of rotenone as evidenced by dopaminergic cell loss, it significantly increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, the number of necrotic cells in the culture and the number of nuclei showing apoptotic features. Rotenone exerted toxicity by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species production and shifting respiration to a more anaerobic state.

  10. Gold nanoparticles do not induce myotube cytotoxicity but increase the susceptibility to cell death.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Corrêa; Pereira, Mariana Rodrigues; do Nascimento Santos, Carlos Antonio; Campos, Andrea Porto Carreiro; Esteves, Ticiana Mota; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been widely used for many applications, including as biological carriers. A better understanding concerning AuNP safety on muscle cells is crucial, since it could be a potential tool in the nanomedicine field. Here, we describe the impact of polyethylene glycol-coated gold nanoparticles (PEG-AuNP) interaction with differentiated skeletal muscle C2C12 cells on cell viability, mitochondria function, cell signaling related to survival, cytokine levels and susceptibility to apoptosis. Intracellular localization of 4.5 nm PEG-AuNP diameter size was evidenced by STEM-in-SEM in myotube cells. Methods for cytotoxicity analysis showed that PEG-AuNP did not affect cell viability, but intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential increased. Phosphorylation of ERK was not altered but p-AKT levels reduced (p<0.01). Pre-treatment of cells with PEG-AuNP followed by staurosporine induction increased the caspases-3/7 activity. Indeed, cytokines analysis revealed a sharp increase of IFN-γ and TGF-β1 levels after PEG-AuNP treatment, suggesting that inflammatory and fibrotic phenotypes process were activated. These data demonstrate that PEG-AuNP affect the myotube physiology leading these cells to be more susceptible to death stimuli in the presence of staurosporine. Altogether, these results present evidence that PEG-AuNP affect the susceptibility to apoptosis of muscle cells, contributing to development of safer strategies for intramuscular delivery. PMID:25790728

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  12. Human Traumatic Brain Injury Results in Oligodendrocyte Death and Increases the Number of Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Flygt, Johanna; Gumucio, Astrid; Ingelsson, Martin; Skoglund, Karin; Holm, Jonatan; Alafuzoff, Irina; Marklund, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte (OL) death may contribute to white matter pathology, a common cause of network dysfunction and persistent cognitive problems in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) persist throughout the adult CNS and may replace dead OLs. OL death and OPCs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry of human brain tissue samples, surgically removed due to life-threatening contusions and/or focal brain swelling at 60.6 ± 75 hours (range 4-192 hours) postinjury in 10 severe TBI patients (age 51.7 ± 18.5 years). Control brain tissue was obtained postmortem from 5 age-matched patients without CNS disorders. TUNEL and CC1 co-labeling was used to analyze apoptotic OLs, which were increased in injured brain tissue (p < 0.05), without correlation with time from injury until surgery. The OPC markers Olig2, A2B5, NG2, and PDGFR-α were used. In contrast to the number of single-labeled Olig2, A2B5, NG2, and PDGFR-α-positive cells, numbers of Olig2 and A2B5 co-labeled cells were increased in TBI samples (p < 0.05); this was inversely correlated with time from injury to surgery (r = -0.8, p < 0.05). These results indicate that severe focal human TBI results in OL death and increases in OPCs postinjury, which may influence white matter function following TBI.

  13. A lipid analogue that inhibits sphingomyelin hydrolysis and synthesis, increases ceramide, and leads to cell death.

    PubMed

    Darroch, Peter I; Dagan, Arie; Granot, Tami; He, Xingxuan; Gatt, Shimon; Schuchman, Edward H

    2005-11-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel thiourea derivative of sphingomyelin (AD2765). In vitro assays using pure enzyme and/or cell extracts revealed that this compound inhibited the hydrolysis of BODIPY-conjugated or 14C-labeled sphingomyelin by acid sphingomyelinase and Mg2+-dependent neutral sphingomyelinase. Studies in normal human skin fibroblasts further revealed that AD2765 was taken up by cells and inhibited the hydrolysis of BODIPY-conjugated sphingomyelin in situ. In situ and in vitro studies also showed that this compound inhibited the synthesis of sphingomyelin from BODIPY-conjugated ceramide. The specificity of AD2765 for enzymes involved in sphingomyelin metabolism was demonstrated by the fact that it had no effect on the hydrolysis of BODIPY-conjugated ceramide by acid ceramidase or on the synthesis of BODIPY-conjugated glucosylceramide from BODIPY-conjugated ceramide. The overall effect of AD2765 on sphingomyelin metabolism was concentration-dependent, and treatment of normal human skin fibroblasts or cancer cells with this compound at concentrations > 10 microM led to an increase in cellular ceramide and cell death. Thus, AD2765 might be used to manipulate sphingomyelin metabolism in various ways, potentially to reduce substrate accumulation in cells from types A and B Niemann-Pick disease patients, and/or to affect the growth of human cancer cells.

  14. Increased frequency and cell death of CD16+ monocytes with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2011-09-01

    Monocytes from tuberculosis patients exhibit functional and phenotypical alterations compared with healthy controls. To determine whether these discrepancies can be explained by changes in monocyte subsets, the expression of CD14 and CD16 was evaluated in tuberculosis patients and healthy controls; additionally, some markers related to the mononuclear phagocytes maturation, differentiation and function, such as CD1a, CD1c, CD11b, CD11c, CD13, CD33, CD36, CD40, CD64, CD68, CD80, CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, CCR2, CCR5, and non-specific esterases (NSE) were determined in monocyte subsets. Patients had increased percentage of circulating CD14(Hi)CD16(+) and CD14(Lo)CD16(+) monocytes. The percentage of monocytes expressing CD11b, CD36, CD64, CD68, CD80, CD86, CCR2 and NSE was lower in CD14(Hi)CD16(+) and CD14(Lo)CD16(+) cells than in CD14(Hi)CD16(-) monocytes. M. tuberculosis infected CD16(+) monocytes produced more TNF-α and less IL-10 than CD16(-) cells at 6 h post-infection. Isolated CD16(+) monocytes spontaneously underwent apoptosis during differentiation into macrophages; in contrast to CD16(-) monocytes that became differentiated into monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) with a minimal induction of cell death. In addition, there were more Annexin V and propidium iodide positive monocytes in the CD16(+) subset infected with live M. tuberculosis at 24 h than CD16(-) monocytes. Under the culture conditions established for this study, the monocyte subsets did not differentiate into dendritic cells. These results show that tuberculosis patients have an augmented frequency of CD16(+) circulating monocytes which are more prone to produce TNF-α and to undergo cell death in response to M. tuberculosis infection.

  15. Increased Anion Channel Activity Is an Unavoidable Event in Ozone-Induced Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Errakhi, Rafik; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Meimoun, Patrice; Briand, Joël; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Kawano, Tomonori; Bouteau, François

    2010-01-01

    Background Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. Principal Findings By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O3 treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O3-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O3, Ca2+ influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O3; namely, H2O2 generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. Significance Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O3-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s) for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation. PMID:20967217

  16. Increased Caspase Activity Primes Human Lyme Arthritis Synovial γδ T cells for Proliferation and Death

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Phan T.; Collins, Cheryl C.; Fortner, Karen A.; Koenig, Andreas; Hayes, Sandra M.; Budd, Ralph C.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells function between the innate and adaptive immune responses, promoting antigen-presenting cell function, and manifesting cytolytic activity. Their numbers often increase during infections, such as HIV, and at sites of chronic inflammation. However, the turnover dynamics of human γδ T cells are poorly understood. Here we find that despite more rapid proliferation in vitro by human Lyme arthritis synovial γδ T cells of the Vδ1 subset, they have reduced surviving cell numbers compared to αβ T cells due to increased cell death by the γδ T cells. Because caspases are involved in cell proliferation and death, and signaling is more efficient through TCR-γδ than TCR-αβ, we examined the levels of active caspases during cell cycling and following TCR restimulation. We observed higher overall caspase activity in Borrelia-reactive γδ T cells than comparable αβ T cells. This was paralleled by greater spontaneous cell death and TCR restimulation-induced cell death of the γδ T cells, which was caspase dependent. Our current findings thus are consistent with a model where human γδ T cells evolved to function quickly and transiently, in an innate fashion. PMID:21983117

  17. Autophagic cell death exists

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Peter G.H.; Puyal, Julien

    2012-01-01

    The term autophagic cell death (ACD) initially referred to cell death with greatly enhanced autophagy, but is increasingly used to imply a death-mediating role of autophagy, as shown by a protective effect of autophagy inhibition. In addition, many authors require that autophagic cell death must not involve apoptosis or necrosis. Adopting these new and restrictive criteria, and emphasizing their own failure to protect human osteosarcoma cells by autophagy inhibition, the authors of a recent Editor’s Corner article in this journal argued for the extreme rarity or nonexistence of autophagic cell death. We here maintain that, even with the more stringent recent criteria, autophagic cell death exists in several situations, some of which were ignored by the Editor’s Corner authors. We reject their additional criterion that the autophagy in ACD must be the agent of ultimate cell dismantlement. And we argue that rapidly dividing mammalian cells such as cancer cells are not the most likely situation for finding pure ACD. PMID:22652592

  18. Expression of Interferon Lambda 4 Is Associated with Reduced Proliferation and Increased Cell Death in Human Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onabajo, Olusegun O.; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Paquin, Ashley; Rao, Nina; Liu, Luyang; Tang, Wei; Brand, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Interferon lambda 4 (IFN-λ4) is a novel type-III interferon that can be generated only in individuals carrying a ΔG frame-shift allele of an exonic genetic variant (rs368234815-ΔG/TT). The rs368234815-ΔG allele is strongly associated with decreased clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here, we further explored the biological function of IFN-λ4 expressed in human hepatic cells—a hepatoma cell line HepG2 and fresh primary human hepatocytes (PHHs). We performed live confocal imaging, cell death and proliferation assays, mRNA expression profiling, protein detection, and antibody blocking assays using transient and inducible stable in vitro systems. Not only did we observe significant intracellular retention of IFN-λ4 but also detected secreted IFN-λ4 in the culture media of expressing cells. Secreted IFN-λ4 induced strong activation of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in IFN-λ4-expressing and surrounding cells in transwell assays. Specifically, in PHHs, secreted IFN-λ4 induced expression of the CXCL10 transcript and a corresponding pro-inflammatory chemokine, IP-10. In IFN-λ4-expressing HepG2 cells, we also observed decreased proliferation and increased cell death. All IFN-λ4-induced phenotypes—activation of ISGs, decreased proliferation, and increased cell death—could be inhibited by an anti-IFN-λ4-specific antibody. Our study offers new insights into biology of IFN-λ4 and its possible role in HCV clearance. PMID:26134097

  19. Lithium increases bcl-2 expression in chick cochlear nucleus and protects against deafferentation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Bush, A L; Hyson, R L

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 20-30% of neurons in the avian cochlear nucleus (nucleus magnocellularis) die following deafferentation (i.e. deafness produced by cochlea removal) and the remaining neurons show a decrease in soma size. Cell death is generally accepted to be a highly regulated process involving various pro-survival and pro-death molecules. One treatment that has been shown to modify the expression of these molecules is chronic administration of lithium. The present experiments examined whether lithium treatment can protect neurons from deafferentation-induced cell death. Post-hatch chicks were treated with LiCl or saline for 17 consecutive days, beginning on the day of hatching. On the 17th day, a unilateral cochlea ablation was performed. Five days following surgery, the nucleus magnocellularis neurons were counted stereologically on opposite sides of the same brains. Lithium reduced deafferentation-induced cell death by more than 50% (9.8% cell death as compared with 22.4% in saline-treated subjects). Lithium did not affect cell number on the intact side of the brain. Lithium also did not prevent the deafferentation-induced decrease in soma size, suggesting a dissociation between the mechanisms involved in the afferent control of soma size and those involved in the afferent control of cell viability. A possible mechanism for lithium's neuroprotective influence was examined in a second set of subjects. Previous studies suggest that the pro-survival molecule, bcl-2, may play a role in regulating cell death following deafferentation. Tissues from lithium- and saline-treated subjects were examined using immunocytochemistry. Chronic administration of lithium dramatically increased the expression of bcl-2 protein in nucleus magnocellularis neurons. These data suggest that lithium may impart its neuroprotective effect by altering the expression of molecules that regulate cell death.

  20. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  1. Inflammasome priming increases retinal pigment epithelial cell susceptibility to lipofuscin phototoxicity by changing the cell death mechanism from apoptosis to pyroptosis.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, Carolina; Patt, Joshua; Holz, Frank G; Krohne, Tim U

    2016-08-01

    Progressive death of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells is a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in all developed countries. Photooxidative damage and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome have been suggested as contributing factors to this process. We investigated the effects of inflammasome activation on oxidative damage-induced RPE cell death. In primary human RPE cells and ARPE-19 cells, lipofuscin accumulated following incubation with oxidatively modified photoreceptor outer segments. Oxidative stress was induced by blue light irradiation (dominant wavelength: 448nm, irradiance: 0.8mW/cm(2), duration: 3 to 6h) of lipofuscin-loaded cells and resulted in cell death by apoptosis. Prior inflammasome priming by IL-1α or complement activation product C5a altered the cell death mechanism to pyroptosis and resulted in a significant increase of the phototoxic effect. Following IL-1α priming, viability 24h after irradiation was reduced in primary RPE cells and ARPE-19 cells from 65.3% and 56.7% to 22.6% (p=0.003) and 5.1% (p=0.0002), respectively. Inflammasome-mediated IL-1β release occurred only in association with pyroptotic cell lysis. Inflammasome priming by conditioned media of pyroptotic cells likewise increased cell death. Suppression of inflammasome activation by inhibition of caspase-1 or cathepsins B and L significantly reduced cell death in primed cells. In summary, inflammasome priming by IL-1α, C5a, or conditioned media of pyroptotic cells increases RPE cell susceptibility to photooxidative damage-mediated cell death and changes the mechanism of induced cell death from apoptosis to pyroptosis. This process may contribute to RPE degeneration in AMD and provide new targets for intervention. PMID:27240191

  2. Curcumin induces apoptotic cell death of activated human CD4+ T cells via increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Lee, Bong Hee; Ryu, Do Gon; Kwon, Kang Beom; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-03-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, exerts well-known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, the latter which can influence the activation of immune cells including T cells. Furthermore, curcumin can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, through suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The beneficial effects of curcumin in diseases such as arthritis, allergy, asthma, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer may be due to its immunomodulatory properties. We studied the potential of curcumin to modulate CD4+ T cells-mediated autoimmune disease, by examining the effects of this compound on human CD4+ lymphocyte activation. Stimulation of human T cells with PHA or CD3/CD28 induced IL-2 mRNA expression and activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The treatment of T cells with curcumin induced the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway, initiated by the phosphorylation of PERK and IRE1. Furthermore, curcumin increased the expression of the ER stress associated transcriptional factors XBP-1, cleaved p50ATF6α and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in human CD4+ and Jurkat T cells. In PHA-activated T cells, curcumin further enhanced PHA-induced CHOP expression and reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, curcumin treatment induced apoptotic cell death in activated T cells via eliciting an excessive ER stress response, which was reversed by the ER-stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid or transfection with CHOP-specific siRNA. These results suggest that curcumin can impact both ER stress and mitochondria functional pathways, and thereby could be used as a promising therapy in the context of Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:23415873

  3. The suppression of radiation-induced NF-{kappa}B activity by dexamethasone correlates with increased cell death in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seon Young; Chung, Hee-Yong . E-mail: hychung@hanyang.ac.kr

    2005-10-21

    In this study, we show that dexamethasone treatment increases ionizing radiation-induced cell death by inducing the inhibitory {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) pathway in mice. The effect of dexamethasone on radiation-induced cell death was assessed by changes in total spleen cellularity and bone marrow colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) contents after total body irradiation. While in vivo treatment of mice with dexamethasone alone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) failed to elicit cell death in spleen cells, the combined treatment with dexamethasone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) and {gamma}-rays (1 or 5 Gy) caused a 50-80% reduction in total cellularity in spleen and CFU-GM contents in bone marrow. These results demonstrate that dexamethasone has a synergistic effect on radiation-induced cellular damages in vivo. Immunoblot analysis showed that dexamethasone treatment significantly increases I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in the spleens of irradiated mice. In addition, the dexamethasone treatment significantly reduced radiation-induced nuclear translocation of the nucleus factor-{kappa}B in the spleens of irradiated mice. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment in vivo may increase radiation-induced cell damages by increasing I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in hematopoietic organs such as spleen and bone marrow.

  4. A rare mutation in UNC5C predisposes to late-onset Alzheimer's disease and increases neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Wetzel-Smith, Monica K; Hunkapiller, Julie; Bhangale, Tushar R; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Maloney, Janice A; Atwal, Jasvinder K; Sa, Susan M; Yaylaoglu, Murat B; Foreman, Oded; Ortmann, Ward; Rathore, Nisha; Hansen, David V; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Goate, Alison; Behrens, Timothy W; Cruchaga, Carlos; Watts, Ryan J; Graham, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    We have identified a rare coding mutation, T835M (rs137875858), in the UNC5C netrin receptor gene that segregated with disease in an autosomal dominant pattern in two families enriched for late-onset Alzheimer's disease and that was associated with disease across four large case-control cohorts (odds ratio = 2.15, Pmeta = 0.0095). T835M alters a conserved residue in the hinge region of UNC5C, and in vitro studies demonstrate that this mutation leads to increased cell death in human HEK293T cells and in rodent neurons. Furthermore, neurons expressing T835M UNC5C are more susceptible to cell death from multiple neurotoxic stimuli, including β-amyloid (Aβ), glutamate and staurosporine. On the basis of these data and the enriched hippocampal expression of UNC5C in the adult nervous system, we propose that one possible mechanism in which T835M UNC5C contributes to the risk of Alzheimer's disease is by increasing susceptibility to neuronal cell death, particularly in vulnerable regions of the Alzheimer's disease brain. PMID:25419706

  5. Safrole-induced cellular Ca2+ increases and death in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsueh-Chi; Cheng, He-Hsiung; Huang, Chun-Jen; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Chen, I-Shu; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chang, Hong-Tai; Huang, Jong-Khing; Chen, Jin-Shyr; Lu, Yih-Chau; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2006-08-01

    The effect of the carcinogen safrole on intracellular Ca2+ movement has not been explored in osteoblast-like cells. This study examined whether safrole could alter Ca2+ handling and viability in MG63 human osteosarcoma cells. Cytosolic free Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) in populations of cells were measured using fura-2 as a fluorescent Ca2+ probe. Safrole at concentrations above 130 microM increased [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 450 microM. The Ca2+ signal was reduced by 30% by removing extracellular Ca2+. Addition of Ca2+ after safrole had depleted intracellular Ca2+ induced Ca2+ influx, suggesting that safrole caused Ca2+ entry. In Ca2+-free medium, after pretreatment with 650 microM safrole, 1 microM thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor) failed to release more Ca2+; and pretreatment with thapsigargin inhibited most of the safrole-induced [Ca2+]i increases. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 did not affect safrole-induced Ca2+ release; whereas activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester enhanced safrole-induced [Ca2+]i increase. Trypan exclusion assays revealed that incubation with 65 microM safrole for 30 min did not kill cells, but incubation with 650 microM safrole for 10-30 min nearly killed all cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that safrole evoked apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Safrole-induced cytotoxicity was not reversed by chelation of Ca2+ with BAPTA. Collectively, the data suggest that in MG63 cells, safrole induced a [Ca2+]i increase by causing Ca2+ release mainly from the endoplasmic reticulum in a phospholipase C-independent manner. The safrole response involved Ca2+ influx and is modulated by protein kinase C. Furthermore, safrole can cause apoptosis in a Ca2+-independent manner.

  6. The carcinogen safrole increases intracellular free Ca2+ levels and causes death in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chuan; Cheng, He-Hsiung; Huang, Chun-Jen; Lu, Yih-Chau; Chen, I-Shu; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chang, Hong-Tai; Huang, Jong-Khing; Chen, Jin-Shyr; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2007-02-28

    The effect of the carcinogen safrole on intracellular Ca2+ movement in renal tubular cells has not been explored previously. The present study examined whether safrole could alter Ca2+ handling in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Cytosolic free Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) in populations of cells were measured using fura-2 as a fluorescent Ca2+ probe. Safrole at concentrations above 33 microM increased [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 400 microM. The Ca2+ signal was reduced by 90% by removing extracellular Ca2+, but was not affected by nifedipine, verapamil, or diltiazem. Addition of Ca2+ after safrole had depleted intracellular Ca(2+)-induced dramatic Ca2+ influx, suggesting that safrole caused store-operated Ca2+ entry. In Ca(2+)-free medium, after pretreatment with 650 microM safrole, 1 microM thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor) failed to release more Ca 2+. Inhibition of phospholipase C with 2 microM U73122 did not affect safrole-induced Ca2+ release. Trypan blue exclusion assays revealed that incubation with 650 microM safrole for 30 min did not kill cells, but killed 70% of cells after incubation for 60 min. Collectively, the data suggest that in MDCK cells, safrole induced a [Ca2+] increase by causing Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in a phospholipase C-independent fashion, and by inducing Ca2+ influx via store-operated Ca2+ entry. Furthermore, safrole can cause acute toxicity to MDCK cells.

  7. High Glucose-Induced PC12 Cell Death by Increasing Glutamate Production and Decreasing Methyl Group Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minjiang; Zheng, Hong; Wei, Tingting; Wang, Dan; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Ji, Jiansong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. High glucose- (HG-) induced neuronal cell death is responsible for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the effect of HG on metabolism in neuronal cells is still unclear. Materials and Methods. The neural-crest derived PC12 cells were cultured for 72 h in the HG (75 mM) or control (25 mM) groups. We used NMR-based metabolomics to examine both intracellular and extracellular metabolic changes in HG-treated PC12 cells. Results. We found that the reduction in intracellular lactate may be due to excreting more lactate into the extracellular medium under HG condition. HG also induced the changes of other energy-related metabolites, such as an increased succinate and creatine phosphate. Our results also reveal that the synthesis of glutamate from the branched-chain amino acids (isoleucine and valine) may be enhanced under HG. Increased levels of intracellular alanine, phenylalanine, myoinositol, and choline were observed in HG-treated PC12 cells. In addition, HG-induced decreases in intracellular dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, and 3-methylhistidine may indicate a downregulation of methyl group metabolism. Conclusions. Our metabolomic results suggest that HG-induced neuronal cell death may be attributed to a series of metabolic changes, involving energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, osmoregulation and membrane metabolism, and methyl group metabolism. PMID:27413747

  8. FASL -844C polymorphism is associated with increased activation-induced T cell death and risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Zhou, Yifeng; Li, Hua; Han, Xiaohong; Shi, Yuankai; Wang, Li; Miao, Xiaoping; Tan, Wen; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xuemei; Guo, Yongli; Lin, Dongxin

    2005-10-01

    The FAS receptor-ligand system plays a key role in regulating apoptotic cell death, and corruption of this signaling pathway has been shown to participate in tumor-immune escape and carcinogenesis. We have recently demonstrated (Sun, T., X. Miao, X. Zhang, W. Tan, P. Xiong, and D. Lin. 2004. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 96:1030-1036; Zhang, X., X. Miao, T. Sun, W. Tan, S. Qu, P. Xiong, Y. Zhou, and D. Lin. 2005. J. Med. Genet. 42:479-484) that functional polymorphisms in FAS and FAS ligand (FASL) are associated with susceptibility to lung cancer and esophageal cancer; however, the mechanisms underlying this association have not been elucidated. We show that the FAS -1377G, FAS -670A, and FASL -844T variants are expressed more highly on ex vivo-stimulated T cells than the FAS -1377A, FAS -670G, and FASL -844C variants. Moreover, activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells carrying the FASL -844C allele was increased. We also found a threefold increased risk of cervical cancer among subjects with the FASL -844CC genotype compared with those with the -844TT genotype in a case-control study in Chinese women. Together, these observations suggest that genetic polymorphisms in the FAS-FASL pathway confer host susceptibility to cervical cancers, which might be caused by immune escape of tumor cells because of enhanced AICD of tumor-specific T cells.

  9. High Glucose-Induced PC12 Cell Death by Increasing Glutamate Production and Decreasing Methyl Group Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjiang; Zheng, Hong; Wei, Tingting; Wang, Dan; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective. High glucose- (HG-) induced neuronal cell death is responsible for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the effect of HG on metabolism in neuronal cells is still unclear. Materials and Methods. The neural-crest derived PC12 cells were cultured for 72 h in the HG (75 mM) or control (25 mM) groups. We used NMR-based metabolomics to examine both intracellular and extracellular metabolic changes in HG-treated PC12 cells. Results. We found that the reduction in intracellular lactate may be due to excreting more lactate into the extracellular medium under HG condition. HG also induced the changes of other energy-related metabolites, such as an increased succinate and creatine phosphate. Our results also reveal that the synthesis of glutamate from the branched-chain amino acids (isoleucine and valine) may be enhanced under HG. Increased levels of intracellular alanine, phenylalanine, myoinositol, and choline were observed in HG-treated PC12 cells. In addition, HG-induced decreases in intracellular dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, and 3-methylhistidine may indicate a downregulation of methyl group metabolism. Conclusions. Our metabolomic results suggest that HG-induced neuronal cell death may be attributed to a series of metabolic changes, involving energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, osmoregulation and membrane metabolism, and methyl group metabolism. PMID:27413747

  10. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  11. A rare mutation in UNC5C predisposes to Alzheimer’s disease and increases neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel-Smith, MK; Hunkapiller, J; Bhangale, TR; Srinivasan, K; Maloney, JA; Atwal, JK; Sa, SM; Yaylaoglu, MB; Foreman, O; Ortmann, W; Rathore, N; Hansen, DV; Tessier-Lavigne, M; Mayeux, R; Pericak-Vance, M; Haines, J; Farrer, LA; Schellenberg, GD; Goate, A; Behrens, TW

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a rare coding mutation, T835M (rs137875858), in the Netrin receptor UNC5C that segregated with disease in an autosomal dominant pattern in two families enriched for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), and was associated with disease across four large case/control cohorts (OR = 2.15, Pmeta= 0.0095). T835M alters a conserved residue in the hinge region of UNC5C, and in vitro studies demonstrate that this mutation leads to increased cell death in several cell types, including neurons. Furthermore, neurons expressing T835M UNC5C are more susceptible to multiple neurodegenerative stimuli, including β-Amyloid (Aβ). Based on these data and the enriched hippocampal expression of UNC5C in the adult nervous system, we propose one possible mechanism in which T835M UNC5C contributes to the risk of Alzheimer’s disease is by increasing susceptibility to neuronal cell death, particularly in vulnerable regions of the Alzheimer’s brain. PMID:25419706

  12. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiem, Anne Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  13. Bufalin increases sensitivity to AKT/mTOR-induced autophagic cell death in SK-HEP-1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Chang; Yang, Jai-Sing; Peng, Shu-Fen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Chung, Jing-Gung; Lin, Meng-Wei; Lin, Jen-Kun; Amagaya, Sakae; Wai-Shan Chung, Cinderella; Tung, Theng-Thang; Huang, Wen-Wen; Tseng, Michael T

    2012-10-01

    Bufalin is the major component of Chan-Su (a traditional Chinese medicine, TCM) extracts from the venom of Bufo bufo gargarizan. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacological mechanisms of cell cycle arrest and autophagic cell death induced by bufalin in SK-HEP-1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro. Bufalin inhibited cell survival by MTT assay and increased cell death by trypan blue exclusion assay in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, bufalin induced G2/M phase arrest by reducing CDK1 activity. Bufalin triggered DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cell death in SK-HEP-1 cells by DNA gel electrophoresis, TUNEL and caspase-3 activity assay, while bufalin induced autophagic cell death by double-membrane vacuoles (transmission electron microscopy, TEM), acidic vesicular organelles (acridine orange staining) and cleavage of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). Protein expression levels of cyclin A and B, CDK1, phospho-CDK1 (Thr161), Cdc25c, phospho-Cdc25c (Ser198), phospho-AKT (Thr308), phospho-AKT (Ser473), phospho‑mTOR (Ser2481) were downregulated. In contrast, protein expression levels of the Chk1, Wee1, LC3-II, Beclin-1, Atg 5, Atg 7 and Atg 12 were upregulated in SK-HEP-1 cells after bufalin treatment. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (an inhibitor of class III phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase; 3-MA) or bafilomycin A1 (an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump of lysosomes and endosomes) reduced the effect of bufalin on cell viability and enhanced the effect of bufalin on apoptosis. In conclusion, bufalin triggered autophagic cell death and G2/M phase arrest through the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in SK-HEP-1 cells. Our findings showed that bufalin may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:22858649

  14. Classification of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Baehrecke, EH; Blagosklonny, MV; El-Deiry, WS; Golstein, P; Green, DR; Hengartner, M; Knight, RA; Kumar, S; Lipton, SA; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, ME; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cell death are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell death and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell death research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like ‘percentage apoptosis’ and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that ‘autophagic cell death’ is a type of cell death occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell death-related terminology including ‘entosis’, ‘mitotic catastrophe’, ‘necrosis’, ‘necroptosis’ and ‘pyroptosis’. PMID:18846107

  15. Chronic Social Stress and Ethanol Increase Expression of KLF11, a Cell Death Mediator, in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Jeremy; Wang, Niping; Zhang, Xiao; Johnson, Shakevia; Harris, Sharonda; Zheng, Baoying; Zhang, Qinli; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier; Sittman, Donald; Ou, Xiao-Ming; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Wang, Jun Ming

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder and alcoholism are significant health burdens that can affect executive functioning, cognitive ability, job responsibilities, and personal relationships. Studies in animal models related to depression or alcoholism reveal that the expression of Krüppel-like factor 11 (KLF11, also called TIEG2) is elevated in frontal cortex, which suggests that KLF11 may play a role in stress- or ethanol-induced psychiatric conditions. KLF11 is a transcriptional activator of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B, but also serves other functions in cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was used to quantify intensity of nuclear KLF11, combined with an unbiased stereological approach to assess nuclei in fronto-limbic, limbic, and other brain regions of rats exposed chronically to social defeat or ethanol. KLF11 immunoreactivity was increased significantly in the medial prefrontal cortex, frontal cortex and hippocampus of both stressed rats and rats fed ethanol. However, expression of KLF11 protein was not significantly affected in the thalamus, hypothalamus or amygdala in either treatment group compared to respective control rats. Triple-label immunofluorescence revealed that KLF11 protein was localized in nuclei of neurons and astrocytes. KLF11 was also co-localized with the immunoreactivity of cleaved caspase 3. In addition, Western blot analysis revealed a significant reduction in anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-xL, but an increase of caspase-3 expression in the frontal cortex of ethanol-treated rats compared to ethanol-preferring controls. Thus, KLF11 protein is up-regulated following chronic exposure to stress or ethanol in a region-specific manner and may contribute to pro-apoptotic signaling in ethanol-treated rats. Further investigation into the KLF11 signaling cascade as a mechanism for neurotoxicity and cell death in depression and alcoholism may provide novel pharmacological targets to lessen brain damage

  16. Delivery of carboplatin by carbon-based nanocontainers mediates increased cancer cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, M.; Haase, D.; Hampel, S.; Oswald, S.; Bachmatiuk, A.; Klingeler, R.; Schulze, R.; Ritschel, M.; Leonhardt, A.; Fuessel, S.; Büchner, B.; Kraemer, K.; Wirth, M. P.

    2010-08-01

    Since the activity of several conventional anticancer drugs is restricted by resistance mechanisms and dose-limiting side-effects, the design of nanocarriers seems to be an efficient and promising approach for drug delivery. Their chemical and mechanical stability and their possible multifunctionality render tubular nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), promising delivery agents for anticancer drugs. The goal of the present study was to investigate CNTs and CNFs in order to deliver carboplatin in vitro. No significant intrinsic toxicity of unloaded materials was found, confirming their biocompatibility. Carboplatin was loaded onto CNTs and CNFs, revealing a loading yield of 0.20 mg (CNT-CP) and 0.13 mg (CNF-CP) platinum per milligram of material. The platinum release depended on the carrier material. Whereas CNF-CP marginally released the drug, CNT-CP functioned as a drug depot, constantly releasing up to 68% within 14 days. The cytotoxicity of CNT-CP and CNF-CP in urological tumour cell lines was dependent on the drug release. CNT-CP was identified to be more effective than CNF-CP concerning the impairment of proliferation and clonogenic survival of tumour cells. Moreover, carboplatin, which was delivered by CNT-CP, exhibited a higher anticancer activity than free carboplatin.

  17. Increased expression and activity of p75NTR are crucial events in azacitidine-induced cell death in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Marampon, Francesco; Sanità, Patrizia; Mancini, Andrea; Colapietro, Alessandro; Scarsella, Luca; Jitariuc, Ana; Biordi, Leda; Ficorella, Corrado; Festuccia, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    The high affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) NGF receptor, p75NTR, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that shares a conserved intracellular death domain capable of inducing apoptosis and suppressing growth in prostate epithelial cells. Expression of this receptor is lost as prostate cancer progresses and is minimal in established prostate cancer cell lines. We aimed to verify the role of p75NTR in the azacitidine-mediated antitumor effects on 22Rv1 and PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we reported that the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of 5-azacytidine (azacitidine) were more marked in the presence of physiological concentrations of NGF and were reduced when a blocking p75NTR antibody or the selective p75NTR inhibitor, Ro 08-2750, were used. Azacitidine increased the expression of p75NTR without interfering with the expression of the low affinity NGF receptor TrkA and induced caspase 9-dependent caspase 3 activity. Taken together, our results suggest that the NGF network could be a candidate for future pharmacological manipulation in aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:27222100

  18. CD147 is increased in HCC cells under starvation and reduces cell death through upregulating p-mTOR in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gou, Xingchun; Tang, Xu; Kong, Derek Kai; He, Xinying; Gao, Xingchun; Guo, Na; Hu, Zhifang; Zhao, Zhaohua; Chen, Yanke

    2016-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the standard of care for treatment of intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however, key molecules involved in HCC cell survival and tumor metastasis post-TACE remain unclear. CD147 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is overexpressed on the surface of HCC cells and is associated with malignant potential and poor prognosis in HCC patients. In this study, using an Earle's Balanced Salt Solution medium culture model that mimics nutrient deprivation induced by TACE, we investigated the regulation of CD147 expression on HCC cells under starvation conditions and its functional effects on HCC cell death. During early stages of starvation, the expression of CD147 was considerably upregulated in SMMC7721, HepG2 and HCC9204 hepatoma cell lines at the protein levels. Downregulation of CD147 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly promoted starvation-induced cell death. In addition, CD147 siRNA-transfected SMMC7721 cells demonstrated significantly increased levels of both apoptosis and autophagy as compared to cells transfected with control siRNA under starvation conditions, whereas no difference was observed between the two treatment groups under normal culture conditions. Furthermore, silencing of CD147 resulted in a remarkable downregulation of phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) in starved SMMC7721 cells. Finally, the combined treatment of starvation and anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody exhibited a synergistic HCC cell killing effect. Our study suggests that upregulation of CD147 under starvation may reduce hepatoma cell death by modulating both apoptosis and autophagy through mTOR signaling, and that CD147 may be a novel potential molecular target to improve the efficacy of TACE.

  19. Yeast NDI1 Improve Oxidative Phosphorylation Capacity and Increases Protection Against Oxidative Stress and Cell Death in Cells Carrying a Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Soon; Li, You-fen; Bai, Yidong

    2007-01-01

    G11778A in the subunit ND4 gene of NADH dehydrogenase complex is the most common primary mutation found in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. The NDI1 gene, which encodes the internal NADH -quinone oxidoreductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was introduced into the nuclear genome of a mitochondrial defective human cell line, Le1.3.1, carrying the G11778A mutation. In transformant cell lines, LeNDI1-1 and -2, total and complex I-dependent respiration were fully restored and largely resistant to complex I inhibitor, rotenone, indicating a dominant role of NDI1 in the transfer of electrons in the host cells. Whereas the original mutant Le1.3.1 cell grows poorly in medium containing galactose, the transformants have a fully restored growth capacity in galactose medium, although the ATP production was not totally recovered. Furthermore, the increased oxidative stress in the cells carrying the G11778A mutation was alleviated in transformants, demonstrated by a decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Finally, transformants were also shown to be desensitized to induction to apoptosis and also exhibit greater resistance to paraquat-induced cell death. It is concluded that the yeast ND11 enzyme can improve the oxidative phosphorylation capacity in cells carrying the G11778A mutation and protect the cells from oxidative stress and cell death. PMID:17320357

  20. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  1. Docetaxel induced-JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway increases degradation of HIF-1α and causes cancer cell death under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eun-Taex; Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Hong, Soon-Sun; Park, Heon Joo

    2016-01-01

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) regulates the expression of more than 70 genes involved in angiogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance. Thus, there is growing interest in using HIF-1 inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Docetaxel, a Food and Drug Administration-approved anticancer drug, is reported to enhance HIF-1α degradation. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel pretreatment enhanced the polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of HIF-1α, and increased cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel also activated the prolyl hydroxylase, PHD1, in hypoxia, and pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHD1 prevented docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death. Additionally, siRNA-mediated JNK2 knockdown blocked docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death by inhibiting PHD1 activation. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that inhibition of the JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway significantly increased the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 in docetaxel-treated cancer cells under hypoxia. Consistent with these results, docetaxel-treated JNK2-knockdown tumors grew much faster than control tumors through inhibition of docetaxel-induced PHD1 activation and degradation of HIF-1α. Our results collectively show that, under hypoxic conditions, docetaxel induces apoptotic cell death through JNK2/PHD1 signaling-mediated HIF-1α degradation. PMID:27263528

  2. Mimulone-induced autophagy through p53-mediated AMPK/mTOR pathway increases caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun-Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  3. Mimulone-Induced Autophagy through p53-Mediated AMPK/mTOR Pathway Increases Caspase-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  4. Apoptotic cell death during Drosophila oogenesis is differentially increased by electromagnetic radiation depending on modulation, intensity and duration of exposure.

    PubMed

    Sagioglou, Niki E; Manta, Areti K; Giannarakis, Ioannis K; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2016-01-01

    Present generations are being repeatedly exposed to different types and doses of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) from wireless technologies (FM radio, TETRA and TV stations, GSM and UMTS phones/base stations, Wi-Fi networks, DECT phones). Although there is controversy on the published data regarding the non-thermal effects of NIR, studies have convincingly demonstrated bioeffects. Their results indicate that modulation, intensity, exposure duration and model system are important factors determining the biological response to irradiation. Attempting to address the dependence of NIR bioeffectiveness on these factors, apoptosis in the model biological system Drosophila melanogaster was studied under different exposure protocols. A signal generator was used operating alternatively under Continuous Wave (CW) or Frequency Modulation (FM) emission modes, at three power output values (10 dB, 0, -10 dB), under four carrier frequencies (100, 395, 682, 900 MHz). Newly emerged flies were exposed either acutely (6 min or 60 min on the 6th day), or repeatedly (6 min or 60 min daily for the first 6 days of their life). All exposure protocols resulted in an increase of apoptotic cell death (ACD) observed in egg chambers, even at very low electric field strengths. FM waves seem to have a stronger effect in ACD than continuous waves. Regarding intensity and temporal exposure pattern, EMF-biological tissue interaction is not linear in response. Intensity threshold for the induction of biological effects depends on frequency, modulation and temporal exposure pattern with unknown so far mechanisms. Given this complexity, translating such experimental data into possible human exposure guidelines is yet arbitrary.

  5. Up-regulation of TRPV1 in mononuclear cells of end-stage kidney disease patients increases susceptibility to N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA)-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Cassandra I; Fassett, Robert G; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2009-10-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 channels function as sensors for a variety of noxious and inflammatory signals, including capsaicin, heat and protons, and are up-regulated under inflammatory conditions. As end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is associated with chronic inflammation, impaired immunity and depressed lymphocyte numbers, we sought to determine whether altered TRPV1 (and related TRPV2) expression in immune cells might be a contributing factor. TRPV1 and TRPV2 mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was similar in controls and ESKD patients by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. However, using immunocytochemistry, TRPV1-immunoreactivity was significantly higher and TRPV2-immunoreactivity was significantly lower in PBMC from ESKD patients compared to controls. The plant-derived TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) and the putative endovanilloid/endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) and N-oleoyl-dopamine (OLDA), induced concentration-dependent death of PBMC from healthy donors with a rank order of potency of RTX>NADA>OLDA>capsaicin. TRPV1 (5'-iodoresiniferatoxin) and cannabinoid (CB2; AM630) receptor antagonists blocked the cytotoxic effect of NADA. In subsequent experiments, PBMC from ESKD patients exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to NADA-induced death compared to PBMC from controls. The apparent up-regulation of TRPV1 may be a response to the inflammatory milieu in which PBMC exist in ESKD and may be responsible for the increased susceptibility of these cells to NADA-induced death, providing a possible explanation as to why ESKD patients have reduced lymphocyte counts and impaired immune function. Thus, TRPV1 (and possibly CB2) antagonists may have potential for the treatment of immune dysfunction in ESKD.

  6. Loss of Bcl-2 in invasive breast cancer is associated with high rates of cell death, but also with increased proliferative activity.

    PubMed Central

    van Slooten, H. J.; van de Vijver, M. J.; van de Velde, C. J.; van Dierendonck, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    Bcl-2 has been demonstrated to inhibit apoptosis in breast cancer cells in vitro, and the ratio between Bcl-2 and its proapoptotic homologue Bax seems to be an important determinant of cellular sensitivity to induction of apoptosis. However, little information is available on the relationship between Bcl-2 and the rate of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in breast tumours. From a series of 441 premenopausal, lymphnode-negative breast cancer patients, a subset of 49 tumours was selected in which immunostaining for the 26-kDa isoform of Bcl-2 was either absent (n = 23) or very high (n = 26). High expression of Bcl-2 was found to be strongly associated with low rates of apoptotic (P < 0.001) and necrotic cell death (P < 0.001). The mean value of the apoptotic index was 2.69%+/-1.40% in Bcl-2-negative tumours and 0.68%+/-1.00% in Bcl-2-positive tumours. Expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax correlated neither with Bcl-2 nor with the frequency of apoptotic cells. Immunostaining for the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 homologue BcI-X(L) correlated with Bcl-2 expression (P < 0.001) but not with apoptosis. High proliferation rate and high tumour grade (Bloom-Richardson) were strongly associated with absence of Bcl-2 expression (P< 0.001). p53 accumulation was associated with absence of Bcl-2 expression and increased apoptotic activity. Loss of Bcl-2 expression was strongly correlated with increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death, high proliferation rate and high tumour grade, supporting a model in which Bcl-2 not only mediates cell death, but also cell division in breast cancer tissue, and in which regulation of cell division and cell death are tightly linked. Images Figure 1 PMID:9514059

  7. Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) Improves Neurogenesis: Increase of Neuronal Differentiation Yield by Preventing Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Ana S; Soares, Nuno L; Vieira, Melissa; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases lead to impairment or death of neurons in the central nervous system. Stem cell based therapies are promising strategies currently under investigation. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous product of heme degradation by heme oxygenase (HO) activity. Administration of CO at low concentrations produces several beneficial effects in distinct tissues, namely anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. Herein the CO role on modulation of neuronal differentiation was assessed. Three different models with increasing complexity were used: human neuroblastoma SH-S5Y5 cell line, human teratocarcinoma NT2 cell line and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). Cell lines were differentiated into post-mitotic neurons by treatment with retinoic acid (RA) supplemented with CO-releasing molecule A1 (CORM-A1). CORM-A1 positively modulated neuronal differentiation, since it increased final neuronal production and enhanced the expression of specific neuronal genes: Nestin, Tuj1 and MAP2. Furthermore, during neuronal differentiation process, there was an increase in proliferative cell number (ki67 mRNA expressing cells) and a decrease in cell death (lower propidium iodide (PI) uptake, limitation of caspase-3 activation and higher Bcl-2 expressing cells). CO supplementation did not increase the expression of RA receptors. In the case of SH-S5Y5 model, small amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation emerges as important signaling molecules during CO-promoted neuronal differentiation. CO's improvement of neuronal differentiation yield was validated using OHSC as ex vivo model. CORM-A1 treatment of OHSC promoted higher levels of cells expressing the neuronal marker Tuj1. Still, CORM-A1 increased cell proliferation assessed by ki67 expression and also prevented cell death, which was followed by increased Bcl-2 expression, decreased levels of active caspase-3 and PI uptake. Likewise, ROS signaling emerged as key factors in CO

  8. Cell death: a dynamic response concept.

    PubMed

    Loos, Benjamin; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2009-07-01

    Autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis have previously been described as distinct static processes that induce and execute cell death. Due to an increased use of novel techniques in mapping cellular death-techniques which allow for reporting of real-time data-the existence of "grey zones" between cell death modes and the existence of the "point of no return" within these have been revealed. This revelation demands the integration of new concepts in describing the cellular death process. Furthermore, since the contribution of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is still poorly understood, it is important to accurately describe its function within the dynamic framework of cell death. In this review cell death is viewed as a dynamic and integrative cellular response to ensure the highest likelihood of self-preservation. Suggestions are offered for conceptualizing cell death modes and their morphological features, both individually and in relation to one another. It addresses the need for distinguishing between dying cells and dead cells so as to better locate and control the onset of cell death. Most importantly, the fundamental role of autophagy, autophagic flux, and the effects of the intracellular metabolic environment on the kinetics of the cell death modes are stressed. It also contextualizes the kinetic dimension of cell death as a process and aims to contribute towards a better understanding of autophagy as a key mechanism within this process. Understanding the dynamic nature of the cell death process and autophagy's central role can reveal new insight for therapeutic intervention in preventing cell death.

