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Sample records for increased chemokine signaling

  1. Increased chemokine signaling in a model of HIV1-associated peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bhangoo, Sonia K; Ripsch, Matthew S; Buchanan, David J; Miller, Richard J; White, Fletcher A

    2009-08-12

    Painful distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common neurological complication of HIV1 infection. Although infection with the virus itself is associated with an incidence of DSP, patients are more likely to become symptomatic following initiation of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) treatment. The chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1/CCL2) and stromal derived factor-1 (SDF1/CXCL12) and their respective receptors, CCR2 and CXCR4, have been implicated in HIV1 related neuropathic pain mechanisms including NRTI treatment in rodents. Utilizing a rodent model that incorporates the viral coat protein, gp120, and the NRTI, 2'3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC), we examined the degree to which chemokine receptor signaling via CCR2 and CXCR4 potentially influences the resultant chronic hypernociceptive behavior. We observed that following unilateral gp120 sciatic nerve administration, rats developed profound tactile hypernociception in the hindpaw ipsilateral to gp120 treatment. Behavioral changes were also present in the hindpaw contralateral to the injury, albeit delayed and less robust. Using immunohistochemical studies, we demonstrated that MCP1 and CCR2 were upregulated by primary sensory neurons in lumbar ganglia by post-operative day (POD) 14. The functional nature of these observations was confirmed using calcium imaging in acutely dissociated lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) derived from gp120 injured rats at POD 14. Tactile hypernociception in gp120 treated animals was reversed following treatment with a CCR2 receptor antagonist at POD 14. Some groups of animals were subjected to gp120 sciatic nerve injury in combination with an injection of ddC at POD 14. This injury paradigm produced pronounced bilateral tactile hypernociception from POD 14-48. More importantly, functional MCP1/CCR2 and SDF1/CXCR4 signaling was present in sensory neurons. In contrast to gp120 treatment alone, the hypernociceptive behavior associated with the injury

  2. Chemokine Oligomerization in Cell Signaling and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Sharp, Joshua S.; Handel, Tracy M.; Prestegard, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins best known for their role in controlling the migration of diverse cells, particularly leukocytes. Upon binding to their G-protein-coupled receptors on the leukocytes, chemokines stimulate the signaling events that cause cytoskeletal rearrangements involved in cell movement, and migration of the cells along chemokine gradients. Depending on the cell type, chemokines also induce many other types of cellular responses including those related to defense mechanisms, cell proliferation, survival, and development. Historically, most research efforts have focused on the interaction of chemokines with their receptors, where monomeric forms of the ligands are the functionally relevant state. More recently, however, the importance of chemokine interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans has come to light, and in most cases appears to involve oligomeric chemokine structures. This review summarizes existing knowledge relating to the structure and function of chemokine oligomers, and emerging methodology for determining structures of complex chemokine assemblies in the future. PMID:23663982

  3. Lack of Chemokine Signaling through CXCR5 Causes Increased Mortality, Ventricular Dilatation and Deranged Matrix during Cardiac Pressure Overload

    PubMed Central

    Waehre, Anne; Husberg, Cathrine; Sjaastad, Ivar; Nygård, Ståle; Dahl, Christen P.; Ahmed, M. Shakil; Finsen, Alexandra V.; Reims, Henrik; Louch, William E.; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Vinge, Leif E.; Roald, Borghild; Attramadal, Håvard; Lipp, Martin; Gullestad, Lars; Aukrust, Pål; Christensen, Geir

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Inflammatory mechanisms have been suggested to play a role in the development of heart failure (HF), but a role for chemokines is largely unknown. Based on their role in inflammation and matrix remodeling in other tissues, we hypothesized that CXCL13 and CXCR5 could be involved in cardiac remodeling during HF. Objective We sought to analyze the role of the chemokine CXCL13 and its receptor CXCR5 in cardiac pathophysiology leading to HF. Methods and Results Mice harboring a systemic knockout of the CXCR5 (CXCR5−/−) displayed increased mortality during a follow-up of 80 days after aortic banding (AB). Following three weeks of AB, CXCR5−/− developed significant left ventricular (LV) dilatation compared to wild type (WT) mice. Microarray analysis revealed altered expression of several small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) that bind to collagen and modulate fibril assembly. Protein levels of fibromodulin, decorin and lumican (all SLRPs) were significantly reduced in AB CXCR5−/− compared to AB WT mice. Electron microscopy revealed loosely packed extracellular matrix with individual collagen fibers and small networks of proteoglycans in AB CXCR5−/− mice. Addition of CXCL13 to cultured cardiac fibroblasts enhanced the expression of SLRPs. In patients with HF, we observed increased myocardial levels of CXCR5 and SLRPs, which was reversed following LV assist device treatment. Conclusions Lack of CXCR5 leads to LV dilatation and increased mortality during pressure overload, possibly via lack of an increase in SLRPs. This study demonstrates a critical role of the chemokine CXCL13 and CXCR5 in survival and maintaining of cardiac structure upon pressure overload, by regulating proteoglycans essential for correct collagen assembly. PMID:21533157

  4. Chemokine signaling: rules of attraction.

    PubMed

    Schier, Alexander F

    2003-03-04

    The chemokine SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 control cell migration in the immune and nervous systems. Recent studies in zebrafish have shown that SDF-1 and CXCR4 also guide the migration of germ cells and sensory organs of the lateral line.

  5. HIV persistence: Chemokines and their signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Vanessa A.; Khoury, Gabriela; Saleh, Suha; Cameron, Paul U.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2014-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4+ T cells are the major barrier to curing HIV. We have recently demonstrated that chemokines, which bind to the chemokine receptors CCR7, CXCR3 and CCR6, facilitate efficient HIV nuclear localisation and integration in resting CD4+ T cells, leading to latency. As latently infected cells are enriched in lymphoid tissues, where chemokines are highly concentrated, this may provide a mechanism for the generation of latently infected cells in vivo. Here we review the role of chemokines in HIV persistence; the main signalling pathways that are involved; and how these pathways may be exploited to develop novel strategies to reduce or eliminate latently infected cells. PMID:22749173

  6. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  7. CXCR4 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Painful Diabetic Neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating syndrome present in a quarter of diabetic patients that has a substantial impact on their quality of life. Despite this significant prevalence and impact, current therapies for PDN are only partially effective. Moreover, the cellular mechanisms underlying PDN are not well understood. Neuropathic pain is caused by a variety of phenomena including sustained excitability in sensory neurons that reduces the pain threshold so that pain is produced in the absence of appropriate stimuli. Chemokine signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain in a variety of animal models. We therefore tested the hypothesis that chemokine signaling mediates DRG neuronal hyperexcitability in association with PDN. Results We demonstrated that intraperitoneal administration of the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 reversed PDN in two animal models of type II diabetes. Furthermore DRG sensory neurons acutely isolated from diabetic mice displayed enhanced SDF-1 induced calcium responses. Moreover, we demonstrated that CXCR4 receptors are expressed by a subset of DRG sensory neurons. Finally, we observed numerous CXCR4 expressing inflammatory cells infiltrating into the DRG of diabetic mice. Conclusions These data suggest that CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling mediates enhanced calcium influx and excitability in DRG neurons responsible for PDN. Simultaneously, CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling may coordinate inflammation in diabetic DRG that could contribute to the development of pain in diabetes. Therefore, targeting CXCR4 chemokine receptors may represent a novel intervention for treating PDN. PMID:24961298

  8. Timely interaction between prostaglandin and chemokine signaling is a prerequisite for successful fertilization.

    PubMed

    Tamba, Shigero; Yodoi, Rieko; Segi-Nishida, Eri; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Narumiya, Shuh; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2008-09-23

    Timely interaction between the egg and sperm is required for successful fertilization; however, little is known about the signaling therein. Prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2-deficient (Ptger2(-/-)) female mice exhibit a severe fertilization defect. We investigated the molecular events leading to this failure. We found increased gene expression for chemokines, such as Ccl2, Ccl7, and Ccl9, in Ptger2(-/-) cumulus cells (the somatic cells surrounding the egg) compared with wild-type cells. Furthermore, under physiological conditions, cumulus-derived chemokine signaling was found to have a dual action; CCL7 facilitates sperm migration to the cumulus-egg complex and integrin-mediated cumulus extracellular matrix (ECM) assembly to protect eggs. However, in the absence of PGE(2)-EP2 signaling, chronic CCL7 signaling results in excessive integrin engagement to the ECM, making the cumulus ECM resistant to sperm hyaluronidase, thereby preventing sperm penetration. Our findings indicate that PGE(2)-EP2 signaling negatively regulates the autocrine action of chemokines and prevents excessive cumulus ECM assembly. This interaction between PG and chemokine signaling is required for successful fertilization.

  9. Chemokines induce axon outgrowth downstream of Hepatocyte Growth Factor and TCF/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Deepshikha; Náger, Mireia; Camats, Judith; David, Monica; Benguria, Alberto; Dopazo, Ana; Cantí, Carles; Herreros, Judit

    2013-01-01

    Axon morphogenesis is a complex process regulated by a variety of secreted molecules, including morphogens and growth factors, resulting in the establishment of the neuronal circuitry. Our previous work demonstrated that growth factors [Neurotrophins (NT) and Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF)] signal through β-catenin during axon morphogenesis. HGF signaling promotes axon outgrowth and branching by inducing β-catenin phosphorylation at Y142 and transcriptional regulation of T-Cell Factor (TCF) target genes. Here, we asked which genes are regulated by HGF signaling during axon morphogenesis. An array screening indicated that HGF signaling elevates the expression of chemokines of the CC and CXC families. In line with this, CCL7, CCL20, and CXCL2 significantly increase axon outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. Experiments using blocking antibodies and chemokine receptor antagonists demonstrate that chemokines act downstream of HGF signaling during axon morphogenesis. In addition, qPCR data demonstrates that CXCL2 and CCL5 expression is stimulated by HGF through Met/b-catenin/TCF pathway. These results identify CC family members and CXCL2 chemokines as novel regulators of axon morphogenesis downstream of HGF signaling. PMID:23641195

  10. Activated platelets signal chemokine synthesis by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; Elstad, M R; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Morrissey, J H; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1996-01-01

    Human blood monocytes adhere rapidly and for prolonged periods to activated platelets that display P-selectin, an adhesion protein that recognizes a specific ligand on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein-1. We previously demonstrated that P-selectin regulates expression and secretion of cytokines by stimulated monocytes when it is presented in a purified, immobilized form or by transfected cells. Here we show that thrombin-activated platelets induce the expression and secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 by monocytes. Enhanced monokine synthesis requires engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein-1 on the leukocyte by P-selectin on the platelet. Secretion of the chemokines is not, however, directly signaled by P-selectin; instead, tethering of the monocytes by P-selectin is required for their activation by RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed presumed secreted), a platelet chemokine not previously known to induce immediate-early gene products in monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to activated platelets results in nuclear translocation of p65 (RelA), a component of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors that binds kappaB sequences in the regulatory regions of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-8, and other immediate-early genes. However, expression of tissue factor, a coagulation protein that also has a kappaB sequence in the 5' regulatory region of its gene, is not induced in monocytes adherent to activated platelets. Thus, contact of monocytes with activated platelets differentially affects the expression of monocyte products. These experiments suggest that activated platelets regulate chemokine secretion by monocytes in inflammatory lesions in vivo and provide a model for the study of gene regulation in cell-cell interactions. PMID:8617886

  11. Chemokine 25–induced signaling suppresses colon cancer invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Edwards, Robert; Tucci, Serena; Bu, Pengcheng; Milsom, Jeff; Lee, Sang; Edelmann, Winfried; Gümüs, Zeynep H.; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) can help regulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Here, we show that chemokine 25 (CCL25) and its cognate receptor chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) inhibit colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion and metastasis. We found that CCR9 protein expression levels were highest in colon adenomas and progressively decreased in invasive and metastatic CRCs. CCR9 was expressed in both primary tumor cell cultures and colon-cancer-initiating cell (CCIC) lines derived from early-stage CRCs but not from metastatic CRC. CCL25 stimulated cell proliferation by activating AKT signaling. In vivo, systemically injected CCR9+ early-stage CCICs led to the formation of orthotopic gastrointestinal xenograft tumors. Blocking CCR9 signaling inhibited CRC tumor formation in the native gastrointestinal CCL25+ microenvironment, while increasing extraintestinal tumor incidence. NOTCH signaling, which promotes CRC metastasis, increased extraintestinal tumor frequency by stimulating CCR9 proteasomal degradation. Overall, these data indicate that CCL25 and CCR9 regulate CRC progression and invasion and further demonstrate an appropriate in vivo experimental system to study CRC progression in the native colon microenvironment. PMID:22863617

  12. CXCR3: latest evidence for the involvement of chemokine signaling in bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Genhua; Gao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that chemokines participate in the generation and maintenance of bone cancer pain (BCP). Recent work in Exp Neurol by Guan et al. (2015) demonstrated the involvement of spinal chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its downstream PI3K/Akt and Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathways in BCP. This work provides new evidence to support that chemokines participate in central sensitization in BCP condition. Reviewed evidence suggests that few chemokines have been proved to be related to cancer pain. The underlying relationship between CXCR3 signaling and BCP condition requires further study.

  13. Transmembrane chemokines act as receptors in a novel mechanism termed inverse signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Gebhardt, Henrike; Krossa, Sebastian; Ludwig, Andreas; Lucius, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1/fractalkine and CXCL16 are widely expressed in different types of tumors, often without an appropriate expression of their classical receptors. We observed that receptor-negative cancer cells could be stimulated by the soluble chemokines. Searching for alternative receptors we detected that all cells expressing or transfected with transmembrane chemokine ligands bound the soluble chemokines with high affinity and responded by phosphorylation of intracellular kinases, enhanced proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This activity requires the intracellular domain and apparently the dimerization of the transmembrane chemokine ligand. Thus, shed soluble chemokines can generate auto- or paracrine signals by binding and activating their transmembrane forms. We term this novel mechanism “inverse signaling”. We suppose that inverse signaling is an autocrine feedback and fine-tuning system in the communication between cells that in tumors supports stabilization and proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10820.001 PMID:26796342

  14. Pathway-selective suppression of chemokine receptor signaling in B cells by LPS through downregulation of PLC-β2.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Aiko-Konno; Liao, Fang; Zhang, Hongwei H; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Wu, Dianqing; Farber, Joshua M

    2010-11-01

    Lymphocyte activation leads to changes in chemokine receptor expression. There are limited data, however, on how lymphocyte activators can alter chemokine signaling by affecting downstream pathways. We hypothesized that B cell-activating agents might alter chemokine responses by affecting downstream signal transducers, and that such effects might differ depending on the activator. We found that activating mouse B cells using either anti-IgM or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the surface expression of CCR6 and CCR7 with large increases in chemotaxis to their cognate ligands. By contrast, while anti-IgM also led to enhanced calcium responses, LPS-treated cells showed only small changes in calcium signaling as compared with cells that were freshly isolated. Of particular interest, we found that LPS caused a reduction in the level of B-cell phospholipase C (PLC)-β2 mRNA and protein. Data obtained using PLC-β2(-/-) mice showed that the β2 isoform mediates close to one-half the chemokine-induced calcium signal in resting and anti-IgM-activated B cells, and we found that calcium signals in the LPS-treated cells were boosted by increasing the level of PLC-β2 using transfection, consistent with a functional effect of downregulating PLC-β2. Together, our results show activator-specific effects on responses through B-cell chemokine receptors that are mediated by quantitative changes in a downstream signal-transducing protein, revealing an activity for LPS as a downregulator of PLC-β2, and a novel mechanism for controlling chemokine-induced signals in lymphocytes.

  15. Pathway-selective suppression of chemokine receptor signaling in B cells by LPS through downregulation of PLC-β2

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Aiko-Konno; Liao, Fang; Zhang, Hongwei H; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Wu, Dianqing; Farber, Joshua M

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocyte activation leads to changes in chemokine receptor expression. There are limited data, however, on how lymphocyte activators can alter chemokine signaling by affecting downstream pathways. We hypothesized that B cell-activating agents might alter chemokine responses by affecting downstream signal transducers, and that such effects might differ depending on the activator. We found that activating mouse B cells using either anti-IgM or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the surface expression of CCR6 and CCR7 with large increases in chemotaxis to their cognate ligands. By contrast, while anti-IgM also led to enhanced calcium responses, LPS-treated cells showed only small changes in calcium signaling as compared with cells that were freshly isolated. Of particular interest, we found that LPS caused a reduction in the level of B-cell phospholipase C (PLC)-β2 mRNA and protein. Data obtained using PLC-β2−/− mice showed that the β2 isoform mediates close to one-half the chemokine-induced calcium signal in resting and anti-IgM-activated B cells, and we found that calcium signals in the LPS-treated cells were boosted by increasing the level of PLC-β2 using transfection, consistent with a functional effect of downregulating PLC-β2. Together, our results show activator-specific effects on responses through B-cell chemokine receptors that are mediated by quantitative changes in a downstream signal-transducing protein, revealing an activity for LPS as a downregulator of PLC-β2, and a novel mechanism for controlling chemokine-induced signals in lymphocytes. PMID:20871625

  16. RGS1 regulates myeloid cell accumulation in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm rupture through altered chemokine signalling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jyoti; McNeill, Eileen; Douglas, Gillian; Hale, Ashley B.; de Bono, Joseph; Lee, Regent; Iqbal, Asif J.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Stylianou, Elena; Greaves, David R.; Channon, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine signalling drives monocyte recruitment in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms. The mechanisms that lead to retention and accumulation of macrophages in the vascular wall remain unclear. Regulator of G-Protein Signalling-1 (RGS1) deactivates G-protein signalling, reducing the response to sustained chemokine stimulation. Here we show that Rgs1 is upregulated in atherosclerotic plaque and aortic aneurysms. Rgs1 reduces macrophage chemotaxis and desensitizes chemokine receptor signalling. In early atherosclerotic lesions, Rgs1 regulates macrophage accumulation and is required for the formation and rupture of Angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysms, through effects on leukocyte retention. Collectively, these data reveal a role for Rgs1 in leukocyte trafficking and vascular inflammation and identify Rgs1, and inhibition of chemokine receptor signalling as potential therapeutic targets in vascular disease. PMID:25782711

  17. Differential Modulation of Retinal Degeneration by Ccl2 and Cx3cr1 Chemokine Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Lange, Clemens A.; Robbie, Scott; Munro, Peter M. G.; Cowing, Jill A.; Armer, Hannah E. J.; Luong, Vy; Carvalho, Livia S.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Fitzke, Frederick W.; Bainbridge, James W. B.; Ali, Robin R.

    2012-01-01

    Microglia and macrophages are recruited to sites of retinal degeneration where local cytokines and chemokines determine protective or neurotoxic microglia responses. Defining the role of Ccl2-Ccr2 and Cx3cl1-Cx3cr1 signalling for retinal pathology is of particular interest because of its potential role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ccl2, Ccr2, and Cx3cr1 signalling defects impair macrophage trafficking, but have, in several conflicting studies, been reported to show different degrees of age-related retinal degeneration. Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout (CCDKO) mice show an early onset retinal degeneration and have been suggested as a model for AMD. In order to understand phenotypic discrepancies in different chemokine knockout lines and to study how defects in Ccl2 and/or Cx3cr1 signalling contribute to the described early onset retinal degeneration, we defined primary and secondary pathological events in CCDKO mice. To control for genetic background variability, we compared the original phenotype with that of single Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout mice obtained from backcrosses of CCDKO with C57Bl/6 mice. We found that the primary pathological event in CCDKO mice develops in the inferior outer nuclear layer independently of light around postnatal day P14. RPE and vascular lesions develop secondarily with increasing penetrance with age and are clinically similar to retinal telangiectasia not to choroidal neovascularisation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a third autosomal recessive gene causes the degeneration in CCDKO mice and in all affected re-derived lines and subsequently demonstrated co-segregation of the naturally occurring RD8 mutation in the Crb1 gene. By comparing CCDKO mice with re-derived CCl2−/−/Crb1Rd8/RD8, Cx3cr1−/−/Crb1Rd8/RD8 and CCl2−/−/Cx3cr1−/−/Crb1Rd8/RD8 mice, we observed a differential modulation of the retinal phenotype by genetic background and both chemokine signalling pathways. These findings

  18. The CC-Chemokine RANTES Increases the Attachment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 to Target Cells via Glycosaminoglycans and Also Activates a Signal Transduction Pathway That Enhances Viral Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Trkola, Alexandra; Gordon, Cynthia; Matthews, Jamie; Maxwell, Elizabeth; Ketas, Tom; Czaplewski, Lloyd; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Moore, John P.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the mechanisms by which the CC-chemokine RANTES can enhance the infectivities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other enveloped viruses, when present at concentrations in excess of 500 ng/ml in vitro. Understanding the underlying mechanisms might throw light on fundamental processes of viral infection, in particular for HIV-1. Our principal findings are twofold: firstly, that oligomers of RANTES can cross-link enveloped viruses, including HIV-1, to cells via glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) present on the membranes of both virions and cells; secondly, that oligomers of RANTES interact with cell-surface GAGs to transduce a herbimycin A-sensitive signal which, over a period of several hours, renders the cells more permissive to infection by several viruses, including HIV-1. The enhancement mechanisms require that RANTES oligomerize either in solution or following binding to GAGs, since no viral infectivity enhancement is observed with a mutant form of the RANTES molecule that contains a single-amino-acid change (glutamic acid to serine at position 66) which abrogates oligomerization. PMID:10400729

  19. Pancreatic cancer cell migration and metastasis is regulated by chemokine-biased agonism and bioenergetic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ishan; McAllister, Donna M.; Gorse, Egal; Dixon, Kate; Piper, Clinton T.; Zimmerman, Noah P.; Getschman, Anthony E.; Tsai, Susan; Engle, Dannielle D.; Evans, Douglas B.; Volkman, Brian F.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Dwinell, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) invariably succumb to metastatic disease, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate PDAC cell movement and metastasis remain little understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of the chemokine gene CXCL12, which is silenced in PDAC tumors yet is sufficient to suppress growth and metastasis when re-expressed. Chemokines like CXCL12 regulate cell movement in a biphasic pattern, with peak migration typically in the low nanomolar concentration range. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the biphasic cell migration pattern induced by CXCL12 reflected a bias of agonist bioenergetic signaling that might be exploited to interfere with PDAC metastasis. In human and murine PDAC cell models, we observed that non-migratory doses of CXCL12 were sufficient to decrease oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic capacity and to increase levels of phosphorylated forms of the master metabolic kinase AMPK. Those same doses of CXCL12 locked myosin light chain into a phosphorylated state, thereby decreasing F-actin polymerization and preventing cell migration in a manner dependent upon AMPK and the calcium-dependent kinase CAMKII. Notably, at elevated concentrations of CXCL12 that were insufficient to trigger chemotaxis of PDAC cells, AMPK blockade resulted in increased cell movement. In two preclinical mouse models of PDAC, administration of CXCL12 decreased tumor dissemination, supporting our hypothesis that chemokine-biased agonist signaling may offer a useful therapeutic strategy. Our results offer a mechanistic rationale for further investigation of CXCL12 as a potential therapy to prevent or treat PDAC metastasis. PMID:26330165

  20. Regulation of Chemokine Signal Integration by Activator of G-Protein Signaling 4 (AGS4)

    PubMed Central

    Robichaux, William G.; Branham-O’Connor, Melissa; Hwang, Il-Young; Vural, Ali; Kehrl, Johne H.

    2017-01-01

    Activator of G-protein signaling 4 (AGS4)/G-protein signaling modulator 3 (Gpsm3) contains three G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs, each of which can bind Gαi-GDP free of Gβγ. We previously demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi interaction is regulated by seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7-TMR), which may reflect direct coupling of the GPR-Gαi module to the receptor analogous to canonical Gαβγ heterotrimer. We have demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi complex is regulated by chemokine receptors in an agonist-dependent manner that is receptor-proximal. As an initial approach to investigate the functional role(s) of this regulated interaction in vivo, we analyzed leukocytes, in which AGS4/Gpsm3 is predominantly expressed, from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice. Loss of AGS4/Gpsm3 resulted in mild but significant neutropenia and leukocytosis. Dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and neutrophils from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice also exhibited significant defects in chemoattractant-directed chemotaxis and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. An in vivo peritonitis model revealed a dramatic reduction in the ability of AGS4/Gpsm3-null neutrophils to migrate to primary sites of inflammation. Taken together, these data suggest that AGS4/Gpsm3 is required for proper chemokine signal processing in leukocytes and provide further evidence for the importance of the GPR-Gαi module in the regulation of leukocyte function. PMID:28062526

  1. Chemokine signaling directs trunk lymphatic network formation along the preexisting blood vasculature.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young Ryun; Fujita, Misato; Butler, Matthew; Isogai, Sumio; Kochhan, Eva; Siekmann, Arndt F; Weinstein, Brant M

    2012-04-17

    The lymphatic system is crucial for fluid homeostasis, immune responses, and numerous pathological processes. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for establishing the anatomical form of the lymphatic vascular network remain largely unknown. Here, we show that chemokine signaling provides critical guidance cues directing early trunk lymphatic network assembly and patterning. The chemokine receptors Cxcr4a and Cxcr4b are expressed in lymphatic endothelium, whereas chemokine ligands Cxcl12a and Cxcl12b are expressed in adjacent tissues along which the developing lymphatics align. Loss- and gain-of-function studies in zebrafish demonstrate that chemokine signaling orchestrates the stepwise assembly of the trunk lymphatic network. In addition to providing evidence for a lymphatic vascular guidance mechanism, these results also suggest a molecular basis for the anatomical coalignment of lymphatic and blood vessels.

  2. Epithelial Anion Transport as Modulator of Chemokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rousseau, Simon; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Veit, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of epithelial cells is to secrete and absorb ions and water in order to allow the formation of a luminal fluid compartment that is fundamental for the epithelial function as a barrier against environmental factors. Importantly, epithelial cells also take part in the innate immune system. As a first line of defense they detect pathogens and react by secreting and responding to chemokines and cytokines, thus aggravating immune responses or resolving inflammatory states. Loss of epithelial anion transport is well documented in a variety of diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pancreatitis, and cholestatic liver disease. Here we review the effect of aberrant anion secretion with focus on the release of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells and discuss putative mechanisms linking these transport defects to the augmented epithelial release of chemokines and cytokines. These mechanisms may contribute to the excessive and persistent inflammation in many respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27382190

  3. Epithelial Anion Transport as Modulator of Chemokine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rousseau, Simon; Lukacs, Gergely L; Veit, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of epithelial cells is to secrete and absorb ions and water in order to allow the formation of a luminal fluid compartment that is fundamental for the epithelial function as a barrier against environmental factors. Importantly, epithelial cells also take part in the innate immune system. As a first line of defense they detect pathogens and react by secreting and responding to chemokines and cytokines, thus aggravating immune responses or resolving inflammatory states. Loss of epithelial anion transport is well documented in a variety of diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pancreatitis, and cholestatic liver disease. Here we review the effect of aberrant anion secretion with focus on the release of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells and discuss putative mechanisms linking these transport defects to the augmented epithelial release of chemokines and cytokines. These mechanisms may contribute to the excessive and persistent inflammation in many respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases.

  4. Signal transmission through the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) transmembrane helices

    PubMed Central

    Wescott, Melanie P.; Kufareva, Irina; Paes, Cheryl; Goodman, Jason R.; Thaker, Yana; Puffer, Bridget A.; Berdougo, Eli; Rucker, Joseph B.; Handel, Tracy M.; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    The atomic-level mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular ligand binding events through their transmembrane helices to activate intracellular G proteins remain unclear. Using a comprehensive library of mutations covering all 352 residues of the GPCR CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), we identified 41 amino acids that are required for signaling induced by the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). CXCR4 variants with each of these mutations do not signal properly but remain folded, based on receptor surface trafficking, reactivity to conformationally sensitive monoclonal antibodies, and ligand binding. When visualized on the structure of CXCR4, the majority of these residues form a continuous intramolecular signaling chain through the transmembrane helices; this chain connects chemokine binding residues on the extracellular side of CXCR4 to G protein-coupling residues on its intracellular side. Integrated into a cohesive model of signal transmission, these CXCR4 residues cluster into five functional groups that mediate (i) chemokine engagement, (ii) signal initiation, (iii) signal propagation, (iv) microswitch activation, and (v) G protein coupling. Propagation of the signal passes through a “hydrophobic bridge” on helix VI that coordinates with nearly every known GPCR signaling motif. Our results agree with known conserved mechanisms of GPCR activation and significantly expand on understanding the structural principles of CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27543332

  5. Biased agonism as a mechanism for differential signaling by chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Bassoni, Daniel L; Campbell, James J; Gerard, Norma P; Gerard, Craig; Wehrman, Tom S

    2013-12-06

    Chemokines display considerable promiscuity with multiple ligands and receptors shared in common, a phenomenon that is thought to underlie their biochemical "redundancy." Their receptors are part of a larger seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily, commonly referred to as G protein-coupled receptors, which have been demonstrated to be able to signal with different efficacies to their multiple downstream signaling pathways, a phenomenon referred to as biased agonism. Biased agonism has been primarily reported as a phenomenon of synthetic ligands, and the biologic prevalence and importance of such signaling are unclear. Here, to assess the presence of biased agonism that may underlie differential signaling by chemokines targeting the same receptor, we performed a detailed pharmacologic analysis of a set of chemokine receptors with multiple endogenous ligands using assays for G protein signaling, β-arrestin recruitment, and receptor internalization. We found that chemokines targeting the same receptor can display marked differences in their efficacies for G protein- or β-arrestin-mediated signaling or receptor internalization. This ligand bias correlates with changes in leukocyte migration, consistent with different mechanisms underlying the signaling downstream of these receptors induced by their ligands. These findings demonstrate that biased agonism is a common and likely evolutionarily conserved biological mechanism for generating qualitatively distinct patterns of signaling via the same receptor in response to different endogenous ligands.

  6. [Circulating levels of Th1- and Th2-chemokines increase in patients with early syphilis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Anyou; Wang, Chenchen; Sun, Hong; Han, Hongfang; Wang, Fengchao; Zhang, Lunjun; Hu, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Objective To study the changes of plasma T helper type I (Th1)-and Th2-chemokine levels and analyze their roles in immune response and pathogenesis of early syphilis. Methods Heparin-anticoagulated peripheral blood was collected from 56 patients with early syphilis (primary syphilis, PS, n=22; secondary syphilis, SS, n=34) and healthy controls (HC, n=20). The levels of plasma Th1 chemokines including monokine induced by interferon-γ (MIG), interferon-γ inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC) and Th2 chemokines including thymus-and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) were examined using ELISA. Meanwhile, the levels of plasma cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4 and TNF-α) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected. Results The levels of plasma MIG, IP-10 and TARC, MDC in the patients with PS and SS were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls. Moreover, the level of I-TAC in the patients with SS was significantly higher than that in the healthy controls. In particular, the levels of plasma Th1 chemokines (MIG, IP-10 and I-TAC) in the patients with SS significantly increased compared with those with PS. However, no significant difference was observed in the levels of plasma Th2 chemokines (TARC and MDC) between the patients with PS and SS. The correlation analysis showed that there was an obvious positive correlation between IP-10 and MIG, I-TAC, IFN-γ, TNF-α levels in the patients with early syphilis. Furthermore, the levels of MIG and IP-10 were positively associated with plasma CRP in the patients with early syphilis. Conclusion Both Th1 chemokines and Th2 chemokines are involved in immune response of early syphilis.

  7. Immunopathological Roles of Cytokines, Chemokines, Signaling Molecules, and Pattern-Recognition Receptors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shui-Lian; Kuan, Woon-Pang; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K.; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with unknown etiology affecting more than one million individuals each year. It is characterized by B- and T-cell hyperactivity and by defects in the clearance of apoptotic cells and immune complexes. Understanding the complex process involved and the interaction between various cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the immune pathways will provide valuable information on the development of novel therapeutic targets for treating SLE. In this paper, we review the immunopathological roles of novel cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, PRRs, and their interactions in immunoregulatory networks and suggest how their disturbances may implicate pathological conditions in SLE. PMID:22312407

  8. Neuronal apoptotic signaling pathways probed and intervened by synthetically and modularly modified (SMM) chemokines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Tak; Kaul, Marcus; Kumar, Santosh; Wang, Jun; Kumar, I M Krishna; Dong, Chang-Zhi; An, Jing; Lipton, Stuart A; Huang, Ziwei

    2007-03-09

    As the main coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, CXCR4 and CCR5 play important roles in HIV-associated dementia (HAD). HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 contributes to HAD by causing neuronal damage and death, either directly by triggering apoptotic pathways or indirectly by stimulating glial cells to release neurotoxins. Here, to understand the mechanism of CXCR4 or CCR5 signaling in neuronal apoptosis associated with HAD, we have applied synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokine analogs derived from natural stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha or viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II as chemical probes of the mechanism(s) whereby these SMM-chemokines prevent or promote neuronal apoptosis. We show that inherently neurotoxic natural ligands of CXCR4, such as stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha or viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II, can be modified to protect neurons from apoptosis induced by CXCR4-preferring gp120(IIIB), and that the inhibition of CCR5 by antagonist SMM-chemokines, unlike neuroprotective CCR5 natural ligands, leads to neurotoxicity by activating a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent pathway. Furthermore, we discover distinct signaling pathways activated by different chemokine ligands that are either natural agonists or synthetic antagonists, thus demonstrating a chemical biology strategy of using chemically engineered inhibitors of chemokine receptors to study the signaling mechanism of neuronal apoptosis and survival.

  9. A20 regulates IL-1-induced tolerant production of CXC chemokines in human mesangial cells via inhibition of MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongbo; Liu, Yuming; Li, Qian; Liao, Lingjuan; Sun, Ruili; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Hu, Jinyue

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in the resolution or progression of renal diseases. Locally secreted chemokines mediated leukocyte recruitment during the initiation and amplification phase of renal inflammation. However, the regulation of chemokine induction is not fully understood. In this study, we found that IL-1 induced a significant up-regulation of CXC chemokines CXCL1, 2, and 8 at both mRNA and protein levels in human mesangial cells. The induction of chemokines was tolerant, as the pre-treatment of HMC with IL-1 down-regulated the induction of chemokines induced by IL-1 re-stimulation. IL-1 up-regulated the ubiquintin-editing enzyme A20. A20 over-expression down-regulated IL-1-induced up-regulation of chemokines, and A20 down-regulation reversed chemokine inhibition induced by IL-1 pre-treatment, suggested that A20 played important roles in the tolerant production of chemokines. Unexpectedly, A20 over- expression inhibited the activation of ERK, JNK, and P38, but did not inhibit the activation of NF-κB. In addition, both IL-1 treatment and A20 over-expression induced the degradation of IRAK1, an important adaptor for IL-1R1 signaling, and A20 inhibition by RNA interference partly reversed the degradation of IRAK1. Taken together, IL-1-induced A20 negatively regulated chemokine production, suggesting that A20 may be an important target for the prevention and control of kidney inflammation. PMID:26648169

  10. Citrullination of CXCL8 increases this chemokine's ability to mobilize neutrophils into the blood circulation.

    PubMed

    Loos, Tamara; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul

    2009-10-01

    During the first line defense of an infected host, circulating neutrophils invade the inflamed tissue, whereas mature neutrophils from the bone marrow pool migrate into the blood circulation and from there reinforce tissue infiltration. The CXC chemokine CXCL8, also know as interleukin-8, is a potent attractant of neutrophils. Recently, we discovered a new natural post-translational modification of CXCL8, i.e. the deimination of arginine into citrulline by peptidylarginine deiminases. The ability to provoke leukocytosis was assessed by intravenous administration of citrullinated CXCL8 in rabbits. Adsorption of citrullinated CXCL8 to the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines on human or rabbit erythrocytes was evaluated using a competitive binding assay. Finally, surface expression of adhesion molecules was studied after stimulating neutrophils with citrullinated CXCL8. Citrullination of CXCL8 significantly increased this chemokine's ability to recruit neutrophils into the blood circulation. In addition, the competitive binding properties of CXCL8 for the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines were impaired upon citrullination. Since the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines is an important scavenging receptor for CXCL8 in the blood stream, citrullination may delay CXCL8 clearance from the circulation. Furthermore, the shedding of CD62L (L-selectin) and the upregulation of CD11b (beta2-integrin) protein expression on CXCL8-induced neutrophils were improved by deimination of CXCL8, possibly contributing to the neutrophil egress from the bone marrow. Conversely, surface expression of CD15, the neutrophilic ligand of endothelial selectins, was equally well upregulated by intact and citrullinated CXCL8. These data show that citrullination of CXCL8 enhances leukocytosis, possibly through impaired chemokine clearance from the blood circulation and prolonged presentation to the bone marrow.

  11. Reduced IL-37 Production Increases Spontaneous Chemokine Expressions in Colon Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Günaltay, Sezin; Ghiboub, Mohammed; Hultgren, Olof; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2017-05-01

    Microscopic colitis, comprising collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis, is a common cause of chronic diarrhea. Previously, we showed enhanced chemokine productions in microscopic colitis patients, indicating dysregulated immune cell chemotaxis in the immunopathogenesis. We also showed decreased mRNA of IL-37, mainly regarded as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in the colonic mucosa of these patients, potentially an important factor for the chronicity of the colitis. Our aim in this study was to understand the possible role of IL-37 in chemokine production using a cell line model. A colon epithelial cell line, T84, was stimulated with the TLR5 ligand flagellin. IL-37 protein production was reduced 20% using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and the changes in chemokine mRNA and protein expressions were compared to cells transfected with empty plasmid. The 20% reduction in IL-37 protein levels spontaneously increased CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL10, and CXCL11 mRNA and protein expressions. CCL2 mRNA and protein levels were enhanced upon TLR5 stimulation. CCL3, CCL20, and CX3CL1 mRNA expressions were increased either spontaneously or following TLR5 stimulation, whereas CCL4 and CCL22 mRNA expressions were significantly decreased. Even a minor decrease in the ability of colon epithelial cells to produce IL-37 results in altered chemokine expression, mainly an increase in the production of several chemokines. Our results indicate that a decreased IL-37 expression by colon epithelial cells may be an important factor for increasing the recruitment of immune cells and subsequently developing microscopic colitis.

  12. Induction of cytokines and chemokines by Toll-like receptor signaling: strategies for control of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeytun, Ahmet; Chaudhary, Anu; Pardington, Paige; Cary, R; Gupta, Goutam

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) by host Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an important component of the innate immune response for countering against invading viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Upon PAMP recognition, the TLR induces intracellular signaling cascades that involve adapter, signalosome, and transcription factor complexes and result in the production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. An inflammatory response for a short duration can be beneficial because it helps to clear the infectious agent. However, prolonged inflammation can be detrimental because it may cause host toxicity and tissue damage. Indeed, excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines via TLR pathways is often associated with many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, fine control of inflammation in the TLR pathway is highly desirable for effective host defense. In this article, we review intrinsic control mechanisms that include a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, production of host effectors, and regulation at the level of adapter, signalosome, and transcription factor complexes in the TLR pathways. We also discuss how understanding of the TLR signaling steps leads to the development of small-molecule drugs that can interfere with the formation of active adapter, signalosome, and adapter complexes.

  13. Chemokines in tumor proximal fluids.

    PubMed

    Kotyza, Jaromir

    2017-03-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines produced by leukocytes and other types of cells including tumor cells. Their action is determined by the expression of cognate receptors and subsequent signaling in target cells, followed by the modulation of cytoskeletal proteins and the induction of other responses. In tumors, chemokines produced by neoplastic/stroma cells control the leukocyte infiltrate influencing tumor growth and progression. Tumor cells also express functional chemokine receptors responding to chemokine signals, promoting cell survival, proliferation and metastasis formation. Chemokines may be detected in serum of cancer patients, but due to the paracrine nature of these molecules, more significant concentrations are found in the tumor adjacent, non-vascular fluids, collectively called tumor proximal fluids. This review summarizes the expression of CC and CXC chemokines in these fluids, namely in interstitial fluid, pleural, ascitic, and cyst fluids, but also in urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, cervical secretions and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Most comparative clinical studies reveal increased chemokine levels in high-grade tumor proximal fluids rather than in low-grade tumors and benign conditions, indicating shorter survival periods. The data confirm peritumoral fluid chemokines as sensitive diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as offer support for chemokines and their receptors as potential targets for antitumor therapy.

  14. Signaling properties of the human chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 by cellular electric impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Doijen, Jordi; Van Loy, Tom; De Haes, Wouter; Landuyt, Bart; Luyten, Walter; Schoofs, Liliane; Schols, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and 7 (CXCR7) are G-protein-coupled receptors involved in various diseases including human cancer. As such, they have become important targets for therapeutic intervention. Cell-based receptor assays, able to detect agents that modulate receptor activity, are of key importance for drug discovery. We evaluated the potential of cellular electric impedance for this purpose. Dose-dependent and specific stimulation of CXCR4 was detected upon addition of its unique chemokine ligand CXCL12. The response magnitude correlated with the CXCR4 expression level. Gαi coupling and signaling contributed extensively to the impedance response, whereas Gαq- and Gβγ-related events had only minor effects on the impedance profile. CXCR7 signaling could not be detected using impedance measurements. However, increasing levels of CXCR7 expression significantly reduced the CXCR4-mediated impedance readout, suggesting a regulatory role for CXCR7 on CXCR4-mediated signaling. Taken together, cellular electric impedance spectroscopy can represent a valuable alternative pharmacological cell-based assay for the identification of molecules targeting CXCR4, but not for CXCR7 in the absence of CXCR4.

  15. CXCR3 chemokine receptor signaling mediates itch in experimental allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Yang, Jennifer; Shimada, Steven G; LaMotte, Robert H

    2015-09-01

    Persistent itch is a common symptom of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and represents a significant health burden. The chemokine CXCL10 is predominantly produced by epithelial cells during ACD. Although the chemokine CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 are implicated in the pathophysiology of ACD, it is largely unexplored for itch and pain accompanying this disorder. Here, we showed that CXCL10 and CXCR3 mRNA, protein, and signaling activity were upregulated in the dorsal root ganglion after contact hypersensitivity (CHS), a murine model of ACD, induced by squaric acid dibutylester. CXCL10 directly activated a subset of cutaneous dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating the area of CHS through neuronal CXCR3. In behavioral tests, a CXCR3 antagonist attenuated spontaneous itch- but not pain-like behaviors directed to the site of CHS. Injection of CXCL10 into the site of CHS elicited site-directed itch- but not pain-like behaviors, but neither type of CXCL10-evoked behaviors was observed in control mice. These results suggest that CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates allergic itch but not inflammatory pain in the context of skin inflammation. Thus, upregulation of CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling in sensory neurons may contribute to itch associated with ACD. Targeting the CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling might be beneficial for the treatment of allergic itch.

  16. Induction of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 by sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-Hong; Harel, Miriam; Hla, Timothy; Ferrer, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Preliminary data derived from a human angiogenesis array in NB showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induced the secretion of several angiogenesis-related proteins including the important inflammatory factor chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of S1P-induced CCL2 expression in NB. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR and CCL2 ELISA were conducted to detect the mRNA expression and protein secretion of CCL2 in NB cells. Gain and loss of function studies were performed by using specific S1PR antagonists, adenoviral transduction and siRNA transfection. Macrophage F4/80 receptor in NB xenografts was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. Results S1P induced CCL2 mRNA expression and protein secretion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in NB cells. Blockade of S1P2 signaling using the selective S1P2 antagonist JTE-013 inhibited S1P-induced CCL2 expression. Overexpression of S1P2 by adenoviral transduction increased CCL2 secretion while knockdown of S1P2 by siRNA transfection decreased S1P-induced CCL2 secretion in NB cells. Macrophage infiltration, as detected by F4/80 staining, was significantly decreased in JTE-013-treated NB xenografts. Conclusions Taken together, our data for the first time demonstrate that S1P induced the macrophage-recruiting factor CCL2 expression in NB cells via S1P2, providing new insights into the complicated functions of S1P2 in cancer. PMID:25092091

  17. Increased Systemic Cytokine/Chemokine Expression in Asthmatic and Non-asthmatic Patients with Bacterial, Viral or Mixed Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, M J; Valero, N; Mosquera, J; Duran, A; Arocha, F; Chacín, B; Espina, L M; Gotera, J; Bermudez, J; Mavarez, A; Alvarez-Mon, M

    2017-04-01

    This study was aimed to determine the profiles of serum cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5) and chemokines (MCP-1: monocyte chemoattract protein-1 and RANTES: regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) in individuals with an asthmatic versus a non-asthmatic background with bacterial, viral or mixed acute respiratory infection. Asthmatic (n = 14) and non-asthmatic (n = 29) patients with acute viral, bacterial or mixed (bacterial and viruses) respiratory infection were studied. Patients were also analysed as individuals with pneumonia or bronchitis. Healthy individuals with similar age and sex (n = 10) were used as controls. Cytokine/chemokine content in serum was determined by ELISA. Increased cytokine/chemokine concentration in asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients was observed. However, higher concentrations of chemokines (MCP-1 and RANTES) in asthmatic patients infected by viruses, bacteria or bacteria and viruses (mixed) than in non-asthmatic patients were observed. In general, viral and mixed infections were better cytokine/chemokine inducers than bacterial infection. Cytokine/chemokine expression was similarly increased in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients with pneumonia or bronchitis, except that RANTES remained at normal levels in bronchitis. Circulating cytokine profiles induced by acute viral, bacterial or mixed lung infection were not related to asthmatic background, except for chemokines that were increased in asthmatic status. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  18. A role for chemokine signaling in neural crest cell migration and craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Eugenia C. Olesnicky; Birkholz, Denise A.; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2009-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a unique population of multipotent cells that migrate along defined pathways throughout the embryo and give rise to many diverse cell types including pigment cells, craniofacial cartilage and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Aberrant migration of NCCs results in a wide variety of congenital birth defects including craniofacial abnormalities. The chemokine Sdf1 and its receptors, Cxcr4 and Cxcr7, have been identified as key components in the regulation of cell migration in a variety of tissues. Here we describe a novel role for the zebrafish chemokine receptor Cxcr4a in the development and migration of cranial NCCs (CNCCs). We find that loss of Cxcr4a, but not Cxcr7b results in aberrant CNCC migration, defects in the neurocranium, as well as cranial ganglia dismorphogenesis. Moreover, overexpression of either Sdf1b or Cxcr4a causes aberrant CNCC migration and results in ectopic craniofacial cartilages. We propose a model in which Sdf1b signaling from the pharyngeal arch endoderm and optic stalk to Cxcr4a expressing CNCCs is important for both the proper condensation of the CNCCs into pharyngeal arches and the subsequent patterning and morphogenesis of the neural crest derived tissues. PMID:19576198

  19. Fas/CD95-induced chemokines can serve as "find-me" signals for apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Sean P; Henry, Conor M; Kearney, Conor J; Logue, Susan E; Feoktistova, Maria; Tynan, Graham A; Lavelle, Ed C; Leverkus, Martin; Martin, Seamus J

    2013-03-28

    Apoptosis is commonly thought to represent an immunologically silent or even anti-inflammatory mode of cell death, resulting in cell clearance in the absence of explicit activation of the immune system. However, here we show that Fas/CD95-induced apoptosis is associated with the production of an array of cytokines and chemokines, including IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1, MCP-1, and GMCSF. Fas-induced production of MCP-1 and IL-8 promoted chemotaxis of phagocytes toward apoptotic cells, suggesting that these factors serve as "find-me" signals in this context. We also show that RIPK1 and IAPs are required for optimal production of cytokines and chemokines in response to Fas receptor stimulation. Consequently, a synthetic IAP antagonist potently suppressed Fas-dependent expression of multiple proinflammatory mediators and inhibited Fas-induced chemotaxis. Thus, in addition to provoking apoptosis, Fas receptor stimulation can trigger the secretion of chemotactic factors and other immunologically active proteins that can influence immune responsiveness toward dying cells.