  9. Programmed cell death in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-02-23

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an evolutionarily conserved contributor to nervous system development. In the vertebrate peripheral nervous system, PCD is the basis of the neurotrophic theory, whereby cell death results from a surplus of neurons relative to target and competition for neurotrophic factors. In addition to stochastic cell death, PCD can be intrinsically determined by cell lineage or position and timing in both invertebrate and vertebrate central nervous systems. The underlying PCD molecular mechanisms include intrinsic transcription factor cascades and regulators of competence/susceptibility to cell death. Here, we provide a framework for understanding neural PCD from its regulation to its functions.

  10. Tetrandrine and caffeine modulated cell cycle and increased glioma cell death via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Cherng; Hwang, Juen-Haur; Chiu, Wen-Hsuan; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Viability, cell cycle distribution, and expressions of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α (eIF-2α), cyclin D1, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) of RT-2 glioma cells were assayed under treatment of tetrandrine and caffeine for 48 h. The results showed that cell viability decreased significantly under treatment with tetrandrine (5 μM) alone or under combined treatment with tetrandrine (5 μM) and caffeine (0.5 or 1 mM). The ratio of RT-2 cells at sub G1 and G0/G1 stages increased significantly during combined treatment of tetrandrine (5 μM) and caffeine (0.5, 1 mM). The ratio of phospharylated eIF-2α to dephospharylated eIF-2α increased, whereas cyclin D1 decreased significantly under combined treatment of tetrandrine (5 μM) and caffeine (1 mM). The cleaved PARP-1 to PARP-1 ratio was elevated significantly under treatment of 5 μM tetrandrine alone, and combined treatment of 5 μM tetrandrine and caffeine (0.5, 1 mM). The expression levels of AIF increased significantly under treatment of 5 μM tetrandrine alone or 1 mM caffeine alone, and combined treatment of 5 μM tetrandrine and caffeine (0.5, 1 mM). In conclusion, tetrandrine and caffeine could induce glioma cell death possibly via increasing eIF-2α phospharylation, decreasing cyclin-D1 expression, and increasing caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis pathways. PMID:24738643

  11. [Increased expressions of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands in peripheral CD3(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chai, Lin; Liang, Junli; Lu, Zhizhong; Yang, Siwei

    2016-09-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and ligands, as well as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods The peripheral blood was collected from 15 early HCC patients, 13 progressive HCC patients and 12 healthy volunteers. PBMCs was isolated from the peripheral blood. The expressions of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 in PBMCs were detected by flow cytometry; the serum level of IFN-γ was determined by ELISA; the correlation of PD-1 and IFN-γ was analyzed with Pearson's correlation and One-way ANOVA. Results The expression levels of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 in CD3(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells and serum IFN-γ level in progressive HCC patients were significantly higher than those in the healthy group and early HCC patients. The expression levels of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 in the CD3(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells of the HCC patients were positively correlated with IFN-γ. Conclusion The expression levels of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 increase in the PBMCs of HCC patients; PD-1 and PD-L1 are correlated with IFN-γ level. PMID:27609582

  12. Programmed cell death in aging

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis, are required for normal cell turnover and tissue homeostasis. Mis-regulation of PCD is increasingly implicated in aging and aging-related disease. During aging the cell turnover rate declines for several highly-mitotic tissues. Aging-associated disruptions in systemic and inter-cell signaling combined with cell-autonomous damage and mitochondrial malfunction result in increased PCD in some cell types, and decreased PCD in other cell types. Increased PCD during aging is implicated in immune system decline, skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia), loss of cells in the heart, and neurodegenerative disease. In contrast, cancer cells and senescent cells are resistant to PCD, enabling them to increase in abundance during aging. PCD pathways limit life span in fungi, but whether PCD pathways normally limit adult metazoan life span is not yet clear. PCD is regulated by a balance of negative and positive factors, including the mitochondria, which are particularly subject to aging-associated malfunction. PMID:25862945

  13. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

  14. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M.; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M.; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of WT or A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells and yeast in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. PMID:25497688

  15. Transgenic over-expression of slit2 enhances disruption of blood-brain barrier and increases cell death after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Li, Hang; He, Xiao-Fei; Li, Ge; Zhang, Qun; Liang, Feng-Ying; Jia, Huan-Huan; Li, Jiang-Chao; Huang, Ren; Pei, Zhong; Wang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-09-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and disability among male adolescents and young adults; and mild traumatic brain injury is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. The disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in brain trauma. Previously, we have found that slit2, a member of slit protein family, increases permeability of BBB. In the present study, we examined the role of slit2 in the pathogenesis of mild TBI in a mouse model of micro TBI. Rhodamine BandPI (PropidiumIodide) staining were used to detect the permeability of BBB and cell death, respectively. The leakage of Rhodamine B and cell death were significantly increased in Slit2-Tg mice than in C57 control mice after micro TBI. The present results suggest that over expression of slit2 plays a detrimental role in the pathophysiology of mild TBI.

  16. Class specific inhibition of house dust mite proteinases which cleave cell adhesion, induce cell death and which increase the permeability of lung epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Winton, Helen L; Wan, Hong; Cannell, Mark B; Thompson, Philip J; Garrod, David R; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Robinson, Clive

    1998-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens with cysteine and serine proteinase activity are risk factors for allergic sensitization and asthma. A simple method to fractionate proteinase activity from HDM faecal pellets into cysteine and serine class activity is described. Both proteinase fractions increased the permeability of epithelial cell monolayers. The effects of the serine proteinase fraction were inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). The effects of the cysteine proteinase fraction could be inhibited by E-64. No reciprocity of action was found. Treatment of epithelial monolayers with either proteinase fraction caused breakdown of tight junctions (TJs). AEBSF inhibited TJ breakdown caused by the serine proteinase fraction, whereas E-64 inhibited the cysteine proteinase fraction. Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the proteinases induced DNA cleavage which was inhibited by the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-250. Compound E-64 inhibited DNA fragmentation caused by the cysteine proteinase fraction, but was without effect on the serine proteinase fraction. Staining of proteinase-treated cells with annexin V (AV) and propidium iodide (PI) revealed a diversity of cellular responses. Some cells stained only with AV indicating early apoptosis, whilst others were dead and stained with both AV and PI. HDM proteinases exert profound effects on epithelial cells which will promote allergic sensitization; namely disruption of intercellular adhesion, increased paracellular permeability and initiation of cell death. Attenuation of these actions by proteinase inhibitors leads to the conclusion that compounds designed to be selective for the HDM enzymes may represent a novel therapy for asthma. PMID:9720772

  17. Combination of Nimbolide and TNF-α-Increases Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cell Death through JNK-mediated DR5 Up- regulation.

    PubMed

    Chantana, Chantana; Yenjai, Chavi; Reubroycharoen, Prasert; Waiwut, Pornthip

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), an inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, has previously been used in anti-cancer therapy. However, the therapeutic applications of TNF-α are largely limited due to its general toxicity and anti-apoptotic influence. To overcome this problem, the present study focused on the effect of active constituents isolated from a medicinal plant on TNF-α-induced apoptosis in human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. Nimbolide from Azadirachta indica was evaluated for cytotoxicity by methyl tetrazolium 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and phase contrast microscopy. Effects on apoptotic signaling proteins were investigated using Western blot analysis. Nimbolide showed cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells that was significantly different from the control group (<0.01), a concentration of 10 μM significantly inducing cell death (<0.01). In combination with TNF-α, nimbolide significantly enhanced-induced cell death. In apoptotic pathway, nimbolide activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (Bid) and up-regulated the death receptor 5 (DR5) level. In the combination group, nimbolide markedly sensitized TNF-α-induced JNK, Bid, caspase-3 activation and the up-regulation of DR5. Our findings overall indicate that nimbolide may enhance TNF-α-mediated cellular proliferation inhibition through increasing cell apoptosis of HT-29 cells by up-reglation of DR5 expression via the JNK pathway. PMID:27268643

  18. Chemotherapeutic Approaches for Targeting Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, M. Stacey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-01-01

    For several decades, apoptosis has taken center stage as the principal mechanism of programmed cell death in mammalian tissues. It also has been increasingly noted that conventional chemotherapeutic agents not only elicit apoptosis but other forms of nonapoptotic death such as necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. This review presents background on the signaling pathways involved in the different cell death outcomes. A re-examination of what we know about chemotherapy-induced death is vitally important in light of new understanding of nonapoptotic cell death signaling pathways. If we can precisely activate or inhibit molecules that mediate the diversity of cell death outcomes, perhaps we can succeed in more effective and less toxic chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:16614230

  19. Extracellular Histone Released from Leukemic Cells Increases Their Adhesion to Endothelium and Protects them from Spontaneous and Chemotherapy-Induced Leukemic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Gu, JaYoon; Koh, Youngil; Kim, Inho; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction When leukocytes are stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), they release nuclear contents into the extracellular milieu, called by extracellular traps (ET). The nuclear contents are mainly composed of the histone–DNA complex and neutrophil elastase. This study investigated whether leukemic cells could release ET and the released histone could induce endothelial activation, eventually resulting in leukemic progression. Methods The circulating ET were measured in 80 patients with hematologic diseases and 40 healthy controls. ET formation and ROS levels were investigated during leukemic cell proliferation in vitro. Histone-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression and cell survival were measured by flow cytometry. Results Acute leukemia patients had high levels of ET, which correlated with peripheral blast count. Leukemic cells produced high ROS levels and released extracellular histone, which was significantly blocked by antioxidants. Histone significantly induced 3 endothelial adhesion molecules expression, and promoted leukemic cell adhesion to endothelial cells, which was inhibited by histone inhibitors (heparin, polysialic acid, and activated protein C), neutralizing antibodies against these adhesion molecules, and a Toll like receptor(TLR)9 antagonist. When leukemic cells were co-cultured with endothelial cells, adherent leukemic cells showed better survival than the non-adherent ones, demonstrating that histone-treated endothelial cells protected leukemic cells from both spontaneous and chemotherapy-induced death. Conclusion Our data demonstrate for the first time that extracellular histone can be released from leukemic cells through a ROS-dependent mechanism. The released histone promotes leukemic cell adhesion by inducting the surface expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and eventually protects leukemic cells from cell death. PMID:27706246

  20. Transcription coupled repair deficiency results in increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in the UV61 cell line, the Chinese hamster homologue of Cockayne's syndrome B.

    PubMed

    Proietti De Santis, L; Garcia, C L; Balajee, A S; Brea Calvo, G T; Bassi, L; Palitti, F

    2001-03-01

    Transcription coupled repair (TCR), a special sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER), removes transcription blocking lesions rapidly from the transcribing strand of active genes. In this study, we have evaluated the importance of the TCR pathway in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in isogenic Chinese hamster cell lines, which differ in TCR efficiency. AA8 is the parental cell line, which is proficient in the genome overall repair of UV-C radiation induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4 PP) and the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) from the transcribing strand of active genes. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome (CS) group B cells) originally isolated from AA8, exhibit proficient repair of 6-4 PP but are deficient in CPD removal by the TCR pathway. Upon UV-C irradiation of cells in G1-phase, UV61 showed a dramatic increase in apoptotic response as compared to AA8 cells. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in AA8 cells also resulted in an elevated apoptotic response like that observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is largely responsible for increased apoptotic response in UV61 cells. Furthermore, the chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced by UV were also found to be higher in UV61 cells than in TCR proficient AA8 cells. This study shows that the increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in UV61 cells is due to their inability to remove CPD from the transcribing strand of active genes and suggests a protective role for TCR in the prevention of both chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and time-course appearance of apoptotic cells suggest that the conversion of UV-DNA damage into chromosomal aberrations precedes and determines the apoptotic process. PMID:11182543

  1. Programmed cell death in protists.

    PubMed

    Deponte, Marcel

    2008-07-01

    Programmed cell death in protists does not seem to make sense at first sight. However, apoptotic markers in unicellular organisms have been observed in all but one of the six/eight major groups of eukaryotes suggesting an ancient evolutionary origin of this regulated process. This review summarizes the available data on apoptotic markers in non-opisthokonts and elucidates potential functions and evolution of programmed cell death. A newly discovered family of caspase-like proteases, the metacaspases, is considered to exert the function of caspases in unicellular organisms. Important results on metacaspases, however, showed that they cannot be always correlated to the measured proteolytic activity during protist cell death. Thus, a major challenge for apoptosis research in a variety of protists remains the identification of the molecular cell death machinery.

  2. Arundic acid attenuates retinal ganglion cell death by increasing glutamate/aspartate transporter expression in a model of normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, M; Aida, T; Takeda, T; Namekata, K; Harada, T; Shinagawa, R; Tanaka, K

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and is characterized by gradual visual impairment owing to progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been implicated as a mechanism of RGC death in glaucoma. Consistent with this claim, we previously reported that glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST)-deficient mice show optic nerve degeneration that is similar to that observed in glaucoma. Therefore, drugs that upregulate GLAST may be useful for neuroprotection in glaucoma. Although many compounds are known to increase the expression of another glial glutamate transporter, EAAT2/GLT1, few compounds are shown to increase GLAST expression. Arundic acid is a glial modulating agent that ameliorates delayed ischemic brain damage by attenuating increases in extracellular glutamate. We hypothesized that arundic acid neuroprotection involves upregulation of GLAST. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of arundic acid on GLAST expression and glutamate uptake. We found that arundic acid induces GLAST expression in vitro and in vivo. In addition, arundic acid treatment prevented RGC death by upregulating GLAST in heterozygous (GLAST+/−) mice. Furthermore, arundic acid stimulates the human GLAST ortholog, EAAT1, expression in human neuroglioblastoma cells. Thus, discovering compounds that can enhance EAAT1 expression and activity may be a novel strategy for therapeutic treatment of glaucoma. PMID:25789968

  3. Caspase-independent cell deaths.

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2002-12-01

    A very common and the best understood of the mechanisms of physiological cell death is apoptosis, resulting from the activation, through either of two primary pathways, of site-specific proteases called caspases. There are, however, many other routes to cell death, prominently including autophagy and proteasomal degradation of critical constituents of cells. These routes are frequently seen in experimental situations in which initiator or effector caspases are inhibited or blocked through genetic means, but they are also encountered during normal physiological and pathological processes. Most frequently, autophagic or proteasomal degradation is used to eliminate massive cytoplasm of very large cells, especially post-mitotic cells, and these pathways are prominent even though caspase genes, messages, and pro-enzymes are found in the cells. These forms of cell death are fully physiological and not simply a default pathway for a defective cell; and they are distinct from necrosis. We do not yet understand the extent to which the pathways are linked, what mechanisms trigger the caspase-independent deaths, and how the choices are made.

  4. Regulated cell death in AKI.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Chen, Guochun; Dong, Guie; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan; Dong, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    AKI is pathologically characterized by sublethal and lethal damage of renal tubules. Under these conditions, renal tubular cell death may occur by regulated necrosis (RN) or apoptosis. In the last two decades, tubular apoptosis has been shown in preclinical models and some clinical samples from patients with AKI. Mechanistically, apoptotic cell death in AKI may result from well described extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as well as ER stress. Central converging nodes of these pathways are mitochondria, which become fragmented and sensitized to membrane permeabilization in response to cellular stress, resulting in the release of cell death-inducing factors. Whereas apoptosis is known to be regulated, tubular necrosis was thought to occur by accident until recent work unveiled several RN subroutines, most prominently receptor-interacting protein kinase-dependent necroptosis and RN induced by mitochondrial permeability transition. Additionally, other cell death pathways, like pyroptosis and ferroptosis, may also be of pathophysiologic relevance in AKI. Combination therapy targeting multiple cell-death pathways may, therefore, provide maximal therapeutic benefits. PMID:24925726

  5. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Angel L.; Mena, Salvador; Estrela, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy. PMID:24212662

  6. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  7. Hsp90 inhibition increases SOCS3 transcript and regulates migration and cell death in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Timothy L.; Gupta, Nikhil; Lehman, Amy; Ruppert, Amy S.; Yu, Lianbo; Oakes, Christopher C.; Claus, Rainer; Plass, Christoph; Maddocks, Kami J.; Andritsos, Leslie; Jones, Jeffery A.; Lucas, David M.; Johnson, Amy J.; Byrd, John C.; Hertlein, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic or transcriptional silencing of important tumor suppressors has been described to contribute to cell survival and tumorigenesis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Using gene expression microarray analysis, we found that thousands of genes are repressed more than 2-fold in CLL compared to normal B cells; however therapeutic approaches to reverse this have been limited in CLL. Following treatment with the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-DMAG, a significant number of these repressed genes were significantly re-expressed. One of the genes significantly repressed in CLL and up-regulated by 17-DMAG was suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, (SOCS3). SOCS3 has been shown to be silenced in solid tumors as well as myeloid leukemia; however little is known about the regulation in CLL. We found that 17-DMAG induces expression of SOCS3 by via the activation of p38 signaling, and subsequently inhibits AKT and STAT3 phosphorylation resulting in downstream effects on cell migration and survival. We therefore suggest that SOCS3 is an important signaling protein in CLL, and Hsp90 inhibitors represent a novel approach to target transcriptional repression in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders which exhibit a substantial degree of gene repression. PMID:27107422

  8. Cell Death in Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xinchen; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate survival of abnormal cells underlies tumorigenesis. Most discoveries about programmed cell death have come from studying model organisms. Revisiting the experimental contexts that inspired these discoveries helps explain confounding biases that inevitably accompany such discoveries. Amending early biases has added a newcomer to the collection of cell death models. Analysis of gene-dependent death in yeast revealed the surprising influence of single gene mutations on subsequent eukaryotic genome evolution. Similar events may influence the selection for mutations during early tumorigenesis. The possibility that an early random mutation might drive the selection for a cancer driver mutation is conceivable but difficult to demonstrate. This was tested in yeast, revealing that mutation of almost any gene appears to specify the selection for a new second mutation. Some human tumors contain pairs of mutant genes homologous to co-occurring mutant genes in yeast. Here we consider how yeast again provide novel insights into tumorigenesis. PMID:25725369

  9. Diabetes augments cognitive dysfunction in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion by increasing neuronal cell death: implication of cilostazol for diabetes mellitus-induced dementia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Min Kyeong; Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jung Nam; Kim, Jin Ok; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Hahn Young; Han, Jung-Soo; Shin, Chan Young; Han, Seol-Heui

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with diabetes are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Diabetes mellitus is a vascular risk factor that may increase the risk of dementia through its associations with vascular dementia. We tested whether cognitive impairment could be exacerbated in combined injury using a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion with diabetes. We also determined whether a potent inhibitor of type III phosphodiesterase could prevent the cognitive decline caused by this combined injury. We used Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats as a model of type II diabetes (T2DM) and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats as a control. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion was modeled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). At 24weeks, the non-diabetic and T2DM rats were randomly assigned into groups for the following experiments: analysis I (1) sham non-diabetic rats (n=8); (2) hypoperfused non-diabetic rats (n=9); (3) sham T2DM rats (n=8); (4) hypoperfused T2DM rats (n=9); analysis II- (1) sham T2DM rats without treatment (n=8); (2) cilostazol-treated T2DM rats (n=8); (3) hypoperfused T2DM rats (n=9); and (4) hypoperfused T2DM rats and cilostazol treatment (n=9). The rats were orally administered cilostazol (50mg/kg) or vehicle once a day for 2weeks after 24weeks. Rats performed Morris water maze tasks, and neuronal cell death and neuroinflammation were investigated via Western blots and histological investigation. Spatial memory impairment was exacerbated synergistically in the hypoperfused T2DM group compared with the hypoperfused non-diabetic group and sham T2DBM group (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, neuronal cell death was increased in the hippocampus of the hypoperfused T2DM group. Cilostazol, a PDE-3 inhibitor, improved the memory impairments through inhibition of neuronal cell death, activation of CREB phosphorylation and BDNF expression in the hypoperfused T2DM group. Our experimental results support the

  10. Regulated Cell Death in AKI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guochun; Dong, Guie; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    AKI is pathologically characterized by sublethal and lethal damage of renal tubules. Under these conditions, renal tubular cell death may occur by regulated necrosis (RN) or apoptosis. In the last two decades, tubular apoptosis has been shown in preclinical models and some clinical samples from patients with AKI. Mechanistically, apoptotic cell death in AKI may result from well described extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as well as ER stress. Central converging nodes of these pathways are mitochondria, which become fragmented and sensitized to membrane permeabilization in response to cellular stress, resulting in the release of cell death–inducing factors. Whereas apoptosis is known to be regulated, tubular necrosis was thought to occur by accident until recent work unveiled several RN subroutines, most prominently receptor-interacting protein kinase–dependent necroptosis and RN induced by mitochondrial permeability transition. Additionally, other cell death pathways, like pyroptosis and ferroptosis, may also be of pathophysiologic relevance in AKI. Combination therapy targeting multiple cell-death pathways may, therefore, provide maximal therapeutic benefits. PMID:24925726

  11. Autophagic cell death: Loch Ness monster or endangered species?

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Ming; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The concept of autophagic cell death was first established based on observations of increased autophagic markers in dying cells. The major limitation of such a morphology-based definition of autophagic cell death is that it fails to establish the functional role of autophagy in the cell death process, and thus contributes to the confusion in the literature regarding the role of autophagy in cell death and cell survival. Here we propose to define autophagic cell death as a modality of non-apoptotic or necrotic programmed cell death in which autophagy serves as a cell death mechanism, upon meeting the following set of criteria: (i) cell death occurs without the involvement of apoptosis; (ii) there is an increase of autophagic flux, and not just an increase of the autophagic markers, in the dying cells; and (iii) suppression of autophagy via both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic approaches is able to rescue or prevent cell death. In light of this new definition, we will discuss some of the common problems and difficulties in the study of autophagic cell death and also revisit some well-reported cases of autophagic cell death, aiming to achieve a better understanding of whether autophagy is a real killer, an accomplice or just an innocent bystander in the course of cell death. At present, the physiological relevance of autophagic cell death is mainly observed in lower eukaryotes and invertebrates such as Dictyostelium discoideum and Drosophila melanogaster. We believe that such a clear definition of autophagic cell death will help us study and understand the physiological or pathological relevance of autophagic cell death in mammals.

  12. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 modulates programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T

    2006-02-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae-induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events.

  13. Enzymatic dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I of the Candida albicans goa1 mutant is associated with increased reactive oxidants and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; Chen, Hui; Florentino, Abigail; Alex, Deepu; Sikorski, Patricia; Fonzi, William A; Calderone, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We have previously shown that deletion of GOA1 (growth and oxidant adaptation) of Candida albicans results in a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP synthesis, increased sensitivity to oxidants and killing by human neutrophils, and avirulence in a systemic model of candidiasis. We established that translocation of Goa1p to mitochondria occurred during peroxide stress. In this report, we show that the goa1Δ (GOA31), compared to the wild type (WT) and a gene-reconstituted (GOA32) strain, exhibits sensitivity to inhibitors of the classical respiratory chain (CRC), including especially rotenone (complex I [CI]) and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), an inhibitor of the alternative oxidase pathway (AOX), while potassium cyanide (KCN; CIV) causes a partial inhibition of respiration. In the presence of SHAM, however, GOA31 has an enhanced respiration, which we attribute to the parallel respiratory (PAR) pathway and alternative NADH dehydrogenases. Interestingly, deletion of GOA1 also results in a decrease in transcription of the alternative oxidase gene AOX1 in untreated cells as well as negligible AOX1 and AOX2 transcription in peroxide-treated cells. To explain the rotenone sensitivity, we measured enzyme activities of complexes I to IV (CI to CIV) and observed a major loss of CI activity in GOA31 but not in control strains. Enzymatic data of CI were supported by blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) experiments which demonstrated less CI protein and reduced enzyme activity. The consequence of a defective CI in GOA31 is an increase in reactive oxidant species (ROS), loss of chronological aging, and programmed cell death ([PCD] apoptosis) in vitro compared to control strains. The increase in PCD was indicated by an increase in caspase activity and DNA fragmentation in GOA31. Thus, GOA1 is required for a functional CI and partially for the AOX pathway; loss of GOA1 compromises cell survival. Further, the loss of chronological aging is new to

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist Therapy with Imidazoquinoline Enhances Cancer Cell Death and Increases Lymphocytic Infiltration and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Established Tumors of a Renal Cell Carcinoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Eric C.; Liu, Huixian; Schwartz, Michael J.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Imidazoquinolines are synthetic toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonists and potent dendritic cell activators with established anticancer activity. Here we test the hypothesis that imidazoquinoline has in vivo efficacy within established renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tumors. Immunocompetent mice bearing syngeneic RCC xenografts were treated with imidazoquinoline or placebo at two separate time points. Harvested tumors were assayed by TUNEL/caspase-3/Ki67 immunostains to evaluate cell death/apoptosis/proliferation, and CD3/B220/CD45 immunostains to evaluate T-cell lymphocyte/B-cell lymphocyte/pan-leukocyte tumor infiltration. ELISA measurement of tumor and serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1, was performed. A single imidazoquinoline dose significantly decreased RCC tumor growth by 50% and repeat dosing compounded the effect, without observed weight loss or other toxicity. Tumor immunostaining revealed significant increases in cell death and apoptosis without changes in cell proliferation, supporting induction of apoptosis as the primary mechanism of tumor growth suppression. Imidazoquinoline treatment also significantly enhanced peritumoral aggregation and intratumoral infiltration by T-cell lymphocytes, while increasing intratumoral (but not serum) levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, imidazoquinoline treatment enhances T-cell lymphocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine production within established mouse RCC tumors, while suppressing tumor growth via induction of cancer cell apoptosis. These findings support a therapeutic role for imidazoquinoline in RCC. PMID:22481916

  15. Reovirus-associated reduction of microRNA-let-7d is related to the increased apoptotic death of cancer cells in clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Nuovo, Gerard J; Garofalo, Michela; Valeri, Nicola; Roulstone, Vicki; Volinia, Stefano; Cohn, David E; Phelps, Mitch; Harrington, Kevin J; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan; Galanis, Evanthia; Sehl, Sarah; Adair, Rob; Scott, Karen; Rose, Ailsa; Toogood, Giles; Coffey, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the in situ molecular correlates of infection from cancer patients treated with reovirus. Melanoma, colorectal, and ovarian cancer samples from such patients showed variable infection of the cancer cells but not the intermingled benign cells. RT in situ PCR showed most cancer cells contained the viral genome with threefold less having productive viral infection as documented by either tubulin or reoviral protein co-expression. Productive infection in the cancer cells was strongly correlated with co-expression of p38 and caspase-3 as well as apoptosis-related death (P<0.001). The cancer cell apoptotic death was due to a marked viral-induced inhibition of microRNA-let-7d that, in turn, upregulated caspase-3 activity. In summary, reovirus shows a striking tropism to cancer cells in clinical samples. A rate-limiting factor of reovirus-induced cancer cell death is productive viral infection that operates via the marked reduction of microRNA-let-7d and concomitant elevated caspase-3 expression. PMID:22699519

  16. Integrated metabolomic and transcriptomic profiling illustrates successive phases of increasing gene expression associated with chilling-related apple peel cell death

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superficial scald is a chilling-related storage disorder of apple caused by the death of peel epidermal and hypodermal cells and associated discoloration. It is controlled using postharvest antioxidant (diphenylamine; DPA) and ethylene action inhibitor (1-methylcyclopropene; 1-MCP), and/or controlle...

  17. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  18. Deficiency of programmed cell death 4 results in increased IL-10 expression by macrophages and thereby attenuates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yang; Gao, Qi; Wang, Liyang; Guo, Chun; Zhu, Faliang; Wang, Bo; Wang, Qun; Gao, Fei; Chen, Youhai; Zhang, Lining

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) is a newly defined inhibitor of transcription and translation and a tumor suppressor. Recent studies have suggested that Pdcd4 may also be involved in some inflammatory diseases. However, its role in atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall, remains to be investigated. Here, we found that Pdcd4 deficiency in mice increased the expression of IL-10 in macrophages and decreased the expression of IL-17 in T cells in the presence of an atherosclerosis-associated stimulator in vitro and in high fat-induced atherosclerotic plaques. Importantly, knocking out Pdcd4 led to a decrease in atherosclerotic lesions in Apoe−/− mice fed a high fat diet. This effect could be partly reversed by blocking IL-10 with a neutralizing antibody but not by the application of exogenous IL-17. Further mechanistic studies revealed that Pdcd4 negatively regulated the expression of IL-10 in an ERK1/2- and p38-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that Pdcd4 deficiency attenuates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice in part through the upregulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. This indicates that endogenous Pdcd4 promotes atherosclerosis and therefore represents a potential therapeutic target for patients with atherosclerosis. PMID:26166769

  19. Autophagic and apoptotic cell death in amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z-Y; Li, E-M; Lu, S-Q; Shen, J; Cai, Y-M; Wu, Y-E; Zheng, R-M; Tan, L-J; Xu, L-Y

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine if autophagic cell death is associated with apoptosis and whether it participates in the process of term amniotic rupture. Forty pieces of fresh term amnions, including twenty from a position near the margin of the placentas and twenty from the margin of the naturally ruptured part of the placentas in term gestation were collected, respectively. The amnions were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and amniotic epithelial (AE) cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Autophagic and apoptotic cell death (PCD) were assayed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) or flow cytometry using monodansylcadaverin (MDC) and propidium iodide (PI) stain. BCL(2) and BAX were examined by immunoblotting. Under SEM the amniotic epithelia appeared normal in the position near the placenta. They had an atrophied appearance in the margin of their natural broken parts. In the AE cells PCD was divided into three subtypes by TEM: autophagic cell death with positive stains of MDC and PI; apoptotic cell death; and the mixed type. Quantitative detection showed that there were more death cells, including autophagic and apoptotic, in the AE cells near the ruptured parts than near the placentas. An increased expression of BAX and a decreased expression of BCL(2) protein in the AE cells near the broken margin were observed. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death by the intrinsic pathway are the basic event in the AE cell and they are involved in the cause of membrane rupture of the human amnion in term gestation.

  20. PTEN Overexpression Cooperates With Lithium to Reduce the Malignancy and to Increase Cell Death by Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Suppression in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Robbs, Bruno Kaufmann; Bastos, Lilian G; de Souza, Waldemir F; Vidal, Flávia C B; Viola, João P B; Morgado-Diaz, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is a well-established non-competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a kinase that is involved in several cellular processes related to cancer progression. GSK-3β is regulated upstream by PI3K/Akt, which is negatively modulated by PTEN. The role that lithium plays in cancer is controversial because lithium can activate or inhibit survival signaling pathways depending on the cell type. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which lithium can modulate events related to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and evaluated the role that survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and PTEN play in this context. We show that the administration of lithium decreased the proliferative potential of CRC cells in a GSK-3β-independent manner but induced the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. Furthermore, high doses of lithium increased apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreased proteins levels of Akt and PTEN. Then, cells that were induced to overexpress PTEN were treated with lithium; we observed that low doses of lithium strongly increased apoptosis. Additionally, PTEN overexpression reduced proliferation, but this effect was minor compared with that in cells treated with lithium alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment separately reduced cell migration, colony formation, and invasion, and these effects were enhanced when lithium treatment and PTEN overexpression were combined. In conclusion, our findings indicate that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment cooperate to reduce the malignancy of CRC cells and highlight lithium and PTEN as potential candidates for studies to identify new therapeutic approaches for CRC treatment.

  1. Cell death in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Rao, Rammohan V.; Mehlen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease trigger neuronal cell death through endogenous suicide pathways. Surprisingly, although the cell death itself may occur relatively late in the course of the degenerative process, the mediators of the underlying cell-death pathways have shown promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:17051206

  2. Reduction in Aβ-induced cell death in the hippocampus of 17β-estradiol-treated female rats is associated with an increase in IGF-I signaling and somatostatinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Perianes-Cachero, Aránzazu; Canelles, Sandra; Aguado-Llera, David; Frago, Laura M; Toledo-Lobo, María Val; Carrera, Iván; Cacabelos, Ramón; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Arilla-Ferreiro, Eduardo; Barrios, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Several studies indicate that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-induced cell death and activates factors associated with learning and memory, a function involving the hippocampal somatostatinergic system. As alterations in somatostatin have been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease, we examined whether E2 prevents changes in the hippocampal somatostatinergic system induced by Aβ25-35 and cell death, as well as the possible involvement of leptin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I signaling. We also measured the levels of Aβ proteases neprilysin and insulin-degrading-enzyme. Co-administration of E2 with Aβ25-35 reduced both its levels and cell death, in addition to preventing the Aβ-induced depletion of some somatostatinergic parameters. Activation of leptin and IGF-I pathways increased after E2 co-administration, and this correlated with changes in the somatostatinergic system. Changes in some components of this system were inversely related with Aβ levels and cell death. Moreover, neprilysin levels were increased only in Aβ plus E2-treated rats and E2 prevented the Aβ-induced insulin-degrading-enzyme reduction. Our results suggest that the E2-induced reduction in cell death is related to lower Aβ levels, probably because of IGF-I and somatostatin modulation of Aβ proteases. We asked how 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced cell death. E2 co-administration prevents Aβ-produced depletion of hippocampal somatostatin (SRIF) by an IGF-I-mediated mechanism, being related this protective effect with an increase in Aβ proteases. Our results suggest that the E2-induced reduction in cell death is related to lower Aβ levels, probably because of SRIF modulation of Aβ proteases. CREB, cAMP response element-binding protein; IGF-I, insulin-like growth factor-I; STAT3, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3.

  3. Pathogen Tactics to Manipulate Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M Shahid; McCormack, Maggie E; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M

    2016-07-11

    Cell death is a vital process for multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death (PCD) functions in a variety of processes including growth, development, and immune responses for homeostasis maintenance. In particular, plants and animals utilize PCD to control pathogen invasion and infected cell populations. Despite some similarity, there are a number of key differences between how these organisms initiate and regulate cell death. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile, lack a circulatory system, and have additional cellular structures, including cell walls and chloroplasts. Plant cells have the autonomous ability to induce localized cell death using conserved eukaryotic pathways as well as unique plant-specific pathways. Thus, in order to successfully infect host cells, pathogens must subvert immune responses and avoid detection to prevent PCD and allow infection. Here we discuss the roles of cell death in plant immune responses and the tactics pathogens utilize to avert cell death. PMID:27404256

  4. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  5. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  6. Increases in heroin overdose deaths - 28 States, 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Rose A; Paulozzi, Len J; Bauer, Michael J; Burleson, Richard W; Carlson, Rick E; Dao, Dan; Davis, James W; Dudek, Jennifer; Eichler, Beth Ann; Fernandes, Jessie C; Fondario, Anna; Gabella, Barbara; Hume, Beth; Huntamer, Theron; Kariisa, Mbabazi; Largo, Thomas W; Miles, JoAnne; Newmyer, Ashley; Nitcheva, Daniela; Perez, Beatriz E; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Sabel, Jennifer C; Skiba, Jessica; Slavova, Svetla; Stone, Kathy; Tharp, John M; Wendling, Tracy; Wright, Dagan; Zehner, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    Nationally, death rates from prescription opioid pain reliever (OPR) overdoses quadrupled during 1999-2010, whereas rates from heroin overdoses increased by <50%. Individual states and cities have reported substantial increases in deaths from heroin overdose since 2010. CDC analyzed recent mortality data from 28 states to determine the scope of the heroin overdose death increase and to determine whether increases were associated with changes in OPR overdose death rates since 2010. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that, from 2010 to 2012, the death rate from heroin overdose for the 28 states increased from 1.0 to 2.1 per 100,000, whereas the death rate from OPR overdose declined from 6.0 per 100,000 in 2010 to 5.6 per 100,000 in 2012. Heroin overdose death rates increased significantly for both sexes, all age groups, all census regions, and all racial/ethnic groups other than American Indians/Alaska Natives. OPR overdose mortality declined significantly among males, persons aged <45 years, persons in the South, and non-Hispanic whites. Five states had increases in the OPR death rate, seven states had decreases, and 16 states had no change. Of the 18 states with statistically reliable heroin overdose death rates (i.e., rates based on at least 20 deaths), 15 states reported increases. Decreases in OPR death rates were not associated with increases in heroin death rates. The findings indicate a need for intensified prevention efforts aimed at reducing overdose deaths from all types of opioids while recognizing the demographic differences between the heroin and OPR-using populations. Efforts to prevent expansion of the number of OPR users who might use heroin when it is available should continue.

  7. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  8. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. PMID:27516615

  9. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  10. Loss of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation is associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma-specific death

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Thai H.; Kapur, Payal; Joseph, Richard W.; Serie, Daniel J.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Tong, Pan; Wang, Jing; Castle, Erik P.; Stanton, Melissa L.; Cheville, John C.; Jonasch, Eric; Brugarolas, James; Parker, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of clear cell renal cell carcinomas identified loss-of-function mutations of SETD2, a gene that encodes a nonredundant methytransferase responsible for histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3), and H3K36me3 is progressively deregulated in metastases. However, few data exist regarding the impact of loss of H3K36me3 on outcomes. We assessed the association of SETD2 DNA alterations and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression with overall survival using The Cancer Genome Atlas clear cell renal carcinoma data (N=411). Additionally, we assessed the association of H3K36 loss of methylation with renal cell carcinoma-specific survival and progression-free survival using an independent cohort at Mayo Clinic (N=1,454). Overall survival, renal cell carcinoma-specific survival and progression-free survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method and differences in survival across groups was compared using Cox regression models, adjusted for age and the Mayo SSIGN (stage, size, grade, and necrosis) score. In The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort, SETD2 DNA alterations or mRNA expression was not associated with overall survival (P>.05). In the Mayo cohort, patients with H3K36me3-negative tumors were 2 times more likely to experience renal cell carcinoma-specific death than patients with H3K36me3-positive tumors (hazard ratio, 2.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.77–2.81); P<0.0001. After stratifying for the SSIGN score, H3K36me3-negative tumors in the low-risk SSIGN group had a worse renal cell carcinoma–specific survival (hazard ratio, 2.18 [95% confidence interval, 1.09–4.36]); P=.03. While SETD2 DNA and mRNA alterations are not associated with overall survival, we provide evidence that deregulation of the H3K36me3 axis is associated with a higher risk of renal cell carcinoma-specific death. This association remains significant after stratifying for the SSIGN score, particularly among those patients with low-risk tumors. PMID:26516698

  11. Spontaneous cell death in the chorion laeve.

    PubMed

    Parmley, T H

    1990-06-01

    The granulosa cells of the dominant follicle grow, differentiate, and die in a roughly predictable amount of time. Because the simultaneous death of this population of cells results in menstruation, one may say that the life span of this population of cells "times" the menstrual cycle. Metamorphosis in amphibians and morphogenesis in several vertebrates are other examples of developmental milestones that are "timed" by the life span of specific cell populations. In all these examples, cell death is associated with a specific histology, apoptosis. Apoptosis characterizes the cell death that produces the progressive disappearance of the trophoblast in the chorion laeve as term is approached. Therefore, the histology of trophoblastic death in the near-term chorion laeve corresponds to that of populations of cells with life spans that "time" developmental events. The trophoblastic cell population of the chorion laeve is prematurely destroyed by infiltrating maternal leukocytes in cases of chorioamnionitis.

  12. Sulfur dioxide induced programmed cell death in Vicia guard cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Huilan; Yin, Jingjing; Liu, Xin; Jing, Xiuqing; Fan, Sanhong; Zhang, Hufang

    2012-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) induced nuclear condensation and nuclear fragmentation and rapid loss of guard cell viability in detached epidermis of Vicia leaves at concentrations of 1 mM and higher (3 h exposure). Caspase inhibitors Z-Asp-CH(2)-DCB (0.1 mM) and TLCK (0.1 mM) markedly suppressed SO(2)-induced cell death. The typical nuclear morphological changes and the inhibition effects of caspase inhibitors suggest the activation of a programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. SO(2)-induced cell death can be blocked by either antioxidants (0.1 mM AsA or 200 U/mL CAT) or Ca(2+) antagonists (0.1mM EGTA or LaCl(3)). AsA and CAT also blocked SO(2)-induced ROS production and [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase. However, EGTA and LaCl(3) can inhibit SO(2)-induced [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase, but cannot suppress SO(2)-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that high concentrations of SO(2) induce guard cell death via a PCD pathway through ROS mediating [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation, which causes harmful effects to plants.

  13. Modulation of programmed cell death by medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Thatte, U; Bagadey, S; Dahanukar, S

    2000-02-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis), a form of cell death, described by Kerr and Wyllie some 20 years ago, has generated considerable interest in recent years. The mechanisms by which this mode of cell death (seen both in animal and plant cells), takes place have been examined in detail. Extracellular signals and intracellular events have been elaborated. Of interest to the clinician, is the concentrated effort to study pharmacological modulation of programmed cell death. The attempt to influence the natural phenomenon of programmed cell death stems from the fact that it is reduced (like in cancer) or increased (like in neurodegenerative diseases) in several clinical situations. Thus, chemicals that can modify programmed cell death are likely to be potentially useful drugs. From foxglove, which gave digitalis to the Pacific Yew from which came taxol, plants have been a source of research material for useful drugs. Recently, a variety of plant extracts have been investigated for their ability to influence the apoptotic process. This article discusses some of the interesting data. The ability of plants to influence programmed cell death in cancerous cells in an attempt to arrest their proliferation has been the topic of much research. Various cell-lines like HL60, human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (KIM-1), a cholangiocarcinoma cell-line (KMC-1), B-cell hybridomas, U937 a monocytic cell-line, HeLa cells, human lymphoid leukemia (MOLT-4B) cells and K562 cells have been studied. The agents found to induce programmed cell death (measured either morphologically or flow cytometrically) included extracts of plants like mistletoe and Semicarpus anacardium. Isolated compounds like bryonolic acid (from Trichosanthes kirilowii var. Japonica, crocin (from saffron) and allicin (from Allium sativum) have also been found to induce programmed cell death and therefore arrest proliferation. Even Chinese herbal medicine "Sho-saiko-to" induces programmed cell death in selected

  14. Cell Death Control by Matrix Metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dirk; Gomez-Barrera, Juan A; Pasule, Christian; Brack-Frick, Ursula B; Sieferer, Elke; Nicholson, Tim M; Pfannstiel, Jens; Stintzi, Annick; Schaller, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that play important roles in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in animals, the proteases responsible for dynamic modifications of the plant cell wall are largely unknown. A possible involvement of MMPs was addressed by cloning and functional characterization of Sl2-MMP and Sl3-MMP from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The two tomato MMPs were found to resemble mammalian homologs with respect to gelatinolytic activity, substrate preference for hydrophobic amino acids on both sides of the scissile bond, and catalytic properties. In transgenic tomato seedlings silenced for Sl2/3-MMP expression, necrotic lesions were observed at the base of the hypocotyl. Cell death initiated in the epidermis and proceeded to include outer cortical cell layers. In later developmental stages, necrosis spread, covering the entire stem and extending into the leaves of MMP-silenced plants. The subtilisin-like protease P69B was identified as a substrate of Sl2- and Sl3-MMP. P69B was shown to colocalize with Sl-MMPs in the apoplast of the tomato hypocotyl, it exhibited increased stability in transgenic plants silenced for Sl-MMP activity, and it was cleaved and inactivated by Sl-MMPs in vitro. The induction of cell death in Sl2/3-MMP-silenced plants depended on P69B, indicating that Sl2- and Sl3-MMP act upstream of P69B in an extracellular proteolytic cascade that contributes to the regulation of cell death in tomato. PMID:27208293

  15. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  16. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917-derived factors reduce cell death and late apoptosis and increase transepithelial electrical resistance in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Cheah, Ker Y; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the capacity for supernatants (SNs) derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), cultured under different growth conditions, to prevent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage. EcN was cultured in: Luria Bertani (LB) broth, tryptone soya broth (TSB), de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were treated with the following EcN SNs: LB(+), TSB(+), MRS(+), and M17(+) in the presence and absence of 5-FU (1.5 or 5 μM). Cell viability, apoptotic activity and cell monolayer permeability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) assays, respectively. 5-FU significantly reduced cell viability (P<0.05) at both 24 and 48 h. However, only EcN SN produced from LB and M17 growth media significantly decreased cell death induced by 5-FU (by approximately 10% after 24 and 48 h; and 10% after 24 h, respectively [P<0.05]). When measured by flow cytometry all EcN SNs in the presence of 5-FU increased the proportion of viable cells (by 3-5% for 24 h, 3-7% for 48 h, P<0.05) and reduced late-apoptotic cells after 24 and 48 h, compared with 5-FU control. Moreover, all EcN SNs significantly reduced the disruption of IEC-6 cell barrier function induced by 5-FU by 7-10% (P<0.05), compared with DMEM control. We conclude that EcN derived factors could potentially reduce the severity of intestinal mucositis. PMID:24556751

  17. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917-derived factors reduce cell death and late apoptosis and increase transepithelial electrical resistance in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Cheah, Ker Y; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the capacity for supernatants (SNs) derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), cultured under different growth conditions, to prevent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage. EcN was cultured in: Luria Bertani (LB) broth, tryptone soya broth (TSB), de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were treated with the following EcN SNs: LB(+), TSB(+), MRS(+), and M17(+) in the presence and absence of 5-FU (1.5 or 5 μM). Cell viability, apoptotic activity and cell monolayer permeability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) assays, respectively. 5-FU significantly reduced cell viability (P<0.05) at both 24 and 48 h. However, only EcN SN produced from LB and M17 growth media significantly decreased cell death induced by 5-FU (by approximately 10% after 24 and 48 h; and 10% after 24 h, respectively [P<0.05]). When measured by flow cytometry all EcN SNs in the presence of 5-FU increased the proportion of viable cells (by 3-5% for 24 h, 3-7% for 48 h, P<0.05) and reduced late-apoptotic cells after 24 and 48 h, compared with 5-FU control. Moreover, all EcN SNs significantly reduced the disruption of IEC-6 cell barrier function induced by 5-FU by 7-10% (P<0.05), compared with DMEM control. We conclude that EcN derived factors could potentially reduce the severity of intestinal mucositis.