  20. Vesicular Trafficking and Signaling for Cytokine and Chemokine Secretion in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Ulrich; Madera-Salcedo, Iris Karina; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Tiwari, Neeraj; Sánchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Ramírez-Valadez, Karla Alina; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Espinosa, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation mast cells (MCs) secrete numerous inflammatory compounds stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules by a process called anaphylactic degranulation, which is responsible for type I hypersensitivity responses. Prestored mediators include histamine and MC proteases but also some cytokines and growth factors making them available within minutes for a maximal biological effect. Degranulation is followed by the de novo synthesis of lipid mediators such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes as well as a vast array of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which are responsible for late phase inflammatory responses. While lipid mediators diffuse freely out of the cell through lipid bilayers, both anaphylactic degranulation and secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors depends on highly regulated vesicular trafficking steps that occur along the secretory pathway starting with the translocation of proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Vesicular trafficking in MCs also intersects with endocytic routes, notably to form specialized cytoplasmic granules called secretory lysosomes. Some of the mediators like histamine reach granules via specific vesicular monoamine transporters directly from the cytoplasm. In this review, we try to summarize the available data on granule biogenesis and signaling events that coordinate the complex steps that lead to the release of the inflammatory mediators from the various vesicular carriers in MCs. PMID:25295038

  1. Increased plasma chemokine levels in children with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; Hossain, Waheeda; Sulsona, Carlos; Driscoll, Daniel J; Manzardo, Ann M

    2015-03-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by loss of paternally expressed genes from the 15q11-q13 region and reportedly rearranged as a cause of autism. Additionally, increased inflammatory markers and features of autism are reported in PWS. Cytokines encoded by genes involved with inflammation, cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion play a role in neurodevelopment and could be disturbed in PWS as abnormal plasma cytokine levels are reported in autism. We analyzed 41 plasma cytokines in a cohort of well-characterized children with PWS between 5 and 11 years of age and unaffected unrelated siblings using multiplex sandwich immunoassays with the Luminex magnetic-bead based platform. Data were analyzed using ANOVA testing for effects of diagnosis, gender, body mass index (BMI) and age on the 24 cytokines meeting laboratory criteria for inclusion. No significant effects were observed for age, gender or BMI. The log-transformed levels of the 24 analyzable cytokines were examined simultaneously using MANOVA adjusting for age and gender and a main effect of diagnosis was found (P-value <0.03). Four of 24 plasma cytokine levels (MCP1, MDC, Eotaxin, RANTES) were significantly higher in children with PWS compared with controls and classified as bioinflammatory chemokines supporting a disturbed immune response unrelated to obesity status. BMI was not statistically different in the two subject groups (PWS or unaffected unrelated siblings) and chemokine levels were not correlated with percentage of total body fat. Additional studies are required to identify whether possible early immunological disturbances and chemokine inflammatory processes found in PWS may contribute to neurodevelopment and behavioral features.

  2. Increased cytokine/chemokines in serum from asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients with viral respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, María J; Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Alvarez de Mon, Melchor; Chacín, Betulio; Espina, Luz Marina; Gotera, Jennifer; Bermudez, John; Mavarez, Alibeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory viral infections can induce different cytokine/chemokine profiles in lung tissues and have a significant influence on patients with asthma. There is little information about the systemic cytokine status in viral respiratory-infected asthmatic patients compared with non-asthmatic patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine changes in circulating cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5) and chemokines (MCP1: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and RANTES: regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) in patients with an asthmatic versus a non-asthmatic background with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus or adenovirus respiratory infection. In addition, human monocyte cultures were incubated with respiratory viruses to determine the cytokine/chemokine profiles. Patients/Methods Patients with asthmatic (n = 34) and non-asthmatic (n = 18) history and respiratory infections with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, and adenovirus were studied. Healthy individuals with similar age and sex (n = 10) were used as controls. Cytokine/chemokine content in blood and culture supernatants was determined by ELISA. Monocytes were isolated by Hystopaque gradient and cocultured with each of the above-mentioned viruses. Results Similar increased cytokine concentrations were observed in asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients. However, higher concentrations of chemokines were observed in asthmatic patients. Virus-infected monocyte cultures showed similar cytokine/chemokine profiles to those observed in the patients. Conclusions Circulating cytokine profiles induced by acute viral lung infection were not related to asthmatic status, except for chemokines that were already increased in the asthmatic status. Monocytes could play an important role in the increased circulating concentration of cytokines found during respiratory viral infections. PMID:23962134

  3. The chemokine (CCL2-CCR2) signaling axis mediates perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    He, Shizhi; He, Shuangba; Chen, Chun-Hao; Deborde, Sylvie; Bakst, Richard L.; Chernichenko, Natalya; McNamara, William F.; Lee, Sei Young; Barajas, Fernando; Yu, Zhenkun; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A.; Wong, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is a form of cancer progression where cancer cells invade along nerves. This behavior is associated with poor clinical outcomes; therefore, it is critical to identify novel ligand-receptor interactions between nerves and cancer cells that support the process of PNI. A proteomic profiler chemokine array was used to screen for nerve-derived factors secreted from tissue explants of dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and CCL2 was identified as a lead candidate. Prostate cancer cell line expression of CCR2, the receptor to CCL2, correlated closely with MAPK and Akt pathway activity and cell migration towards CCL2 and DRG. In vitro nerve and cancer co-culture invasion assays of PNI demonstrated that cancer cell CCR2 expression facilitates PNI. PNI is significantly diminished in co-culture assays when using DRG harvested from CCL2−/− knockout mice as compared with control CCL2+/+ mice, indicating that CCR2 is required for PNI in this murine model of PNI. Furthermore, 20/21 (95%) of patient specimens of prostate adenocarcinoma with PNI exhibited CCR2 expression by immunohistochemistry, while just 3/13 (23%) lacking PNI expressed CCR2. In summary, nerve-released CCL2 supports prostate cancer migration and PNI though CCR2-mediated signaling. PMID:25312961

  4. Adaptation of solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue in response to microbiota and chemokine receptor CCR7 signaling.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Oliver; Herbrand, Heike; Friedrichsen, Michaela; Velaga, Sarvari; Dorsch, Martina; Berhardt, Günter; Worbs, Tim; Macpherson, Andrew J; Förster, Reinhold

    2006-11-15

    Besides Peyer's patches, solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue (SILT) provides a structural platform to efficiently initiate immune responses in the murine small intestine. SILT consists of dynamic lymphoid aggregates that are heterogeneous in size and composition, ranging from small clusters of mostly lineage-negative cells known as cryptopatches to larger isolated lymphoid follicles rich in B cells. In this study, we report that in chemokine receptor CCR7-deficient mice SILT is enlarged, although unchanged in frequency and cellular composition compared with wild-type mice. This phenotype is conferred by bone marrow-derived cells and is independent of the presence of intestinal bacteria. Remarkably, particularly small-sized SILT predominates in germfree wild-type mice. Colonization of wild-type mice with commensal bacteria provokes an adjustment of the spectrum of SILT to that observed under specific pathogen-free conditions by the conversion of pre-existing lymphoid structures into larger-sized SILT. In conclusion, our findings establish that intestinal microbes influence the manifestation of gut-associated lymphoid tissues and identify CCR7 signaling as an endogeneous factor that controls this process.

  5. Increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy by modulating the CCR2/CCR5 chemokine axes

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Kelli A.; Belt, Brian A.; Figueroa, Nathania M.; Murthy, Aditi; Patel, Ankit; Kim, Minsoo; Lord, Edith M.; Linehan, David C.; Gerber, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Although radiotherapy (RT) is widely used to control tumor growth across many cancer types, there is a relatively high incidence of RT failure exhibited by tumor recurrence, therefore a clear need exists to achieve improved effectiveness of RT. The RT-elicited immune response largely impacts the efficacy of RT and includes immune cells that kill tumor cells, but also immunosuppressive cells, which dampen anti-tumor immunity. Using murine models in which syngeneic tumor cell lines (Colon38, Glioma261, Line1) are grown intramuscularly and treated with 15 Gy local RT, we assessed the effects of RT on both the systemic and intratumoral immune response. Here we demonstrate that RT stimulates increased production of two chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5, at the tumor site. Further, that this leads to increased CCR2+ CCR5+ monocytes in circulation and subsequently alters the intratumoral immune infiltrate favoring the largely immunosuppressive CCR2+ CCR5+ monocytes. Importantly, a CCR2/CCR5 antagonist administered daily (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) starting two days prior to RT reduces both circulating and intratumoral monocytes resulting in increased efficacy of RT in radioresponsive tumors. Overall, these data have important implications for the mechanism of RT and present a means to improve RT efficacy across many cancer types. PMID:27852031

  6. Intermediate Progenitors Facilitate Intracortical Progression of Thalamocortical Axons and Interneurons through CXCL12 Chemokine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Abe, Philipp; Molnár, Zoltán; Tzeng, Yi-Shiuan; Lai, Dar-Ming; Arnold, Sebastian J; Stumm, Ralf

    2015-09-23

    Glutamatergic principal neurons, GABAergic interneurons and thalamocortical axons (TCAs) are essential elements of the cerebrocortical network. Principal neurons originate locally from radial glia and intermediate progenitors (IPCs), whereas interneurons and TCAs are of extrinsic origin. Little is known how the assembly of these elements is coordinated. C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12), which is known to guide axons outside the neural tube and interneurons in the cortex, is expressed in the meninges and IPCs. Using mouse genetics, we dissected the influence of IPC-derived CXCL12 on TCAs and interneurons by showing that Cxcl12 ablation in IPCs, leaving meningeal Cxcl12 intact, attenuates intracortical TCA growth and disrupts tangential interneuron migration in the subventricular zone. In accordance with strong CXCR4 expression in the forming thalamus and TCAs, we identified a CXCR4-dependent growth-promoting effect of CXCL12 on TCAs in thalamus explants. Together, our findings indicate a cell-autonomous role of CXCR4 in promoting TCA growth. We propose that CXCL12 signals from IPCs link cortical neurogenesis to the progression of TCAs and interneurons spatially and temporally. Significance statement: The cerebral cortex exerts higher brain functions including perceptual and emotional processing. Evolutionary expansion of the mammalian cortex is mediated by intermediate progenitors, transient amplifying cells generating cortical excitatory neurons. During the peak period of cortical neurogenesis, migrating precursors of inhibitory interneurons originating in subcortical areas and thalamic axons invade the cortex. Although defects in the assembly of cortical network elements cause neurological and mental disorders, little is known how neurogenesis, interneuron recruitment, and axonal ingrowth are coordinated. We demonstrate that intermediate progenitors release the chemotactic cytokine CXCL12 to promote intracortical interneuron migration and growth of thalamic axons

  7. Increased feelings with increased body signals

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Eduardo P. M.; Weinstock, Joel; Elliott, David; Summers, Robert; Tranel, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Since the beginning of psychology as a scientific endeavour, the question of whether the body plays a role in how a person experiences emotion has been the centre of emotion research. Patients with structural gastrointestinal disorders, such as Crohn's disease, provide an intriguing opportunity to study the influence of body signals on emotions and feelings. In the present study, emotionally salient films were presented to participants with Crohn's disease in either the active state (Crohn's-active, CA) or silent state (Crohn's-silent, CS), and to normal comparison (NC) participants. We hypothesized that CA participants would have increased feelings, compared with CS and NC participants, when viewing emotional films designed to elicit happiness, disgust, sadness and fear. Gastric myoelectrical activity (electrogastrogram, or EGG) was measured during the films, and after each film was presented, participants rated emotion intensity (arousal) and pleasantness (valence). All groups labelled the emotions similarly. In support of the hypothesis, CA participants showed an increase in subjective arousal for negative emotions compared with CS and NC participants. The CA participants also showed increased EGG during emotional film viewing, as well as a strong positive correlation of EGG with arousal ratings. Together, these findings can be taken as evidence that aberrant feedback from the gastrointestinal system up-regulates the intensity of feelings of negative emotions. PMID:18985099

  8. Chemokine GPCR Signaling Inhibits β-Catenin during Zebrafish Axis Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Yu; Shin, Jimann; Sepich, Diane S.; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic axis formation in vertebrates is initiated by the establishment of the dorsal Nieuwkoop blastula organizer, marked by the nuclear accumulation of maternal β-catenin, a transcriptional effector of canonical Wnt signaling. Known regulators of axis specification include the canonical Wnt pathway components that positively or negatively affect β-catenin. An involvement of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) was hypothesized from experiments implicating G proteins and intracellular calcium in axis formation, but such GPCRs have not been identified. Mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores generates Ca2+ transients in the superficial blastomeres of zebrafish blastulae when the nuclear accumulation of maternal β-catenin marks the formation of the Nieuwkoop organizer. Moreover, intracellular Ca2+ downstream of non-canonical Wnt ligands was proposed to inhibit β-catenin and axis formation, but mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report a novel function of Ccr7 GPCR and its chemokine ligand Ccl19.1, previously implicated in chemotaxis and other responses of dendritic cells in mammals, as negative regulators of β-catenin and axis formation in zebrafish. We show that interference with the maternally and ubiquitously expressed zebrafish Ccr7 or Ccl19.1 expands the blastula organizer and the dorsoanterior tissues at the expense of the ventroposterior ones. Conversely, Ccr7 or Ccl19.1 overexpression limits axis formation. Epistatic analyses demonstrate that Ccr7 acts downstream of Ccl19.1 ligand and upstream of β-catenin transcriptional targets. Moreover, Ccl19/Ccr7 signaling reduces the level and nuclear accumulation of maternal β-catenin and its axis-inducing activity and can also inhibit the Gsk3β -insensitive form of β-catenin. Mutational and pharmacologic experiments reveal that Ccr7 functions during axis formation as a GPCR to inhibit β-catenin, likely by promoting Ca2+ transients throughout the blastula. Our study delineates a novel negative, Gsk3

  9. Autism with intellectual disability is associated with increased levels of maternal cytokines and chemokines during gestation.

    PubMed

    Jones, K L; Croen, L A; Yoshida, C K; Heuer, L; Hansen, R; Zerbo, O; DeLorenze, G N; Kharrazi, M; Yolken, R; Ashwood, P; Van de Water, J

    2017-02-01

    Immune abnormalities have been described in some individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) as well as their family members. However, few studies have directly investigated the role of prenatal cytokine and chemokine profiles on neurodevelopmental outcomes in humans. In the current study, we characterized mid-gestational serum profiles of 22 cytokines and chemokines in mothers of children with ASD (N=415), developmental delay (DD) without ASD (N=188), and general population (GP) controls (N=428) using a bead-based multiplex technology. The ASD group was further divided into those with intellectual disabilities (developmental/cognitive and adaptive composite score<70) (ASD+ID, N=184) and those without (composite score⩾70) (ASD-noID, N=201). Levels of cytokines and chemokines were compared between groups using multivariate logistic regression analyses, adjusting for maternal age, ethnicity, birth country and weight, as well as infant gender, birth year and birth month. Mothers of children with ASD+ID had significantly elevated mid-gestational levels of numerous cytokines and chemokines, such as granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-γ, interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-6, compared with mothers of children with either ASD-noID, those with DD, or GP controls. Conversely, mothers of children with either ASD-noID or with DD had significantly lower levels of the chemokines IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 compared with mothers of GP controls. This observed immunologic distinction between mothers of children with ASD+ID from mothers of children with ASD-noID or DD suggests that the intellectual disability associated with ASD might be etiologically distinct from DD without ASD. These findings contribute to the ongoing efforts toward identification of early biological markers specific to subphenotypes of ASD.

  10. Autism with Intellectual Disability is Associated with Increased Levels of Maternal Cytokines and Chemokines During Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Karen L.; Croen, Lisa A.; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Heuer, Luke; Hansen, Robin; Zerbo, Ousseny; DeLorenze, Gerald N.; Kharrazi, Martin; Yolken, Robert; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Immune abnormalities have been described in some individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) as well as their family members. However, few studies have directly investigated the role of prenatal cytokine and chemokine profiles on neurodevelopmental outcomes in humans. In the current study, we characterized mid-gestational serum profiles of 22 cytokines and chemokines in mothers of children with ASD (N=415), developmental delay without ASD (DD) (N=188), and general population (GP) controls (N=428) using a bead-based multiplex technology. The ASD group was further divided into those with intellectual disabilities (DQ<70) (ASD+ID, N=184) and those without (DQ≥70) (ASD-noID, N=201). Levels of cytokines and chemokines were compared between groups using multivariate logistic regression analyses, adjusting for maternal age, ethnicity, birth country, and weight, as well as infant gender, birth year, and birth month. Mothers of children with ASD+ID had significantly elevated mid-gestational levels of numerous cytokines and chemokines, such as GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IL-1α, and IL-6, compared to mothers of children with either ASD-noID, those with DD, or GP controls. Conversely, mothers of children with either ASD-noID or with DD had significantly lower levels of the chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 compared to mothers of GP controls. This observed immunologic distinction between mothers of children with ASD+ID from mothers of children with ASD-noID or DD suggests that the intellectual disability (ID) associated with ASD might be etiologically distinct from DD without ASD. These findings contribute to the ongoing efforts toward identification of early biological markers specific to sub-phenotypes of ASD. PMID:27217154

  11. "Inverse signaling" of the transmembrane chemokine CXCL16 contributes to proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects in cultured human meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Bartsch, Kareen; Gebhardt, Henrike H; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Synowitz, Michael; Schmitt, Anne Dorothée; Mentlein, Rolf; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2016-10-27

    Chemokines and their receptors play a decisive role in tumor progression and metastasis. We recently found a new signaling mechanism in malignant glioma cells mediated by transmembrane chemokines that we termed "inverse signaling". According to this hypothesis, soluble (s)-CXCL16 binds to the surface-expressed transmembrane (tm) -CXCL16, and induces signaling and different biological effects in the stimulated cells, so that the transmembrane ligand itself acts as a receptor for its soluble counterpart. Now, we hypothesized that "inverse signaling" via tm-CXCL16 might also take place in meningiomas, a completely different, benign tumor entity. We used quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry and western blot to detect CXCL16 and CXCR6 in human meningioma cells isolated from 28 human meningiomas. Subsequently, we stimulated cultured human tm-CXCL16-positive, CXCR6-negative meningioma cells with recombinant s-CXCL16 and analyzed binding, signaling and biological effects using RNAi silencing to verify specificity. In fact, cultured human meningioma cells considerably express CXCL16, but substantially lack CXCR6, the only known CXCL16 receptor. These receptor-negative cells could bind s-CXCL16, and responded to s-CXCL16 application with activation of the intracellular kinases ERK1/2 und Akt. As a consequence, we observed increased proliferation and rescue of apoptosis of cultured meningioma cells. Since binding and signaling were abolished by siRNA silencing, we concluded that tm-CXCL16 specifically acts as a receptor for s-CXCL16 also in human meningioma cells. These findings underline our recent report on the mechanism of inverse signaling as a broad biological process also observable in more benign tumor cells and contributing to tumor progression.

  12. Cxcl12/Cxcr4 chemokine signaling is required for placode assembly and sensory axon pathfinding in the zebrafish olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Knaut, Holger; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro

    2007-07-01

    Positioning neurons in the right places and wiring axons to the appropriate targets are essential events for establishment of neural circuits. In the zebrafish olfactory system, precursors of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) assemble into a compact cluster to form the olfactory placode. Subsequently, OSNs differentiate and extend their axons to the presumptive olfactory bulb with high precision. In this study, we aim to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying these two developmental processes. cxcr4b, encoding a chemokine receptor, is expressed in the migrating olfactory placodal precursors, and cxcl12a (SDF-1a), encoding a ligand for Cxcr4b, is expressed in the abutting anterior neural plate. The expression of cxcr4b persists in the olfactory placode at the initial phase of OSN axon pathfinding. At this time, cxcl12a is expressed along the placode-telencephalon border and at the anterior tip of the telencephalon, prefiguring the route and target of OSN axons, respectively. Interfering with Cxcl12a/Cxcr4b signaling perturbs the assembly of the olfactory placode, resulting in the appearance of ventrally displaced olfactory neurons. Moreover, OSN axons frequently fail to exit the olfactory placode and accumulate near the placode-telencephalon border in the absence of Cxcr4b-mediated signaling. These data indicate that chemokine signaling contributes to both the olfactory placode assembly and the OSN axon pathfinding in zebrafish.

  13. Chemokines in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chow, Melvyn T; Luster, Andrew D

    2014-12-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that control the migration of cells between tissues and the positioning and interactions of cells within tissue. The chemokine superfamily consists of approximately 50 endogenous chemokine ligands and 20 G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning signaling receptors. Chemokines mediate the host response to cancer by directing the trafficking of leukocytes into the tumor microenvironment. This migratory response is complex and consists of diverse leukocyte subsets with both antitumor and protumor activities. Although chemokines were initially appreciated as important mediators of immune cell migration, we now know that they also play important roles in the biology of nonimmune cells important for tumor growth and progression. Chemokines can directly modulate the growth of tumors by inducing the proliferation of cancer cells and preventing their apoptosis. They also direct tumor cell movement required for metastasis. Chemokines can also indirectly modulate tumor growth through their effects on tumor stromal cells and by inducing the release of growth and angiogenic factors from cells in the tumor microenvironment. In this Masters of Immunology primer, we focus on recent advances in understanding the complex nature of the chemokine system in tumor biology with a focus on how the chemokine system could be used to augment cancer immunotherapeutic strategies to elicit a more robust and long-lasting host antitumor immune response.

  14. CXC chemokine ligand 16 is increased in gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia and associated with lipoproteins in gestational diabetes mellitus at 5 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lekva, Tove; Michelsen, Annika E; Aukrust, Pål; Paasche Roland, Marie Cecilie; Henriksen, Tore; Bollerslev, Jens; Ueland, Thor

    2017-08-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between CXC chemokine ligand 16 and indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation in gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia. This sub-study of the population-based prospective cohort included 310 women. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed during pregnancy and 5 years later along with lipid analysis. CXC chemokine ligand 16 was measured in plasma (protein) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (messenger RNA) during pregnancy and at follow-up. Circulating CXC chemokine ligand 16 was higher in gestational diabetes mellitus women early in pregnancy and at follow-up, while higher in preeclampsia women late in pregnancy compared to control women. Messenger RNA of CXC chemokine ligand 16 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were lower in gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia women compared to control women. Increased circulating CXC chemokine ligand 16 level was associated with a higher apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in gestational diabetes mellitus women but not in normal pregnancy at follow-up. Our study shows that women with gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia had a dysregulated CXC chemokine ligand 16 during pregnancy, and in gestational diabetes mellitus, the increase in CXC chemokine ligand 16 early in pregnancy and after 5 years was strongly associated with their lipid profile.

  15. A Hox gene controls lateral line cell migration by regulating chemokine receptor expression downstream of Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Breau, Marie A; Wilkinson, David G; Xu, Qiling

    2013-10-15

    The posterior lateral line primordium in zebrafish provides an amenable model to study mechanisms of collective cell migration. The directed migration of the cell cluster along the path of Sdf1a chemokine requires two receptors, Cxcr4b and Cxcr7b, which are expressed in the leading and trailing part of the primordium, respectively. The polarized expression of receptors is regulated by Wnt signaling, but downstream players mediating this control remain to be found. Here, we show that the Hox homeobox gene Hoxb8a is a critical component that acts downstream of the Wnt pathway to coordinate the expression of both chemokine receptors. We find that Hoxb8a is expressed in the leading part of the primordium and is required for the correct speed and extent of migration. Hoxb8a expression is dependent upon Wnt activity and needed both for cxcr4b expression and to repress and thus restrict cxcr7b expression to the trailing zone of the primordium. In the absence of Wnt activity, overexpressed Hoxb8a is able to repress cxcr7b but not up-regulate cxcr4b expression. Together with results from expressing dominant activator and repressor constructs, these findings suggest that Hoxb8a is induced by and cooperates with Wnt signaling to up-regulate cxcr4b, and acts through multiple mechanisms to repress cxcr7b expression.

  16. Human herpesvirus 6A infection in CD46 transgenic mice: viral persistence in the brain and increased production of proinflammatory chemokines via Toll-like receptor 9.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Joséphine M; Jégou, Jean-François; Welsch, Jérémy C; Horvat, Branka

    2014-05-01

    expressing the human CD46 protein. Infection of CD46 transgenic mice with HHV-6A resulted in long-term persistence of viral DNA in the brains of infected animals and was followed by lymphocyte infiltration and upregulation of the CCL5 chemokine in the absence of clinical signs of disease. The secretion of a panel of chemokines was increased after infection in primary murine brain glial cultures, and the HHV-6-induced chemokine expression was inhibited when TLR9 signaling was blocked. These results describe the first murine model for HHV-6A-induced brain infection and suggest the importance of the TLR9 pathway in HHV-6A-initiated neuroinflammation.

  17. [Research progress on role of chemokine receptor CCR3 signaling in allergic airway diseases].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Liu, Yuehui

    2012-12-01

    Allergic airway diseases have been identified as chronic inflammatory diseases of respiratory membranes, characterized by infiltration of many inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils. The expression of CCR3 is abundant on the cell surface of eosinophils. Increased accumulation of CCR3-driven inflammatory cells is thought to favor the development of allergy. In this review, we survey the properties of CCR3 and its ligands and highlight the roles of CCR3 signaling in allergic airway diseases.

  18. Articular Ankle Fracture Results in Increased Synovitis, Synovial Macrophage Infiltration, and Synovial Fluid Concentrations of Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Bridgette D.; Kimmerling, Kelly A.; Zura, Robert D.; Reilly, Rachel M.; Zlowodzki, Michal P.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Guilak, Farshid; Olson, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The inflammatory response following an articular fracture is thought to play a role in the development of posttraumatic arthritis (PTA) but has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize the acute inflammatory response, both locally and systemically, in joint synovium, synovial fluid (SF), and serum following articular fracture of the ankle. We hypothesized that intraarticular fracture would alter the synovial environment and lead to increased local and systemic inflammation. Methods Synovial tissue biopsy specimens, SF samples, and serum samples were collected from patients with an acute articular ankle fracture (n = 6). Additional samples (normal, ankle osteoarthritis [OA], and knee OA [n = 6 per group]) were included for comparative analyses. Synovial tissue was assessed for synovitis and macrophage count. SF and serum were assessed for cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, and tumor necrosis factor α) and chemokines (eotaxin, eotaxin 3, IFNγ-inducible 10-kd protein, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], MCP-4, macrophage-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and thymus and activation–regulated chemokine). Results Synovitis scores were significantly higher in ankle fracture tissue compared with normal ankle tissue (P = 0.007), and there was a trend toward an increased abundance of CD68+ macrophages in ankle fracture synovium compared with normal knee synovium (P = 0.06). The concentrations of all cytokines and chemokines were elevated in the SF of patients with ankle fracture compared with those in SF from OA patients with no history of trauma. Only the concentration of IL-6 was significantly increased in the serum of patients with ankle fracture compared with normal serum (P = 0.027). Conclusion Articular fracture of the ankle increased acute local inflammation, as indicated by increased synovitis, increased macrophage infiltration into

  19. Partial Agonist and Biased Signaling Properties of the Synthetic Enantiomers J113863/UCB35625 at Chemokine Receptors CCR2 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Corbisier, Jenny; Huszagh, Alexandre; Galés, Céline; Parmentier, Marc; Springael, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-13

    Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors constitutes a promising area of research for the identification of new therapeutic molecules. In this study we identified two novel biased ligands for the chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 and characterized their functional properties. We showed that J113863 and its enantiomer UCB35625, initially identified as high affinity antagonists for CCR1 and CCR3, also bind with low affinity to the closely related receptors CCR2 and CCR5. Binding of J113863 and UCB35625 to CCR2 or CCR5 resulted in the full or partial activation of the three Gi proteins and the two Go isoforms. Unlike chemokines, the compounds did not activate G12 Binding of J113863 to CCR2 or CCR5 also induced the recruitment of β-arrestin 2, whereas UCB35625 did not. UCB35625 induced the chemotaxis of L1.2 cells expressing CCR2 or CCR5. In contrast, J113863 induced the migration of L1.2-CCR2 cells but antagonized the chemokine-induced migration of L1.2-CCR5 cells. We also showed that replacing the phenylalanine 3.33 in CCR5 TM3 by the corresponding histidine of CCR2 converts J113863 from an antagonist for cell migration and a partial agonist in other assays to a full agonist in all assays. Further analyses indicated that F3.33H substitution strongly increased the activation of G proteins and β-arrestin 2 by J113863. These results highlight the biased nature of the J113863 and UCB35625 that act either as antagonist, partial agonist, or full agonist according to the receptor, the enantiomer, and the signaling pathway investigated.

  20. PGF2α modulates the output of chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines in myometrial cells from term pregnant women through divergent signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Liu, Weina; You, Xingji; Leimert, Kelycia; Popowycz, Krystyn; Fang, Xin; Wood, Stephen L.; Slater, Donna M.; Sun, Qianqian; Gu, Hang; Olson, David M.; Ni, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) plays a critical role in the initiation and process of parturition. Since human labor has been described as an inflammatory event, we investigated the role of PGF2α in the inflammatory process using cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells (HUSMCs) isolated from term pregnant women as a model. Using a multiplex assay, HUSMCs treated with PGF2α changed their output of a number of cytokines and chemokines, with a distinct response pattern that differed between HUSMCs isolated from the upper and lower segment region of the uterus. Confirmatory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that PGF2α stimulated increased output of interleukin (IL) 1β, IL6, IL8 (CXCL8) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1, also known as chemokine (c-c motif) ligand 2, CCL2) by HUSMCs isolated from both upper and lower uterine segments. In contrast, PGF2α inhibited tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release by HUMSCs from the lower uterine segment while the output of TNFα was undetectable in the upper segment. Small interfering (si) RNA mediated knockdown of the PGF2α receptor prevented the changes in cytokine and chemokine output by the HUSMCs. Since the PGF2α receptor (PTGFR) couples via the Gq protein and subsequently activates the phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways, we examined the role of these pathways in PGF2α modulation of the cytokines. Inhibition of PLC and PKC reversed the effects of PGF2α. PGF2α activated multiple signaling pathways including extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), P38, calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and NF-κB signaling. Inhibition of ERK reversed PGF2α-induced IL1β, IL6 and CCL2 output, while inhibition of PI3K blocked the effect of PGF2α on IL6, CXCL8 and CCL2 output and inhibition of NF-κB reversed PGF2α-induced IL1β and CCL2 output. NFAT was involved in PGF2α modulation of CCL2

  1. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces cytokine and chemokine production via NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yujun; Lü, Xuena; Man, Chaoxin; Han, Linlin; Shan, Yi; Qu, Xingguang; Liu, Ying; Yang, Shiqin; Xue, Yuqing; Zhang, Yinghua

    2012-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells can respond to certain bacteria by producing an array of cytokines and chemokines which are associated with host immune responses. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a characterized probiotic, originally isolated from human feces. This study aimed to test the ability of L. acidophilus NCFM to stimulate cytokine and chemokine production in intestinal epithelial cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their upregulation. In experiments using intestinal epithelial cell lines and mouse models, we observed that L. acidophilus NCFM could rapidly but transiently upregulate a number of effector genes encoding cytokines and chemokines such as interleukin 1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, CCL2, and CCL20 and that cytokines showed lower expression levels with L. acidophilus NCFM treatment than chemokines. Moreover, L. acidophilus NCFM could activate a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), in intestinal epithelial cell lines. The phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in intestinal epithelial cell lines was also enhanced by L. acidophilus NCFM. Furthermore, inhibitors of NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate [PDTC]) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) significantly reduced cytokine and chemokine production in the intestinal epithelial cell lines stimulated by L. acidophilus NCFM, suggesting that both NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways were important for the production of cytokines and chemokines induced by L. acidophilus NCFM.

  2. Lactobacillus acidophilus Induces Cytokine and Chemokine Production via NF-κB and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathways in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Xuena; Man, Chaoxin; Han, Linlin; Shan, Yi; Qu, Xingguang; Liu, Ying; Yang, Shiqin; Xue, Yuqing; Zhang, Yinghua

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells can respond to certain bacteria by producing an array of cytokines and chemokines which are associated with host immune responses. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a characterized probiotic, originally isolated from human feces. This study aimed to test the ability of L. acidophilus NCFM to stimulate cytokine and chemokine production in intestinal epithelial cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their upregulation. In experiments using intestinal epithelial cell lines and mouse models, we observed that L. acidophilus NCFM could rapidly but transiently upregulate a number of effector genes encoding cytokines and chemokines such as interleukin 1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, CCL2, and CCL20 and that cytokines showed lower expression levels with L. acidophilus NCFM treatment than chemokines. Moreover, L. acidophilus NCFM could activate a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), in intestinal epithelial cell lines. The phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in intestinal epithelial cell lines was also enhanced by L. acidophilus NCFM. Furthermore, inhibitors of NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate [PDTC]) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) significantly reduced cytokine and chemokine production in the intestinal epithelial cell lines stimulated by L. acidophilus NCFM, suggesting that both NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways were important for the production of cytokines and chemokines induced by L. acidophilus NCFM. PMID:22357649

  3. The chemokine CCL5 regulates glucose uptake and AMP kinase signaling in activated T cells to facilitate chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Olivia; Burke, J Daniel; Gao, Darrin F; Fish, Eleanor N

    2012-08-24

    Recruitment of effector T cells to sites of infection or inflammation is essential for an effective adaptive immune response. The chemokine CCL5 (RANTES) activates its cognate receptor, CCR5, to initiate cellular functions, including chemotaxis. In earlier studies, we reported that CCL5-induced CCR5 signaling activates the mTOR/4E-BP1 pathway to directly modulate mRNA translation. Specifically, CCL5-mediated mTOR activation contributes to T cell chemotaxis by initiating the synthesis of chemotaxis-related proteins. Up-regulation of chemotaxis-related proteins may prime T cells for efficient migration. It is now clear that mTOR is also a central regulator of nutrient sensing and glycolysis. Herein we describe a role for CCL5-mediated glucose uptake and ATP accumulation to meet the energy demands of chemotaxis in activated T cells. We provide evidence that CCL5 is able to induce glucose uptake in an mTOR-dependent manner. CCL5 treatment of ex vivo activated human CD3(+) T cells also induced the activation of the nutrient-sensing kinase AMPK and downstream substrates ACC-1, PFKFB-2, and GSK-3β. Using 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glucose uptake, and compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, experimental data are presented that demonstrate that CCL5-mediated T cell chemotaxis is dependent on glucose, as these inhibitors inhibit CCL5-mediated chemotaxis in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, these findings suggest that both glycolysis and AMPK signaling are required for efficient T cell migration in response to CCL5. These studies extend the role of CCL5 mediated CCR5 signaling beyond lymphocyte chemotaxis and demonstrate a role for chemokines in promoting glucose uptake and ATP production to match energy demands of migration.

  4. The chemokine and chemokine receptor superfamilies and their molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnik, Albert; Yoshie, Osamu; Nomiyama, Hisayuki

    2006-01-01

    The human chemokine superfamily currently includes at least 46 ligands, which bind to 18 functionally signaling G-protein-coupled receptors and two decoy or scavenger receptors. The chemokine ligands probably comprise one of the first completely known molecular superfamilies. The genomic organization of the chemokine ligand genes and a comparison of their sequences between species shows that tandem gene duplication has taken place independently in the mouse and human lineages of some chemokine families. This means that care needs to be taken when extrapolating experimental results on some chemokines from mouse to human. PMID:17201934

  5. Chemokines as relay signals in human dendritic cell migration: serum amyloid A kicks off chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sozzani, Silvano; Del Prete, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is a response highly conserved in evolution. Chemotactic factors secreted in injured and inflamed tissues generate a concentration-based, chemotactic gradient that directs leukocytes from the blood compartment into tissue. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Gouwy et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 101-112] show that the SAA1α isoform of serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an acute phase protein upregulated in inflammation and shown to chemoattract some leukocyte subsets, is also able to chemoattract monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (DCs). The authors also show that the chemotactic activity of SAA1α for monocytes and DCs is indirectly mediated by rapid chemokine induction, providing evidence that proposes a new level of regulation of leukocyte migration.

  6. Common and biased signaling pathways of the chemokine receptor CCR7 elicited by its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Mark A; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    Chemokines are pivotal regulators of cell migration during continuous immune surveillance, inflammation, homeostasis, and development. Chemokine binding to their 7-transmembrane domain, G-protein-coupled receptors causes conformational changes that elicit intracellular signaling pathways to acquire and maintain an asymmetric architectural organization and a polarized distribution of signaling molecules necessary for directional cell migration. Leukocytes rely on the interplay of chemokine-triggered migration modules to promote amoeboid-like locomotion. One of the most important chemokine receptors for adaptive immune cell migration is the CC-chemokine receptor CCR7. CCR7 and its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 control homing of T cells and dendritic cells to areas of the lymph nodes where T cell priming and the initiation of the adaptive immune response occur. Moreover, CCR7 signaling also contributes to T cell development in the thymus and to lymphorganogenesis. Although the CCR7-CCL19/CCL21 axis evolved to benefit the host, inappropriate regulation or use of these proteins can contribute or cause pathobiology of chronic inflammation, tumorigenesis, and metastasis, as well as autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it appears as the CCR7-CCL19/CCL21 axis is tightly regulated at numerous intersections. Here, we discuss the multiple regulatory mechanism of CCR7 signaling and its influence on CCR7 function. In particular, we focus on the functional diversity of the 2 CCR7 ligands, CCL19 and CCL21, as well as on their impact on biased signaling. The understanding of the molecular determinants of biased signaling and the multiple layers of CCR7 regulation holds the promise for potential future therapeutic intervention.

  7. LncRNA Directs Cooperative Epigenetic Regulation Downstream of Chemokine Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Yang; Park, Peter; Qin, Li; Wei, Yongkun; Hawke, David; Hung, Mien-Chie; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing

    2014-01-01

    Summary LncRNAs are known to regulate a number of different development and tumorigenic processes. Here we report a role for lncRNA BCAR4 in breast cancer metastasis that is mediated by chemokine-induced binding of BCAR4 to two transcription factors with extended regulatory consequences. BCAR4 binding of SNIP1 and PNUTS in response to CCL21 releases the SNIP1's inhibition of p300-dependent histone acetylation that in turn enables the BCAR4-recruited PNUTS to bind H3K18ac and relieve inhibition of RNA Pol II via activation of the PP1 phosphatase. This mechanism activates a noncanonical Hedgehog/GLI2 transcriptional program that promotes cell migration. BCAR4 expression correlates with advanced breast cancers and therapeutic delivery of Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) targeting BCAR4 strongly suppresses breast cancer metastasis in mouse models. The findings reveal a disease-relevant lncRNA mechanism consisting of both direct coordinated protein recruitment and indirect regulation of transcription factors. PMID:25416949

  8. Loss of Gata4 in Sertoli cells impairs the spermatogonial stem cell niche and causes germ cell exhaustion by attenuating chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, Ji-Xin; Cheng, Jin-Mei; Li, Jian; Jin, Cheng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Deng, Shou-Long; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-11-10

    Sertoli cells, the primary somatic cell in the seminiferous epithelium, provide the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) microenvironment (niche) through physical support and the expression of paracrine factors. However, the regulatory mechanisms within the SSC niche, which is primarily controlled by Sertoli cells, remain largely unknown. GATA4 is a Sertoli cell marker, involved in genital ridge initiation, sex determination and differentiation during the embryonic stage. Here, we showed that neonatal mice with a targeted disruption of Gata4 in Sertoli cells (Gata4(flox/flox); Amh-Cre; hereafter termed Gata4 cKO) displayed a loss of the establishment and maintenance of the SSC pool and apoptosis of both gonocyte-derived differentiating spermatogonia and meiotic spermatocytes. Thus, progressive germ cell depletion and a Sertoli-cell-only syndrome were observed as early as the first wave of murine spermatogenesis. Transplantation of germ cells from postnatal day 5 (P5) Gata4 cKO mice into Kit(W/W-v) recipient seminiferous tubules restored spermatogenesis. In addition, microarray analyses of P5 Gata4 cKO mouse testes showed alterations in chemokine signaling factors, including Cxcl12, Ccl3, Cxcr4 (CXCL12 receptor), Ccr1 (CCL3 receptor), Ccl9, Xcl1 and Ccrl2. Deletion of Gata4 in Sertoli cells markedly attenuated Sertoli cell chemotaxis, which guides SSCs or prospermatogonia to the stem cell niche. Finally, we showed that GATA4 transcriptionally regulated Cxcl12 and Ccl9, and the addition of CXCL12 and CCL9 to an in vitro testis tissue culture system increased the number of PLZF+ undifferentiated spermatogonia within Gata4 cKO testes. Together, these results reveal a novel role for GATA4 in controlling the SSC niche via the transcriptional regulation of chemokine signaling shortly after birth.

  9. Loss of Gata4 in Sertoli cells impairs the spermatogonial stem cell niche and causes germ cell exhaustion by attenuating chemokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, Ji-Xin; Cheng, Jin-Mei; Li, Jian; Jin, Cheng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Deng, Shou-Long; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli cells, the primary somatic cell in the seminiferous epithelium, provide the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) microenvironment (niche) through physical support and the expression of paracrine factors. However, the regulatory mechanisms within the SSC niche, which is primarily controlled by Sertoli cells, remain largely unknown. GATA4 is a Sertoli cell marker, involved in genital ridge initiation, sex determination and differentiation during the embryonic stage. Here, we showed that neonatal mice with a targeted disruption of Gata4 in Sertoli cells (Gata4flox/flox; Amh-Cre; hereafter termed Gata4 cKO) displayed a loss of the establishment and maintenance of the SSC pool and apoptosis of both gonocyte-derived differentiating spermatogonia and meiotic spermatocytes. Thus, progressive germ cell depletion and a Sertoli-cell-only syndrome were observed as early as the first wave of murine spermatogenesis. Transplantation of germ cells from postnatal day 5 (P5) Gata4 cKO mice into KitW/W-v recipient seminiferous tubules restored spermatogenesis. In addition, microarray analyses of P5 Gata4 cKO mouse testes showed alterations in chemokine signaling factors, including Cxcl12, Ccl3, Cxcr4 (CXCL12 receptor), Ccr1 (CCL3 receptor), Ccl9, Xcl1 and Ccrl2. Deletion of Gata4 in Sertoli cells markedly attenuated Sertoli cell chemotaxis, which guides SSCs or prospermatogonia to the stem cell niche. Finally, we showed that GATA4 transcriptionally regulated Cxcl12 and Ccl9, and the addition of CXCL12 and CCL9 to an in vitro testis tissue culture system increased the number of PLZF+ undifferentiated spermatogonia within Gata4 cKO testes. Together, these results reveal a novel role for GATA4 in controlling the SSC niche via the transcriptional regulation of chemokine signaling shortly after birth. PMID:26473289

  10. Chemically induced neuronal damage and gliosis: enhanced expression of the proinflammatory chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, without a corresponding increase in proinflammatory cytokines(1).

    PubMed

    Little, A R; Benkovic, S A; Miller, D B; O'Callaghan, J P

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines has long been linked to neuronal and glial responses to brain injury. Indeed, inflammation in the brain has been associated with damage that stems from conditions as diverse as infection, multiple sclerosis, trauma, and excitotoxicity. In many of these brain injuries, disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may allow entry of blood-borne factors that contribute to, or serve as the basis of, brain inflammatory responses. Administration of trimethyltin (TMT) to the rat results in loss of hippocampal neurons and an ensuing gliosis without BBB compromise. We used the TMT damage model to discover the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that are expressed in response to neuronal injury. TMT caused pyramidal cell damage within 3 days and a substantial loss of these neurons by 21 days post dosing. Marked microglial activation and astrogliosis were evident over the same time period. The BBB remained intact despite the presence of multiple indicators of TMT-induced neuropathology. TMT caused large increases in whole hippocampal-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 mRNA (1,000%) by day 3 and in MCP-1 (300%) by day 7. The mRNA levels for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6, cytokines normally expressed during the earliest stage of inflammation, were not increased up to 21 days post dosing. Lipopolysaccharide, used as a positive control, caused large inductions of cytokine mRNA in liver, as well as an increase in IL-1beta in hippocampus, but it did not result in the induction of astrogliosis. The data suggest that enhanced expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6, is not required for neuronal and glial responses to injury and that MCP-1 may serve a signaling function in the damaged CNS that is distinct from its role in proinflammatory events.