  18. Cell Death and DAMPs in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Billiar, Timothy R; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and inflammation are key pathologic responses of acute pancreatitis (AP), the leading cause of hospital admissions for gastrointestinal disorders. It is becoming increasingly clear that damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of AP by linking local tissue damage to systemic inflammation syndrome. Endogenous DAMPs released from dead, dying or injured cells initiate and extend sterile inflammation via specific pattern recognition receptors. Inhibition of the release and activity of DAMPs (for example, high mobility group box 1, DNA, histones and adenosine triphosphate) provides significant protection against experimental AP. Moreover, increased serum levels of DAMPs in patients with AP correlate with disease severity. These findings provide novel insight into the mechanism, diagnosis and management of AP. DAMPs might be an attractive therapeutic target in AP. PMID:25105302

  19. Autophagy and cell death in model organisms.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, N; Tavernarakis, N

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy evolved in unicellular eukaryotes as a means for surviving nutrient stress. During the course of evolution, as multicellular organisms developed specialized cell types and complex intracellular signalling networks, autophagy has been summoned to serve additional cellular functions. Numerous recent studies indicate that apart from its pro-survival role under nutrient limitation, autophagy also participates in cell death. However, the precise role of this catabolic process in dying cells is not fully understood. Although in certain situations autophagy has a protective function, in other types of cell death it actually contributes to cellular destruction. Simple model organisms ranging from the unicellular Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and the metazoans Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster provide clearly defined cell death paradigms that can be used to dissect the involvement of autophagy in cell death, at the molecular level. In this review, we survey current research in simple organisms, linking autophagy to cell death and discuss the complex interplay between autophagy, cell survival and cell death. PMID:19079286

  20. Entosis and Related Forms of Cell Death within Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, X-D

    2015-01-01

    By eliminating the unneeded or mutant cells, programmed cell death actively participates in a wide range of biological processes from embryonic development to homeostasis maintenance in adult. Continuing efforts have identified multiple cell death pathways, with apoptosis, necrosis and autophage the mostly studied. Recently a unique cell death pathway called "cell-in-cell death" has been defined. Unlike traditional cell death pathways, cell-in-cell death, characterized by cell death within another cell, is triggered by the invasion of one cell into its neighbor and executed by either lysosome-dependent degradation or caspase-dependent apoptosis. With remarkable progresses on cell-in-cell over past few years, multiple mechanisms, including entosis, cannibalism and emperitosis, are found to be responsible for cell-in-cell death. Some key questions, such as specific biochemical markers to distinguish precisely the properties of different cell-in-cell structures and the physiological and pathological relevance, remain to be addressed. In light of this situation and a surge of interests, leading scientists in this field intend to share with readers current research progresses on cell-in-cell structures from different model systems through this special edition on cell-in-cell. The mechanistic advances will be highlighted while the future researches be speculated. PMID:26511710

  1. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells.

  2. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  3. Death of mitochondria during programmed cell death of leaf mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Selga, Tūrs; Selga, Maija; Pāvila, Vineta

    2005-12-01

    The role of plant mitochondria in the programmed cell death (PCD) is widely discussed. However, spectrum and sequence of mitochondrial structural changes during different types of PCD in leaves are poorly described. Pea, cucumber and rye plants were grown under controlled growing conditions. A part of them were sprinkled with ethylene releaser to accelerate cell death. During yellowing the palisade parenchyma mitochondria were attracted to nuclear envelope. Mitochondrial matrix became electron translucent. Mitochondria entered vacuole by invagination of tonoplast and formed multivesicular bodies. Ethephon treatment increased the frequency of sticking of mitochondria to the nuclear envelope or chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Mitochondria divided by different mechanisms and became enclosed in Golgi and ER derived authopagic vacuoles or in the central vacuole. Several fold increase of the diameter of cristae became typical. In all cases mitochondria were attached to nuclear envelope. It can be considered as structural mechanism of promoting of PCD.

  4. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI.

  5. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, W G; Beers, E P; Dangl, J L; Franklin-Tong, V E; Gallois, P; Hara-Nishimura, I; Jones, A M; Kawai-Yamada, M; Lam, E; Mundy, J; Mur, L A J; Petersen, M; Smertenko, A; Taliansky, M; Van Breusegem, F; Wolpert, T; Woltering, E; Zhivotovsky, B; Bozhkov, P V

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term ‘apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during tissue and organ formation and elimination, whereas necrosis is typically found under abiotic stress. Some examples of plant PCD cannot be ascribed to either major class and are therefore classified as separate modalities. These are PCD associated with the hypersensitive response to biotrophic pathogens, which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined. PMID:21494263

  6. Programmed Cell Death and Complexity in Microbial Systems.

    PubMed

    Durand, Pierre M; Sym, Stuart; Michod, Richard E

    2016-07-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is central to organism development and for a long time was considered a hallmark of multicellularity. Its discovery, therefore, in unicellular organisms presents compelling questions. Why did PCD evolve? What is its ecological effect on communities? To answer these questions, one is compelled to consider the impacts of PCD beyond the cell, for death obviously lowers the fitness of the cell. Here, we examine the ecological effects of PCD in different microbial scenarios and conclude that PCD can increase biological complexity. In mixed microbial communities, the mode of death affects the microenvironment, impacting the interactions between taxa. Where the population comprises groups of relatives, death has a more explicit effect. Death by lysis or other means can be harmful, while PCD can evolve by providing advantages to relatives. The synchronization of death between individuals suggests a group level property is being maintained and the mode of death also appears to have had an impact during the origin of multicellularity. PCD can result in the export of fitness from the cell to the group level via re-usable resources and PCD may also provide a mechanism for how groups beget new groups comprising kin. Furthermore, PCD is a means for solving a central problem of group living - the toxic effects of death - by making resources in dying cells beneficial to others. What emerges from the data reviewed here is that while PCD carries an obvious cost to the cell, it can be a driver of complexity in microbial communities. PMID:27404254

  7. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis.

  8. Depletion of Intracellular Thiols and Increased Production of 4-Hydroxynonenal that Occur During Cryopreservation of Stallion Spermatozoa Lead to Caspase Activation, Loss of Motility, and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Martin Muñoz, Patricia; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Vizuete, Guillermo; Plaza Dávila, Maria; Rodriguez Martinez, Heriberto; Peña, Fernando J

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to sperm death and the accelerated senescence of cryopreserved spermatozoa. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered relevant signaling molecules for sperm function, only becoming detrimental when ROS homeostasis is lost. We hereby hypothesize that a major component of the alteration of ROS homeostasis in cryopreserved spermatozoa is the exhaustion of intrinsic antioxidant defense mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, semen from seven stallions was frozen using a standard technique. The parameters of sperm quality (motility, velocity, and membrane integrity) and markers of sperm senescence (caspase 3, 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitochondrial membrane potential) were assessed before and after cryopreservation. Changes in the intracellular thiol content were also monitored. Cryopreservation caused significant increases in senescence markers as well as dramatic depletion of intracellular thiols to less than half of the initial values (P < 0.001) postthaw. Interestingly, very high and positive correlations were observed among thiol levels with sperm functionality postthaw: total motility (r = 0.931, P < 0.001), progressive motility (r = 0.904, P < 0.001), and percentage of live spermatozoa without active caspase 3 (r = 0.996, P < 0.001). In contrast, negative correlations were detected between active caspase 3 and thiol content both in living (r = -0.896) and dead (r = -0.940) spermatozoa; additionally, 4-hydroxynonenal levels were negatively correlated with thiol levels (r = -0.856). In conclusion, sperm functionality postthaw correlates with the maintenance of adequate levels of intracellular thiols. The accelerated senescence of thawed spermatozoa is related to oxidative and electrophilic stress induced by increased production of 4-hydroxynoneal in thawed samples once intracellular thiols are depleted.

  9. Enhanced UV-B radiation during pupal stage reduce body mass and fat content, while increasing deformities, mortality and cell death in female adults of solitary bee Osmia bicornis.

    PubMed

    Wasielewski, Oskar; Wojciechowicz, Tatiana; Giejdasz, Karol; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-08-01

    The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on the oogenesis and morpho-anatomical characteristics of the European solitary red mason bee Osmia bicornis L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) were tested under laboratory conditions. Cocooned females in the pupal stage were exposed directly to different doses (0, 9.24, 12.32, and 24.64 kJ/m(2) /d) of artificial UV-B. Our experiments revealed that enhanced UV-B radiation can reduce body mass and fat body content, cause deformities and increase mortality. Following UV exposure at all 3 different doses, the body mass of bees was all significantly reduced compared to the control, with the highest UV dose causing the largest reduction. Similarly, following UV-B radiation, in treated groups the fat body index decreased and the fat body index was the lowest in the group receiving the highest dose of UV radiation. Mortality and morphological deformities, between untreated and exposed females varied considerably and increased with the dose of UV-B radiation. Morphological deformities were mainly manifested in the wings and mouthparts, and occurred more frequently with an increased dose of UV. Cell death was quantified by the Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay (DNA fragmentation) during early stages of oogenesis of O. bicornis females. The bees, after UV-B exposure exhibited more germarium cells with fragmented DNA. The TUNEL test indicated that in germarium, low doses of UV-B poorly induced the cell death during early development. However, exposure to moderate UV-B dose increased programmed cell death. In females treated with the highest dose of UV-B the vast majority of germarium cells were TUNEL-positive. PMID:24644123

  10. Programmed cell death in cereal aleurone.

    PubMed

    Fath, A; Bethke, P; Lonsdale, J; Meza-Romero, R; Jones, R

    2000-10-01

    Progress in understanding programmed cell death (PCD) in the cereal aleurone is described. Cereal aleurone cells are specialized endosperm cells that function to synthesize and secrete hydrolytic enzymes that break down reserves in the starchy endosperm. Unlike the cells of the starchy endosperm, aleurone cells are viable in mature grain but undergo PCD when germination is triggered or when isolated aleurone layers or protoplasts are incubated in gibberellic acid (GA). Abscisic acid (ABA) slows down the process of aleurone cell death and isolated aleurone protoplasts can be kept alive in media containing ABA for up to 6 months. Cell death in barley aleurone occurs only after cells become highly vacuolated and is manifested in an abrupt loss of plasma membrane integrity. Aleurone cell death does not follow the apoptotic pathway found in many animal cells. The hallmarks of apoptosis, including internucleosomal DNA cleavage, plasma membrane and nuclear blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, are not observed in dying aleurone cells. PCD in barley aleurone cells is accompanied by the accumulation of a spectrum of nuclease and protease activities and the loss of organelles as a result of cellular autolysis.

  11. A necrotic cell death model in a protist.

    PubMed

    Laporte, C; Kosta, A; Klein, G; Aubry, L; Lam, D; Tresse, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    2007-02-01

    While necrotic cell death is attracting considerable interest, its molecular bases are still poorly understood. Investigations in simple biological models, taken for instance outside the animal kingdom, may benefit from less interference from other cell death mechanisms and from better experimental accessibility, while providing phylogenetic information. Can necrotic cell death occur outside the animal kingdom? In the protist Dictyostelium, developmental stimuli induced in an autophagy mutant a stereotyped sequence of events characteristic of necrotic cell death. This sequence included swift mitochondrial uncoupling with mitochondrial 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence, ATP depletion and increased oxygen consumption. This was followed by perinuclear clustering of dilated mitochondria. Rapid plasma membrane rupture then occurred, which was evidenced by time-lapse videos and quantified by FACS. Of additional interest, developmental stimuli and classical mitochondrial uncouplers triggered a similar sequence of events, and exogenous glucose delayed plasma membrane rupture in a nonglycolytic manner. The occurrence of necrotic cell death in the protist Dictyostelium (1) provides a very favorable model for further study of this type of cell death, and (2) strongly suggests that the mechanism underlying necrotic cell death was present in an ancestor common to the Amoebozoa protists and to animals and has been conserved in evolution.

  12. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  13. Nineteenth century research on cell death.

    PubMed

    Clarke, P G H; Clarke, S

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews research on cell death in the 19th C. The first report of cell death was by Vogt in 1842, which was remarkably soon after the establishment of the cell theory by Schleiden and Schwann between 1838 and 1842. Initial studies on cell death, including that of Vogt, focused on its occurrence in metamorphosis (Vogt, 1842; Prévost and Lebert, 1844; Weismann, 1863-1866) or in blatant pathology (Virchow, 1858), but as histological techniques improved it was found to be involved in more subtle roles in numerous situations including endochondral ossification (Stieda, 1872), ovarian follicle atresia (Flemming, 1885), cell turnover (Nissen, 1886), the wholesale loss of a population of sensory neurons in fish (Beard, 1889), and the naturally occurring histogenetic death of myocytes (Felix, 1889) and neurons (Collin, 1906). The current categorization of cell death into about three main morphological types has 19th century roots in that apoptosis was well described by Flemming (1885), who called it chromatolysis, and various authors including Noetzel (1895) proposed a threefold classification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later". PMID:23069997

  14. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  15. Increased expression of programmed death (PD)-1 and its ligand PD-L1 correlates with impaired cell-mediated immunity in high-risk human papillomavirus-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Song, Yan; Lu, Yun-Long; Sun, Jun-Zhong; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Impaired local cellular immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, the programmed death 1/programmed death 1 ligand (PD-1/PD-L1; CD279/CD274) pathway was demonstrated to play a critical role in attenuating T-cell responses and promoting T-cell tolerance during chronic viral infections. In this study, we examined the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on cervical T cells and dendritic cells (DCs), respectively, from 40 women who were HR-HPV-negative (-) or HR-HPV-positive (+) with CIN grades 0, I and II-III. We also measured interferon-γ, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 in cervical exudates. The most common HPV type was HPV 16, followed by HPV 18, 33, 51 and 58. PD-1 and PD-L1 expression on cervical T cells and DCs, respectively, was associated with HR-HPV positivity and increased in parallel with increasing CIN grade. The opposite pattern was observed for CD80 and CD86 expression on DCs, which decreased in HR-HPV+ patients in parallel with increasing CIN grade. Similarly, reduced levels of the T helper type 1 cytokines interferon-γ and IL-12 and increased levels of the T helper type 2 cytokine IL-10 in cervical exudates correlated with HR-HPV positivity and CIN grade. Our results suggest that up-regulation of the inhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may negatively regulate cervical cell-mediated immunity to HPV and contribute to the progression of HR-HPV-related CIN. These results may aid in the development of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway-based strategies for immunotherapy of HR-HPV-related CIN.

  16. Folic acid deficiency increases delayed neuronal death, DNA damage, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 immunoreactivity, and gliosis in the hippocampus after transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Suh, Hong-Won; Kim, Young Sup; Kwon, Dae Young; Kwon, Young-Guen; Yoo, Jun-Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho

    2008-07-01

    Folic acid deficiency increases stroke risk. In the present study, we examined whether folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage and gliosis via oxidative stress in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia. Animals were exposed to a folic acid-deficient diet (FAD) for 3 months and then subjected to occlusion of both common carotid arteries for 5 min. Exposure to an FAD increased plasma homocysteine levels by five- to eightfold compared with those of animals fed with a control diet (CD). In CD-treated animals, most neurons were dead in the hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after ischemia/reperfusion, whereas, in FAD-treated animals, this occurred 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. Immunostaining for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was performed to examine DNA damage in CA1 neurons in both groups after ischemia, and it was found that 8-OHdG immunoreactivity in both FAD and CD groups peaked at 12 hr after reperfusion, although the immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much greater than that in the CD group. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1; a final mediator of neutrophil transendothelial migration) immunoreactivity in both groups increased with time after ischemia/reperfusion: Its immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much higher than that in the CD group 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, reactive gliosis in the ischemic CA1 region increased with time after ischemia in both groups, but astrocytosis and microgliosis in the FAD group were more severe than in the CD group at all times after ischemia. Our results suggest that folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage induced by ischemia.

  17. α-Synuclein and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a small protein that has special relevance for understanding Parkinson disease and related disorders. Not only is α-synuclein found in Lewy bodies characteristic of Parkinson disease, but also mutations in the gene for α-synuclein can cause an inherited form of Parkinson disease and expression of normal α-synuclein can increase the risk of developing Parkinson disease in sporadic, or non-familial, cases. Both sporadic and familial Parkinson disease are characterized by substantial loss of several groups of neurons, including the dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra that are the target of most current symptomatic therapies. Therefore, it is predicted that α-synuclein, especially in its mutant forms or under conditions where its expression levels are increased, is a toxic protein in the sense that it is associated with an increased rate of neuronal cell death. This review will discuss the experimental contexts in which α-synuclein has been demonstrated to be toxic. I will also outline what is known about the mechanisms by which α-synuclein triggers neuronal damage, and identify some of the current gaps in our knowledge about this subject. Finally, the therapeutic implications of toxicity of α-synuclein will be discussed. PMID:19193223

  18. Nitric oxide and cell death in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Muntané, Jordi; De la Rosa, Angel J; Marín, Luís M; Padillo, Francisco J

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a lipophillic, highly diffusible, and short-lived physiological messenger which regulates a variety of physiopathological responses. NO may exert its cellular action through cGMP-dependent and cGMP-independent pathways which includes different postranslational modifications. The effect of NO in cancer depends on the activity and localization of NOS isoforms, concentration and duration of NO exposure, cellular sensitivity, and hypoxia/re-oxygenation process. NO regulates critical factors such as the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and p53 generally leading to growth arrest, apoptosis or adaptation. NO sensitizes hepatoma cells to chemotherapeutic compounds probably through increased p53 and cell death receptor expressions.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  20. Insulin withdrawal-induced cell death in adult hippocampal neural stem cells as a model of autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kim, Seong Who; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2009-02-01

    The term "autophagic cell death" was coined to describe a form of cell death associated with the massive formation of autophagic vacuoles without signs of apoptosis. However, questions about the actual role of autophagy and its molecular basis in cell death remain to be elucidated. We recently reported that adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells undergo autophagic cell death following insulin withdrawal. Insulin-deprived HCN cells exhibit morphological and biochemical markers of autophagy, including accumulation of Beclin 1 and the type II form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) without evidence of apoptosis. Suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 reduces cell death, whereas promotion of autophagy with rapamycin augments cell death in insulin-deficient HCN cells. These data reveal a causative role of autophagy in insulin withdrawal-induced HCN cell death. HCN cells have intact apoptotic capability despite the lack of apoptosis following insulin withdrawal. Our study demonstrates that autophagy is the default cell death mechanism in insulin-deficient HCN cells, and provides a genuine model of autophagic cell death in apoptosis-intact cells. Novel insight into molecular mechanisms of this underappreciated form of programmed cell death should facilitate the development of therapeutic methods to cope with human diseases caused by dysregulated cell death.

  1. Multiple Doses of Erythropoietin Impair Liver Regeneration by Increasing TNF-α, the Bax to Bcl-xL Ratio and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Cantré, Daniel; Abshagen, Kerstin; Menger, Michael D.; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    Background Liver resection and the use of small-for-size grafts are restricted by the necessity to provide a sufficient amount of functional liver mass. Only few promising strategies to maximize liver regeneration are available. Apart from its erythropoiesis-stimulating effect, erythropoietin (EPO) has meanwhile been recognized as mitogenic, tissue-protective, and anti-apoptotic pleiotropic cytokine. Thus, EPO may support regeneration of hepatic tissue. Methodology Rats undergoing 68% hepatectomy received daily either high dose (5000 IU/kg bw iv) or low dose (500 IU/kg bw iv) recombinant human EPO or equal amounts of physiologic saline. Parameters of liver regeneration and hepatocellular apoptosis were assessed at 24 h, 48 h and 5 d after resection. In addition, red blood cell count, hematocrit and serum EPO levels as well as plasma concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were evaluated. Further, hepatic Bcl-xL and Bax protein expression were analyzed by Western blot. Principal Findings Administration of EPO significantly reduced the expression of PCNA at 24 h followed by a significant decrease in restitution of liver mass at day 5 after partial hepatectomy. EPO increased TNF-α levels and shifted the Bcl-xL to Bax ratio towards the pro-apoptotic Bax resulting in significantly increased hepatocellular apoptosis. Conclusions Multiple doses of EPO after partial hepatectomy increase hepatocellular apoptosis and impair liver regeneration in rats. Thus, careful consideration should be made in pre- and post-operative recombinant human EPO administration in the setting of liver resection and transplantation. PMID:19079544

  2. Increase in the Level of Proinflammatory Cytokine HMGB1 in Nasal Fluids of Patients With Rhinitis and its Sequestration by Glycyrrhizin Induces Eosinophil Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Cuppari, Caterina; Manti, Sara; Grasso, Luisa; Arrigo, Teresa; Calamai, Luca; Salpietro, Carmelo; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The nuclear protein high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) is a proinflammatory mediator that belongs to the alarmin family of proinflammatory mediators, and it has recently emerged as a key player in different acute and chronic immune disorders. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that HMGB1 is actively released extracellularly from immune cells or passively released from necrotic cells. Because of the ability of HMGB1 to sustain chronic inflammation, we investigated whether the protein is present in nasal fluids of patients with different forms of rhinitis. Methods HMGB1 levels were evaluated in nasal fluids of healthy subjects or rhinitis patients who were treated or not treated with different treatments. Results We report that the level of HMGB1 was significantly increased in nasal fluids of patients with allergic rhinitis, patients with NARES (nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophiliac syndrome), as well as patients with polyps. We also found that a formulation containing the HMGB1-binding compound glycyrrhizin (GLT) reduced the HMGB1 content in nasal fluids of rhinitis patients to an extent similar to that with nasal budesonide treatment. We also found that among the cultured human leukocyte populations, eosinophils released higher amounts of HMGB1. Based on the ability of HMGB1 to sustain eosinophil survival and the ability of GLT to inactivate HMGB1, we report that GLT selectively killed cultured eosinophils and had no effect on neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Conclusion Collectively, these data underscore the role of HMGB1 in rhinitis pathogenesis and the therapeutic potential of GLT formulations in treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders of the nasal mucosa. PMID:26045910

  3. Time-Lapse Imaging of Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Meier, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The best approach to distinguish between necrosis and apoptosis is time-lapse video microscopy. This technique enables a biological process to be photographed at regular intervals over a period, which may last from a few hours to several days, and can be applied to cells in culture or in vivo. We have established two time-lapse microscopy methods based on different ways of calculating cell death: semiautomated and automated. In the semiautomated approach, cell death can be visualized by staining with combinations of Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V and Sytox Green (SG), or Annexin V(FITC) and Propidium iodide (PI). The automated method is similar except that all cells are labeled with dyes. This allows faster quantification of data. To this end Cell Tracker Green is used to label all cells at time zero in combination with PI and Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V. Necrotic cell death is accompanied by either simultaneous labeling with Annexin V and PI or SG (double-positive), or direct PI or SG staining. Additionally, necrotic cells display characteristic morphology, such as cytoplasmic swelling. In contrast to necrosis where membrane permeabilization is an early event, cells that die by apoptosis lose their membrane permeability relatively late. Therefore, the time between Annexin V staining and PI or SG uptake (double-positive) can be used to distinguish necrosis from apoptosis. This protocol describes the analysis of cell death by time-lapse imaging of HT1080 and L929 cells stained with these dyes, but it can be readily adapted to other cell types of interest. PMID:26933245

  4. The apoptosome: signalling platform of cell death.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Salvesen, Guy S

    2007-05-01

    Recent work on the initial switches that trigger cell death has revealed surprising inventions of nature that ensure the ordered suicide of a cell that has been selected for demise. Particularly intriguing is how a signal--the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria--is translated into the activation of the death cascade, which leads to a point of no return. Now there is new understanding of how this crucial process is delicately handled by a cytosolic signalling platform known as the apoptosome. The formation of the apoptosome and the activation of its effector, caspase-9, reveals a sophisticated mechanism that might be more common than was initially thought. PMID:17377525

  5. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  6. Cell death during crisis is mediated by mitotic telomere deprotection.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makoto T; Cesare, Anthony J; Rivera, Teresa; Karlseder, Jan

    2015-06-25

    Tumour formation is blocked by two barriers: replicative senescence and crisis. Senescence is triggered by short telomeres and is bypassed by disruption of tumour-suppressive pathways. After senescence bypass, cells undergo crisis, during which almost all of the cells in the population die. Cells that escape crisis harbour unstable genomes and other parameters of transformation. The mechanism of cell death during crisis remains unexplained. Here we show that human cells in crisis undergo spontaneous mitotic arrest, resulting in death during mitosis or in the following cell cycle. This phenotype is induced by loss of p53 function, and is suppressed by telomerase overexpression. Telomere fusions triggered mitotic arrest in p53-compromised non-crisis cells, indicating that such fusions are the underlying cause of cell death. Exacerbation of mitotic telomere deprotection by partial TRF2 (also known as TERF2) knockdown increased the ratio of cells that died during mitotic arrest and sensitized cancer cells to mitotic poisons. We propose a crisis pathway wherein chromosome fusions induce mitotic arrest, resulting in mitotic telomere deprotection and cell death, thereby eliminating precancerous cells from the population.

  7. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  8. Acetaminophen Induces Human Neuroblastoma Cell Death through NFKB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP)-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β. PMID:23166834

  9. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms.

  10. Cell death pathways associated with PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy leads to both direct and indirect tumor cell death. The latter also involves the consequences of vascular shut-down and immunologic effects. While these factors are a major factor in tumor eradication, there is usually an element of direct cell killing that can reduce the cell population by as much as 2-3 logs. Necrosis was initially believed to represent the predominant PDT death mechanism. An apoptotic response to PDT was first reported by Oleinick in 1991, using a sensitizer that targets the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Apoptosis leads to fragmentation of DNA and of cells into apoptotic bodies that are removed by phagocytosis. Inflammatory effects are minimized, and the auto- catalytic elements of the process can amplify the death signal. In this study, we examined consequences of Bcl-2 photodamage by a porphycene sensitizer that targets the ER and causes photodamage to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Death patterns after Bcl-2 inactivation by a small-molecular antagonist were also assessed. In addition to apoptosis, we also characterized a hitherto undescribed PDT effect, the initiation of autophagy. Autophagy was initially identified as a cell survival pathway, allowing the recycling of components as nutrients become scarce. We propose that autophagy can also represent both a potential survival pathway after PDT damage to cellular organelles, as well as a cell-death pathway. Recent literature reports indicate that autophagy, as well as apoptosis, can be evoked after down-regulation of Bcl-2, a result consistent with results reported here.

  11. Programmed cell death in seeds of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-12-01

    During the diversification of angiosperms, seeds have evolved structural, chemical, molecular and physiologically developing changes that specially affect the nucellus and endosperm. All through seed evolution, programmed cell death (PCD) has played a fundamental role. However, examples of PCD during seed development are limited. The present review examines PCD in integuments, nucellus, suspensor and endosperm in those representative examples of seeds studied to date.

  12. Nanomaterials Toxicity and Cell Death Modalities

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Daniela; Carnuccio, Rosa; Maiuri, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the nanotechnology advancement has developed a plethora of novel and intriguing nanomaterial application in many sectors, including research and medicine. However, many risks have been highlighted in their use, particularly related to their unexpected toxicity in vitro and in vivo experimental models. This paper proposes an overview concerning the cell death modalities induced by the major nanomaterials. PMID:23304518

  13. Lipids and cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding lipid-induced malfunction represents a major challenge of today's biomedical research. The connection of lipids to cellular and organ dysfunction, cell death, and disease (often referred to as lipotoxicity) is more complex than the sole lipotoxic effects of excess free fatty acids and requires genetically tractable model systems for mechanistic investigation. We herein summarize recent advances in the field of lipid-induced toxicity that employ the established model system for cell death and aging research of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies in yeast have shed light on various aspects of lipotoxicity, including free fatty acid toxicity, sphingolipid-modulated cell death as well as the involvement of cardiolipin and lipid peroxidation in the mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Regimens used range from exogenously applied lipids, genetic modulation of lipolysis and triacylglyceride synthesis, variations in sphingolipid/ceramide metabolism as well as changes in peroxisome function by either genetic or pharmacological means. In future, the yeast model of programmed cell death will further contribute to the clarification of crucial questions of lipid-associated malfunction. PMID:24119111

  14. Decoding cell death signals in liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Catherine; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental to the liver, depending on multiple factors. Mild (i.e., limited in intensity and destined to resolve) inflammatory responses have indeed been shown to exert consistent hepatoprotective effects, contributing to tissue repair and promoting the re-establishment of homeostasis. Conversely, excessive (i.e., disproportionate in intensity and permanent) inflammation may induce a massive loss of hepatocytes and hence exacerbate the severity of various hepatic conditions, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, systemic metabolic alterations (e.g., obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders), alcoholic hepatitis, intoxication by xenobiotics and infection, de facto being associated with irreversible liver damage, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Both liver-resident cells (e.g., Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells) and cells that are recruited in response to injury (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells) emit pro-inflammatory signals including - but not limited to - cytokines, chemokines, lipid messengers, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the apoptotic or necrotic demise of hepatocytes. In turn, dying hepatocytes release damage-associated molecular patterns that-upon binding to evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptors-activate cells of the innate immune system to further stimulate inflammatory responses, hence establishing a highly hepatotoxic feedforward cycle of inflammation and cell death. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that account for the most deleterious effect of hepatic inflammation at the cellular level, that is, the initiation of a massive cell death response among hepatocytes.

  15. Substituted 3‑acyl‑2‑phenylamino‑1,4‑naphthoquinones intercalate into DNA and cause genotoxicity through the increased generation of reactive oxygen species culminating in cell death.

    PubMed

    Farias, Mirelle Sifroni; Pich, Claus Tröger; Kviecinski, Maicon Roberto; Bucker, Nádia Cristina Falcão; Felipe, Karina Bettega; Da Silva, Fabiana Ourique; Günther, Tânia Mara Fisher; Correia, João Francisco; Ríos, David; Benites, Julio; Valderrama, Jaime A; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2014-07-01

    Naphthoquinones interact with biological systems by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can damage cancer cells. The cytotoxicity and the antitumor activity of 3‑acyl‑2‑phenylamino‑1,4‑naphthoquinones (DPB1‑DPB9) were evaluated in the MCF7 human breast cancer cell line and in male Ehrlich tumor‑bearing Balb/c mice. DPB4 was the most cytotoxic derivative against MCF7 cells (EC50 15 µM) and DPB6 was the least cytotoxic one (EC50 56 µM). The 1,4‑naphthoquinone derivatives were able to cause DNA damage and promote DNA fragmentation as shown by the plasmid DNA cleavage assay (FII form). In addition, 1,4‑naphthoquinone derivatives possibly interacted with DNA as intercalating agents, which was demonstrated by the changes caused in the fluorescence of the DNA‑ethidium bromide complexes. Cell death of MCF7 cells induced by 3‑acyl‑2‑phenylamino‑1,4‑naphthoquinones was mostly due to apoptosis. The DNA fragmentation and subsequent apoptosis may be correlated to the redox potential of the 1,4‑naphthoquinone derivatives that, once present in the cell nucleus, led to the increased generation of ROS. Finally, certain 1,4‑naphthoquinone derivatives and particularly DPB4 significantly inhibited the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumors in mice (73%). PMID:24756411

  16. Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study However, black soldiers with the gene ... cell gene variant, are at risk of premature death. People with the sickle cell gene variant do ...

  17. Cell Death and Autophagy in TB

    PubMed Central

    Moraco, Andrew H.; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has succeeded in infecting one third of the human race though inhibition or evasion of innate and adaptive immunity. The pathogen is a facultative intracellular parasite that uses the niche provided by mononuclear phagocytes for its advantage. Complex interactions determine whether the bacillus will or will not be delivered to acidified lysosomes, whether the host phagocyte will survive infection or die, and whether the timing and mode of cell death works to the advantage of the host or the pathogen. Here we discuss cell death and autophagy in TB. These fundamental processes of cell biology feature in all aspects of TB pathogenesis and may be exploited to the treatment or prevention of TB disease. PMID:25453227

  18. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-01-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms. PMID:21475301

  19. Lung epithelial cell death induced by oil-dispersant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Shi, Yongli; Major, Danielle; Yang, Zhanjun

    2012-08-01

    The dispersants used in oil spill disasters are claimed to be safe, but increased solubility of high-molecular-weight components in crude oil is of public health concern. The water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of crude oil mixed with dispersants may become airborne and cause lung epithelial damage when inhaled. This study was designed to examine the cell death and related death pathways of lung epithelial cells in response to WAF. Cultured A549 cells were treated for 2 or 24h with different concentrations of WAF. The WAF was prepared by mixing each of the dispersants (Corexit EC9527A, Corexit EC9500A and Corexit EC9580A) with crude oil for extraction with PBS. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide MTT assay, lactate dehydrogenase assay, morphology and cleaved caspase 9 protein, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 were all used to measure cell viability, necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy quantitation, respectively. Results showed that the WAF of oil-dispersant mixtures caused cell death in the lung epithelial cells, in a dose-dependent manner, with the major cellular pathways of necrosis and apoptosis involved. Autophagy also occurred in cells exposed to WAF mixtures at lower concentrations before any detectable cell death, indicating greater sensitivity to WAF exposure. The three types of cell behavior, namely necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy, may play different roles in oil spill-related respiratory disorders. PMID:22504303

  20. Role of IgE immune complexes in the regulation of HIV-1 replication and increased cell death of infected U1 monocytes: involvement of CD23/Fc epsilon RII-mediated nitric oxide and cyclic AMP pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Ouaaz, F.; Ruscetti, F. W.; Dugas, B.; Mikovits, J.; Agut, H.; Debré, P.; Mossalayi, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE/anti-IgE immune complexes (IgE-IC) induce the release of multiple mediators from monocytes/macrophages and the monocytic cell line U937 following the ligation of the low-affinity Fc epsilon receptors (Fc epsilon RII/CD23). These effects are mediated through an accumulation of cAMP and the generation of L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide (NO). Since high IgE levels predict more rapid progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, we attempted to define the effects of IgE-IC on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production in monocytes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two variants of HIV-1 chronically infected monocytic U1 cells were stimulated with IgE-IC and virus replication was quantified. NO and cAMP involvement was tested through the use of agonistic and antagonistic chemicals of these two pathways. RESULTS: IgE-IC induced p24 production by U1 cells with low-level constitutive expression of HIV-1 mRNAs and extracellular HIV capsid protein p24 levels (U1low), upon their pretreatment with interleukin 4 (IL-4) or IL-13. This effect was due to the crosslinking of CD23, as it was reversed by blocking the IgE binding site on CD23. The IgE-IC effect could also be mimicked by crosslinking of CD23 by a specific monoclonal antibody. p24 induction by IgE-IC was then shown to be due to CD23-mediated stimulation of cAMP, NO, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) generation. In another variant of U1 cells with > 1 log higher constitutive production of p24 levels (U1high), IgE-IC addition dramatically decreased all cell functions tested and accelerated cell death. This phenomenon was reversed by blocking the nitric oxide generation. CONCLUSIONS: These data point out a regulatory role of IgE-IC on HIV-1 production in monocytic cells, through CD23-mediated stimulation of cAMP and NO pathways. IgE-IC can also stimulate increased cell death in high HIV producing cells through the NO pathway. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 5 PMID:8900533

  1. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  2. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  3. Ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minghui; Monian, Prashant; Pan, Qiuhui; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jenny; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of regulated necrosis. It is implicated in various human diseases, including ischemic organ damage and cancer. Here, we report the crucial role of autophagy, particularly autophagic degradation of cellular iron storage proteins (a process known as ferritinophagy), in ferroptosis. Using RNAi screening coupled with subsequent genetic analysis, we identified multiple autophagy-related genes as positive regulators of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis induction led to autophagy activation and consequent degradation of ferritin and ferritinophagy cargo receptor NCOA4. Consistently, inhibition of ferritinophagy by blockage of autophagy or knockdown of NCOA4 abrogated the accumulation of ferroptosis-associated cellular labile iron and reactive oxygen species, as well as eventual ferroptotic cell death. Therefore, ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process, and NCOA4-mediated ferritinophagy supports ferroptosis by controlling cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:27514700

  4. Cell Death and Deubiquitinases: Perspectives in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Seemana

    2014-01-01

    The process of cell death has important physiological implications. At the organism level it is mostly involved in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. At the cellular level, the strategies of cell death may be categorized as either suicide or sabotage. The mere fact that many of these processes are programmed and that these are often deregulated in pathological conditions is seed to thought. The various players that are involved in these pathways are highly regulated. One of the modes of regulation is via post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and deubiquitination. In this review, we have first dealt with the different modes and pathways involved in cell death and then we have focused on the regulation of several proteins in these signaling cascades by the different deubiquitinating enzymes, in the perspective of cancer. The study of deubiquitinases is currently in a rather nascent stage with limited knowledge both in vitro and in vivo, but the emerging roles of the deubiquitinases in various processes and their specificity have implicated them as potential targets from the therapeutic point of view. This review throws light on another aspect of cancer therapeutics by targeting the deubiquitinating enzymes. PMID:25121098

  5. Light uncages a copper complex to induce nonapoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Anupa A; Franks, Andrew T; Butcher, Raymond J; Franz, Katherine J

    2013-03-25

    Cu3G is a Cu(II) complex of a photoactive tetradentate ligand that is cleaved upon UV irradiation to release Cu. Here we show that the cytotoxicity of Cu3G increases in response to brief UV stimulation to result in extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is indicative of nonapoptotic cell death. PMID:23417227

  6. Power and death: Mortality salience increases power seeking while feeling powerful reduces death anxiety.

    PubMed

    Belmi, Peter; Pfeffer, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    According to Terror Management Theory, people respond to reminders of mortality by seeking psychological security and bolstering their self-esteem. Because previous research suggests that having power can provide individuals a sense of security and self-worth, we hypothesize that mortality salience leads to an increased motivation to acquire power, especially among men. Study 1 found that men (but not women) who wrote about their death reported more interest in acquiring power. Study 2A and Study 2B demonstrated that when primed with reminders of death, men (but not women) reported behaving more dominantly during the subsequent week, while both men and women reported behaving more prosocially during that week. Thus, mortality salience prompts people to respond in ways that help them manage their death anxiety but in ways consistent with normative gender expectations. Furthermore, Studies 3-5 showed that feeling powerful reduces anxiety when mortality is salient. Specifically, we found that when primed to feel more powerful, both men and women experienced less mortality anxiety. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26867106

  7. Sensitization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for LCL161-induced cell death by targeting redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haß, Christina; Belz, Katharina; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Fulda, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed redox homeostasis with both elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense mechanisms has been reported in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of pathways responsible for ROS detoxification renders ALL cells more susceptible for cell death. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibitors of key pathways for the elimination of ROS, i.e. Erastin, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and Auranofin, sensitize ALL cells for cell death upon treatment with the Smac mimetic LCL161 that antagonizes Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Erastin, BSO or Auranofin significantly increase LCL161-induced cell death and also act in concert with LCL161 to profoundly suppress long-term clonogenic survival in several ALL cell lines. Erastin or BSO cooperates with LCL161 to stimulate ROS production and lipid peroxidation prior to cell death. ROS production and lipid peroxidation are required for this cotreatment-induced cell death, since ROS scavengers or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation provides significant protection against cell death. These results emphasize that inhibition of antioxidant defense mechanisms can serve as a potent approach to prime ALL cells for LCL161-induced cell death.

  8. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A.; Navarro-Villarán, E.; González, R.; Pereira, S.; Soriano-De Castro, L.B.; Sarrias-Giménez, A.; Barrera-Pulido, L.; Álamo-Martínez, J.M.; Serrablo-Requejo, A.; Blanco-Fernández, G.; Nogales-Muñoz, A.; Gila-Bohórquez, A.; Pacheco, D.; Torres-Nieto, M.A.; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J.; Suárez-Artacho, G.; Bernal-Bellido, C.; Marín-Gómez, L.M.; Barcena, J.A.; Gómez-Bravo, M.A.; Padilla, C.A.; Padillo, F.J.; Muntané, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10 nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells. PMID:26233703

  9. Decoding cell death signals in liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Catherine; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental to the liver, depending on multiple factors. Mild (i.e., limited in intensity and destined to resolve) inflammatory responses have indeed been shown to exert consistent hepatoprotective effects, contributing to tissue repair and promoting the re-establishment of homeostasis. Conversely, excessive (i.e., disproportionate in intensity and permanent) inflammation may induce a massive loss of hepatocytes and hence exacerbate the severity of various hepatic conditions, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, systemic metabolic alterations (e.g., obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders), alcoholic hepatitis, intoxication by xenobiotics and infection, de facto being associated with irreversible liver damage, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Both liver-resident cells (e.g., Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells) and cells that are recruited in response to injury (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells) emit pro-inflammatory signals including - but not limited to - cytokines, chemokines, lipid messengers, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the apoptotic or necrotic demise of hepatocytes. In turn, dying hepatocytes release damage-associated molecular patterns that-upon binding to evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptors-activate cells of the innate immune system to further stimulate inflammatory responses, hence establishing a highly hepatotoxic feedforward cycle of inflammation and cell death. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that account for the most deleterious effect of hepatic inflammation at the cellular level, that is, the initiation of a massive cell death response among hepatocytes. PMID:23567086

  10. Current and Emerging Biomarkers of Cell Death in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kongning; Wu, Deng; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Lu; Yi, Ying; Miao, Zhengqiang; Jin, Nana; Bi, Xiaoman; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a critical biological process, serving many important functions within multicellular organisms. Aberrations in cell death can contribute to the pathology of human diseases. Significant progress made in the research area enormously speeds up our understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of cell death. According to the distinct morphological and biochemical characteristics, cell death can be triggered by extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death, and mitotic catastrophe. Nevertheless, the realization that all of these efforts seek to pursue an effective treatment and cure for the disease has spurred a significant interest in the development of promising biomarkers of cell death to early diagnose disease and accurately predict disease progression and outcome. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about cell death, survey current and emerging biomarkers of cell death, and discuss the relationship with human diseases. PMID:24949464

  11. How does metabolism affect cell death in cancer?

    PubMed

    Villa, Elodie; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland

    2016-07-01

    In cancer research, identifying a specificity of tumor cells compared with 'normal' proliferating cells for targeted therapy is often considered the Holy Grail for researchers and clinicians. Although diverse in origin, most cancer cells share characteristics including the ability to escape cell death mechanisms and the utilization of different methods of energy production. In the current paradigm, aerobic glycolysis is considered the central metabolic characteristic of cancer cells (Warburg effect). However, recent data indicate that cancer cells also show significant changes in other metabolic pathways. Indeed, it was recently suggested that Kreb's cycle, pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, and essential and nonessential amino acids have key roles. Renewed interest in the fact that cancer cells have to reprogram their metabolism in order to proliferate or resist treatment must take into consideration the ability of tumor cells to adapt their metabolism to the local microenvironment (low oxygen, low nutrients). This variety of metabolic sources might be either a strength, resulting in infinite possibilities for adaptation and increased ability to resist chemotherapy-induced death, or a weakness that could be targeted to kill cancer cells. Here, we discuss recent insights showing how energetic metabolism may regulate cell death and how this might be relevant for cancer treatment.

  12. Cell death monitoring using quantitative optical coherence tomography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2011-03-01

    Cell death is characterized by a series of predictable morphological changes, which modify the light scattering properties of cells. We present a multi-parametric approach to detecting changes in subcellular morphology related to cell death using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Optical coherence tomography data were acquired from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells undergoing apoptosis over a period of 48 hours. Integrated backscatter (IB) and spectral slope (SS) were computed from OCT backscatter spectra and statistical parameters were extracted from a generalized gamma (GG) distribution fit to OCT signal intensity histograms. The IB increased by 2-fold over 48 hours with significant increases observed as early as 4 hours. The SS increased in steepness by 2.5-fold with significant changes at 12 hours, while the GG parameters were sensitive to apoptotic changes at 24 to 48 hours. Histology slides indicated nuclear condensation and fragmentation at 24 hours, suggesting the late scattering changes could be related to nuclear structure. A second series of measurements from AML cells treated with cisplatin, colchicine or ionizing radiation suggested that the GG parameters could potentially differentiate between modes of cell death. Distinct cellular morphology was observed in histology slides obtained from cells treated under each condition.

  13. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging.

    PubMed

    Smaili, Soraya; Hirata, Hanako; Ureshino, Rodrigo; Monteforte, Priscila T; Morales, Ana P; Muler, Mari L; Terashima, Juliana; Oseki, Karen; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Lopes, Guiomar S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2009-09-01

    Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+) and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+) are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes may lead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.

  14. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  15. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  16. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections. PMID:27460563

  17. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections.