  11. A novel MEK-ERK-AMPK signaling axis controls chemokine receptor CCR7-dependent survival in human mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    López-Cotarelo, Pilar; Escribano-Díaz, Cristina; González-Bethencourt, Ivan Luis; Gómez-Moreira, Carolina; Deguiz, María Laura; Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Gómez-Cabañas, Laura; Fernández-Barrera, Jaime; Delgado-Martín, Cristina; Mellado, Mario; Regueiro, José Ramón; Miranda-Carús, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2015-01-09

    Chemokine receptor CCR7 directs mature dendritic cells (mDCs) to secondary lymph nodes where these cells regulate the activation of T cells. CCR7 also promotes survival in mDCs, which is believed to take place largely through Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms. We have analyzed the involvement of the AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) in the control of CCR7-dependent survival. A pro-apoptotic role for AMPK is suggested by the finding that pharmacological activators induce apoptosis, whereas knocking down of AMPK with siRNA extends mDC survival. Pharmacological activation of AMPK also induces apoptosis of mDCs in the lymph nodes. Stimulation of CCR7 leads to inhibition of AMPK, through phosphorylation of Ser-485, which was mediated by G(i)/Gβγ, but not by Akt or S6K, two kinases that control the phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 in other settings. Using selective pharmacological inhibitors, we show that CCR7-induced phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 is mediated by MEK and ERK. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis and proximity ligation assays indicate that AMPK associates with ERK, but not with MEK. These results suggest that in addition to Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms, CCR7 can also promote survival of mDCs through a novel MEK1/2-ERK1/2-AMPK signaling axis. The data also suggest that AMPK may be a potential target to modulate mDC lifespan and the immune response.

  12. A Novel MEK-ERK-AMPK Signaling Axis Controls Chemokine Receptor CCR7-dependent Survival in Human Mature Dendritic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    López-Cotarelo, Pilar; Escribano-Díaz, Cristina; González-Bethencourt, Ivan Luis; Gómez-Moreira, Carolina; Deguiz, María Laura; Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Gómez-Cabañas, Laura; Fernández-Barrera, Jaime; Delgado-Martín, Cristina; Mellado, Mario; Regueiro, José Ramón; Miranda-Carús, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR7 directs mature dendritic cells (mDCs) to secondary lymph nodes where these cells regulate the activation of T cells. CCR7 also promotes survival in mDCs, which is believed to take place largely through Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms. We have analyzed the involvement of the AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) in the control of CCR7-dependent survival. A pro-apoptotic role for AMPK is suggested by the finding that pharmacological activators induce apoptosis, whereas knocking down of AMPK with siRNA extends mDC survival. Pharmacological activation of AMPK also induces apoptosis of mDCs in the lymph nodes. Stimulation of CCR7 leads to inhibition of AMPK, through phosphorylation of Ser-485, which was mediated by Gi/Gβγ, but not by Akt or S6K, two kinases that control the phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 in other settings. Using selective pharmacological inhibitors, we show that CCR7-induced phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 is mediated by MEK and ERK. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis and proximity ligation assays indicate that AMPK associates with ERK, but not with MEK. These results suggest that in addition to Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms, CCR7 can also promote survival of mDCs through a novel MEK1/2-ERK1/2-AMPK signaling axis. The data also suggest that AMPK may be a potential target to modulate mDC lifespan and the immune response. PMID:25425646

  13. Induction of CXC chemokines in human mesenchymal stem cells by stimulation with secreted frizzled-related proteins through non-canonical Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs) on CXC chemokine expression in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). METHODS: CXC chemokines such as CXCL5 and CXCL8 are induced in hMSCs during differentiation with osteogenic differentiation medium (OGM) and may be involved in angiogenic stimulation during bone repair. hMSCs were treated with conditioned medium (CM) from L-cells expressing non-canonical Wnt5a protein, or with control CM from wild type L-cells, or directly with sFRPs for up to 10 d in culture. mRNA expression levels of both CXCL5 and CXCL8 were quantitated by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and secreted protein levels of these proteins determined by ELISA. Dose- (0-500 ng/mL) and time-response curves were generated for treatment with sFRP1. Signal transduction pathways were explored by western blot analysis with pan- or phosphorylation-specific antibodies, through use of specific pathway inhibitors, and through use of siRNAs targeting specific frizzled receptors (Fzd)-2 and 5 or the receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-2 (RoR2) prior to treatment with sFRPs. RESULTS: CM from L-cells expressing Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, stimulated an increase in CXCL5 mRNA expression and protein secretion in comparison to control L-cell CM. sFRP1, which should inhibit both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling, surprisingly enhanced the expression of CXCL5 at 7 and 10 d. Dickkopf1, an inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling prevented the sFRP-stimulated induction of CXCL5 and actually inhibited basal levels of CXCL5 expression at 7 but not at 10 d post treatment. In addition, all four sFRPs isoforms induced CXCL8 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner with maximum expression at 7 d with treatment at 150 ng/mL. The largest increases in CXCL5 expression were seen from stimulation with sFRP1 or sFRP2. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the presence of OGM showed s

  14. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin expression is increased in asthmatic airways and correlates with expression of Th2-attracting chemokines and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Ying, Sun; O'Connor, Brian; Ratoff, Jonathan; Meng, Qiu; Mallett, Kirsty; Cousins, David; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Guizhen; Zhao, Jisheng; Lee, Tak H; Corrigan, Chris

    2005-06-15

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is said to increase expression of chemokines attracting Th2 T cells. We hypothesized that asthma is characterized by elevated bronchial mucosal expression of TSLP and Th2-attracting, but not Th1-attracting, chemokines as compared with controls, with selective accumulation of cells bearing receptors for these chemokines. We used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to examine the expression and cellular provenance of TSLP, Th2-attracting (thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)/CCL17, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC)/CCL22, I-309/CCL1) and Th1-attracting (IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10)/CXCL10, IFN-inducible T cell alpha-chemoattractant (I-TAC)/CXCL11) chemokines and expression of their receptors CCR4, CCR8, and CXCR3 in bronchial biopsies from 20 asthmatics and 15 normal controls. The numbers of cells within the bronchial epithelium and submucosa expressing mRNA for TSLP, TARC/CCL17, MDC/CCL22, and IP-10/CXCL10, but not I-TAC/CXCL11 and I-309/CCL1, were significantly increased in asthmatics as compared with controls (p chemokines. Our data implicate TSLP, TARC/CCL17, MDC/CCL22, and IP-10/CXCL10 in asthma pathogenesis. These may act partly through selective development and retention, or recruitment of Th2 cells bearing their receptors.

  15. Ligand-biased and probe-dependent modulation of chemokine receptor CXCR3 signaling by negative allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Brox, Regine; Heinrich, Markus R; Auberson, Yves P; Tschammer, Nuska

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, functional selectivity (or ligand bias) has evolved from being a peculiar phenomenon to being recognized as an essential feature of synthetic ligands that target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is an outstanding platform to study various aspects of biased signaling, because nature itself uses functional selectivity to manipulate receptor signaling. At the same time, CXCR3 is an attractive therapeutic target in the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein we report the discovery of an 8-azaquinazolinone derivative (N-{1-[3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2-yl]ethyl}-4-(4-fluorobutoxy)-N-[(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]butanamide, 1 b) that can inhibit CXC chemokine 11 (CXCL11)-dependent G protein activation over β-arrestin recruitment with 187-fold selectivity. This compound also demonstrates probe-dependent activity, that is, it inhibits CXCL11- over CXCL10-mediated G protein activation with 12-fold selectivity. Together with a previously reported biased negative allosteric modulator from our group, the present study provides additional information on the molecular requirements for allosteric modulation of CXCR3.

  16. Antibiotic-Induced Cell Wall Fragments of Staphylococcus aureus Increase Endothelial Chemokine Secretion and Adhesiveness for Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    van Langevelde, P.; Ravensbergen, E.; Grashoff, P.; Beekhuizen, H.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; van Dissel, J. T.

    1999-01-01

    Antibiotics release inflammatory fragments, such as lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and peptidoglycan (PG), from the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we exposed S. aureus cultures to a number of β-lactam antibiotics (imipenem, flucloxacillin, and cefamandole) and protein synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics (erythromycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin) and investigated whether supernatants of these cultures differ in their capacity to stimulate endothelial cells (EC). After 24 h of incubation, endothelial adhesiveness for leukocytes, surface expression of various adhesion molecules, and secretion of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured. Supernatants of β-lactam-exposed cultures (designated β-lactam supernatants) enhanced the adhesiveness of EC for granulocytes, whereas those of protein synthesis-inhibiting antibiotic-exposed cultures (designated protein synthesis-inhibitor supernatants) did not. This hyperadhesiveness coincided with a higher intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on the surface of the stimulated EC. In addition, EC stimulated with β-lactam supernatants secreted significantly higher concentrations of the chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 than those stimulated with protein synthesis-inhibitor supernatants. The finding that the concentrations of LTA and PG in β-lactam supernatants were much higher than those in protein synthesis-inhibitor supernatants suggests that the observed differences in stimulatory effect between these supernatants are a result of differences in the release of cell wall fragments, although the presence of other stimulatory factors in the supernatants cannot be excluded. In conclusion, our results argue for a release of LTA and PG from S. aureus after exposure to β-lactam antibiotics that enhances the development of a systemic inflammatory response by stimulating EC such that adhesiveness for granulocytes is increased and large amounts of IL-8 and MCP-1 are secreted

  17. PDGF-driven proliferation, migration, and IL8 chemokine secretion in human corneal fibroblasts involve JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay; Thakkar, Mahesh; Sinha, Sunilima; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is associated with corneal fibroblast migration and proliferation and plays an important role in corneal wound healing. However, the intracellular mechanisms of PDGF-mediated functions in corneal fibroblasts are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that PDGF functional activities in the cornea involve the Janus kinase-2/signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 (JAK2-STAT3) signaling pathway and whether PDGF induces the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), belonging to the novel family of feedback regulators of cytokine and growth factor activities. Methods Human corneal fibroblast (HSF) cultures were used as an in vitro model for functional analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to quantify gene expression. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques were used to measure protein expression. Cell growth, migration, and ELISA assays were used for functional validation. Results Low endogenous levels of STAT3 and SOCS3 mRNA and protein expression were noted in HSFs. PDGF treatment of HSF significantly induced SOCS3 mRNA (3.0–4.5 fold) and protein (1.5–2.5 fold) expression in a time-dependent manner. Similarly, PDGF treatment of HSF significantly increased STAT3 protein expression at two tested time points (2.5–2.96 fold). Cultures exposed to vehicle (control) did not show any change in SOCS3 and STAT3 mRNA or protein expression. An addition of AG-490, a selective inhibitor of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway, significantly inhibited PDGF-mediated STAT3 induction and cell growth and migration in HSF. We also observed that PDGF induced interleukin-8 (IL8) chemokine secretion (2 fold) and AG-490 inhibited IL8 secretion. Conclusions Our data showed that PDGF induced STAT3, SOCS3, and IL8 chemokine secretion in human corneal fibroblasts. Further, PDGF-induced cell growth, migration, and IL8 secretion in corneal fibroblast involve the JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway

  18. Drug discovery and chemokine receptor antagonists: eppur si muove!

    PubMed

    Terricabras, Emma; Benjamim, Claudia; Godessart, Nuria

    2004-11-01

    The blockade of leukocyte migration has been demonstrated to be a valid option for the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. Chemokines play an active role in regulating cell infiltration into inflammatory sites and disrupting chemokine-receptor interactions has emerged as an alternative therapeutic approach. Pharmaceutical companies have developed an intense activity in the drug discovery of chemokine receptor antagonists in the last 10 years. Potent and selective compounds have been obtained and some of them are currently being evaluated in the clinic. The success of these trials will demonstrate whether the blockade of a single receptor is of therapeutic benefit. Alternative approaches, such as pan-receptor antagonists or inhibitors of the signalling pathways evoked by chemokines, are also being explored. In the meantime, new relationships between chemokines and receptors will be revealed, increasing our knowledge of such a fascinating field.

  19. Circulating galectins -2, -4 and -8 in cancer patients make important contributions to the increased circulation of several cytokines and chemokines that promote angiogenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Duckworth, C A; Fu, B; Pritchard, D M; Rhodes, J M; Yu, L-G

    2014-02-04

    Circulating concentrations of the cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and chemokines monocyte chemotatic protein 1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 and growth-regulator oncogene α (GROα)/chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1 are commonly increased in cancer patients and they are increasingly recognised as important promoters, via divergent mechanisms, of cancer progression and metastasis. The effect of galectins-2, -4 and -8, whose circulating levels are highly increased in cancer patients, on endothelial secretion of cytokines was assessed in vitro by cytokine array and in mice. The relationship between serum levels of galectins and cytokines was analysed in colon and breast cancer patients. Galectins-2, -4 and -8 at pathological concentrations induce secretion of G-CSF, IL-6, MCP-1 and GROα from the blood vascular endothelial cells in vitro and in mice. Multiple regression analysis indicates that increased circulation of these galectins accounts for 41∼83% of the variance of these cytokines in the sera of colon and breast cancer patients. The galectin-induced secretion of these cytokines/chemokines is shown to enhance the expression of endothelial cell surface adhesion molecules, causing increased cancer-endothelial adhesion and increased endothelial tubule formation. The increased circulation of galectins -2, -4 and -8 in cancer patients contributes substantially to the increased circulation of G-CSF, IL-6 and MCP-1 by interaction with the blood vascular endothelium. These cytokines and chemokines in turn enhance endothelial cell activities in angiogenesis and metastasis.

  20. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  1. Flow cytometry applications for the analysis of chemokine receptor expression and function.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Achille; Mazzon, Cristina; Borroni, Elena Monica; Bonecchi, Raffaella; Graham, Gerard J; Locati, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    Chemokine receptors play an important role in leukocyte migration, both in physiological and pathological conditions, and the interest in new methodologies for their detection is increasing. In this review, we focused on chemokine receptors detection through flow cytometric approaches, including the use of specific antibodies and fluorescent chemokines, and on approaches aimed at the analysis of their functions, from intracellular trafficking to signaling activities. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Chemokines: novel targets for breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Simi; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the possible involvement of chemokines and their receptors in breast cancer progression and metastasis. Chemokines and their receptors constitute a superfamily of signalling factors whose prognosis value in breast cancer progression remains unclear. We will examine here the expression pattern of chemokines and their receptors in mammary gland physiology and carcinogenesis. The nature of the cells producing chemokines or harboring chemokine receptors appears to be crucial in certain conditions for example, the infiltration of the primary tumor by leukocytes and angiogenesis. In addition, chemokines, their receptors and the interaction with glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) are key players in the homing of cancer cells to distant metastasis sites. Several lines of evidence, including in vitro and in vivo models, suggest that the mechanism of action of chemokines in cancer development involves the modulation of proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, leukocyte recruitment or angiogenesis. Furthermore, we will discuss the regulation of chemokine network in tumor neovascularity by decoy receptors. The reasons accounting for the deregulation of chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in breast cancer are certainly crucial for the comprehension of chemokine role in breast cancer and are in several cases linked to estrogen receptor status. The targeting of chemokines and chemokine receptors by antibodies, small molecule antagonists, viral chemokine binding proteins and heparins appears as promising tracks to develop therapeutic strategies. Thus there is significant interest in developing strategies to antagonize the chemokine function, and an opportunity to interfere with metastasis, the leading cause of death in most patients. PMID:17717637

  3. Chemokine and Fgf signalling act as opposing guidance cues in formation of the lateral line primordium

    PubMed Central

    Breau, Marie A.; Wilson, Duncan; Wilkinson, David G.; Xu, Qiling

    2012-01-01

    The directional migration of many cell populations occurs as a coherent group. An amenable model is provided by the posterior lateral line in zebrafish, which is formed by a cohesive primordium that migrates from head to tail and deposits future neuromasts at intervals. We found that prior to the onset of migration, the compact state of the primordium is not fully established, as isolated cells with lateral line identity are present caudal to the main primordium. These isolated cells are retained in position such that they fuse with the migrating primordium as it advances, and later contribute to the leading zone and terminal neuromasts. We found that the isolated lateral line cells are positioned by two antagonistic cues: Fgf signalling attracts them towards the primordium, which counteracts Sdf1α/Cxcr4b-mediated caudal attraction. These findings reveal a novel chemotactic role for Fgf signalling in which it enables the coalescence of the lateral line primordium from an initial fuzzy pattern into a compact group of migrating cells. PMID:22619392

  4. Chemokine and Fgf signalling act as opposing guidance cues in formation of the lateral line primordium.

    PubMed

    Breau, Marie A; Wilson, Duncan; Wilkinson, David G; Xu, Qiling

    2012-06-01

    The directional migration of many cell populations occurs as a coherent group. An amenable model is provided by the posterior lateral line in zebrafish, which is formed by a cohesive primordium that migrates from head to tail and deposits future neuromasts at intervals. We found that prior to the onset of migration, the compact state of the primordium is not fully established, as isolated cells with lateral line identity are present caudal to the main primordium. These isolated cells are retained in position such that they fuse with the migrating primordium as it advances, and later contribute to the leading zone and terminal neuromasts. We found that the isolated lateral line cells are positioned by two antagonistic cues: Fgf signalling attracts them towards the primordium, which counteracts Sdf1α/Cxcr4b-mediated caudal attraction. These findings reveal a novel chemotactic role for Fgf signalling in which it enables the coalescence of the lateral line primordium from an initial fuzzy pattern into a compact group of migrating cells.

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae induces expression of the antibacterial CXC chemokine MIG/CXCL9 via MyD88-dependent signaling in a murine model of airway infection.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Mette; Mörgelin, Matthias; Farber, Joshua M; Egesten, Arne; Albiger, Barbara

    2010-07-01

    MIG/CXCL9 belongs to the CXC family of chemokines and participates in the regulation of leukocyte-trafficking and angiogenesis. Certain chemokines, including human MIG/CXCL9, exert strong antibacterial activity in vitro, although the importance of this property in vivo is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the expression and a possible role for MIG/CXCL9 in host defense during mucosal airway infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in vivo. We found that intranasal challenge of C57BL/6 wild-type mice with pneumococci elicited production of high levels of MIG/CXCL9 in the lungs via the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Whereas both human and murine MIG/CXCL9 showed efficient killing of S. pneumoniae in vitro, MIG/CXCL9 knock-out mice were not more susceptible to pneumococcal infection. Our data demonstrate that, in vivo this chemokine probably has a redundant role, acting together with other antibacterial peptides and chemokines, in innate and adaptive host defense mechanisms against pneumococcal infections.

  6. Increased expression of chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR3 in nasal polyps: molecular basis for recruitment of the granulocyte infiltrate.

    PubMed

    Fundová, P; Funda, D P; Kovář, D; Holý, R; Navara, M; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory processes play an important role in the development of nasal polyps (NP), but the etiology and, to a high degree also, the pathogenesis of NP are not fully understood. The role of several cytokines and chemokines such as eotaxins, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, and RANTES has been reported in NP. Herewith, we investigated the expression and pattern of distribution of chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR3 in nasal polyps. Immunohistochemical detection was carried out in frozen sections of biopsies from 22 NP and 18 nasal mucosa specimens in both the epithelial and stromal compartments. Fluorescence microscopy and computerized image analysis revealed a statistically significant increased number of CCR1 (45.2 ± 2.8 vs. 15.1 ± 1.9, p < 0.001)-positive as well as CCR3 (16.4 ± 1.4 vs. 9.7 ± 1.1, p < 0.001)-positive cells in the stroma of NP compared to nasal mucosa. In comparison to healthy nasal mucosa, increased positivity of CCR3 was detected in the epithelial compartment of NP. Our data suggest that increased expression of CCR1 and CCR3 chemokine receptors may, in accord with various chemokines, contribute to the pathogenesis of nasal polyposis by facilitating increased migration and prolonged accumulation of inflammatory cells, e.g., eosinophils, in the inflammatory infiltrate of NP.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 via similar but distinct signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Ok-Jin; Cho, Min-Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacterium frequently isolated from lesions of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to initiate inflammatory responses. In this study, we purified LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans (AaLPS) and investigated its ability to induce the expression of chemokines, which play an important role in recruitment of leukocytes to the infection site. AaLPS induced the expression of chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 in murine macrophages, leading to the infiltration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a transwell system. Although TLR4 was essential for the induction of all these chemokines by AaLPS, MCP-1 and MIP-1α expressions were MyD88-dependent, but IP-10 expression was MyD88-independent, as determined using macrophages from mice deficient in TLR4 or MyD88. Furthermore, the activation of ERK and JNK were necessary for the expression of MCP-1 and MIP-1α, whereas p38 MAP kinase and JNK activations were required for IP-10 expression. In addition, IFN-β/STAT1 signaling was exclusively involved in IP-10 expression but not in MCP-1 or MIP-1α expression. AaLPS also activated the transcription factors, NF-κB, AP-1, NF-IL6, and ISRE, all of which are involved in chemokine gene expression. These results suggest that AaLPS induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 through TLR4 in murine macrophages. Further, the induction of MCP-1 and MIP-1α requires MyD88, ERK, and JNK, whereas the induction of IP-10 requires JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and IFN-β/STAT1.

  8. Receptor oligomerization: a pivotal mechanism for regulating chemokine function.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Laura Martínez; Lucas, Pilar; Holgado, Borja López; Barroso, Rubén; Vega, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Mellado, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Since the first reports on chemokine function, much information has been generated on the implications of these molecules in numerous physiological and pathological processes, as well as on the signaling events activated through their binding to receptors. Despite these extensive studies, no chemokine-related drugs have yet been approved for use in patients with inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. This discrepancy between efforts and results has forced a re-evaluation of the chemokine field. We have explored chemokine receptor conformations at the cell surface and found that, as is the case for other G protein-coupled receptors, chemokine receptors are not isolated entities that are activated following ligand binding; rather, they are found as dimers and/or higher order oligomers at the cell surface, even in the absence of ligands. These complexes form organized arrays that can be modified by receptor expression and ligand levels, indicating that they are dynamic structures. The way in which these receptor complexes are stabilized modulates ligand binding, as well as their pharmacological properties and the signaling events activated. These conformations thus represent a mechanism that increases the broad variety of chemokine functions. Understanding these receptor interactions and their dynamics at the cell surface is thus critical for influencing chemokine function and could open up new possibilities for drug design. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Circulating galectins -2, -4 and -8 in cancer patients make important contributions to the increased circulation of several cytokines and chemokines that promote angiogenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C; Duckworth, C A; Fu, B; Pritchard, D M; Rhodes, J M; Yu, L-G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Circulating concentrations of the cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and chemokines monocyte chemotatic protein 1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 and growth-regulator oncogene α (GROα)/chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1 are commonly increased in cancer patients and they are increasingly recognised as important promoters, via divergent mechanisms, of cancer progression and metastasis. Methods: The effect of galectins-2, -4 and -8, whose circulating levels are highly increased in cancer patients, on endothelial secretion of cytokines was assessed in vitro by cytokine array and in mice. The relationship between serum levels of galectins and cytokines was analysed in colon and breast cancer patients. Results: Galectins-2, -4 and -8 at pathological concentrations induce secretion of G-CSF, IL-6, MCP-1 and GROα from the blood vascular endothelial cells in vitro and in mice. Multiple regression analysis indicates that increased circulation of these galectins accounts for 41∼83% of the variance of these cytokines in the sera of colon and breast cancer patients. The galectin-induced secretion of these cytokines/chemokines is shown to enhance the expression of endothelial cell surface adhesion molecules, causing increased cancer-endothelial adhesion and increased endothelial tubule formation. Conclusion: The increased circulation of galectins -2, -4 and -8 in cancer patients contributes substantially to the increased circulation of G-CSF, IL-6 and MCP-1 by interaction with the blood vascular endothelium. These cytokines and chemokines in turn enhance endothelial cell activities in angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:24384681

  10. Social defeat promotes a reactive endothelium in a brain region-dependent manner with increased expression of key adhesion molecules, selectins and chemokines associated with the recruitment of myeloid cells to the brain.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, C M; McKim, D B; Wohleb, E S; Jarrett, B L; Reader, B F; Norden, D M; Godbout, J P; Sheridan, J F

    2015-08-27

    Repeated social defeat (RSD) in mice causes myeloid cell trafficking to the brain that contributes to the development of prolonged anxiety-like behavior. Myeloid cell recruitment following RSD occurs in regions where neuronal and microglia activation is observed. Thus, we hypothesized that crosstalk between neurons, microglia, and endothelial cells contributes to brain myeloid cell trafficking via chemokine signaling and vascular adhesion molecules. Here we show that social defeat caused an exposure- and brain region-dependent increase in several key adhesion molecules and chemokines involved in the recruitment of myeloid cells. For example, RSD induced distinct patterns of adhesion molecule expression that may explain brain region-dependent myeloid cell trafficking. VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 mRNA expression were increased in an exposure-dependent manner. Furthermore, RSD-induced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein expression were localized to the vasculature of brain regions implicated in fear and anxiety responses, which spatially corresponded to previously reported patterns of myeloid cell trafficking. Next, mRNA expression of additional adhesion molecules (E- and P-selectin, PECAM-1) and chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL12, CCL2) were determined in the brain. Social defeat induced an exposure-dependent increase in mRNA levels of E-selectin, CXCL1, and CXCL2 that increased with additional days of social defeat. While CXCL12 was unaffected by RSD, CCL2 expression was increased by six days of social defeat. Last, comparison between enriched CD11b(+) cells (microglia/macrophages) and enriched GLAST-1(+)/CD11b(-) cells (astrocytes) revealed RSD increased mRNA expression of IL-1β, CCL2, and CXCL2 in microglia/macrophages but not in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that key mediators of leukocyte recruitment were increased in the brain vasculature following RSD in an exposure- and brain region-dependent manner.

  11. Local release from affinity-based polymers increases urethral concentration of the stem cell chemokine CCL7 in rats.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Delgado, Edgardo; Sadeghi, Zhina; Wang, Nick X; Kenyon, Jonathan; Satyanarayan, Sapna; Kavran, Michael; Flask, Chris; Hijaz, Adonis Z; von Recum, Horst A

    2016-04-21

    The protein chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7) is significantly over-expressed in urethral and vaginal tissues immediately following vaginal distention in a rat model of stress urinary incontinence. Further evidence, in this scenario and other clinical scenarios, indicates CCL7 stimulates stem cell homing for regenerative repair. This CCL7 gradient is likely absent or compromised in the natural repair process of women who continue to suffer from SUI into advanced age. We evaluated the feasibility of locally providing this missing CCL7 gradient by means of an affinity-based implantable polymer. To engineer these polymers we screened the affinity of different proteoglycans, to use them as CCL7-binding hosts. We found heparin to be the strongest binding host for CCL7 with a 0.323 nM dissociation constant. Our experimental approach indicates conjugation of heparin to a polymer backbone (using either bovine serum albumin or poly (ethylene glycol) as the base polymer) can be used as a delivery system capable of providing sustained concentrations of CCL7 in a therapeutically useful range up to a month in vitro. With this approach we are able to detect, after polymer implantation, significant increase in CCL7 in the urethral tissue directly surrounding the polymer implants with only trace amounts of human CCL7 present in the blood of the animals. Whole animal serial sectioning shows evidence of retention of locally injected human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) only in animals with sustained CCL7 delivery, 2 weeks after affinity-polymers were implanted.

  12. Dogs infected with the blood trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi display an increase expression of cytokines and chemokines plus an intense cardiac parasitism during acute infection.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Sheler Martins; Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Reis, Levi Eduardo Soares; da Silva Fonseca, Kátia; Nogueira, Nívia Carolina; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2014-03-01

    The recent increase in immigration of people from areas endemic for Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) to the United States and Europe has raised concerns about the transmission via blood transfusion and organ transplants in these countries. Infection by these pathways occurs through blood trypomastigotes (BT), and these forms of T. cruzi are completely distinct of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT), released by triatomine vector, in relation to parasite-host interaction. Thus, research comparing infection with these different infective forms is important for explaining the potential impacts on the disease course. Here, we investigated tissue parasitism and relative mRNA expression of cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in the heart during acute infection by MT or BT forms in dogs. BT-infected dogs presented a higher cardiac parasitism, increased relative mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines and of the chemokines CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL5/RANTES, and the chemokine receptor CCR5 during the acute phase of infection, as compared to MT-infected dogs. These results suggest that infection with BT forms may lead to an increased immune response, as revealed by the cytokines ratio, but this kind of immune response was not able to control the cardiac parasitism. Infection with the MT form presented an increase in the relative mRNA expression of IL-12p40 as compared to that of IL-10 or TGF-β1. Correlation analysis showed increased relative mRNA expression of IFN-γ as well as IL-10, which may be an immunomodulatory response, as well as an increase in the correlation of CCL5/RANTES and its CCR5 receptor. Our findings revealed a difference between inoculum sources of T. cruzi, as vectorial or transfusional routes of T. cruzi infection may trigger distinct parasite-host interactions during the acute phase, which may influence immunopathological aspects of Chagas disease.

  13. [Interceptors:--"silent" chemokine receptors].

    PubMed

    Grodecka, Magdalena; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2007-01-01

    The physiological effect caused by chemokines is regulated by interactions with a group of rodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors share a number of common features: the polypeptide chain is a 7-transmembrane ?-helix (7 TMD motif) and the region involved in G-protein interaction (the DRYLAIV sequence) is located in the second transmembrane loop. So far, 19 chemokine receptors have been identified. Three of them (Duffy glycoprotein, D6, and CCX-CKR proteins), although structurally related to other GPCRs, lack the ability of G-protein signal transduction. Instead, they efficiently internalize their cognate ligands, regulating chemokine levels in various body compartments. These three proteins are suggested to form a distinct chemokine receptor family, designated "interceptors" or "silent" chemokine receptors.

  14. Structural perspectives on antimicrobial chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines are best known as signaling proteins in the immune system. Recently however, a large number of human chemokines have been shown to exert direct antimicrobial activity. This moonlighting activity appears to be related to the net high positive charge of these immune signaling proteins. Chemokines can be divided into distinct structural elements and some of these have been studied as isolated peptide fragments that can have their own antimicrobial activity. Such peptides often encompass the α-helical region found at the C-terminal end of the parent chemokines, which, similar to other antimicrobial peptides, adopt a well-defined membrane-bound amphipathic structure. Because of their relatively small size, intact chemokines can be studied effectively by NMR spectroscopy to examine their structures in solution. In addition, NMR relaxation experiments of intact chemokines can provide detailed information about the intrinsic dynamic behavior; such analyses have helped for example to understand the activity of TC-1, an antimicrobial variant of CXCL7/NAP-2. With chemokine dimerization and oligomerization influencing their functional properties, the use of NMR diffusion experiments can provide information about monomer-dimer equilibria in solution. Furthermore, NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments can be used to map out the interface between self-associating subunits. Moreover, the unusual case of XCL1/lymphotactin presents a chemokine that can interconvert between two distinct folds in solution, both of which have been elucidated. Finally, recent advances have allowed for the determination of the structures of chemokines in complex with glycosaminoglycans, a process that could interfere with their antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these studies highlight several different structural facets that contribute to the way in which chemokines exert their direct microbicidal actions. PMID:23293636

  15. Fetal exposure to HIV-1 alters chemokine receptor expression by CD4+T cells and increases susceptibility to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Bunders, Madeleine J; van Hamme, John L; Jansen, Machiel H; Boer, Kees; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2014-10-24

    Absolute numbers of lymphocytes are decreased in uninfected infants born to HIV-1-infected women (HIV-1-exposed). Although the exact mechanism is unknown, fetal exposure to maternal HIV-1-infection could prime the immune system and affect T cell trafficking. We compared the expression of chemokine receptors on cord blood CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-exposed children and healthy controls. At baseline CD4(+) T cells had a largely naïve phenotype. However, stimulation with cytokines resulted in an upregulation of inflammatory response-related chemokine receptors on CD4(+) T cells, with HIV-1-exposed infants having a significantly higher frequency of CD4(+) T cells expressing, in particularly Th2 associated chemokine receptors (CCR3 p < 0.01, CCR8 p = 0.03). Numbers of naive CCR7(+) CD4(+) T cells were reduced (p = 0.01) in HIV-1-exposed infants. We further assessed whether the inflammatory phenotype was associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 and detected higher levels of p24 upon in in vitro infection of stimulated CD4(+) T cells of HIV-1-exposed infants. In summary, fetal exposure to HIV-1 primes the immune system in the infant leading to an enhanced immune activation and altered T cell homing, with potential ramifications regarding T cell responses and the acquisition of HIV-1 as an infant.

  16. Novel human cytomegalovirus viral chemokines, vCXCL-1s, display functional selectivity for neutrophil signaling and function

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinho; Dogra, Pranay; Masi, Tom J.; Pitt, Elisabeth A.; de Kruijf, Petra; Smit, Martine J.; Sparer, Tim E.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) uses members of the hematopoietic system including neutrophils for dissemination throughout the body. HCMV encodes a viral chemokine, vCXCL-1, that is postulated to attract neutrophils for dissemination within the host. The gene encoding vCXCL-1, UL146, is one of the most variable genes in the HCMV genome. Why HCMV has evolved this hypervariability and how this affects the virus’ dissemination/pathogenesis is unknown. Because the vCXCL-1 hypervariability maps to important binding and activation domains, we hypothesized that vCXCL-1s differentially activate neutrophils, which could contribute to HCMV dissemination and/or pathogenesis. In order to test whether these viral chemokines affect neutrophil function, we generated vCXCL-1 proteins from 11 different clades from clinical isolates from HCMV-congenitally infected infants. All vCXCL-1s were able to induce calcium flux at a concentration of 100 nM and integrin expression on human peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) in spite of differences in affinity for the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors. In fact their affinity for CXCR1 or CXCR2 did not directly correlate with chemotaxis, G protein-dependent and independent (β-arrestin2) activation, or secondary chemokine (CCL22) expression. Our data suggest that vCXCL-1 polymorphisms impact the binding affinity, receptor usage, and differential PBN activation that could contribute to HCMV dissemination and/or pathogenesis. PMID:25987741

  17. Targeting the chemokines in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Cavalera, Michele; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are a family of chemotactic cytokines that play an essential role in leukocyte trafficking. Upregulation of both CC and CXC chemokines is a hallmark of the inflammatory and reparative response following myocardial infarction. Release of danger signals from dying cells and damaged extracellular matrix activates innate immune pathways that stimulate chemokine synthesis. Cytokineand chemokine-driven adhesive interactions between endothelial cells and leukocytes mediate extravasation of immune cells into the infarct. CXC chemokines (such as interleukin-8) are bound to glycosaminoglycans on the endothelial surface and activate captured neutrophils, inducing expression of integrins. CC chemokines (such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) mediate recruitment of proinflammatory and phagocytotic mononuclear cells into the infarct. CC Chemokines may also regulate late infiltration of the healing infarct with inhibitory leukocytes that suppress inflammation and restrain the post-infarction immune response. Non-hematopoietic cells are also targeted by chemokines; in healing infarcts, the CXC chemokine Interferon-γ inducible Protein (IP)-10 exerts antifibrotic actions, inhibiting fibroblast migration. Another member of the CXC subfamily, Stromal cell-derived Factor (SDF)-1, may protect the infarcted heart by activating pro-survival signaling in cardiomyocytes, while exerting angiogenic actions through chemotaxis of endothelial progenitors. Several members of the chemokine family may be promising therapeutic targets to attenuate adverse remodeling in patients with myocardial infarction.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-temozolomide co-treatment inhibits melanoma growth through suppression of Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2-driven signals

    PubMed Central

    Cesare, Michelandrea De; Arrighetti, Noemi; Manenti, Giacomo; Ciusani, Emilio; Verderio, Paolo; Ciniselli, Chiara M.; Cominetti, Denis; Carenini, Nives; Corna, Elisabetta; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Rodolfo, Monica; Rivoltini, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Target-specific agents used in melanoma are not curative, and chemokines are being implicated in drug-resistance to target-specific agents. Thus, the use of conventional agents in rationale combinations may result in optimization of therapy. Because histone deacetylases participate in tumor development and progression, the combination of the pan-inhibitor SAHA and temozolomide might provide a therapeutic advantage. Here, we show synergism between the two drugs in mutant BRAF cell lines, in association with decreased phosphorylation of cell survival proteins (e.g., C-Jun-N-terminal-kinase, JNK). In the spontaneous ret transgenic mouse melanoma model, combination therapy produced a significant disease onset delay and down-regulation of Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), JNK, and of Myeloid-derived suppressor cell recruitment. Co-incubation with a CCL2-blocking-antibody enhanced in vitro cell sensitivity to temozolomide. Conversely, recombinant CCL2 activated JNK in human tumor melanoma cells. In keeping with these results, the combination of a JNK-inhibitor with temozolomide was synergistic. By showing that down-regulation of CCL2-driven signals by SAHA and temozolomide via JNK contributes to reduce melanoma growth, we provide a rationale for the therapeutic advantage of the drug combination. This combination strategy may be effective because of interference both with tumor cell and tumor microenvironment. PMID:24980831

  19. Myxomavirus anti-inflammatory chemokine binding protein reduces the increased plaque growth induced by chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection after balloon angioplasty aortic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Alexandra R; Verma, Raj K; Dai, Erbin; Liu, Liying; Chen, Hao; Kesavalu, Sheela; Rivera, Mercedes; Velsko, Irina; Ambadapadi, Sriram; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of inflammatory plaque in coronary arteries causes myocardial infarction. Treatment with emergent balloon angioplasty (BA) and stent implant improves survival, but restenosis (regrowth) can occur. Periodontal bacteremia is closely associated with inflammation and native arterial atherosclerosis, with potential to increase restenosis. Two virus-derived anti-inflammatory proteins, M-T7 and Serp-1, reduce inflammation and plaque growth after BA and transplant in animal models through separate pathways. M-T7 is a broad spectrum C, CC and CXC chemokine-binding protein. Serp-1 is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) inhibiting thrombotic and thrombolytic pathways. Serp-1 also reduces arterial inflammation and improves survival in a mouse herpes virus (MHV68) model of lethal vasculitis. In addition, Serp-1 demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with unstable coronary disease and stent implant, reducing markers of myocardial damage. We investigate here the effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, on restenosis after BA and the effects of blocking chemokine and protease pathways with M-T7 and Serp-1. ApoE-/- mice had aortic BA and oral P. gingivalis infection. Arterial plaque growth was examined at 24 weeks with and without anti-inflammatory protein treatment. Dental plaques from mice infected with P. gingivalis tested positive for infection. Neither Serp-1 nor M-T7 treatment reduced infection, but IgG antibody levels in mice treated with Serp-1 and M-T7 were reduced. P. gingivalis significantly increased monocyte invasion and arterial plaque growth after BA (P<0.025). Monocyte invasion and plaque growth were blocked by M-T7 treatment (P<0.023), whereas Serp-1 produced only a trend toward reductions. Both proteins modified expression of TLR4 and MyD88. In conclusion, aortic plaque growth in ApoE-/- mice increased after angioplasty in mice with chronic oral P. gingivalis infection. Blockade of chemokines, but not serine

  20. Myxomavirus Anti-Inflammatory Chemokine Binding Protein Reduces the Increased Plaque Growth Induced by Chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis Oral Infection after Balloon Angioplasty Aortic Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Alexandra R.; Verma, Raj K.; Dai, Erbin; Liu, Liying; Chen, Hao; Kesavalu, Sheela; Rivera, Mercedes; Velsko, Irina; Ambadapadi, Sriram; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of inflammatory plaque in coronary arteries causes myocardial infarction. Treatment with emergent balloon angioplasty (BA) and stent implant improves survival, but restenosis (regrowth) can occur. Periodontal bacteremia is closely associated with inflammation and native arterial atherosclerosis, with potential to increase restenosis. Two virus-derived anti-inflammatory proteins, M-T7 and Serp-1, reduce inflammation and plaque growth after BA and transplant in animal models through separate pathways. M-T7 is a broad spectrum C, CC and CXC chemokine-binding protein. Serp-1 is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) inhibiting thrombotic and thrombolytic pathways. Serp-1 also reduces arterial inflammation and improves survival in a mouse herpes virus (MHV68) model of lethal vasculitis. In addition, Serp-1 demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with unstable coronary disease and stent implant, reducing markers of myocardial damage. We investigate here the effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, on restenosis after BA and the effects of blocking chemokine and protease pathways with M-T7 and Serp-1. ApoE−/− mice had aortic BA and oral P. gingivalis infection. Arterial plaque growth was examined at 24 weeks with and without anti-inflammatory protein treatment. Dental plaques from mice infected with P. gingivalis tested positive for infection. Neither Serp-1 nor M-T7 treatment reduced infection, but IgG antibody levels in mice treated with Serp-1 and M-T7 were reduced. P. gingivalis significantly increased monocyte invasion and arterial plaque growth after BA (P<0.025). Monocyte invasion and plaque growth were blocked by M-T7 treatment (P<0.023), whereas Serp-1 produced only a trend toward reductions. Both proteins modified expression of TLR4 and MyD88. In conclusion, aortic plaque growth in ApoE−/− mice increased after angioplasty in mice with chronic oral P. gingivalis infection. Blockade of chemokines, but not serine

  1. CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine signaling in spinal glia induces pain hypersensitivity through MAPKs-mediated neuroinflammation in bone cancer rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Liu, Yan-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Long; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Li-Ping; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    The activation of MAPK pathways in spinal cord and subsequent production of proinflammatory cytokines in glial cells contribute to the development of spinal central sensitization, the basic mechanism underlying bone cancer pain (BCP). Our previous study showed that spinal CXCL12 from astrocytes mediates BCP generation by binding to CXCR4 in both astrocyters and microglia. Here, we verified that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling contributed to BCP through a MAPK-mediated mechanism. In naïve rats, a single intrathecal administration of CXCL12 considerably induced pain hyperalgesia and phosphorylation expression of spinal MAPK members (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase), which could be partially prevented by pre-treatment with CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3100. This CXCL12-induced hyperalgesia was also reduced by MAPK inhibitors. In bone cancer rats, tumor cell inoculation into the tibial cavity caused prominent and persistent pain hyperalgesia, and associated with up-regulation of CXCL12 and CXCR4, activation of glial cells, phosphorylation of MAPKs, and production of proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord. These tumor cell inoculation-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations were all suppressed by blocking CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling or MAPK pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that spinal MAPK pathways mediated CXCL12/CXCR4-induced pain hypersensitivity in bone cancer rats, which could be druggable targets for alleviating BCP and glia-derived neuroinflammation. Following tumor cell inoculation, chemokine CXCL12 from astrocytes spreads around the spinal environment, resulting in functional activation of CXCR4-expressing astrocytes and microglia. Once glia are activated, they may initiate MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathways, and subsequently produce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Among them, CXCL12 could reinforce the astrocytic and microglial activation in autocrine and paracrine manners

  2. Restoration of dysregulated CC chemokine signaling for monocyte/macrophage chemotaxis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients by neem leaf glycoprotein maximizes tumor cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Bose, Anamika; Chakraborty, Tathagata; Sarkar, Koustav; Goswami, Shyamal; Pal, Smarajit; Baral, Rathindranath

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that the CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is downregulated on monocyte/macrophage (MO/Mphi) surfaces in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients (stage IIIB). Ligands (RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta) of this chemokine receptor were also secreted in lesser quantity from MO/Mphi of HNSCC patients in comparison with healthy individuals. In an aim to restore this dysregulated receptor-ligand signaling, we have used neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP), a novel immunomodulator reported from our laboratory. NLGP upregulated CCR5 expression, as evidenced from studies on MO/Mphi of peripheral blood from HNSCC patients as well as healthy individuals. Expression of RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta was also upregulated following NLGP treatment of these cells in vitro. Interestingly, NLGP has little effect on the expression of CCR5 and the ligand RANTES in oral cancer cells. This restored CCR5 receptor-ligand signaling seen in MO/Mphi was reflected in improved CCR5-dependent, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated migration of MO/Mphi after NLGP treatment to a standard chemoattractant. NLGP also induces better antigen presentation and simultaneous costimulation to effector T cells by MO/Mphi by upregulating human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-ABC, CD80 and CD86. In addition, NLGP-treated MO/Mphi-primed T cells can effectively lyse tumor cells in vitro. The effects of NLGP on monocyte migration and T cell-mediated oral tumor cell killing were further demonstrated in transwell assays with or without CCR5 neutralization. These results suggest a new approach in cancer immunotherapy by modulating dysregulated CCR5 signals from MO/Mphi.

  3. Differential structural remodelling of heparan sulfate by chemokines: the role of chemokine oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Migliorini, Elisa; Salanga, Catherina L.; Thakar, Dhruv

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines control the migration of cells in normal physiological processes and in the context of disease such as inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. Two major interactions are involved: (i) binding of chemokines to chemokine receptors, which activates the cellular machinery required for movement; and (ii) binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which facilitates the organization of chemokines into haptotactic gradients that direct cell movement. Chemokines can bind and activate their receptors as monomers; however, the ability to oligomerize is critical for the function of many chemokines in vivo. Chemokine oligomerization is thought to enhance their affinity for GAGs, and here we show that it significantly affects the ability of chemokines to accumulate on and be retained by heparan sulfate (HS). We also demonstrate that several chemokines differentially rigidify and cross-link HS, thereby affecting HS rigidity and mobility, and that HS cross-linking is significantly enhanced by chemokine oligomerization. These findings suggest that chemokine–GAG interactions may play more diverse biological roles than the traditional paradigms of physical immobilization and establishment of chemokine gradients; we hypothesize that they may promote receptor-independent events such as physical re-organization of the endothelial glycocalyx and extracellular matrix, as well as signalling through proteoglycans to facilitate leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. PMID:28123055

  4. Increase in chemokines CXCL10 and CCL2 in blood from pigs infected with high compared to low virulence African swine fever virus isolates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors in whole blood was compared following infection of pigs with high and low virulence isolates of African swine fever virus. Levels of mRNAs for CCL2, CCL3L1, CCL4, CXCL10, CCR1 and CCR5 were significantly increased in at least one time point following infection in two experiments and CCL5, CCR9 and CXCR4 mRNA were significantly increased in one of the experiments. The results showed that greatest fold increases in mRNAs for CXCL10 and CCL2 were observed following infection of pigs. CXCL10 mRNA was increased by up to 15 fold in infected compared to uninfected pigs. CXCL10 protein was also detected in serum from pigs infected with the high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate. Levels of CCL2 mRNA were increased in pigs infected with high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate compared to low virulence OURT88/3 isolate and this correlated with an increase of greater than 30 fold in levels of CCL2 protein detected in serum from pigs infected with this isolate. An increase in overall chemotaxis active compounds in defibrinated plasma samples from Benin 97/1 infected pigs was observed at 3 days post-infection (dpi) and a decrease by 7 dpi as measured by chemotaxis assay using normal pig leucocytes in vitro. Increased levels of CXCL10 may either contribute to the activation of lymphocyte priming toward the Th1 phenotype or induction of T lymphocyte apoptosis. Increased levels of CCL2, a chemoattractant for macrophages, may result in increased recruitment of monocytes from bone marrow thus increasing the pool of cells susceptible to infection. PMID:24083897

  5. Increase in chemokines CXCL10 and CCL2 in blood from pigs infected with high compared to low virulence African swine fever virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Fishbourne, Emma; Hutet, Evelyne; Abrams, Charles; Cariolet, Roland; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Takamatsu, Haru-H; Dixon, Linda K

    2013-10-01

    Modulation of the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors in whole blood was compared following infection of pigs with high and low virulence isolates of African swine fever virus. Levels of mRNAs for CCL2, CCL3L1, CCL4, CXCL10, CCR1 and CCR5 were significantly increased in at least one time point following infection in two experiments and CCL5, CCR9 and CXCR4 mRNA were significantly increased in one of the experiments. The results showed that greatest fold increases in mRNAs for CXCL10 and CCL2 were observed following infection of pigs. CXCL10 mRNA was increased by up to 15 fold in infected compared to uninfected pigs. CXCL10 protein was also detected in serum from pigs infected with the high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate. Levels of CCL2 mRNA were increased in pigs infected with high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate compared to low virulence OURT88/3 isolate and this correlated with an increase of greater than 30 fold in levels of CCL2 protein detected in serum from pigs infected with this isolate. An increase in overall chemotaxis active compounds in defibrinated plasma samples from Benin 97/1 infected pigs was observed at 3 days post-infection (dpi) and a decrease by 7 dpi as measured by chemotaxis assay using normal pig leucocytes in vitro. Increased levels of CXCL10 may either contribute to the activation of lymphocyte priming toward the Th1 phenotype or induction of T lymphocyte apoptosis. Increased levels of CCL2, a chemoattractant for macrophages, may result in increased recruitment of monocytes from bone marrow thus increasing the pool of cells susceptible to infection.

  6. CC chemokine ligand 19 secreted by mature dendritic cells increases naive T cell scanning behavior and their response to rare cognate antigen.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andrew; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Trautmann, Alain; Nardin, Alessandra

    2005-08-15

    For immune responses to take place, naive T cells have to encounter, adhere to, and be stimulated by dendritic cells (DCs). In murine lymph nodes, T cells move randomly and scan the surface of multiple DCs. The factors controlling this motility as well as its consequences remain unclear. We have monitored by video-imaging the earliest steps of the interaction between human DCs and autologous naive CD4+ T cells in the absence of exogenous Ags. Mature, but not immature, DCs were able to elicit small calcium responses in naive T cells along with cell polarization and random motility, resulting in an efficient scanning of DC surfaces by T cells. We identified CCL19 as a key factor enabling all these early T cell responses, including the occurrence of calcium transients. Because this chemokine did not influence the strength of naive T cell adhesion to DCs, enhanced LFA-1 affinity for ICAM-1 was not the main mechanism by which CCL19 increased Ag-independent calcium transients. However, concomitantly to T cell motility, CCL19 augmented the frequency of T cell responses to rare anti-CD3/CD28-coated beads, used as surrogate APCs. We thus propose a new role for CCL19 in humans: by conditioning T cells into a motile DC-scanning state, this chemokine promotes Ag-independent responses and increases the probability of cognate MHC-peptide encounter.

  7. The chemokine network. II. On how polymorphisms and alternative splicing increase the number of molecular species and configure intricate patterns of disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Colobran, R; Pujol-Borrell, R; Armengol, M P; Juan, M

    2007-01-01

    In this second review on chemokines, we focus on the polymorphisms and alternative splicings and on their consequences in disease. Because chemokines are key mediators in the pathogenesis of inflammatory, autoimmune, vascular and neoplastic disorders, a large number of studies attempting to relate particular polymorphisms of chemokines to given diseases have already been conducted, sometimes with contradictory results. Reviewing the published data, it becomes evident that some chemokine genes that are polymorphic have alleles that are found repeatedly, associated with disease of different aetiologies but sharing some aspects of pathogenesis. Among CXC chemokines, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CXCL8 and CXCL12 genes stand out, as they have alleles associated with many diseases such as asthma and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), respectively. Of CC chemokines, the stronger associations occur among alleles from SNPs in CCL2 and CCL5 genes and a number of inflammatory conditions. To understand how chemokines contribute to disease it is also necessary to take into account all the isoforms resulting from differential splicing. The first part of this review deals with polymorphisms and the second with the diversity of molecular species derived from each chemokine gene due to alternative splicing phenomena. The number of molecular species and the level of expression of each of them for every chemokine and for each functionally related group of chemokines reaches a complexity that requires new modelling algorithms akin to those proposed in systems biology approaches. PMID:17848170

  8. Enhancement of Chemokine Function as an Immunomodulatory Strategy Employed by Human Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Martinez-Martín, Nadia; Nel, Hendrik J.; Rueda, Patricia; Martín, Rocío; Blanco, Soledad; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Thelen, Marcus; Fallon, Padraic G.; Alcamí, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogens that cause a variety of diseases, including lethal encephalitis. The relationship between HSV and the host immune system is one of the main determinants of the infection outcome. Chemokines play relevant roles in antiviral response and immunopathology, but the modulation of chemokine function by HSV is not well understood. We have addressed the modulation of chemokine function mediated by HSV. By using surface plasmon resonance and crosslinking assays we show that secreted glycoprotein G (SgG) from both HSV-1 and HSV-2 binds chemokines with high affinity. Chemokine binding activity was also observed in the supernatant of HSV-2 infected cells and in the plasma membrane of cells infected with HSV-1 wild type but not with a gG deficient HSV-1 mutant. Cell-binding and competition experiments indicate that the interaction takes place through the glycosaminoglycan-binding domain of the chemokine. The functional relevance of the interaction was determined both in vitro, by performing transwell assays, time-lapse microscopy, and signal transduction experiments; and in vivo, using the air pouch model of inflammation. Interestingly, and in contrast to what has been observed for previously described viral chemokine binding proteins, HSV SgGs do not inhibit chemokine function. On the contrary, HSV SgGs enhance chemotaxis both in vitro and in vivo through increasing directionality, potency and receptor signaling. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a viral chemokine binding protein from a human pathogen that increases chemokine function and points towards a previously undescribed strategy of immune modulation mediated by viruses. PMID:22319442

  9. C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) signaling protects neonatal male mice with hypoxic-ischemic hippocampal damage from developing spatial learning deficits.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M; Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Rivest, Serge

    2015-06-01

    Chemokines are a family of cytokines involved in the chemotaxis of leukocytes and other target cells by binding to specific G-protein-coupled receptors on their membranes. As such, the activation of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) is involved in the mobilization of "inflammatory" monocytes from bone marrow and in their recruitment to the brain under inflammatory/pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated whether CCR2 signaling could affect the progression of learning deficits and hippocampal damage in a model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. Postnatal day 3 wild-type (WT) and CCR2 knockout (KO) mice of both sexes were subjected to the Rice-Vannucci model of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and were followed for up to 14 weeks. HI CCR2 KO male mice were the only animals to exhibit long-term spatial learning deficits in the T-water maze task, compared to their corresponding sham-operated controls. CCR2 KO mouse pups of both sexes had a lower number of circulating monocytes, although only HI CCR2 KO male mice exhibited reduced numbers of activated macrophages/microglia in the damaged hippocampus, compared to WT mice. However, no differences were observed in hippocampal atrophy between HI CCR2 KO and HI WT mice. These results suggest that CCR2 signaling can protect neonatal mice from developing spatial learning deficits after a HI insult, in a sex-specific fashion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Bryan; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Oligomerization of chemokine receptors has been reported to influence many aspects of receptor function through allosteric communication between receptor protomers. Allosteric interactions within chemokine receptor hetero-oligomers have been shown to cause negative cooperativity in the binding of chemokines and to inhibit receptor activation in the case of some receptor pairs. Other receptor pairs can cause enhanced signaling and even activate entirely new, hetero-oligomer-specific signaling complexes and responses downstream of receptor activation. Many mechanisms contribute to these effects including direct allosteric coupling between the receptors, G protein mediated allostery, G protein stealing, ligand sequestration and recruitment of new intracellular proteins by exposing unique binding interfaces on the oligomerized receptors. These effects present both challenges as well as exciting opportunities for drug discovery. One of the most difficult challenges will involve determining if and when hetero-oligomers versus homo-oligomers are involved in specific disease states. PMID:23415099

  11. A novel CXCR3-B chemokine receptor-induced growth-inhibitory signal in cancer cells is mediated through the regulation of Bach-1 protein and Nrf2 protein nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Balan, Murugabaskar; Pal, Soumitro

    2014-02-07

    Chemokines and their receptors play diverse roles in regulating cancer growth and progression. The receptor CXCR3 can have two splice variants with opposite functions. CXCR3-A promotes cell growth, whereas CXCR3-B mediates growth-inhibitory signals. However, the negative signals through CXCR3-B in cancer cells are not well characterized. In this study, we found that CXCR3-B-mediated signaling in MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells induced apoptotic cell death. Signals through CXCR3-B decreased the levels of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and increased the expression of apoptotic cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Along with up-regulation in apoptosis, CXCR3-B signals were associated with a decrease in cellular autophagy with reduced levels of the autophagic markers Beclin-1 and LC3B. Notably, CXCR3-B down-regulated the expression of the cytoprotective and antiapoptotic molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) at the transcriptional level. There was an increased nuclear localization of Bach-1 and nuclear export of Nrf2, which are important negative and positive transcription factors, respectively, for HO-1 expression. We also observed that CXCR3-B promoted the activation of p38 MAPK and the inhibition of ERK-1/2. CXCR3-B could not induce cancer cell apoptosis at the optimal level when we either inhibited p38 activity or knocked down Bach-1. Further, CXCR3-B-induced apoptosis was down-regulated when we overexpressed HO-1. Together, our data suggest that CXCR3-B mediates a growth-inhibitory signal in breast cancer cells through the modulations of nuclear translocation of Bach-1 and Nrf2 and down-regulation of HO-1. We suggest that the induction of CXCR3-B-mediated signaling can serve as a novel therapeutic approach where the goal is to promote tumor cell apoptosis.

  12. T cell costimulation by chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Molon, Barbara; Gri, Giorgia; Bettella, Monica; Gómez-Moutón, Concepción; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Martínez-A, Carlos; Mañes, Santos; Viola, Antonella

    2005-05-01

    Signals mediated by chemokine receptors may compete with T cell receptor stop signals and determine the duration of T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions. Here we show that during T cell stimulation by antigen-presenting cells, T cell chemokine receptors coupled to G(q) and/or G(11) protein were recruited to the immunological synapse by a G(i)-independent mechanism. When chemokine receptors were sequestered at the immunological synapse, T cells became insensitive to chemotactic gradients, formed more stable conjugates and finally responded with enhanced proliferation and cytokine production. We suggest that chemokine receptor trapping at the immunological synapse enhances T cell activation by improving T cell-antigen-presenting cell attraction and impeding the 'distraction' of successfully engaged T cells by other chemokine sources.

  13. The Role of Chemokines in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Homing to Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are being administered to cutaneous wounds with the goal of accelerating wound closure and promoting regeneration instead of scar formation. An ongoing challenge for cell-based therapies is achieving effective and optimal targeted delivery and engraftment at the site of injury. Contributing to this challenge is our incomplete understanding of endogenous MSC homing to sites of injury. Recent Advances: Chemokines and their receptors are now recognized as important mediators of stem cell homing. To date, the most studied chemokine–chemokine receptor axis in MSC homing to wounds is CXCL12-CXCR4 but recent work suggests that CCL27-CCR10 and CCL21-CCR7 may also be involved. Critical Issues: Strategies to enhance chemokine-mediated MSC homing to wounds are using a variety of approaches to amplify the chemokine signal at the wound site and/or overexpress specific chemokine receptors on the surface of the MSC. Future Directions: Harnessing chemokine signaling may enhance the therapeutic effects of stem cell therapy by increasing the number of both exogenous and endogenous stem cells recruited to the site of injury. Alternatively, chemokine-based therapies directly targeting endogenous stem cells may circumvent the need for the time-consuming and costly isolation and expansion of autologous stem cells prior to therapeutic administration. PMID:26543676

  14. Synergy between coproduced CC and CXC chemokines in monocyte chemotaxis through receptor-mediated events.

    PubMed

    Gouwy, Mieke; Struyf, Sofie; Noppen, Samuel; Schutyser, Evemie; Springael, Jean-Yves; Parmentier, Marc; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo

    2008-08-01

    CC and CXC chemokines coinduced in fibroblasts and leukocytes by cytokines and microbial agents determine the number of phagocytes infiltrating into inflamed tissues. Interleukin-8/CXCL8 and stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCL12 significantly and dose-dependently increased the migration of monocytes, expressing the corresponding CXC chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, toward suboptimal concentrations of the monocyte chemotactic proteins CCL2 or CCL7. These findings were confirmed using different chemotaxis assays and monocytic THP-1 cells. In contrast, the combination of two CC chemokines (CCL2 plus CCL7) or two CXC chemokines (CXCL8 plus CXCL12) did not provide synergy in monocyte chemotaxis. These data show that chemokines competing for related receptors and using similar signaling pathways do not synergize. Receptor heterodimerization is probably not essential for chemokine synergy as shown in CXCR4/CCR2 cotransfectants. It is noteworthy that CCL2 mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and calcium mobilization was significantly enhanced by CXCL8 in monocytes, indicating cooperative downstream signaling pathways during enhanced chemotaxis. Moreover, in contrast to intact CXCL12, truncated CXCL12(3-68), which has impaired receptor signaling capacity but can still desensitize CXCR4, was unable to synergize with CCL2 in monocytic cell migration. Furthermore, AMD3100 and RS102895, specific CXCR4 and CCR2 inhibitors, respectively, reduced the synergistic effect between CCL2 and CXCL12 significantly. These data indicate that for synergistic interaction between chemokines binding and signaling of the two chemokines via their proper receptors is necessary.

  15. Increased expression of chemokine receptor CCR3 and its ligands in ulcerative colitis: the role of colonic epithelial cells in in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Manousou, P; Kolios, G; Valatas, V; Drygiannakis, I; Bourikas, L; Pyrovolaki, K; Koutroubakis, I; Papadaki, H A; Kouroumalis, E

    2010-11-01

    Human colonic epithelial cells express T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated chemoattractants, yet little is known about the production of Th2-associated chemoattractants. CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL24/eotaxin-2 and CCL26/eotaxin-3 are known to attract CCR3-expressing, Th2-polarized lymphocytes. We studied constitutive and inflammation-induced expression and production of CCR3 together with its ligands in the colon and peripheral blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by flow cytometry, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We further defined the regulated expression of these chemokines by RT–PCR and ELISA using cultured human epithelial cell lines. A higher fraction of peripheral T lymphocytes were found to be positive for CCR3 in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) compared to Crohn’s disease (CD), while almost no CCR3(+) T cells were found in normal controls (NC). Similarly, higher and more frequent expression of CCR3 was observed in colonic biopsies from patients with UC, regardless of the disease activity, when compared to CD or NCs. Serum CCL11/eotaxin-1 was increased significantly in UC (306 ± 87 pg/ml) and less so in CD (257 ± 43 pg/ml), whereas CCL24/eotaxin-2, and CCL26/eotaxin-3 were increased only in UC. Colonic expression of the three chemokines was minimal in NCs but high in inflammatory bowel diseases (especially UC) and was independent of disease activity. Th2, and to a lesser extent Th1, cytokines were able to induce expression and production of all three eotaxins from colonic epithelial cells in culture. CCR3 and ligands over-expression would appear to be a characteristic of UC. The production of CCR3 ligands by human colonic epithelial cells suggests further that epithelium can play a role in modulating pathological T cell-mediated mucosal inflammation.

  16. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  17. Immune Alterations in CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Neuronal C-C and C-X-C Chemokine Receptor Regulation Through Adenosine A2A Receptor Signaling in a BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J Autistic Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh F; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Mohammad, Raish; Attia, Sabry M

    2017-04-18

    Associative studies on a range of neurodevelopmental disorders have identified relationships between behavioral deficits and immune system function. The BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J (BTBR) mouse strain displays aberrant characteristics in its social behavior and immune responses, providing a significant opportunity to examine the relationship between behavior and the immune system. This study investigated the influence of adenosine A2A receptor activity on C-C and C-X-C chemokine receptors involved in autism in the BTBR mouse model. A2A receptors have previously been targeted in clinical trials by potential therapeutics with neuroprotective, immunomodulatory, and analgesic properties. In this study, we examined the effects of A2A receptor antagonist SCH5826 (SCH) and A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 (CGS) on C-C and C-X-C chemokine receptors (CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, CXCR3, CXCR4, and CXCR5) on splenic CD8(+) T cells in the BTBR autistic mouse model. We also assessed the C-C and C-X-C chemokine receptors mRNA levels in brain tissue. Our results showed that CCR3(+), CCR4(+), CCR5(+), CCR6(+), CCR7(+), CXCR3(+), CXCR4(+), and CXCR5(+) production in splenic CD8(+) T cells decreased significantly in BTBR-CGS-treated mice in comparison with that in BTBR control and BTBR-SCH-treated mice. In addition, RT-PCR analysis revealed decreased gene expression levels for C-C and C-X-C chemokine receptors in the brain tissue of BTBR-CGS-treated mice, whereas these levels were significantly increased in BTBR control and BTBR-SCH-treated mice. Our results suggest that treating BTBR mice with CGS decreases C-C and C-X-C chemokine receptor signaling and might therefore provide a unique avenue for developing future therapies for autism and neuroimmunological disorders.

  18. Chemokine and chemokine receptor dynamics during genital chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Belay, Tesfaye; Eko, Francis O; Ananaba, Godwin A; Bowers, Samera; Moore, Terri; Lyn, Deborah; Igietseme, Joseph U

    2002-02-01

    Current design strategies for vaccines against certain microbial pathogens, including Chlamydia trachomatis, require the induction and targeting of specific immune effectors to the local sites of infection known as the mucosal effector sites. Chemokines and their receptors are important mediators of leukocyte trafficking and of the controlled recruitment of specific leukocyte clonotypes during host defense against infections and during inflammation. We analyzed the dynamics of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in genital mucosae during genital chlamydial infection in a murine model to determine how these molecular entities influence the development of immunity and the clearance of infection. A time course study revealed an increase of up to threefold in the levels of expression of RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), gamma-interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), and intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) after genital infection with the C. trachomatis agent of mouse pneumonitis. Peak levels of expression of RANTES, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha occurred by day 7 after primary infection, while those of IP-10 and ICAM-1 peaked by day 21. Expression levels of these molecules decreased by day 42 after primary infection, by which time all animals had resolved the infection, suggesting an infection-driven regulation of expression. A rapid upregulation of expression of these molecules was observed after secondary infection. The presence of cells bearing the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3, known to be preferentially expressed on Th1 and dendritic cells, was also synchronous with the kinetics of immune induction in the genital tract and clearance of infection. Results demonstrated that genital chlamydial infection is associated with a significant induction of chemokines and chemokine receptors that are involved in the recruitment of Th1 cells into the site of infection. Future studies will focus

  19. Chemokine CCL2-CCR2 Signaling Induces Neuronal Cell Death via STAT3 Activation and IL-1β Production after Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dai-Shi; Peng, Jiyun; Murugan, Madhuvika; Feng, Li-Jie; Liu, Jun-Li; Eyo, Ukpong B; Zhou, Li-Jun; Mogilevsky, Rochelle; Wang, Wei; Wu, Long-Jun

    2017-08-16

    Elevated levels of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor CCR2 have been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in experimental seizures. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanism underlying CCL2-CCR2 signaling in epileptic brain remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that the upregulated CCL2 was mainly expressed in hippocampal neurons and activated microglia from mice 1 d after kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. Taking advantage of CX3CR1(GFP/+):CCR2(RFP/+) double-transgenic mice, we demonstrated that CCL2-CCR2 signaling has a role in resident microglial activation and blood-derived monocyte infiltration. Moreover, seizure-induced degeneration of neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region was attenuated in mice lacking CCL2 or CCR2. We further showed that CCR2 activation induced STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation and IL-1β production, which are critical for promoting neuronal cell death after status epilepticus. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 by WP1066 reduced seizure-induced IL-1β production and subsequent neuronal death. Two weeks after KA-induced seizures, CCR2 deficiency not only reduced neuronal loss, but also attenuated seizure-induced behavioral impairments, including anxiety, memory decline, and recurrent seizure severity. Together, we demonstrated that CCL2-CCR2 signaling contributes to neurodegeneration via STAT3 activation and IL-1β production after status epilepticus, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of epilepsy.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a global concern and epileptic seizures occur in many neurological conditions. Neuroinflammation associated with microglial activation and monocyte infiltration are characteristic of epileptic brains. However, molecular mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in neuronal death following epilepsy remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that CCL2-CCR2 signaling is

  20. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-12-03

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH is stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring twofold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH(+) neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2(+) cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2(+) cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83-87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2(+) and MCH(+) neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2(+)/MCH(+)/BrdU(+) neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2(+)/MCH(+) neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that

  1. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G.-Q.; Karatayev, O.; Leibowitz, S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3 g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring two-fold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH+ neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2+ cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2+ cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83–87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2+ and MCH+ neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2+/MCH+/BrdU+ neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2+/MCH+ neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that these systems

  2. The carboxyl terminus of the chemokine receptor CCR3 contains distinct domains which regulate chemotactic signaling and receptor down-regulation in a ligand-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, Ian; Jorritsma, Annelies; Stubbs, Victoria E L; Xanthou, Georgina; Jopling, Louise A; Ponath, Paul D; Williams, Timothy J; Murphy, Philip M; Pease, James E

    2005-04-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 regulates the chemotaxis of leukocytes implicated in allergic disease, such as eosinophils. Incubation of eosinophils with CCL11, CCL13 or CCL5 resulted in a rapid decrease of cell-surface CCR3 which was replicated using CCR3 transfectants. Progressive truncation of the CCR3 C terminus by 15 amino acids produced three constructs, Delta340, Delta325 and Delta310. Delta340 and Delta325 were able to bind CCL11 with affinities similar to wild-type CCR3. Delta340 transfectants exhibited enhanced migration and reduced receptor down-regulation in response to CCL11 and CCL13. Delta325 transfectants displayed chemotactic responses to CCL11 and CCL13 similar to wild-type CCR3, and had impaired down-regulation when stimulated with CCL13 but not CCL11. In contrast, neither the Delta325 nor Delta340 truncation affected chemotaxis or receptor down-regulation induced by CCL5. Delta310 transfectants bound CCL11 poorly and were biologically inactive. Inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3-kinase antagonized eosinophil shape change responses and chemotaxis of transfectants to CCL11 and CCL13. In contrast, shape change but not chemotaxis was sensitive to inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase pathway suggesting differential regulation of the two responses. Thus, the CCR3 C terminus contains distinct domains responsible for the regulation of receptor desensitization and for coupling to chemotactic responses.

  3. Chemokines and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  4. Interplay between signaling via the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) and chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lena; Redvall, Elin; Johnsson, Marianne; Stenfeldt, Anna-Lena; Dahlgren, Claes; Wennerås, Christine

    2009-08-01

    Eosinophils express the chemoattractant receptors CCR3 and FPR. CCR3 binds several agonists such as eotaxin-1, -2, and -3 and RANTES, whereas the FPR binds the formylated tripeptide fMLP and a host of other ligands. The aim of this study was to investigate if there is interplay between these two receptors regarding the elicitation of migration and respiratory burst in human blood-derived eosinophils. Inhibition of the FPR with the antagonists CyH and boc-MLP abrogated the migration of eosinophils toward all of the CCR3 agonists. Similar results were seen when the FPR was desensitized with its cognate ligand, fMLP. In contrast, the respiratory burst triggered by eotaxin-1 was not inhibited by CyH. Thus, signals evoked via the FPR caused unidirectional down-regulation of CCR3-mediated chemotaxis but not respiratory burst in human eosinophils. The underlying mechanism was neither reduced ability of the CCR3 ligand eotaxin-1 to bind to CCR3 nor down-regulation of CCR3 from the cell surface. Finally, confocal microscopy and adFRET analysis ruled out homo- or heterodimer formation between FPR and/or CCR3 as an explanation for the reduction in chemotaxis via CCR3. Pharmacologic inhibition of signal transduction molecules showed that the release of free oxygen radicals in response to eotaxin-1 compared with fMLP is relatively more dependent on the p38 MAPK pathway.

  5. Interactions between Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Anna; Hippensteel, Randi; Shimizu, Saori; Nicolai, Jaclyn; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2010-01-01

    The soluble form of the chemokine fractalkine/CX3CL1 regulates microglia activation in the central nervous system (CNS), ultimately affecting neuronal survival. This study aims to determine whether CXCL12, another chemokine constitutively expressed in the CNS (known as stromal cell-derived factor 1; SDF-1), regulates cleavage of fractalkine from neurons. To this end, ELISA was used to measure protein levels of soluble fractalkine in the medium of rat neuronal cultures exposed to SDF-1. Gene arrays, quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot were used to measure overall fractalkine expression in neurons. The data show that the rate of fractalkine shedding in healthy cultures positively correlates with in vitro differentiation and survival. In analogy to non-neuronal cells, metalloproteinases (ADAM10/17) are involved in cleavage of neuronal fractalkine as indicated by studies with pharmacologic inhibitors. Moreover, treatment of the neuronal cultures with SDF-1 stimulates expression of the inducible metalloproteinase ADAM17 and increases soluble fractalkine content in culture medium. The effect of SDF-1 is blocked by an inhibitor of both ADAM10 and -17, but only partially affected by a more specific inhibitor of ADAM10. In addition, SDF-1 also up-regulates expression of the fractalkine gene. Conversely, exposure of neurons to an excitotoxic stimulus (i.e. NMDA) inhibits α-secretase activity and markedly diminishes soluble fractalkine levels, leading to cell death. These results, along with previous findings on the neuroprotective role of both SDF-1 and fractalkine, suggest that this novel interaction between the two chemokines may contribute to in vivo regulation of neuronal survival by modulating microglial neurotoxic properties. PMID:20124406

  6. Increased Levels of C-C Chemokine RANTES in Asbestos Exposed Workers and in Malignant Mesothelioma Patients from an Hyperendemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Comar, Manola; Zanotta, Nunzia; Bonotti, Alessandra; Tognon, Mauro; Negro, Corrado; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Bovenzi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Background Asbestos-induced mesothelial inflammatory processes are thought to be the basic mechanisms underlying Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) development. Detection of MM often occurs at late stage due to the long and unpredictable latent period and the low incidence in asbestos exposed individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate early immunological biomarkers to characterize the prognostic profile of a possible asbestos-induced disease, in subjects from a MM hyperendemic area. Methods The Luminex Multiplex Panel Technology was used for the simultaneous measurement of serum levels of a large panel of 47 analytes, including cytokines and growth factors, from workers previously exposed to asbestos (Asb-workers), asbestos-induced MM patients and healthy subjects. In addition, to explore the influence on serum cytokines profile exerted by SV40 infection, a cofactor in MM development, a quantitative real time PCR was performed for sequences detection in the N-terminal and intronic regions of the SV40 Tag gene. Statistical analysis was done by means of the Mann-Whitney test and the Kruskall-Wallis test for variance analysis. Results A variety of 25 cytokines linked to pulmonary inflammation and tumor development were found significantly associated with Asb-workers and MM patients compared with healthy controls. A specific pattern of cytokines were found highly expressed in Asb-workers: IFN-alpha (p<0.05), EOTAXIN (p<0.01), RANTES (p<0.001), and in MM patients: IL-12(p40), IL-3, IL-1 alpha, MCP-3, beta-NGF, TNF-beta, RANTES (p<0.001). Notably, the chemokine RANTES measured the highest serum level showing an increased gradient of concentration from healthy subjects to Asb-workers and MM patients (p<0.001), independently of SV40 infection. Conclusion This study shows that, in subjects from an hyperendemic area for MM, the C-C chemokine RANTES is associated with the exposure to asbestos fibres. If validated in larger samples, this factor could have the potential to

  7. Association of MIF, but not type I interferon-induced chemokines, with increased disease activity in Asian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Connelly, K L; Kandane-Rathnayake, R; Hoi, A; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, E F

    2016-07-25

    Ethnicity is a key factor impacting on disease severity in SLE, but molecular mechanisms of these associations are unknown. Type I IFN and MIF have each been associated with SLE pathogenesis. We investigated whether increased SLE severity in Asian patients is associated with either MIF or Type I IFN. SLE patients (n = 151) had prospective recording of disease variables. Serum MIF, and a validated composite score of three Type I IFN-inducible chemokines (IFNCK:CCL2, CXCL10, CCL19) were measured. Associations of MIF and IFNCK score with disease activity were assessed, with persistent active disease (PAD) used as a marker of high disease activity over a median 2.6 years follow up. In univariable analysis, MIF, IFNCK score and Asian ethnicity were significantly associated with PAD. Asian ethnicity was associated with higher MIF but not IFNCK score. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, MIF (OR3.62 (95% CI 1.14,11.5), p = 0.03) and Asian ethnicity (OR3.00 (95% CI 1.39,6.46), p < 0.01) but not IFNCK were significantly associated with PAD. These results potentially support an effect of MIF, but not Type I IFN, in heightened SLE disease severity in Asian SLE. The associations of MIF and Asian ethnicity with PAD are at least partly independent.

  8. Cytokine-induced sleep: Neurons respond to TNF with production of chemokines and increased expression of Homer1a in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karrer, Maureen; Lopez, Martin Alexander; Meier, Daniel; Mikhail, Cyril; Ogunshola, Omolara O; Müller, Andreas Felix; Strauss, Laura; Tafti, Mehdi; Fontana, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    Interactions of neurons with microglia may play a dominant role in sleep regulation. TNF may exert its somnogeneic effects by promoting attraction of microglia and their processes to the vicinity of dendrites and synapses. We found TNF to stimulate neurons (i) to produce CCL2, CCL7 and CXCL10, chemokines acting on mononuclear phagocytes and (ii) to stimulate the expression of the macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF/Csf1), which leads to elongation of microglia processes. TNF may also act on neurons by affecting the expression of genes essential in sleep-wake behavior. The neuronal expression of Homer1a mRNA, increases during spontaneous and enforced periods of wakefulness. Mice with a deletion of Homer1a show a reduced wakefulness with increased non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep during the dark period. Recently the TNF-dependent increase of NREM sleep in the dark period of mice with CD40-induced immune activation was found to be associated with decreased expression of Homer1a. In the present study we investigated the effects of TNF and IL-1β on gene expression in cultures of the neuronal cell line HT22 and cortical neurons. TNF slightly increased the expression of Homer1a and IL-1β profoundly enhanced the expression of Early growth response 2 (Egr2). The data presented here indicate that the decreased expression of Homer1a, which was found in the dark period of mice with CD40-induced increase of NREM sleep is not due to inhibitory effects of TNF and IL-1β on the expression of Homer1a in neurons.

  9. Overexpression of the monocyte chemokine CCL2 in dorsal root ganglion neurons causes a conditioning-like increase in neurite outgrowth and does so via a STAT3 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Jon P; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Cregg, Jared M; Howarth, Madeline; Zigmond, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the regeneration of peripheral nerves following axotomy. An injury to the sciatic nerve leads to significant macrophage accumulation in the L5 DRG, an effect not seen when the dorsal root is injured. We recently demonstrated that this accumulation around axotomized cell bodies is necessary for a peripheral conditioning lesion response to occur. Here we asked whether overexpression of the monocyte chemokine CCL2 specifically in DRG neurons of uninjured mice is sufficient to cause macrophage accumulation and to enhance regeneration or whether other injury-derived signals are required. AAV5-EF1α-CCL2 was injected intrathecally, and this injection led to a time-dependent increase in CCL2 mRNA expression and macrophage accumulation in L5 DRG, with a maximal response at 3 weeks post-injection. These changes led to a conditioning-like increase in neurite outgrowth in DRG explant and dissociated cell cultures. This increase in regeneration was dependent upon CCL2 acting through its primary receptor CCR2. When CCL2 was overexpressed in CCR2-/- mice, macrophage accumulation and enhanced regeneration were not observed. To address the mechanism by which CCL2 overexpression enhances regeneration, we tested for elevated expression of regeneration-associated genes in these animals. Surprisingly, we found that CCL2 overexpression led to a selective increase in LIF mRNA and neuronal phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) in L5 DRGs, with no change in expression seen in other RAGs such as GAP-43. Blockade of STAT3 phosphorylation by each of two different inhibitors prevented the increase in neurite outgrowth. Thus, CCL2 overexpression is sufficient to induce macrophage accumulation in uninjured L5 DRGs and increase the regenerative capacity of DRG neurons via a STAT3-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Overexpression of the Monocyte Chemokine CCL2 in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Causes a Conditioning-Like Increase in Neurite Outgrowth and Does So via a STAT3 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Jon P.; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Cregg, Jared; Howarth, Madeline; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the regeneration of peripheral nerves following axotomy. An injury to the sciatic nerve leads to significant macrophage accumulation in the L5 DRG, an effect not seen when the dorsal root is injured. We recently demonstrated that this accumulation around axotomized cell bodies is necessary for a peripheral conditioning lesion response to occur. Here we asked whether overexpression of the monocyte chemokine CCL2 specifically in DRG neurons of uninjured mice is sufficient to cause macrophage accumulation and to enhance regeneration or whether other injury-derived signals are required. AAV5-EF1α-CCL2 was injected intrathecally, and this injection led to a time-dependent increase in CCL2 mRNA expression and macrophage accumulation in L5 DRG, with a maximal response at 3 wk post-injection. These changes led to a conditioning-like increase in neurite outgrowth in DRG explant and dissociated cell cultures. This increase in regeneration was dependent upon CCL2 acting through its primary receptor CCR2. When CCL2 was overexpressed in CCR2 −/− mice, macrophage accumulation and enhanced regeneration were not observed. To address the mechanism by which CCL2 overexpression enhances regeneration, we tested for elevated expression of regeneration-associated genes in these animals. Surprisingly, we found that CCL2 overexpression led to a selective increase in LIF mRNA and neuronal phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) in L5 DRGs, with no change in expression seen in other RAGs such as GAP-43. Blockade of STAT3 phosphorylation by each of two different inhibitors prevented the increase in neurite outgrowth. Thus, CCL2 overexpression is sufficient to induce macrophage accumulation in uninjured L5 DRGs and increase the regenerative capacity of DRG neurons via a STAT3-dependent mechanism. PMID:26431741

  11. CIPROFLOXACIN INCREASES SURVIVAL AFTER IONIZING IRRADIATION COMBINED INJURY: γ-H2AX FORMATION, CYTOKINE/CHEMOKINE, AND RED BLOOD CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Juliann G.; Fukumoto, Risaku

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation alone (radiation injury, as abbreviated RI) or combined with traumatic tissue injury (radiation combined injury, as abbreviated CI) is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological accidents. It is well-documented that RI and CI occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and system levels. However, their mechanisms remain largely unclear. It has been observed in dogs, pigs, rats, guinea pigs, and mice that radiation exposure combined with burns, wounds, or bacterial infection results in greater mortality than radiation exposure alone. In our laboratory, we found that B6D2F1/J female mice exposed to 9.75 Gy 60Co-γ photon radiation followed by 15% total body surface area wounds experienced 50% higher mortality (over 30-day observation period) compared to irradiation alone. CI enhanced DNA damages, amplified iNOS activation, induced massive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, overexpressed MMPs and TLRs and aggravated sepsis that led to cell death. In the present study, B6D2F1/J mice received CI were treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP, 90 mg/kg p.o., q.d. within 2h after CI through day 21). At day 1, CIP treatment significantly reduced CI-induced γ-H2AX formation. At day 10, CIP treatment not only significantly reduced cytokine/chemokine concentrations, including IL-6 and KC (i.e., IL-8 in human), but also enhanced IL-3 production compared to vehicle-treated controls. CIP also elevated red blood cell counts, hemoglobin levels and hematocrits. At day 30, CIP treatment increased 45% survival after CI (i.e., 2.3-fold increase over vehicle treatment). The results suggest that CIP may prove to be an effective therapeutic drug for CI. PMID:24776905

  12. Chemokines and chemokine receptors: standing at the crossroads of immunobiology and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Ransohoff, Richard M

    2009-11-20

    There are several molecular entities common to the immune and nervous systems. Salient among them are the chemokines and their receptors, which play remarkably varied and potent roles in immunobiology and neurobiology. This review limns several illustrative examples and presents general principles of chemokine action that are manifest in both systems. These include the following: (1) chemokines tend equally to arrest cells and to make them move, in the process of positioning target cells with spatiotemporal precision; (2) signaling and nonsignaling receptors collaborate to adjust the chemokine environment for maximal efficacy; and (3) expression of a single chemokine receptor on circulating blood cells and parenchymal cells is often used to coordinate complex tissue responses. The challenge is to integrate knowledge of the roles of key receptors (as well as their ligands) into a coherent account of events during pathologic processes, in order to guide therapeutic development.

  13. Atypical chemokine receptors: from silence to sound.

    PubMed

    Cancellieri, Cinzia; Vacchini, Alessandro; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella; Borroni, Elena M

    2013-02-01

    ACRs (atypical chemokine receptors) were initially referred to as 'silent' receptors on the basis of a lack of signalling and functional activities that are typically observed with conventional chemokine receptors. Although ACRs do not directly induce cell migration, they indirectly control leucocyte recruitment by shaping chemokine gradients in tissues through degradation, transcytosis or local concentration of their cognate ligands. Recent evidence also suggests that these biological activities are supported by G-protein-independent, β-arrestin-dependent signalling events. In the present article, we review current knowledge on structural and signalling properties of ACRs that are changing our view on this entire class of receptors from silent to endogenous β-arrestin-biased signalling receptors.

  14. Dysregulated Chemokine Receptor Expression and Chemokine-Mediated Cell Trafficking in Pediatric Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Barbara; Dai, Wei Wei; Lesser, Martin L.; Trachtman, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Children and adolescents with ESRD on dialysis are susceptible to serious bacterial infections (SBI). Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a critical role in modulating macrophage and neutrophil function. This study examined the hypothesis that expression and/or function of these molecules is dysregulated in patients with ESRD, contributing to leukocyte dysfunction. Design setting, participants, & measurements: Pediatric patients, age 6 mo to 18 yr, with ESRD treated with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis were enrolled in this prospective, nontherapeutic study. Blood was collected for plasma chemokine levels, chemokine receptor profiling by flow cytometry, and functional chemotaxis studies on neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Results: ESRD in children was associated with reduced expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) on circulating neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. When ESRD patients were divided into two subgroups, those who were infection-free and those who had three or more SBI in the preceding year, the differences in chemokine receptor expression were statistically significant compared with control subjects only in those with recurrent infection. In addition to the effects of ESRD on baseline chemokine receptor expression, the hemodialysis procedure itself acutely lowered neutrophil CXCR1 and monocyte CCR2 expression. Furthermore, neutrophil and monocyte responsiveness to chemokine-mediated trafficking signals was impaired in all ESRD patients studied. This abnormality was independent of the level of chemokine receptor expression on the leukocytes. Conclusions: The data presented in this study suggest that chemokine receptor dysregulation contributes to leukocyte dysfunction in patients with ESRD. This alteration is especially prominent in ESRD patients with recurrent infection. PMID:18235145

  15. Chemokines, chemokine receptors and the gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Yeudall, W Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The biological properties of tumor cells are known to be regulated by a multitude of cytokines and growth factors, which include epidermal growth factor receptor agonists and members of the transforming growth factor β family. Furthermore, the recent explosion of research in the field of chemokine function as mediators of tumor progression has led to the possibility that these small, immunomodulatory proteins also play key roles in carcinogenesis and may, therefore, be potential targets for novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we will summarize recently reported findings in chemokine biology with a focus on the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23704819

  16. CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Signaling Induces Apoptosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells via Regulation of the Bcl-2 Family Members Bcl-XL, Noxa, and Bak*

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Schneider, Paula A.; Meng, X. Wei; Dai, Haiming; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; Rodriguez-Ramirez, Christie; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    The CXCR4 chemokine receptor promotes survival of many different cell types. Here, we describe a previously unsuspected role for CXCR4 as a potent inducer of apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and a subset of clinical AML samples. We show that SDF-1, the sole ligand for CXCR4, induces the expected migration and ERK activation in the KG1a AML cell line transiently overexpressing CXCR4, but ERK activation did not lead to survival. Instead, SDF-1 treatment led via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism to apoptosis, as evidenced by increased annexin V staining, condensation of chromatin, and cleavage of both procaspase-3 and PARP. This SDF-1-induced death pathway was partially inhibited by hypoxia, which is often found in the bone marrow of AML patients. SDF-1-induced apoptosis was inhibited by dominant negative procaspase-9 but not by inhibition of caspase-8 activation, implicating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Further analysis showed that this pathway was activated by multiple mechanisms, including up-regulation of Bak at the level of mRNA and protein, stabilization of the Bak activator Noxa, and down-regulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-XL. Furthermore, adjusting expression levels of Bak, Bcl-XL, or Noxa individually altered the level of apoptosis in AML cells, suggesting that the combined modulation of these family members by SDF-1 coordinates their interplay to produce apoptosis. Thus, rather than mediating survival, SDF-1 may be a means to induce apoptosis of CXCR4-expressing AML cells directly in the SDF-1-rich bone marrow microenvironment if the survival cues of the bone marrow are disrupted. PMID:23798675

  17. Costly Signaling Increases Trust, Even Across Religious Affiliations.

    PubMed

    Hall, Deborah L; Cohen, Adam B; Meyer, Kaitlin K; Varley, Allison H; Brewer, Gene A

    2015-09-01

    Trust is a critical aspect of social interaction. One might predict that individuals trust religious out-groups less than religious in-groups, and that costly signals performed by members of religious in-groups increase trust while costly signals performed by members of religious out-groups decrease trust. We examined how Christian participants perceived the trustworthiness of Muslim and Christian individuals who did or did not engage in religious costly signaling. Religious costly signaling, operationalized as giving to religious charities (Experiments 1 and 2) or adhering to religious dietary restrictions (Experiment 3), increased self-reported trust, regardless of target religious affiliation. Furthermore, when estimating the likelihood that trustworthy versus untrustworthy targets engaged in costly signaling, participants made systematic judgments that showed that costly signaling is associated with trust for both Muslim and Christian targets (Experiment 4). These results are novel in their suggestion that costly signals of religious commitment can increase trust both within and, crucially, across religious-group lines.

  18. Adhesive Dynamics Simulation of G-Protein-Mediated Chemokine-Activated Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Kelly E.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To reach sites of inflammation, a blood-borne neutrophil first rolls over the vessel wall, becoming firmly adherent on activation, and then transmigrates through the endothelium. In this study, we simulate the transition to firm adhesion via chemokine-induced integrin activation. To recreate the transition from rolling to firm adhesion, we use an integrated signaling adhesive dynamics simulation that includes selectin, integrin, and chemokine interactions between the cell and an adhesive substrate. Integrin bonds are of low affinity until activated by chemokine binding to G-protein coupled receptors on the model cell. The signal propagates within the cell through probabilistic diffusion and reaction of the signaling elements to induce the high-affinity integrins required for firm adhesion. This model showed that integrins become progressively active as cells roll and interact with chemokines, leading to a slight slowing before firm adhesion on a timescale similar to that observed in experiments. Increasing the density of chemokine resulted in decreases in the rolling time before stopping, consistent with experimental observations. However, a limit is reached where further increases in chemokine density do not increase adhesion. We found that the timescale for integrin activation correlated with the time to stop. Further, altering parameters within the intracellular signaling cascade that changed the speed of integrin activation, such as effector activation and dissociation rates, correspondingly affected the time to firm adhesion. For all conditions tested, the number of active integrin bonds at the point of firm adhesion was relatively constant. The model predicts that the time to stop would be relatively independent of selectin or integrin density, but strongly dependent on the shear rate because higher shear rates limit the intrinsic activation rate of integrins and require more integrins for adhesion. PMID:19383446

  19. Induction of alpha and beta chemokines by intestinal epithelial cells stimulated with Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Bakhiet, Moiz; Al-Salloom, Fajer Subah; Qareiballa, Ahmed; Bindayna, Khalid; Farid, Iman; Botta, Giuseppe A

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the production of dynamic alpha and beta chemokines represented by interleukin-8 (IL-8) as alpha chemokine and CCL2 (monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1, CCR2 ligand), CCL4 (macrophage-inflammatory protein-1beta, CCR5 ligand), CCL3 (macrophage-inflammatory protein-1alpha, CCR1/5 ligand), (CCL5, regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, CCR5 ligand) as beta chemokines by the human intestinal cell line INT407 stimulated with factors produced by living Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and those present within sonicated and filtrated bacteria. We used immunohistochemical technique modified to detect intracellular production of cytokines protein and RT-PCR to read RNA messages for evaluation of de novo cytokine synthesis. Living bacteria induced increased numbers of IL-8, CCL4 and CCL2 but not CCL3 or CCL5 producing cells. Low numbers of IL-8, CCL4 and CCL2 producing cells were detected with filtrated supernatant compared to living and sonicated bacteria. A non-significant low number of chemokine producing cells was noted when comparing numbers of chemokine producing cells stimulated with living C. jejuni to those stimulated with sonicated bacteria, indicating that the triggering factors involved in stimulation with living bacteria were still active after sonication, but they were largely lost upon filtration. The mRNA signals for IL-8 were noted in conformity with its protein levels as increased IL-8 mRNA signals were registered after stimulation with living and sonicated bacteria but not with filtrated supernatant. Preferential production of chemokines probably induced by membrane associate factors of C. jejuni acting on intestinal epithelial cells is presented. These chemokines are suggested to be part of an inflammatory network affecting cell types that contribute to initiation and/or resolution of the infection.