  18. Cell death goes LIVE: technological advances in real-time tracking of cell death.

    PubMed

    Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-06-15

    Cell population can be viewed as a quantum system, which like Schrödinger's cat exists as a combination of survival- and death-allowing states. Tracking and understanding cell-to-cell variability in processes of high spatio-temporal complexity such as cell death is at the core of current systems biology approaches. As probabilistic modeling tools attempt to impute information inaccessible by current experimental approaches, advances in technologies for single-cell imaging and omics (proteomics, genomics, metabolomics) should go hand in hand with the computational efforts. Over the last few years we have made exciting technological advances that allow studies of cell death dynamically in real-time and with the unprecedented accuracy. These approaches are based on innovative fluorescent assays and recombinant proteins, bioelectrical properties of cells, and more recently also on state-of-the-art optical spectroscopy. Here, we review current status of the most innovative analytical technologies for dynamic tracking of cell death, and address the interdisciplinary promises and future challenges of these methods.

  19. ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 suppresses mitochondrial oxidative bursts and modulates cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Hortensteiner, Stefan; Kunz, Lukas; Christ, Bastien; Moulin, Michael; Smith, Alison G.; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 2 (ACD2) protein protects cells from programmed cell death (PCD) caused by endogenous porphyrin-related molecules like red chlorophyll catabolite or exogenous protoporphyrin IX. We previously found that during bacterial infection, ACD2, a chlorophyll breakdown enzyme, localizes to both chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves. Additionally, acd2 cells show mitochondrial dysfunctions. In plants with acd2 and ACD2+ sectors, ACD2 functions cell autonomously, implicating a pro-death ACD2 substrate as cell non-autonomous in promoting spreading PCD. ACD2 targeted solely to mitochondria can reduce the accumulation of an ACD2 substrate that originates in chloroplasts, indicating that ACD2 substrate molecules are likely mobile within cells. Two different light-dependent reactive oxygen bursts in mitochondria play prominent and causal roles in the acd2 PCD phenotype. Finally, ACD2 can complement acd2 when targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively, as long as it is catalytically active; the ability to bind substrate is not sufficient for ACD2 to function in vitro or in vivo. Together the data suggest that ACD2 localizes dynamically during infection to protect cells from pro-death mobile substrate molecules, some of which may originate in chloroplasts, but have major effects on mitochondria. PMID:21988537

  20. Accelerated cell death 2 suppresses mitochondrial oxidative bursts and modulates cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Hortensteiner, Stefan; Kunz, Lukas; Christ, Bastien; Moulin, Michael; Smith, Alison G; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Greenberg, Jean T

    2012-02-01

    The Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 2 (ACD2) protein protects cells from programmed cell death (PCD) caused by endogenous porphyrin-related molecules like red chlorophyll catabolite or exogenous protoporphyrin IX. We previously found that during bacterial infection, ACD2, a chlorophyll breakdown enzyme, localizes to both chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves. Additionally, acd2 cells show mitochondrial dysfunction. In plants with acd2 and ACD2 (+) sectors, ACD2 functions cell autonomously, implicating a pro-death ACD2 substrate as being cell non-autonomous in promoting the spread of PCD. ACD2 targeted solely to mitochondria can reduce the accumulation of an ACD2 substrate that originates in chloroplasts, indicating that ACD2 substrate molecules are likely to be mobile within cells. Two different light-dependent reactive oxygen bursts in mitochondria play prominent and causal roles in the acd2 PCD phenotype. Finally, ACD2 can complement acd2 when targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively, as long as it is catalytically active: the ability to bind substrate is not sufficient for ACD2 to function in vitro or in vivo. Together, the data suggest that ACD2 localizes dynamically during infection to protect cells from pro-death mobile substrate molecules, some of which may originate in chloroplasts, but have major effects on mitochondria.

  1. Increased Susceptibility to Oxidative Death of Lymphocytes from Alzheimer Patients Correlates with Dementia Severity

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Daniela P.; Salech, Felipe; SanMartin, Carol D.; Silva, Monica; Xiong, Chengjie; Roe, Catherine M.; Henriquez, Mauricio; Quest, Andrew F.; Behrens, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on enhanced susceptibility to death of lymphocytes from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and an increased resistance to death in those of patients with a history of skin cancer. This is consistent with our hypothesis proposing that the cellular machinery controlling cell death is deregulated in opposite directions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer, to explain the inverse association observed in epidemiological studies. Here we investigated whether the observed increased susceptibility correlates with the degree of dementia severity. Peripheral lymphocytes from 23 AD patients, classified using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) into severe dementia (CDR 3, n=10) and mild-to-moderate dementia (CDR 1–2, n=13), and 15 healthy controls (HC) (CDR 0), were exposed to H2O2 for 20 hours. Lymphocyte death was determined by flow cytometry and propidium iodide staining. The greatest susceptibility to H2O2-induced death was observed for lymphocytes from severe dementia patients, whereas those with mild-to-moderate dementia exhibited intermediate values, compared to healthy controls. A significant increase in the apoptosis/necrosis ratio was found in AD patients. Poly (ADP-ribosyl) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition significantly protected from H2O2-induced death of lymphocytes, whereby a lower degree of protection was observed in severe AD patients. Moreover, inhibition of PARP-1 abolished the differences in apoptosis/necrosis ratios observed between the three groups of patients. These results support the notion that AD is a systemic disorder, whereby enhanced susceptibility to H2O2-induced death in peripheral lymphocytes correlates with dementia severity and enhanced death in AD patients is attributable to a PARP-dependent increase in the apoptosis/necrosis ratio. PMID:25274115

  2. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  3. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Jerry D; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980's, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies.

  4. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Jerry D.; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies. PMID:25954154

  5. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-09

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting.

  6. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting. PMID:25571970

  7. Cell death and autophagy: cytokines, drugs, and nutritional factors.

    PubMed

    Bursch, Wilfried; Karwan, Anneliese; Mayer, Miriam; Dornetshuber, Julia; Fröhwein, Ulrike; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Fazi, Barbara; Di Sano, Federica; Piredda, Lucia; Piacentini, Mauro; Petrovski, Goran; Fésüs, László; Gerner, Christopher

    2008-12-30

    might be attributed to the degree of cell damage caused by tamoxifen, either by generating ROS, increasing membrane fluidity or forming DNA-adducts. Finally, autophagy constitutes a cell's major adaptive (survival) strategy in response to metabolic challenges such as glucose or amino acid deprivation, or starvation in general. Notably, the role of autophagy appears not to be restricted to nutrient recycling in order to maintain energy supply of cells and to adapt cell(organ) size to given physiological needs. For instance, using a newly established hepatoma cell line HCC-1.2, amino acid and glucose deprivation revealed a pro-apoptotic activity, additive to TGF-beta1. The pro-apoptotic action of glucose deprivation was antagonized by 2-deoxyglucose, possibly by stabilizing the mitochondrial membrane involving the action of hexokinase II. These observations suggest that signaling cascades steering autophagy appear to provide links to those regulating cell number. Taken together, our data exemplify that a given cell may flexibly respond to type and degree of (micro)environmental changes or cell death stimuli; a cell's response may shift gradually from the elimination of damaged proteins by autophagy and the recovery to autophagic or apoptotic pathways of cell death, the failure of which eventually may result in necrosis.

  8. Increased neuronal death and disturbed axonal growth in the Polμ-deficient mouse embryonic retina

    PubMed Central

    Baleriola, Jimena; Álvarez-Lindo, Noemí; de la Villa, Pedro; Bernad, Antonio; Blanco, Luis; Suárez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Enrique J.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death occurs naturally at different stages of neural development, including neurogenesis. The functional role of this early phase of neural cell death, which affects recently differentiated neurons among other cell types, remains undefined. Some mouse models defective in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair present massive cell death during neural development, occasionally provoking embryonic lethality, while other organs and tissues remain unaffected. This suggests that DSBs occur frequently and selectively in the developing nervous system. We analyzed the embryonic retina of a mouse model deficient in the error-prone DNA polymerase μ (Polμ), a key component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair system. DNA DSBs were increased in the mutant mouse at embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), as well as the incidence of cell death that affected young neurons, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Polμ−/− mice also showed disturbed RGC axonal growth and navigation, and altered distribution of the axonal guidance molecules L1-CAM and Bravo (also known as Nr-CAM). These findings demonstrate that Polμ is necessary for proper retinal development, and support that the generation of DSBs and their repair via the NHEJ pathway are genuine processes involved in neural development. PMID:27172884

  9. Cellular Stress Responses: Cell Survival and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone; Gorman, Adrienne M.; Hori, Osamu; Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    Cells can respond to stress in various ways ranging from the activation of survival pathways to the initiation of cell death that eventually eliminates damaged cells. Whether cells mount a protective or destructive stress response depends to a large extent on the nature and duration of the stress as well as the cell type. Also, there is often the interplay between these responses that ultimately determines the fate of the stressed cell. The mechanism by which a cell dies (i.e., apoptosis, necrosis, pyroptosis, or autophagic cell death) depends on various exogenous factors as well as the cell's ability to handle the stress to which it is exposed. The implications of cellular stress responses to human physiology and diseases are manifold and will be discussed in this review in the context of some major world health issues such as diabetes, Parkinson's disease, myocardial infarction, and cancer. PMID:20182529

  10. Programmed Cell Death in the Leaves of the Arabidopsis Spontaneous Necrotic Spots (sns-D) Mutant Correlates with Increased Expression of the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor eIF4B2

    PubMed Central

    Gaussand, Gwénaël M. D. J.-M.; Jia, Qi; van der Graaff, Eric; Lamers, Gerda E. M.; Fransz, Paul F.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; de Pater, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    From a pool of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants harboring an activator T-DNA construct, one mutant was identified that developed spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) on the rosette leaves under aseptic conditions. The sns-D mutation is dominant and homozygous plants are embryo lethal. The mutant produced smaller rosettes with a different number of stomata than the wild-type. DNA fragmentation in the nuclei of cells in the necrotic spots and a significant increase of caspase-3 and caspase-6 like activities in sns-D leaf extracts indicated that the sns-D mutation caused programmed cell death (PCD). The integration of the activator T-DNA caused an increase of the expression level of At1g13020, which encodes the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2. The expression level of eIF4B2 was positively correlated with the severity of sns-D mutant phenotype. Overexpression of the eIF4B2 cDNA mimicked phenotypic traits of the sns-D mutant indicating that the sns-D mutant phenotype is indeed caused by activation tagging of eIF4B2. Thus, incorrect regulation of translation initiation may result in PCD. PMID:22639576

  11. Methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in liver.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-09-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted glutathione (GSH) content. Pretreatment with antioxidants caused a marked decrease in methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis, indicating that oxidant species are involved in the apoptotic process. Methylglyoxal treatment induced mitochondrial permeability transition, which represents mitochondrial impairment. However, pretreatment with cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the formation of the permeability transition pore, partially inhibited methylglyoxal-induced cell death. Furthermore, acute treatment of mice with methylglyoxal increased the plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), indicating liver toxicity. Collectively, our results showed that methylglyoxal increases cell death and induces liver toxicity, which results from ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:25343013

  12. Autophagy Protects Against Aminochrome-Induced Cell Death in Substantia Nigra-Derived Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Irmgard; Muñoz, Patricia; Huenchuguala, Sandro; Couve, Eduardo; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, John Timothy; Caviedes, Pablo; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, has been proposed to be involved in the neurodegeneration neuromelanin-containing dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease. We aimed to study the mechanism of aminochrome-dependent cell death in a cell line derived from rat substantia nigra. We found that aminochrome (50μM), in the presence of NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.99.2 (DT)-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol (DIC) (100μM), induces significant cell death (62 ± 3%; p < 0.01), increase in caspase-3 activation (p < 0.001), release of cytochrome C, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (p < 0.01), damage of mitochondrial DNA, damage of mitochondria determined with transmission electron microscopy, a dramatic morphological change characterized as cell shrinkage, and significant increase in number of autophagic vacuoles. To determine the role of autophagy on aminochrome-induced cell death, we incubated the cells in the presence of vinblastine and rapamycin. Interestingly, 10μM vinblastine induces a 5.9-fold (p < 0.001) and twofold (p < 0.01) significant increase in cell death when the cells were incubated with 30μM aminochrome in the absence and presence of DIC, respectively, whereas 10μM rapamycin preincubated 24 h before addition of 50μM aminochrome in the absence and the presence of 100μM DIC induces a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in cell death. In conclusion, autophagy seems to be an important protective mechanism against two different aminochrome-induced cell deaths that initially showed apoptotic features. The cell death induced by aminochrome when DT-diaphorase is inhibited requires activation of mitochondrial pathway, whereas the cell death induced by aminochrome alone requires inhibition of autophagy-dependent degrading of damaged organelles and recycling through lysosomes. PMID:21427056

  13. Apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis. An overview of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1995-01-01

    The historical development of the cell death concept is reviewed, with special attention to the origin of the terms necrosis, coagulation necrosis, autolysis, physiological cell death, programmed cell death, chromatolysis (the first name of apoptosis in 1914), karyorhexis, karyolysis, and cell suicide, of which there are three forms: by lysosomes, by free radicals, and by a genetic mechanism (apoptosis). Some of the typical features of apoptosis are discussed, such as budding (as opposed to blebbing and zeiosis) and the inflammatory response. For cell death not by apoptosis the most satisfactory term is accidental cell death. Necrosis is commonly used but it is not appropriate, because it does not indicate a form of cell death but refers to changes secondary to cell death by any mechanism, including apoptosis. Abundant data are available on one form of accidental cell death, namely ischemic cell death, which can be considered an entity of its own, caused by failure of the ionic pumps of the plasma membrane. Because ischemic cell death (in known models) is accompanied by swelling, the name oncosis is proposed for this condition. The term oncosis (derived from ónkos, meaning swelling) was proposed in 1910 by von Reckling-hausen precisely to mean cell death with swelling. Oncosis leads to necrosis with karyolysis and stands in contrast to apoptosis, which leads to necrosis with karyorhexis and cell shrinkage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856735

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a vast family of enzymes involved in chromatin remodeling and have crucial roles in numerous biological processes, largely through their repressive influence on transcription. In addition to modifying histones, HDACs also target many other non-histone protein substrates to regulate gene expression. Recently, HDACs have gained growing attention as HDAC-inhibiting compounds are being developed as promising cancer therapeutics. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to induce differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis in a variety of transformed cell lines. In this review, we mainly discuss how HDACi may elicit a therapeutic response to human cancers through different cell death pathways, in particular, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24898083

  15. Autophagonizer, a novel synthetic small molecule, induces autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, In-Kwon; Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-03-19

    Autophagy is an apoptosis-independent mechanism of cell death that protects the cell from environmental imbalances and infection by pathogens. We identified a novel small molecule, 2-(3-Benzyl-4-oxo-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylmethyl)-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid (2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethyl)-amide (referred as autophagonizer), using high-content cell-based screening and the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3. Autophagonizer inhibited growth and induced cell death in the human tumor cell lines MCF7, HeLa, HCT116, A549, AGS, and HT1080 via a caspase-independent pathway. Conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II was greatly enhanced by autophagonizer treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed increased autophagy in the cytoplasm of autophagonizer-treated cells. In conclusion, autophagonizer is a novel autophagy inducer with unique structure, which induces autophagic cell death in the human tumor cell lines.

  16. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27404255

  17. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles.

  18. Macrophage cell death upon intracellular bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Xu, Yunsheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-pathogen interaction is a complex process and the outcome of this tag-of-war for both sides is to live or die. Without attempting to be comprehensive, this review will discuss the complexity and significance of the interaction outcomes between macrophages and some facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens as exemplified by Francisella, Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia. Upon bacterial infection, macrophages can die by a variety of ways, such as apoptosis, autophagic cell death, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, pyronecrosis, pyroptosis etc, which is the focus of this review. PMID:26690967

  19. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  1. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  2. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  3. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  4. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  5. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  6. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  7. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  8. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197148

  9. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  11. Stimulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by Beta Interferon Increases Necrotic Death of Macrophages upon Listeria monocytogenes Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Zwaferink, Heather; Stockinger, Silvia; Reipert, Siegfried; Decker, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Murine macrophage death upon infection with Listeria monocytogenes was previously shown to be increased by beta interferon, produced by the infected cells. We saw that interferon-upregulated caspase activation or other interferon-inducible, death-associated proteins, including TRAIL, protein kinase R, and p53, were not necessary for cell death. Macrophage death was reduced when inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was inhibited during infection, and iNOS-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to death upon infection than wild-type cells. The production of nitric oxide correlated with increased death, while no role was seen for iNOS in control of Listeria numbers during infection of resting macrophages. This indicates that the induction of iNOS by beta interferon in cells infected with L. monocytogenes contributes to cell death. Based on morphology, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, and a lack of dependence on caspase 1, we characterize the type of cell death occurring and show that infected macrophages die by interferon-upregulated necrosis. PMID:18268032

  12. Activation of caspase-8 and Erk-1/2 in domes regulates cell death induced by confluence in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Heng; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Wang, Yang-Kao; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2007-04-01

    Under normal culture conditions, cells adhere to culture dish, spread out, proliferate, and finally cover all areas and reach confluence. During the confluent stage, cell proliferation ceases and differentiation is enhanced. Meanwhile, cell death also appears as the monolayer confluence proceeds. To delineate the mechanism of cell death induced by the confluent process, we employed Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. When approaching confluence, MDCK cells exhibited increase the levels of caspase-2 and enhanced the activity of caspase-8. Using various caspase inhibitors to block apoptosis, we found that only z-VAD-fmk and z-IETD-fmk can inhibit confluent cell death, indicating that confluent cell death is mediated by activation of caspase-8. Overexpression of Bcl-2 inhibited confluent cell death, suggesting the involvement of mitochondria-dependent pathway in confluent cell death. Interestingly, the activity of phospho-Erk (p-Erk) was initially decreased before confluence, but markedly increased after confluence. Immunofluorescence staining studies showed that p-Erk was expressed exclusively on dome-forming cells that underwent apoptosis. Treatment of confluent MDCK cells with PD98059 and UO126, the inhibitors of MEK, enhanced apoptosis as well as activity of caspase-8. These data indicate that elevation of p-Erk activity during confluence may serve to suppress confluent cell death. Taken together, activation of caspase-8 contributes to and results in confluent cell death, whereas elevated p-Erk activity serves to prevent confluent cell death by regulating activation of caspase-8.

  13. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Apetoh, Lionel; Baert, Thais; Birge, Raymond B.; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Breckpot, Karine; Brough, David; Chaurio, Ricardo; Cirone, Mara; Coosemans, An; Coulie, Pierre G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dini, Luciana; de Witte, Peter; Dudek-Peric, Aleksandra M.; Faggioni, Alberto; Fucikova, Jitka; Gaipl, Udo S.; Golab, Jakub; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hemminki, Akseli; Herrmann, Martin; Hodge, James W.; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Land, Walter G.; Madeo, Frank; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Mattarollo, Stephen R.; Maueroder, Christian; Merendino, Nicolò; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pabst, Thomas; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Riganti, Chiara; Romano, Erminia; Rufo, Nicole; Smyth, Mark J.; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Spisek, Radek; Stagg, John; Vacchelli, Erika; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vandenberk, Lien; Van den Eynde, Benoit J.; Van Gool, Stefaan; Velotti, Francesca; Zitvogel, Laurence; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens, including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of the so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs). The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD) favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical, and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation. PMID:26635802

  14. Viewing Death on Television Increases the Appeal of Advertised Products

    PubMed Central

    DAR-NIMROD, ILAN

    2012-01-01

    References to death abound in many television programs accessible to most people. Terror Management Theory (TMT) postulates that existential anxiety, which death reminders activate, may reinforce materialistic tendencies. The current paper explores the effect of a death reminder in television shows on the desirability of advertised products. Consistent with TMT's predictions, in two studies participants show greater desire for products, which were advertised immediately following clips from programs that featured a death scene, compared with programs that did not. Cognitive accessibility of death predicted the appeal difference while changes in affect or interest in the show did not. The findings are discussed in light on affective and existential theories which make opposite predictions. Implications and future directions are considered. PMID:22468421

  15. Viewing death on television increases the appeal of advertised products.

    PubMed

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    References to death abound in many television programs accessible to most people. Terror Management Theory postulates that existential anxiety, which death reminders activate, may reinforce materialistic tendencies. The current article explores the effect of a death reminder in television shows on the desirability of advertised products. Consistent with Terror Management Theory's predictions, in two studies participants show greater desire for products, which were advertised immediately following clips from programs that featured a death scene, compared with programs that did not. Cognitive accessibility of death predicted the appeal difference while changes in affect or interest in the show did not. The findings are discussed in light on affective and existential theories which make opposite predictions. Implications and future directions are considered. PMID:22468421

  16. Catching up with solid tumor oncology: what is the evidence for a prognostic role of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression in B-cell lymphomas?

    PubMed Central

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Sharp, Thomas G.; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies targeting the programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 pathway have shown significant responses and good tolerability in solid malignancies. Although preclinical studies suggest that inhibiting programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions might also be highly effective in hematological malignancies, remarkably few clinical trials have been published. Determining patients who will benefit most from programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1-directed immunotherapy and whether programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 are adequate prognostic markers becomes an increasingly important clinical question, especially as aberrant programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression are key mediators of impaired anti-tumor immune responses in a range of B-cell lymphomas. Herein, we systematically review the published literature on the expression and prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 in these patients and identify considerable differences in expression patterns, distribution and numbers of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+cells, both between and within lymphoma subtypes, which is reflected in conflicting findings regarding the prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+ cells. This can be partly explained by differences in methodologies (techniques, protocols, cutoff values) and definitions of positivity. Moreover, lymphomagenesis, disease progression, and prognosis appear to be determined not only by the presence, numbers and distribution of specific subtypes of T cells, but also by other cells and additional immune checkpoints. Collectively, our findings indicate that programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions play an essential role in B-cell lymphoma biology and are of clinical importance, but that the overall outcome is determined by additional components

  17. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  18. Ceramide metabolism regulates autophagy and apoptotic cell death induced by melatonin in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Raquel; Fernández, Anna; Prieto-Domínguez, Néstor; Martínez, Laura; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Mauriz, José L; González-Gallego, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains homeostasis during stress, although it also contributes to cell death under specific contexts. Ceramides have emerged as important effectors in the regulation of autophagy, mediating the crosstalk with apoptosis. Melatonin induces apoptosis of cancer cells; however, its role in autophagy and ceramide metabolism has yet to be clearly elucidated. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of melatonin administration on autophagy and ceramide metabolism and its possible link with melatonin-induced apoptotic cell death in hepatocarcinoma (HCC) cells. Melatonin (2 mm) transiently induced autophagy in HepG2 cells through JNK phosphorylation, characterized by increased Beclin-1 expression, p62 degradation, and LC3II and LAMP-2 colocalization, which translated in decreased cell viability. Moreover, ATG5 silencing sensitized HepG2 cells to melatonin-induced apoptosis, suggesting a dual role of autophagy in cell death. Melatonin enhanced ceramide levels through both de novo synthesis and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) stimulation. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) inhibition with myriocin prevented melatonin-induced autophagy and ASMase inhibition with imipramine-impaired autophagy flux. However, ASMase inhibition partially protected HepG2 cells against melatonin, while SPT inhibition significantly enhanced cell death. Findings suggest a crosstalk between SPT-mediated ceramide generation and autophagy in protecting against melatonin, while specific ASMase-induced ceramide production participates in melatonin-mediated cell death. Thus, dual blocking of SPT and autophagy emerges as a potential strategy to potentiate the apoptotic effects of melatonin in liver cancer cells.

  19. Lead-induced cell death in testes of young rats.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, N; Sinha, N; Narayan, R; Saxena, D K

    2001-01-01

    Lead is a well-documented testicular toxicant. The present work was planned to study the occurrence of germ cell death after lead administration. Young growing rats were treated with 5, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) body weight of lead for 2 weeks. Cell death was assessed by employing in situ TUNEL staining, DNA electrophoresis and morphological examination of the tubules. The results showed that Pb induced significant numbers of germ cells to undergo apoptosis in the seminiferous tubules of rats treated with 20 mg kg(-1) body weight. However, DNA fragmentation was not detected at any of the doses. The level of lead accumulation in the testis increased in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:11481659

  20. Autophagy prevents autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-Wei; Feng, Jiang-Nan; Cao, Yi; Meng, Li-Ping; Wang, Shu-Lin

    2015-05-18

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway used to degrade long-lived proteins or organelles that may be damaged due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cellular stress. Autophagy typically enhances cell survival, but it may also act to promote cell death under certain conditions. The mechanism underlying this paradox, however, remains unclear. We showed that Tetrahymena cells exerted increased membrane-bound vacuoles characteristic of autophagy followed by autophagic cell death (referred to as cell death with autophagy) after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine or 3-methyladenine significantly augmented autophagic cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. Blockage of the mitochondrial electron transport chain or starvation triggered activation of autophagy followed by cell death by inducing the production of ROS due to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. This indicated a regulatory role of mitochondrial ROS in programming autophagy and autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena. Importantly, suppression of autophagy enhanced autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena in response to elevated ROS production from starvation, and this was reversed by antioxidants. Therefore, our results suggest that autophagy was activated upon oxidative stress to prevent the initiation of autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena until the accumulation of ROS passed the point of no return, leading to delayed cell death in Tetrahymena.

  1. Autophagy prevents autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Si-Wei; FENG, Jiang-Nan; CAO, Yi; MENG, Li-Ping; WANG, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway used to degrade long-lived proteins or organelles that may be damaged due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cellular stress. Autophagy typically enhances cell survival, but it may also act to promote cell death under certain conditions. The mechanism underlying this paradox, however, remains unclear. We showed that Tetrahymena cells exerted increased membrane-bound vacuoles characteristic of autophagy followed by autophagic cell death (referred to as cell death with autophagy) after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine or 3-methyladenine significantly augmented autophagic cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. Blockage of the mitochondrial electron transport chain or starvation triggered activation of autophagy followed by cell death by inducing the production of ROS due to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. This indicated a regulatory role of mitochondrial ROS in programming autophagy and autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena. Importantly, suppression of autophagy enhanced autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena in response to elevated ROS production from starvation, and this was reversed by antioxidants. Therefore, our results suggest that autophagy was activated upon oxidative stress to prevent the initiation of autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena until the accumulation of ROS passed the point of no return, leading to delayed cell death in Tetrahymena. PMID:26018860

  2. Protection of islet cells from inflammatory cell death in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, V; Kolb, H

    1993-01-01

    Islet cells cocultured with activated macrophages are lysed within 15 h in vitro. We showed previously that nitric oxide generated by macrophages is a major mediator of islet cell death. We have now probed several pathways to interfere with the chain of events leading to islet cell death. Scavenging of extracellular oxygen radicals by superoxide dismutase and catalase did not improve islet cell survival. Scavenging of extra- and intracellular oxygen radicals by two potent substances, citiolone and dimethyl-thiourea, also did not reduce islet cell lysis, while a lipid-soluble scavenger, probucol, provided partial protection. These findings argue against a synergistic action of nitric oxide and oxygen radicals in islet cell toxicity. The inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase by 3-aminobenzamide significantly improved islet cell survival. Selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, such as indomethacin or acetylsalicylic acid, did not improve islet cell survival. Full protection was seen in the presence of NDGA, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, and partial suppression was caused by BW755c, an inhibitor of both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase. We conclude that inflammatory islet cell death caused by activated macrophages involves the activation of arachidonic acid metabolism and of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, but that scavenging of oxygen free radicals provides little protection from lysis. PMID:8348756

  3. Vanadium pentoxide induces activation and death of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Dávalos, Angélica; Gonzalez-Villava, Adriana; Rodriguez-Lara, Vianey; Montaño, Luis Felipe; Fortoul, Teresa I; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium is a transition metal released into the atmosphere, as air-suspended particles, as a result of the combustion of fossil fuels and some metallurgic industry activities. Air-suspended particle pollution causes inflammation-related processes such as thrombosis and other cardiovascular events. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) on endothelial cells since they are key participants in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Cell adhesion, the expression of adhesion molecules and oxidative stress, as well as proliferation, morphology and cell death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to V2O5, were evaluated. Vanadium pentoxide at a 3.12 µg cm(-2) concentration induced an enhanced adhesion of the U937 macrophage cell line to HUVECs, owing to an increased expression of late adhesion molecules. HUVECs exposed to V2O5 showed an increase in ROS and nitric oxide production, and a diminished proliferation. These changes in vanadium-treated HUVECs were accompanied by severe morphological changes and apoptotic cell death. Vanadium pentoxide induced serious endothelial cell damage, probably related to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality observed in individuals living in highly air-polluted areas. PMID:21721017

  4. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  5. Xylem cell death: emerging understanding of regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Bollhöner, Benjamin; Prestele, Jakob; Tuominen, Hannele

    2012-02-01

    Evolutionary, as well as genetic, evidence suggests that vascular development evolved originally as a cell death programme that allowed enhanced movement of water in the extinct protracheophytes, and that secondary wall formation in the water-conducting cells evolved afterwards, providing mechanical support for effective long-distance transport of water. The extant vascular plants possess a common regulatory network to coordinate the different phases of xylem maturation, including secondary wall formation, cell death, and finally autolysis of the cell contents, by the action of recently identified NAC domain transcription factors. Consequently, xylem cell death is an inseparable part of the xylem maturation programme, making it difficult to uncouple cell death mechanistically from secondary wall formation, and thus identify the key factors specifically involved in regulation of cell death. Current knowledge suggests that the necessary components for xylem cell death are produced early during xylem differentiation, and cell death is prevented through the action of inhibitors and storage of hydrolytic enzymes in inactive forms in compartments such as the vacuole. Bursting of the central vacuole triggers autolytic hydrolysis of the cell contents, which ultimately leads to cell death. This cascade of events varies between the different xylem cell types. The water-transporting tracheary elements rely on a rapid cell death programme, with hydrolysis of cell contents taking place for the most part, if not entirely, after vacuolar bursting, while the xylem fibres disintegrate cellular contents at a slower pace, well before cell death. This review includes a detailed description of cell morphology, function of plant growth regulators, such as ethylene and thermospermine, and the action of hydrolytic nucleases and proteases during cell death of the different xylem cell types.

  6. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    PubMed

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases.

  7. Pyroptotic cell death defends against intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Ine; Miao, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inflammatory caspases play a central role in innate immunity by responding to cytosolic signals and initiating a twofold response. First, caspase-1 induces the activation and secretion of the two prominent pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. Second, either caspase-1 or caspase-11 can trigger a form of lytic, programmed cell death called pyroptosis. Pyroptosis operates to remove the replication niche of intracellular pathogens, making them susceptible to phagocytosis and killing by a secondary phagocyte. However, aberrant, systemic activation of pyroptosis in vivo may contribute to sepsis. Emphasizing the efficiency of inflammasome detection of microbial infections, many pathogens have evolved to avoid or subvert pyroptosis. This review focuses on molecular and morphological characteristics of pyroptosis and the individual inflammasomes and their contribution to defense against infection in mice and humans. PMID:25879289

  8. Human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 and human alphaB-crystallin expression-mediated increase in glutathione is essential for the protective activity of these proteins against TNFalpha-induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Mehlen, P; Kretz-Remy, C; Préville, X; Arrigo, A P

    1996-01-01

    Expression of small stress proteins (shsp) enhances the survival of mammalian cells exposed to heat or oxidative injuries. Recently, we have shown that the expression of shsp from different species, such as human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 or human alphaB-crystallin protected murine L929 cells against cell death induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha), hydrogen peroxide or menadione. Here, we report that, in growing L929 cell lines, the presence of these shsp decreased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). shsp expression also abolished the burst of intracellular ROS induced by TNFalpha. Several downstream effects resulting from the TNFalpha-mediated ROS increment, such as NF-kappaB activation, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, were inhibited by shsp expression. We also report that the expression of these different shsp raised the total glutathione level in both L929 cell lines and transiently transfected NIH 3T3-ras cells. This phenomenon was essential for the shsp-mediated decrease in ROS and resistance against TNFalpha. Our results therefore suggest that the protective activity shared by human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 and human alphaB-crystallin against TNFalpha-mediated cell death and probably other types of oxidative stress results from their conserved ability to raise the intracellular concentration of glutathione. Images PMID:8654367

  9. Caspases Connect Cell-Death Signaling to Organismal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; López-Soto, Alejandro; Kumar, Sharad; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-02-16

    Some forms of regulated cell death, such as apoptosis, are precipitated by the activation of cysteine proteases of the caspase family, including caspase 8, 9, and 3. Other caspases, such as caspase 1 and 4, are well known for their pro-inflammatory functions but regulate cell death in a limited number of pathophysiological settings. Accumulating evidence suggests that the most conserved function of mammalian caspases is not to control cell death sensu stricto, but to regulate inflammatory and immune reactions to dying cells and infectious challenges. Here, we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms though which mammalian caspases connect cell-death signaling to the maintenance of organismal homeostasis.

  10. How does ethanol induce apoptotic cell death of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yong; Kwon, Yongil; Yu, Shun

    2013-07-15

    A body of evidence suggests that ethanol can lead to damage of neuronal cells. However, the mechanism underlying the ethanol-induced damage of neuronal cells remains unclear. The role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in ethanol-induced damage was investigated in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide cell viability assay, DNA fragmentation detection, and flow cytometric analysis showed that ethanol induced apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest, characterized by increased caspase-3 activity, DNA fragmentation, nuclear disruption, and G1 arrest of cell cycle of the SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. In addition, western blot analysis indicated that ethanol induced a lasting increase in c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activity and a transient increase in p38 kinase activity of the neuroblastoma cells. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase or p38 kinase inhibitors significantly reduced the ethanol-induced cell death. Ethanol also increased p53 phosphorylation, followed by an increase in p21 tumor suppressor protein and a decrease in phospho-Rb (retinoblastoma) protein, leading to alterations in the expressions and activity of cyclin dependent protein kinases. Our results suggest that ethanol mediates apoptosis of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells by activating p53-related cell cycle arrest possibly through activation of the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase-related cell death pathway. PMID:25206494

  11. Cell death by autophagy: facts and apparent artefacts

    PubMed Central

    Denton, D; Nicolson, S; Kumar, S

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy (the process of self-digestion by a cell through the action of enzymes originating within the lysosome of the same cell) is a catabolic process that is generally used by the cell as a mechanism for quality control and survival under nutrient stress conditions. As autophagy is often induced under conditions of stress that could also lead to cell death, there has been a propagation of the idea that autophagy can act as a cell death mechanism. Although there is growing evidence of cell death by autophagy, this type of cell death, often called autophagic cell death, remains poorly defined and somewhat controversial. Merely the presence of autophagic markers in a cell undergoing death does not necessarily equate to autophagic cell death. Nevertheless, studies involving genetic manipulation of autophagy in physiological settings provide evidence for a direct role of autophagy in specific scenarios. This article endeavours to summarise these physiological studies where autophagy has a clear role in mediating the death process and discusses the potential significance of cell death by autophagy. PMID:22052193

  12. Orexin A attenuates palmitic acid-induced hypothalamic cell death.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Nixon, Joshua P; Butterick, Tammy A

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), an abundant dietary saturated fatty acid, contributes to obesity and hypothalamic dysregulation in part through increase in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and neuroinflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of PA exposure contributes to the onset of neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, high fat diets lead to changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles including suppression of the anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax). Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic peptide important in obesity resistance, also contributes to neuroprotection. Prior studies have demonstrated that OXA attenuates oxidative stress induced cell death. We hypothesized that OXA would be neuroprotective against PA induced cell death. To test this, we treated an immortalized hypothalamic cell line (designated mHypoA-1/2) with OXA and PA. We demonstrate that OXA attenuates PA-induced hypothalamic cell death via reduced caspase-3/7 apoptosis, stabilization of Bcl-2 gene expression, and reduced Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression ratio. We also found that OXA inhibits ROS production after PA exposure. Finally, we show that PA exposure in mHypoA-1/2 cells significantly reduces basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. However, OXA treatment reverses PA-induced changes in intracellular metabolism, increasing basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. Collectively, these results support that OXA protects against PA-induced hypothalamic dysregulation, and may represent one mechanism through which OXA can ameliorate effects of obesogenic diet on brain health. PMID:27449757

  13. Sickle Cell Trait-Related Exertional Deaths: Observations at Autopsy and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Rhome L; Feig, James

    2015-08-01

    Sickle cell trait-related exertional deaths, although rare, are well-accepted in the field of forensic pathology; however, the increased risk of sudden unexpected deaths in persons with sickle cell trait undergoing strenuous physical activity may be an underappreciated acute phenomenon in the clinical realm. Herein, we report two cases of sickle cell trait-related exertional deaths of active duty military members, with a review of the literature including the pathophysiology of sickle cell trait-related deaths and current military screening guidelines.

  14. Citreoviridin induces ROS-dependent autophagic cell death in human liver HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Wang, Yue-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Jiang, Li-Ping; Yang, Guang; Sun, Xian-Ce; Geng, Cheng-Yan; Li, Qiu-Juan; Chen, Min; Yao, Xiao-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Citreoviridin (CIT) is one of toxic mycotoxins derived from fungal species in moldy cereals. Whether CIT exerts hepatotoxicity and the precise molecular mechanisms of CIT hepatotoxicity are not completely elucidated. In this study, the inhibitor of autophagosome formation, 3-methyladenine, protected the cells against CIT cytotoxicity, and the autophagy stimulator rapamycin further decreased the cell viability of CIT-treated HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Atg5 with Atg5 siRNA alleviated CIT-induced cell death. These finding suggested the hypothesis that autophagic cell death contributed to CIT-induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. CIT increased the autophagosome number in HepG2 cells observed under a transmission electron microscope, and this effect was confirmed by the elevated LC3-II levels detected through Western blot. Reduction of P62 protein levels and the result of LC3 turnover assay indicated that the accumulation of autophagosomes in the CIT-treated HepG2 cells was due to increased formation rather than impaired degradation. The pretreatment of HepG2 cells with the ROS inhibitor NAC reduced autophagosome formation and reversed the CIT cytotoxicity, indicating that CIT-induced autophagic cell death was ROS-dependent. In summary, ROS-dependent autophagic cell death of HpeG2 cells described in this study may help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of CIT cytotoxicity.

  15. Subnanosecond electric pulses cause membrane permeabilization and cell death.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu; Guo, Siqi; Nesin, Vasyl; Heller, Richard; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-05-01

    Subnanosecond electric pulses (200 ps) at electric field intensities on the order of 20 kV/cm cause the death of B16.F10 murine melanoma cells when applied for minutes with a pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz. The lethal effect of the ultrashort pulses is found to be caused by a combination of thermal effects and electrical effects. Studies on the cellular level show increased transport across the membrane at much lower exposure times or number of pulses. Exposed to 2000 pulses, NG108 cells exhibit an increase in membrane conductance, but only allow transmembrane currents to flow, if the medium is positively biased with respect to the cell interior. This means that the cell membrane behaves like a rectifying diode. This increase in membrane conductance is a nonthermal process, since the temperature rise due to the pulsing is negligible.

  16. Stroke and cardiac cell death: Two peas in a pod.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-03-01

    A close pathological link between stroke brain and heart failure may exist. Here, we discuss relevant laboratory and clinical reports demonstrating neural and cardiac myocyte cell death following ischemic stroke. Although various overlapping risk factors exist between cerebrovascular incidents and cardiac incidents, stroke therapy has largely neglected the cardiac pathological consequences. Recent preclinical stroke studies have implicated an indirect cell death pathway, involving toxic molecules, that originates from the stroke brain and produces cardiac cell death. In concert, previous laboratory reports have revealed a reverse cell death cascade, in that cardiac arrest leads to ischemic cell death in the brain. A deeper understanding of the crosstalk of cell death pathways between stroke and cardiac failure will facilitate the development of novel treatments designed to arrest the global pathology of both diseases thereby improving the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with stroke and heart failure.

  17. Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, facing north (note cell block fifteen to the right and cell block fourteen in the distance_ - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  19. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  20. Mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to necrosis in NSCLC cells treated with oncolytic measles virus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Jiang, Aiqin; Chen, Aiping; Dahlhaus, Meike; Gonzalez, Patrick; Beltinger, Christian; Wei, Jiwu

    2014-06-15

    Although apoptotic phenomena have been observed in malignant cells infected by measles virus vaccine strain Edmonston B (MV-Edm), the precise oncolytic mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study we found that MV-Edm induced autophagy and sequestosome 1-mediated mitophagy leading to decreased cytochrome c release, which blocked the pro-apoptotic cascade in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). The decrease of apoptosis by mitophagy favored viral replication. Persistent viral replication sustained by autophagy ultimately resulted in necrotic cell death due to ATP depletion. Importantly, when autophagy was impaired in NSCLCs MV-Edm-induced cell death was significantly abrogated despite of increased apoptosis. Taken together, our results define a novel oncolytic mechanism by which mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to more efficient necrosis in NSCLCs following MV-Edm infection. This provides a foundation for future improvement of oncolytic virotherapy or antiviral therapy.

  1. Neurodegeneration in Lurcher mice occurs via multiple cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Doughty, M L; De Jager, P L; Korsmeyer, S J; Heintz, N

    2000-05-15

    Lurcher (Lc) is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor (GRID2) that results in the cell-autonomous death of cerebellar Purkinje cells in heterozygous lurcher (+/Lc) mice. This in turn triggers the massive loss of afferent granule cells during the first few postnatal weeks. Evidence suggests that the death of Purkinje cells as a direct consequence of GRID2(Lc) activation and the secondary death of granule cells because of target deprivation occur by apoptosis. We have used mice carrying null mutations of both the Bax and p53 genes to examine the roles of these genes in cell loss in lurcher animals. The absence of Bax delayed Purkinje cell death in response to the GRID2(Lc) mutation and permanently rescued the secondary death of granule cells. In contrast, the p53 deletion had no effect on either cell death pathway. Our results demonstrate that target deprivation induces a Bax-dependent, p53-independent cell death response in cerebellar granule cells in vivo. In contrast, Bax plays a minor role in GRID2(Lc)-mediated Purkinje cell death.

  2. Light regulation of cadmium-induced cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J; Wang, Yun; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant with deleterious effects on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In plants, the effects of cadmium toxicity are concentration dependent; lower doses destabilize many physiological processes and inhibit cell growth and multiplication, while higher doses evoke a more severe response that triggers activation of cell death. We recently investigated the effects of light on cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis using a cell suspension culture system. Although not affecting the inhibitory effects on cell multiplication, we found that light is a powerful regulator of Cd-induced cell death. A very specific proteomic response, which was clearly controlled by light, preceded cell death. Here we discuss the implications of these findings and highlight similarities between the regulation of cell death triggered by Cd and fumonisin B1. We consider how both compounds could be useful tools in dissecting plant cell death signaling. PMID:24398567

  3. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 Modulates Programmed Cell DeathW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae–induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events. PMID:16387834

  4. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity.

  5. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Taisei

    1995-12-31

    Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes {open_quote}programmed cell death{close_quote} or {open_quote}apoptosis{close_quote} - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell death responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell death in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage microarray analysis of H2O2-induced cell death have begun to unravel the complexity of the H2O2 network. This review also describes a novel link between H2O2 and sphingolipids, two signals that can interplay and regulate plant cell death. PMID:15631987

  7. Photoreceptor cell death and rescue in retinal detachment and degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the ultimate cause of vision loss in various retinal disorders, including retinal detachment (RD). Photoreceptor cell death has been thought to occur mainly through apoptosis, which is the most characterized form of programmed cell death. The caspase family of cysteine proteases plays a central role for inducing apoptosis, and in experimental models of RD, dying photoreceptor cells exhibit caspase activation; however, there is a paradox that caspase inhibition alone does not provide a sufficient protection against photoreceptor cell loss, suggesting that other mechanisms of cell death are involved. Recent accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as autophagy and necrosis, are also regulated by specific molecular machinery, such as those mediated by autophagy-related proteins and receptor-interacting protein kinases, respectively. Here we summarize the current knowledge of cell death signaling and its roles in photoreceptor cell death after RD and other retinal degenerative diseases. A body of studies indicate that not only apoptotic but also autophagic and necrotic signaling are involved in photoreceptor cell death, and that combined targeting of these pathways may be an effective neuroprotective strategy for retinal diseases associated with photoreceptor cell loss. PMID:23994436

  8. Predictors of Increased Death Following Relocation in Institutionalized Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosty, Mark; And Others

    Because research studies on post-relocation mortality in the elderly have come to inconsistent and contradictory conclusions, clinical teams recommending patients for placement are still relying on educated intuition as a basis for clinical decisions in what may be a life-or-death matter for elderly institutionalized patients. This study was…

  9. Bacterial programmed cell death of cerebral endothelial cells involves dual death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bermpohl, Daniela; Halle, Annett; Freyer, Dorette; Dagand, Emilie; Braun, Johann S.; Bechmann, Ingo; Schröder, Nicolas W.J.; Weber, Joerg R.

    2005-01-01

    Major barriers separating the blood from tissue compartments in the body are composed of endothelial cells. Interaction of bacteria with such barriers defines the course of invasive infections, and meningitis has served as a model system to study endothelial cell injury. Here we report the impressive ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae, clinically one of the most important pathogens, to induce 2 morphologically distinct forms of programmed cell death (PCD) in brain-derived endothelial cells. Pneumococci and the major cytotoxins H202 and pneumolysin induce apoptosis-like PCD independent of TLR2 and TLR4. On the other hand, pneumococcal cell wall, a major proinflammatory component, causes caspase-driven classical apoptosis that is mediated through TLR2. These findings broaden the scope of bacterial-induced PCD, link these effects to innate immune TLRs, and provide insight into the acute and persistent phases of damage during meningitis. PMID:15902310

  10. Cell death programs in Yersinia immunity and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Naomi H.; Brodsky, Igor E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell death plays a central role in host-pathogen interactions, as it can eliminate the pathogen's replicative niche and provide pro-inflammatory signals necessary for an effective immune response; conversely, cell death can allow pathogens to eliminate immune cells and evade anti-microbial effector mechanisms. In response to developmental signals or cell-intrinsic stresses, the executioner caspases-3 and -7 mediate apoptotic cell death, which is generally viewed as immunologically silent or immunosuppressive. A proinflammatory form of cell death that requires caspase-1, termed pyroptosis, is activated in response to microbial products within the host cytosol or disruption of cellular membranes by microbial pathogens. Infection by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia has features of both apoptosis and pyroptosis. Cell death and caspase-1 processing in Yersinia-infected cells occur in response to inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling by the Yersinia virulence factor YopJ. However, the molecular basis of YopJ-induced cell death, and the role of different death pathways in anti-Yersinia immune responses remain enigmatic. Here, we discuss the role that cell death may play in inducing specific pro-inflammatory signals that shape innate and adaptive immune responses against Yersinia infection. PMID:23226685

  11. Atg3 Overexpression Enhances Bortezomib-Induced Cell Death in SKM-1 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Chen; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic stem cell malignancies with a high risk of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clonal evolutions are significantly associated with transformation to AML. According to a gene expression microarray, atg3 is downregulated in MDS patients progressing to leukemia, but less is known about the function of Atg3 in the survival and death of MSD/AML cells. Moreover, the role of autophagy as a result of bortezomib treatment is controversial. The current study was designed to investigate the function of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells and to study the effect of Atg3 on cell viability and cell death following bortezomib treatment. Methods Four leukemia cell lines (SKM-1, THP-1, NB4 and K562) and two healthy patients’ bone marrow cells were analyzed for Atg3 expression via qRT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. The role of Atg3 in SKM-1 cell survival and cell death was analyzed by CCK-8 assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, DAPI staining and Annexin V/PI dual staining with or without bortezomib treatment. Western blotting analysis was used to detect proteins in autophagic and caspase signaling pathways. Electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes after Atg3 overexpression. Results Downregulation of Atg3 expression was detected in four leukemia cell lines compared with healthy bone marrow cells. Atg3 mRNA was significantly decreased in MDS patients’ bone marrow cells. Overexpression of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells resulted in AKT-mTOR-dependent autophagy, a significant reduction in cell proliferation and increased cell death, which could be overcome by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. SKM-1 cells overexpressing Atg3 were hypersensitive to bortezomib treatment at different concentrations via autophagic cell death and enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis in the SKM-1 cell line. Following treatment with 3-MA, the sensitivity of Atg3-overexpressing cells to bortezomib treatment was reduced

  12. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  13. Responding to bioterror concerns by increasing milk pasteurization temperature would increase estimated annual deaths from listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Martin, Nicole; Laue, Shelley; Gröhn, Yrjo T; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In a 2005 analysis of a potential bioterror attack on the food supply involving a botulinum toxin release into the milk supply, the authors recommended adopting a toxin inactivation step during milk processing. In response, some dairy processors increased the times and temperatures of pasteurization well above the legal minimum for high temperature, short time pasteurization (72 °C for 15 s), with unknown implications for public health. The present study was conducted to determine whether an increase in high temperature, short time pasteurization temperature would affect the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, a potentially lethal foodborne pathogen normally eliminated with proper pasteurization but of concern when milk is contaminated postpasteurization. L. monocytogenes growth during refrigerated storage was higher in milk pasteurized at 82 °C than in milk pasteurized at 72 °C. Specifically, the time lag before exponential growth was decreased and the maximum population density was increased. The public health impact of this change in pasteurization was evaluated using a quantitative microbial risk assessment of deaths from listeriosis attributable to consumption of pasteurized fluid milk that was contaminated postprocessing. Conservative estimates of the effect of pasteurizing all fluid milk at 82 °C rather than 72 °C are that annual listeriosis deaths from consumption of this milk would increase from 18 to 670, a 38-fold increase (8.7- to 96-fold increase, 5th and 95th percentiles). These results exemplify a situation in which response to a rare bioterror threat may have the unintended consequence of putting the public at increased risk of a known, yet severe harm and illustrate the need for a paradigm shift toward multioutcome risk benefit analyses when proposing changes to established food safety practices.

  14. Responding to bioterror concerns by increasing milk pasteurization temperature would increase estimated annual deaths from listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Martin, Nicole; Laue, Shelley; Gröhn, Yrjo T; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In a 2005 analysis of a potential bioterror attack on the food supply involving a botulinum toxin release into the milk supply, the authors recommended adopting a toxin inactivation step during milk processing. In response, some dairy processors increased the times and temperatures of pasteurization well above the legal minimum for high temperature, short time pasteurization (72 °C for 15 s), with unknown implications for public health. The present study was conducted to determine whether an increase in high temperature, short time pasteurization temperature would affect the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, a potentially lethal foodborne pathogen normally eliminated with proper pasteurization but of concern when milk is contaminated postpasteurization. L. monocytogenes growth during refrigerated storage was higher in milk pasteurized at 82 °C than in milk pasteurized at 72 °C. Specifically, the time lag before exponential growth was decreased and the maximum population density was increased. The public health impact of this change in pasteurization was evaluated using a quantitative microbial risk assessment of deaths from listeriosis attributable to consumption of pasteurized fluid milk that was contaminated postprocessing. Conservative estimates of the effect of pasteurizing all fluid milk at 82 °C rather than 72 °C are that annual listeriosis deaths from consumption of this milk would increase from 18 to 670, a 38-fold increase (8.7- to 96-fold increase, 5th and 95th percentiles). These results exemplify a situation in which response to a rare bioterror threat may have the unintended consequence of putting the public at increased risk of a known, yet severe harm and illustrate the need for a paradigm shift toward multioutcome risk benefit analyses when proposing changes to established food safety practices. PMID:24780323

  15. Resveratrol induces cell death and inhibits human herpesvirus 8 replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng-Yi; Chen, Chang-Yu; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Hong, Shin; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chiou, Yee-Hsuan; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Wang, Lin-Yu; Wang, Yi-Fen

    2015-12-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has been reported to inhibit proliferation of various cancer cells. However, the effects of resveratrol on the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) harboring primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells remains unclear. The anti-proliferation effects and possible mechanisms of resveratrol in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells were examined in this study. Results showed that resveratrol induced caspase-3 activation and the formation of acidic vacuoles in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells, indicating resveratrol treatment could cause apoptosis and autophagy in PEL cells. In addition, resveratrol treatment increased ROS generation but did not lead to HHV8 reactivation. ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) could attenuate both the resveratrol induced caspase-3 activity and the formation of acidic vacuoles, but failed to attenuate resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Caspase inhibitor, autophagy inhibitors and necroptosis inhibitor could not block resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Moreover, resveratrol disrupted HHV8 latent infection, inhibited HHV8 lytic gene expression and decreased virus progeny production. Overexpression of HHV8-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) could partially block resveratrol induced cell death in PEL cells. These data suggest that resveratrol-induced cell death in PEL cells may be mediated by disruption of HHV8 replication. Resveratrol may be a potential anti-HHV8 drug and an effective treatment for HHV8-related tumors.

  16. Cell death by necrosis, a regulated way to go.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Mauricio; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andrés; Quest, Andrew F G

    2008-05-01

    Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death with well-defined morphological traits that are often associated with activation of caspases. More recently evidence has become available demonstrating that upon caspase inhibition alternative programs of cell death are executed, including ones with features characteristic of necrosis. These findings have changed our view of necrosis as a passive and essentially accidental form of cell death to that of an active, regulated and controllable process. Also necrosis has now been observed in parallel with, rather than as an alternative pathway to, apoptosis. Thus, cell death responses are extremely flexible despite being programmed. In this review, some of the hallmarks of different programmed cell death modes have been highlighted before focusing the discussion on necrosis. Obligatory events associated with this form of cell death include uncompensated cell swelling and related changes at the plasma membrane. In this context, representatives of the transient receptor channel family and their regulation are discussed. Also mechanisms that lead to execution of the necrotic cell death program are highlighted. Emphasis is laid on summarizing our understanding of events that permit switching between cell death modes and how they connect to necrosis. Finally, potential implications for the treatment of some disease states are mentioned. PMID:18473819

  17. Actin as Deathly Switch? How Auxin Can Suppress Cell-Death Related Defence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Riemann, Michael; Liu, Qiong; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers – a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death. PMID:25933033

  18. TORC1 is required to balance cell proliferation and cell death in planarians.

    PubMed

    Tu, Kimberly C; Pearson, Bret J; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-05-15

    Multicellular organisms are equipped with cellular mechanisms that enable them to replace differentiated cells lost to normal physiological turnover, injury, and for some such as planarians, even amputation. This process of tissue homeostasis is generally mediated by adult stem cells (ASCs), tissue-specific stem cells responsible for maintaining anatomical form and function. To do so, ASCs must modulate the balance between cell proliferation, i.e. in response to nutrients, and that of cell death, i.e. in response to starvation or injury. But how these two antagonistic processes are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we explore the role of the core components of the TOR pathway during planarian tissue homeostasis and regeneration and identified an essential function for TORC1 in these two processes. RNAi-mediated silencing of TOR in intact animals resulted in a significant increase in cell death, whereas stem cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance were unaffected. Amputated animals failed to increase stem cell proliferation after wounding and displayed defects in tissue remodeling. Together, our findings suggest two distinct roles for TORC1 in planarians. TORC1 is required to modulate the balance between cell proliferation and cell death during normal cell turnover and in response to nutrients. In addition, it is required to initiate appropriate stem cell proliferation during regeneration and for proper tissue remodeling to occur to maintain scale and proportion.

  19. TORC1 is required to balance cell proliferation and cell death in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C.; Pearson, Bret J.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are equipped with cellular mechanisms that enable them to replace differentiated cells lost to normal physiological turnover, injury, and for some such as planarians, even amputation. This process of tissue homeostasis is generally mediated by adult stem cells (ASCs), tissue-specific stem cells responsible for maintaining anatomical form and function. To do so, ASCs must modulate the balance between cell proliferation, i.e. in response to nutrients, and that of cell death, i.e. in response to starvation or injury. But how these two antagonistic processes are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we explore the role of the core components of the TOR pathway during planarian tissue homeostasis and regeneration and identified an essential function for TORC1 in these two processes. RNAi-mediated silencing of TOR in intact animals resulted in a significant increase in cell death, whereas stem cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance were unaffected. Amputated animals failed to increase stem cell proliferation after wounding and displayed defects in tissue remodeling. Together, our findings suggest two distinct roles for TORC1 in planarians. TORC1 is required to modulate the balance between cell proliferation and cell death during normal cell turnover and in response to nutrients. In addition, it is required to initiate appropriate stem cell proliferation during regeneration and for proper tissue remodeling to occur to maintain scale and proportion. PMID:22445864

  20. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death.

    PubMed

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A; Sundier, Stephanie Y; Duchen, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  1. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A.; Sundier, Stephanie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26375864

  2. Triggering Death of Adherent Cells with Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a convenient stimulus for triggering cell death that is available in most laboratories. We use a Stratalinker UV cross-linker because it is a safe, cheap, reliable, consistent, and easily controlled source of UV irradiation. This protocol describes using a Stratalinker to trigger UV-induced death of HeLa cells. PMID:27371593

  3. Functional inactivation of Rb sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Danos, Arpad M.; Liao, Yang; Li, Xuan; Du, Wei

    2012-01-01

    We showed previously that inactivation of TSC2 induces death in cancer cells lacking the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor under stress conditions, suggesting that inactivation of TSC2 can potentially be used as an approach to specifically kill cancers that have lost WT Rb. As Rb is often inactivated in cancers by overexpression of cyclin D1, loss of p16ink4a cdk inhibitor, or expression of viral oncoproteins, it will be interesting to determine if such functional inactivation of Rb would similarly sensitize cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death. In addition, many cancers lack functional Pten, resulting in increased PI3K/Akt signaling that has been shown to modulate E2F-induced cell death. Therefore it will be interesting to test whether loss of Pten will affect TSC2 inactivation induced killing of Rb mutant cancer cells. Here, we show that overexpression of Cyclin D1 or the viral oncogene E1a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death and growth inhibition. On the other hand, knockdown of p16ink4a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in a manner that is likely dependant on serum induction of Cyclin D1 to inactivate the Rb function. Additionally, we demonstrate that loss of Pten does not interfere with TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in Rb mutant cancer cells. Together, these results suggest that TSC2 is potentially a useful target for a large spectrum of cancer types with an inactivated Rb pathway. PMID:23022476

  4. New insights into autophagic cell death in the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Davide; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Quaglino, Daniela; Ottaviani, Enzo

    2009-04-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionary ancient process based on the activity of genes conserved from yeast to metazoan taxa. Whereas its role as a mechanism to provide energy during cell starvation is commonly accepted, debate continues about the occurrence of autophagy as a means specifically activated to achieve cell death. The IPLB-LdFB insect cell line, derived from the larval fat body of the lepidoptera Lymantria dispar, represents a suitable model to address this question, as both autophagic and apoptotic cell death can be induced by various stimuli. Using morphological and functional approaches, we have observed that the culture medium conditioned by IPLB-LdFB cells committed to death by the ATPase inhibitor oligomycin A stimulates autophagic cell death in untreated IPLB-LdFB cells. Moreover, proteomic analysis of the conditioned media suggests that, in IPLB-LdFB cells, oligomycin A promotes a shift towards lipid metabolism, increases oxidative stress and specifically directs the cells towards autophagic activity.

  5. Chloroquine-induced autophagic vacuole accumulation and cell death in glioma cells is p53 independent.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ying; Kohli, Latika; Klocke, Barbara J; Roth, Kevin A

    2010-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade central nervous system malignancy and despite aggressive treatment strategies, GBM patients have a median survival time of just 1 year. Chloroquine (CQ), an antimalarial lysosomotropic agent, has been identified as a potential adjuvant in the treatment regimen of GBMs. However, the mechanism of CQ-induced tumor cell death is poorly defined. We and others have shown that CQ-mediated cell death may be p53-dependent and at least in part due to the intrinsic apoptotic death pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of CQ on 5 established human GBM lines, differing in their p53 gene status. CQ was found to induce a concentration-dependent death in each of these cell lines. Although CQ treatment increased caspase-3-like enzymatic activity in all 5 cell lines, a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor did not significantly attenuate death. Moreover, CQ caused an accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in all cell lines and was found to affect the levels and subcellular distribution of cathepsin D, suggesting that altered lysosomal function may also play a role in CQ-induced cell death. Thus, CQ can induce p53-independent death in gliomas that do not require caspase-mediated apoptosis. To potentially identify more potent chemotherapeutics, various CQ derivatives and lysosomotropic compounds were tested on the GBM cells. Quinacrine and mefloquine were found to be more potent than CQ in killing GBM cells in vitro and given their superior blood-brain barrier penetration compared with CQ may prove more efficacious as chemotherapeutic agents for GBM patients.

  6. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Teresita; de las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  7. TRAIL restores DCA/metformin-mediated cell death in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Jin Kyung; Hong, Jungil; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Woo Chul; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, In-Chul

    2016-09-23

    Previous studies have shown that hypoxia can reverse DCA/metformin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells. Therefore, targeting hypoxia is necessary for therapies targeting cancer metabolism. In the present study, we found that TRAIL can overcome the effect of hypoxia on the cell death induced by treatment of DCA and metformin in breast cancer cells. Unexpectedly, DR5 is upregulated in the cells treated with DCA/metformin, and sustained under hypoxia. Blocking DR5 by siRNA inhibited DCA/metformin/TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that DR5 upregulation plays an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that activation of JNK and c-Jun is responsible for upregulation of DR5 induced by DCA/metformin. These findings support the potential application of combining TRAIL and metabolism-targeting drugs in the treatment of cancers under hypoxia. PMID:27569287

  8. The convergence of radiation and immunogenic cell death signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Encouse B.; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Demaria, Sandra; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) triggers programmed cell death in tumor cells through a variety of highly regulated processes. Radiation-induced tumor cell death has been studied extensively in vitro and is widely attributed to multiple distinct mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe (MC), autophagy, and senescence, which may occur concurrently. When considering tumor cell death in the context of an organism, an emerging body of evidence suggests there is a reciprocal relationship in which radiation stimulates the immune system, which in turn contributes to tumor cell kill. As a result, traditional measurements of radiation-induced tumor cell death, in vitro, fail to represent the extent of clinically observed responses, including reductions in loco-regional failure rates and improvements in metastases free and overall survival. Hence, understanding the immunological responses to the type of radiation-induced cell death is critical. In this review, the mechanisms of radiation-induced tumor cell death are described, with particular focus on immunogenic cell death (ICD). Strategies combining radiotherapy with specific chemotherapies or immunotherapies capable of inducing a repertoire of cancer specific immunogens might potentiate tumor control not only by enhancing cell kill but also through the induction of a successful anti-tumor vaccination that improves patient survival. PMID:22891162

  9. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  10. [Programmed cell death: history and future of a concept].

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Cell death was observed and understood since the 19th century, but there was no experimental examination until the mid-20th century. Beginning in the 1960's, several laboratories demonstrated that cell death was biologically controlled (programmed) and that the morphology was common and not readily explained (apoptosis). By 1990 the genetic basis of programmed cell death had been established and the first components of the cell death machinery (caspase 3, bcl-2 and Fas) had been identified, sequenced, and recognized as highly conserved in evolution. The rapid development of the field has given us substantial understanding of how cell death is achieved. However, capitalizing on our knowledge for therapeutic purposes requires us to learn much more about how a cell commits to death, as well as recognizing that apoptosis may be the most common and efficient means of death, but that there are alternative pathways that can result in cell death even when the conventional pathway is blocked. Interestingly enough, many of the arguments and missteps in the history of the field were anticipated by Claude Bernard, and his warnings and recommendations remain valid today.

  11. Cell-Centric View of Apoptosis and Apoptotic Cell Death-Inducing Antitumoral Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Apraiz, Aintzane; Boyano, Maria Dolores; Asumendi, Aintzane

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death and especially apoptotic cell death, occurs under physiological conditions and is also desirable under pathological circumstances. However, the more we learn about cellular signaling cascades, the less plausible it becomes to find restricted and well-limited signaling pathways. In this context, an extensive description of pathway-connections is necessary in order to point out the main regulatory molecules as well as to select the most appropriate therapeutic targets. On the other hand, irregularities in programmed cell death pathways often lead to tumor development and cancer-related mortality is projected to continue increasing despite the effort to develop more active and selective antitumoral compounds. In fact, tumor cell plasticity represents a major challenge in chemotherapy and improvement on anticancer therapies seems to rely on appropriate drug combinations. An overview of the current status regarding apoptotic pathways as well as available chemotherapeutic compounds provides a new perspective of possible future anticancer strategies. PMID:24212653

  12. A High Concentration of Genistein Induces Cell Death in Human Uterine Leiomyoma Cells by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Lysandra; Gao, Xioahua; Moore, Alicia B; Yu, Linda; Di, Xudong; Kissling, Grace E; Dixon, Darlene

    2016-01-01

    Genistein, an estrogenic, soy-derived isoflavone, may play a protective role against hormone-related cancers. We have reported that a high concentration of genistein inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human uterine smooth muscle cells, but not in leiomyoma (fibroid) cells. To better understand the differential cell death responses of normal and tumor cells to a high concentration of genistein, we treated uterine smooth muscle cells and uterine leiomyoma cells with 50 μg/ml of genistein for 72 h and 168 h, and assessed for mediators of apoptosis, cytotoxicity and autophagy. We found that leiomyoma cells had increased protection from apoptosis by expressing an increased ratio of Bcl-2: bak at 72 h and 168 h; however, in smooth muscle cells, the Bcl-2: bak ratio was decreased at 72 h, but significantly rebounded by 168 h. The apoptosis extrinsic factors, Fas ligand and Fas receptor, were highly expressed in uterine smooth muscle cells following genistein treatment at both time points as evidenced by confocal microscopy. This was not seen in the uterine leiomyoma cells; however, cytotoxicity as indicated by elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels was significantly enhanced at 168 h. Increased immunoexpression of an autophagy/autophagosome marker was also observed in the leiomyoma cells, although minimally present in smooth muscle cells at 72 h. Ultrastructurally, there was evidence of autophagic vacuoles in the leiomyoma cells; whereas, the normal smooth muscle cells showed nuclear fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. In summary, our data show differential cell death pathways induced by genistein in tumor and normal uterine smooth muscle cells, and suggest novel cell death pathways that can be targeted for preventive and intervention strategies for inhibiting fibroid tumor cell growth in vivo. PMID:27512718

  13. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M; Reichel, Christoph A; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R; Green, Douglas R; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-11-25

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy. PMID:25385600

  14. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M.; Reichel, Christoph A.; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R.; Green, Douglas R.; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy. PMID:25385600

  15. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Cell Death Control by Matrix Metalloproteinases1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Dirk; Sieferer, Elke; Pfannstiel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that play important roles in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in animals, the proteases responsible for dynamic modifications of the plant cell wall are largely unknown. A possible involvement of MMPs was addressed by cloning and functional characterization of Sl2-MMP and Sl3-MMP from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The two tomato MMPs were found to resemble mammalian homologs with respect to gelatinolytic activity, substrate preference for hydrophobic amino acids on both sides of the scissile bond, and catalytic properties. In transgenic tomato seedlings silenced for Sl2/3-MMP expression, necrotic lesions were observed at the base of the hypocotyl. Cell death initiated in the epidermis and proceeded to include outer cortical cell layers. In later developmental stages, necrosis spread, covering the entire stem and extending into the leaves of MMP-silenced plants. The subtilisin-like protease P69B was identified as a substrate of Sl2- and Sl3-MMP. P69B was shown to colocalize with Sl-MMPs in the apoplast of the tomato hypocotyl, it exhibited increased stability in transgenic plants silenced for Sl-MMP activity, and it was cleaved and inactivated by Sl-MMPs in vitro. The induction of cell death in Sl2/3-MMP-silenced plants depended on P69B, indicating that Sl2- and Sl3-MMP act upstream of P69B in an extracellular proteolytic cascade that contributes to the regulation of cell death in tomato. PMID:27208293

  17. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Aoshiba, K; Nagai, A

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke. PMID:19570263

  18. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Aoshiba, K; Nagai, A

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  19. Androgen Receptor (AR) Positive vs Negative Roles in Prostate Cancer Cell Deaths including Apoptosis, Anoikis, Entosis, Necrosis and Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Simeng; Niu, Yuanjie; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays pivotal roles in the prostate development and homeostasis as well as in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with anti-androgens remains as the main treatment of PCa, and it has been shown to effectively suppress PCa growth during the first 12–24 months. However, ADT eventually fails and tumors may re-grow and progress into the castration resistant stage. Recent reports revealed that AR might play complicated and even opposite roles in PCa progression that might depend on cell types and tumor stages. Importantly, AR may influence PCa progression via differential modulation of various cell deaths including apoptosis, anoikis, entosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell deaths. Targeting AR may induce PCa cell apoptosis, autophagic cell deaths and programmed necrosis, yet targeting AR may also suppress cell deaths via anoikis and entosis that may potentially lead to increased metastasis. These differential functions of AR in various types of PCa cell death might challenge the current ADT with anti-androgens treatment. Further detailed dissection of molecular mechanisms by which AR modulates different PCa cell deaths will help us to develop a better therapy to battle PCa. PMID:23993415

  20. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  1. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-11-10

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5-/- cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis. PMID:26416459

  2. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5−/− cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis. PMID:26416459

  3. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  4. Apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Aten, J; Rentenaar, R J; Hack, C E; Koopman, G; Weening, J J; ten Berge, I J

    1998-01-01

    Tubular cells are important targets during acute renal allograft rejection and induction of apoptosis might be a mechanism of tubular cell destruction. Susceptibility to induction of apoptosis is regulated by the homologous Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax is regulated by p53, which down-regulates expression of Bcl-2, while simultaneously up-regulating expression of Bax. We studied apoptotic tubular cell death in 10 renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with acute rejection by in situ end-labelling and the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide. Tubular expression of p53, Bcl-2 and Bax was studies by immunohistochemistry. Five renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with uncomplicated clinical course and histologically normal renal tissue present in nephrectomy specimens from 4 patients with renal adenocarcinoma served as control specimens. Apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies were detected in tubular epithelia and tubular lumina in 9 out of 10 acute rejection biopsies. In control renal tissue, apoptotic cells were detected in 1 biopsy only. Compared to control renal tissue, acute renal allograft rejection was, furthermore, associated with a shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax in tubular epithelia and increased expression of p53 in tubular nuclei. These observations demonstrate that apoptosis contributes in part to tubular cell destruction during acute renal allograft rejection. In accordance, the shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax indicates increased susceptibility of tubular epithelia to induction of apoptosis. The expression of p53 in tubular nuclei during acute renal allograft rejection indicates the presence of damaged DNA, which can be important in initiation of part of the observed apoptosis. These findings elucidate part of the mechanisms controlling apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

  5. Ceramide metabolism regulates autophagy and apoptotic-cell death induced by melatonin in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez, Raquel; Fernández, Ana; Prieto-Domínguez, Néstor; Martínez, Laura; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C.; Mauriz, José L.; González-Gallego, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains homeostasis during stress, although it also contributes to cell death under specific contexts. Ceramides have emerged as important effectors in the regulation of autophagy, mediating the crosstalk with apoptosis. Melatonin induces apoptosis of cancer cells; however, its role in autophagy and ceramide metabolism has yet to be clearly elucidated. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of melatonin administration on autophagy and ceramide metabolism and its possible link with melatonin-induced apoptotic cell death in hepatocarcinoma (HCC) cells. Melatonin (2 mM) transiently induced autophagy in HepG2 cells through JNK phosphorylation, characterized by increased Beclin1 expression, p62 degradation and LC3II and LAMP2 colocalization, which translated in decreased cell viability. Moreover, ATG5-silencing sensitized HepG2 cells to melatonin induced-apoptosis, suggesting a dual role of autophagy in cell death. Melatonin enhanced ceramide levels through both de novo synthesis and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) stimulation. Serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT) inhibition with myriocin prevented melatonin induced autophagy and ASMase inhibition with imipramine impaired autophagy flux. However, ASMase inhibition partially protected HepG2 cells against melatonin while SPT inhibition significantly enhanced cell death. Findings suggest a cross-talk between SPT-mediated ceramide generation and autophagy in protecting against melatonin, while specific ASMase-induced ceramide production participates in melatonin-mediated cell death. Thus, dual blocking of SPT and autophagy emerge as a potential strategy to potentiate the apoptotic effects of melatonin in liver cancer cells. PMID:25975536

  6. Dynamic quantitative photothermal monitoring of cell death of individual human red blood cells upon glucose depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George Chung Kit; Andika, Marta; Agarwal, Shuchi; Chen, Peng; Olivo, Malini

    2010-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) have been found to undergo ``programmed cell death,'' or eryptosis, and understanding this process can provide more information about apoptosis of nucleated cells. Photothermal (PT) response, a label-free photothermal noninvasive technique, is proposed as a tool to monitor the cell death process of living human RBCs upon glucose depletion. Since the physiological status of the dying cells is highly sensitive to photothermal parameters (e.g., thermal diffusivity, absorption, etc.), we applied linear PT response to continuously monitor the death mechanism of RBC when depleted of glucose. The kinetics of the assay where the cell's PT response transforms from linear to nonlinear regime is reported. In addition, quantitative monitoring was performed by extracting the relevant photothermal parameters from the PT response. Twofold increases in thermal diffusivity and size reduction were found in the linear PT response during cell death. Our results reveal that photothermal parameters change earlier than phosphatidylserine externalization (used for fluorescent studies), allowing us to detect the initial stage of eryptosis in a quantitative manner. Hence, the proposed tool, in addition to detection of eryptosis earlier than fluorescence, could also reveal physiological status of the cells through quantitative photothermal parameter extraction.

  7. Noncanonical cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kinet, Maxime J.; Shaham, Shai

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis. elegans has served as a fruitful setting for cell death research for over three decades. A conserved pathway of four genes, egl-1/BH3-only, ced-9/Bcl-2, ced-4/Apaf-1, and ced-3/caspase, coordinates most developmental cell deaths in C. elegans. However, other cell death forms, programmed and pathological, have also been described in this animal. Some of these share morphological and/or molecular similarities with the canonical apoptotic pathway, while others do not. Indeed, recent studies suggest the existence of an entirely novel mode of programmed developmental cell destruction that may also be conserved beyond nematodes. Here we review evidence for these noncanonical pathways. We propose that different cell death modalities can function as backup mechanisms for apoptosis, or as tailor-made programs that allow specific dying cells to be efficiently cleared from the animal. PMID:25065890

  8. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Audrey; Courtin, Aurélie; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:19126655

  9. [Death].

    PubMed

    Ribas, Jordi Domingo

    2003-12-01

    Intercultural factors are essential for reflection. In this article, the authors deals with a more direct vision on the special edition about Grief and Mourning, about the topic which lies in the depths of all of our consciences: death and the question what lies beyond death? The author provides us elements to reflect about concepts, some accepted in various cases, rejected in others, but always polemical, which help us to penetrate farther into the real mystery of life: death and what follows death.

  10. Neuronal cell death in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Northington, Frances J; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Martin, Lee J

    2011-05-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and young children. Therapeutic opportunities are very limited for neonatal and pediatric HIE. Specific neural systems and populations of cells are selectively vulnerable in HIE; however, the mechanisms of degeneration are unresolved. These mechanisms involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and the activation of several different cell death pathways. Decades ago the structural and mechanistic basis of the cellular degeneration in HIE was thought to be necrosis. Subsequently, largely due to advances in cell biology and to experimental animal studies, emphasis has been switched to apoptosis or autophagy mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms as important forms of degeneration in HIE. We have conceptualized based on morphological and biochemical data that this degeneration is better classified according to an apoptosis-necrosis cell death continuum and that programmed cell necrosis has prominent contribution in the neurodegeneration of HIE in animal models. It is likely that neonatal HIE evolves through many cell death chreodes influenced by the dynamic injury landscape. The relevant injury mechanisms remain to be determined in human neonatal HIE, though preliminary work suggests a complexity in the cell death mechanisms greater than that anticipated from experimental animal models. The accurate identification of the various cell death chreodes and their mechanisms unfolding within the immature brain matrix could provide fresh insight for developing meaningful therapies for neonatal and pediatric HIE. PMID:21520238

  11. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes.

  12. Neuronal Cell Death in Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Northington, Frances J.; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Martin, Lee J.

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and young children. Therapeutic opportunities are very limited for neonatal and pediatric HIE. Specific neural systems and populations of cells are selectively vulnerable in HIE; however, the mechanisms of degeneration are unresolved. These mechanisms involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and the activation of several different cell death pathways. Decades ago the structural and mechanistic basis of the cellular degeneration in HIE was thought to be necrosis. Subsequently, largely due to advances in cell biology and to experimental animal studies, emphasis has been switched to apoptosis or autophagy mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms as important forms of degeneration in HIE. We have conceptualized based on morphological and biochemical data that this degeneration is better classified according to an apoptosis-necrosis cell death continuum and that programmed cell necrosis has prominent contribution in the neurodegeneration of HIE in animal models. It is likely that neonatal HIE evolves through many cell death chreodes influenced by the dynamic injury landscape. The relevant injury mechanisms remain to be determined in human neonatal HIE, though preliminary work suggests a complexity in the cell death mechanisms greater than that anticipated from experimental animal models. The accurate identification of the various cell death chreodes and their mechanisms unfolding within the immature brain matrix could provide fresh insight for developing meaningful therapies for neonatal and pediatric HIE. PMID:21520238

  13. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes. PMID:25962350

  14. Peruvoside, a Cardiac Glycoside, Induces Primitive Myeloid Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qian; Leong, Wa Seng; Liu, Liang; Chan, Wai-In

    2016-01-01

    Despite the available chemotherapy and treatment, leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure due to frequent relapses after treatment. Among the heterogeneous leukemic cells, a rare population referred as the leukemic stem cell (LSC), is thought to be responsible for relapses and drug resistance. Cardiac glycosides (CGs) have been used in treating heart failure despite its toxicity. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated its new usage as a potential anti-cancer drug. Ouabain, one of the CGs, specifically targeted CD34⁺CD38(-) leukemic stem-like cells, but not the more mature CD34⁺CD38⁺ leukemic cells, making this type of compounds a potential treatment for leukemia. In search of other potential anti-leukemia CGs, we found that Peruvoside, a less studied CG, is more effective than Ouabain and Digitoxin at inducing cell death in primitive myeloid leukemia cells without obvious cytotoxicity on normal blood cells. Similar to Ouabain and Digitoxin, Peruvoside also caused cell cycle arrest at G₂/M stage. It up-regulates CDKN1A expression and activated the cleavage of Caspase 3, 8 and PARP, resulting in apoptosis. Thus, Peruvoside showed potent anti-leukemia effect, which may serve as a new anti-leukemia agent in the future. PMID:27110755

  15. Sickle cell trait and sudden death--bringing it home.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell trait continues to be the leading cause of sudden death for young African Americans in military basic training and civilian organized sports. The syndrome may have caused the death of up to 10 college football players since 1974 and, as recently as 2000, was suspected as the cause of death of three U.S. Army recruits. The penal military-style boot camps in the United States and the recent death of two teenagers with sickle cell trait merits renewed vigor in the education of athletic instructors, the military and the public about conditions associated with sudden death in individuals with sickle cell trait. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17393956

  16. Contact-independent cell death of human microglial cells due to pathogenic Naegleria fowleri trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2008-12-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri leads to a fatal infection known as primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. Previously, the target cell death could be induced by phagocytic activity of N. fowleri as a contact-dependent mechanism. However, in this study we investigated the target cell death under a non-contact system using a tissue-culture insert. The human microglial cells, U87MG cells, co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites for 30 min in a non-contact system showed morphological changes such as the cell membrane destruction and a reduction in the number. By fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, U87MG cells co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system showed a significant increase of apoptotic cells (16%) in comparison with that of the control or N. fowleri lysate. When U87MG cells were co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system for 30 min, 2 hr, and 4 hr, the cytotoxicity of amebae against target cells was 40.5, 44.2, and 45.6%, respectively. By contrast, the cytotoxicity of non-pathogenic N. gruberi trophozoites was 10.2, 12.4, and 13.2%, respectively. These results suggest that the molecules released from N. fowleri in a contact-independent manner as well as phagocytosis in a contact-dependent manner may induce the host cell death.

  17. Ultraviolet-induced cell death is independent of DNA replication in rat kangaroo cells.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, E N; Menck, C F

    1995-05-01

    Rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylus) cells have an efficient repair system for photoreactivation of lethal lesions induced by 254 nm UV. However, this ability is lost with increasing time after UV, being completely ineffective after 24 h. Critical events leading to UV-induced cell death must occur within this period of time. DNA synthesis was inhibited by the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin and the loss of the capability to photorepair lethal lesions was maintained as for replicating cells. Similar data were obtained in synchronized cells UV irradiated immediately before S phase. Under the same conditions, the ability to remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation in these cells remained unchanged 24 h after irradiation. These data indicate that the critical events responsible for UV-induced cell death occur in the absence of DNA replication.

  18. Thioredoxin Reductase Deficiency Potentiates Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Dopaminergic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopert, Pamela; Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are considered major generators of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). We have recently shown that isolated mitochondria consume hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a substrate- and respiration-dependent manner predominantly via the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Trx/Prx system in dopaminergic cell death. We asked if pharmacological and lentiviral inhibition of the Trx/Prx system sensitized dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H2O2 levels and death in response to toxicants implicated in PD. Incubation of N27 dopaminergic cells or primary rat mesencephalic cultures with the Trx reductase (TrxR) inhibitor auranofin in the presence of sub-toxic concentrations of parkinsonian toxicants paraquat; PQ or 6-hydroxydopamine; 6OHDA (for N27 cells) resulted in a synergistic increase in H2O2 levels and subsequent cell death. shRNA targeting the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2) in N27 cells confirmed the effects of pharmacological inhibition. A synergistic decrease in maximal and reserve respiratory capacity was observed in auranofin treated cells and TrxR2 deficient cells following incubation with PQ or 6OHDA. Additionally, TrxR2 deficient cells showed decreased basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. These data demonstrate that inhibition of the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system sensitizes dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H2O2, and cell death. Therefore, in addition to their role in the production of cellular H2O2 the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system serve as a major sink for cellular H2O2 and its disruption may contribute to dopaminergic pathology associated with PD. PMID:23226354

  19. Radiation-induced Cochlea hair cell death: mechanisms and protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pei-Xin; Du, Sha-Sha; Ren, Chen; Yao, Qi-Wei; Yuan, Ya-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Cochlea hair cell death is regarded to be responsible for the radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is one of the principal complications of radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers. In this mini- review, we focus on the current progresses trying to unravel mechanisms of radiation-induced hair cell death and find out possible protection. P53, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways have been proposed as pivotal in the processes leading to radiation hair cell death. Potential protectants, such as amifostine, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and epicatechin (EC) , are claimed to be effective at reducing radiation- inducedhair cell death. The RT dosage, selection and application of concurrent chemotherapy should be pre- examined in order to minimize the damage to cochlea hair cells.

  20. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  1. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  2. The role of Bcl-2 family member BNIP3 in cell death and disease: NIPping at the heels of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Teralee R.; Gibson, Spencer B.

    2011-01-01

    Bcl-2 nineteen kilodalton interacting protein (BNIP3) is a BH-3 only Bcl-2 family member that its expression levels increase during stress such as hypoxia through hypoxia inducing factor -1 (HIF-1) dependent or independent mechanisms. When BNIP3 expression is induced, it localizes to the mitochondria and triggers a loss of membrane potential, and an increase reactive oxygen species production, which often leads to cell death. Cells under normal growth conditions suppress BNIP3 expression though transcriptional repression. There is considerable debate in the literature regarding what type of cell death is induced by BNIP3. It has been observed that BNIP3 could induce necrosis, autophagy and/or apoptosis. In contrast, other studies indicate that BNIP3 could promote cell survival. Besides its cell death regulation, BNIP3 plays a key role in the pathogenicity of many diseases. In cardiac infarction, loss of BNIP3 expression has been shown to reduce the number of damaged cardiomyocytes after ischemia and reperfusion. BNIP3 expression also plays an important role in the de-regulation of cell death in many cancers. In this review, we will discuss the different and often contradictory mechanisms of BNIP3 regulation of cell death and the role BNIP3 may play in diseases. PMID:19136941

  3. Cell Death and Tissue Remodeling in Planarian Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pellettieri, Jason; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Watanabe, Shigeki; Mancuso, Joel; Green, Douglas R.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    Many long-lived organisms, including humans, can regenerate some adult tissues lost to physical injury or disease. Much of the previous research on mechanisms of regeneration has focused on adult stem cells, which give rise to new tissue necessary for the replacement of missing body parts. Here we report that apoptosis of differentiated cells complements stem cell division during regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Specifically, we developed a whole-mount TUNEL assay that allowed us to document two dramatic increases in the rate of apoptosis following amputation – an intial localized response near the wound site and a subsequent systemic response that varies in magnitude depending on the type of fragment examined. The latter cell death response can be induced in uninjured organs, occurs in the absence of planarian stem cells, and can also be triggered by prolonged starvation. Taken together, our results implicate apoptosis in the restoration of proper anatomical scale and proportion through remodeling of existing tissues. We also report results from initial mechanistic studies of apoptosis in planarians, which revealed that a S. mediterranea homolog of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is required for cell survival in adult animals. We propose that apoptosis is a central mechanism working in concert with stem cell division to restore anatomical form and function during metazoan regeneration. PMID:19766622

  4. Doxorubicin-induced cell death requires cathepsin B in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Bien, S; Rimmbach, C; Neumann, H; Niessen, J; Reimer, E; Ritter, C A; Rosskopf, D; Cinatl, J; Michaelis, M; Schroeder, H W S; Kroemer, H K

    2010-11-15

    The cysteine protease cathepsin B acts as a key player in apoptosis. Cathepsin B-mediated cell death is induced by various stimuli such as ischemia, bile acids or TNFα. Whether cathepsin B can be influenced by anticancer drugs, however, has not been studied in detail. Here, we describe the modulation of doxorubicin-induced cell death by silencing of cathepsin B expression. Previously, it was shown that doxorubicin, in contrast to other drugs, selectively regulates expression and activity of cathepsin B. Selective silencing of cathepsin B by siRNA or the cathepsin B specific inhibitor CA074Me modified doxorubicin-mediated cell death in Hela tumor cells. Both Caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage were significantly reduced in cells lacking cathepsin B. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization as well as the release of cytochrome C and AIF from mitochondria into cytosol induced by doxorubicin were significantly diminished in cathepsin B suppressed cells. In addition, doxorubicin associated down-regulation of XIAP was not observed in cathepsin B silenced cells. Lack of cathepsin B significantly modified cell cycle regulatory proteins such as cdk1, Wee1 and p21 without significant changes in G(1), S or G(2)M cell cycle phases maybe indicating further cell cycle independent actions of these proteins. Consequently, cell viability following doxorubicin was significantly elevated in cells with cathepsin B silencing. In summary, our data strongly suggest a role of cathepsin B in doxorubicin-induced cell death. Therefore, increased expression of cathepsin B in various types of cancer can modify susceptibility towards doxorubicin. PMID:20709028

  5. Octylphenol induces vitellogenin production and cell death in fish hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, B.H.; Monteverdi, G.H.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    The effects of octylphenol (OP) on vitellogenin production and cell death in hepatocytes from brown bullhead catfish (Americurus nebulosus) were studied. Production of vitellogenin was induced in hepatocytes exposed to 10 to 50 {micro}M OP, whereas a higher concentration of OP (100 {micro}M) induced apoptotic cell death. By 3 h after the addition of 100 {micro}M OP, dying cells showed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation as determined by fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis. Later stages of cell death (nuclear membrane breakdown and cell fragmentation into apoptotic bodies) were identified in cells exposed to OP for at least 6 h. Hepatocytes exposed to 100 {micro}M OP also produced less vitellogenin than cells exposed to 50 {micro}M OP. An estrogen receptor antagonist, tamoxifen, greatly decreased vitellogenin production in OP-exposed hepatocytes from male fish but did not decrease cell death in these cells. Thus, although the ability of OP to induce vitellogenin production is likely mediated through interactions with the estrogen receptor, the induction of apoptotic cell death by OP does not appear to be dependent on its estrogenic activity but may be a more general toxic effect.

  6. Cell biology: Death drags down the neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Claudia G.; Martin, Adam C.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of dying cells reveals that they play an active part in modifying tissue shape by pulling on neighbouring cells. This induces neighbouring cells to contract at their apices, which results in tissue folding. See Letter p.245

  7. The Impact of Autophagy on Cell Death Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy represents a homeostatic cellular mechanism for the turnover of organelles and proteins, through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy facilitates cell survival through the recycling of metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can modulate other vital processes such as programmed cell death (e.g., apoptosis), inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms and thereby influence disease pathogenesis. Selective pathways can target distinct cargoes (e.g., mitochondria and proteins) for autophagic degradation. At present, the causal relationship between autophagy and various forms of regulated or nonregulated cell death remains unclear. Autophagy can occur in association with necrosis-like cell death triggered by caspase inhibition. Autophagy and apoptosis have been shown to be coincident or antagonistic, depending on experimental context, and share cross-talk between signal transduction elements. Autophagy may modulate the outcome of other regulated forms of cell death such as necroptosis. Recent advances suggest that autophagy can dampen inflammatory responses, including inflammasome-dependent caspase-1 activation and maturation of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy may also act as regulator of caspase-1 dependent cell death (pyroptosis). Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases in which apoptosis or other forms of regulated cell death may play a cardinal role. PMID:24639873

  8. SrrAB Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Cell Death through Regulation of cidABC Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Windham, Ian H.; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Thomas, Vinai C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The death and lysis of a subpopulation in Staphylococcus aureus biofilm cells are thought to benefit the surviving population by releasing extracellular DNA, a critical component of the biofilm extracellular matrix. Although the means by which S. aureus controls cell death and lysis is not understood, studies implicate the role of the cidABC and lrgAB operons in this process. Recently, disruption of the srrAB regulatory locus was found to cause increased cell death during biofilm development, likely as a result of the sensitivity of this mutant to hypoxic growth. In the current study, we extended these findings by demonstrating that cell death in the ΔsrrAB mutant is dependent on expression of the cidABC operon. The effect of cidABC expression resulted in the generation of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and was independent of acetate production. Interestingly, consistently with previous studies, cidC-encoded pyruvate oxidase was found to be important for the generation of acetic acid, which initiates the cell death process. However, these studies also revealed for the first time an important role of the cidB gene in cell death, as disruption of cidB in the ΔsrrAB mutant background decreased ROS generation and cell death in a cidC-independent manner. The cidB mutation also caused decreased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, which suggests a complex role for this system in ROS metabolism. Overall, the results of this study provide further insight into the function of the cidABC operon in cell death and reveal its contribution to the oxidative stress response. IMPORTANCE The manuscript focuses on cell death mechanisms in Staphylococcus aureus and provides important new insights into the genes involved in this ill-defined process. By exploring the cause of increased stationary-phase death in an S. aureus ΔsrrAB regulatory mutant, we found that the decreased viability of this mutant was a consequence of the overexpression of the cid

  9. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis.