  20. A novel highly potent therapeutic antibody neutralizes multiple human chemokines and mimics viral immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Scalley-Kim, Michelle L; Hess, Bruce W; Kelly, Ryan L; Krostag, Anne-Rachel F; Lustig, Kurt H; Marken, John S; Ovendale, Pamela J; Posey, Aaron R; Smolak, Pamela J; Taylor, Janelle D L; Wood, C L; Bienvenue, David L; Probst, Peter; Salmon, Ruth A; Allison, Daniel S; Foy, Teresa M; Raport, Carol J

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines play a key role in leukocyte recruitment during inflammation and are implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of autoimmune diseases. As such, inhibiting chemokine signaling has been of keen interest for the development of therapeutic agents. This endeavor, however, has been hampered due to complexities in the chemokine system. Many chemokines have been shown to signal through multiple receptors and, conversely, most chemokine receptors bind to more than one chemokine. One approach to overcoming this complexity is to develop a single therapeutic agent that binds and inactivates multiple chemokines, similar to an immune evasion strategy utilized by a number of viruses. Here, we describe the development and characterization of a novel therapeutic antibody that targets a subset of human CC chemokines, specifically CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5, involved in chronic inflammatory diseases. Using a sequential immunization approach, followed by humanization and phage display affinity maturation, a therapeutic antibody was developed that displays high binding affinity towards the three targeted chemokines. In vitro, this antibody potently inhibits chemotaxis and chemokine-mediated signaling through CCR1 and CCR5, primary chemokine receptors for the targeted chemokines. Furthermore, we have demonstrated in vivo efficacy of the antibody in a SCID-hu mouse model of skin leukocyte migration, thus confirming its potential as a novel therapeutic chemokine antagonist. We anticipate that this antibody will have broad therapeutic utility in the treatment of a number of autoimmune diseases due to its ability to simultaneously neutralize multiple chemokines implicated in disease pathogenesis.

  1. Partial Seizures Are Associated with Early Increases in Signal Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Jouny, Christophe C; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Partial seizures are often believed to be associated with EEG signals of low complexity because seizures are associated with increased neural network synchrony. The investigations reported here provide an assessment of the signal complexity of epileptic seizure onsets using newly developed quantitative measures. Methods Using the Gabor atom density (GAD) measure of signal complexity, 339 partial seizures in 45 patients with intracranial electrode arrays were analyzed. Segmentation procedures were applied to determine the timing and amplitude of GAD changes relative to the electrographic onset of the seizure. Results 330 out of 339 seizures have significant complexity level changes, with 319 (97%) having an increase in complexity. GAD increases occur within seconds of the onset of the partial seizure but are not observed in channels remote from the focus. The complexity increase is similar for seizures from mesial temporal origin, neocortical temporal and extra-temporal origin. Conclusions Partial onset seizures are associated with early increases in signal complexity as measured by GAD. This increase is independent of the location of the seizure focus. Significance Despite the often predominant rhythmic activity that characterizes onset and early evolution of epileptic seizures, partial seizure onset is associated with an early increase in complexity. These changes are common to partial seizures originating from different brain regions, indicating a similar seizure dynamic. PMID:19910249

  2. The structural role of receptor tyrosine sulfation in chemokine recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ludeman, Justin P; Stone, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification of secreted and transmembrane proteins, including many GPCRs such as chemokine receptors. Most chemokine receptors contain several potentially sulfated tyrosine residues in their extracellular N-terminal regions, the initial binding site for chemokine ligands. Sulfation of these receptors increases chemokine binding affinity and potency. Although receptor sulfation is heterogeneous, insights into the molecular basis of sulfotyrosine (sTyr) recognition have been obtained using purified, homogeneous sulfopeptides corresponding to the N-termini of chemokine receptors. Receptor sTyr residues bind to a shallow cleft defined by the N-loop and β3-strand elements of cognate chemokines. Tyrosine sulfation enhances the affinity of receptor peptides for cognate chemokines in a manner dependent on the position of sulfation. Moreover, tyrosine sulfation can alter the selectivity of receptor peptides among several cognate chemokines for the same receptor. Finally, binding to receptor sulfopeptides can modulate the oligomerization state of chemokines, thereby influencing the ability of a chemokine to activate its receptor. These results increase the motivation to investigate the structural basis by which tyrosine sulfation modulates chemokine receptor activity and the biological consequences of this functional modulation. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24116930

  3. Nicotinic α7 receptor inhibits the acylation stimulating protein‑induced production of monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 and keratinocyte‑derived chemokine in adipocytes by modulating the p38 kinase and nuclear factor‑κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhou-Yang; Wu, Jing; Liu, Chao; Wen, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Zeng; Du, Xin-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low‑grade inflammation, which is characterized by increased infiltration of macrophages into adipose tissue. Acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipokine derived from the immune complement system, which constitutes a link between adipocytes and macrophages, and is involved in energy homeostasis and inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to preliminarily investigate in vitro, whether functional α7nAChR in adipocytes may suppress ASP‑induced inflammation and determine the possible signaling mechanism. Studies have reported associations between the expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) and obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Additionally, α7nAChRs are important peripheral mediators of chronic inflammation, which is a key contributor to health problems in obesity. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of exogenous ASP and α7nAChR on macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and to examine the potential underlying molecular mechanism. Western blot analysis revealed that recombinant ASP increased the expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 (MCP‑1) and keratinocyte‑derived chemokine (KC) by 3T3‑L1 adipocytes. However, nicotine significantly inhibited the production of ASP‑induced cytokines via the stimulation of α7nAChR. It was also found that α7nAChR inhibited the ASP‑induced activation of p38 kinase and nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB), and the production of MCP‑1 and KC. These data indicated that α7nAChR caused the inhibition of ASP‑induced activation of p38 kinase and NF‑κB to inhibit the production of MCP‑1 and KC.

  4. Mutational Analysis of Atypical Chemokine Receptor 3 (ACKR3/CXCR7) Interaction with Its Chemokine Ligands CXCL11 and CXCL12.

    PubMed

    Benredjem, Besma; Girard, Mélanie; Rhainds, David; St-Onge, Geneviève; Heveker, Nikolaus

    2017-01-06

    Atypical chemokine receptors do not mediate chemotaxis or G protein signaling, but they recruit arrestin. They also efficiently scavenge their chemokine ligands, thereby contributing to gradient maintenance and termination. ACKR3, also known as CXCR7, binds and degrades the constitutive chemokine CXCL12, which also binds the canonical receptor CXCR4, and CXCL11, which also binds CXCR3. Here we report comprehensive mutational analysis of the ACKR3 interaction with its chemokine ligands, using 30 substitution mutants. Readouts are radioligand binding competition, arrestin recruitment, and chemokine scavenging. Our results suggest different binding modes for both chemokines. CXCL11 depends on the ACKR3 N terminus and some extracellular loop (ECL) positions for primary binding, ECL residues mediate secondary binding and arrestin recruitment potency. CXCL12 binding required key residues Asp-179(4.60) and Asp-275(6.58) (residue numbering follows the Ballesteros-Weinstein scheme), with no evident involvement of N-terminal residues, suggesting an uncommon mode of receptor engagement. Mutation of residues corresponding to CRS2 in CXCR4 (positions Ser-103(2.63) and Gln-301(7.39)) increased CXCL11 binding, but reduced CXCL12 affinity. Mutant Q301E(7.39) did not recruit arrestin. Mutant K118A(3.26) in ECL1 showed moderate baseline arrestin recruitment with ablation of ligand-induced responses. Substitutions that affected CXCL11 binding also diminished scavenging. However, detection of reduced CXCL12 scavenging by mutants with impaired CXCL12 affinity required drastically reduced receptor expression levels, suggesting that scavenging pathways can be saturated and that CXCL12 binding exceeds scavenging at higher receptor expression levels. Arrestin recruitment did not correlate with scavenging; although Q301E(7.39) degraded chemokines in the absence of arrestin, S103D(2.63) had reduced CXCL11 scavenging despite intact arrestin responses. © 2017 by The American Society for

  5. Fatal attraction: cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine homologs.

    PubMed

    Saederup, N; Mocarski, E S

    2002-01-01

    Members of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) subfamily of betaherpesviruses infecting primates and rodents encode divergent proteins with sequence characteristics and activities of chemokines, a class of small, secreted proteins that control leukocyte migration and trafficking behavior. Human CMV genes UL146 and UL147 encode proteins with sequence characteristics of CXC chemokines, whereas, murine CMV encodes a CC chemokine homolog (MCK-2). Human CMV UL146 encodes a neutrophil-attracting chemokine denoted viral CXC chemokine-1 (vCXCL1) that is as potent as host IL-8 and functions via the CXCR2 receptor, one of two human IL-8 receptors. Murine CMV MCK-2 is composed of a chemokine domain derived from open reading frame (ORF) m131 (and denoted MCK-1) as well as a domain derived from m129 that does not have sequence similarity to any known class of proteins. A synthetic version of murine CMV m131 (MCK-1) protein carries out many of the activities of a positive-acting chemokine, including transient release of intracellular calcium stores and cell adhesion of peritoneal macrophage populations. In the context of the viral genome and infection of the mouse host, the m131-m129 (MCK-2) gene product confers increased inflammation, higher levels of viremia, and higher titers of virus in salivary glands, consistent with a role in promoting dissemination by attracting an important mononuclear leukocyte population. Other characterized primate CMVs, but not other primate betaherpesviruses, encode gene products similar to human UL146 and UL147. Other characterized rodent CMVs encode a gene product similar to the murine CMV chemokine homolog, although not as a spliced gene product. Thus chemokines, like viral proteins that downmodulate MHC class I expression or have sequence homology to host MHC class I proteins, have evolved in primate and rodent CMVs to carry out an analogous set of immunomodulatory functions during infection of the host even though they arise from distinct origins.

  6. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, skeletal muscle and polycystic ovary syndrome: effects of pioglitazone and metformin treatment.

    PubMed

    Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Aroda, Vanita; Mudaliar, Sunder R; Henry, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a common feature of insulin resistant states, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Less is known about inflammation in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Thus we evaluated the impact of PCOS on circulating cytokine levels and the effects of anti-diabetic therapies on insulin action, cytokine and chemokine levels and inflammatory signaling in skeletal muscle. Twenty subjects with PCOS and 12 healthy normal cycling (NC) subjects of similar body mass index were studied. PCOS subjects received oral placebo or pioglitazone, 45 mg/d, for 6 months. All PCOS subjects then had metformin, 2 g/day, added to their treatment. Circulating levels of cytokines, chemokines, and adiponectin, skeletal muscle markers of inflammation and phosphorylation of signaling proteins, insulin action evaluated by the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp procedure and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance were measured. Circulating levels of a number of cytokines and chemokines were generally similar between PCOS and NC subjects. Levels in PCOS subjects were not altered by pioglitazone or metformin treatment, even though whole body insulin action and adiponectin levels increased with pioglitazone. In spite of the lack of change in levels of cytokines and chemokines, several markers of inflammation in skeletal muscle were improved with Pio treatment. PCOS may represent a state of elevated sensitivity of inflammatory cells in skeletal muscle to cytokines and chemokines, a property that could be reversed by pioglitazone treatment together with improved insulin action. © 2013.

  7. Chemokines and chemokine receptors blockers as new drugs for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Caramori, G; Di Stefano, A; Casolari, P; Kirkham, P A; Padovani, A; Chung, K F; Papi, A; Adcock, I M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by an abnormal inflammatory response of the lung to noxious particles or gases. The cellular inflammatory response in COPD is characterised by an increased number of inflammatory cells in the lungs. Although the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the development of COPD are not well understood; several mediators are assumed to regulate the activation and recruitment of these inflammatory cells into the lung of COPD patients particularly those belonging to the chemokine family. Inhibitors or blockers of chemokine and chemokine receptors are therefore of great interest as potential novel therapies for COPD and many are now in clinical development. A high degree of redundancy exists in the chemokine network and inhibition of a single chemokine or receptor may not be sufficient to block the inflammatory response. Despite this, animal studies suggest a strong rationale for inhibiting the chemokine network in COPD. As such, every leading pharmaceutical company maintains a significant interest in developing agents that regulate leukocyte navigation as potential anti-inflammatory drugs. Drugs and antibodies targeting chemokines and their receptors are generally still in early stages of development and the results of clinical trial are awaited with great interest. These agents may not only provide improved management of COPD but also, importantly, indicate proof-of-concept to further clarify the role of chemokines in the pathophysiology of COPD.

  8. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; de Jong, Eiko K; van Weering, Hilmar R J; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today that chemokine signaling orchestrates the immune system and is widely involved in both physiological and pathophysiological processes. Since the chemokine system offers various targets through which pathology could be influenced, most pharmaceutical companies have chosen this system as a therapeutic target for a variety of diseases. Here recent developments concerning the role of chemokines in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as their possible therapeutic relevance are discussed.

  9. Dysregulation of Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Axes and NK Cell Tissue Localization during Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Bonanni, Valentina; Santoni, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Current research is focused on analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors, including CXCR4, CXCR3, and CX3CR1, are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets, and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. At first, this review will summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed. PMID:27766097

  10. Dysregulation of Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Axes and NK Cell Tissue Localization during Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Bonanni, Valentina; Santoni, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Current research is focused on analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors, including CXCR4, CXCR3, and CX3CR1, are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets, and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. At first, this review will summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed.

  11. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL): from understanding the basics towards therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jan A

    2010-12-01

    Chemokines and their receptors organize the recruitment and positioning of cells at each stage of the immune response, a system critically dependent upon coordination to get the right cells to the right place at the right time. Chemokine receptors expressed on CLL B cells are thought to function in a similar fashion, regulating the trafficking of the leukemia cells between blood, lymphoid organs, and the bone marrow, and within sub compartments within these tissues, in concert with adhesion molecules and other guidance cues. CLL cells not only respond to chemokines secreted in the microenvironment, the leukemia cells also secrete chemokines in response to external signals, such as B cell receptor engagement. These CLL cell-derived chemokines facilitate interactions between CLL cells, T cells, and other immune cells that shape the CLL microenvironment. CXCR4, the most prominent chemokine receptor in CLL, is now targeted in a first clinical trial, emphasizing that chemokines and their receptors have become a highly dynamic translational research field.

  12. Chemokine CXCL12 uses CXCR4 and a signaling core formed by bifunctional Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) proteins to control chemotaxis and survival simultaneously in mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Martín, Cristina; Escribano, Cristina; Pablos, José Luis; Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2011-10-28

    Chemokines control several cell functions in addition to chemotaxis. Although much information is available on the involvement of specific signaling molecules in the control of single functions controlled by chemokines, especially chemotaxis, the mechanisms used by these ligands to regulate several cell functions simultaneously are completely unknown. Mature dendritic cells (maDCs) migrate through the afferent lymphatic vessels to the lymph nodes, where they regulate the initiation of the immune response. As maDCs are exposed to chemokine CXCL12 (receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7) during their migration, its functions are amenable to be regulated by this ligand. We have used maDCs as a model system to analyze the mechanisms whereby CXCL12 simultaneously controls chemotaxis and survival in maDCs. We show that CXCL12 uses CXCR4, but not CXCR7, and the components of a signaling core that includes G(i)/Gβγ, PI3K-α/-δ/-γ, Akt, ERK1/2 and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which organize hierarchically to control both functions. Downstream of Akt, Forkhead box class O (FOXO) regulates CXCL12-dependent survival, but not chemotaxis, suggesting that downstream of the aforementioned signaling core, additional signaling molecules may control more selectively CXCL12-dependent chemotaxis or survival. Finally, the data obtained also show that CXCR4 uses a signaling signature that is different from that used by CCR7 to control similar functions.

  13. Chemical intervention in plant sugar signalling increases yield and resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Cara A.; Sagar, Ram; Geng, Yiqun; Primavesi, Lucia F.; Patel, Mitul K.; Passarelli, Melissa K.; Gilmore, Ian S.; Steven, Rory T.; Bunch, Josephine; Paul, Matthew J.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2016-12-01

    The pressing global issue of food insecurity due to population growth, diminishing land and variable climate can only be addressed in agriculture by improving both maximum crop yield potential and resilience. Genetic modification is one potential solution, but has yet to achieve worldwide acceptance, particularly for crops such as wheat. Trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P), a central sugar signal in plants, regulates sucrose use and allocation, underpinning crop growth and development. Here we show that application of a chemical intervention strategy directly modulates T6P levels in planta. Plant-permeable analogues of T6P were designed and constructed based on a ‘signalling-precursor’ concept for permeability, ready uptake and sunlight-triggered release of T6P in planta. We show that chemical intervention in a potent sugar signal increases grain yield, whereas application to vegetative tissue improves recovery and resurrection from drought. This technology offers a means to combine increases in yield with crop stress resilience. Given the generality of the T6P pathway in plants and other small-molecule signals in biology, these studies suggest that suitable synthetic exogenous small-molecule signal precursors can be used to directly enhance plant performance and perhaps other organism function.

  14. Scleroderma dermal microvascular endothelial cells exhibit defective response to pro-angiogenic chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Rabquer, Bradley J.; Ohara, Ray A.; Stinson, William A.; Campbell, Phillip L.; Amin, M. Asif; Balogh, Beatrix; Zakhem, George; Renauer, Paul A.; Lozier, Ann; Arasu, Eshwar; Haines, G. Kenneth; Kahaleh, Bashar; Schiopu, Elena; Khanna, Dinesh; Koch, Alisa E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Angiogenesis plays a critical role in SSc (scleroderma). The aim of this study was to examine the expression of growth-regulated protein-γ (Gro-γ/CXCL3), granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) and their receptor CXCR2 in endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from SSc skin and determine whether these cells mount an angiogenic response towards pro-angiogenic chemokines. The downstream signalling pathways as well as the pro-angiogenic transcription factor inhibitor of DNA-binding protein 1 (Id-1) were also examined. Methods. Skin biopsies were obtained from patients with dcSSc. ECs were isolated via magnetic positive selection. Angiogenesis was measured by EC chemotaxis assay. Results. Gro-γ/CXCL3 and GCP-2/CXCL6 were minimally expressed in both skin types but elevated in SSc serum. Pro-angiogenic chemokine mRNA was greater in SSc ECs than in normal ECs. SSc ECs did not migrate to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Gro-γ/CXCL3, GCP-2/CXCL6 or CXCL16. The signalling pathways stimulated by these chemokines were also dysregulated. Id-1 mRNA in SSc ECs was lower compared with normal ECs, and overexpression of Id-1 in SSc ECs increased their ability to migrate towards VEGF and CXCL16. Conclusion. Our results show that SSc ECs are unable to respond to pro-angiogenic chemokines despite their increased expression in serum and ECs. This might be due to the differences in the signalling pathways activated by these chemokines in normal vs SSc ECs. In addition, the lower expression of Id-1 also decreases the angiogenic response. The inability of pro-angiogenic chemokines to promote EC migration provides an additional mechanism for the impaired angiogenesis that characterizes SSc. PMID:26705326

  15. Subsets of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in hepatocellular carcinoma express chemokines and chemokine receptors differentially.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenxiu; Xu, Yaping; Xu, Jianfeng; Wu, Duan; Zhao, Bixing; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2015-06-01

    Tumors induce the recruitment and expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of cells that can be further sub-divided into polymorphonuclear Ly6G(+) PMN-MDSCs and monocytic Ly6G(-) Mo-MDSCs. To identify chemokines and chemokine-related genes that are differentially expressed within the tumor microenvironment in these two MDSC subsets, we established an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model in immunocompetent mice. Splenic PMN-MDSCs and Mo-MDSCs were isolated to >95% homogeneity by flow cytometry. Using a real-time PCR array, we investigated the expression of 84 genes encoding chemokines and cytokines, chemokine receptors, and related signaling molecules involved with chemotaxis. Clustering analysis suggested that a core set of chemokine-related genes is expressed in both PMN-MDSC and Mo-MDSC populations, but that the expression profile is broader for Mo-MDSCs. Furthermore, 11 genes are more highly expressed in PMN-MDSCs and 12 genes are more highly expressed in Mo-MDSCs. Among these, PMN-MDSCs express Cxcr1, Cxcr2 and Il1b at 33.03- to 109.76-fold higher levels than in Mo-MDSCs, and Mo-MDSCs express eight genes (Ccr2, Ccr5, Cmklr1, Cx3cr1, Ccr3, Ccl9, Cmtm3 and Cxcl16) at 30.2 to 515.5-fold higher levels than in PMN-MDSCs. These results suggest that the profile of chemokines and chemokine-related genes is more expansive for Mo-MDSCs than for PMN-MDSCs. The differential expression of chemokines and chemokine-associated genes may regulate the presence and activity of PMN-MDSCs and Mo-MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment.

  16. Burkholderia Diffusible Signal Factor Signals to Francisella novicida To Disperse Biofilm and Increase Siderophore Production.

    PubMed

    Dean, Scott N; Chung, Myung-Chul; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria, the ability to modulate biofilm production relies on specific signaling molecules that are either self-produced or made by neighboring microbes within the ecological niche. We analyzed the potential interspecies signaling effect of the Burkholderia diffusible signal factor (BDSF) on Francisella novicida, a model organism for Francisella tularensis, and demonstrated that BDSF both inhibits the formation and causes the dispersion of Francisella biofilm. Specificity was demonstrated for the cis versus the trans form of BDSF. Using transcriptome sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and activity assays, we found that BDSF altered the expression of many F. novicida genes, including genes involved in biofilm formation, such as chitinases. Using a chitinase inhibitor, the antibiofilm activity of BDSF was also shown to be chitinase dependent. In addition, BDSF caused an increase in RelA expression and increased levels of (p)ppGpp, leading to decreased biofilm production. These results support our observation that exposure of F. novicida to BDSF causes biofilm dispersal. Furthermore, BDSF upregulated the genes involved in iron acquisition (figABCD), increasing siderophore production. Thus, this study provides evidence for a potential role and mechanism of diffusible signal factor (DSF) signaling in the genus Francisella and suggests the possibility of interspecies signaling between Francisella and other bacteria. Overall, this study suggests that in response to the interspecies DSF signal, F. novicida can alter its gene expression and regulate its biofilm formation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Chemokine RANTES in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Glück, J; Rogala, B

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines play a key role in inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate chemokine RANTES in the sera of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to analyze the correlation between RANTES serum level and the immunological and clinical parameters of the disease. Serum levels of RANTES (ELISA; R&D Systems), total IgE and specific IgE (FEIA; Pharmacia CAP System) were estimated in 24 patients with AD, 28 patients with pollinosis (PL) and 22 healthy nonatopic subjects (HC). The division of the AD group into a pure AD (pAD) subgroup, without a coexisting respiratory allergy, and a subgroup of patients with AD and a respiratory allergy (AD+AO) was done according to Wütrich. Levels of RANTES were higher in the AD group than in the HC group and the PL group. RANTES levels did not differ among subgroups with various clinical scores and between the pAD and AD+AO subgroups. There were no correlations between levels of RANTES and total IgE. Significant positive correlations between serum levels of RANTES and Dermatophagoides farinae and cat dander-specific IgE were found in the AD group. We conclude that the serum level of chemokine RANTES differs patients with AD from patients with PL. The increase of RANTES concentration in the serum of patients with AD depends neither on a clinical picture nor an IgE system.

  18. Chemokines and other GPCR ligands synergize in receptor-mediated migration of monocyte-derived immature and mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gouwy, Mieke; Struyf, Sofie; Leutenez, Lien; Pörtner, Noëmie; Sozzani, Silvano; Van Damme, Jo

    2014-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, described as the initiators of adaptive immune responses. Immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDC) showed decreased CD14 expression, increased cell surface markers DC-SIGN and CD1a and enhanced levels of receptors for the chemokines CCL3 (CCR1/CCR5) and CXCL8 (CXCR1/CXCR2) compared with human CD14⁺ monocytes. After further MDDC maturation by LPS, the markers CD80 and CD83 and the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were upregulated, whereas CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression was reduced. CCL3 dose-dependently synergized with CXCL8 or CXCL12 in chemotaxis of immature MDDC. CXCL12 augmented the CCL3-induced ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation in immature MDDC, although the synergy between CCL3 and CXCL12 in chemotaxis of immature MDDC was dependent on the Akt signaling pathway but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CCL2 also synergized with CXCL12 in immature MDDC migration. Moreover, two CXC chemokines not sharing receptors (CXCL12 and CXCL8) cooperated in immature MDDC chemotaxis, whereas two CC chemokines (CCL3 and CCL7) sharing CCR1 did not. Further, the non-chemokine G protein-coupled receptor ligands chemerin and fMLP synergized with respectively CCL7 and CCL3 in immature MDDC signaling and migration. Finally, CXCL12 and CCL3 did not cooperate, but CXCL12 synergized with CCL21 in mature MDDC chemotaxis. Thus, chemokine synergy in immature and mature MDDC migration is dose-dependently regulated by chemokines via alterations in their chemokine receptor expression pattern according to their role in immune responses.

  19. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy.

  20. Multiple Myeloma Impairs Bone Marrow Localization of Effector Natural Killer Cells by Altering the Chemokine Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ponzetta, Andrea; Benigni, Giorgia; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Sanseviero, Emilio; Zingoni, Alessandra; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Santoni, Angela; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2015-11-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key innate immune effectors against multiple myeloma, their activity declining in multiple myeloma patients with disease progression. To identify the mechanisms underlying NK cell functional impairment, we characterized the distribution of functionally distinct NK cell subsets in the bone marrow of multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Herein we report that the number of KLRG1(-) NK cells endowed with potent effector function rapidly and selectively decreases in bone marrow during multiple myeloma growth, this correlating with decreased bone marrow NK cell degranulation in vivo. Altered NK cell subset distribution was dependent on skewed chemokine/chemokine receptor axes in the multiple myeloma microenvironment, with rapid downmodulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on NK cells, increased CXCL9 and CXCL10, and decreased CXCL12 expression in bone marrow. Similar alterations in chemokine receptor/chemokine axes were observed in patients with multiple myeloma. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that KLRG1(-) NK cell migration to the bone marrow was more efficient in healthy than multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Furthermore, bone marrow localization of transferred CXCR3-deficient NK cells with respect to wild type was enhanced in healthy and multiple myeloma-bearing mice, suggesting that CXCR3 restrains bone marrow NK cell trafficking. Our results indicate that multiple myeloma-promoted CXCR3 ligand upregulation together with CXCL12 downmodulation act as exit signals driving effector NK cells outside the bone marrow, thus weakening the antitumor immune response at the primary site of tumor growth.

  1. Glycosaminoglycan Interactions with Chemokines Add Complexity to a Complex System

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Johnson, Zoë; Bonvin, Pauline; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines have two types of interactions that function cooperatively to control cell migration. Chemokine receptors on migrating cells integrate signals initiated upon chemokine binding to promote cell movement. Interactions with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) localize chemokines on and near cell surfaces and the extracellular matrix to provide direction to the cell movement. The matrix of interacting chemokine–receptor partners has been known for some time, precise signaling and trafficking properties of many chemokine–receptor pairs have been characterized, and recent structural information has revealed atomic level detail on chemokine–receptor recognition and activation. However, precise knowledge of the interactions of chemokines with GAGs has lagged far behind such that a single paradigm of GAG presentation on surfaces is generally applied to all chemokines. This review summarizes accumulating evidence which suggests that there is a great deal of diversity and specificity in these interactions, that GAG interactions help fine-tune the function of chemokines, and that GAGs have other roles in chemokine biology beyond localization and surface presentation. This suggests that chemokine–GAG interactions add complexity to the already complex functions of the receptors and ligands. PMID:28792472

  2. Chemokines in atherosclerosis: proceedings resumed.

    PubMed

    Zernecke, Alma; Weber, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines play important roles in atherosclerotic vascular disease. Expressed by not only cells of the vessel wall but also emigrated leukocytes, chemokines were initially discovered to direct leukocytes to sites of inflammation. However, chemokines can also exert multiple functions beyond cell recruitment. Here, we discuss novel and recently emerging aspects of chemokines and their involvement in atherosclerosis. While reviewing newly identified roles of chemokines and their receptors in monocyte and neutrophil recruitment during atherogenesis and atheroregression, we also revisit homeostatic functions of chemokines, including their roles in cell homeostasis and foam cell formation. The functional diversity of chemokines in atherosclerosis warrants a clear-cut mechanistic dissection and stage-specific assessment to better appreciate the full scope of their actions in vascular inflammation and to identify pathways that harbor the potential for a therapeutic targeting of chemokines in atherosclerosis.

  3. Chemokines and chemokine receptors as promoters of prostate cancer growth and progression.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Nicole; Castellan, Miguel; Shirodkar, Samir S; Lokeshwar, Bal L

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is estimated to be first in incidence among cancers, with more than 240,000 new cases in 2012 in the United States. Chemokines and their receptors provide survival, proliferation, and invasion characteristics to CaP cells in both primary sites of cancer and metastatic locations. The emerging data demonstrate that many chemokines and their receptors are involved in the multistep process of CaP, leading to metastasis, and, further, that these factors act cooperatively to enhance other mechanisms of tumor cell survival, growth, and metastasis. Changes of chemokine receptor cohorts may be necessary to activate tumor-promoting signals. Chemokine receptors can activate downstream effectors, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases, by complex mechanisms of ligand-dependent activation of cryptic growth factors; guanosine triphosphate-binding, protein-coupled activation of survival kinases; or transactivation of other receptors such as ErbB family members. We describe vanguard research in which more than the classic view of chemokine receptor biology was clarified. Control of chemokines and inhibition of their receptor activation may add critical tools to reduce tumor growth, especially in chemo-hormonal refractory CaP that is both currently incurable and the most aggressive form of the disease, accounting for most of the more than 28,000 annual deaths.

  4. Impaired Striatal Akt Signaling Disrupts Dopamine Homeostasis and Increases Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Adeola R.; Owens, W. Anthony; Matthies, Heinrich J. G.; Saadat, Sanaz; Kennedy, Jack P.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Russo, Scott J.; Daws, Lynette C.; Niswender1, Kevin D.; Galli, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically worldwide. The obesity epidemic begs for novel concepts and therapeutic targets that cohesively address “food-abuse” disorders. We demonstrate a molecular link between impairment of a central kinase (Akt) involved in insulin signaling induced by exposure to a high-fat (HF) diet and dysregulation of higher order circuitry involved in feeding. Dopamine (DA) rich brain structures, such as striatum, provide motivation stimuli for feeding. In these central circuitries, DA dysfunction is posited to contribute to obesity pathogenesis. We identified a mechanistic link between metabolic dysregulation and the maladaptive behaviors that potentiate weight gain. Insulin, a hormone in the periphery, also acts centrally to regulate both homeostatic and reward-based HF feeding. It regulates DA homeostasis, in part, by controlling a key element in DA clearance, the DA transporter (DAT). Upon HF feeding, nigro-striatal neurons rapidly develop insulin signaling deficiencies, causing increased HF calorie intake. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that consumption of fat-rich food impairs striatal activation of the insulin-activated signaling kinase, Akt. HF-induced Akt impairment, in turn, reduces DAT cell surface expression and function, thereby decreasing DA homeostasis and amphetamine (AMPH)-induced DA efflux. In addition, HF-mediated dysregulation of Akt signaling impairs DA-related behaviors such as (AMPH)-induced locomotion and increased caloric intake. We restored nigro-striatal Akt phosphorylation using recombinant viral vector expression technology. We observed a rescue of DAT expression in HF fed rats, which was associated with a return of locomotor responses to AMPH and normalization of HF diet-induced hyperphagia. Conclusions/Significance Acquired disruption of brain insulin action may confer risk for and/or underlie “food-abuse” disorders and the recalcitrance of obesity. This molecular model

  5. Compaction of rolling circle amplification products increases signal integrity and signal-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Clausson, Carl-Magnus; Arngården, Linda; Ishaq, Omer; Klaesson, Axel; Kühnemund, Malte; Grannas, Karin; Koos, Björn; Qian, Xiaoyan; Ranefall, Petter; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Brismar, Hjalmar; Nilsson, Mats; Wählby, Carolina; Söderberg, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) for generation of distinct fluorescent signals in situ relies upon the self-collapsing properties of single-stranded DNA in commonly used RCA-based methods. By introducing a cross-hybridizing DNA oligonucleotide during rolling circle amplification, we demonstrate that the fluorophore-labeled RCA products (RCPs) become smaller. The reduced size of RCPs increases the local concentration of fluorophores and as a result, the signal intensity increases together with the signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, we have found that RCPs sometimes tend to disintegrate and may be recorded as several RCPs, a trait that is prevented with our cross-hybridizing DNA oligonucleotide. These effects generated by compaction of RCPs improve accuracy of visual as well as automated in situ analysis for RCA based methods, such as proximity ligation assays (PLA) and padlock probes. PMID:26202090

  6. Effects of chemokine receptor signalling on cognition-like, emotion-like and sociability behaviours of CCR6 and CCR7 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jaehne, E J; Baune, B T

    2014-03-15

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders. Chemokines, which are a part of the immune system, have effects on various aspects of brain function, but little is known about their effects on behaviour. We have compared the cognition-like behaviour (learning and spatial memory) of CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice with wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, in the Barnes maze, as well as a range of other behaviours, including exploratory, anxiety and depression-like behaviour, using a battery of tests. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also measured. In the Barnes maze, CCR7(-/-) mice were shown to take longer to learn the location of the escape box on the 1st of 4 days of training. In the behavioural battery, CCR6(-/-) mice showed higher locomotor activity and lower anxiety in the open field test, and a lack of preference for social novelty in a sociability test. CCR7(-/-) mice behaved much like WT mice, although showed higher anxiety in Elevated Zero Maze. While baseline saccharin preference in a 2-bottle choice test, a test for anhedonia depression-like behaviour, was equal in all strains at baseline, weekly tests showed that both CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice developed a decreased preference for saccharin compared to WT over time. There were no differences between strains in any of the cytokines measured. These results suggest that chemokine receptors may play a role in cognition and learning behaviour, as well as anxiety and other behaviours, although the biological mechanisms are still unclear.

  7. Age-Associated Increase in BMP Signaling Inhibits Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Hanadie; Morgenthaler, Adam; Schlesinger, Christina; Bugaj, Lukasz; Conboy, Irina M; Schaffer, David V

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis, the product of resident neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, persists into adulthood but decreases with organismal aging, which may contribute to the age-related decline in cognitive function. The mechanisms that underlie this decrease in neurogenesis are not well understood, although evidence in general indicates that extrinsic changes in an aged stem cell niche can contribute to functional decline in old stem cells. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family members are intercellular signaling proteins that regulate stem and progenitor cell quiescence, proliferation, and differentiation in various tissues and are likewise critical regulators of neurogenesis in young adults. Here, we establish that BMP signaling increases significantly in old murine hippocampi and inhibits neural progenitor cell proliferation. Furthermore, direct in vivo attenuation of BMP signaling via genetic and transgenic perturbations in aged mice led to elevated neural stem cell proliferation, and subsequent neurogenesis, in old hippocampi. Such advances in our understanding of mechanisms underlying decreased hippocampal neurogenesis with age may offer targets for the treatment of age-related cognitive decline.

  8. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Selten, Martijn M; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D; van Vugt, Ruben W M; van Hulten, Josephus A; van Bakel, Nick H M; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M M; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J M

    2016-09-30

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20-22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  9. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Selten, Martijn M.; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A.; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D.; van Vugt, Ruben W. M.; van Hulten, Josephus A.; van Bakel, Nick H. M.; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J.; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M. M.; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20–22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:27687783

  10. PMT signal increase using a wavelength shifting paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allada, K.; Hurlbut, Ch.; Ou, L.; Schmookler, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2015-05-01

    We report a 1.65 times increase of the PMT signal and a simple procedure of application of a new wavelength shifting (WLS) paint for PMTs with non-UV-transparent windows. Samples of four different WLS paints, made from hydrocarbon polymers and organic fluors, were tested on a 5-in. PMT (ET 9390KB) using Cherenkov radiation produced in fused silica disks by 106Ru electrons on a 'table-top' setup. The best performing paint was employed on two different types of 5-in. PMTs (ET 9390KB and XP4572B), installed in atmospheric pressure CO2 gas Cherenkov detectors, and tested using GeV electrons.

  11. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  12. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes act as a chemokine and recruit macrophages by activating the PLC/IP3/CRAC channel signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Yan, Li; Zeng, Bo; Meng, Jie; Xu, Hai-Yan; Cao, Ji-Min

    2017-03-22

    The impact of nanomaterials on immune cells is gaining attention but is not well documented. Here, we report a novel stimulating effect of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNTs) on the migration of macrophages and uncover the underlying mechanisms, especially the upstream signaling, using a series of techniques including transwell migration assay, patch clamp, ELISA and confocal microscopy. c-MWCNTs dramatically stimulated the migration of RAW264.7 macrophages when endocytosed, and this effect was abolished by inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) with U-73122, antagonizing the IP3 receptor with 2-APB, and blocking calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels with SK&F96365. c-MWCNTs directly activated PLC and increased the IP3 level and [Ca(2+)]i level in RAW264.7 cells, promoted the translocation of the ER-resident stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) towards the membranous calcium release-activated calcium channel modulator 1 (Orai1), and increased CRAC current densities in both RAW264.7 cells and HEK293 cells stably expressing the CRAC channel subunits Orai1 and STIM1. c-MWCNTs also induced dramatic spatial polarization of KCa3.1 channels in the RAW264.7 cells. We conclude that c-MWCNT is an activator of PLC and strongly recruits macrophages via the PLC/IP3/CRAC channel signaling cascade. These novel findings may provide a fundamental basis for the impact of MWCNTs on the immune system.

  13. Methamphetamine increases LPS-mediated expression of IL-8, TNF-α and IL-1β in human macrophages through common signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Silverstein, Peter S; Singh, Vijeta; Shah, Ankit; Qureshi, Nilofer; Kumar, Anil

    2012-01-01

    The use of methamphetamine (MA) has increased in recent years, and is a major health concern throughout the world. The use of MA has been associated with an increased risk of acquiring HIV-1, along with an increased probability of the acquisition of various sexually transmitted infections. In order to determine the potential effects of MA exposure in the context of an infectious agent, U937 macrophages were exposed to various combinations of MA and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Treatment with MA alone caused significant increases in the levels of TNF-α, while treatment with both MA and LPS resulted in significant increases in TNF-α, IL-1β and the chemokine IL-8. The increases in cytokine or chemokine levels seen when cells were treated with both LPS and MA were generally greater than those increases observed when cells were treated with only LPS. Treatment with chemical inhibitors demonstrated that the signal transduction pathways including NF-kB, MAPK, and PI3-Akt were involved in mediating the increased inflammatory response. As discussed in the paper, these pathways appear to be utilized by both MA and LPS, in the induction of these inflammatory mediators. Since these pathways are involved in the induction of inflammation in response to other pathogens, this suggests that MA-exacerbated inflammation may be a common feature of infectious disease in MA abusers.

  14. An atypical addition to the chemokine receptor nomenclature: IUPHAR Review 15.

    PubMed

    Bachelerie, Françoise; Graham, Gerard J; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Murphy, Philip M; Nibbs, Robert; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus

    2015-08-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are essential regulators of in vivo leukocyte migration and, some years ago, a systematic nomenclature system was developed for the chemokine receptor family. Chemokine receptor biology and biochemistry was recently extensively reviewed. In this review, we also highlighted a new component to the nomenclature system that incorporates receptors previously known as 'scavenging', or 'decoy', chemokine receptors on the basis of their lack of classical signalling responses to ligand binding and their general ability to scavenge, or sequester, their cognate chemokine ligands. These molecules are now collectively referred to as 'atypical chemokine receptors', or ACKRs, and play fundamental roles in regulating in vivo responses to chemokines. This commentary highlights this new addition to the chemokine receptor nomenclature system and provides brief information on the four receptors currently covered by this nomenclature.

  15. An atypical addition to the chemokine receptor nomenclature: IUPHAR Review 15

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Françoise; Graham, Gerard J; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Murphy, Philip M; Nibbs, Robert; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are essential regulators of in vivo leukocyte migration and, some years ago, a systematic nomenclature system was developed for the chemokine receptor family. Chemokine receptor biology and biochemistry was recently extensively reviewed. In this review, we also highlighted a new component to the nomenclature system that incorporates receptors previously known as ‘scavenging’, or ‘decoy’, chemokine receptors on the basis of their lack of classical signalling responses to ligand binding and their general ability to scavenge, or sequester, their cognate chemokine ligands. These molecules are now collectively referred to as ‘atypical chemokine receptors’, or ACKRs, and play fundamental roles in regulating in vivo responses to chemokines. This commentary highlights this new addition to the chemokine receptor nomenclature system and provides brief information on the four receptors currently covered by this nomenclature. PMID:25958743

  16. Sexual signalling by females: do unmated females increase their signalling effort?

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Leigh W.

    2015-01-01

    Theory predicts that females should invest least in mate searching when young, but increase their effort with age if they remain unmated. Few studies have examined variation in female sexual signalling. Female Dawson's burrowing bees (Amegilla dawsoni) search for males by signalling their receptivity on emergence, but many leave the emergence site unmated and must attract males at feeding sites. Female bees prevented from mating on emergence had more extreme versions of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles that make them attractive to males, lending empirical evidence of adaptive shifts in female mating effort. PMID:26109613

  17. A mitochondrial superoxide signal triggers increased longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2010-12-07

    The nuo-6 and isp-1 genes of C. elegans encode, respectively, subunits of complex I and III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Partial loss-of-function mutations in these genes decrease electron transport and greatly increase the longevity of C. elegans by a mechanism that is distinct from that induced by reducing their level of expression by RNAi. Electron transport is a major source of the superoxide anion (O(⋅) (-)), which in turn generates several types of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), and aging is accompanied by increased oxidative stress, which is an imbalance between the generation and detoxification of ROS. These observations have suggested that the longevity of such mitochondrial mutants might result from a reduction in ROS generation, which would be consistent with the mitochondrial oxidative stress theory of aging. It is difficult to measure ROS directly in living animals, and this has held back progress in determining their function in aging. Here we have adapted a technique of flow cytometry to directly measure ROS levels in isolated mitochondria to show that the generation of superoxide is elevated in the nuo-6 and isp-1 mitochondrial mutants, although overall ROS levels are not, and oxidative stress is low. Furthermore, we show that this elevation is necessary and sufficient to increase longevity, as it is abolished by the antioxidants NAC and vitamin C, and phenocopied by mild treatment with the prooxidant paraquat. Furthermore, the absence of effect of NAC and the additivity of the effect of paraquat on a variety of long- and short-lived mutants suggest that the pathway triggered by mitochondrial superoxide is distinct from previously studied mechanisms, including insulin signaling, dietary restriction, ubiquinone deficiency, the hypoxic response, and hormesis. These findings are not consistent with the mitochondrial oxidative stress theory of aging. Instead they show that increased superoxide generation acts as a signal in young

  18. Monitoring Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Confocal Immunofluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a protocol to detect chemokine receptor CXCR4 by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy in HeLa cells treated with its chemokine ligand CXCL12. Typically, ligand-activated chemokine receptors undergo a multistep process of desensitization and/or internalization from the plasma membrane in order to terminate signaling. Once internalized to endosomes, chemokine receptors readily enter the recycling pathway and return to the cell surface, giving rise to resensitization of signaling. The chemokine receptor CXCR4, when activated by CXCL12 is also internalized to endosomes, but in contrast to many chemokine receptors it is mainly sorted to the degradative pathway, contributing to a loss in the cellular complement of CXCR4 and long-term downregulation of signaling. The trafficking of CXCR4 from early endosomes to lysosomes can be easily detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy by immunostaining fixed cells for the receptor and with markers of these vesicular compartments. This approach is advantageous because it can be used to identify factors that regulate the trafficking of CXCR4 from early endosomes to lysosomes. The protocol described here focuses on CXCR4, but it can be easily adapted to other chemokine receptors. PMID:26921951

  19. 'Reverse gear' cellular movement mediated by chemokines.

    PubMed

    Zlatopolskiy, A; Laurence, J

    2001-08-01

    We sought to model the mechanism by which leucocytes may be actively repulsed by a beta-chemokine signal. This model is used to interpret an apparent paradox in chemokine biology, whereby high levels of a T-cell chemoattractant, stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), are present in bone marrow and thymic tissues despite a paucity of mature T lymphocytes in these areas. We postulate the differential involvement in cell migration of the two binding sites on SDF-1 for its sole receptor, CXCR4, depending on whether high or low concentrations of SDF-1 are encountered by the cell. Site choice would be mediated by divergent affinities of the two binding interactions. We also propose differential signalling following SDF-1/CXCR4 interactions on the plasma membrane versus ligand/receptor complexes in endocytic vesicles. Preliminary data showing divergent susceptibility to kinase inhibitors depending on whether a cell is attracted to or repulsed by SDF-1, are consistent with this model. In terms of physical movement toward or away from a chemokine gradient, we compare the cycling of surface receptors during migration to the caterpillar drive of a tractor, which can change direction simply by altering the direction of rotation of its threads. Finally, the potential clinical implications of concentration-dependent, chemokine-based cell attraction and repulsion are discussed.

  20. Cholesterol Depletion Alters Cardiomyocyte Subcellular Signaling and Increases Contractility

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Victoria J.; Abou Samra, Abdul B.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Lasley, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane cholesterol levels play an important factor in regulating cell function. Sarcolemmal cholesterol is concentrated in lipid rafts and caveolae, which are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The scaffolding protein caveolin permits the enrichment of cholesterol in caveolae, and caveolin interactions with numerous proteins regulate their function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute reductions in cardiomyocyte cholesterol levels alter subcellular protein kinase activation, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility. Methods: Ventricular myocytes, isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with the cholesterol reducing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 hr, room temperature). Total cellular cholesterol levels, caveolin-3 localization, subcellular, ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, contractility, and [Ca2+]i were assessed. Results: Treatment with MβCD reduced cholesterol levels by ~45 and shifted caveolin-3 from cytoskeleton and triton-insoluble fractions to the triton-soluble fraction, and increased ERK isoform phosphorylation in cytoskeletal, cytosolic, triton-soluble and triton-insoluble membrane fractions without altering their subcellular distributions. In contrast the primary effect of MβCD was on p38 subcellular distribution of p38α with little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Cholesterol depletion increased cardiomyocyte twitch amplitude and the rates of shortening and relaxation in conjunction with increased diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i. Conclusions: These results indicate that acute reductions in membrane cholesterol levels differentially modulate basal cardiomyocyte subcellular MAPK signaling, as well as increasing [Ca2+]i and contractility. PMID:27441649

  1. MicroRNA-126 inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and invasion by targeting the chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 and Ras homolog gene family, member A, signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Guo, Ye-Qing; Li, Xia-Yu; Deng, Min-Zi; Shen, Zhao-Hua; Bo, Chi-Bin; Dai, Ya-Fei; Huang, Ming-Yu; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Quan, Yong-Sheng; Tian, Li; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-126 (miR-126) suppresses the migration, proliferation and invasion of colon cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of miR-126 in colon cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this study, in vivo experiments revealed that miR-126 inhibits colon cancer growth and metastasis. Furthermore, miR-126 was down-regulated in human colon cancer tissue, and its expression was inversely correlated with TNM stage and metastasis of patients. Low level of miR-126 identified patients with poor prognosis. And we found that miR-126 expression was negatively correlated with the expression levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) and components of signaling pathway of Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we verified that miR-126 negatively regulated CXCR4 and RhoA signaling in vitro. In addition, either in miR-126-overexpressing or in miR- 126-silenced colon cancer cells, the restoration of CXCR4 could significantly reverse the proliferation and invasion, as well as abolish the effects of miR-126 on RhoA signaling pathway. Collectively, these results demonstrated that miR-126 acts as a tumor suppressor by inactivating RhoA signaling via CXCR4 in colon cancer. And miR-126 may serve as a prognostic marker for monitoring and treating colon cancer. PMID:27517626

  2. MicroRNA-126 inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and invasion by targeting the chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 and Ras homolog gene family, member A, signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Guo, Ye-Qing; Li, Xia-Yu; Deng, Min-Zi; Shen, Zhao-Hua; Bo, Chi-Bin; Dai, Ya-Fei; Huang, Ming-Yu; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Quan, Yong-Sheng; Tian, Li; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-13

    MicroRNA-126 (miR-126) suppresses the migration, proliferation and invasion of colon cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of miR-126 in colon cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this study, in vivo experiments revealed that miR-126 inhibits colon cancer growth and metastasis. Furthermore, miR-126 was down-regulated in human colon cancer tissue, and its expression was inversely correlated with TNM stage and metastasis of patients. Low level of miR-126 identified patients with poor prognosis. And we found that miR-126 expression was negatively correlated with the expression levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) and components of signaling pathway of Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we verified that miR-126 negatively regulated CXCR4 and RhoA signaling in vitro. In addition, either in miR-126-overexpressing or in miR- 126-silenced colon cancer cells, the restoration of CXCR4 could significantly reverse the proliferation and invasion, as well as abolish the effects of miR-126 on RhoA signaling pathway. Collectively, these results demonstrated that miR-126 acts as a tumor suppressor by inactivating RhoA signaling via CXCR4 in colon cancer. And miR-126 may serve as a prognostic marker for monitoring and treating colon cancer.

  3. Increased entropy of signal transduction in the cancer metastasis phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The statistical study of biological networks has led to important novel biological insights, such as the presence of hubs and hierarchical modularity. There is also a growing interest in studying the statistical properties of networks in the context of cancer genomics. However, relatively little is known as to what network features differ between the cancer and normal cell physiologies, or between different cancer cell phenotypes. Results Based on the observation that frequent genomic alterations underlie a more aggressive cancer phenotype, we asked if such an effect could be detectable as an increase in the randomness of local gene expression patterns. Using a breast cancer gene expression data set and a model network of protein interactions we derive constrained weighted networks defined by a stochastic information flux matrix reflecting expression correlations between interacting proteins. Based on this stochastic matrix we propose and compute an entropy measure that quantifies the degree of randomness in the local pattern of information flux around single genes. By comparing the local entropies in the non-metastatic versus metastatic breast cancer networks, we here show that breast cancers that metastasize are characterised by a small yet significant increase in the degree of randomness of local expression patterns. We validate this result in three additional breast cancer expression data sets and demonstrate that local entropy better characterises the metastatic phenotype than other non-entropy based measures. We show that increases in entropy can be used to identify genes and signalling pathways implicated in breast cancer metastasis and provide examples of de-novo discoveries of gene modules with known roles in apoptosis, immune-mediated tumour suppression, cell-cycle and tumour invasion. Importantly, we also identify a novel gene module within the insulin growth factor signalling pathway, alteration of which may predispose the tumour to

  4. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  5. Chemokine Detection Using Receptors Immobilized on an SPR Sensor Surface.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Villares, Ricardo; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Gomariz, Rosa P; Mellado, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors take part in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulated expression is linked to chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, and cancer. The chemokine receptors, members of the G protein-coupled receptor family, are integral membrane proteins, with seven-transmembrane domains that bind the chemokines and transmit signals through GTP-binding proteins. Many assays used to study the structure, conformation, or activation mechanism of these receptors are based on ligand-binding measurement, as are techniques to detect new agonists and antagonists that modulate chemokine function. Such methods require labeling of the chemokine and/or its receptor, which can alter their binding characteristics. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for analysis of the interaction between immobilized receptors and ligands in solution, in real time, and without labeling. SPR measurements nonetheless require expression and purification steps that can alter the conformation, stability, and function of the chemokine and/or the chemokine receptor. In this review, we focus on distinct methods to immobilize chemokine receptors on the surface of an optical biosensor. We expose the advantages and disadvantages of different protocols used and describe in detail the method to retain viral particles as receptor carriers that can be used for SPR determinations. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease exhibit increased serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but decreased circulating levels of macrophage inhibitory protein-1β, interleukin-2 and interleukin-17

    PubMed Central

    KLEINER, GIULIO; ZANIN, VALENTINA; MONASTA, LORENZO; CROVELLA, SERGIO; CARUSO, LORENZO; MILANI, DANIELA; MARCUZZI, ANNALISA

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the causative events that lead to the onset of IBD are yet to be fully elucidated, deregulation of immune and inflammatory mechanisms are hypothesized to significantly contribute to this disorder. Since the onset of IBD is often during infancy, in the present study, the serum values of a large panel of cytokines and chemokines in pediatric patients (<18 years; n=26) were compared with age-matched controls (n=37). While elevations in the serum level of several proinflammatory and immune regulating cytokines were confirmed, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-5, IL-7, interferon (IFN)-γ-inducible protein-10, IL-16, cutaneous T-cell-attracting chemokine, leukemia inhibitory factor, monokine induced by γ-IFN, IFN-α2 and IFN-γ, notably decreased levels of IL-2, IL-17 and macrophage inhibitory protein-1β were also observed. Therefore, while a number of proinflammatory cytokines exhibit increased levels in IBD patients, pediatric IBD patients may also exhibit certain aspects of a reduced immunological response. PMID:26136934

  7. Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease exhibit increased serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but decreased circulating levels of macrophage inhibitory protein-1β, interleukin-2 and interleukin-17.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Giulio; Zanin, Valentina; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio; Caruso, Lorenzo; Milani, Daniela; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the causative events that lead to the onset of IBD are yet to be fully elucidated, deregulation of immune and inflammatory mechanisms are hypothesized to significantly contribute to this disorder. Since the onset of IBD is often during infancy, in the present study, the serum values of a large panel of cytokines and chemokines in pediatric patients (<18 years; n=26) were compared with age-matched controls (n=37). While elevations in the serum level of several proinflammatory and immune regulating cytokines were confirmed, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-5, IL-7, interferon (IFN)-γ-inducible protein-10, IL-16, cutaneous T-cell-attracting chemokine, leukemia inhibitory factor, monokine induced by γ-IFN, IFN-α2 and IFN-γ, notably decreased levels of IL-2, IL-17 and macrophage inhibitory protein-1β were also observed. Therefore, while a number of proinflammatory cytokines exhibit increased levels in IBD patients, pediatric IBD patients may also exhibit certain aspects of a reduced immunological response.

  8. Transendothelial migration of lymphocytes mediated by intraendothelial vesicle stores rather than by extracellular chemokine depots.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Ziv; Cohen, Shmuel J; Roediger, Ben; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Jain, Rohit; Grabovsky, Valentin; Klein, Eugenia; Shinder, Vera; Stoler-Barak, Liat; Feigelson, Sara W; Meshel, Tsipi; Nurmi, Susanna M; Goldstein, Itamar; Hartley, Olivier; Gahmberg, Carl G; Etzioni, Amos; Weninger, Wolfgang; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Alon, Ronen

    2011-12-04

    Chemokines presented by the endothelium are critical for integrin-dependent adhesion and transendothelial migration of naive and memory lymphocytes. Here we found that effector lymphocytes of the type 1 helper T cell (T(H)1 cell) and type 1 cytotoxic T cell (T(C)1 cell) subtypes expressed adhesive integrins that bypassed chemokine signals and established firm arrests on variably inflamed endothelial barriers. Nevertheless, the transendothelial migration of these lymphocytes strictly depended on signals from guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the G(i) type and was promoted by multiple endothelium-derived inflammatory chemokines, even without outer endothelial surface exposure. Instead, transendothelial migration-promoting endothelial chemokines were stored in vesicles docked on actin fibers beneath the plasma membranes and were locally released within tight lymphocyte-endothelial synapses. Thus, effector T lymphocytes can cross inflamed barriers through contact-guided consumption of intraendothelial chemokines without surface-deposited chemokines or extraendothelial chemokine gradients.

  9. Abnormal peripheral chemokine profile in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Wild, Edward; Magnusson, Anna; Lahiri, Nayana; Krus, Ulrika; Orth, Michael; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Björkqvist, Maria

    2011-04-13

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by both neurological and systemic abnormalities. Immune activation is a well-established feature of the HD brain and we have previously demonstrated a widespread, progressive innate immune response detectable in plasma throughout the course of HD. In the present work we used multiplex ELISA to quantify levels of chemokines in plasma from controls and subjects at different stages of HD. We found an altered chemokine profile tracking with disease progression, with significant elevations of five chemokines (eotaxin-3, MIP-1β, eotaxin, MCP-1 and MCP-4) while three (eotaxin-3, MIP-1β and eotaxin) showed significant linear increases across advancing disease stages. We validated our results in a separate sample cohort including subjects at different stages of HD. Here we saw that chemokine levels (MCP-1 and eotaxin) correlated with clinical scores. We conclude that, like cytokines, chemokines may be linked to the pathogenesis of HD, and that immune molecules may be valuable in tracking and exploring the pathogenesis of HD.

  10. Influenza A Viruses Replicate Productively in Mouse Mastocytoma Cells (P815) and Trigger Pro-inflammatory Cytokine and Chemokine Production through TLR3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Di; Huo, Caiyun; Wang, Ming; Xiao, Jin; Liu, Bo; Wei, Tangting; Dong, Hong; Zhang, Guozhong; Hu, Yanxin; Sun, Lunquan

    2017-01-01

    The influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause acute respiratory infection in both humans and animals. As a member of the initial lines of host defense system, the role of mast cells during IAV infection has been poorly understood. Here, we characterized for the first time that both avian-like (α-2, 3-linked) and human-like (α-2, 6- linked) sialic acid (SA) receptors were expressed by the mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). The P815 cells did support the productive replication of H1N1 (A/WSN/33), H5N1 (A/chicken/ Henan/1/04) and H7N2 (A/chicken/Hebei/2/02) in vitro while the in vivo infection of H5N1 in mast cells was confirmed by the specific staining of nasal mucosa and lung tissue from mice. All the three viruses triggered the infected P815 cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL-2, CCL-5, and IP-10, but not the antiviral type I interferon. It was further confirmed that TLR3 pathway was involved in P815 cell response to IAV-infection. Our findings highlight the remarkable tropism and infectivity of IAV to P815 cells, indicating that mast cells may be unneglectable player in the development of IAV infection. PMID:28127293

  11. The role of chemokines in term and premature rupture of the fetal membranes: a review.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Laresgoiti-Servitje, Estibalitz; Olson, David M; Estrada-Gutiérrez, Guadalupe; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2010-05-01

    Several studies indicate that at the choriodecidual interface, where maternal and fetal tissues make contact, a network of signals is established during labor that includes infiltration of leukocytes and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we provide an overview of the inflammatory milieu present in the choriodecidua during membrane rupture, describe the recruitment and homing of leukocytes to the reproductive tissues, and detail specific actions of the key chemokines released by the choriodecidual cells. These data lend further support to the hypothesis that labor is an inflammatory response, wherein the infiltrated leukocytes in the choriodecidua interface could be contributing to the creation of a microenvironment leading to collagenolysis, which would promote the rupture of these tissues during labor. In addition to the available information describing biological actions of chemokines during various pathological conditions such as infection, preterm labor and preterm rupture of membranes suggest that these compounds play important roles in other gestational events such as cervical dilation and myometrial contractions. Even though we do not know the totality of biochemical signals that integrate the molecular dialogue between leukocytes and the various gestational tissues, it is becoming increasingly evident that this microenvironment is characterized, at least in part, by the differential expression and secretion of chemokines that induce selective trafficking of leukocyte subsets to the fetal membranes. Therefore, chemokines should be considered as important regulatory molecules with the ability to initiate the events that characterize normal and pathological labor.

  12. Pharmacological and signaling analysis of human chemokine receptor CCR-7 stably expressed in HEK-293 cells: high-affinity binding of recombinant ligands MIP-3beta and SLC stimulates multiple signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, S K; McGrath, D A; Grigoriadis, D; Bacon, K B

    1999-10-05

    The chemokine receptor CCR-7 is expressed in T, NK, and dendritic cells in a time-ordered and stimulus-dependent manner. Thorough analyses of the pharmacological profiles of the recombinant ligands for CCR-7, MIP-3beta/ELC/CK-beta 11, and SLC/Exodus-2/TCA4/6C-kine, using CCR-7-expressing HEK-293E transfectants determine that ligands both bind with a K(d) in the 100 pM range-10- to 100-fold greater affinities than published K(d) values. High-affinity binding of each ligand is associated with rapid mobilization of intracellular calcium and cell migration as predicted for chemokine GPCRs, and in keeping with more recent evidence, robust activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Chemokine/chemokine receptor pair CCL20/CCR6 in human colorectal malignancy: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Vilma Oliveira; Rubie, Claudia; Keilholz, Ulrich; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a superfamily of small, cytokine-like proteins, which induce multiple physiological functions, particularly cytoskeletal rearrangement and compartment-specific migration through their interaction with G-protein-coupled receptors. Chemokines and their receptors have been widely acknowledged as essential and selective mediators in leukocyte migration in inflammatory response. It is now established that the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is also used by cancer cells to direct lymphatic and haematogenous spreading and additionally has an impact on the site of metastatic growth of different tumours. In recent years an increasing number of studies have drawn attention to CC-chemokine cysteine motif chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and its physiological sole receptor CCR6 to play a role in the onset, development and metastatic spread of various gastrointestinal cancer entities. Among various cancer types CCR6 was also demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) and stimulation by its physiological ligand CCL20 has been reported to promote CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Further, the CCL20/CCR6 system apparently plays a role in the organ-selective liver metastasis of CRC. Here we review the literature on expression patterns of CCL20 and CCR6 and their physiological interactions as well as the currently presumed role of CCL20 and CCR6 in the formation of CRC and the development of liver metastasis, providing a potential basis for novel treatment strategies. PMID:26811629

  14. MET signalling in primary colon epithelial cells leads to increased transformation irrespective of aberrant Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Boon, E M J; Kovarikova, M; Derksen, P W B; van der Neut, R

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that in hereditary and most sporadic colon tumours, components of the Wnt pathway are mutated. The Wnt target MET has been implicated in the development of colon cancer. Here, we show that overexpression of wild-type or a constitutively activated form of MET in colon epithelial cells leads to increased transformation irrespective of Wnt signalling. Fetal human colon epithelial cells without aberrant Wnt signalling were transfected with wild-type or mutated MET constructs. Expression of these constructs leads to increased phosphorylation of MET and its downstream targets PKB and MAPK. Upon stimulation with HGF, the expression of E-cadherin is downregulated in wild-type MET-transfected cells, whereas cells expressing mutated MET show low E-cadherin levels independent of stimulation with ligand. This implies a higher migratory propensity of these cells. Furthermore, fetal human colon epithelial cells expressing the mutated form of MET have colony-forming capacity in soft agar, while cells expressing wild-type MET show an intermediate phenotype. Subcutaneous injection of mutated MET-transfected cells in nude mice leads to the formation of tumours within 12 days in all mice injected. At this time point, mock-transfected cells do not form tumours, while wild-type MET-transfected cells form subcutaneous tumours in one out of five mice. We thus show that MET signalling can lead to increased transformation of colon epithelial cells independent of Wnt signalling and in this way could play an essential role in the onset and progression of colorectal cancer. PMID:15785735

  15. MET signalling in primary colon epithelial cells leads to increased transformation irrespective of aberrant Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Boon, E M J; Kovarikova, M; Derksen, P W B; van der Neut, R

    2005-03-28

    It has been shown that in hereditary and most sporadic colon tumours, components of the Wnt pathway are mutated. The Wnt target MET has been implicated in the development of colon cancer. Here, we show that overexpression of wild-type or a constitutively activated form of MET in colon epithelial cells leads to increased transformation irrespective of Wnt signalling. Fetal human colon epithelial cells without aberrant Wnt signalling were transfected with wild-type or mutated MET constructs. Expression of these constructs leads to increased phosphorylation of MET and its downstream targets PKB and MAPK. Upon stimulation with HGF, the expression of E-cadherin is downregulated in wild-type MET-transfected cells, whereas cells expressing mutated MET show low E-cadherin levels independent of stimulation with ligand. This implies a higher migratory propensity of these cells. Furthermore, fetal human colon epithelial cells expressing the mutated form of MET have colony-forming capacity in soft agar, while cells expressing wild-type MET show an intermediate phenotype. Subcutaneous injection of mutated MET-transfected cells in nude mice leads to the formation of tumours within 12 days in all mice injected. At this time point, mock-transfected cells do not form tumours, while wild-type MET-transfected cells form subcutaneous tumours in one out of five mice. We thus show that MET signalling can lead to increased transformation of colon epithelial cells independent of Wnt signalling and in this way could play an essential role in the onset and progression of colorectal cancer.

  16. Neutralizing nanobodies targeting diverse chemokines effectively inhibit chemokine function.

    PubMed

    Blanchetot, Christophe; Verzijl, Dennis; Mujić-Delić, Azra; Bosch, Leontien; Rem, Louise; Leurs, Rob; Verrips, C Theo; Saunders, Michael; de Haard, Hans; Smit, Martine J

    2013-08-30

    Chemokine receptors and their ligands play a prominent role in immune regulation but many have also been implicated in inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, allograft rejection after transplantation, and also in cancer metastasis. Most approaches to therapeutically target the chemokine system involve targeting of chemokine receptors with low molecular weight antagonists. Here we describe the selection and characterization of an unprecedented large and diverse panel of neutralizing Nanobodies (single domain camelid antibodies fragment) directed against several chemokines. We show that the Nanobodies directed against CCL2 (MCP-1), CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL11 (I-TAC), and CXCL12 (SDF-1α) bind the chemokines with high affinity (at nanomolar concentration), thereby blocking receptor binding, inhibiting chemokine-induced receptor activation as well as chemotaxis. Together, we show that neutralizing Nanobodies can be selected efficiently for effective and specific therapeutic treatment against a wide range of immune and inflammatory diseases.

  17. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  18. Loss of Ranbp2 in motoneurons causes disruption of nucleocytoplasmic and chemokine signaling, proteostasis of hnRNPH3 and Mmp28, and development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung-In; Yoon, Dosuk; Qiu, Sunny; Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M; Wetsel, William C; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2017-05-01

    The pathogenic drivers of sporadic and familial motor neuron disease (MND), such amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are unknown. MND impairs the Ran GTPase cycle, which controls nucleocytoplasmic transport, ribostasis and proteostasis; however, cause-effect mechanisms of Ran GTPase modulators in motoneuron pathobiology have remained elusive. The cytosolic and peripheral nucleoporin Ranbp2 is a crucial regulator of the Ran GTPase cycle and of the proteostasis of neurological disease-prone substrates, but the roles of Ranbp2 in motoneuron biology and disease remain unknown. This study shows that conditional ablation of Ranbp2 in mouse Thy1 motoneurons causes ALS syndromes with hypoactivity followed by hindlimb paralysis, respiratory distress and, ultimately, death. These phenotypes are accompanied by: a decline in the nerve conduction velocity, free fatty acids and phophatidylcholine of the sciatic nerve; a reduction in the g-ratios of sciatic and phrenic nerves; and hypertrophy of motoneurons. Furthermore, Ranbp2 loss disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of the import and export nuclear receptors importin β and exportin 1, respectively, Ran GTPase and histone deacetylase 4. Whole-transcriptome, proteomic and cellular analyses uncovered that the chemokine receptor Cxcr4, its antagonizing ligands Cxcl12 and Cxcl14, and effector, latent and activated Stat3 all undergo early autocrine and proteostatic deregulation, and intracellular sequestration and aggregation as a result of Ranbp2 loss in motoneurons. These effects were accompanied by paracrine and autocrine neuroglial deregulation of hnRNPH3 proteostasis in sciatic nerve and motoneurons, respectively, and post-transcriptional downregulation of metalloproteinase 28 in the sciatic nerve. Mechanistically, our results demonstrate that Ranbp2 controls nucleocytoplasmic, chemokine and metalloproteinase 28 signaling, and proteostasis of substrates that are crucial to motoneuronal homeostasis and whose impairments

  19. Mechanisms of Regulation of the Chemokine-Receptor Network

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Martin J.; Hayward, Jenni A.; Huang, Cheng; E. Huma, Zil; Sanchez, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The interactions of chemokines with their G protein-coupled receptors promote the migration of leukocytes during normal immune function and as a key aspect of the inflammatory response to tissue injury or infection. This review summarizes the major cellular and biochemical mechanisms by which the interactions of chemokines with chemokine receptors are regulated, including: selective and competitive binding interactions; genetic polymorphisms; mRNA splice variation; variation of expression, degradation and localization; down-regulation by atypical (decoy) receptors; interactions with cell-surface glycosaminoglycans; post-translational modifications; oligomerization; alternative signaling responses; and binding to natural or pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:28178200

  20. Chemotaxis, chemokine receptors and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tian; Xu, Xuehua; Hereld, Dale

    2008-10-01

    Cell migration is involved in diverse physiological processes including embryogenesis, immunity, and diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammatory disease. The movement of many cell types is directed by extracellular gradients of diffusible chemicals. This phenomenon, referred to as "chemotaxis", was first described in 1888 by Leber who observed the movement of leukocytes toward sites of inflammation. We now know that a large family of small proteins, chemokines, serves as the extracellular signals and a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), chemokine receptors, detects gradients of chemokines and guides cell movement in vivo. Currently, we still know little about the molecular machineries that control chemokine gradient sensing and migration of immune cells. Fortunately, the molecular mechanisms that control these fundamental aspects of chemotaxis appear to be evolutionarily conserved, and studies in lower eukaryotic model systems have allowed us to form concepts, uncover molecular components, develop new techniques, and test models of chemotaxis. These studies have helped our current understanding of this complicated cell behavior. In this review, we wish to mention landmark discoveries in the chemotaxis research field that shaped our current understanding of this fundamental cell behavior and lay out key questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  1. Environmental Factors Impacting Bone-Relevant Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justin T.; Schneider, Andrew D.; Katchko, Karina M.; Yun, Chawon; Hsu, Erin L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines play an important role in normal bone physiology and the pathophysiology of many bone diseases. The recent increased focus on the individual roles of this class of proteins in the context of bone has shown that members of the two major chemokine subfamilies—CC and CXC—support or promote the formation of new bone and the remodeling of existing bone in response to a myriad of stimuli. These chemotactic molecules are crucial in orchestrating appropriate cellular homing, osteoblastogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis during normal bone repair. Bone healing is a complex cascade of carefully regulated processes, including inflammation, progenitor cell recruitment, differentiation, and remodeling. The extensive role of chemokines in these processes and the known links between environmental contaminants and chemokine expression/activity leaves ample opportunity for disruption of bone healing by environmental factors. However, despite increased clinical awareness, the potential impact of many of these environmental factors on bone-related chemokines is still ill defined. A great deal of focus has been placed on environmental exposure to various endocrine disruptors (bisphenol A, phthalate esters, etc.), volatile organic compounds, dioxins, and heavy metals, though mainly in other tissues. Awareness of the impact of other less well-studied bone toxicants, such as fluoride, mold and fungal toxins, asbestos, and chlorine, is also reviewed. In many cases, the literature on these toxins in osteogenic models is lacking. However, research focused on their effects in other tissues and cell lines provides clues for where future resources could be best utilized. This review aims to serve as a current and exhaustive resource detailing the known links between several classes of high-interest environmental pollutants and their interaction with the chemokines relevant to bone healing. PMID:28261155

  2. Modulation of Chemokine Receptor Function by Cholesterol: New Prospects for Pharmacological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Legler, Daniel F; Matti, Christoph; Laufer, Julia M; Jakobs, Barbara D; Purvanov, Vladimir; Uetz-von Allmen, Edith; Thelen, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    Chemokine receptors are seven transmembrane-domain receptors belonging to class A of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The receptors together with their chemokine ligands constitute the chemokine system, which is essential for directing cell migration and plays a crucial role in a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes. Given the importance of orchestrating cell migration, it is vital that chemokine receptor signaling is tightly regulated to ensure appropriate responses. Recent studies highlight a key role for cholesterol in modulating chemokine receptor activities. The steroid influences the spatial organization of GPCRs within the membrane bilayer, and consequently can tune chemokine receptor signaling. The effects of cholesterol on the organization and function of chemokine receptors and GPCRs in general include direct and indirect effects (Fig. 1). Here, we review how cholesterol and some key metabolites modulate functions of the chemokine system in multiple ways. We emphasize the role of cholesterol in chemokine receptor oligomerization, thereby promoting the formation of a signaling hub enabling integration of distinct signaling pathways at the receptor-membrane interface. Moreover, we discuss the role of cholesterol in stabilizing particular receptor conformations and its consequence for chemokine binding. Finally, we highlight how cholesterol accumulation, its deprivation, or cholesterol metabolites contribute to modulating cell orchestration during inflammation, induction of an adaptive immune response, as well as to dampening an anti-tumor immune response.

  3. Dystrophic muscle improvement in zebrafish via increased heme oxygenase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Genri; Gasperini, Molly J.; Myers, Jennifer A.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Eran, Alal; Serafini, Peter R.; Alexander, Matthew S.; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Morris, Carl A.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of the dystrophin protein and has no effective treatment at present. Zebrafish provide a powerful in vivo tool for high-throughput therapeutic drug screening for the improvement of muscle phenotypes caused by dystrophin deficiency. Using the dystrophin-deficient zebrafish, sapje, we have screened a total of 2640 compounds with known modes of action from three drug libraries to identify modulators of the disease progression. Six compounds that target heme oxygenase signaling were found to rescue the abnormal muscle phenotype in sapje and sapje-like, while upregulating the inducible heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) at the protein level. Direct Hmox1 overexpression by injection of zebrafish Hmox1 mRNA into fertilized eggs was found to be sufficient for a dystrophin-independent restoration of normal muscle via an upregulation of cGMP levels. In addition, treatment of mdx5cv mice with the PDE5 inhibitor, sildenafil, which was one of the six drugs impacting the Hmox1 pathway in zebrafish, significantly increased the expression of Hmox1 protein, thus making Hmox1 a novel target for the improvement of dystrophic symptoms. These results demonstrate the translational relevance of our zebrafish model to mammalian models and support the use of zebrafish to screen for new drugs to treat human DMD. The discovery of a small molecule and a specific therapeutic pathway that might mitigate DMD disease progression could lead to significant clinical implications. PMID:24234649

  4. Stress increases aversive prediction error signal in the ventral striatum.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Oliver J; Overstreet, Cassie; Charney, Danielle R; Vytal, Katherine; Grillon, Christian

    2013-03-05

    From job interviews to the heat of battle, it is evident that people think and learn differently when stressed. In fact, learning under stress may have long-term consequences; stress facilitates aversive conditioning and associations learned during extreme stress may result in debilitating emotional responses in posttraumatic stress disorder. The mechanisms underpinning such stress-related associations, however, are unknown. Computational neuroscience has successfully characterized several mechanisms critical for associative learning under normative conditions. One such mechanism, the detection of a mismatch between expected and observed outcomes within the ventral striatum (i.e., "prediction errors"), is thought to be a critical precursor to the formation of new stimulus-outcome associations. An untested possibility, therefore, is that stress may affect learning via modulation of this mechanism. Here we combine a translational model of stress with a cognitive neuroimaging paradigm to demonstrate that stress significantly increases ventral striatum aversive (but not appetitive) prediction error signal. This provides a unique account of the propensity to form threat-related associations under stress with direct implications for our understanding of both normal stress and stress-related disorders.

  5. Increased Brain Signal Variability Accompanies Lower Behavioral Variability in Development

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Kovacevic, Natasa; Itier, Roxane J.

    2008-01-01

    As the brain matures, its responses become optimized. Behavioral measures show this through improved accuracy and decreased trial-to-trial variability. The question remains whether the supporting brain dynamics show a similar decrease in variability. We examined the relation between variability in single trial evoked electrical activity of the brain (measured with EEG) and performance of a face memory task in children (8–15 y) and young adults (20–33 y). Behaviorally, children showed slower, more variable response times (RT), and less accurate recognition than adults. However, brain signal variability increased with age, and showed strong negative correlations with intrasubject RT variability and positive correlations with accuracy. Thus, maturation appears to lead to a brain with greater functional variability, which is indicative of enhanced neural complexity. This variability may reflect a broader repertoire of metastable brain states and more fluid transitions among them that enable optimum responses. Our results suggest that the moment-to-moment variability in brain activity may be a critical index of the cognitive capacity of the brain. PMID:18604265

  6. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica; Mantovani, Alberto

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  7. Chemokine expression of oral fibroblasts and epithelial cells in response to artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Müller, Heinz-Dieter; Cvikl, Barbara; Lussi, Adrian; Gruber, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    Artificial saliva is widely used to overcome reduced natural salivary flow. Natural saliva provokes the expression of chemokines in oral fibroblasts in vitro. However, if artificial saliva changes the expression of chemokines remains unknown. Here, we investigated the ability of Saliva Orthana®, Aldiamed®, Glandosane®, and Saliva Natura® to change the expression of chemokines in human oral fibroblasts and the human oral epithelial cell line HSC-2 by means of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoassays. Mucins isolated from bovine submaxillary glands and recombinant human mucin 1 were included in the bioassay. Formazan formation and LIVE/DEAD® staining determined the impact of artificial saliva on cell viability. The involvement of signaling pathways was determined by pharmacologic inhibitors and Western blotting. In gingival fibroblasts, Saliva Orthana®-containing mucins provoked a significantly increased expression of CXC ligand 8 (CXCL8, or interleukin 8), CXCL1, and CXCL2. Immunoassays for CXCL8 and CXCL1 confirmed the translation at the protein level. The respective dilution of artificial saliva had no impact on formazan formation and LIVE/DEAD® staining. Mucins isolated from bovine submaxillary glands also increased the panel of chemokine expression in gingival fibroblasts. BAY 11-7082, a nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) inhibitor, but also TAK-242, an inhibitor of toll-like receptor 4 signaling, blocked chemokine expression of Saliva Orthana® and bovine mucins. In HSC-2 cells, Glandosane® significantly increased CXCL8 expression. Saliva Orthana® stimulated chemokine expression in gingival fibroblasts. Mammalian mucins, but also possible contaminations with endotoxins, might contribute to the respective changes in gene expression. Epithelial cells have a differential response to artificial saliva with Glandosane® changing CXCL8 expression. Artificial saliva can incite a cellular response

  8. The fine balance of chemokines during disease: trafficking, inflammation, and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Sandra M; Garcia, Jenny A; Cardona, Astrid E

    2013-01-01

    The action of chemokines (or "chemotactic cytokines") is recognized as an integral part of inflammatory and regulatory processes. Leukocyte mobilization during physiological conditions, trafficking of various cell types during pathological conditions, cell activation, and angiogenesis are among the target functions exerted by chemokines upon signaling via their specific receptors. Current research is focused in analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor patterns during various diseases with the aim to modulate pathological trafficking of cells, or to attract particular cell types to specific tissues. This review focuses on defining the role(s) of certain chemokine ligands and receptors in inflammatory neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis. In addition, the role(s) of chemokines in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease is also described, as well as the contribution of chemokines to the pathogenesis of cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Roflumilast n-oxide associated with PGE2 prevents the neutrophil elastase-induced production of chemokines by epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Victoni, Tatiana; Gicquel, Thomas; Bodin, Aude; Daude, Marion; Tenor, Hermann; Valença, Samuel; Devillier, Philippe; Porto, Luis Cristovão; Lagente, Vincent; Boichot, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil chemotaxis is involved in the lung inflammatory process in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Neutrophil elastase (NE), one of the main proteases produced by neutrophils, has an important role in the inflammatory process via the release of chemokines from airway epithelial cells. It was recently shown that roflumilast N-oxide has therapeutic potential in COPD. The aim of the present study was to investigate roflumilast N-oxide's effect on NE-induced chemokine production and signaling pathways in A549 epithelial cells. A549 cells were incubated with NE for 30min, washed with PBS and then cultured for 2h (for measurement of mRNA expression) and 24h (for chemokine release) or for 5 to 30min (for protein phosphorylation assays). Prior to the addition of NE, cells were also pre-incubated with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), alone and in combination with roflumilast N-oxide. Addition of NE was associated with elevated chemokine production by A549 cells and induction of the p38α pathway. In contrast when combined with PGE2, the roflumilast N-oxide had an additive effect on the inhibition of NE-induced chemokine release and p38α and other kinases activation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NE is able to increase the release of chemokines from epithelial cells via the activation of p38α MAP-kinase and that roflumilast N-oxide when combined with PGE2 lowers NE-induced kinase activation and chemokine production.

  10. [Hypothalamic inflammation and energy balance deregulations: focus on chemokines.

    PubMed

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Rovère, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance. It especially controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural and nutrient-related signals and cues. Hypothalamic neurons and glial cells act jointly to orchestrate, both spatially and temporally, regulated metabolic functions of the hypothalamus. Thus, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and deregulations of feeding behavior, such as involuntary weight-loss or obesity, has been suggested. Among the inflammatory mediators that could induce deregulations of hypothalamic control of the energy balance, chemokines represent interesting candidates. Indeed, chemokines, primarily known for their chemoattractant role of immune cells to the inflamed site, have also been suggested capable of neuromodulation. Thus, chemokines could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators that are involved in the maintenance of energy balance. Here, we relate, on one hand, recent results showing the primary role of the central chemokinergic signaling CCL2/CCR2 for metabolic and behavioral adaptation to high-grade inflammation, especially loss of appetite and weight, through its activity on hypothalamic neurons producing the orexigenic peptide Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) and, on the other hand, results that suggest that chemokines could also deregulate hypothalamic neuropeptidergic circuits to induce an opposite phenotype and eventually participate in the onset/development of obesity. In more details, we will emphasize a study recently showing, in a model of high-grade acute inflammation of LPS injection in mice, that central CCL2/CCR2 signaling is of primary importance for several aspects explaining weight loss associated with inflammation: after LPS injection, animals lose weight, reduce their food intake, increase their fat oxidation (thus energy consumption from

  11. CC chemokines induce neutrophils to chemotaxis, degranulation, and alpha-defensin release.

    PubMed

    Jan, Ming-Shiou; Huang, Yi-Hsien; Shieh, Biehuoy; Teng, Ru-Hsiu; Yan, Yao-Pei; Lee, Yuan-Ti; Liao, Ko-Kaung; Li, Ching

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that a Taiwanese cohort of HIV-uninfected individuals was associated with the significantly elevated levels of serum beta-chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1)-alpha and MIP-beta, and RANTES. In the present study, we report that the members of this cohort have significantly greater numbers of lower buoyant-density neutrophils in their blood, which leads to further investigation of the effects of beta-chemokines on neutrophils. By electron and confocal microscopic techniques and FACScan, the results demonstrated that MIP-1alpha, MIP-beta, and/or RANTES readily activated the cells to release a large quantity of alpha-defensins in vitro through the degranulation process, which was the cause of low-buoyant-density neutrophil production. The purified neutrophils underwent chemotaxis and increased phagocytic capability when beta-chemokines were present. Only when using all 3 neutralizing antibodies for CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5 could the chemotaxis of neutrophils be inhibited completely, suggesting that these receptors are involved in transducing activating signals. Because neutrophils are the most abundant white blood cells that can be activated simultaneously to release alpha-defensins and because these proteins are antiviral, including anti-HIV, our results support the hypothesis that in addition to beta-chemokines, the innate immunity of the cohort plays a role in inhibiting the transmission of HIV.

  12. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    cells (HAECs) in vitro under conditions that mimic the shear stress in the bloodstream. For both heavy ions and x-rays, these adhesiveness changes are independent of adhesion molecule expression levels, but are chemokine dependent. Here we identify the specific endothelial chemokine responsible for this radiation-induced adhesiveness. X-irradiation increased IL-8 secretion almost 5-fold, while having little or no effect on expression of 15 other chemokines. Adhesiveness was then assayed under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Radiation significantly increased endothelial adhesiveness. The radiation-induced adhesiveness was specifically blocked by anti-IL-8 antibody, with no effect on baseline, radiation-independent adhesion. Addition of recombinant human IL-8 to un-irradiated HAECs was sufficient to increase adhesion to the same level as x-rays. Therefore, radiation-induced IL-8 signaling is both necessary and sufficient for radiation effects on aortic endothelial adhesiveness. This IL-8 induced adhesiveness may explain, at least in part, the mechanism by which radiation accelerates development of atherosclerosis. A better understanding of this mechanism can provide the basis for future countermeasure development.

  13. Rosacea: the Cytokine and Chemokine Network

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Steinhoff, Martin; Homey, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Rosacea is one of the most common dermatoses of adults. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of rosacea. Current concepts suggest that known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV radiation, heat, cold, stress, spicy food, and microbes modulate Toll-like receptor signaling, induce reactive oxygen species, as well as enhance antimicrobial peptide and neuropeptide production. Downstream of these events cytokines and chemokines orchestrate an inflammatory response that leads to the recruitment and activation of distinct leukocyte subsets and induces the characteristic histopathological features of rosacea. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the cytokine and chemokine network in rosacea and propose pathways that may be of therapeutic interest. PMID:22076326

  14. SMM-chemokines: a class of unnatural synthetic molecules as chemical probes of chemokine receptor biology and leads for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Choi, Won-Tak; Dong, Chang-Zhi; Madani, Navid; Tian, Shaomin; Liu, Dongxiang; Wang, Youli; Pesavento, James; Wang, Jun; Fan, Xuejun; Yuan, Jian; Fritzsche, Wayne R; An, Jing; Sodroski, Joseph G; Richman, Douglas D; Huang, Ziwei

    2006-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. To develop natural chemokines into receptor probes and inhibitors of pathological processes, the lack of chemokine-receptor selectivity must be overcome. Here, we apply chemical synthesis and the concept of modular modifications to generate unnatural synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokines that have high receptor selectivity and affinity, and reduced toxicity. A proof of the concept was shown by transforming the nonselective viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II into new analogs with enhanced selectivity and potency for CXCR4 or CCR5, two principal coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 entry. These new analogs provided insights into receptor binding and signaling mechanisms and acted as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. These results support the concept of SMM-chemokines for studying and controlling the function of other chemokine receptors.

  15. ACKR2: An Atypical Chemokine Receptor Regulating Lymphatic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Bonavita, Ornella; Mollica Poeta, Valeria; Setten, Elisa; Massara, Matteo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in the induction of the immune response by transporting antigens, inflammatory mediators, and leukocytes from peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes. It is emerging that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are playing an active role in this context via the expression of chemokines, inflammatory mediators promoting cell migration, and chemokine receptors. Particularly, LECs express atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs), which are unable to promote conventional signaling and cell migration while they are involved in the regulation of chemokine availability. Here, we provide a summary of the data on the role of ACKR2 expressed by lymphatics, indicating an essential role for this ACKRs in the regulation of the inflammation and the immune response in different pathological conditions, including infection, allergy, and cancer. PMID:28123388

  16. Role of chemokines and their receptors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: function in microenvironment and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Ting-Ting; Fan, Lei; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines produced in distinct tissue microenvironments sustain migration of mature lymphocytes in lymphoglandula. Chemokine receptors expressed on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells regulate the migration of the leukemia cells within the bone marrow (BM), lymphoid organs in collaboration with chemokines. Chemokines form a pro-survival circuitry by regulating leukocyte trafficking, maintaining extended lymphocyte survival. Therefore, chemokines in tumor cell-microenvironment interactions represent a target for treatment of CLL. AMD3100 disrupts the CLL/microenvironment interactions and influences CXCL12/CXCR4 survival signaling. Fostamatinib, ibrutinib, and GS-1101 as B-cell receptor (BCR)-related kinase inhibitors inhibit BCR- and chemokine-receptor-signal-regulated kinase and have a good clinical response in CLL. Lenalidomide, sorafenib, and dasatinib are other additional drugs associated with chemokine in microenvironment. Inhibiting signaling through chemokine and microenvironment associated signaling are emerging as innovative therapeutic targets in CLL. In this article, we reviewed the role of chemokines in CLL microenvironment and novel therapeutics targeting CLL microenvironment.

  17. p115 RhoGEF activates the Rac1 GTPase signaling cascade in MCP1 chemokine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nikhlesh K; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2017-08-25

    Although the involvement of Rho proteins in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases is well studied, little is known about the role of their upstream regulators, the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). Here, we sought to identify the RhoGEFs involved in monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1)-induced vascular wall remodeling. We found that, among the RhoGEFs tested, MCP1 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p115 RhoGEF but not of PDZ RhoGEF or leukemia-associated RhoGEF in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Moreover, p115 RhoGEF inhibition suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC migration and proliferation. Consistent with these observations, balloon injury (BI) induced p115 RhoGEF tyrosine phosphorylation in rat common carotid arteries, and siRNA-mediated down-regulation of its levels substantially attenuated BI-induced smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, resulting in reduced neointima formation. Furthermore, depletion of p115 RhoGEF levels also abrogated MCP1- or BI-induced Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling, which, as we reported previously, is involved in vascular wall remodeling. Our findings also show that protein kinase N1 (PKN1) downstream of Rac1-cyclin D1/CDK6 and upstream of CDK4-PAK1 in the p115 RhoGEF-Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling axis is involved in the modulation of vascular wall remodeling. Of note, we also observed that CCR2-Gi/o-Fyn signaling mediates MCP1-induced p115 RhoGEF and Rac1 GTPase activation. These findings suggest that p115 RhoGEF is critical for MCP1-induced HASMC migration and proliferation in vitro and for injury-induced neointima formation in vivo by modulating Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Vascular Stem/Progenitor Cell Migration Induced by Smooth Muscle Cell‐Derived Chemokine (C‐C Motif) Ligand 2 and Chemokine (C‐X‐C motif) Ligand 1 Contributes to Neointima Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Baoqi; Wong, Mei Mei; Potter, Claire M. F.; Simpson, Russell M. L.; Karamariti, Eirini; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Lingfang; Warren, Derek; Hu, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have shown that Sca‐1+ (stem cell antigen‐1) stem/progenitor cells within blood vessel walls may contribute to neointima formation, but the mechanism behind their recruitment has not been explored. In this work Sca‐1+ progenitor cells were cultivated from mouse vein graft tissue and found to exhibit increased migration when cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or when treated with SMC‐derived conditioned medium. This migration was associated with elevated levels of chemokines, CCL2 (chemokine (C‐C motif) ligand 2) and CXCL1 (chemokine (C‐X‐C motif) ligand 1), and their corresponding receptors on Sca‐1+ progenitors, CCR2 (chemokine (C‐C motif) receptor 2) and CXCR2 (chemokine (C‐X‐C motif) receptor 2), which were also upregulated following SMC conditioned medium treatment. Knockdown of either receptor in Sca‐1+ progenitors significantly inhibited cell migration. The GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 were activated by both CCL2 and CXCL1 stimulation and p38 phosphorylation was increased. However, only Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced migration and p38 phosphorylation. After Sca‐1+ progenitors labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were applied to the adventitial side of wire‐injured mouse femoral arteries, a large proportion of GFP‐Sca‐1+‐cells were observed in neointimal lesions, and a marked increase in neointimal lesion formation was seen 1 week post‐operation. Interestingly, Sca‐1+ progenitor migration from the adventitia to the neointima was abrogated and neointima formation diminished in a wire injury model using CCL2−/− mice. These findings suggest vascular stem/progenitor cell migration from the adventitia to the neointima can be induced by SMC release of chemokines which act via CCR2/Rac1/p38 and CXCR2/Rac1/p38 signaling pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:2368–2380 PMID:27300479

  19. Cobalt ions induce chemokine secretion in primary human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Queally, J M; Devitt, B M; Butler, J S; Malizia, A P; Murray, D; Doran, P P; O'Byrne, J M

    2009-07-01

    Chemokines are major regulators of the inflammatory response and have been shown to play an important role in periprosthetic osteolysis. Titanium particles have previously been shown to induce IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion in osteoblasts. These chemokines result in the chemotaxis and activation of neutrophils and macrophages, respectively. Despite a resurgence in the use of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys in metal-on-metal arthroplasty, cobalt and chromium ion toxicity in the periprosthetic area has been insufficiently studied. In this study we investigate the in vitro effect of cobalt ions on primary human osteoblast activity. We demonstrate that cobalt ions rapidly induce the protein secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1 in primary human osteoblasts. This elevated chemokine secretion is preceded by an increase in the transcription of the corresponding chemokine gene. Using a Transwell migration chemotaxis assay we also demonstrate that the chemokines secreted are capable of inducing neutrophil and macrophage migration. Furthermore, cobalt ions significantly inhibit osteoblast function as demonstrated by reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. In aggregate these data demonstrate that cobalt ions can activate transcription of the chemokine genes IL-8 and MCP-1 in primary human osteoblasts. Cobalt ions are not benign and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of osteolysis by suppressing osteoblast function and stimulating the production and secretion of chemokines that attract inflammatory and osteoclastic cells to the periprosthetic area.