  10. PACAP protects against TNFα-induced cell death in olfactory epithelium and olfactory placodal cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, Shami; Gandham, Mahendra; Lucero, Mary T

    2010-01-01

    In mouse olfactory epithelium (OE), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) protects against axotomy-induced apoptosis. We used mouse OE to determine whether PACAP protects neurons during exposure to the inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Live slices of neonatal mouse OE were treated with 40 ng/ml TNFα ± 40 nM PACAP for 6 hours and dying cells were live-labeled with 0.5% propidium iodide. TNFα significantly increased the percentage of dying cells while co-incubation with PACAP prevented cell death. PACAP also prevented TNFα-mediated cell death in the olfactory placodal (OP) cell lines, OP6 and OP27. Although OP cell lines express all three PACAP receptors (PAC1, VPAC1,VPAC2), PACAP’s protection of these cells from TNFα was mimicked by the specific PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan and abolished by the PAC1 antagonist PACAP6–38. Treatment of OP cell lines with blockers or activators of the PLC and AC/MAPKK pathways revealed that PACAP-mediated protection from TNFα involved both pathways. PACAP may therefore function through PAC1 receptors to protect neurons from cell death during inflammatory cytokine release in vivo as would occur upon viral infection or allergic rhinitis-associated injury. PMID:20654718

  11. Inhibition of regulated cell death by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Stefan; Dewitz, Christin; Fändrich, Fred; Kunzendorf, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Development of the means to efficiently and continuously renew missing and non-functional proteins in diseased cells remains a major goal in modern molecular medicine. While gene therapy has the potential to achieve this, substantial obstacles must be overcome before clinical application can be considered. A promising alternative approach is the direct delivery of non-permeant active biomolecules, such as oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins, to the affected cells with the purpose of ameliorating an advanced disease process. In addition to receptor-mediated endocytosis, cell-penetrating peptides are widely used as vectors for rapid translocation of conjugated molecules across cell membranes into intracellular compartments and the delivery of these therapeutic molecules is generally referred to as novel prospective protein therapy. As a broad coverage of the enormous amount of published data in this field is unrewarding, this review will provide a brief, focused overview of the technology and a summary of recent studies of the most commonly used protein transduction domains and their potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cellular damage and the prevention of regulated cell death. PMID:27048815

  12. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  13. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  14. Increases in Drug and Opioid Overdose Deaths--United States, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Rose A; Aleshire, Noah; Zibbell, Jon E; Gladden, R Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The United States is experiencing an epidemic of drug overdose (poisoning) deaths. Since 2000, the rate of deaths from drug overdoses has increased 137%, including a 200% increase in the rate of overdose deaths involving opioids (opioid pain relievers and heroin). CDC analyzed recent multiple cause-of-death mortality data to examine current trends and characteristics of drug overdose deaths, including the types of opioids associated with drug overdose deaths. During 2014, a total of 47,055 drug overdose deaths occurred in the United States, representing a 1-year increase of 6.5%, from 13.8 per 100,000 persons in 2013 to 14.7 per 100,000 persons in 2014. The rate of drug overdose deaths increased significantly for both sexes, persons aged 25-44 years and ≥55 years, non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks, and in the Northeastern, Midwestern, and Southern regions of the United States. Rates of opioid overdose deaths also increased significantly, from 7.9 per 100,000 in 2013 to 9.0 per 100,000 in 2014, a 14% increase. Historically, CDC has programmatically characterized all opioid pain reliever deaths (natural and semisynthetic opioids, methadone, and other synthetic opioids) as "prescription" opioid overdoses (1). Between 2013 and 2014, the age-adjusted rate of death involving methadone remained unchanged; however, the age-adjusted rate of death involving natural and semisynthetic opioid pain relievers, heroin, and synthetic opioids, other than methadone (e.g., fentanyl) increased 9%, 26%, and 80%, respectively. The sharp increase in deaths involving synthetic opioids, other than methadone, in 2014 coincided with law enforcement reports of increased availability of illicitly manufactured fentanyl, a synthetic opioid; however, illicitly manufactured fentanyl cannot be distinguished from prescription fentanyl in death certificate data. These findings indicate that the opioid overdose epidemic is worsening. There is a need for continued action to prevent opioid

  15. Surviving apoptosis: life-death signaling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are regulated by opposing pro-survival and pro-death signals. An interesting feature of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family of ligands is that they simultaneously activate opposing signals within a single cell via the same ligand-receptor complex. The magnitude of pro-death events such as caspase activation and pro-survival events such as NF-κB activation vary not only from one cell type to the next but also among individual cells of the same type due to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The molecules involved in these pro-survival/pro-death pathways, and the different phenotypes that result from their activities, have been recently reviewed. Here we focus on the impact of cell-to-cell variability in the strength of these opposing signals on shaping cell fate decisions. PMID:25920803

  16. Centrality of host cell death in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Martin B; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for proper growth, development, and cellular homeostasis in all eukaryotes. The regulation of PCD is of central importance in plant-microbe interactions; notably, PCD and features associated with PCD are observed in many host resistance responses. Conversely, pathogen induction of inappropriate cell death in the host results in a susceptible phenotype and disease. Thus, the party in control of PCD has a distinct advantage in these battles. PCD processes appear to be of ancient origin, as indicated by the fact that many features of cell death strategy are conserved between animals and plants; however, some of the details of death execution differ. Mammalian core PCD genes, such as caspases, are not present in plant genomes. Similarly, pro- and antiapoptotic mammalian regulatory elements are absent in plants, but, remarkably, when expressed in plants, successfully impact plant PCD. Thus, subtle structural similarities independent of sequence homology appear to sustain operational equivalence. The vacuole is emerging as a key organelle in the modulation of plant PCD. Under different signals for cell death, the vacuole either fuses with the plasmalemma membrane or disintegrates. Moreover, the vacuole appears to play a key role in autophagy; evidence suggests a prosurvival function for autophagy, but other studies propose a prodeath phenotype. Here, we describe and discuss what we know and what we do not know about various PCD pathways and how the host integrates signals to activate salicylic acid and reactive oxygen pathways that orchestrate cell death. We suggest that it is not cell death as such but rather the processes leading to cell death that contribute to the outcome of a given plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:23915134

  17. Interplay between autophagy and programmed cell death in mammalian neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Min; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) are of particular interest because of their role in brain development and function. Recent findings suggest the intimate involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) in the turnover of NSCs. However, the underlying mechanisms of PCD are largely unknown. Although apoptosis is the best-defined form of PCD, accumulating evidence has revealed a wide spectrum of PCD encompassing apoptosis, autophagic cell death (ACD) and necrosis. This mini-review aims to illustrate a unique regulation of PCD in NSCs. The results of our recent studies on autophagic death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells are also discussed. HCN cell death following insulin withdrawal clearly provides a reliable model that can be used to analyze the molecular mechanisms of ACD in the larger context of PCD. More research efforts are needed to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of NSC turnover under degenerating conditions, such as aging, stress and neurological diseases. Efforts aimed at protecting and harnessing endogenous NSCs will offer novel opportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategies for neuropathologies. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8): 383-390] PMID:23977985

  18. Chinese medicines induce cell death: the molecular and cellular mechanisms for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuanbin; Feng, Yibin; Wang, Ning; Cheung, Fan; Tan, Hor Yue; Zhong, Sen; Li, Charlie; Kobayashi, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals) were used in the study. The key words including "cancer", "cell death", "apoptosis", "autophagy," "necrosis," and "Chinese medicine" were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future.

  19. Pathophysiological role of different tubular epithelial cell death modes in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M.; López-Novoa, José M.; López-Hernández, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    The histological substrate of many forms of intrinsic acute kidney injury (AKI) has been classically attributed to tubular necrosis. However, more recent studies indicate that necrosis is not the main form of cell death in AKI and that other forms such as apoptosis, regulated necrosis (i.e. necroptosis and parthanatos), autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe, also participate in AKI and that their contribution depends on the cause and stage of AKI. Herein, we briefly summarize the main characteristics of the major types of cell death and we also critically review the existing evidence on the occurrence of different types of cell death reported in the most common experimental models of AKI and human specimens. We also discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms linking tubule epithelial cell death with reduced glomerular filtration, azotaemia and hydroelectrolytic imbalance. For instance, special relevance is given to the analysis of the inflammatory component of some forms of cell death over that of others, as an important and differential pathophysiological determinant. Finally, known molecular mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in each cell death type pose appropriate targets to specifically prevent or reverse AKI, provided that further knowledge of their participation and repercussion in each AKI syndrome is progressively increased in the near future. PMID:26413280

  20. Co-localization of cell death with antigen deposition in skin enhances vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Depelsenaire, Alexandra C.I.; Meliga, Stefano C.; McNeilly, Celia L.; Pearson, Frances E.; Coffey, Jacob W.; Haigh, Oscar L.; Flaim, Christopher J.; Frazer, Ian H.; Kendall, Mark A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines delivered to the skin by microneedles – with and without adjuvants – have increased immunogenicity with lower doses than standard vaccine delivery techniques such as intramuscular (i.m.) or intradermal (i.d.) injection. However, the mechanisms behind this skin-mediated ‘adjuvant’ effect are not clear. Here, we show that the dynamic application of a microprojection array (the Nanopatch) to skin generates localized transient stresses invoking cell death around each projection. Nanopatch application caused significantly higher levels (~65-fold) of cell death in murine ear skin than i.d. injection using a hypodermic needle. Measured skin cell death is associated with modeled stresses ~1–10 MPa. Nanopatch-immunized groups also yielded consistently higher anti-IgG endpoint titers (up to 50-fold higher) than i.d. groups after delivery of a split virion influenza vaccine. Importantly, co-localization of cell death with nearby live skin cells and delivered antigen was necessary for immunogenicity enhancement. These results suggest a correlation between cell death caused by the Nanopatch with increased immunogenicity. We propose that the localized cell death serves as a ‘physical immune enhancer’ for the adjacent viable skin cells, which also receive antigen from the projections. This natural immune enhancer effect has the potential to mitigate or replace chemical-based adjuvants in vaccines. PMID:24714201

  1. Understanding Cone Photoreceptor Cell Death in Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Livia S; Vandenberghe, Luk H

    2016-01-01

    Colour vision is only achieved in the presence of healthy and functional cone photoreceptors found in the retina. It is an essential component of human vision and usually the first complaint patients undergoing vision degeneration have is the loss of daylight colour vision. Therefore, an understanding of the biology and basic mechanisms behind cone death under the degenerative state of retinal dystrophies and how the activation of the apoptotic pathway is triggered will provide valuable knowledge. It will also have broader applications for a spectrum of visual disorders and will be critical for future advances in translational research. PMID:26427416

  2. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  3. The binary switch that controls the life and death decisions of ER stressed beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Oslowski, Christine M.; Urano, Fumihiko

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of common metabolic disorders defined by hyperglycemia. One of the most important factors contributing to hyperglycemia is dysfunction and death of β cells. Increasing experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an important role in β cell dysfunction and death during the progression of type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as genetic forms of diabetes such as Wolfram syndrome. The mechanisms of ER stress-mediated β cell dysfunction and death are complex and not homogenous. Here we review the recent key findings on the role of ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in β cells and the mechanisms of ER stress mediated β cell dysfunction and death. Complete understanding of these mechanisms will lead to novel therapeutic modalities for diabetes. PMID:21168319

  4. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  5. Measuring Cell Death by Propidium Iodide Uptake and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Scott, Adrian P; Marfell, Brooke J; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Propidium iodide (PI) is a small fluorescent molecule that binds to DNA but cannot passively traverse into cells that possess an intact plasma membrane. PI uptake versus exclusion can be used to discriminate dead cells, in which plasma membranes become permeable regardless of the mechanism of death, from live cells with intact membranes. PI is excited by wavelengths between 400 and 600 nm and emits light between 600 and 700 nm, and is therefore compatible with lasers and photodetectors commonly available in flow cytometers. This protocol for PI staining can be used to quantitate cell death in most modern research facilities and universities. PMID:27371595

  6. Morphological and cytochemical determination of cell death by apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Burton E.; Budd, Ralph C.

    2007-01-01

    Several modes of cell death are now recognized, including necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. Oftentimes the distinctions between these various modes may not be apparent, although the precise mode may be physiologically important. Accordingly, it is often desirable to be able to classify the mode of cell death. Apoptosis was originally defined by structural alterations in cells observable by transmitted light and electron microscopy. Today, a wide variety of imaging and cytochemical techniques are available for the investigation of apoptosis. This review will highlight many of these methods, and provide a critique on the advantages and disadvantages associated with them for the specific identification of apoptotic cells in culture and tissues. PMID:18000678

  7. Transcriptomics and functional genomics of ROS-induced cell death regulation by RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1.

    PubMed

    Brosché, Mikael; Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Cui, Fuqiang; Sipari, Nina; Leppälä, Johanna; Lamminmäki, Airi; Tomai, Gloria; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Reddy, Ramesha A; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-02-01

    Plant responses to changes in environmental conditions are mediated by a network of signaling events leading to downstream responses, including changes in gene expression and activation of cell death programs. Arabidopsis thaliana RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) has been proposed to regulate plant stress responses by protein-protein interactions with transcription factors. Furthermore, the rcd1 mutant has defective control of cell death in response to apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combining transcriptomic and functional genomics approaches we first used microarray analysis in a time series to study changes in gene expression after apoplastic ROS treatment in rcd1. To identify a core set of cell death regulated genes, RCD1-regulated genes were clustered together with other array experiments from plants undergoing cell death or treated with various pathogens, plant hormones or other chemicals. Subsequently, selected rcd1 double mutants were constructed to further define the genetic requirements for the execution of apoplastic ROS induced cell death. Through the genetic analysis we identified WRKY70 and SGT1b as cell death regulators functioning downstream of RCD1 and show that quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression related to cell death appeared to better explain the outcome. Allocation of plant energy to defenses diverts resources from growth. Recently, a plant response termed stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR) was proposed to regulate the balance between defense and growth. Using a rcd1 double mutant collection we show that SIMR is mostly independent of the classical plant defense signaling pathways and that the redox balance is involved in development of SIMR. PMID:24550736

  8. Transcriptomics and Functional Genomics of ROS-Induced Cell Death Regulation by RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1

    PubMed Central

    Salojärvi, Jarkko; Cui, Fuqiang; Sipari, Nina; Leppälä, Johanna; Lamminmäki, Airi; Tomai, Gloria; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Reddy, Ramesha A.; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to changes in environmental conditions are mediated by a network of signaling events leading to downstream responses, including changes in gene expression and activation of cell death programs. Arabidopsis thaliana RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) has been proposed to regulate plant stress responses by protein-protein interactions with transcription factors. Furthermore, the rcd1 mutant has defective control of cell death in response to apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combining transcriptomic and functional genomics approaches we first used microarray analysis in a time series to study changes in gene expression after apoplastic ROS treatment in rcd1. To identify a core set of cell death regulated genes, RCD1-regulated genes were clustered together with other array experiments from plants undergoing cell death or treated with various pathogens, plant hormones or other chemicals. Subsequently, selected rcd1 double mutants were constructed to further define the genetic requirements for the execution of apoplastic ROS induced cell death. Through the genetic analysis we identified WRKY70 and SGT1b as cell death regulators functioning downstream of RCD1 and show that quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression related to cell death appeared to better explain the outcome. Allocation of plant energy to defenses diverts resources from growth. Recently, a plant response termed stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR) was proposed to regulate the balance between defense and growth. Using a rcd1 double mutant collection we show that SIMR is mostly independent of the classical plant defense signaling pathways and that the redox balance is involved in development of SIMR. PMID:24550736

  9. Human clusterin gene expression is confined to surviving cells during in vitro programmed cell death.

    PubMed Central

    French, L E; Wohlwend, A; Sappino, A P; Tschopp, J; Schifferli, J A

    1994-01-01

    Clusterin is a serum glycoprotein endowed with cell aggregating, complement inhibitory, and lipid binding properties, and is also considered as a specific marker of dying cells, its expression being increased in various tissues undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). However, no study has so far directly shown that cells expressing clusterin in these tissues are actually apoptotic as defined by morphological and biochemical criteria. We have studied cellular clusterin gene expression in vitro using three different models of PCD: (a) ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation of human U937, HeLa, and A431 cell lines, (b) in vitro aging of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PMNs), and (c) dexamethasone-induced cell death of the human lymphoblastoid cell line CEM-C7. In all three models, the classical morphological and biochemical features of PCD observed did not correlate with an increase, but with either a marked decrease or an absence of clusterin gene expression as assessed by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells after UV-B irradiation revealed, in addition, that only morphologically normal cells that are surviving continue to express the clusterin gene. Our results demonstrate that in the human myeloid, lymphoid, and epithelial cell types studied, clusterin gene expression is not a prerequisite to their death by apoptosis. In addition, and most interestingly, in situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells revealed that only surviving cells express the clusterin gene after the induction of PCD, thus providing novel evidence suggesting that clusterin may be associated with cell survival within tissues regressing as a consequence of PCD. Images PMID:8113419

  10. Cinnamic acid induces apoptotic cell death and cytoskeleton disruption in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Niero, Evandro Luís de Oliveira; Machado-Santelli, Gláucia Maria

    2013-05-23

    Anticancer activities of cinnamic acid derivatives include induction of apoptosis by irreversible DNA damage leading to cell death. The present work aimed to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of cinnamic acid in human melanoma cell line (HT-144) and human melanocyte cell line derived from blue nevus (NGM). Viability assay showed that the IC50 for HT-144 cells was 2.4 mM, while NGM cells were more resistant to the treatment. The growth inhibition was probably associated with DNA damage leading to DNA synthesis inhibition, as shown by BrdU incorporation assay, induction of nuclear aberrations and then apoptosis. The frequency of cell death caused by cinnamic acid was higher in HT-144 cells. Activated-caspase 3 staining showed apoptosis after 24 hours of treatment with cinnamic acid 3.2 mM in HT-144 cells, but not in NGM. We observed microtubules disorganization after cinnamic acid exposure, but this event and cell death seem to be independent according to M30 and tubulin labeling. The frequency of micronucleated HT-144 cells was higher after treatment with cinnamic acid (0.4 and 3.2 mM) when compared to the controls. Cinnamic acid 3.2 mM also increased the frequency of micronucleated NGM cells indicating genotoxic activity of the compound, but the effects were milder. Binucleation and multinucleation counting showed similar results. We conclude that cinnamic acid has effective antiproliferative activity against melanoma cells. However, the increased frequency of micronucleation in NGM cells warrants the possibility of genotoxicity and needs further investigation.

  11. Cinnamic acid induces apoptotic cell death and cytoskeleton disruption in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer activities of cinnamic acid derivatives include induction of apoptosis by irreversible DNA damage leading to cell death. The present work aimed to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of cinnamic acid in human melanoma cell line (HT-144) and human melanocyte cell line derived from blue nevus (NGM). Viability assay showed that the IC50 for HT-144 cells was 2.4 mM, while NGM cells were more resistant to the treatment. The growth inhibition was probably associated with DNA damage leading to DNA synthesis inhibition, as shown by BrdU incorporation assay, induction of nuclear aberrations and then apoptosis. The frequency of cell death caused by cinnamic acid was higher in HT-144 cells. Activated-caspase 3 staining showed apoptosis after 24 hours of treatment with cinnamic acid 3.2 mM in HT-144 cells, but not in NGM. We observed microtubules disorganization after cinnamic acid exposure, but this event and cell death seem to be independent according to M30 and tubulin labeling. The frequency of micronucleated HT-144 cells was higher after treatment with cinnamic acid (0.4 and 3.2 mM) when compared to the controls. Cinnamic acid 3.2 mM also increased the frequency of micronucleated NGM cells indicating genotoxic activity of the compound, but the effects were milder. Binucleation and multinucleation counting showed similar results. We conclude that cinnamic acid has effective antiproliferative activity against melanoma cells. However, the increased frequency of micronucleation in NGM cells warrants the possibility of genotoxicity and needs further investigation. PMID:23701745

  12. A matter of life and cell death.

    PubMed

    Evan, G; Littlewood, T

    1998-08-28

    In multicellular organisms, mutations in somatic cells affecting critical genes that regulate cell proliferation and survival cause fatal cancers. Repair of the damage is one obvious option, although the relative inconsequence of individual cells in metazoans means that it is often a "safer" strategy to ablate the offending cell. Not surprisingly, corruption of the machinery that senses or implements DNA damage greatly predisposes to cancer. Nonetheless, even when oncogenic mutations do occur, there exist potent mechanisms that limit the expansion of affected cells by suppressing their proliferation or triggering their suicide. Growing understanding of these innate mechanisms is suggesting novel therapeutic strategies for cancer.

  13. External and internal triggers of cell death in yeast.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Claudio; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, yeast was confirmed as a useful eukaryotic model system to decipher the complex mechanisms and networks occurring in higher eukaryotes, particularly in mammalian cells, in physiological as well in pathological conditions. This article focuses attention on the contribution of yeast in the study of a very complex scenario, because of the number and interconnection of pathways, represented by cell death. Yeast, although it is a unicellular organism, possesses the basal machinery of different kinds of cell death occurring in higher eukaryotes, i.e., apoptosis, regulated necrosis and autophagy. Here we report the current knowledge concerning the yeast orthologs of main mammalian cell death regulators and executors, the role of organelles and compartments, and the cellular phenotypes observed in the different forms of cell death in response to external and internal triggers. Thanks to the ease of genetic manipulation of this microorganism, yeast strains expressing human genes that promote or counteract cell death, onset of tumors and neurodegenerative diseases have been constructed. The effects on yeast cells of some of these genes are also presented.

  14. Nitric oxide induces cell death by regulating anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Colleen M; Shroff, Emelyn H; Liu, Jing; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2009-09-21

    Nitric oxide (NO) activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway to induce cell death. However, the mechanism by which this pathway is activated in cells exposed to NO is not known. Here we report that BAX and BAK are activated by NO and that cytochrome c is released from the mitochondria. Cells deficient in Bax and Bak or Caspase-9 are completely protected from NO-induced cell death. The individual loss of the BH3-only proteins, Bim, Bid, Puma, Bad or Noxa, or Bid knockdown in Bim(-/-)/Puma(-/-) MEFs, does not prevent NO-induced cell death. Our data show that the anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1 undergoes ASK1-JNK1 mediated degradation upon exposure to NO, and that cells deficient in either Ask1 or Jnk1 are protected against NO-induced cell death. NO can inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain resulting in an increase in superoxide generation and peroxynitrite formation. However, scavengers of ROS or peroxynitrite do not prevent NO-induced cell death. Collectively, these data indicate that NO degrades MCL-1 through the ASK1-JNK1 axis to induce BAX/BAK-dependent cell death.

  15. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  16. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    PubMed

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016.

  17. Apocynin attenuates cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death by suppressing NF-κB-mediated cell death process in differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Hee; Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Chung Soo

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol oxidation products are suggested to be involved in neuronal degeneration. Apocynin has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. We assessed the effect of apocynin on the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in neuronal cells using differentiated PC12 cells in relation to NF-κB-mediated cell death process. 7-Ketocholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the levels of Bid and Bcl-2, increased the levels of Bax and p53, and induced loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases (-8, -9 and -3). 7-Ketocholesterol caused an increase in the levels of cytosolic and nuclear NF-κB p65, cytosolic NF-κB p50 and cytosolic phospho-IκB-α, which was inhibited by the addition of 0.5 μM Bay11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation). Apocynin attenuated the cholesterol oxidation product-induced changes in the programmed cell death-related protein levels, NF-κB activation, production of reactive oxygen species, and depletion of GSH. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in PC12 cells by suppressing the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways that are mediated by NF-κB activation. The preventive effect appears to be associated with the inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH.

  18. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death induced by glucolaxogenin in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, L; Escobar, M L; Sandoval-Ramírez, J; López-Muñoz, H; Fernández-Herrera, M A; Hernández-Vázquez, J M V; Hilario-Martínez, C; Zenteno, E

    2015-12-01

    The antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of glucolaxogenin and its ability to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells are reported. We ascertained that glucolaxogenin exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HeLa, CaSki and ViBo cells in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of DNA distribution in the cell-cycle phase of tumor cells treated with glucolaxogenin suggests that the anti-proliferative activity of this steroid is not always dependent on the cell cycle. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated by detection of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in supernatants from tumor cell cultures treated with the steroid. Glucolaxogenin exhibited null cytotoxic activity. With respect to the apoptotic activity, the generation of apoptotic bodies, the presence of active caspase-3 and annexin-V, as well as the DNA fragmentation observed in all tumor lines after treatment with glucolaxogenin suggests that this compound does indeed induce cell death by apoptosis. Also, a significantly increased presence of the LC3-II, LC3 and Lamp-1 proteins was evidenced with the ultrastructural existence of autophagic vacuoles in cells treated with this steroidal glycoside, indicating that glucolaxogenin also induces autophagic cell death. It is important to note that this compound showed no cytotoxic effect and did not affect the proliferative capacity of mononuclear cells obtained from normal human peripheral blood activated by phytohaemagglutinin. Thus, glucolaxogenin is a compound with anti-proliferative properties that induces programmed cell death in cancer cell lines, though it is selective with respect to normal lymphocytic cells. These findings indicate that this glycoside could have a selective action on tumor cells and, therefore, be worthy of consideration as a therapeutic candidate with anti-tumor potential.

  19. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death induced by glucolaxogenin in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, L; Escobar, M L; Sandoval-Ramírez, J; López-Muñoz, H; Fernández-Herrera, M A; Hernández-Vázquez, J M V; Hilario-Martínez, C; Zenteno, E

    2015-12-01

    The antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of glucolaxogenin and its ability to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells are reported. We ascertained that glucolaxogenin exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HeLa, CaSki and ViBo cells in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of DNA distribution in the cell-cycle phase of tumor cells treated with glucolaxogenin suggests that the anti-proliferative activity of this steroid is not always dependent on the cell cycle. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated by detection of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in supernatants from tumor cell cultures treated with the steroid. Glucolaxogenin exhibited null cytotoxic activity. With respect to the apoptotic activity, the generation of apoptotic bodies, the presence of active caspase-3 and annexin-V, as well as the DNA fragmentation observed in all tumor lines after treatment with glucolaxogenin suggests that this compound does indeed induce cell death by apoptosis. Also, a significantly increased presence of the LC3-II, LC3 and Lamp-1 proteins was evidenced with the ultrastructural existence of autophagic vacuoles in cells treated with this steroidal glycoside, indicating that glucolaxogenin also induces autophagic cell death. It is important to note that this compound showed no cytotoxic effect and did not affect the proliferative capacity of mononuclear cells obtained from normal human peripheral blood activated by phytohaemagglutinin. Thus, glucolaxogenin is a compound with anti-proliferative properties that induces programmed cell death in cancer cell lines, though it is selective with respect to normal lymphocytic cells. These findings indicate that this glycoside could have a selective action on tumor cells and, therefore, be worthy of consideration as a therapeutic candidate with anti-tumor potential. PMID:26437916

  20. Raloxifene induces autophagy-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells via the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Eun; Kim, Yunha; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Sung-Bae; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Koh, Jae-Young; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER), and exhibits potent anti-tumor and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism of raloxifene-induced cell death and autophagy is not well-established. So, we analyzed mechanism underlying death and autophagy induced by raloxifene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with raloxifene significantly induced death in MCF-7 cells. Raloxifene accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta and increased the level of autophagic marker proteins, such as LC3-II, BECN1, and ATG12-ATG5 conjugates, indicating activated autophagy. Raloxifene also increased autophagic flux indicators, the cleavage of GFP from GFP-LC3 and only red fluorescence-positive puncta in mRFP-GFP-LC3-expressing cells. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), suppressed the level of LC3-II and blocked the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Moreover, siRNA targeting BECN1 markedly reversed cell death and the level of LC3-II increased by raloxifene. Besides, raloxifene-induced cell death was not related to cleavage of caspases-7, -9, and PARP. These results indicate that raloxifene activates autophagy-dependent cell death but not apoptosis. Interestingly, raloxifene decreased the level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and activated the AMPK/ULK1 pathway. However it was not suppressed the AKT/mTOR pathway. Addition of ATP decreased the phosphorylation of AMPK as well as the accumulation of LC3-II, finally attenuating raloxifene-induced cell death. Our current study demonstrates that raloxifene induces autophagy via the activation of AMPK by sensing decreases in ATP, and that the overactivation of autophagy promotes cell death and thereby mediates the anti-cancer effects of raloxifene in breast cancer cells.

  1. The life and death of a B cell.

    PubMed

    Defrance, Thierry; Casamayor-Pallejà, Montserrat; Krammer, Peter H

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of apoptosis in the B cell lineage has implications for homeostasis, quality control of the antibody response, and tolerance. In this chapter we examine the different checkpoints that control life and death decisions of B cells during the antigen-independent and antigen-dependent phases of their development. We discuss the cell death mechanism involved in elimination of unwanted B cells at different stages of their development as well as the signals that trigger or repress the apoptotic process. At the steady state, before or after development of an immune response, B cell apoptosis ensures that the antigen receptor (BCR) on newly produced B cells is functional and does not recognize self-antigens with high avidity. It also ensures that the size of the peripheral B cell compartment remains constant in spite of the continuous input of B cells from the bone marrow. All these processes are controlled by the mitochondrial death pathway and are thus perturbed by overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the bcl-2 gene family. By contrast, the death receptor pathway plays a prominent role during the antigen-dependent phase of B cell development. Three sets of membrane molecules stand as crucial regulators of B cell survival. First, the BCR which plays a central but ambiguous role. On the one hand, it triggers death of B cells that recognize self-antigens or have been exposed to repeated antigenic stimulations. On the other hand, it promotes survival of the peripheral mature B cell pool and protects activated B cells from CD95-induced killing. Second, the death receptor Fas/CD95 which is instrumental in censoring B cells activated in a bystander fashion at the initiation of the response to T-dependent antigens. It also drives elimination of low-affinity and self-reactive B cell clones that arise through the process of somatic mutations during the germinal center reaction. As such, it contributes to the affinity maturation of the antibody response. Finally

  2. Programmed hepatocytes cell death associated with FLIP downregulation in response to extracellular preS1/2.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Masyelly D; Peterson, Darrell L; Barboza, Luisa; Terán-Ángel, Guillermo; Labastida-Moreno, Cesar A; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham

    2014-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection involves liver damage resulting in continuous cell injury and death. During HBV infection, hepatocytes exhibit changes in death receptor expression and in their susceptibility to death. These changes are observed not only in infected cells but also in bystander cells. Because excess viral surface protein (HBsAg) is secreted in large amounts as soluble particles containing preS proteins, the role of soluble preS1/2 in hepatocyte (HepG2) death modulation is an important issue to be explored. An increase of cell death induced by preS1/2 was observed. Also, cell death was associated with the down-regulation of FLIP and activation of caspase 8, caspase 9, and BID. Additionally, hepatocytes exhibited a sensitization to death mediated by the Fas receptor. These results, may contribute to understanding the role of envelope proteins (preS1/2) in the pathogenesis of HBV infection.

  3. Therapeutic approaches to preventing cell death in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Anna; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect the lives of millions of patients and their families. Due to the complexity of these diseases and our limited understanding of their pathogenesis, the design of therapeutic agents that can effectively treat these diseases has been challenging. Huntington disease (HD) is one of several neurological disorders with few therapeutic options. HD, like numerous other neurodegenerative diseases, involves extensive neuronal cell loss. One potential strategy to combat HD and other neurodegenerative disorders is to intervene in the execution of neuronal cell death. Inhibiting neuronal cell death pathways may slow the development of neurodegeneration. However, discovering small molecule inhibitors of neuronal cell death remains a significant challenge. Here, we review candidate therapeutic targets controlling cell death mechanisms that have been the focus of research in HD, as well as an emerging strategy that has been applied to developing small molecule inhibitors—fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). FBDD has been successfully used in both industry and academia to identify selective and potent small molecule inhibitors, with a focus on challenging proteins that are not amenable to traditional high-throughput screening approaches. FBDD has been used to generate potent leads, pre-clinical candidates, and has led to the development of an FDA approved drug. This approach can be valuable for identifying modulators of cell-death-regulating proteins; such compounds may prove to be the key to halting the progression of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22967354

  4. Therapeutic approaches to preventing cell death in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Anna; Stockwell, Brent R

    2012-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect the lives of millions of patients and their families. Due to the complexity of these diseases and our limited understanding of their pathogenesis, the design of therapeutic agents that can effectively treat these diseases has been challenging. Huntington disease (HD) is one of several neurological disorders with few therapeutic options. HD, like numerous other neurodegenerative diseases, involves extensive neuronal cell loss. One potential strategy to combat HD and other neurodegenerative disorders is to intervene in the execution of neuronal cell death. Inhibiting neuronal cell death pathways may slow the development of neurodegeneration. However, discovering small molecule inhibitors of neuronal cell death remains a significant challenge. Here, we review candidate therapeutic targets controlling cell death mechanisms that have been the focus of research in HD, as well as an emerging strategy that has been applied to developing small molecule inhibitors-fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). FBDD has been successfully used in both industry and academia to identify selective and potent small molecule inhibitors, with a focus on challenging proteins that are not amenable to traditional high-throughput screening approaches. FBDD has been used to generate potent leads, pre-clinical candidates, and has led to the development of an FDA approved drug. This approach can be valuable for identifying modulators of cell-death-regulating proteins; such compounds may prove to be the key to halting the progression of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22967354

  5. Solamargine triggers hepatoma cell death through apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    XIE, XIAODONG; ZHU, HAITAO; YANG, HUIJIAN; HUANG, WENSI; WU, YINGYING; WANG, YING; LUO, YANLING; WANG, DONGQING; SHAO, GENBAO

    2015-01-01

    Solamargine (SM), a steroidal alkaloid glycoside extracted from the traditional Chinese herb Solanum incanum, has been evidenced to inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis in a number of human cancer cell lines. In the present study, the anticancer effect of SM and underlying molecular mechanism of SM-induced apoptosis were investigated on the human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, SMMC7721 and HepG2. The proliferation effects of SM on the SMMC7721 and HepG2 cell lines were evaluated using MTT and colony formation assays. In addition, the percentage of apoptosis was measured using an Annexin V/propidium iodide staining method and the cell cycle distribution mediated by SM was analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), caspase-3, caspase-9, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna) and Ki67 proteins were examined to further demonstrate the proliferate and apoptosis effects of SM on the hepatoma cells. The results indicated that SM effectively inhibited hepatoma cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. SM resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in the two cell lines. In addition, SM downregulated the levels of proliferation-associated (Ki67 and pcna) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, and promoted the activity of apoptosis-associated proteins (Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9). Therefore, the activation of the Bcl-2/Bax and caspase signaling pathways may be involved in the SM-induced apoptosis of hepatoma cells. PMID:26170994

  6. Microenvironmental Effects of Cell Death in Malignant Disease.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher D; Ford, Catriona A; Voss, Jorine J L P

    2016-01-01

    Although apoptosis is well recognized as a cell death program with clear anticancer roles, accumulating evidence linking apoptosis with tissue repair and regeneration indicates that its relationship with malignant disease is more complex than previously thought. Here we review how the responses of neighboring cells in the microenvironment of apoptotic tumor cells may contribute to the cell birth/cell death disequilibrium that provides the basis for cancerous tissue emergence and growth. We describe the bioactive properties of apoptotic cells and consider, in particular, how apoptosis of tumor cells can engender a range of responses including pro-oncogenic signals having proliferative, angiogenic, reparatory, and immunosuppressive features. Drawing on the parallels between wound healing, tissue regeneration and cancer, we propose the concept of the "onco-regenerative niche," a cell death-driven generic network of tissue repair and regenerative mechanisms that are hijacked in cancer. Finally, we consider how the responses to cell death in tumors can be targeted to provide more effective and long-lasting therapies. PMID:27558817

  7. RACK-1 overexpression protects against goniothalamin-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Inayat-Hussain, S.H.; Wong, L.T.; Chan, K.M.; Rajab, N.F.; Din, L.B.; Harun, R.; Kizilors, A.; Saxena, N.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, M.; Farzaneh, F.; Williams, G.T.

    2009-01-01

    Goniothalamin, a styryllactone, has been shown to induce cytotoxicity via apoptosis in several tumor cell lines. In this study, we have examined the potential role of several genes, which were stably transfected into T-cell lines and which regulate apoptosis in different ways, on goniothalamin-induced cell death. Overexpression of full-length receptor for activated protein C-kinase 1 (RACK-1) and pc3n3, which up-regulates endogenous RACK-1, in both Jurkat and W7.2 T cells resulted in inhibition of goniothalamin-induced cell death as assessed by MTT and clonogenic assays. However, overexpression of rFau (antisense sequence to Finkel–Biskis–Reilly murine sarcoma virus-associated ubiquitously expressed gene) in W7.2 cells did not confer resistance to goniothalamin-induced cell death. Etoposide, a clinically used cytotoxic agent, was equipotent in causing cytotoxicity in all the stable transfectants. Assessment of DNA damage by Comet assay revealed goniothalamin-induced DNA strand breaks as early as 1 h in vector control but this effect was inhibited in RACK-1 and pc3n3 stably transfected W7.2 cells. This data demonstrate that RACK-1 plays a crucial role in regulating cell death signalling pathways induced by goniothalamin. PMID:19698770

  8. High-frequency ultrasound analysis of post-mitotic arrest cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Maurice M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of cancer cell death would permit rapid feedback on treatment response. One technique showing such promise is quantitative ultrasound. High-frequency ultrasound spectral radiofrequency analysis was used to study cell death in breast cancer cell samples. Quantitative ultrasound parameters, including attenuation, spectral slope, spectral 0-MHz-intercept, midband fit, and fitted parameters displayed significant changes with paclitaxel-induced cell death, corresponding to observations of morphological changes seen in histology and electron microscopy. In particular, a decrease in spectral slope from 0.24±0.07 dB/MHz to 0.04±0.09 dB/MHz occurred over 24 hours of treatment time and was identified as an ultrasound parameter capable of differentiating post-mitotic arrest cell death from classical apoptosis. The formation of condensed chromatin aggregates of 1 micron or greater in size increased the number of intracellular scatterers, consistent with a hypothesis that nuclear material is a primary source of ultrasound scattering in dying cells. It was demonstrated that the midband fit quantitatively correlated to cell death index, with a Pearson R-squared value of 0.99 at p<0.01. These results suggest that high-frequency ultrasound can not only qualitatively assess the degree of cancer cell death, but may be used to quantify the efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27226984

  9. HTLV-1 Tax protein sensitizes cells to apoptotic cell death induced by DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kao, S Y; Lemoine, F J; Mariott, S J

    2000-04-27

    Transient HTLV-1 Tax expression suppresses cellular nucleotide excision repair, and this effect correlates with Tax transactivation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter. The inability to repair DNA damage typically induces apoptotic cell death. Therefore, we investigated the effect of Tax-mediated suppression of DNA repair on apoptosis in stable Tax-expressing cells. Constitutive Tax expression reduced cellular nucleotide excision repair activity compared with parental and control cells. Tax-expressing cells were also more sensitive to apoptosis induced by DNA damaging agents than control cells. Even though Tax-expressing cells displayed reduced DNA repair, they showed increased DNA replication following UV damage. These results suggest that Tax suppresses the cell's ability to repair DNA damage and stimulates DNA replication even in the presence of damage. The inability to repair DNA damage is likely to stimulate apoptotic cell death in the majority of Tax-expressing cells while the ability to promote DNA replication may also allow the survival of a small population of cells. We propose that together these effects contribute to the monoclonal nature and low efficiency of HTLV-1 transformation.

  10. Detection of Apoptotic Versus Autophagic Cell Death by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sica, Valentina; Maiuri, M Chiara; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Different modes of regulated cell death (RCD) can be initiated by distinct molecular machineries and their morphological manifestations can be difficult to discriminate. Moreover, cells responding to stress often activate an adaptive response centered around autophagy, and whether such a response is cytoprotective or cytotoxic cannot be predicted based on morphological parameters only. Molecular definitions are therefore important to understand various RCD subroutines from a mechanistic perspective. In vitro, various forms of RCD including apoptosis and autophagic cell death can be easily discriminated from each other with assays that involve chemical or pharmacological interventions targeting key components of either pathway. Here, we detail a straightforward method to discriminate apoptosis from autophagic cell death by flow cytometry, based on the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the genetic inhibition of ATG5.

  11. Radiation-Induced Autophagy Contributes to Cell Death and Induces Apoptosis Partly in Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Guk Heui; Bögler, Oliver; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Youn-Jae; Kim, Jong Heon; Gwak, Ho-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced autophagy has been shown to play two different roles, in malignant glioma (MG) cells, cytocidal or cytoprotective. However, neither the role of radiation-induced autophagy for cell death nor the existence of autophagy-induced apoptosis, a well-known cell-death pathway after irradiation, has been verified yet. Materials and Methods We observed both temporal and dose-dependent response patterns of autophagy and apoptosis to radiation in MG cell lines. Additionally, we investigated the role of autophagy in apoptosis through knockdown of autophagy-related proteins. Results Autophagic activity measured by staining of acidic vesicle organelles and Western blotting of LC-3 protein increased in proportion to radiation dose from day 1 to 5 after irradiation. Apoptosis measured by annexin-V staining and Western blotting of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase demonstrated relatively late appearance 3 days after irradiation that increased for up to 7 days. Blocking of pan-caspase (Z-VAD-FMK) did not affect apoptosis after irradiation, but silencing of Atg5 effectively reduced radiation-induced autophagy, which decreased apoptosis significantly. Inhibition of autophagy in Atg5 knockdown cells was shown to be beneficial for cell survival. Stable transfection of GFP-LC3 cells was observed after irradiation. Annexin-V was localized in cells bearing GFP-LC3 punctuated spots, indicating autophagy in immunofluorescence. Some of these punctuated GFP-LC3 bearing cells formed conglomerated spots and died in final phase. Conclusion These findings suggest that autophagy appears earlier than apoptosis after irradiation and that a portion of the apoptotic population that appears later is autophagy-dependent. Thus, autophagy is a pathway to cell death after irradiation of MG cells. PMID:25410762

  12. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  13. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  14. Technological advances in real-time tracking of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Cell population can be viewed as a quantum system, which like Schrödinger’s cat exists as a combination of survival- and death-allowing states. Tracking and understanding cell-to-cell variability in processes of high spatio-temporal complexity such as cell death is at the core of current systems biology approaches. As probabilistic modeling tools attempt to impute information inaccessible by current experimental approaches, advances in technologies for single-cell imaging and omics (proteomics, genomics, metabolomics) should go hand in hand with the computational efforts. Over the last few years we have made exciting technological advances that allow studies of cell death dynamically in real-time and with the unprecedented accuracy. These approaches are based on innovative fluorescent assays and recombinant proteins, bioelectrical properties of cells, and more recently also on state-of-the-art optical spectroscopy. Here, we review current status of the most innovative analytical technologies for dynamic tracking of cell death, and address the interdisciplinary promises and future challenges of these methods. PMID:20519963

  15. Baicalein induces programmed cell death in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Cao, Ying-Ying; Huang, Shan; Xu, Yong-Gang; Gao, Ping-Hui; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of an apoptotic phenotype in Candida albicans that is inducible with environmental stresses such as acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and amphotericin B. In the present study, we found that the Chinese herbal medicine Baicalein (BE), which was one of the skullcapflavones, can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. The apoptotic effects of BE were detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and DAPI, and it was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. After exposure to 4 microg/ml BE for 12 h, about 10% of C. albicans cells were apoptotic. Both the increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulation of some redox-related genes (CAP1, SOD2, TRR1) were observed. Furthermore, we compared the survivals of CAP1 deleted, wild-type, and overexpressed strains and found that Cap1p attenuated BE-initiated cell death, which was coherent with a higher mRNA level of the CAP1 gene. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential of C. albicans cells changed significantly ( p<0.001) upon BE treatment compared with control. Taken together, our results indicate that BE treatment induces apoptosis in C.albicans cells, and the apoptosis was associated with the breakdown of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:19734718

  16. Melatonin decreases cell proliferation, impairs myogenic differentiation and triggers apoptotic cell death in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Codenotti, Silvia; Battistelli, Michela; Burattini, Sabrina; Salucci, Sara; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Rezzani, Rita; Faggi, Fiorella; Colombi, Marina; Monti, Eugenio; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Melatonin is a small indole produced by the pineal gland and other tissues, and has numerous functions that aid in the maintenance of the whole body homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep to protection from oxidative stress. Melatonin has also been reported to counteract cell growth and chemoresistance in different types of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exogenous melatonin administration on different human cell lines and primary mouse tumor cultures of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma affecting childhood. The results showed that melatonin significantly affected the behavior of RMS cells, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and impairment of myogenic differentiation followed by increased apoptotic cell death, as observed by immunoblotting analysis of apoptosis-related markers including Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3. Similar findings were observed using a combination of microscopy techniques, including scanning/transmission electron and confocal microscopy. Furthermore, melatonin in combination with doxorubicin or cisplatin, two compounds commonly used for the treatment of solid tumors, increased the sensitivity of RMS cells to apoptosis. These data indicated that melatonin may be effective in counteracting RMS tumor growth and chemoresistance.