  20. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a CC chemokine gene from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanzhi; Sun, Yuena; Shi, Ge; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2012-12-01

    Chemokines are a family of structurally related chemotactic cytokines that regulate the migration of leukocytes, under both physiological and inflammatory conditions. A partial cDNA of CC chemokine gene designed as Mimi-CC3 was isolated from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) spleen cDNA library. Unknown 3' part of the cDNA was amplified by 3'-RACE. The complete cDNA of Mimi-CC3 contains an 89-nt 5'-UTR, a 303-nt open reading frame and a 441-nt 3'-UTR. Three exons and two introns were identified in Mimi-CC3. The deduced Mimi-CC3 protein sequences contain a 22 amino acids signal peptide and a 78 amino acids mature polypeptide, which possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines as found in other known CC chemokines. It shares low amino acid sequence identities with most other fish and mammalian CC chemokines (less than 54.1 %), but shares very high identities with large yellow croaker CC chemokine (94.6 %). Phylogenetic analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene may have an orthologous relationship with mammalian/amphibian CCL25 gene. Tissue expression distributed analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene was constitutively expressed in all nine tissues examined, although at different levels. Upon stimulated with Vibrio anguillarum, the time-course analysis using a real-time PCR showed that Mimi-CC3 transcript in kidney and liver was obviously up-regulated and reached the peak levels, followed by a recovery. Mimi-CC3 expression in kidney was more strongly increased than in liver. However, down-regulation was observed in spleen. These results indicated that Mimi-CC3 plays important roles in miiuy croaker immune response as well as in homeostatic mechanisms.

  1. Chemokine receptor oligomerization: a further step toward chemokine function.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Laura Martínez; Holgado, Borja López; Martínez-A, Carlos; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Mellado, Mario

    2012-07-30

    A broad array of biological responses including cell polarization, movement, immune and inflammatory responses, as well as prevention of HIV-1 infection, are triggered by the chemokines, a family of secreted and structurally related chemoattractant proteins that bind to class A-specific seven-transmembrane receptors linked to G proteins. Chemokines and their receptors should not be considered isolated entities, as they act in complex networks. Chemokines bind as oligomers, or oligomerize after binding to glycosaminoglycans on endothelial cells, and are then presented to their receptors on target cells, facilitating the generation of chemoattractant gradients. The chemokine receptors form homo- and heterodimers, as well as higher order structures at the cell surface. These structures are dynamic and are regulated by receptor expression and ligand levels. Complexity is even greater, as in addition to regulation by cytokines and decoy receptors, chemokine and receptor levels are affected by proteolytic cleavage and other protein modifications. This complex scenario should be considered when analyzing chemokine biology and the ability of their antagonists to act in vivo. Strategies based on blocking or stabilizing ligand and receptor dimers could be alternative approaches that might have broad therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  3. The role of chemokines in hypertension and consequent target organ damage.

    PubMed

    Rudemiller, Nathan P; Crowley, Steven D

    2017-03-06

    Immune cells infiltrate the kidney, vasculature, and central nervous system during hypertension, consequently amplifying tissue damage and/or blood pressure elevation. Mononuclear cell motility depends partly on chemokines, which are small cytokines that guide cells through an increasing concentration gradient via ligation of their receptors. Tissue expression of several chemokines is elevated in clinical and experimental hypertension. Likewise, immune cells have enhanced chemokine receptor expression during hypertension, driving immune cell infiltration and inappropriate inflammation in cardiovascular control centers. T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages are pivotal mediators of hypertensive inflammation, and these cells migrate in response to several chemokines. As powerful drivers of diapedesis, the chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 have long been implicated in hypertension, but experimental data highlight divergent, context-specific effects of these chemokines on blood pressure and tissue injury. Several other chemokines, particularly those of the CXC family, contribute to blood pressure elevation and target organ damage. Given the significant interplay and chemotactic redundancy among chemokines during disease, future work must not only describe the actions of individual chemokines in hypertension, but also characterize how manipulating a single chemokine modulates the expression and/or function of other chemokines and their cognate receptors. This information will facilitate the design of precise chemotactic immunotherapies to limit cardiovascular and renal morbidity in hypertensive patients.

  4. Chemokines in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gillitzer, R; Goebeler, M

    2001-04-01

    Healing of wounds is one of the most complex biological events after birth as a result of the interplay of different tissue structures and a large number of resident and infiltrating cell types. The latter are mainly constituted by leukocyte subsets (neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, and lymphocytes), which sequentially infiltrate the wound site and serve as immunological effector cells but also as sources of inflammatory and growth-promoting cytokines. Recent data demonstrate that recruitment of leukocyte subtypes is tightly regulated by chemokines. Moreover, the presence of chemokine receptors on resident cells (e.g., keratinocytes, endothelial cells) indicates that chemokines also contribute to the regulation of epithelialization, tissue remodeling, and angiogenesis. Thus, chemokines are in an exclusive position to integrate inflammatory events and reparative processes and are important modulators of human-skin wound healing. This review will focus preferentially on the role of chemokines during skin wound healing and intends to provide an update on the multiple functions of individual chemokines during the phases of wound repair.

  5. GPR35/CXCR8 IS THE RECEPTOR OF THE MUCOSAL CHEMOKINE CXCL17

    PubMed Central

    Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Hevezi, Peter A.; Carnevale, Christina D.; Smit, Martine J.; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that direct the traffic of leukocytes and other cells in the body. Chemokines bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on target cells to initiate signaling cascades and induce chemotaxis. Although the cognate receptors of most chemokines have been identified, the receptor for the mucosal chemokine CXCL17 is still undefined. Here we show that GPR35 is the receptor of CXCL17. GPR35 is expressed in mucosal tissues, in CXCL17-responsive monocytes, and in the THP-1 monocytoid cell line. Transfection of GPR35 into Ba/F3 cells rendered them responsive to CXCL17 as measured by calcium mobilization assays. Furthermore, GPR35 expression is downregulated in the lungs of Cxcl17-/- mice, which exhibit defects in macrophage recruitment to the lungs. We conclude that GPR35 is a novel chemokine receptor, and suggest that it should be named chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 8 (CXCR8). PMID:25411203

  6. Dysfunctional nitric oxide signalling increases risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Jeanette; Stark, Klaus; Esslinger, Ulrike B; Rumpf, Philipp Moritz; Koesling, Doris; de Wit, Cor; Kaiser, Frank J; Braunholz, Diana; Medack, Anja; Fischer, Marcus; Zimmermann, Martina E; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Graf, Elisabeth; Eck, Sebastian; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Willenborg, Christina; Bruse, Petra; Brænne, Ingrid; Nöthen, Markus M; Hofmann, Per; Braund, Peter S; Mergia, Evanthia; Reinhard, Wibke; Burgdorf, Christof; Schreiber, Stefan; Balmforth, Anthony J; Hall, Alistair S; Bertram, Lars; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Li, Shu-Chen; März, Winfried; Reilly, Muredach; Kathiresan, Sekar; McPherson, Ruth; Walter, Ulrich; Ott, Jurg; Samani, Nilesh J; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Hengstenberg, Christian; Schunkert, Heribert

    2013-12-19

    Myocardial infarction, a leading cause of death in the Western world, usually occurs when the fibrous cap overlying an atherosclerotic plaque in a coronary artery ruptures. The resulting exposure of blood to the atherosclerotic material then triggers thrombus formation, which occludes the artery. The importance of genetic predisposition to coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is best documented by the predictive value of a positive family history. Next-generation sequencing in families with several affected individuals has revolutionized mutation identification. Here we report the segregation of two private, heterozygous mutations in two functionally related genes, GUCY1A3 (p.Leu163Phefs*24) and CCT7 (p.Ser525Leu), in an extended myocardial infarction family. GUCY1A3 encodes the α1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase (α1-sGC), and CCT7 encodes CCTη, a member of the tailless complex polypeptide 1 ring complex, which, among other functions, stabilizes soluble guanylyl cyclase. After stimulation with nitric oxide, soluble guanylyl cyclase generates cGMP, which induces vasodilation and inhibits platelet activation. We demonstrate in vitro that mutations in both GUCY1A3 and CCT7 severely reduce α1-sGC as well as β1-sGC protein content, and impair soluble guanylyl cyclase activity. Moreover, platelets from digenic mutation carriers contained less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein and consequently displayed reduced nitric-oxide-induced cGMP formation. Mice deficient in α1-sGC protein displayed accelerated thrombus formation in the microcirculation after local trauma. Starting with a severely affected family, we have identified a link between impaired soluble-guanylyl-cyclase-dependent nitric oxide signalling and myocardial infarction risk, possibly through accelerated thrombus formation. Reversing this defect may provide a new therapeutic target for reducing the risk of myocardial infarction.

  7. Redox regulation of chemokine receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Saccani, Alessandra; Saccani, Simona; Orlando, Simone; Sironi, Marina; Bernasconi, Sergio; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mantovani, Alberto; Sica, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Cytokines and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) are frequent companions at sites of acute inflammation. We have shown previously that in human monocytes, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, IL-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α induce a rapid down-regulation of the monocyte chemotactic protein-1 receptor CCR2 (CC chemokine receptor-2). These stimuli also induce production of ROI. In this paper, we investigate the influence of antioxidants and/or ROI on chemokine-receptor expression. In human monocytes, the antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) rapidly inhibited CCR2 (95–100% of inhibition) and CCR5 (77–100% of inhibition) mRNA expression by strongly decreasing transcript stability. CCR2 half-life was decreased from 1.5 h to 45 min; CCR5 half-life was decreased from 2 h to 70 min. This inhibitory activity also included CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor-4) but not CXCR2 receptor and, although to a lesser extent, was shared by the antioxidants N-acetyl-l-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol. In contrast, the ROI-generating system xanthine/xanthine oxidase increased CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA expression and counteracted the inhibitory effect of PDTC. Accordingly, H2O2 and the glutathione-depleting drug buthionine sulfoximine increased to different extents CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 mRNA expression. The PDTC-mediated inhibition of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA expression was associated with decreased chemotactic responsiveness (>90% inhibition) and with a marked inhibition of surface-receptor expression. In contrast, xanthine/xanthine oxidase opposed the bacterial lipopolysaccharide- and tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inhibition of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA expression and increased both the CCR5 surface expression and the cell migration (3-fold) in response to macrophage inflammatory protein-1β. These results suggest that the redox status of cells is a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. PMID:10716998

  8. Truncation of CXCL12 by CD26 reduces its CXC chemokine receptor 4- and atypical chemokine receptor 3-dependent activity on endothelial cells and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Rik; Mortier, Anneleen; Boff, Daiane; Ruytinx, Pieter; Gouwy, Mieke; Vantilt, Bo; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Parmentier, Marc; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Van Damme, Jo; Struyf, Sofie; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Proost, Paul

    2017-05-15

    The chemokine CXCL12 or stromal cell-derived factor 1/SDF-1 attracts hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature leukocytes through the G protein-coupled CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). In addition, it interacts with atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3 or CXCR7) and glycosaminoglycans. CXCL12 activity is regulated through posttranslational cleavage by CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 that removes two NH2-terminal amino acids. CD26-truncated CXCL12 does not induce calcium signaling or chemotaxis of mononuclear cells. CXCL12(3-68) was chemically synthesized de novo for detailed biological characterization. Compared to unmodified CXCL12, CXCL12(3-68) was no longer able to signal through CXCR4 via inositol trisphosphate (IP3), Akt or extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Interestingly, the recruitment of β-arrestin 2 to the cell membrane via CXCR4 by CXCL12(3-68) was abolished, whereas a weakened but significant β-arrestin recruitment remained via ACKR3. CXCL12-induced endothelial cell migration and signal transduction was completely abrogated by CD26. Intact CXCL12 hardly induced lymphocyte migration upon intra-articular injection in mice. In contrast, oral treatment of mice with the CD26 inhibitor sitagliptin reduced CD26 activity and CXCL12 cleavage in blood plasma. The potential of CXCL12 to induce intra-articular lymphocyte infiltration was significantly increased in sitagliptin-treated mice and CXCL12(3-68) failed to induce migration under both CD26-inhibiting and non-inhibiting conditions. In conclusion, CD26-cleavage skews CXCL12 towards β-arrestin dependent recruitment through ACKR3 and destroys the CXCR4-mediated lymphocyte chemoattractant properties of CXCL12 in vivo. Hence, pharmacological CD26-blockade in tissues may enhance CXCL12-induced inflammation.

  9. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor.

  10. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor. PMID:28098154

  11. Chemokine receptor CXCR4: role in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Lucia; Tavano, Francesca; Morelli, Franco; Latiano, Tiziana Pia; Di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Maiello, Evaristo

    2013-12-01

    Chemokines (CK)s, small proinflammatory chemoattractant cytokines that bind to specific G-protein coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors, are major regulators of cell trafficking and adhesion. The CXCL12 [stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)] binds primarily to CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4; CD184). The binding of CXCL12 to CXCR4 induces intracellular signaling through several divergent pathways initiating signals related to chemotaxis, cell survival and/or proliferation, increase in intracellular calcium, and gene transcription. CXCR4 is expressed on multiple cell types including lymphocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial and epithelial cells, and cancer cells. One of the most intriguing and perhaps important roles that CKs and the CK receptors have is in regulating metastasis. Here, CK receptors may potentially facilitate tumor dissemination at each of the key steps of metastasis, including adherence of tumor cells to endothelium, extravasation from blood vessels, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, proliferation, and protection from the host response via activation of key survival pathways such as ERK/MAPK, PI-3K/Akt/mTOR, or Jak/STAT, etc. In addition, it is increasingly recognized that CKs play an important role in facilitating communication between cancer cells and non-neoplatic cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), including endothelial cells and fibroblasts, promoting the infiltration, activation of neutrophils, and tumor-associated macrophages within the TME. In this review, we mainly focus on the roles of chemokines CXCL12 and its cognate receptors CXCR4 as they pertain to cancer progression. In particular, we summarizes our current understanding regarding the contribution of CXCR4 and SDF-1 to gastrointestinal tumor behavior and its role in local progression, dissemination, and immune evasion of tumor cells. Also, describes recent therapeutic approaches that target these receptors or their ligands.

  12. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay.

  13. Acute alcohol intoxication suppresses the pulmonary ELR-negative CXC chemokine response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Happel, Kyle I; Rudner, Xiaowen; Quinton, Lee J; Movassaghi, Jennifer L; Clark, Charles; Odden, Anthony R; Zhang, Ping; Bagby, Gregory J; Nelson, Steve; Shellito, Judd E

    2007-08-01

    Alcohol abuse impairs the pulmonary immune response to infection and increases the morbidity and mortality of bacterial pneumonia. Acute alcohol intoxication suppresses lung expression of CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg motif (ELR+) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, but its effect on the structurally related ELR- CXC chemokines, which attract T cells, is unknown. We therefore investigated the effect of acute alcohol intoxication on the pulmonary response to intratracheal (i.t.) LPS challenge for the ELR- CXC chemokines monokine induced by gamma (MIG or CXCL9), interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and interferon-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC or CXCL11). Male C57BL/6 or C3H/HeN mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (3.0 g/kg) or phosphate buffered saline 30 min before i.t. LPS challenge. Chemokine mRNA transcripts were measured at 0, 2, 6, and 16 h. Acute alcohol intoxication inhibited the lung's expression of all three chemokine genes in response to LPS. Lung IFN-gamma mRNA was also inhibited by acute intoxication over the same time course. The in vitro effect of ethanol on chemokine secretion was further studied in the MH-S alveolar macrophage cell line. IP-10, MIG, and I-TAC in response to LPS were enhanced by exogenous interferon (IFN)-gamma, and these responses were blunted by exposure to ethanol. Alcohol exposure did not affect MH-S cell nuclear factor kappa beta p65 nuclear localization during challenge, despite dose-dependent inhibition of Erk 1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, phospho-signal transduction and activator of transcription 1 was not decreased in the presence of acute ethanol, thereby indicating that acute intoxication does not affect IFN-gamma signaling in MH-S cells. Recruitment of CD3+ T cells into the alveolar space 4 days after LPS challenge was moderately impaired by acute ethanol intoxication. These results implicate acute ethanol intoxication as a significant inhibitor of

  14. [Evaluation of chemokines in tears of patients with infectious keratitis].

    PubMed

    Hori, Shinsuke; Shoji, Jun; Inada, Noriko; Sawa, Mitsuru

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the chemokine profile in tears of patients with infectious keratitis. Subjects were 32 eyes of 16 patients with infectious keratitis and 5 eyes of 5 healthy volunteers as a control. The patients with infectious keratitis were classified into two groups of eyes: 10 with bacterial keratitis and 6 with Acanthamoeba keratitis. Tear fluid was obtained from both eyes of the patients with infectious keratitis and from the right eyes of the control subjects using filter paper. Chemokine concentration (unit: Odu/mm2) and its profile in tears was analyzed using an antibody-array. In terms of chemokine profile in the bacterial keratitis group, the expression volume of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in the diseased eyes was significantly higher than in the healthy eyes (p < 0.05). The expression volume of mucosae-associated epithelial chemokines (MECs) in the diseased eyes of the bacterial keratitis group was significantly lower than in the healthy eyes of that group (p < 0.05). In the Acanthamoeba keratitis group, chemokines were not significantly increased in the diseased eyes compared with those in the healthy eyes. However, MCP-1 was increased in tears of the Acanthamoeba keratitis group. Regarding the chemokine ratio, the IL-8/MEC ratio in the diseased eyes of the Pseudomonas keratitis group and the MCP-1/IL-8 in the diseased eyes of the Acanthamoeba keratitis group showed a significantly high level (p < 0.05). We concluded that the analyses of the chemokine profile and chemokine ratio in the tears of infectious keratitis patients is useful as a clinical tear laboratory test to interpret the pathologic condition of infectious keratitis

  15. Pregnancy in Obese Mice Protects Selectively against Visceral Adiposity and Is Associated with Increased Adipocyte Estrogen Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pedroni, Silvia M. A.; Turban, Sophie; Kipari, Tiina; Dunbar, Donald R.; McInnes, Kerry; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Morton, Nicholas M.; Norman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is linked with increased adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child. The metabolic impact of excessive fat within the context of pregnancy is not fully understood. We used a mouse model of high fat (HF) feeding to induce maternal obesity to identify adipose tissue-mediated mechanisms driving metabolic dysfunction in pregnant and non-pregnant obese mice. As expected, chronic HF-feeding for 12 weeks preceding pregnancy increased peripheral (subcutaneous) and visceral (mesenteric) fat mass. However, unexpectedly at late gestation (E18.5) HF-fed mice exhibited a remarkable normalization of visceral but not peripheral adiposity, with a 53% reduction in non-pregnant visceral fat mass expressed as a proportion of body weight (P<0.001). In contrast, in control animals, pregnancy had no effect on visceral fat mass proportion. Obesity exaggerated glucose intolerance at mid-pregnancy (E14.5). However by E18.5, there were no differences, in glucose tolerance between obese and control mice. Transcriptomic analysis of visceral fat from HF-fed dams at E18.5 revealed reduced expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis (diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 - Dgat2) and inflammation (chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 - Ccl2) and upregulation of estrogen receptor α (ERα) compared to HF non pregnant. Attenuation of adipose inflammation was functionally confirmed by a 45% reduction of CD11b+CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophages (expressed as a proportion of all stromal vascular fraction cells) in HF pregnant compared to HF non pregnant animals (P<0.001). An ERα selective agonist suppressed both de novo lipogenesis and expression of lipogenic genes in adipocytes in vitro. These data show that, in a HF model of maternal obesity, late gestation is associated with amelioration of visceral fat hypertrophy, inflammation and glucose intolerance, and suggest that these effects are mediated in part by elevated visceral adipocyte ERα signaling. PMID:24732937

  16. Chemokine-cytokine cross-talk. The ELR+ CXC chemokine LIX (CXCL5) amplifies a proinflammatory cytokine response via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-NF-kappa B pathway.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Bysani; Melby, Peter C; Sarau, Henry M; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Perla, Rao P; Marelli-Berg, Federica M; Dulin, Nickolai O; Singh, Ishwar S

    2003-02-14

    It is well established that cytokines can induce the production of chemokines, but the role of chemokines in the regulation of cytokine expression has not been fully investigated. Exposure of rat cardiac-derived endothelial cells (CDEC) to lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine (LIX), and to a lesser extent to KC and MIP-2, activated NF-kappaB and induced kappaB-driven promoter activity. LIX did not activate Oct-1. LIX-induced interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha promoter activity, and up-regulated mRNA expression. Increased transcription and mRNA stability both contributed to cytokine expression. LIX-mediated cytokine gene transcription was inhibited by interleukin-10. Transient overexpression of kinase-deficient NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) and IkappaB kinase (IKK), and dominant negative IkappaB significantly inhibited LIX-mediated NF-kappaB activation in rat CDEC. Inhibition of G(i) protein-coupled signal transduction, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and the 26 S proteasome significantly inhibited LIX-mediated NF-kappaB activation and cytokine gene transcription. Blocking CXCR2 attenuated LIX-mediated kappaB activation and kappaB-driven promoter activity in rat CDEC that express both CXCR1 and -2, and abrogated its activation in mouse CDEC that express only CXCR2. These results indicate that LIX activates NF-kappaB and induces kappaB-responsive proinflammatory cytokines via either CXCR1 or CXCR2, and involved phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NIK, IKK, and IkappaB. Thus, in addition to attracting and activating neutrophils, the ELR(+) CXC chemokines amplify the inflammatory cascade, stimulating local production of cytokines that have negative inotropic and proapoptotic effects.

  17. Cannabis use: signal of increasing risk of serious cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Jouanjus, Emilie; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Micallef, Joelle

    2014-04-23

    Cannabis is known to be associated with neuropsychiatric problems, but less is known about complications affecting other specified body systems. We report and analyze 35 recent remarkable cardiovascular complications following cannabis use. In France, serious cases of abuse and dependence in response to the use of psychoactive substances must be reported to the national system of the French Addictovigilance Network. We identified all spontaneous reports of cardiovascular complications related to cannabis use collected by the French Addictovigilance Network from 2006 to 2010. We described the clinical characteristics of these cases and their evolution: 1.8% of all cannabis-related reports (35/1979) were cardiovascular complications, with patients being mostly men (85.7%) and of an average age of 34.3 years. There were 22 cardiac complications (20 acute coronary syndromes), 10 peripheral complications (lower limb or juvenile arteriopathies and Buerger-like diseases), and 3 cerebral complications (acute cerebral angiopathy, transient cortical blindness, and spasm of cerebral artery). In 9 cases, the event led to patient death. Increased reporting of cardiovascular complications related to cannabis and their extreme seriousness (with a death rate of 25.6%) indicate cannabis as a possible risk factor for cardiovascular disease in young adults, in line with previous findings. Given that cannabis is perceived to be harmless by the general public and that legalization of its use is debated, data concerning its danger must be widely disseminated. Practitioners should be aware that cannabis may be a potential triggering factor for cardiovascular complications in young people.

  18. Cannabis Use: Signal of Increasing Risk of Serious Cardiovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jouanjus, Emilie; Lapeyre‐Mestre, Maryse; Micallef, Joelle

    2014-01-01

    Background Cannabis is known to be associated with neuropsychiatric problems, but less is known about complications affecting other specified body systems. We report and analyze 35 recent remarkable cardiovascular complications following cannabis use. Methods and Results In France, serious cases of abuse and dependence in response to the use of psychoactive substances must be reported to the national system of the French Addictovigilance Network. We identified all spontaneous reports of cardiovascular complications related to cannabis use collected by the French Addictovigilance Network from 2006 to 2010. We described the clinical characteristics of these cases and their evolution: 1.8% of all cannabis‐related reports (35/1979) were cardiovascular complications, with patients being mostly men (85.7%) and of an average age of 34.3 years. There were 22 cardiac complications (20 acute coronary syndromes), 10 peripheral complications (lower limb or juvenile arteriopathies and Buerger‐like diseases), and 3 cerebral complications (acute cerebral angiopathy, transient cortical blindness, and spasm of cerebral artery). In 9 cases, the event led to patient death. Conclusions Increased reporting of cardiovascular complications related to cannabis and their extreme seriousness (with a death rate of 25.6%) indicate cannabis as a possible risk factor for cardiovascular disease in young adults, in line with previous findings. Given that cannabis is perceived to be harmless by the general public and that legalization of its use is debated, data concerning its danger must be widely disseminated. Practitioners should be aware that cannabis may be a potential triggering factor for cardiovascular complications in young people. PMID:24760961

  19. Dynamic expression of chemokines and the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the HSV-infected cornea and its associated tissues.

    PubMed

    Araki-Sasaki, Kaoru; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Ebisuno, Yukihiko; Kanda, Hidenobu; Umemoto, Eiji; Hayashi, Kozaburo; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2006-10-01

    The chemotactic signals regulating cell trafficking in the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infected cornea are well documented, however, those in the cornea-associated tissues, such as the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and draining lymph nodes (LNs), are largely unknown. To examine chemokine expression and subsequent cell infiltration in the HSV-1 infected cornea and its associated tissues. Eight-week-old female BALB/c mice were infected with 10 mu l HSV-1 (CHR3 strain: 5 x 106 PFU/ml) by corneal scarification. Total RNAs were extracted from the corneas, TGs, and LNs at pre-inoculation, 3 days post-inoculation (P.I.) and 7 days P.I. The mRNA for 28 different chemokines in the extracts was amplified by RT-PCR. Infiltrating cells were identified by immunohistochemistry. After the HSV-1 infection, the corneal stroma became edematous by infiltrated cells under the eroded epithelium. The TG and LNs were markedly swollen. The cornea was infiltrated with granulocytes and CD11b+ cells at 3 days P.I., followed by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells at 12 days P.I. In the TG, CD11b+ cells, but no granulocytes, infiltrated throughout the observation period. T cells migrated into the TG earlier than into the cornea. Gene expressions of neutrophil-attracting chemokines (CXCL1, 2, 3, and 5) increased in the cornea, but they did not enhance in the TG or LNs. On the other hand, gene expressions of chemokines which attract CD11b+ cells such as CCL2, 8, 7, 12, CCL3, 4, and CCL5, increased in the cornea and TG with its peak at 3 days P.I. Gene expressions of chemokines those work on T cells and B cells, such as CCL19, CCL21, CXCL9, CXCL13, CXCL10, XCL1, and CXCL16, were up-regulated and peaked at 3 days P.I. in the cornea and in the TG. Thus, pattern of chemokine gene expression was similar in the cornea and in the TG. On the contrary, gene expressions of chemokines in the draining LNs affecting CD11b+ cells and T cells were temporarily down-regulated. Upon HSV-1 infection, dynamic gene expression

  20. The DRF motif of CXCR6 as chemokine receptor adaptation to adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Koenen, Andrea; Babendreyer, Aaron; Schumacher, Julian; Pasqualon, Tobias; Schwarz, Nicole; Seifert, Anke; Deupi, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    The CXC-chemokine receptor 6 (CXCR6) is a class A GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs) that mediates adhesion of leukocytes by interacting with the transmembrane cell surface-expressed chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16), and also regulates leukocyte migration by interacting with the soluble shed variant of CXCL16. In contrast to virtually all other chemokine receptors with chemotactic activity, CXCR6 carries a DRF motif instead of the typical DRY motif as a key element in receptor activation and G protein coupling. In this work, modeling analyses revealed that the phenylalanine F3.51 in CXCR6 might have impact on intramolecular interactions including hydrogen bonds by this possibly changing receptor function. Initial investigations with embryonic kidney HEK293 cells and further studies with monocytic THP-1 cells showed that mutation of DRF into DRY does not influence ligand binding, receptor internalization, receptor recycling, and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Adhesion was slightly decreased in a time-dependent manner. However, CXCL16-induced calcium signaling and migration were increased. Vice versa, when the DRY motif of the related receptor CX3CR1 was mutated into DRF the migratory response towards CX3CL1 was diminished, indicating that the presence of a DRF motif generally impairs chemotaxis in chemokine receptors. Transmembrane and soluble CXCL16 play divergent roles in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, which can be beneficial or detrimental. Therefore, the DRF motif of CXCR6 may display a receptor adaptation allowing adhesion and cell retention by transmembrane CXCL16 but reducing the chemotactic response to soluble CXCL16. This adaptation may avoid permanent or uncontrolled recruitment of inflammatory cells as well as cancer metastasis. PMID:28267793

  1. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in stem cell circulation.

    PubMed

    Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Peled, Amnon

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells are rare, pluripotent, self-renewing cells that give rise to all mature cells during development and adult life. Due to their proliferative capabilities and their ability to home and contribute to the regeneration of damage tissue, stem cells can be transformed into established tumors. Stem cells can function as a double-edged sword--they have the ability to circulate and migrate throughout the developing and mature adult organism, which is essential for their normal function; however, transformed stem cells are also endowed with the machinery to metastasize into various organs. Chemokine and chemokine receptors play a critical role in directing the trafficking of these cells. It is therefore evident that understanding the role of chemokines and their receptors in stem cell circulation is critical for the successful use of these cells in therapy for a wide variety of pathological conditions.

  2. The local cytokine and chemokine milieu within malignant effusions.

    PubMed

    Atanackovic, Djordje; Cao, Yanran; Kim, Ji-Won; Brandl, Stephan; Thom, Ina; Faltz, Christiane; Hildebrandt, York; Bartels, Katrin; de Weerth, Andreas; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna; Hossfeld, Dieter Kurt; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Malignant effusions offer a unique opportunity for the study of interactions between the human immune system and cancer. We have recently demonstrated that malignant effusions are characterized by an accumulation of T cells expressing chemokine receptors such as CCR4, which is commonly found on Th2 cells. In contrast, effector T cells expressing chemokine receptors typical for Th1 cells, such as CCR5, showed a diminished homing into malignant effusions. We analyzed concentrations of 12 different cytokines and 9 chemokines within malignant and nonmalignant effusions and investigated cytokine expression by effusion-infiltrating leukocytes. We observed that concentrations of the immunoregulatory cytokine TGF-beta(1) and of angiogenic factors VEGF and IL-8 were markedly increased within effusions caused by malignancies. However, we did not observe signs of a typical Th1 or Th2 milieu. Analyzing concentrations of 9 different chemokines, we found elevated concentrations of the chemokines MDC, eotaxin, I-TAC, and MCP-1 in malignant effusions. Interestingly, tumor-infiltrating leukocytes themselves seemed to contribute strongly to the creation of a distinct cytokine/chemokine pattern within cancer-related effusions. Additional analyses suggested that this cytokine/chemokine milieu might support an enrichment of immunosuppressive leukocytes. The local cytokine and chemokine milieu within malignant effusions seems to promote angiogenesis and to block an efficient immune-mediated antitumor response. An elimination of such tumor-promoting influences will be necessary in order to transform local immunotolerance into clinically relevant immune recognition of tumors causing malignant effusions. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Secreted adenosine triphosphate from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans triggers chemokine response.

    PubMed

    Ding, Q; Quah, S Y; Tan, K S

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) is an important intercellular signaling molecule secreted by activated immune cells or released by damaged cells. In mammalian cells, a rapid increase of ATP concentration in the extracellular space sends a danger signal, which alerts the immune system of an impending danger, resulting in recruitment and priming of phagocytes. Recent studies show that bacteria also release ATP into the extracellular milieu, suggesting a potential role for eATP in host-microbe interactions. It is currently unknown if any oral bacteria release eATP. As eATP triggers and amplifies innate immunity and inflammation, we hypothesized that eATP secreted from periodontal bacteria may contribute to inflammation in periodontitis. The aims of this study were to determine if periodontal bacteria secrete ATP, and to determine the function of bacterially derived eATP as an inducer of inflammation. Our results showed that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, but not Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, or Fusobacterium nucleatum, secreted ATP into the culture supernatant. Exposure of periodontal fibroblasts to filter sterilized culture supernatant of A. actinomycetemcomitans induced chemokine expression in an eATP-dependent manner. This occurred independently of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and phospholipase C, suggesting that ionotrophic P2X receptor is involved in sensing of bacterial eATP. Silencing of P2X7 receptor in periodontal fibroblasts led to a significant reduction in bacterial eATP-induced chemokine response. Furthermore, bacterial eATP served as a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils and monocytes. Collectively, our findings provide evidence for secreted ATP of A. actinomycetemcomitans as a novel virulence factor contributing to inflammation during periodontal disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. [corrected]. LXXXIX. Update on the extended family of chemokine receptors and introducing a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M; Graham, Gerard J; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Murphy, Philip M; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145-176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human Genome

  5. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  6. Hepatocellular carcinoma and CXCR3 chemokines: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Elia, G; Fallahi, P

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results from several factors like viral hepatitis infection [hepatitis B, or C (25%)] or occupational exposure. T-helper (Th)1 inflammatory cells, characterized by interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 secretion, predominate in the liver during chronic HCV infection, and chemokines attracting these cells are particularly important in disease progression. Among C-X-C chemokines, the non-ELR group [as IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG) and IFN-inducible T-cell-alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC)], attracts Th1-cells interacting with chemokine C-X-C receptor (CXCR3). IP-10 has uniquely been shown to have prognostic utility as a marker of treatment outcome. IFN- γ-induced chemokines, as MIG and IP-10, may promote lymphocyte recruitment to HCC playing important roles in cancer immunology. The production of CXC chemokines by HCC cell lines has been shown. It has been identified immune-gene signature that predicts patient survival including the chemokine gene IP-10. Inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-α, IFN-γ) and Toll-like receptor 3 ligands stimulate intratumoral production of these chemokines which drive T and Natural Killer cells tumor infiltration, leading to enhanced cancer cell death. Furthermore selective recruitment of CXCR3(+) B-cells that bridges proinflammatory IL-17 response and protumorigenic macrophage polarization in HCC has been shown, suggesting that blocking CXCR3(+) B-cell migration or function may help defeat HCC. It has been also shown that the overexpression of IP-10, which induced by liver graft injury, may lead to cisplatin resistance via ATF6/Grp78 ER stress signaling pathway in HCC; IP-10 neutralizing antibody could be a potential adjuvant therapy to sensitize HCC-cisplatin treatment.

  7. Chemokines in Innate and Adaptive Granuloma Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chensue, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Granulomas are cellular inflammations that vary widely in histologic appearance depending upon the inciting agent and immunologic status of the responding host. Despite their heterogeneity, granulomas are at their core an ancient innate sequestration response characterized by the accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes. In fact, this innate cellular response was first observed by Metchnikov in simple invertebrates. Among higher vertebrates, environmental pressures have resulted in the evolution of more sophisticated adaptive immune responses which can be superimposed upon and modify the character of granulomatous inflammation. Compared to immune responses that rapidly neutralize and eliminate infectious agents, the granuloma represents a less desirable “fall back” response which still has value to the host but can be co-opted by certain infectious agents and contribute to bystander organ damage. Understanding granulomas requires an analysis of the complex interplay of innate and adaptive molecular signals that govern the focal accumulation and activity of their cellular components. Among these signals, small molecular weight chemoattractant proteins known as chemokines are potentially important contributors as they participate in both directing leukocyte migration and function. This tract will discuss the contribution of chemokines to the development of innate and adaptive granuloma formation, as well as describe their relationship to more recently evolved cytokines generated during adaptive immune responses. PMID:23444049

  8. Electromagnetic Signals and Earthquakes 2.0: Increasing Signals and Reducing Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunson, J. C.; Bleier, T.; Heraud, J. A.; Muller, S.; Lindholm, C.; Christman, L.; King, R.; Lemon, J.

    2013-12-01

    QuakeFinder has an international network of 150+ Magnetometers and air conductivity instruments located in California, Peru, Chile, Taiwan, and Greece. Since 2000, QuakeFinder has been collecting electromagnetic data and applying simple algorithms to identify and characterize electromagnetic signals that occur in the few weeks prior to earthquakes greater than M4.5. In this presentation, we show refinements to several aspects of our signal identification techniques that enhance detection of pre-earthquake patterns. Our magnetometers have been improved to show longer pulses, and we are now using second generation algorithms that have been refined to detect the proper shape of the earthquake-generated pulses and to allow individual site adjustments. Independent lightning strike data has also now been included to mask out lightning based on amplitude and distance from a given instrument site. Direction of arrival (Azimuth) algorithms have been added to identify patterns of pulse clustering that occur prior to nearby earthquakes. Likewise, positive and negative air ion concentration detection has been improved by building better enclosures, using stainless screens to eliminate insects and some dirt sources, conformal coating PC boards to reduce moisture contamination, and filtering out contaminated data segments based on relative humidity measurements at each site. Infra Red data from the western GOES satellite has been time-filtered, cloud-filtered, and compared to 3 year averages of each pixel's output (by seasonal month) to arrive at a relevant comparison baseline for each night's temperature/cooling slope. All these efforts have helped improve the detection of multiple, nearly simultaneous, electromagnetic signals due to earthquake preparation processes, while reducing false positive indications due to environmental noise sources.

  9. Chemokine induction by all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia: triggering the differentiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Luesink, Maaike; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Wissink, Willemijn M; Linssen, Peter C M; Muus, Petra; Pfundt, Rolph; de Witte, Theo J M; van der Reijden, Bert A; Jansen, Joop H

    2009-12-24

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), differentiation therapy with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and/or arsenic trioxide can induce a differentiation syndrome (DS) with massive pulmonary infiltration of differentiating leukemic cells. Because chemokines are implicated in migration and extravasation of leukemic cells, chemokines might play a role in DS. ATRA stimulation of the APL cell line NB4 induced expression of multiple CC-chemokines (CCLs) and their receptors (> 19-fold), resulting in increased chemokine levels and chemotaxis. Induction of CCL2 and CCL24 was directly mediated by ligand-activated retinoic acid receptors. In primary leukemia cells derived from APL patients at diagnosis, ATRA induced chemokine production as well. Furthermore, in plasma of an APL patient with DS, we observed chemokine induction, suggesting that chemokines might be important in DS. Dexamethasone, which efficiently reduces pulmonary chemokine production, did not inhibit chemokine induction in APL cells. Finally, chemokine production was also induced by arsenic trioxide as single agent or in combination with ATRA. We propose that differentiation therapy may induce chemokine production in the lung and in APL cells, which both trigger migration of leukemic cells. Because dexamethasone does not efficiently reduce leukemic chemokine production, pulmonary infiltration of leukemic cells may induce an uncontrollable hyperinflammatory reaction in the lung.

  10. Differential effects of protein kinase C inhibitors on chemokine production in human synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, N. J.; Watson, M. L.; Yoshimura, T.; Westwick, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with the accumulation and activation of selected populations of inflammatory cells within the arthritic joint. One putative signal for this process is the production, by resident cells, of a group of inflammatory mediators known as the chemokines. 2. The chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and RANTES (regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted) are target-cell specific chemoattractants produced by synovial fibroblasts in response to stimulation with interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). The signalling pathways involved in their production are not well defined. We therefore used four different protein kinase C inhibitors to investigate the role of this kinase in the regulation of chemokine mRNA and protein expression in human cultured synovial fibroblasts. 3. The non-selective PKC inhibitor, staurosporine (1-300 nM) significantly increased the production of IL-1 alpha-induced IL-8 mRNA and protein. A specific PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine chloride (0.1-3 microM), also caused a small concentration-dependent increase in IL-8 mRNA and protein production. In contrast, 3-[1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl]-3-indoly]-4-(1-methyl-3-indolyl )- 1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione methanesulphonate (Ro 31-8220) and 2[1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3- yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X), two selective PKC inhibitors of the substituted bisindolylmaleimide family had a concentration-dependent biphasic effect on IL-1 alpha or TNF alpha-induced chemokine expression. At low concentrations they caused a stimulation in chemokine production, which was especially evident at the mRNA level. At higher concentrations both inhibited IL-1 alpha or TNF alpha-induced chemokine mRNA and protein production. Ro 31-8220 was 10 fold more potent than GF 109203X, with an IC50 of 1.6 +/- 0.08 microM (mean +/- s.e.mean, n = 4) for IL-1 alpha induced IL-8 production. Ro 31

  11. Tumor immune escape by the loss of homeostatic chemokine expression.

    PubMed

    Pivarcsi, Andor; Müller, Anja; Hippe, Andreas; Rieker, Juliane; van Lierop, Anke; Steinhoff, Martin; Seeliger, Stephan; Kubitza, Robert; Pippirs, Ulrich; Meller, Stephan; Gerber, Peter A; Liersch, Ruediger; Buenemann, Erich; Sonkoly, Eniko; Wiesner, Ulrike; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Schneider, Leonid; Piekorz, Roland; Enderlein, Elaine; Reifenberger, Julia; Rohr, Ulrich-Peter; Haas, Rainer; Boukamp, Petra; Haase, Ingo; Nürnberg, Bernd; Ruzicka, Thomas; Zlotnik, Albert; Homey, Bernhard

    2007-11-27

    The novel keratinocyte-specific chemokine CCL27 plays a critical role in the organization of skin-associated immune responses by regulating T cell homing under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte-derived skin tumors may evade T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses by down-regulating the expression of CCL27 through the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-MAPK-signaling pathways. Compared with healthy skin, CCL27 mRNA and protein expression was progressively lost in transformed keratinocytes of actinic keratoses and basal and squamous cell carcinomas. In vivo, precancerous skin lesions as well as cutaneous carcinomas showed significantly elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK compared with normal skin, suggesting the activation of EGFR-Ras signaling pathways in keratinocyte-derived malignancies. In vitro, exogenous stimulation of the EGFR-Ras signaling pathway through EGF or transfection of the dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (H-RasV12) suppressed whereas an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor increased CCL27 mRNA and protein production in keratinocytes. In mice, neutralization of CCL27 led to decreased leukocyte recruitment to cutaneous tumor sites and significantly enhanced primary tumor growth. Collectively, our data identify a mechanism of skin tumors to evade host antitumor immune responses.

  12. Tumor immune escape by the loss of homeostatic chemokine expression

    PubMed Central

    Pivarcsi, Andor; Müller, Anja; Hippe, Andreas; Rieker, Juliane; van Lierop, Anke; Steinhoff, Martin; Seeliger, Stephan; Kubitza, Robert; Pippirs, Ulrich; Meller, Stephan; Gerber, Peter A.; Liersch, Ruediger; Buenemann, Erich; Sonkoly, Eniko; Wiesner, Ulrike; Hoffmann, Thomas K.; Schneider, Leonid; Piekorz, Roland; Enderlein, Elaine; Reifenberger, Julia; Rohr, Ulrich-Peter; Haas, Rainer; Boukamp, Petra; Haase, Ingo; Nürnberg, Bernd; Ruzicka, Thomas; Zlotnik, Albert; Homey, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    The novel keratinocyte-specific chemokine CCL27 plays a critical role in the organization of skin-associated immune responses by regulating T cell homing under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte-derived skin tumors may evade T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses by down-regulating the expression of CCL27 through the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–Ras–MAPK-signaling pathways. Compared with healthy skin, CCL27 mRNA and protein expression was progressively lost in transformed keratinocytes of actinic keratoses and basal and squamous cell carcinomas. In vivo, precancerous skin lesions as well as cutaneous carcinomas showed significantly elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK compared with normal skin, suggesting the activation of EGFR–Ras signaling pathways in keratinocyte-derived malignancies. In vitro, exogenous stimulation of the EGFR–Ras signaling pathway through EGF or transfection of the dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (H-RasV12) suppressed whereas an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor increased CCL27 mRNA and protein production in keratinocytes. In mice, neutralization of CCL27 led to decreased leukocyte recruitment to cutaneous tumor sites and significantly enhanced primary tumor growth. Collectively, our data identify a mechanism of skin tumors to evade host antitumor immune responses. PMID:18025475

  13. Therapeutic implications of chemokine-mediated pathways in atherosclerosis: realistic perspectives and utopias.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Amanatidou, Virginia; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2010-09-01

    Current perspectives on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis strongly support the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the establishment and progression of atherosclerostic lesions. Chemokine-mediated mechanisms are potent regulators of such processes by orchestrating the interactions of inflammatory cellular components of the peripheral blood with cellular components of the arterial wall. The increasing evidence supporting the role of chemokine pathways in atherosclerosis renders chemokine ligands and their receptors potential therapeutic targets. In the following review, we aim to highlight the special structural and functional features of chemokines and their receptors in respect to their roles in atherosclerosis, and examine to what extent available data can be applied in disease management practices.