  17. Ceramide path in human lung cell death.

    PubMed

    Chan, C; Goldkorn, T

    2000-04-01

    Lung epithelium plays a significant role in modulating the inflammatory response to lung injury. Airway epithelial cells are targeted by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and oxygen radicals, which are agents commonly produced during inflammatory processes. The mechanisms and molecular sites affected by H(2)O(2) are largely unknown but may involve the induction of sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis to generate ceramide, which serves as a second messenger in initiating an apoptotic response. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial (HAE) cells to 50 to 100 microM H(2)O(2) induces within 5 to 10 min a greater than 2-fold activation of neutral sphingomyelinase activity with concomitant SM hydrolysis, ceramide generation, and apoptosis. On the other hand, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate inhibits both H(2)O(2)-induced ceramide production and apoptosis. The apoptotic response could be restored by the addition of 25 microM cell-permeant C6-ceramide. These findings indicate that ceramide, the product of SM hydrolysis, plays an important role in H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in HAE cells, and that PKC counteracts ceramide-mediated apoptosis in these cells. We suggest that the mediation of epithelial cell apoptosis by ceramide and its inhibition by PKC constitute a central mechanism by which inflammatory processes are modulated in the epithelium of the lung.

  18. 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid attenuates proteasome inhibition-mediated programmed cell death in differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Da Hee; Kim, Yun Jeong; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Min Sung; Lee, Chung Soo

    2014-08-01

    The dysfunction of the proteasome system is suggested to be implicated in neuronal degeneration. Caffeoylquinic acid derivatives have demonstrated anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effect of 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid on the neuronal cell death induced by proteasome inhibition has not been studied. Therefore, in the respect of cell death process, we assessed the effect of 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid on the proteasome inhibition-induced programmed cell death using differentiated PC12 cells. The proteasome inhibitors MG132 and MG115 induced a decrease in Bid, Bcl-2, and survivin protein levels, an increase in Bax, loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release, activation of caspases (-8, -9 and -3), and an increase in the tumor suppressor p53 levels. Treatment with 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid attenuated the proteasome inhibitor-induced changes in the programmed cell death-related protein levels, formation of reactive oxygen species, GSH depletion and cell death. The results show that 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid may attenuate the proteasome inhibitor-induced programmed cell death in PC12 cells by suppressing the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways. The preventive effect of 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid appears to be attributed to its inhibitory effect on the formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH.

  19. Pseudolaric acid B activates autophagy in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to prevent cell death

    PubMed Central

    YU, JINGHUA; CHEN, CHUNHAI; XU, TIANYANG; YAN, MINGHUI; XUE, BIANBIAN; WANG, YING; LIU, CHUNYU; ZHONG, TING; WANG, ZENGYAN; MENG, XIANYING; HU, DONGHUA; YU, XIAOFANG

    2016-01-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of resistance to PAB-induced cell death. Following incubation with 4 µM of PAB for 3 days, the majority of MCF-7 cells became senescent, while some retained the same morphology as control cells, as assessed using a senescence detection kit. Additionally, 36 h of treatment with 4 µM of PAB increased the positive staining of autophagy markers, as shown by monodansylcadaverine and acridine orange staining. Western blot analysis indicated that this treatment also increased expression of the autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Furthermore, treatment with PAB and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine significantly decreased the ratio of autophagy, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of monodansylcadaverine staining density (P<0.001), and increased the ratio of cell death, as assessed by MTT analysis (P<0.001). This indicated that autophagy promotes cell survival as a resistance mechanism to PAB treatment. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that PAB treatment did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, which may be related to autophagy. Increased Bcl-2 expression may explain why PAB did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential. A Bcl-2 binding test demonstrated that PAB treatment inhibits the binding of Bcl-2 and Beclin-1, which may free Beclin-1 to participate in autophagy. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that autophagy may be activated by PAB treatment in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, contributing to resistance to cell death. PMID:26998069

  20. Identification of the death zone: a spatially restricted region for programmed cell death that sculpts the fly eye.

    PubMed

    Monserrate, J P; Brachmann, C Baker

    2007-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) sculpts many developing tissues. The final patterning step of the Drosophila retina is the elimination, through PCD, of a subset of interommatidial lattice cells during pupation. It is not understood how this process is spatially regulated to ensure that cells die in the proper positions. To address this, we observed PCD of lattice cells in the pupal retina in real time. This live-visualization method demonstrates that lattice cell apoptosis is a highly specific process. In all, 85% of lattice cells die in exclusive 'death zone' positions between adjacent ommatidia. In contrast, cells that make specific contacts with primary pigment cells are protected from death. Two signaling pathways, Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (dEgfr) and Notch, that are thought to be central to the regulation of lattice cell survival and death, are not sufficient to establish the death zone. Thus, application of live visualization to the fly eye gives new insight into a dynamic developmental process.

  1. Hemeoxygenase-1 Mediates an Adaptive Response to Spermidine-Induced Cell Death in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hana; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Yong Seek

    2013-01-01

    Spermidine (SPD) is a ubiquitous polycation that is commonly distributed in living organisms. Intracellular levels of SPD are tightly regulated, and SPD controls cell proliferation and death. However, SPD undergoes oxidation in the presence of serum, producing aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, which exert cytotoxic effect on cells. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to have a protective effect against oxidative stress. Upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells is considered to be beneficial in the cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we demonstrate that the ubiquitous polyamine, SPD, induces HO-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). SPD-induced HO-1 expression was examined by Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Involvement of reactive oxygen species, serum amine oxidase, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and transcription factor Nrf2 in the induction of HO-1 by SPD was also investigated. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 and treatment with the specific HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP exhibited a noteworthy increase of death of SPD-stimulated HUVECs. In conclusion, these results suggest that SPD induces PI3K/Akt-Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression in human endothelial cells, which may have a role in cytoprotection of the cells against oxidative stress-induced death. PMID:23983896

  2. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, Elena T; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-06-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl(3)-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 microM AlCl(3) showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation. Cell death was effectively inhibited by protease and human caspase inhibitors indicating a cell death execution mechanism with similarities to animal apoptosis. Cell death was suppressed by application of antoxidants and by inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), phospholipase D (PLD) and ethylene signalling pathways. The results suggest that low concentrations of heavy metal ions stimulate both PLC and PLD signalling pathways leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death executed by caspase-like proteases.

  3. Calpains are involved in Entamoeba histolytica-induced death of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yun Soo; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Lee, Sang Kyou; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2011-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that can cause amebic colitis and liver abscess in humans. E. histolytica has the capability to kill colon epithelial cells in vitro; however, information regarding the role of calpain in colon cell death induced by ameba is limited. In this study, we investigated whether calpains are involved in the E. histolytica-induced cell death of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells. When HT-29 cells were co-incubated with E. histolytica, the propidium iodide stained dead cells markedly increased compared to that in HT-29 cells incubated with medium alone. This pro-death effect induced by ameba was effectively blocked by pretreatment of HT-29 cells with the calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. Moreover, knockdown of m- and µ-calpain by siRNA significantly reduced E. histolytica-induced HT-29 cell death. These results suggest that m- and µ-calpain may be involved in colon epithelial cell death induced by E. histolytica. PMID:21738275

  4. Siramesine triggers cell death through destabilisation of mitochondria, but not lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hafner Česen, M; Repnik, U; Turk, V; Turk, B

    2013-01-01

    A sigma-2 receptor agonist siramesine has been shown to trigger cell death of cancer cells and to exhibit a potent anticancer activity in vivo. However, its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. We show that siramesine can induce rapid cell death in a number of cell lines at concentrations above 20 μM. In HaCaT cells, cell death was accompanied by caspase activation, rapid loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cytochrome c release, cardiolipin peroxidation and typical apoptotic morphology, whereas in U-87MG cells most apoptotic hallmarks were not notable, although MMP was rapidly lost. In contrast to the rapid loss of MMP above 20 μM siramesine, a rapid increase in lysosomal pH was observed at all concentrations tested (5–40 μM); however, it was not accompanied by lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and the release of lysosomal enzymes into the cytosol. Increased lysosomal pH reduced the lysosomal degradation potential as indicated by the accumulation of immature forms of cysteine cathepsins. The lipophilic antioxidant α-tocopherol, but not the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, considerably reduced cell death and destabilisation of mitochondrial membranes, but did not prevent the increase in lysosomal pH. At concentrations below 15 μM, siramesine triggered cell death after 2 days or later, which seems to be associated with a general metabolic and energy imbalance due to defects in the endocytic pathway, intracellular trafficking and energy production, and not by a specific molecular event. Overall, we show that cell death in siramesine-treated cells is induced by destabilisation of mitochondria and is independent of LMP and the release of cathepsins into the cytosol. Moreover, it is unlikely that siramesine acts exclusively through sigma-2 receptors, but rather through multiple molecular targets inside the cell. Our findings are therefore of significant importance in designing the next generation of siramesine

  5. Tousled-like kinase mediated a new type of cell death pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Cai, R; Zhou, R; Li, Y; Liu, L

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has an important role in sculpting organisms during development. However, much remains to be learned about the molecular mechanism of PCD. We found that ectopic expression of tousled-like kinase (tlk) in Drosophila initiated a new type of cell death. Furthermore, the TLK-induced cell death is likely to be independent of the canonical caspase pathway and other known caspase-independent pathways. Genetically, atg2 RNAi could rescue the TLK-induced cell death, and this function of atg2 was likely distinct from its role in autophagy. In the developing retina, loss of tlk resulted in reduced PCD in the interommatidial cells (IOCs). Similarly, an increased number of IOCs was present in the atg2 deletion mutant clones. However, double knockdown of tlk and atg2 by RNAi did not have a synergistic effect. These results suggested that ATG2 may function downstream of TLK. In addition to a role in development, tlk and atg2 RNAi could rescue calcium overload-induced cell death. Together, our results suggest that TLK mediates a new type of cell death pathway that occurs in both development and calcium cytotoxicity.

  6. Tousled-like kinase mediated a new type of cell death pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Cai, R; Zhou, R; Li, Y; Liu, L

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has an important role in sculpting organisms during development. However, much remains to be learned about the molecular mechanism of PCD. We found that ectopic expression of tousled-like kinase (tlk) in Drosophila initiated a new type of cell death. Furthermore, the TLK-induced cell death is likely to be independent of the canonical caspase pathway and other known caspase-independent pathways. Genetically, atg2 RNAi could rescue the TLK-induced cell death, and this function of atg2 was likely distinct from its role in autophagy. In the developing retina, loss of tlk resulted in reduced PCD in the interommatidial cells (IOCs). Similarly, an increased number of IOCs was present in the atg2 deletion mutant clones. However, double knockdown of tlk and atg2 by RNAi did not have a synergistic effect. These results suggested that ATG2 may function downstream of TLK. In addition to a role in development, tlk and atg2 RNAi could rescue calcium overload-induced cell death. Together, our results suggest that TLK mediates a new type of cell death pathway that occurs in both development and calcium cytotoxicity. PMID:26088162

  7. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuanbin; Tan, Hor Yue; Zhong, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals) were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future. PMID:25379508

  8. Biomarkers and Molecular Probes for Cell Death Imaging and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bryan A.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2012-01-01

    Cell death is a critically important biological process. Disruption of homeostasis, either by excessive or deficient cell death, is a hallmark of many pathological conditions. Recent research advances have greatly increased our molecular understanding of cell death and its role in a range of diseases and therapeutic treatments. Central to these ongoing research and clinical efforts is the need for imaging technologies that can locate and identify cell death in a wide array of in vitro and in vivo biomedical samples with varied spatiotemporal requirements. This review article summarizes community efforts over the past five years to identify useful biomarkers for dead and dying cells, and to develop molecular probes that target these biomarkers for optical, radionuclear, or magnetic resonance imaging. Apoptosis biomarkers are classified as either intracellular (caspase enzymes, mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic proteins) or extracellular (plasma membrane phospholipids, membrane potential, surface exposed histones). Necrosis, autophagy, and senescence biomarkers are described, as well as unexplored cell death biomarkers. The article discusses possible chemotherapeutic and theranostic strategies, and concludes with a summary of current challenges and expected eventual rewards of clinical cell death imaging. PMID:22989049

  9. Inhibition of RNA interference and modulation of transposable element expression by cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiwu; Liang, Chengzhi; Birchler, James A

    2011-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) regulates gene expression by sequence-specific destruction of RNA. It acts as a defense mechanism against viruses and represses the expression of transposable elements (TEs) and some endogenous genes. We report that mutations and transgene constructs that condition cell death suppress RNA interference in adjacent cells in Drosophila melanogaster. The reversal of RNAi is effective for both the white (w) eye color gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP), indicating the generality of the inhibition. Antiapoptotic transgenes that reverse cell death will also reverse the inhibition of RNAi. Using GFP and a low level of cell death produced by a heat shock-head involution defective (hs-hid) transgene, the inhibition appears to occur by blocking the conversion of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to short interfering RNA (siRNA). We also demonstrate that the mus308 gene and endogenous transposable elements, which are both regularly silenced by RNAi, are increased in expression and accompanied by a reduced level of siRNA, when cell death occurs. The finding that chronic ectopic cell death affects RNAi is critical for an understanding of the application of the technique in basic and applied studies. These results also suggest that developmental perturbations, disease states, or environmental insults that cause ectopic cell death would alter transposon and gene expression patterns in the organism by the inhibition of small RNA silencing processes. PMID:21596898

  10. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Curry, Merril C; Peters, Amelia A; Kenny, Paraic A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-05-10

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  11. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nicole M; Ceresa, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway. PMID:27381222

  12. Glycobiology of cell death: when glycans and lectins govern cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, R G; Rabinovich, G A

    2013-01-01

    Although one typically thinks of carbohydrates as associated with cell growth and viability, glycosylation also has an integral role in many processes leading to cell death. Glycans, either alone or complexed with glycan-binding proteins, can deliver intracellular signals or control extracellular processes that promote initiation, execution and resolution of cell death programs. Herein, we review the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins as essential components of the cell death machinery during physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:23703323

  13. Germline cell death is inhibited by P-element insertions disrupting the dcp-1/pita nested gene pair in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Laundrie, Bonni; Peterson, Jeanne S; Baum, Jason S; Chang, Jeffrey C; Fileppo, Dana; Thompson, Sharona R; McCall, Kimberly

    2003-12-01

    Germline cell death in Drosophila oogenesis is controlled by distinct signals. The death of nurse cells in late oogenesis is developmentally regulated, whereas the death of egg chambers during mid-oogenesis is induced by environmental stress or developmental abnormalities. P-element insertions in the caspase gene dcp-1 disrupt both dcp-1 and the outlying gene, pita, leading to lethality and defective nurse cell death in late oogenesis. By isolating single mutations in the two genes, we have found that the loss of both genes contributes to this ovary phenotype. Mutants of pita, which encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein, are homozygous lethal and show dumpless egg chambers and premature nurse cell death in germline clones. Early nurse cell death is not observed in the dcp-1/pita double mutants, suggesting that dcp-1+ activity is required for the mid-oogenesis cell death seen in pita mutants. dcp-1 mutants are viable and nurse cell death in late oogenesis occurs normally. However, starvation-induced germline cell death during mid-oogenesis is blocked, leading to a reduction and inappropriate nuclear localization of the active caspase Drice. These findings suggest that the combinatorial loss of pita and dcp-1 leads to the increased survival of abnormal egg chambers in mutants bearing the P-element alleles and that dcp-1 is essential for cell death during mid-oogenesis.

  14. Human salivary histatin 5 fungicidal action does not induce programmed cell death pathways in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wunder, David; Dong, Jin; Baev, Didi; Edgerton, Mira

    2004-01-01

    Salivary histatins (Hsts) are potent candidacidal proteins that induce a nonlytic form of cell death in Candida albicans accompanied by loss of mean cell volume, cell cycle arrest, and elevation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since these phenotypes are often markers of programmed cell death and apoptosis, we investigated whether other classical markers of apoptosis, including generation of intracellular ROS and protein carbonyl groups, chromosomal fragmentation (laddering), and cytochrome c release, are found in Hst 5-mediated cell death. Increased intracellular levels of ROS in C. albicans were detected in cells both following exogenous application of Hst 5 and following intracellular expression of Hst 5. However, Western blot analysis failed to detect specifically increased protein carbonylation in Hst 5-treated cells. There was no evidence of chromosomal laddering and no cytochrome c release was observed following treatment of C. albicans mitochondria with Hst 5. Superoxide dismutase enzymes of C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae provide essential protection against oxidative stress; therefore, we tested whether SOD mutants have increased susceptibility to Hst 5, as expected if ROS mediate fungicidal effects. Cell survival of S. cerevisiae SOD1/SOD2 mutants and C. albicans SOD1 mutants following Hst 5 treatment (31 micro M) was indistinguishable from the survival of wild-type cells treated with Hst 5. We conclude that ROS may not play a direct role in fungicidal activity and that Hst 5 does not initiate apoptosis or programmed cell death pathways. PMID:14693527

  15. Apoptotic photoreceptor cell death in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Portera-Cailliau, C; Sung, C H; Nathans, J; Adler, R

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited human diseases in which photoreceptor degeneration leads to visual loss and eventually to blindness. Although mutations in the rhodopsin, peripherin, and cGMP phosphodiesterase genes have been identified in some forms of RP, it remains to be determined whether these mutations lead to photoreceptor cell death through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In this paper, we report a test of the hypothesis that photoreceptor cell death occurs by an apoptotic mechanism in three mouse models of RP: retinal degeneration slow (rds) caused by a peripherin mutation, retinal degeneration (rd) caused by a defect in cGMP phosphodiesterase, and transgenic mice carrying a rhodopsin Q344ter mutation responsible for autosomal dominant RP. Two complementary techniques were used to detect apoptosis-specific internucleosomal DNA fragmentation: agarose gel electrophoresis and in situ labeling of apoptotic cells by terminal dUTP nick end labeling. Both methods showed extensive apoptosis of photoreceptors in all three mouse models of retinal degeneration. We also show that apoptotic death occurs in the retina during normal development, suggesting that different mechanisms can cause photoreceptor death by activating an intrinsic death program in these cells. These findings raise the possibility that retinal degenerations may be slowed by interfering with the apoptotic mechanism itself. Images PMID:8302876

  16. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed. PMID:22737670

  17. Programmed Cell Death During Female Gametophyte Development

    SciTech Connect

    Drews, Gary, N.

    2004-09-15

    Endosperm is a storage tissue in the angiosperm seed that is important both biologically and agriculturally. Endosperm is biologically important because it provides nutrients to the embryo during seed development and agriculturally important because it is a significant source of food, feed, and industrial raw materials. Approximately two-thirds of human calories are derived from endosperm, either directly or indirectly through animal feed. Furthermore, endosperm is used as a raw material for numerous industrial products including ethanol. A major event in endosperm development is the transition between the syncytial phase, during which the endosperm nuclei undergo many rounds of mitosis without cytokinesis, and the cellularized phase, during which cell walls form around the endosperm nuclei. Understanding how the syncytial-cellular transition is regulated is agriculturally important because it influences seed size, seed sink strength, and grain weight. However, the molecular processes controlling this transition are not understood. This project led to the identification of the AGL62 gene that regulates the syncytial-cellular transition during endosperm development. AGL62 is expressed during the syncytial phase and suppresses endosperm cellularization during this period. AGL62 most likely does so by suppressing the expression of genes required for cellularization. At the end of the syncytial phase, the FIS PcG complex suppresses AGL62 expression, which allows expression of the cellularization genes and triggers the initiation of the cellularized phase. Endosperm arises following fertilization of the central cell within the female gametophyte. This project also led to the identification of the AGL80 gene that is required for development of the central cell into the endosperm. Within the ovule and seed, AGL80 is expressed exclusively in the central cell and uncellularized endosperm. AGL80 is required for expression of several central cell-expressed genes, including

  18. Danger signalling during cancer cell death: origins, plasticity and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garg, A D; Martin, S; Golab, J; Agostinis, P

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that following anti-cancer treatments, cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic or tolerogenic by the immune system. The former is made possible due to the ability of certain anti-cancer modalities to induce immunogenic cell death (ICD) that is associated with the emission of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which assist in unlocking a sequence of events leading to the development of anti-tumour immunity. In response to ICD inducers, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been identified to be indispensable to confer the immunogenic character of cancer cell death, due to its ability to coordinate the danger signalling pathways responsible for the trafficking of vital DAMPs and subsequent anti-cancer immune responses. However, in recent times, certain processes apart from ER stress have emerged (e.g., autophagy and possibly viral response-like signature), which have the ability to influence danger signalling. In this review, we discuss the molecular nature, emerging plasticity in the danger signalling mechanisms and immunological impact of known DAMPs in the context of immunogenic cancer cell death. We also discuss key effector mechanisms modulating the interface between dying cancer cells and the immune cells, which we believe are crucial for the therapeutic relevance of ICD in the context of human cancers, and also discuss the influence of experimental conditions and animal models on these. PMID:23686135

  19. Cell death in protists without mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chose, Olivier; Sarde, Claude-Olivier; Noël, Christophe; Gerbod, Delphine; Jimenez, Juan-Carlos; Brenner, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Viscogliosi, Eric; Roseto, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    Some protozoans, such as Trichomonad species, do not possess mitochondria. Most of the time, they harbor another type of membrane-bounded organelle, called hydrogenosome from its capacity to produce H(2). This is the case for the human parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Some other parasites, such as the protist Giardia lamblia, do not harbor any of these organelles. From this observation arises naturally a naive question: How do cells die when the mitochondrion, the cornerstone of apoptotic process, is absent? Data strongly suggest that the mitochondrion and the hydrogenosome arose from a common ancestral endosymbiont. But hydrogenosomes do not appear to directly substitute for mitochondria in apoptotic functions. Thus, it appears judicious to examine more closely the genome of unicellular cells, which do not harbor mitochondria, and search for new molecules that could participate in the apoptotic process in these microorganisms. PMID:15033707

  20. Cell death in protists without mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chose, Olivier; Sarde, Claude-Olivier; Noël, Christophe; Gerbod, Delphine; Jimenez, Juan-Carlos; Brenner, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Viscogliosi, Eric; Roseto, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    Some protozoans, such as Trichomonad species, do not possess mitochondria. Most of the time, they harbor another type of membrane-bounded organelle, called hydrogenosome from its capacity to produce H(2). This is the case for the human parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Some other parasites, such as the protist Giardia lamblia, do not harbor any of these organelles. From this observation arises naturally a naive question: How do cells die when the mitochondrion, the cornerstone of apoptotic process, is absent? Data strongly suggest that the mitochondrion and the hydrogenosome arose from a common ancestral endosymbiont. But hydrogenosomes do not appear to directly substitute for mitochondria in apoptotic functions. Thus, it appears judicious to examine more closely the genome of unicellular cells, which do not harbor mitochondria, and search for new molecules that could participate in the apoptotic process in these microorganisms.

  1. Histological and finite element analysis of cell death due to irreversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Long, G; Bakos, G; Shires, P K; Gritter, L; Crissman, J W; Harris, J L; Clymer, J W

    2014-12-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been shown to be an effective method of killing cells locally. In contrast to radiofrequency ablation, the mechanism by which cells are thought to die via IRE is the creation of pores in cell membranes, without substantial increase in tissue temperature. To determine the degree to which cell death is non-thermal, we evaluated IRE in porcine hepatocytes in vivo. Using pulse widths of 10 µs, bursts of 3 kV square-wave pulses were applied through a custom probe to the liver of an anesthetized pig. Affected tissue was evaluated histologically via stainings of hematoxylin & eosin (H&E), nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) to monitor cell respiration and TUNEL to gauge apoptosis. Temperature was measured during the application of electroporation, and heat transfer was modeled via finite element analysis. Cell death was calculated via Arrhenius kinetics. Four distinct zones were observed within the ring return electrode; heat-fixed tissue, coagulation, necrotic, and viable. The Arrhenius damage integral estimated complete cell death only in the first zone, where the temperature exceeded 70°C, and partial or no cell death in the other zones, where maximum temperature was approximately 45°C. Except for a limited area near the electrode tip, cell death in IRE is predominantly due to a non-thermal mechanism.

  2. Dealcoholated red wine induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, I; Russo, M; Bilotto, S; Spagnuolo, C; Scognamiglio, A; Palumbo, R; Nappo, A; Iacomino, G; Moio, L; Russo, G L

    2013-10-01

    Until recently, the supposed preventive effects of red wine against cardiovascular diseases, the so-called "French Paradox", has been associated to its antioxidant properties. The interest in the anticancer capacity of polyphenols present in red wine strongly increased consequently to the enormous number of studies on resveratrol. In this study, using lyophilized red wine, we present evidence that its anticancer effect in a cellular model is mediated by apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Using a human osteosarcoma cell line, U2Os, we found that the lyophilized red wine was cytotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum effect in the range of 100-200 μg/ml equivalents of gallic acid. A mixed phenotype of types I/II cell death was evidenced by means of specific assays following treatment of U2Os with lyophilized red wine, e.g., autophagy and apoptosis. We found that cell death induced by lyophilized red wine proceeded through a mechanism independent from its anti-oxidant activity and involving the inhibition of PI3K/Akt kinase signaling. Considering the relative low concentration of each single bioactive compound in lyophilized red wine, our study suggests the activation of synergistic mechanism able to inhibit growth in malignant cells.

  3. Temporal rhythm of petal programmed cell death in Ipomoea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Gui, M-Y; Ni, X-L; Wang, H-B; Liu, W-Z

    2016-09-01

    Flowers are the main sexual reproductive organs in plants. The shapes, colours and scents of corolla of plant flowers are involved in attracting insect pollinators and increasing reproductive success. The process of corolla senescence was investigated in Ipomoea purpurea (Convolvulaceae) in this study. In the research methods of plant anatomy, cytology, cell chemistry and molecular biology were used. The results showed that at the flowering stage cells already began to show distortion, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane degradation and tonoplast dissolution and rupture. At this stage genomic DNA underwent massive but gradual random degradation. However, judging from the shape and structure, aging characteristics did not appear until the early flower senescence stage. The senescence process was slow, and it was completed at the late stage of flower senescence with a withering corolla. We may safely arrive at the conclusion that corolla senescence of I. purpurea was mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) that occurred at the flowering stage. The corolla senescence exhibited an obvious temporal rhythm, which demonstrated a high degree of coordination with pollination and fertilization. PMID:27259176

  4. DAMPs from Cell Death to New Life

    PubMed Central

    Vénéreau, Emilie; Ceriotti, Chiara; Bianchi, Marco Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Our body handles tissue damage by activating the immune system in response to intracellular molecules released by injured tissues [damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs)], in a similar way as it detects molecular motifs conserved in pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns). DAMPs are molecules that have a physiological role inside the cell, but acquire additional functions when they are exposed to the extracellular environment: they alert the body about danger, stimulate an inflammatory response, and finally promote the regeneration process. Beside their passive release by dead cells, some DAMPs can be secreted or exposed by living cells undergoing a life-threatening stress. DAMPs have been linked to inflammation and related disorders: hence, inhibition of DAMP-mediated inflammatory responses is a promising strategy to improve the clinical management of infection- and injury-elicited inflammatory diseases. However, it is important to consider that DAMPs are not only danger signals but also central players in tissue repair. Indeed, some DAMPs have been studied for their role in tissue healing after sterile or infection-associated inflammation. This review is focused on two exemplary DAMPs, HMGB1 and adenosine triphosphate, and their contribution to both inflammation and tissue repair. PMID:26347745

  5. Cytoprotective effects of fisetin against hypoxia-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yi; Ho, Yi-Ru; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Huang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Po-Kong; Tai, Mi-Hsueh; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol compound of flavonoids, exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and neuroprotective effects. The aim of this study is to investigate the cytoprotective effect of fisetin and the underlying molecular mechanism against hypoxia-induced cell death in PC12 cells. The results of this study showed that fisetin significantly restored the cell viability of PC12 cells under both cobalt chloride (CoCl₂)- and low oxygen-induced hypoxic conditions. Treatment with fisetin successfully reduced the CoCl₂-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which was accompanied by an increase in the cell viability of PC12 cells. Furthermore, we found that treatment of PC12 cells with fisetin markedly upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), its nuclear accumulation and the hypoxia-response element (HRE)-driven transcriptional activation. The fisetin-mediated cytoprotection during CoCl₂ exposure was significantly attenuated through the administration of HIF-1α siRNA. Moreover, we demonstrated that MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 K) inhibitors significantly blocked the increase in cell survival that was induced by fisetin treatment under hypoxic conditions. Consistently, increased phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and Akt proteins was observed in PC12 cells treated with fisetin. However, the fisetin-induced HRE-driven transcription was not affected by inhibition of these kinase signaling pathways. Current results reveal for the first time that fisetin promotes cell survival and protects against hypoxia-induced cell death through ROS scavenging and the activation of HIF1α-, MAPK/ERK-, p38 MAPK- and PI3 K/Akt-dependent signaling pathways in PC12 cells.

  6. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G V R Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-25

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role.

  7. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A.; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  8. Mechanisms of Cell Death in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bantel, Heike; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can be the consequence of various etiologies, that might vary between different geographic regions. Most frequent are intoxications with acetaminophen, viral hepatitis, or liver damage of unknown origin. ALF occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death exceeds the regenerative capacity of the liver. The mode of liver cell death that is predominantly induced in ALF, i.e., apoptosis or necrosis, is still controversial and presumably determined by the etiology, duration, and magnitude of liver injury. Severe liver damage involves oxidative stress and depletion of ATP resulting in necrosis. In contrast, maintenance of ATP stores is required for the execution of apoptosis. Recent data suggest that necrosis resulting from severe liver damage is associated with poor outcome of ALF patients. Discrimination between apoptosis and necrosis might be therefore useful for the identification of ALF patients requiring liver transplantation. Identification of the molecular cell death mechanisms remains an important issue not only for early prediction of ALF outcome, but also for therapeutic interventions. In view of the pleiotropic functions of critical mediators of cell death and tissue regeneration, a particular challenge will be to reduce hepatocellular death without inhibiting the regenerative capacity of the liver. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of hepatocyte injury and the pathways leading to apoptosis and necrosis, which might represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in ALF. PMID:22485095

  9. Genistein decreases cellular redox potential, partially suppresses cell growth in HL-60 leukemia cells and sensitizes cells to γ-radiation-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    KIM, IN GYU; KIM, JIN SIK; LEE, JAE HA; CHO, EUN WIE

    2014-01-01

    Various mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the cellular activity of genistein, based on biological experiments and epidemiological studies. The present study demonstrated that genistein inhibited the expression of cytoplasmic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (cICDH), thus increasing levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human promyeloid leukemia HL-60 cells. In genistein-treated cells, the cellular redox potential (GSH/GSSG) was significantly decreased. This decrease in redox potential was caused by significant downregulation of the cICDH gene, generating the reducing equivalents (NADPH) for maintenance of cellular redox potential and cellular ROS level, which may regulate cell growth and cell death. Genistein-induced ROS partially induced rapid transition into the G2/M phase by upregulation of p21wap1/cip1 and apoptotic cell death. Treatment of cells with N-acetylcysteine, a well-known antioxidant (ROS scavenger), not only partially restored cell growth and inhibited cell cycle arrest in G2/M, but also prevented apoptotic cell death. By contrast, normal lymphocytes did not significantly progress into the G2/M phase and radiation-induced cell death was inhibited by genistein treatment. Therefore, genistein and γ-irradiation together synergistically cause cell death in leukemia cells, however, genistein has a radioprotective effect in normal human lymphocytes. In conclusion, it was suggested that genistein selectively functions, not as an antioxidant, but as a pro-oxidant in HL-60 cells. This property can increase ionizing radiation-induced cell cycle arrest and sensitivity to apoptotic cell death in human promyeloid leukemia HL-60 cells, but does not cause significant damage to normal cells. PMID:25310747

  10. Cell death signaling in the cerebellum in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Puig, B; Ferrer, I

    2001-09-01

    Examination of the expression of proteins linked with signaling pathways commanding cell death and cell survival has been carried out to increase understanding on the mechanisms leading to cell death in the cerebellum in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Expression of Fas, Fas ligand (Fas-L), ERK, MEK, Bcl-2, Bax, N-myc, c-myc, pro-caspase-2 and active caspase-3 was examined by immunohistochemistry in the cerebellum of six patients with sporadic CJD, three patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and six age-matched controls. No modifications in the expression of these proteins were observed in granule cells in CJD and OPCA when compared with controls, except in a few cells in the molecular and granular layers in CJD that displayed dense homogeneous active caspase-3 immunostaining. This suggests selective activation of caspase-3 in association with increased cellular vulnerability in CJD. No modifications in pro-caspase-2 and c-myc immunoreactivity were observed in Purkinje cells in diseased brains when compared with controls. However, increased diffuse Fas, Fas-L, MEK, ERK and Bax expression, and enhanced granular active caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found in the cytoplasm of Purkinje cells in CJD. Increase in Bcl-2 and N-myc occurred in Purkinje cells in CJD and OPCA. These results indicate that enhanced Fas, Fas-L, MERK, ERK, Bax and granular active caspase-3 expression is not lethal to Purkinje cells in CJD, whereas increased Bcl-2 and N-myc does not preclude per se cell death or death survival in CJD and OPCA. These findings point to the likelihood that expression of these cell death proteins in neurodegeneration has functional roles differing from those related with apoptosis.

  11. Induction of Cell Death Mechanisms and Apoptosis by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields (nsPEFs)

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Stephen J.; Sain, Nova M.; Ren, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Pulse power technology using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) offers a new stimulus to modulate cell functions or induce cell death for cancer cell ablation. New data and a literature review demonstrate fundamental and basic cellular mechanisms when nsPEFs interact with cellular targets. NsPEFs supra-electroporate cells creating large numbers of nanopores in all cell membranes. While nsPEFs have multiple cellular targets, these studies show that nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm closely parallels deterioration in cell viability. Increases in intracellular Ca2+ alone were not sufficient for cell death; however, cell death depended of the presence of Ca2+. When both events occur, cell death ensues. Further, direct evidence supports the hypothesis that pulse rise-fall times or high frequency components of nsPEFs are important for decreasing ΔΨm and cell viability. Evidence indicates in Jurkat cells that cytochrome c release from mitochondria is caspase-independent indicating an absence of extrinsic apoptosis and that cell death can be caspase-dependent and –independent. The Ca2+ dependence of nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm suggests that nanoporation of inner mitochondria membranes is less likely and effects on a Ca2+-dependent protein(s) or the membrane in which it is embedded are more likely a target for nsPEF-induced cell death. The mitochondria permeability transition pore (mPTP) complex is a likely candidate. Data demonstrate that nsPEFs can bypass cancer mutations that evade apoptosis through mechanisms at either the DISC or the apoptosome. PMID:24709649

  12. The metabolism beyond programmed cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Julia; Sommer, Cornelia; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Eisenberg, Tobias; Madeo, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A cell's reaction to any change in the endogenous or exogenous conditions often involves a complex response that eventually either leads to cell adaptation and survival or to the initiation and execution of (programmed) cell death. The molecular decision whether to live or die, while depending on a cell's genome, is fundamentally influenced by its actual metabolic status. Thus, the collection of all metabolites present in a biological system at a certain time point (the so-called metabolome) defines its physiological, developmental and pathological state and determines its fate during changing and stressful conditions. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a unicellular organism that allows to easily modify and monitor conditions affecting the cell's metabolome, for instance through a simple change of the nutrition source. Such changes can be used to mimic and study (patho)physiological scenarios, including caloric restriction and longevity, the Warburg effect in cancer cells or changes in mitochondrial mass affecting cell death. In addition, disruption of single genes or generation of respiratory deficiency (via abrogation of mitochondrial DNA) assists in revealing connections between metabolism and apoptosis. In this minireview, we discuss recent studies using the potential of the yeast model to provide new insights into the processes of stress defense, cell death and longevity. PMID:22480867

  13. Measuring Cell Death by Trypan Blue Uptake and Light Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Trypan blue is a colorimetric dye that stains dead cells with a blue color easily observed using light microscopy at low resolution. The staining procedure is rapid and cells can be analyzed within minutes. The number of live (unstained) and dead (blue) cells can be counted using a hemocytometer on a basic upright microscope. Trypan blue staining is therefore a convenient assay for rapidly determining the overall viability of cells in a culture before commencing scientific experimentation, or for quantitating cell death following treatment with any cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:27371594

  14. Novel cell death by downregulation of eEF1A1 expression in tetraploids.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Yonehara, S

    2009-01-01

    When duplicated sister chromatids are not properly compacted in mitosis, chromosomes are mis-segregated, inducing genetically unstable tetraploidy known to facilitate aneuploid malignancies. Here, we show that tetraploid cells produced by impaired chromosomal condensation are eliminated by a novel type of cell death different from caspase-dependent apoptosis. The cell death was associated with downregulation of eukaryotic translation elongation factor-1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1/EF-1alpha) expression in conjunction with accumulation of its mRNA in processing bodies (P bodies). Importantly, expression of exogenous eEF1A1 was shown to inhibit the caspase-independent cell death, and a similar cell death was observed after inducing the expression of short hairpin RNA specific for eEF1A1. Furthermore, the number of spontaneously arising binucleated cells was indicated to increase several fold during 1- to 2-week cultivation after initiation of exogenous eEF1A expression. Taken together, the novel cell death machinery should help to eliminate abnormal tetraploid cells and inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:18820646

  15. Reactive oxygen species as transducers of sphinganine-mediated cell death pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo-García, Mariana; González-Solís, Ariadna; Rodríguez-Mejía, Priscila; de Jesús Olivera-Flores, Teresa; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2011-01-01

    Long chain bases or sphingoid bases are building blocks of complex sphingolipids that display a signaling role in programmed cell death in plants. So far, the type of programmed cell death in which these signaling lipids have been demonstrated to participate is the cell death that occurs in plant immunity, known as the hypersensitive response. The few links that have been described in this pathway are: MPK6 activation, increased calcium concentrations and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The latter constitute one of the more elusive loops because of the chemical nature of ROS, the multiple possible cell sites where they can be formed and the ways in which they influence cell structure and function. PMID:21921699

  16. Photoreceptor Cells Produce Inflammatory Mediators That Contribute to Endothelial Cell Death in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tonade, Deoye; Liu, Haitao; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies suggest that photoreceptor cells regulate local inflammation in the retina in diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine if photoreceptor cells themselves produce inflammatory proteins in diabetes and if soluble factors released by photoreceptors in elevated glucose induce inflammatory changes in nearby cells. Methods Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the outer retina (photoreceptors) from the inner retina in nondiabetic and diabetic mice. Diabetes-induced changes in the expression of inflammatory targets were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Cell culture experiments were carried out to determine if photoreceptors in vitro and ex vivo release soluble mediators that can stimulate nearby cells. Photoreceptor contribution to leukocyte-mediated endothelial cell death was tested using coculture models. Results Messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression levels for inflammatory proteins intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) were increased in photoreceptors cells in diabetes. In vitro and ex vivo studies show that photoreceptor cells in elevated glucose release mediators that can induce tumor necrosis factor-α in leukocytes and endothelial cells, but not in glia. The soluble mediators released by photoreceptor cells in elevated glucose are regulated by transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) signaling. In contrast to enhanced leukocyte-mediated killing of endothelial cells by leukocytes from wild-type diabetic mice, leukocytes from diabetic mice lacking photoreceptor cells (opsin−/−) did not kill endothelial cells. Conclusions These data indicate that photoreceptor cells are a source of inflammatory proteins in diabetes, and their release of soluble mediators can contribute to the death of retinal capillaries

  17. Mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Yoshioka, T; Saio, M; Banno, Y; Nagaoka, H; Okano, Y

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, which refers to cell death or its prologue triggered by aberrant mitosis, can be induced by a heterogeneous group of stimuli, including chromosome damage or perturbation of the mitotic apparatus. We investigated the mechanism of mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization. We transfected cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 with siRNAs targeting Aurora A, ninein, TOG, TACC3, γ-tubulin, or pericentriolar material-1, and monitored the effects on cell death. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, TOG, and TACC3 led to cell death, regardless of p53 status. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, and TOG, led to aberrant spindle formation and subsequent cell death, which was accompanied by several features of apoptosis, including nuclear condensation and Annexin V binding in HeLa cells. During this process, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 was detected, but cleavage of caspase-8 was not. Cell death, monitored by time-lapse imaging, occurred during both interphase and M phase. In cells depleted of a centrosomal protein (Aurora A, ninein, or TOG), the rate of cell death was higher if the cells were cotransfected with siRNA against BubR1 or Mad2 than if they were transfected with siRNA against Bub1 or a control siRNA. These results suggest that metaphase arrest is necessary for the mitotic catastrophe and cell death caused by depletion of centrosomal proteins. Knockdown of centrosomal proteins led to increased phosphorylation of Chk2. Enhanced p-Chk2 localization was also observed at the centrosome in cells arrested in M phase, as well as in the nuclei of dying cells. Cotransfection of siRNAs against Chk2, in combination with depletion of a centrosomal protein, decreased the amount of cell death. Thus, Chk2 activity is indispensable for apoptosis after mitotic catastrophe induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization

  18. Formic acid and acetic acid induce a programmed cell death in pathogenic Candida species.

    PubMed

    Lastauskienė, Eglė; Zinkevičienė, Auksė; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Kaunietis, Arnoldas; Kvedarienė, Violeta

    2014-09-01

    Cutaneous fungal infections are common and widespread. Antifungal agents used for the treatment of these infections often have undesirable side effects. Furthermore, increased resistance of the microorganisms to the antifungal drugs becomes the growing problem. Accordingly, the search for natural antifungal compounds continues to receive attention. Apoptosis is highly regulated programmed cell death. During yeast cell apoptosis, amino acids and peptides are released and can stimulate regeneration of human epithelium cells. Thus, detection of chemical compounds inducing apoptosis in yeast and nontoxic for humans is of great medical relevance. The aim of this study was to detect chemical compound inducing apoptosis in pathogenic Candida species with the lowest toxicity to the mammalian cells. Five chemical compounds--acetic acid, sodium bicarbonate, potassium carbonate, lithium acetate, and formic acid--were tested for evaluation of antifungal activity on C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. lusitaniae. The results showed that acetic acid and formic acid at the lowest concentrations induced yeast cells death. Apoptosis analysis revealed that cells death was accompanied by activation of caspase. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of potassium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate induced Candida cells necrosis. Toxicity test with mammalian cell cultures showed that formic acid has the lowest effect on the growth of Jurkat and NIH 3T3 cells. In conclusion, our results show that a low concentration of formic acid induces apoptosis-like programmed cell death in the Candida yeast and has a minimal effect on the survivability of mammalian cells, suggesting potential applications in the treatment of these infections. PMID:24752490

  19. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. Methods RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1’s role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. Results We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. Conclusions These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates

  20. Curcumin Attenuates Staurosporine-Mediated Death of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burugula, Balabharathi; Ganesh, Bhagyalaxmi S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Staurosporine (SS) causes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. Since previous studies on RGC-5 cells indicated that SS induces cell death by elevating proteases, this study was undertaken to investigate whether SS induces RGC loss by elevating proteases in the retina, and curcumin prevents SS-mediated death of RGCs. Methods. Transformed mouse retinal ganglion-like cells (RGC-5) were treated with 2.0 μM SS and various doses of curcumin. Two optimal doses of SS (12.5 and 100 nM) and curcumin (2.5 and 10 μM) were injected into the vitreous of C57BL/6 mice. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) activities were assessed by zymography assays. Viability of RGC-5 cells was assessed by MTT assays. RGC and amacrine cell loss in vivo was assessed by immunostaining with Brn3a and ChAT antibodies, respectively. Frozen retinal cross sections were immunostained for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Results. Staurosporine induced uPA and tPA levels in RGC-5 cells, and MMP-9, uPA, and tPA levels in the retinas and promoted the death of RGC-5 cells in vitro and RGCs and amacrine cells in vivo. In contrast, curcumin attenuated RGC and amacrine cell loss, despite elevated levels of proteases. An NF-κB inhibitory peptide reversed curcumin-mediated protective effect on RGC-5 cells, but did not inhibit protease levels. Curcumin did not inhibit protease levels in vivo, but attenuated RGC and amacrine cell loss by restoring NF-κB expression. Conclusions. The results show that curcumin attenuates RGC and amacrine cell death despite elevated levels of proteases and raises the possibility that it may be used as a plausible adjuvant therapeutic agent to prevent the loss of these cells in retinal degenerative conditions. PMID:21498608

  1. Hydrogen peroxide-induced necrotic cell death in cardiomyocytes is independent of matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad A M; Kandasamy, Arulmozhi D; Fan, Xiaohu; Schulz, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is well known to proteolyse both extracellular and intracellular proteins. Reactive oxygen species activate MMP-2 at both transcriptional and post-translational levels, thus MMP-2 activation is considered an early event in oxidative stress injury. Although hydrogen peroxide is widely used to trigger oxidative stress-induced cell death, the type of cell death (apoptosis vs. necrosis) in cardiomyocytes is still controversial depending on the concentration used and the exposure time. We carefully investigated the mode of cell death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes induced by different concentrations (50-500 μM) of hydrogen peroxide at various time intervals after exposure and determined whether MMP-2 is implicated in hydrogen peroxide-induced cardiomyocyte death. Treating cardiomyocytes with hydrogen peroxide led to elevated MMP-2 level/activity with maximal effects seen at 200 μM. Hydrogen peroxide caused necrotic cell death by disrupting the plasmalemma as evidenced by the release of lactate dehydrogenase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner as well as the necrotic cleavage of PARP-1. The absence of both caspase-3 cleavage/activation and apoptotic cleavage of PARP-1 illustrated the weak contribution of apoptosis. Pre-treatment with selective MMP inhibitors did not protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced necrosis. In conclusion hydrogen peroxide increases MMP-2 level/activity in cardiomyocytes and induces necrotic cell death, however, the later effect is MMP-2 independent.

  2. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela Petiti, Juan Pablo; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Gutierrez, Silvina; Paul, Ana Lucia de; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Ines

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC{delta} in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC{delta} in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC{delta}, ERK1/2 and p38.

  3. Evidence of apoptotic cell death in HIV encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Petito, C. K.; Roberts, B.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of cell death in the brains of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome was examined in 15 cases, 8 of whom had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis, and in 8 control cases. Postmortem formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were prepared for routine histology and immunohistochemistry to detect cell-specific antigens. Apoptosis was detected by its morphology and by in situ end labeling of its characteristic oligonucleosomal fragments. Combined in situ end labeling and immunohistochemistry identified specific cell types. Six acquired immune deficiency syndrome brains, 5 of which had HIV encephalitis, contained positive nuclei by in situ end labeling. Co-labeling studies identified the cells as neurons, reactive astrocytes, and, rarely, the multinucleated giant cells of HIV encephalitis. The only control with nuclei positive by in situ end labeling had hepatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer type II astrocytes; the location and absence of cell-specific markers suggested a glial origin for the labeled cells. These results demonstrate that at least some neuronal and astrocytic death in HIV infection occurs by apoptosis. Its stimuli are unknown, but likely candidates include tumor necrosis factor or HIV viral products. Additionally, we hypothesize that apoptotic death of reactive astrocytes may be a normal mechanism whereby the brain removes an excess number of astrocytes that have proliferated after certain types of brain injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 PMID:7747806

  4. Hox proteins: sculpting body parts by activating localized cell death.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Claudio R

    2002-11-19

    Hox proteins shape animal structures by eliciting different developmental programs along the anteroposterior body axis. A recent study reveals that the Drosophila Hox protein Deformed directly activates the cell-death-promoting gene reaper to maintain the boundaries between distinct head segments.

  5. Bortezomib induces autophagic death in proliferating human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, Daniela; Veschini, Lorenzo; Foglieni, Chiara; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ferrarini, Marina; Ferrero, Elisabetta

    2010-04-01

    The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), thanks to its ability to induce MM cell apoptosis. Moreover, Bortezomib has antiangiogenic properties. We report that endothelial cells (EC) exposed to Bortezomib undergo death to an extent that depends strictly on their activation state. Indeed, while quiescent EC are resistant to Bortezomib, the drug results maximally toxic in EC switched toward angiogenesis with FGF, and exerts a moderate effect on subconfluent HUVEC. Moreover, EC activation state deeply influences the death pathway elicited by Bortezomib: after treatment, angiogenesis-triggered EC display typical features of apoptosis. Conversely, death of subconfluent EC is preceded by ROS generation and signs typical of autophagy, including intense cytoplasmic vacuolization with evidence of autophagosomes at electron microscopy, and conversion of the cytosolic MAP LC3 I form toward the autophagosome-associated LC3 II form. Treatment with the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevents both LC3 I/LC3 II conversion and HUVEC cell death. Finally, early removal of Bortezomib is accompanied by the recovery of cell shape and viability. These findings strongly suggest that Bortezomib induces either apoptosis or autophagy in EC; interfering with the autophagic response may potentiate the antiangiogenic effect of the drug.

  6. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lee J.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy. PMID:21258649

  7. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Purpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos.

    Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  8. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  9. Defective TFH Cell Function and Increased TFR Cells Contribute to Defective Antibody Production in Aging.

    PubMed

    Sage, Peter T; Tan, Catherine L; Freeman, Gordon J; Haigis, Marcia; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2015-07-14

    Defective antibody production in aging is broadly attributed to immunosenescence. However, the precise immunological mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the ratio of inhibitory T follicular regulatory (TFR) cells to stimulatory T follicular helper (TFH) cells in aged mice. Aged TFH and TFR cells are phenotypically distinct from those in young mice, exhibiting increased programmed cell death protein-1 expression but decreased ICOS expression. Aged TFH cells exhibit defective antigen-specific responses, and programmed cell death protein-ligand 1 blockade can partially rescue TFH cell function. In contrast, young and aged TFR cells have similar suppressive capacity on a per-cell basis in vitro and in vivo. Together, these studies reveal mechanisms contributing to defective humoral immunity in aging: an increase in suppressive TFR cells combined with impaired function of aged TFH cells results in reduced T-cell-dependent antibody responses in aged mice.

  10. Metal-accelerated oxidation in plant cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M. )

    1993-05-01

    Cadmium and mercury toxicity is further enhanced by external oxidizing conditions O[sub 3] or inherent plant processes. Lepidium sativum L, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., or Phaseolus vulgaris L, were grown inpeat-lite to maturity under continuous cadmium exposure followed by one oxidant (O[sub 3]-6 hr. 30 pphm) exposure, with or without foliar calcium pretreatments. In comparison, Daucus carota, L and other species grown in a 71-V suspension, with or without 2,4-D were exposed continuously to low levels of methylmercury during exponential growth and analyzed in aggregates of distinct populations. Proteins were extracted and analyzed. Mechanisms of toxicity and eventual cell death are Ca-mediated and involve chloroplast, stomatal-water relations and changes in oxidant-anti-oxidant components in cells. Whether the metal-accelerated oxidative damage proceeds to cell death, depends on the species and its differential biotransformation system and cell association component.

  11. Autophagy and Tubular Cell Death in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Havasi, Andrea; Dong, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Many common renal insults such as ischemia and toxic injury primarily target the tubular epithelial cells, especially the highly metabolically active proximal tubular segment. Tubular epithelial cells are particularly dependent on autophagy to maintain homeostasis and respond to stressors. The pattern of autophagy in the kidney has a unique spatial and chronologic signature. Recent evidence has shown that there is complex cross-talk between autophagy and various cell death pathways. This review specifically discusses the interplay between autophagy and cell death in the renal tubular epithelia. It is imperative to review this topic because recent discoveries have improved our mechanistic understanding of the autophagic process and have highlighted its broad clinical applications, making autophagy a major target for drug development. PMID:27339383

  12. Ceramide Synthase-dependent Ceramide Generation and Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Thomas D.; Jenkins, Russell W.; Clarke, Christopher J.; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2011-01-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide has been widely implicated in the regulation of programmed cell death or apoptosis. The accumulation of ceramide has been demonstrated in a wide variety of experimental models of apoptosis and in response to a myriad of stimuli and cellular stresses. However, the detailed mechanisms of its generation and regulatory role during apoptosis are poorly understood. We sought to determine the regulation and roles of ceramide production in a model of ultraviolet light-C (UV-C)-induced programmed cell death. We found that UV-C irradiation induces the accumulation of multiple sphingolipid species including ceramide, dihydroceramide, sphingomyelin, and hexosylceramide. Late ceramide generation was also found to be regulated by Bcl-xL, Bak, and caspases. Surprisingly, inhibition of de novo synthesis using myriocin or fumonisin B1 resulted in decreased overall cellular ceramide levels basally and in response to UV-C, but only fumonisin B1 inhibited cell death, suggesting the presence of a ceramide synthase (CerS)-dependent, sphingosine-derived pool of ceramide in regulating programmed cell death. We found that this pool did not regulate the mitochondrial pathway, but it did partially regulate activation of caspase-7 and, more importantly, was necessary for late plasma membrane permeabilization. Attempting to identify the CerS responsible for this effect, we found that combined knockdown of CerS5 and CerS6 was able to decrease long-chain ceramide accumulation and plasma membrane permeabilization. These data identify a novel role for CerS and the sphingosine salvage pathway in regulating membrane permeability in the execution phase of programmed cell death. PMID:21388949

  13. Enhancement of activation-induced cell death by fibronectin in murine CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, E; Kina, T; Katsura, Y; Tadakuma, T

    1998-01-01

    Development of T cells in the thymus is achieved through the interactions of thymocytes with their microenvironments. This study focused on the function of fibronectin (FN), a major extracellular matrix molecule in the thymus, in the cell death induced by activation via the T-cell antigen receptor. FN alone did not increase cell death in murine thymocytes above the baseline level, but it significantly enhanced the cell death induced by fixed anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), especially when a high concentration of anti-CD3 mAb was used. DNA fragmentation increased in parallel with cell death, indicating that cell death was a result of the apoptosis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis revealed that the activation-induced cell death (AICD) caused by anti-CD3 mAb alone, or by a combination of anti-CD3 mAb and FN, occurred selectively in CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes. Very late activation antigen (VLA)-4 and VLA-5 are two major ligands to FN on thymocytes. The expression of both ligands was investigated at different stages of thymocyte development. VLA-4 was predominantly expressed at the CD4- CD8- stage, and thereafter the expression was reduced, whereas VLA-5 was constantly expressed during maturation. Furthermore, the enhancing effect by FN was inhibited in the presence of the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro (GRGDSP) peptide but not in the presence of the connecting segment-1 (CS-1) peptide, suggesting that enhancement of AICD observed in CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes is mediated through VLA-5. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9893044

  14. Anoikis: a necessary death program for anchorage-dependent cells.

    PubMed

    Chiarugi, Paola; Giannoni, Elisa

    2008-12-01

    Cell to matrix adhesion is a key factor for cellular homeostasis and disruption of such interaction has adverse effects on cell survival. It leads to a specific type of apoptosis known as "anoikis" in most non-transformed cell types. This kind of apoptosis following loss of cell anchorage is important for development, tissue homeostasis and several diseases. Integrins sense mechanical forces arising from the matrix, thereby converting these stimuli to downstream signals modulating cell viability. Anchorage-independent growth is a crucial step during tumorigenesis and in particular during the metastatic spreading of cancer cells. The disruption of the tight control leading an "homeless" cell to death is therefore able to violate the cell defences against transformation. This review analyses the recent investigations into the molecular mechanisms governing anoikis, discussing the different ways in which adhesion can influence this process and addressing the relevance of this unique apoptosis mode in the development of metastatic cancers, as well as in other diseases.

  15. Induction of morphological changes in death-induced cancer cells monitored by holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    El-Schich, Zahra; Mölder, Anna; Tassidis, Helena; Härkönen, Pirkko; Falck Miniotis, Maria; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2015-03-01

    We are using the label-free technique of holographic microscopy to analyze cellular parameters including cell number, confluence, cellular volume and area directly in the cell culture environment. We show that death-induced cells can be distinguished from untreated counterparts by the use of holographic microscopy, and we demonstrate its capability for cell death assessment. Morphological analysis of two representative cell lines (L929 and DU145) was performed in the culture flasks without any prior cell detachment. The two cell lines were treated with the anti-tumour agent etoposide for 1-3days. Measurements by holographic microscopy showed significant differences in average cell number, confluence, volume and area when comparing etoposide-treated with untreated cells. The cell volume of the treated cell lines was initially increased at early time-points. By time, cells decreased in volume, especially when treated with high doses of etoposide. In conclusion, we have shown that holographic microscopy allows label-free and completely non-invasive morphological measurements of cell growth, viability and death. Future applications could include real-time monitoring of these holographic microscopy parameters in cells in response to clinically relevant compounds.

  16. Increases in Fentanyl-Related Overdose Deaths - Florida and Ohio, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Alexis B; Gladden, R Matthew; Delcher, Chris; Spies, Erica; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Wang, Yanning; Halpin, John; Zibbell, Jon; McCarty, Carolyn Lullo; DeFiore-Hyrmer, Jolene; DiOrio, Mary; Goldberger, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    In March and October 2015, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and CDC issued nationwide alerts identifying fentanyl, particularly illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF), as a threat to public health and safety (1,2). IMF is pharmacologically similar to pharmaceutical fentanyl (PF), but is unlawfully produced in clandestine laboratories, obtained via illicit drug markets, and includes fentanyl analogs. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 50-100 times more potent than morphine and approved for the management of surgical/postoperative pain, severe chronic pain, and breakthrough cancer pain.* DEA's National Forensic Laboratory Information System (NFLIS) collects drug identification results from drug cases analyzed by federal, state, and local forensic laboratories throughout the United States.(†) In 2014, 80% of fentanyl submissions (i.e., drug products obtained by law enforcement that tested positive for fentanyl) in NFLIS were identified from 10 states, including Florida and Ohio (2), and seven of these 10 states reported sharp increases in fentanyl-related overdose deaths (fentanyl deaths) (3). This report presents findings of increased fentanyl deaths during 2013-2015 from investigations conducted by the University of Florida and the Ohio Department of Public Health, in collaboration with CDC. Analyses examined the association between trends in fentanyl-related law enforcement submissions and fentanyl deaths and describes groups at risk for fentanyl death using medical examiner and coroner reports. The marked increases in fentanyl death in Florida and Ohio during 2013-2015 were closely associated with parallel increases in fentanyl submissions, with the largest impact on persons who use heroin, consistent with reports that IMF is commonly mixed with or sold as heroin (1,4). In Ohio, circumstances associated with fentanyl deaths included a current diagnosed mental health disorder(§) and recent release from an institution such as a jail, rehabilitation facility

  17. Deletion of Rb1 induces both hyperproliferation and cell death in murine germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiwen; O'Neal, Julie; Wilson, William C; Mahajan, Nitin; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yinan; Su, Mack Y; Lu, Lan; Skeath, James B; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Tomasson, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    The retinoblastoma gene (RB1) has been implicated as a tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma (MM), yet its role remains unclear because in the majority of cases with 13q14 deletions, un-mutated RB1 remains expressed from the retained allele. To explore the role of Rb1 in MM, we examined the functional consequences of single- and double-copy Rb1 loss in germinal center B cells, the cells of origin of MM. We generated mice without Rb1 function in germinal center B cells by crossing Rb1(Flox/Flox) with C-γ-1-Cre (Cγ1) mice expressing the Cre recombinase in class-switched B cells in a p107(-/-) background to prevent p107 from compensating for Rb1 loss (Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-)). All mice developed normally, but B cells with two copies of Rb1 deleted (Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-)) exhibited increased proliferation and cell death compared with Cγ1-Rb1(+/+)-p107(-/-) controls ex vivo. In vivo, Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-) mice had a lower percentage of splenic B220+ cells and reduced numbers of bone marrow antigen-specific secreting cells compared with control mice. Our data indicate that Rb1 loss induces both cell proliferation and death in germinal center B cells. Because no B-cell malignancies developed after 1 year of observation, our data also suggest that Rb1 loss is not sufficient to transform post-germinal center B cells and that additional, specific mutations are likely required to cooperate with Rb1 loss to induce malignant transformation.

  18. Imipramine protects mouse hippocampus against tunicamycin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Oyagi, Atsushi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in various diseases. Recently, some reports have suggested that the sigma-1 receptor may play a role in ER stress, and many antidepressants have a high affinity for the sigma-1 receptor. In the present study, we focused on imipramine, a widely used antidepressant, and investigated whether it might protect against the neuronal cell death induced by tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer. In mouse cultured hippocampal HT22 cells, imipramine inhibited cell death and caspase-3 activation induced by tunicamycin, although it did not alter the elevated expressions of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). Interestingly, in such cells application of imipramine normalized the expression of the sigma-1 receptor, which was decreased by treatment with tunicamycin alone. Additionally, NE-100, a selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, abolished the protective effect of imipramine against such tunicamycin-induced cell death. Imipramine inhibited the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by tunicamycin, and NE-100 blocked this modulating effect of imipramine. Furthermore, in anesthetized mice intracerebroventricular administration of tunicamycin decreased the number of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, particularly in the CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) areas, and 7 days' imipramine treatment (10mg/kg/day; i.p.) significantly suppressed these reductions in CA1 and DG. These findings suggest that imipramine protects against ER stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Such protection may be partly due to the sigma-1 receptor.

  19. Further deliberating the relationship between do-not-resuscitate and the increased risk of death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Yuan; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Lin, Kuan-Han; Wu, Chau-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined the outcome of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) patients in surgical intensive care units (SICUs). This study deliberated the association between a DNR decision and the increased risk of death methodologically and ethically. This study was conducted in three SICUs. We collected patients’ demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, and the status of death/survival at SICU and hospital discharge. We used Kaplan–Meier survival curves to compare the time from SICU admission to the end of SICU stay for the DNR and non-DNR patients. Differences in the Kaplan-Meier curves were tested using log-rank tests. We also conducted a Cox proportional hazards model to account for the effect of a DNR decision on mortality. We found that having a DNR order was associated with an increased risk of death during the SICU stay (aRR = 2.39, p < 0.01) after adjusting for severity of illness upon SICU admission and other confounding variables. To make the conclusion that a DNR order is causally related to an increased risk of death, or that a DNR order increases the risk of death is absolutely questionable. By clarifying this key point, we expect that the discussion of DNR between healthcare professionals and patients/surrogate decision-makers will not be hampered or delayed. PMID:26987301

  20. Breast cancer patients with dense breasts do not have increased death risk

    Cancer.gov

    High mammographic breast density, which is a marker of increased risk of developing breast cancer, does not seem to increase the risk of death among breast cancer patients, according to a study led by Gretchen L. Gierach, Ph.D., NCI. Image shows physician

  1. Activation-Induced Cell Death of Dendritic Cells Is Dependent on Sphingosine Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebs, Anja; Friesen, Olga; Katzy, Elisabeth; Ferreirós, Nerea; Pfeilschifter, Josef M.; Radeke, Heinfried H.

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an immune modulatory lipid mediator and has been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes. S1P is produced by sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) and Sphk2. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central for the direction of immune responses and crucially involved in autoimmunity and cancerogenesis. In this study we examined the function and survival of bone marrow-derived DCs under long-term inflammatory stimulation. We observed that differentiated cells undergo activation-induced cell death (AICD) upon LPS stimulation with an increased metabolic activity shortly after stimulation, followed by a rapid activation of caspase 3 and subsequent augmented apoptosis. Importantly, we highlight a profound role of Sphk1 in secretion of inflammatory cytokines and survival of dendritic cells that might be mediated by a change in sphingolipid levels as well as by a change in STAT3 expression. Cell growth during differentiation of Sphk1-deficient cells treated with the functional S1P receptor antagonist FTYP was reduced. Importantly, in dendritic cells we did not observe a compensatory regulation of Sphk2 mRNA in Sphk1-deficient cells. Instead, we discovered a massive increase in Sphk1 mRNA concentration upon long-term stimulation with LPS in wild type cells that might function as an attempt to rescue from inflammation-caused cell death. Taken together, in this investigation we describe details of a crucial involvement of sphingolipids and Sphk1 in AICD during long-term immunogenic activity of DCs that might play an important role in autoimmunity and might explain the differences in immune response observed in in vivo studies of Sphk1 modulation. PMID:27148053

  2. Mechanism of neem limonoids-induced cell death in cancer: Role of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Neelu; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Rahul; Srivastava, Pragya; Sun, Leimin; Rapali, Peter; Marlowe, Timothy; Schneider, Andrea; Inigo, Joseph R; O'Malley, Jordan; Londonkar, Ramesh; Gogada, Raghu; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadava, Nagendra; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that neem limonoids (neem) induce multiple cancer cell death pathways. Here we dissect the underlying mechanisms of neem-induced apoptotic cell death in cancer. We observed that neem-induced caspase activation does not require Bax/Bak channel-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Neem enhanced mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial biomass. While oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) Complex-I activity was decreased, the activities of other OXPHOS complexes including Complex-II and -IV were unaltered. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were associated with an increase in mitochondrial biomass and apoptosis upon neem exposure. Complex-I deficiency due to the loss of Ndufa1-encoded MWFE protein inhibited neem-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, but cell death induction was enhanced. Complex II-deficiency due to the loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) robustly decreased caspase activation, apoptosis, and cell death. Additionally, the ablation of Complexes-I, -III, -IV, and -V together did not inhibit caspase activation. Together, we demonstrate that neem limonoids target OXPHOS system to induce cancer cell death, which does not require upregulation or activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  3. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  4. A Conserved Core of Programmed Cell Death Indicator Genes Discriminates Developmentally and Environmentally Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Van Bel, Michiel; Van Hautegem, Tom; Fendrych, Matyáš; Huysmans, Marlies; Simaskova, Maria; van Durme, Matthias; Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana; S Coll, Nuria; Coppens, Frederik; Maere, Steven; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-12-01

    A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively little about the regulation of the diverse types of plant PCD. In part, this deficiency in molecular understanding is caused by the lack of reliable reporters to detect PCD processes. Here, we addressed this issue by using a combination of bioinformatics approaches to identify commonly regulated genes during diverse plant PCD processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the transcriptional signatures of developmentally controlled cell death are largely distinct from the ones associated with environmentally induced cell death. Moreover, different cases of developmental PCD share a set of cell death-associated genes. Most of these genes are evolutionary conserved within the green plant lineage, arguing for an evolutionary conserved core machinery of developmental PCD. Based on this information, we established an array of specific promoter-reporter lines for developmental PCD in Arabidopsis. These PCD indicators represent a powerful resource that can be used in addition to established morphological and biochemical methods to detect and analyze PCD processes in vivo and in planta.

  5. Oxytocin Protects against Stress-Induced Cell Death in Murine Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Sayaka; Wei, Fan-Yan; Matsunaga, Tomomi; Matsunaga, Nanami; Kaitsuka, Taku; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) is a key neuropeptide that regulates maternal behaviors as well as social behaviors in mammals. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that the impairment of Oxt signaling is associated with the disturbance of metabolic homeostasis, resulting in obesity and diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oxt signaling controls metabolic responses is largely unknown. Here, we report that Oxt signaling attenuates the death of pancreatic beta cells in islets exposed to cytotoxic stresses. The protective effect of Oxt was diminished in islets isolated from oxytocin receptor knockout (Oxtr−/−) mice. Oxtr−/− mice developed normally, but exhibited impaired insulin secretion and showed glucose intolerance under a high-fat diet. Mechanistically, the deficiency of Oxtr impaired MAPK/ERK-CREB signaling, which exaggerated the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and ultimately increased the death of beta cells in pancreatic islets under stressed conditions. These results reveal that Oxt protects pancreatic beta cells against death caused by metabolic stress, and Oxt signaling may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27143105

  6. DIETARY PHYTOCHEMICALS INDUCE p53- AND CASPASE-INDEPENDENT CELL DEATH IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Bentley, J. Nicole; Laird, Melissa D.; Singh, Nagendra; Vender, John R.; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most prevalent pediatric solid tumor and a leading cause of cancer-related death in children. In the present study, a novel cytotoxic role for the dietary compounds, curcumin, andrographolide, wedelolactone, dibenzoylmethane, and tanshinone IIA was identified in human S-type NB cells, SK-N-AS and SK-N-BE(2). Mechanistically, cell death appeared apoptotic by flow cytometry; however, these effects proceeded independently from both caspase-3 and p53 activation, as assessed by both genetic (shRNA) and pharmacological approaches. Notably, cell death induced by both curcumin and andrographolide was associated with decreased NFκB activity and a reduction in Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression. Finally, curcumin and andrographolide increased cytotoxicity following co-treatment with either cisplatin or doxorubicin, two chemotherapeutic agents widely used in the clinical management of NB. Coupled with the documented safety in humans, dietary compounds may represent a potential adjunct therapy for NB. PMID:21704149

  7. Blockade of maitotoxin-induced oncotic cell death reveals zeiosis

    PubMed Central

    Estacion, Mark; Schilling, William P

    2002-01-01

    Background Maitotoxin (MTX) initiates cell death by sequentially activating 1) Ca2+ influx via non-selective cation channels, 2) uptake of vital dyes via formation of large pores, and 3) release of lactate dehydrogenase, an indication of cell lysis. MTX also causes formation of membrane blebs, which dramatically dilate during the cytolysis phase. To determine the role of phospholipase C (PLC) in the cell death cascade, U73122, a specific inhibitor of PLC, and U73343, an inactive analog, were examined on MTX-induced responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Results Addition of either U73122 or U73343, prior to MTX, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cell death cascade (IC50 ≈ 1.9 and 0.66 μM, respectively) suggesting that the effect of these agents was independent of PLC. Addition of U73343 shortly after MTX, prevented or attenuated the effects of the toxin, but addition at later times had little or no effect. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that U73343 dramatically altered the blebbing profile of MTX-treated cells. Specifically, U73343 blocked bleb dilation and converted the initial blebbing event into "zeiosis", a type of membrane blebbing commonly associated with apoptosis. Cells challenged with MTX and rescued by subsequent addition of U73343, showed enhanced caspase-3 activity 48 hr after the initial insult, consistent with activation of the apoptotic program. Conclusions Within minutes of MTX addition, endothelial cells die by oncosis. Rescue by addition of U73343 shortly after MTX showed that a small percentage of cells are destined to die by oncosis, but that a larger percentage survive; cells that survive the initial insult exhibit zeiosis and may ultimately die by apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:11825342

  8. Glycosphingolipids and cell death: One aim, many ways

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Morales, Albert; Fernández-Checa, José C.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a family of bioactive lipids that in addition to their role in the regulation of structural properties of membrane bilayers have emerged as crucial players in many biological processes and signal transduction pathways. Rather than being uniformly distributed within membrane bilayers, GSLs are localized in selective domains called lipid rafts where many signaling platforms operate. One of the most important functions of GSLs, particularly ceramide, is their ability to regulate cell death pathways and hence cell fate. This complex role is accomplished by the ability of GSLs to act in distinct subcellular strategic centers, such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or lysosomes to mediate apoptosis, ER stress, autophagy, lysosomal membrane permeabilization and necroptosis. Hence better understanding the role of GSLs in cell death may be of relevance for a number of pathological processes and diseases, including neurodegeneration, metabolic liver diseases and cancer. PMID:25637183

  9. Melatonin Protects Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Oxidative Stress and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaolian; Sivakumaran, Priyadharshini; Lim, Shiang Y.; Morrison, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have applications in regenerative medicine based on their therapeutic potential to repair and regenerate diseased and damaged tissue. They are commonly subject to oxidative stress during harvest and transplantation, which has detrimental effects on their subsequent viability. By functioning as an antioxidant against free radicals, melatonin may exert cytoprotective effects on ASCs. Methods We cultured human ASCs in the presence of varying dosages of hydrogen peroxide and/or melatonin for a period of 3 hours. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined with propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining under fluorescence microscopy. Results Hydrogen peroxide (1–2.5 mM) treatment resulted in an incremental increase in cell death. 2 mM hydrogen peroxide was thereafter selected as the dose for co-treatment with melatonin. Melatonin alone had no adverse effects on ASCs. Co-treatment of ASCs with melatonin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide protected ASCs from cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and afforded maximal protection at 100 µM (n=4, one-way analysis of variance P<0.001). Melatonin co-treated ASCs displayed significantly fewer apoptotic cells, as demonstrated by condensed and fragmented nuclei under fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions Melatonin possesses cytoprotective properties against oxidative stress in human ASCs and might be a useful adjunct in fat grafting and cell-assisted lipotransfer. PMID:27218020

  10. Megasporogenesis and programmed cell death in Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Papini, Alessio; Mosti, Stefano; Milocani, Eva; Tani, Gabriele; Di Falco, Pietro; Brighigna, Luigi

    2011-10-01

    The degeneration of three of four meiotic products is a very common process in the female gender of oogamous eukaryotes. In Tillandsia (and many other angiosperms), the surviving megaspore has a callose-free wall in chalazal position while the other three megaspores are completely embedded in callose. Therefore, nutrients and signals can reach more easily the functional megaspore from the nucellus through the chalazal pole with respect to the other megaspores. The abortion of three of four megaspores was already recognized as the result of a programmed cell death (PCD) process. We investigated the process to understand the modality of this specific type of PCD and its relationship to the asymmetric callose deposition around the tetrad. The decision on which of the four megaspores will be the supernumerary megaspores in angiosperms, and hence destined to undergo programmed cell death, appears to be linked to the callose layer deposition around the tetrad. During supernumerary megaspores degeneration, events leading to the deletion of the cells do not appear to belong to a single type of cell death. The first morphological signs are typical of autophagy, including the formation of autophagosomes. The TUNEL positivity and a change in morphology of mitochondria and chloroplasts indicate the passage to an apoptotic-like PCD phase, while the cellular remnants undergo a final process resembling at least partially (ER swelling) necrotic morphological syndromes, eventually leading to a mainly lipidic cell corpse still separated from the functional megaspore by a callose layer.

  11. Cell death and survival signalling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tucka, Joanna; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The loss of cells is an important factor in many diseases, including those of the cardiovascular system. Whereas apoptosis is an essential process in development and tissue homeostasis, its occurrence is often associated with various pathologies. Apoptosis of neurons that fail to make appropriate connections is essential for the selection of correct neural signalling in the developing embryo, but its appearance in adults is often associated with neurodegenerative disease. Similarly, in the cardiovascular system, remodeling of the mammalian outflow tract during the transition from a single to dual series circulation with four chambers is accompanied by a precise pattern of cell death, but apoptosis of cardiomyocytes contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury in the heart. In many cases, it is unclear whether apoptosis represents a causative association or merely a consequence of the disease itself. There are many excellent reviews on cell death in the cardiovascular system (1-5); in this review we outline the critical signalling pathways that promote the survival of cardiovascular cells, and their relevance to both physiological cell death and disease.

  12. Seasonal variations of group-specific phytoplankton cell death in Xiamen Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xin; Chen, Jixin; Xiao, Wupeng; Cao, Zhen; Huang, Bangqin

    2016-05-01

    The importance of phytoplankton cell death is being increasingly recognized, however, there are still no published reports on this in Xiamen Bay. In this study, the proportion of dead phytoplankton cells associated with environmental factors was assessed at a station in Xiamen Bay from December 2012 to December 2013, using a cell digestion assay, which is an eff ective method to analyze dead/ living cells in complex natural phytoplankton communities. The percentages of dead cells (% DC) in the total phytoplankton in summer (16%±6%) were lower than those in winter (27%±16%). Six groups of phytoplankton (G1-G6) were categorized by flow cytometry. These phytoplankton communities with diverse seasonal variations in % DC had different responses to environmental constraints. The main factors aff ecting mortality were temperature and salinity, while nutrient concentration showed little influence on phytoplankton death. Additionally, our results provide evidence that chlorophyll a concentrations had an inverse relationship with total phytoplankton % DC and viable cell abundance was more meaningful than total cells to explain variations in environmental parameters (such as Chl a ). Moreover, the lowest mean % DC in total phytoplankton was 16%±6% at our sample site, which is in a subtropical area with high water temperatures, full solar radiation, and rich nutrients. This indicates that phytoplankton cell death is a process that cannot be ignored. In summary, phytoplankton cell death is important in understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and the functioning of subtropical ecosystems.

  13. [Caspases participarion in the cell death induced by GD2-specific monoclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Vishniakova, P A; Doronin, I I; Holodenko, I V; Riazantsev, D Iu; Molotkovskaia, I M; Holodenko, R V

    2014-01-01

    The participation of the main caspases in the cytotoxic effects induced by monoclonal antibody 14G2a specific against tumor-associated ganglioside GD2 was studied in the EL-4 cells. It has been found constitutive expression ofprocaspases genes in the EL-4 cells; incubation of the cells with 14G2a antibodies didnot result in increasing of the procaspases expression. Weak enzymatic activity of caspases has been shown using fluorescent labeled substrates. At the same cell death level, activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the cells incubated with 14G2a was about 7.5- and 3-fold lower than in cells after incubation with staurosporine. Pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, and caspase-3 inhibitor reduced the cytotoxic effects induced by 14G2a at 9-16 and 6-13%, respectively. At the same conditions, pan caspase inhibitor decreased staurosporine-induced apoptosis at 55-65%. Inhibitors of other caspases had no effect on the cell death triggered by the antibodies. Inhibition analysis demonstrated also that caspases did not involved in the cell volume decreasing and permeabilization of the cell plasma membrane, which were the first stages of anti-GD2-mAb-induced cell death in the EL-4 cells. Thus, despite the slight activation of caspases during the cell death induced by antibodies directed to GD2, they do not play a key role and do not determine the mechanism of cell death triggered through the tumor-associated ganglioside GD2. PMID:25898737

  14. Cell Death Pathways in Astrocytes with a Modified Model of Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Liang yu; Cao, Xu; Chu, Xiaofan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) models do not produce sufficiently stable and continuous deprivation to induce cell death in the ischemic core. Therefore, we modified the OGD model to mimic the observed damage in the ischemic core following stroke and utilized this new model to study cell death pathways in astrocytes. The PO2 and pH levels in the astrocyte culture medium were compared between a physical OGD group, a chemical OGD group and a mixed OGD group. The mixed OGD group was able to maintain anaerobic conditions in astrocyte culture medium for 6 h, while the physical and the chemical groups failed to maintain such conditions. Astrocyte viability decreased and LDH release into in the medium increased as a function of exposure to OGD. Compared to the control group, the expression of active caspase-3 in the mixed OGD group increased within 2 h after OGD, but decreased after 2 h of OGD. Additionally, porimin mRNA levels did not significantly increase during the first 2 h of OGD, while bcl-2 mRNA levels decreased at 1 h. However, both porimin and bcl-2 mRNA levels increased after 2 h of OGD; interestingly, they both suddenly decreased at 4 h of OGD. Taken together, these results indicate that apoptosis and oncosis are the two cell death pathways responsible for astrocyte death in the ischemic core. However, the main death pathway varies depending on the OGD period. PMID:23637816

  15. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals. PMID:26605547

  16. Application of hyperthermia in addition to ionizing irradiation fosters necrotic cell death and HMGB1 release of colorectal tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schildkopf, Petra; Frey, Benjamin; Mantel, Frederick; Ott, Oliver J.; Weiss, Eva-Maria; Sieber, Renate; Janko, Christina; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death in developed countries. Tumor therapies should on the one hand aim to stop the proliferation of tumor cells and to kill them, and on the other hand stimulate a specific immune response against residual cancer cells. Dying cells are modulators of the immune system contributing to anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory responses, depending on the respective cell death form. The positive therapeutic effects of temperature-controlled hyperthermia (HT), when combined with ionizing irradiation (X-ray), were the origin to examine whether combinations of X-ray with HT can induce immune activating tumor cell death forms, also characterized by the release of the danger signal HMGB1. Human colorectal tumor cells with differing radiosensitivities were treated with combinations of HT (41.5 {sup o}C for 1 h) and X-ray (5 or 10 Gy). Necrotic cell death was prominent after X-ray and could be further increased by HT. Apoptosis remained quite low in HCT 15 and SW480 cells. X-ray and combinations with HT arrested the tumor cells in the radiosensitive G2 cell cycle phase. The amount of released HMGB1 protein was significantly enhanced after combinatorial treatments in comparison to single ones. We conclude that combining X-ray with HT may induce anti-tumor immunity as a result of the predominant induction of inflammatory necrotic tumor cells and the release of HMGB1.

  17. Cationic polystyrene nanospheres induce autophagic cell death through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hui-Wen; Xia, Tian; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Wan; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Furthermore, NH2-PS could induce autophagic cell death. NH2-PS increased autophagic flux due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by misfolded protein aggregation. The inhibition of ER stress decreased cytotoxicity and autophagy in the NH2-PS-treated cells. In addition, the Akt/mTOR and AMPK signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of NH2-PS-triggered autophagic cell death. These results suggest an important role of autophagy in cationic NP-induced cell death and provide mechanistic insights into the inhibition of the toxicity and safe material design.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung

  18. High glucose induces cell death of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells through the formation of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Lafuente, Nuria; Matesanz, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Llergo, José L; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2001-01-01

    Alterations of the vessel structure, which is mainly determined by smooth muscle cells through cell growth and/or cell death mechanisms, are characteristic of diabetes complications. We analysed the influence of high glucose (22 mM) on cultured human aortic smooth muscle cell growth and death, as hyperglycaemia is considered one of the main factors involved in diabetic vasculopathy. Growth curves were performed over 96 h in medium containing 0.5% foetal calf serum. Cell number increased by 2–4 fold over the culture period in the presence of 5.5 mM (low) glucose, while a 20% reduction in final cell number was observed with high glucose. Under serum-free conditions, cell number remained constant in low glucose cultures, but a 40% decrease was observed in high glucose cultures, suggesting that high glucose may induce increased cell death rather than reduced proliferation. Reduced final cell number induced by high glucose was also observed after stimulation with 5 or 10% foetal calf serum. The possible participation of oxidative stress was investigated by co-incubating high glucose with different reactive oxygen species scavengers. Only catalase reversed the effect of high glucose. Intracellular H2O2 content, visualized with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein and quantified by flow cytometry, was increased after high glucose treatment. To investigate the cell death mechanism induced by high glucose, apoptosis and necrosis were quantified. No differences were observed regarding the apoptotic index between low and high glucose cultures, but lactate dehydrogenase activity was increased in high glucose cultures. In conclusion, high glucose promotes necrotic cell death through H2O2 formation, which may participate in the development of diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:11487505

  19. Intracellular Delivery of Synthetic dsRNA to Leukemic Cells Induces Apoptotic and Necrotic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, S M; Mek, K J; Idris, A

    2016-01-01

    The type of tumour cell death dictates the type of adaptive immune response mounted against the tumours. In haematological malignancies such as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), immune evasion due to the poor immunogenicity of leukemic cells is a major hurdle in generating an effective immune response. Transfection of synthetic dsRNA, poly I:C, into leukemic cells to trigger tumour cell death and enhance immunogenicity of the tumour is a promising immunotherapeutic approach. However, the temporal cell death kinetics of poly I:C-electroporated AML cells has not been thoroughly investigated. Electroporation of U937 cells, a human AML cell line, with a high dose of poly I:C resulted in cytotoxicity as early as 1 h post-transfection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the temporal switch from early apoptosis to late apoptosis/secondary necrosis in poly I:C-electroporated cells in which the nuclear morphology at later time points was consistent with necrotic cell death. Our brief findings demonstrated the temporal cell death kinetics of dsRNA-transfected leukemic cells. This finding is an important development in the field of dsRNA immunotherapy for leukaemia as understanding the type of cell death elicited by transfected dsRNA will dictate the type of immune response to be directed against leukemic cells. PMID:27187041

  20. Programmed cell death and clearance of cell corpses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochen; Yang, Chonglin

    2016-06-01

    Programmed cell death is critical to the development of diverse animal species from C. elegans to humans. In C. elegans, the cell death program has three genetically distinguishable phases. During the cell suicide phase, the core cell death machinery is activated through a protein interaction cascade. This activates the caspase CED-3, which promotes numerous pro-apoptotic activities including DNA degradation and exposure of the phosphatidylserine "eat me" signal on the cell corpse surface. Specification of the cell death fate involves transcriptional activation of the cell death initiator EGL-1 or the caspase CED-3 by coordinated actions of specific transcription factors in distinct cell types. In the cell corpse clearance stage, recognition of cell corpses by phagocytes triggers several signaling pathways to induce phagocytosis of apoptotic cell corpses. Cell corpse-enclosing phagosomes ultimately fuse with lysosomes for digestion of phagosomal contents. This article summarizes our current knowledge about programmed cell death and clearance of cell corpses in C. elegans. PMID:27048817

  1. Cell death induced by the Alternaria mycotoxin Alternariol.

    PubMed

    Bensassi, Fatma; Gallerne, Cindy; Sharaf El Dein, Ossama; Hajlaoui, Mohamed Rabeh; Bacha, Hassen; Lemaire, Christophe

    2012-09-01

    Mycotoxins are unavoidable contaminants of most foods and feeds, and some are known to be detrimental to human health. It is thus worthwhile to understand how cells of the intestinal system, one of the primary targets of these toxins, respond to their toxic effects. In this study, human colon carcinoma cells were used to elucidate the cell death mode and the pathways triggered by Alternariol (AOH), the most important mycotoxin produced by Alternaria species, which are the most common mycoflora infecting small grain cereals worldwide. Treatment of cells with AOH resulted in a loss of cell viability by inducing apoptosis. AOH-induced apoptosis was mediated through a mitochondria-dependent pathway, characterized by a p53 activation, an opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), a downstream generation of O(2)(*-) and caspase 9 and 3 activation. Besides, deficiency of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax partially protected cells against AOH-induced mitochondrial alterations. In addition, experiments performed on purified mitochondria indicated that AOH does not directly target this organelle to induce cell death. Our results demonstrate for the first time that AOH-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

  2. Cell Wall Invertase Promotes Fruit Set under Heat Stress by Suppressing ROS-Independent Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Offler, Christina E; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Reduced cell wall invertase (CWIN) activity has been shown to be associated with poor seed and fruit set under abiotic stress. Here, we examined whether genetically increasing native CWIN activity would sustain fruit set under long-term moderate heat stress (LMHS), an important factor limiting crop production, by using transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with its CWIN inhibitor gene silenced and focusing on ovaries and fruits at 2 d before and after pollination, respectively. We found that the increase of CWIN activity suppressed LMHS-induced programmed cell death in fruits. Surprisingly, measurement of the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde and the activities of a cohort of antioxidant enzymes revealed that the CWIN-mediated inhibition on programmed cell death is exerted in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner. Elevation of CWIN activity sustained Suc import into fruits and increased activities of hexokinase and fructokinase in the ovaries in response to LMHS Compared to the wild type, the CWIN-elevated transgenic plants exhibited higher transcript levels of heat shock protein genes Hsp90 and Hsp100 in ovaries and HspII17.6 in fruits under LMHS, which corresponded to a lower transcript level of a negative auxin responsive factor IAA9 but a higher expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene ToFZY6 in fruits at 2 d after pollination. Collectively, the data indicate that CWIN enhances fruit set under LMHS through suppression of programmed cell death in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner that could involve enhanced Suc import and catabolism, HSP expression, and auxin response and biosynthesis. PMID:27462084

  3. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  4. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness.

  5. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma Protect Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Tam-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Brian J.; Regan Anderson, Tarah M.; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Ostrander, Julie H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  6. [Selective "death programs" or pleiotropic"life programs"? Looking for programmed cell death in the light of evolution].

    PubMed

    Ameisen, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution", wrote Theodosius Dobzhansky, one of the founders of the Modern Synthesis that led to the unification of evolutionary theory and genetics in the midst of the 20th century. Programmed cell death is a genetically regulated process of cell suicide that is central to the development, homeostasis and integrity of multicellular organisms. Conversely, the dysregulation of mechanisms controlling cell suicide plays a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of diseases. While great progress has been achieved in the unveiling of the molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death, a new, and somehow puzzling level of complexity has recently begun to emerge, suggesting i) that several different self destruction pathways may exist and operate in parallel in our cells, and ii) that molecular effectors of cell suicide might also perform other functions unrelated to cell death induction and crucial to cell survival, such as cell differentiation, metabolism, and the regulation of the cell cycle. These new findings, with important physiopathological and therapeutic implications, seem at odds with the paradigm of programmed cell death derived from the studies of Caenorhabditis elegans, which led to the concept of the existence of selective, bona fide death genes that emerged and became selected for their sole capacity to execute or repress cell death. In this review, I will argue that this new level of complexity might only make sense and be understood when considered in a broader evolutionary context than that of our phylogenetic divergence from C. elegans. A new view of the regulated cell death pathways emerges when one attempts to ask the question of when and how they may have become selected during a timeline of 4 billion years, at the level of ancestral single-celled organisms, including the bacteria. I will argue that there may be no such thing as a bona fide genetic cell death program. Rather, in the framework of

  7. 1-Methylnicotinamide ameliorates lipotoxicity-induced oxidative stress and cell death in kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Kume, Shinji; Araki, Hisazumi; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Free fatty acid-bound albumin (FFA-albumin)-related oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of proximal tubular cell (PTC) damage and subsequent renal dysfunction in patients with refractory proteinuria. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has recently been focused on as a novel therapeutic target for several modern diseases, including diabetes. This study was designed to identify a novel molecule in NAD metabolism to protect PTCs from lipotoxicity-related oxidative stress. Among 19 candidate enzymes involved in mammalian NAD metabolism, the mRNA expression level of nicotinamide n-methyltransferase (NNMT) was significantly increased in both the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice and cultured PTCs stimulated with palmitate-albumin. Knockdown of NNMT exacerbated palmitate-albumin-induced cell death in cultured PTCs, whereas overexpression of NNMT inhibited it. Intracellular concentration of 1-Methylnicotinamide (1-MNA), a metabolite of NNMT, increased and decreased in cultured NNMT-overexpressing and -knockdown PTCs, respectively. Treatment with 1-MNA inhibited palmitate-albumin-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and cell death in cultured PTCs. Furthermore, oral administration of 1-MNA ameliorated oxidative stress, apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice. In conclusion, NNMT-derived 1-MNA can reduce lipotoxicity-mediated oxidative stress and cell damage in PTCs. Supplementation of 1-MNA may have potential as a new therapy in patients with refractory proteinuria.

  8. Glucose Levels in Culture Medium Determine Cell Death Mode in MPP+-treated Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, So-Young

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) causes caspase-independent, non-apoptotic death of dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cells. Here, we specifically examined whether change of glucose concentration in culture medium may play a role for determining cell death modes of DA neurons following MPP+ treatment. By incubating MN9D cells in medium containing varying concentrations of glucose (5~35 mM), we found that cells underwent a distinct cell death as determined by morphological and biochemical criteria. At 5~10 mM glucose concentration (low glucose levels), MPP+ induced typical of the apoptotic dell death accompanied with caspase activation and DNA