  14. Increased Expression of the Chemokines CXCL1 and MIP-1a by Resident Brain Cells Precedes Neutrophil Infiltration in the Brain Following Prolonged Soman-Induced Status Epilepticus in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    chemokine concentrations according to the manufacturer’s instructions. A volume of 25 μl of sample (94 ± 8 μg protein) per well, assayed in dupli- cate...STaRStation software (Applied Cytometry, Sacramento, CA). Values that were calculated by the assay to be below the minimum detectable concentration...The 12 hour time point was selected based on the peak expression times of the analytes from the multiplex assays . Free float fluorescent IHC

  15. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field enhances human keratinocyte cell growth and decreases proinflammatory chemokine production.

    PubMed

    Vianale, G; Reale, M; Amerio, P; Stefanachi, M; Di Luzio, S; Muraro, R

    2008-06-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes are central processes in tissue regeneration after injury. Chemokines, produced by a wide range of cell types including keratinocytes, play a regulatory role in inflammatory skin diseases. Several studies have shown that an electromagnetic field (EMF) can influence both inflammatory processes and repair mechanisms including wound healing on different tissue models. To elucidate the effect of extremely low frequency EMF (ELF-EMF) on keratinocyte proliferation and production of chemokines [RANTES, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha and interleukin (IL)-8] in order to evaluate a potential therapeutic use of magnetic fields. The human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT was exposed at 1 mT, 50 Hz for different lengths of time and compared with unexposed control cells. Cell growth and viability were evaluated at different exposure times by cell count and trypan blue exclusion. Chemokine production and expression were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Total NF-kappaB p65 was quantified by ELISA. Significantly increased growth rates were observed after 48 h of EMF exposure as compared with control cells, while no difference in cell viabilities were detected. Gene expression and release of RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1 alpha and IL-8 were significantly reduced after 72 h of exposure. NF-kappaB levels became almost undetectable after only 1 h of EMF exposure, and were inversely correlated with cell density. Our results show that ELF-EMF modulates chemokine production and keratinocyte growth through inhibition of the NF-kappaB signalling pathway and thus may inhibit inflammatory processes. ELF-EMF could represent an additional therapeutic approach in the treatment of skin injury.

  16. Field Crickets Compensate for Unattractive Static Long-Distance Call Components by Increasing Dynamic Signalling Effort

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multiple sexual signals presents a dilemma since individuals selecting a mate should pay attention to the most honest signal and ignore the rest; however, multiple signals may evolve if, together, they provide more information to the receiver than either one would alone. Static and dynamic signals, for instance, can act as multiple messages, providing information on different aspects of signaller quality that reflect condition at different time scales. While the nature of static signals makes them difficult or impossible for individuals to augment, dynamic signals are much more susceptible to temporary fluctuations in effort. We investigated whether male Texas field crickets, Gryllus texensis, that produce unattractive static signals compensate by dynamically increasing their calling effort. Our findings lend partial support to the compensation hypothesis, as males that called at unattractive carrier frequencies (a static trait) spent more time calling each night (a dynamic trait). Interestingly, this finding was most pronounced in males that called with attractive pulse characteristics (static traits) but did not occur in males that called with unattractive pulse characteristics. Males that signalled with unattractive pulse characteristics (duration and pause) spent less time calling through the night. Our correlative findings on wild caught males suggest that only males that signal with attractive pulse characteristics may be able to afford to pay the costs of both trait exaggeration and increased calling effort to compensate for poor carrier frequencies. PMID:27936045

  17. Field Crickets Compensate for Unattractive Static Long-Distance Call Components by Increasing Dynamic Signalling Effort.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Emily M; Bertram, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multiple sexual signals presents a dilemma since individuals selecting a mate should pay attention to the most honest signal and ignore the rest; however, multiple signals may evolve if, together, they provide more information to the receiver than either one would alone. Static and dynamic signals, for instance, can act as multiple messages, providing information on different aspects of signaller quality that reflect condition at different time scales. While the nature of static signals makes them difficult or impossible for individuals to augment, dynamic signals are much more susceptible to temporary fluctuations in effort. We investigated whether male Texas field crickets, Gryllus texensis, that produce unattractive static signals compensate by dynamically increasing their calling effort. Our findings lend partial support to the compensation hypothesis, as males that called at unattractive carrier frequencies (a static trait) spent more time calling each night (a dynamic trait). Interestingly, this finding was most pronounced in males that called with attractive pulse characteristics (static traits) but did not occur in males that called with unattractive pulse characteristics. Males that signalled with unattractive pulse characteristics (duration and pause) spent less time calling through the night. Our correlative findings on wild caught males suggest that only males that signal with attractive pulse characteristics may be able to afford to pay the costs of both trait exaggeration and increased calling effort to compensate for poor carrier frequencies.

  18. Structural basis of receptor sulfotyrosine recognition by a CC chemokine: the N-terminal region of CCR3 bound to CCL11/eotaxin-1.

    PubMed

    Millard, Christopher J; Ludeman, Justin P; Canals, Meritxell; Bridgford, Jessica L; Hinds, Mark G; Clayton, Daniel J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Payne, Richard J; Stone, Martin J

    2014-11-04

    Trafficking of leukocytes in immune surveillance and inflammatory responses is activated by chemokines engaging their receptors. Sulfation of tyrosine residues in peptides derived from the eosinophil chemokine receptor CCR3 dramatically enhances binding to cognate chemokines. We report the structural basis of this recognition and affinity enhancement. We describe the structure of a CC chemokine (CCL11/eotaxin-1) bound to a fragment of a chemokine receptor: residues 8–23 of CCR3, including two sulfotyrosine residues. We also show that intact CCR3 is sulfated and sulfation enhances receptor activity. The CCR3 sulfotyrosine residues form hydrophobic, salt bridge and cation-p interactions with residues that are highly conserved in CC chemokines. However, the orientation of the chemokine relative to the receptor N terminus differs substantially from those observed for two CXC chemokines, suggesting that initial binding of the receptor sulfotyrosine residues guides subsequent steps in receptor activation, thereby influencing the receptor conformational changes and signaling.

  19. Endogenous ligand bias by chemokines: implications at the front lines of infection and leukocyte trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zidar, David A

    2011-06-01

    Chemokine receptors are a group of homologous seven transmembrane receptors (7TMR) that direct cell migration. Their ligands comprise a family of proteins that share structural, biochemical, and physiological features to govern leukocyte trafficking. Multiple endogenous chemokines with overlapping function have evolved for the majority of chemokine receptors. This duplicity of ligands has traditionally been seen to confer physiologic redundancy, especially as it pertains to chemotaxis mediated through G-protein activation. Yet, several recent reports also suggest that chemokine receptors are capable of differential signaling in a ligand-specific manner. This review will explore emerging concepts related to ligand bias at chemokine receptors. Recent studies show that although the endogenous ligands of CCR7 have apparent equipotency for G-protein signaling, they differentially activate the G-protein coupled receptor kinase (GRK)/β-arrestin system to selectively control receptor desensitization. In contrast, similar studies using endogenous ligands for CCR5, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-receptor, suggest this receptor is not subject to ligand bias by its principle chemokines. Nonetheless, this receptor does appear to be capable of biased agonism by synthetic chemokine analogues. These observations provide compelling evidence that ligand bias exists both as a naturally relevant and therapeutically important phenomenon. This review will highlight the evidence for differential signaling by CCR7 and CCR5, speculate on the physiologic relevance, and discuss the rationale behind the development of biased agonists for the treatment of HIV infection.

  20. Chemokine cooperativity is caused by competitive glycosaminoglycan binding.

    PubMed

    Verkaar, Folkert; van Offenbeek, Jody; van der Lee, Miranda M C; van Lith, Lambertus H C J; Watts, Anne O; Rops, Angelique L W M M; Aguilar, David C; Ziarek, Joshua J; van der Vlag, Johan; Handel, Tracy M; Volkman, Brian F; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Vischer, Henry F; Zaman, Guido J R; Smit, Martine J

    2014-04-15

    Chemokines comprise a family of secreted proteins that activate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and thereby control the migration of leukocytes during inflammation or immune surveillance. The positional information required for such migratory behavior is governed by the binding of chemokines to membrane-tethered glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which establishes a chemokine concentration gradient. An often observed but incompletely understood behavior of chemokines is the ability of unrelated chemokines to enhance the potency with which another chemokine subtype can activate its cognate receptor. This phenomenon has been demonstrated to occur between many chemokine combinations and across several model systems and has been dubbed chemokine cooperativity. In this study, we have used GAG binding-deficient chemokine mutants and cell-based functional (migration) assays to demonstrate that chemokine cooperativity is caused by competitive binding of chemokines to GAGs. This mechanistic explanation of chemokine cooperativity provides insight into chemokine gradient formation in the context of inflammation, in which multiple chemokines are secreted simultaneously.

  1. Stoichiometry and geometry of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 complex with CXC ligand 12: molecular modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Kufareva, Irina; Stephens, Bryan S; Holden, Lauren G; Qin, Ling; Zhao, Chunxia; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Abagyan, Ruben; Handel, Tracy M

    2014-12-16

    Chemokines and their receptors regulate cell migration during development, immune system function, and in inflammatory diseases, making them important therapeutic targets. Nevertheless, the structural basis of receptor:chemokine interaction is poorly understood. Adding to the complexity of the problem is the persistently dimeric behavior of receptors observed in cell-based studies, which in combination with structural and mutagenesis data, suggest several possibilities for receptor:chemokine complex stoichiometry. In this study, a combination of computational, functional, and biophysical approaches was used to elucidate the stoichiometry and geometry of the interaction between the CXC-type chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12. First, relevance and feasibility of a 2:1 stoichiometry hypothesis was probed using functional complementation experiments with multiple pairs of complementary nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. Next, the importance of dimers of WT CXCR4 was explored using the strategy of dimer dilution, where WT receptor dimerization is disrupted by increasing expression of nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. The results of these experiments were supportive of a 1:1 stoichiometry, although the latter could not simultaneously reconcile existing structural and mutagenesis data. To resolve the contradiction, cysteine trapping experiments were used to derive residue proximity constraints that enabled construction of a validated 1:1 receptor:chemokine model, consistent with the paradigmatic two-site hypothesis of receptor activation. The observation of a 1:1 stoichiometry is in line with accumulating evidence supporting monomers as minimal functional units of G protein-coupled receptors, and suggests transmission of conformational changes across the dimer interface as the most probable mechanism of altered signaling by receptor heterodimers.

  2. [The diagnostic role of chemokines and their receptors in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Sysoev, K A; Chukhlovin, A B; Totolian, A A

    2013-02-01

    The chronic hepatitis C is characterized by the increase of inflammatory disorders and progression of fibrosis of liver The corresponding immunologic mechanisms of hepatic lesions are still undiscovered. The actual review presents the analysis of scientific publications and genuine research data concerning the role of chemokines in pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C. The chemokines are small cationic proteins enhancing transit and precipitation of migrating cells (leucocytes mainly) in tissues and organs. The significant role of chemokines in tissue homeostasis, in case of inflammation, wound healing and cell proliferation is demonstrated. The particular kinds of chemokines are produced by different types of cells and impact target cells through their specific receptors. According the data of various studies, chemokines and chemokine receptors of CC-families and CXC-families are involved in fibrosing processes and anti-inflammatory activation of hepatic-biliary system under chronic hepatitis C. The diversity of producers and targets of chemokines in liver is very pronounced: hepatocytes, stellar cells, endothelium cells, macrophages (Kupffer cells), dendritic cells, lymphocytes and monocytes. The review considers pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C from the standpoint of participation of chemokines and chemokine receptors at different stages of cellular transit. The most important cellpopulations involved into pathologic changes under chronic hepatitis C are characterized. The decrease of expression of such gens as CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, and CCR5 in blood leucocytes deserves additional studies to establish their diagnostic values as a marker of disorders of immune system in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  3. Chemokines in Cancer Development and Progression and Their Potential as Targeting Molecules for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mukaida, Naofumi; Sasaki, So-ichiro; Baba, Tomohisa

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines were initially identified as bioactive substances, which control the trafficking of inflammatory cells including granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Moreover, chemokines have profound impacts on other types of cells associated with inflammatory responses, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. These observations would implicate chemokines as master regulators in various inflammatory responses. Subsequent studies have further revealed that chemokines can regulate the movement of a wide variety of immune cells including lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells in both physiological and pathological conditions. These features endow chemokines with crucial roles in immune responses. Furthermore, increasing evidence points to the vital effects of several chemokines on the proliferative and invasive properties of cancer cells. It is widely acknowledged that cancer develops and progresses to invade and metastasize in continuous interaction with noncancerous cells present in cancer tissues, such as macrophages, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. The capacity of chemokines to regulate both cancerous and noncancerous cells highlights their crucial roles in cancer development and progression. Here, we will discuss the roles of chemokines in carcinogenesis and the possibility of chemokine targeting therapy for the treatment of cancer. PMID:24966464

  4. Chemokines and their receptors in the allergic airway inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan Raymundo; Teran, Luis Manuel

    2011-08-01

    The development of the allergic airway disease conveys several cell types, such as T-cells, eosinophils, mast cells, and dendritic cells, which act in a special and temporal synchronization. Cellular mobilization and its complex interactions are coordinated by a broad range of bioactive mediators known as chemokines. These molecules are an increasing family of small proteins with common structural motifs and play an important role in the recruitment and cell activation of both leukocytes and resident cells at the allergic inflammatory site via their receptors. Trafficking and recruitment of cell populations with specific chemokines receptors assure the presence of reactive allergen-specific T-cells in the lung, and therefore the establishment of an allergic inflammatory process. Different approaches directed against chemokines receptors have been developed during the last decades with promising therapeutic results in the treatment of asthma. In this review we explore the role of the chemokines and chemokine receptors in allergy and asthma and discuss their potential as targets for therapy.

  5. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  6. Disruption of mTORC1 in Macrophages Decreases Chemokine Gene Expression and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Ding; Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Ganda, Anjali; Abramowicz, Sandra; Welch, Carrie; Almazan, Felicidad; Zhu, Yi; Miller, Yury I; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, rapamycin, has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, even while increasing plasma LDL levels. This suggests an anti-atherogenic effect possibly mediated by modulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerotic plaques. Objective To assess the role of macrophage mTORC1 in atherogenesis. Methods and Results We transplanted bone marrow from mice in which a key mTORC1 adaptor, Raptor, was deleted in macrophages by Cre/loxP recombination (Mac-RapKO mice) into Ldlr-/- mice and then fed them the Western-type diet (WTD). Atherosclerotic lesions from Mac-RapKO mice showed decreased infiltration of macrophages, lesion size and chemokine gene expression compared with control mice. Treatment of macrophages with minimally modified LDL (mmLDL) resulted in increased levels of chemokine mRNAs and STAT3 phosphorylation; these effects were reduced in Mac-RapKO macrophages. While wild-type and Mac-RapKO macrophages showed similar STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr705, Mac-RapKO macrophages showed decreased STAT3 Ser727 phosphorylation in response to mmLDL treatment and decreased Ccl2 promoter binding of STAT3. Conclusions The results demonstrate cross-talk between nutritionally-induced mTORC1 signaling and mmLDL-mediated inflammatory signaling via combinatorial phosphorylation of STAT3 in macrophages, leading to increased STAT3 activity on the CCL2 (MCP-1)promoter with pro-atherogenic consequences. PMID:24687132

  7. Stretch and inflammatory cytokines drive myometrial chemokine expression via NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Renyi; Pease, James E; Sooranna, Suren R; Viney, Jonathan M; Nelson, Scott M; Myatt, Les; Bennett, Philip R; Johnson, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Both human preterm labor (PTL) and term labor are consistently associated with a chemokine-induced inflammatory infiltration of the myometrium. However, what regulates myometrial chemokine expression and whether the increase in expression precedes the onset of labor, and so may have a role in its causation, or occurs after, and is simply a consequence of labor, is uncertain. Therefore, we assessed 1) chemokine expression in nonlaboring and laboring myometrial samples obtained at and before term and 2) the factors that regulate myometrial chemokine expression. We found that term labor was characterized by an increase in CXCL8 and CCL2 in both upper and lower segments, whereas PTL was associated with a distinct pattern of chemokine expression, with increases in CCL5, CXCL5, and CCL20 in the lower segment myometrium only. Further, we found that chemokine expression in myometrial cell cultures was increased by stretch and inflammatory cytokines and reduced by prostglandins and oxytocin and that the primary mediator of stretch and cytokine effects was nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and to a lesser extent MAPK. These data show that PTL appears to be associated with a distinct pattern of chemokine expression, that stretch and cytokines both drive myometrial chemokine expression primarily via activation of NF-κB. These data suggest that the modulation of NF-κB activity may be of potential benefit in the management of PTL.

  8. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  9. Epithelium-derived chemokines induce airway smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Sumi, Y; Préfontaine, D; Al Abri, J; Al Heialy, N; Al-Ramli, W; Michoud, M-C; Martin, J G; Hamid, Q

    2009-07-01

    The remodelling of airway smooth muscle (ASM) associated with asthma severity may involve the migration of ASM cells towards the epithelium. However, little is known about the mechanisms of cell migration and the effect of epithelial-derived mediators on this process. The main objective of the current study is to assess the effects of epithelial-derived chemokines on ASM cell migration. Normal human ASM cells were incubated with supernatants from cells of the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. To induce chemokine production, epithelial cells were treated with TNF-alpha. Chemokine expression by epithelial cells was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, ELISA and membrane antibody array. To identify the role of individual chemokines in ASM cell migration, we performed migration assays with a modified Boyden chamber using specific neutralizing antibodies to block chemokine effects. Supernatants from BEAS-2B cells treated with TNF-alpha increased ASM cell migration; migration was increased 1.6 and 2.5-fold by supernatant from BEAS-2B cells treated with 10 and 100 ng/mL TNF-alpha, respectively. Protein levels in supernatants and mRNA expression by BEAS-2B cells of regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and IL-8 were significantly increased by 100 ng/mL TNF-alpha treatment. The incubation of supernatant with antibodies to RANTES or IL-8 significantly reduced ASM cell migration, and the combined antibodies further inhibited the cell migration. The migratory effects of supernatants and inhibiting effects of RANTES and/or IL-8 were confirmed also using NHBE cells. The results show that chemokines from airway epithelial cells cause ASM cell migration and might potentially play a role in the process of airway remodelling in asthma.

  10. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  11. Differential Ligand Binding to a Human Cytomegalovirus Chemokine Receptor Determines Cell Type–Specific Motility

    PubMed Central

    Vomaske, Jennifer; Melnychuk, Ryan M.; Smith, Patricia P.; Powell, Joshua; Hall, Laurel; DeFilippis, Victor; Früh, Klaus; Smit, Martine; Schlaepfer, David D.; Nelson, Jay A.; Streblow, Daniel N.

    2009-01-01

    While most chemokine receptors fail to cross the chemokine class boundary with respect to the ligands that they bind, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded chemokine receptor US28 binds multiple CC-chemokines and the CX3C-chemokine Fractalkine. US28 binding to CC-chemokines is both necessary and sufficient to induce vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration in response to HCMV infection. However, the function of Fractalkine binding to US28 is unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that Fractalkine binding to US28 not only induces migration of macrophages but also acts to inhibit RANTES-mediated SMC migration. Similarly, RANTES inhibits Fractalkine-mediated US28 migration in macrophages. While US28 binding of both RANTES and Fractalkine activate FAK and ERK-1/2, RANTES signals through Gα12 and Fractalkine through Gαq. These findings represent the first example of differential chemotactic signaling via a multiple chemokine family binding receptor that results in migration of two different cell types. Additionally, the demonstration that US28-mediated chemotaxis is both ligand-specific and cell type–specific has important implications in the role of US28 in HCMV pathogenesis. PMID:19229316

  12. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C.; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. {yields} Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. {yields} Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. {yields} Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  13. Cytokines and chemokines in neuromyelitis optica: pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Masahiro, Mori; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by severe optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. The discovery of an NMO-specific autoantibody to the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel has improved knowledge of NMO pathogenesis. Many studies have focused on inflammatory and pathological biomarkers of NMO, including cytokines and chemokines. Increased concentrations of T helper (Th)17- and Th2-related cytokines and chemokines may be essential factors for developing NMO inflammatory lesions. For example, interleukin-6 could play important roles in NMO pathogenesis, as it is involved in the survival of plasmablasts that produce anti-AQP4 antibody in peripheral circulation and in the enhancement of inflammation in the central nervous system. Therefore, assessment of these useful biomarkers may become a supportive criterion for diagnosing NMO. Significant advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis will lead to the development of novel treatment strategies. This review focuses on the current advances in NMO immunological research, particularly that of cytokines and chemokines.

  14. Persistent expression of chemokine and chemokine receptor RNAs at primary and latent sites of herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, W James; Kramer, Martha F; Walker, Russell M; Burwell, Timothy J; Holman, Holly A; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines and infiltrating T cells are readily detected in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected mouse cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the acute phase of infection, and certain cytokines continue to be expressed at lower levels in infected TG during the subsequent latent phase. Recent results have shown that HSV infection activates Toll-like receptor signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that chemokines may be broadly expressed at both primary sites and latent sites of HSV infection for prolonged periods of time. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymrease chain reaction (RT-PCR) to quantify expression levels of transcripts encoding chemokines and their receptors in cornea and TG following corneal infection. RNAs encoding the inflammatory-type chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR3, which are highly expressed on activated T cells, macrophages and most immature dendritic cells (DC), and the more broadly expressed CCR7, were highly expressed and strongly induced in infected cornea and TG at 3 and 10 days postinfection (dpi). Elevated levels of these RNAs persisted in both cornea and TG during the latent phase at 30 dpi. RNAs for the broadly expressed CXCR4 receptor was induced at 30 dpi but less so at 3 and 10 dpi in both cornea and TG. Transcripts for CCR3 and CCR6, receptors that are not highly expressed on activated T cells or macrophages, also appeared to be induced during acute and latent phases; however, their very low expression levels were near the limit of our detection. RNAs encoding the CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine ligands MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES, and the CCR2 ligand MCP-1 were also strongly induced and persisted in cornea and TG during the latent phase. These and other recent results argue that HSV antigens or DNA can stimulate expression of chemokines, perhaps through activation of Toll-like receptors, for long periods of time at both primary and latent sites of HSV infection. These chemokines recruit activated T cells and other

  15. Persistent expression of chemokine and chemokine receptor RNAs at primary and latent sites of herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cook, W James; Kramer, Martha F; Walker, Russell M; Burwell, Timothy J; Holman, Holly A; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2004-09-23

    Inflammatory cytokines and infiltrating T cells are readily detected in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected mouse cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the acute phase of infection, and certain cytokines continue to be expressed at lower levels in infected TG during the subsequent latent phase. Recent results have shown that HSV infection activates Toll-like receptor signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that chemokines may be broadly expressed at both primary sites and latent sites of HSV infection for prolonged periods of time. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymrease chain reaction (RT-PCR) to quantify expression levels of transcripts encoding chemokines and their receptors in cornea and TG following corneal infection. RNAs encoding the inflammatory-type chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR3, which are highly expressed on activated T cells, macrophages and most immature dendritic cells (DC), and the more broadly expressed CCR7, were highly expressed and strongly induced in infected cornea and TG at 3 and 10 days postinfection (dpi). Elevated levels of these RNAs persisted in both cornea and TG during the latent phase at 30 dpi. RNAs for the broadly expressed CXCR4 receptor was induced at 30 dpi but less so at 3 and 10 dpi in both cornea and TG. Transcripts for CCR3 and CCR6, receptors that are not highly expressed on activated T cells or macrophages, also appeared to be induced during acute and latent phases; however, their very low expression levels were near the limit of our detection. RNAs encoding the CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine ligands MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta and RANTES, and the CCR2 ligand MCP-1 were also strongly induced and persisted in cornea and TG during the latent phase. These and other recent results argue that HSV antigens or DNA can stimulate expression of chemokines, perhaps through activation of Toll-like receptors, for long periods of time at both primary and latent sites of HSV infection. These chemokines recruit activated T cells and

  16. Acidic pH stimulates the production of the angiogenic CXC chemokine, CXCL8 (interleukin-8), in human adult mesenchymal stem cells via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2008-07-01

    Blood vessel injury results in limited oxygen tension and diffusion leading to hypoxia, increased anaerobic metabolism, and elevated production of acidic metabolites that cannot be easily removed due to the reduced blood flow. Therefore, an acidic extracellular pH occurs in the local microenvironment of disrupted bone. The potential role of acidic pH and glu-leu-arg (ELR(+)) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) treated with medium of decreasing pH (7.4, 7.0, 6.7, and 6.4). The cells showed a reciprocal increase in CXCL8 (interleukin-8, IL-8) mRNA levels as extracellular pH decreased. At pH 6.4, CXCL8 mRNA was induced >60x in comparison to levels at pH 7.4. hMSCs treated with osteogenic medium (OGM) also showed an increase in CXCL8 mRNA with decreasing pH; although, at a lower level than that seen in cells grown in non-OGM. CXCL8 protein was secreted into the medium at all pHs with maximal induction at pH 6.7. Inhibition of the G-protein-coupled receptor alpha, G(alphai), suppressed CXCL8 levels in response to acidic pH; whereas phospholipase C inhibition had no effect on CXCL8. The use of specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction inhibitors indicated that the pH-dependent increase in CXCL8 mRNA is due to activation of ERK and p38 pathways. The JNK pathway was not involved. NF-kappaB inhibition resulted in a decrease in CXCL8 levels in hMSCs grown in non-OGM. However, OGM-differentiated hMSCs showed an increase in CXCL8 levels when treated with the NF-kappaB inhibitor PDTC, a pyrrolidine derivative of dithiocarbamate.

  17. Protection against inflammation- and autoantibody-caused fetal loss by the chemokine decoy receptor D6

    PubMed Central

    Martinez de la Torre, Yeny; Buracchi, Chiara; Borroni, Elena M.; Dupor, Jana; Bonecchi, Raffaella; Nebuloni, Manuela; Pasqualini, Fabio; Doni, Andrea; Lauri, Eleonora; Agostinis, Chiara; Bulla, Roberta; Cook, Donald N.; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Meroni, Pierluigi; Rukavina, Daniel; Vago, Luca; Tedesco, Francesco; Vecchi, Annunciata; Lira, Sergio A.; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Fetal loss in animals and humans is frequently associated with inflammatory conditions. D6 is a promiscuous chemokine receptor with decoy function, expressed in lymphatic endothelium, that recognizes and targets to degradation most inflammatory CC chemokines. Here, we report that D6 is expressed in placenta on invading extravillous trophoblasts and on the apical side of syncytiotrophoblast cells, at the very interface between maternal blood and fetus. Exposure of D6−/− pregnant mice to LPS or antiphospholipid autoantibodies results in higher levels of inflammatory CC chemokines and increased leukocyte infiltrate in placenta, causing an increased rate of fetal loss, which is prevented by blocking inflammatory chemokines. Thus, the promiscuous decoy receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines D6 plays a nonredundant role in the protection against fetal loss caused by systemic inflammation and antiphospholipid antibodies. PMID:17283337

  18. Cytokines and Chemokines in Cerebral Malaria Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dunst, Josefine; Kamena, Faustin; Matuschewski, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is among the major causes of malaria-associated mortality and effective adjunctive therapeutic strategies are currently lacking. Central pathophysiological processes involved in the development of cerebral malaria include an imbalance of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to Plasmodium infection, endothelial cell activation, and loss of blood-brain barrier integrity. However, the sequence of events, which initiates these pathophysiological processes as well as the contribution of their complex interplay to the development of cerebral malaria remain incompletely understood. Several cytokines and chemokines have repeatedly been associated with cerebral malaria severity. Increased levels of these inflammatory mediators could account for the sequestration of leukocytes in the cerebral microvasculature present during cerebral malaria, thereby contributing to an amplification of local inflammation and promoting cerebral malaria pathogenesis. Herein, we highlight the current knowledge on the contribution of cytokines and chemokines to the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria with particular emphasis on their roles in endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment, as well as their implication in the progression to blood-brain barrier permeability and neuroinflammation, in both human cerebral malaria and in the murine experimental cerebral malaria model. A better molecular understanding of these processes could provide the basis for evidence-based development of adjunct therapies and the definition of diagnostic markers of disease progression.

  19. Cytokines and Chemokines in Cerebral Malaria Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunst, Josefine; Kamena, Faustin; Matuschewski, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is among the major causes of malaria-associated mortality and effective adjunctive therapeutic strategies are currently lacking. Central pathophysiological processes involved in the development of cerebral malaria include an imbalance of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to Plasmodium infection, endothelial cell activation, and loss of blood-brain barrier integrity. However, the sequence of events, which initiates these pathophysiological processes as well as the contribution of their complex interplay to the development of cerebral malaria remain incompletely understood. Several cytokines and chemokines have repeatedly been associated with cerebral malaria severity. Increased levels of these inflammatory mediators could account for the sequestration of leukocytes in the cerebral microvasculature present during cerebral malaria, thereby contributing to an amplification of local inflammation and promoting cerebral malaria pathogenesis. Herein, we highlight the current knowledge on the contribution of cytokines and chemokines to the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria with particular emphasis on their roles in endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment, as well as their implication in the progression to blood-brain barrier permeability and neuroinflammation, in both human cerebral malaria and in the murine experimental cerebral malaria model. A better molecular understanding of these processes could provide the basis for evidence-based development of adjunct therapies and the definition of diagnostic markers of disease progression. PMID:28775960

  20. Chemokine and chemokine receptor structure and interactions: implications for therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2015-01-01

    The control of cell migration by chemokines involves interactions with two types of receptors: seven transmembrane chemokine-type G protein-coupled receptors and cell surface or extracellular matrix associated glycosaminoglycans. Coordinated interaction of chemokines with both types of receptors is required for directional migration of cells in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Accumulated structural information, culminating most recently in the structure of a chemokine receptor in complex with a chemokine, has led to a view where chemokine oligomers bind to glycosaminoglycans through epitopes formed when chemokine subunits come together, while chemokine monomers bind to receptors in a pseudo two-step mechanism of receptor activation. Exploitation of this structural knowledge has and will continue to provide important information for therapeutic strategies, as described in this review. PMID:25708536

  1. Fenretinide prevents obesity in aged female mice in association with increased retinoid and estrogen signaling.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Kirsty D; Morrice, Nicola; Henderson, Claire; Reekie, Jenny; Mcilroy, George D; McCaffery, Peter J; Delibegovic, Mirela; Mody, Nimesh

    2015-08-01

    The synthetic retinoid fenretinide (FEN) inhibits adiposity in male mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) in association with alterations in retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Young female mice are protected from obesity via estrogen signaling. We, therefore, investigated whether FEN also influences adiposity in aged female mice differing in parity and whether such effects are mediated by retinoid and estrogen signaling. Aged nulliparous and parous female mice were maintained on HFD ± FEN, and adiposity was assessed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on white adipose tissue (WAT), liver, and 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with RA or FEN ± estrogen. Parous females were more obese than nulliparous mice independent of age. FEN-HFD prevented the HFD-induced increase in adiposity and leptin levels independently of parity. FEN-HFD induced retinoid-responsive genes in WAT and liver. Parous females had reduced expression of hepatic estrogen-responsive genes, but FEN-HFD up-regulated WAT Cyp19a1 and Esr2 in parous mice. Estrogen and RA acted synergistically to increase RA receptor-mediated gene expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. FEN increased Cyp19a1 and Esr2, similar to our findings in vivo. The prevention of adiposity by FEN in response to HFD in female mice seems to involve increased retinoid signaling in association with induction of local estrogen production and estrogen signaling in WAT. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  2. New chemokine targets for asthma therapy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gilles; Godot, Véronique; Humbert, Marc

    2005-03-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are part of a complex network of molecules that play a key role in leukocyte migration and activation. The chemokine family role is crucial in the immune system, orchestrating innate and acquired immune responses, but also in allergic inflammation. A subset of chemokines, including CCL11, CCL24, CCL26, CCL7, CCL13, CCL17, and CCL22 is highly expressed by the three main cell types involved in allergic inflammation: eosinophils, basophils, and Th2 lymphocytes. In vitro and in vivo experimental studies in murine models of asthma as well as evidence from patients with asthma confirm the role of these chemokines and their receptors, including CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8, establishing a subset of chemokine/chemokine receptor that is potentially important in allergic inflammation. Recent data support the concept that interfering with chemokines or chemokine receptors represents a new approach in allergy therapy. However, even if some of them have been shown to be effective in animal models, none is as yet used in human patients.

  3. Midazolam sedation increases fluctuation and synchrony of the resting brain BOLD signal.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Vesa J; Haanpää, Hannu; Kantola, Juha-Heikki; Jauhiainen, Jukka; Vainionpää, Vilho; Alahuhta, Seppo; Tervonen, Osmo

    2005-05-01

    The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance signal of functional brain cortices is dominated by very low frequency (VLF) fluctuations in anesthetized child patients. The temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal is also higher in anesthetized children compared with awake adults. The origin of the synchronous fluctuations can be related to maturation, pathological status or the anesthesia used in the imaging. Two of the three confounding variables (maturation and pathology) were controlled in this study. The effect of midazolam (4+/-0.8 mg) sedation on the BOLD signal was assessed in 12 healthy adults (aged 24+/-1.5 years) at 1.5 T. The VLF fluctuation power and temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal increased significantly after the sedation in the auditory and visual cortices. The fast Fourier transformation power spectral baseline fit parameters of the BOLD signal were also found to change significantly after sedation. It is concluded that the VLF fluctuation and temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal become increased after sedation in functional brain regions.

  4. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-04-12

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  5. Chemokine ligand 2 in the trigeminal ganglion regulates pain induced by experimental tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Luo, Wei; Wang, Jing; Tan, Yu; Fu, Runqing; Fang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that the chemokine ligand 2/chemokine receptor 2 (CCL2/CCR2) signaling pathway plays an important role in pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Expression of CCL2/CCR2 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) was determined by Western blotting 0 hours, 4 hours, 1 day, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after tooth movement. CCL2 localization and cell size distribution were revealed by immunohistochemistry. The effects of increasing force on CCL2 expression and behavioral changes were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of CCL2/CCR2 antagonists on these changes in pain behaviors were all evaluated. Exogenous CCL2 was injected into periodontal tissues and cultured TG neurons with different concentrations, and then the pain responses or c-fos expression were assessed. Experimental tooth movement led to a statistically significant increase in CCL2/CCR2 expression from day 3 to day 7, especially in small to medium-sized TG neurons. It also triggered an increase in the time spent on directed face-grooming behaviors in a force magnitude-dependent and CCL2 dose-dependent manner. Pain induced by experimental tooth movement was effectively blocked by a CCR2 antagonist and by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. Also, exogenous CCL2 led to an increase in c-fos expression in cultured TG neurons, which was blocked by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. The peripheral CCL2/CCR2 axis is modulated by experimental tooth movement and involved in the development of tooth movement pain.

  6. Targeting spare CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) as a principle to inhibit HIV-1 entry.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun; Colin, Philippe; Staropoli, Isabelle; Lima-Fernandes, Evelyne; Ferret, Cécile; Demir, Arzu; Rogée, Sophie; Hartley, Oliver; Randriamampita, Clotilde; Scott, Mark G H; Marullo, Stefano; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Brelot, Anne

    2014-07-04

    CCR5 binds the chemokines CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 and is the major coreceptor for HIV-1 entry into target cells. Chemokines are supposed to form a natural barrier against human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, we showed that their antiviral activity is limited by CCR5 adopting low-chemokine affinity conformations at the cell surface. Here, we investigated whether a pool of CCR5 that is not stabilized by chemokines could represent a target for inhibiting HIV infection. We exploited the characteristics of the chemokine analog PSC-RANTES (N-α-(n-nonanoyl)-des-Ser(1)-[l-thioprolyl(2), l-cyclohexylglycyl(3)]-RANTES(4-68)), which displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that native chemokines fail to prevent high-affinity binding of PSC-RANTES, analog-mediated calcium release (in desensitization assays), and analog-mediated CCR5 internalization. These results indicate that a pool of spare CCR5 may bind PSC-RANTES but not native chemokines. Improved recognition of CCR5 by PSC-RANTES may explain why the analog promotes higher amounts of β-arrestin 2·CCR5 complexes, thereby increasing CCR5 down-regulation and HIV-1 inhibition. Together, these results highlight that spare CCR5, which might permit HIV-1 to escape from chemokines, should be targeted for efficient viral blockade. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Chemokine, cytokine and type I interferon production induced by Toll-like receptor activation in common variable immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lollo, Camila de; de Moraes Vasconcelos, Dewton; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Domingues, Rosana; Carvalho, Gabriel Costa de; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2016-08-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary antibody deficiency and is associated with recurrent infections and chronic inflammatory diseases. We evaluated the ability of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands to induce secretion of chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from CVID patients. High levels of CXCL10, CCL2, CXCL9, CCL5, CXCL8, and IL-6 were detected in sera of CVID patients compared with healthy controls. Increased chemokine levels were observed in unstimulated PBMCs, but after stimulation with TLR2 and TLR4 agonists, equivalent chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, as in healthy controls, was observed, whereas TLR4 agonist induced a decreased secretion of CCL2 and CXCL8 and increased secretion of TNF. Decreased IFN-α secretion induced by TLR7/TLR8 activation was observed in CVID, which was recovered with TLR9 signaling. Our findings revealed that TLR9 activation has an adjuvant effect on the altered type I response in CVID. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemokine interactome mapping enables tailored intervention in acute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Agten, Stijn M; Eckardt, Veit; Blanchet, Xavier; Schmitt, Martin M; Ippel, Hans; Neideck, Carlos; Bidzhekov, Kiril; Leberzammer, Julian; Wichapong, Kanin; Faussner, Alexander; Drechsler, Maik; Grommes, Jochen; van Geffen, Johanna P; Li, He; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Megens, Remco T A; Naumann, Ronald; Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Döring, Yvonne; Soehnlein, Oliver; Lutgens, Esther; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Koenen, Rory R; Mayo, Kevin H; Hackeng, Tilman M; Weber, Christian

    2017-04-05

    Chemokines orchestrate leukocyte trafficking and function in health and disease. Heterophilic interactions between chemokines in a given microenvironment may amplify, inhibit, or modulate their activity; however, a systematic evaluation of the chemokine interactome has not been performed. We used immunoligand blotting and surface plasmon resonance to obtain a comprehensive map of chemokine-chemokine interactions and to confirm their specificity. Structure-function analyses revealed that chemokine activity can be enhanced by CC-type heterodimers but inhibited by CXC-type heterodimers. Functional synergism was achieved through receptor heteromerization induced by CCL5-CCL17 or receptor retention at the cell surface via auxiliary proteoglycan binding of CCL5-CXCL4. In contrast, inhibitory activity relied on conformational changes (in CXCL12), affecting receptor signaling. Obligate CC-type heterodimers showed high efficacy and potency and drove acute lung injury and atherosclerosis, processes abrogated by specific CCL5-derived peptide inhibitors or knock-in of an interaction-deficient CXCL4 variant. Atheroprotective effects of CCL17 deficiency were phenocopied by a CCL5-derived peptide disrupting CCL5-CCL17 heterodimers, whereas a CCL5 α-helix peptide mimicked inhibitory effects on CXCL12-driven platelet aggregation. Thus, formation of specific chemokine heterodimers differentially dictates functional activity and can be exploited for therapeutic targeting. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Increased bone morphogenetic protein signaling contributes to age-related declines in neurogenesis and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Emily A.; Gobeske, Kevin T.; Bond, Allison M.; Jarrett, Jennifer C.; Peng, Chian-Yu; Kessler, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus and diminished hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions. Expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) increases with age by more than 10-fold in the mouse dentate gyrus while levels of the BMP inhibitor, noggin, decrease. This results in a profound 30-fold increase in phosphorylated-SMAD1/5/8, the effector of canonical BMP signaling. Just as observed in mice, a profound increase in expression of BMP4 is observed in the dentate gyrus of humans with no known cognitive abnormalities. Inhibition of BMP signaling either by overexpression of noggin or transgenic manipulation not only increases neurogenesis in aging mice, but remarkably, is associated with a rescue of cognitive deficits to levels comparable to young mice. Additive benefits are observed when combining inhibition of BMP signaling and environmental enrichment. These findings indicate that increased BMP signaling contributes significantly to impairments in neurogenesis and to cognitive decline associated with aging, and identify this pathway as a potential druggable target for reversing age-related changes in cognition. PMID:26827654

  10. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2011-10-14

    Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  11. Resolvin D1 Increases Mucin Secretion in Cultured Rat Conjunctival Goblet Cells via Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lippestad, Marit; Hodges, Robin R.; Utheim, Tor P.; Serhan, Charles N.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Goblet cells in the conjunctiva secrete mucin into the tear film protecting the ocular surface. The proresolution mediator resolvin D1 (RvD1) regulates mucin secretion to maintain homeostasis during physiological conditions and in addition, actively terminates inflammation. We determined the signaling mechanisms used by RvD1 in cultured rat conjunctival goblet cells to increase intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) and induce glycoconjugate secretion. Methods Increase in [Ca2+]i were measured using fura 2/AM and glycoconjugate secretion determined using an enzyme-linked lectin assay with the lectin Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin 1. Signaling pathways activated by RvD1 were studied after goblet cells were pretreated with signaling pathway inhibitors before stimulation with RvD1. The results were compared with results when goblet cells were stimulated with RvD1 alone and percent inhibition calculated. Results The increase in [Ca2+]i stimulated by RvD1 was blocked by inhibitors to phospholipases (PL-) -D, -C, -A2, protein kinase C (PKC), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase (Ca2+/CamK). Glycoconjugate secretion was significantly inhibited by PLD, -C, -A2, ERK1/2 and Ca2+/CamK, but not PKC. Conclusions We conclude that RvD1 increases glycoconjugate secretion from goblet cells via multiple signaling pathways including PLC, PLD, and PLA2, as well as their signaling components ERK1/2 and Ca2+/CamK to preserve the mucous layer and maintain homeostasis by protecting the eye from desiccating stress, allergens, and pathogens. PMID:28892824

  12. Increased spontaneous MEG signal diversity for psychoactive doses of ketamine, LSD and psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Michael M; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D

    2017-04-19

    What is the level of consciousness of the psychedelic state? Empirically, measures of neural signal diversity such as entropy and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity score higher for wakeful rest than for states with lower conscious level like propofol-induced anesthesia. Here we compute these measures for spontaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals from humans during altered states of consciousness induced by three psychedelic substances: psilocybin, ketamine and LSD. For all three, we find reliably higher spontaneous signal diversity, even when controlling for spectral changes. This increase is most pronounced for the single-channel LZ complexity measure, and hence for temporal, as opposed to spatial, signal diversity. We also uncover selective correlations between changes in signal diversity and phenomenological reports of the intensity of psychedelic experience. This is the first time that these measures have been applied to the psychedelic state and, crucially, that they have yielded values exceeding those of normal waking consciousness. These findings suggest that the sustained occurrence of psychedelic phenomenology constitutes an elevated level of consciousness - as measured by neural signal diversity.

  13. Increased spontaneous MEG signal diversity for psychoactive doses of ketamine, LSD and psilocybin

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Michael M.; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Barrett, Adam B.; Seth, Anil K.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.

    2017-01-01

    What is the level of consciousness of the psychedelic state? Empirically, measures of neural signal diversity such as entropy and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity score higher for wakeful rest than for states with lower conscious level like propofol-induced anesthesia. Here we compute these measures for spontaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals from humans during altered states of consciousness induced by three psychedelic substances: psilocybin, ketamine and LSD. For all three, we find reliably higher spontaneous signal diversity, even when controlling for spectral changes. This increase is most pronounced for the single-channel LZ complexity measure, and hence for temporal, as opposed to spatial, signal diversity. We also uncover selective correlations between changes in signal diversity and phenomenological reports of the intensity of psychedelic experience. This is the first time that these measures have been applied to the psychedelic state and, crucially, that they have yielded values exceeding those of normal waking consciousness. These findings suggest that the sustained occurrence of psychedelic phenomenology constitutes an elevated level of consciousness - as measured by neural signal diversity. PMID:28422113

  14. Increased spontaneous MEG signal diversity for psychoactive doses of ketamine, LSD and psilocybin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartner, Michael M.; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Barrett, Adam B.; Seth, Anil K.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.

    2017-04-01

    What is the level of consciousness of the psychedelic state? Empirically, measures of neural signal diversity such as entropy and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity score higher for wakeful rest than for states with lower conscious level like propofol-induced anesthesia. Here we compute these measures for spontaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals from humans during altered states of consciousness induced by three psychedelic substances: psilocybin, ketamine and LSD. For all three, we find reliably higher spontaneous signal diversity, even when controlling for spectral changes. This increase is most pronounced for the single-channel LZ complexity measure, and hence for temporal, as opposed to spatial, signal diversity. We also uncover selective correlations between changes in signal diversity and phenomenological reports of the intensity of psychedelic experience. This is the first time that these measures have been applied to the psychedelic state and, crucially, that they have yielded values exceeding those of normal waking consciousness. These findings suggest that the sustained occurrence of psychedelic phenomenology constitutes an elevated level of consciousness - as measured by neural signal diversity.

  15. Dragon enhances BMP signaling and increases transepithelial resistance in kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Babitt, Jodie L; Bouley, Richard; Zhang, Ying; Da Silva, Nicolas; Chen, Shanzhuo; Zhuang, Zhenjie; Samad, Tarek A; Brenner, Gary J; Anderson, Jennifer L; Hong, Charles C; Schneyer, Alan L; Brown, Dennis; Lin, Herbert Y

    2010-04-01

    The neuronal adhesion protein Dragon acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptor that enhances BMP signaling. Given the importance of BMP signaling in nephrogenesis and its putative role in the response to injury in the adult kidney, we studied the localization and function of Dragon in the kidney. We observed that Dragon localized predominantly to the apical surfaces of tubular epithelial cells in the thick ascending limbs, distal convoluted tubules, and collecting ducts of mice. Dragon expression was weak in the proximal tubules and glomeruli. In mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells, Dragon generated BMP signals in a ligand-dependent manner, and BMP4 is the predominant endogenous ligand for the Dragon coreceptor. In mIMCD3 cells, BMP4 normally signaled through BMPRII, but Dragon enhanced its signaling through the BMP type II receptor ActRIIA. Dragon and BMP4 increased transepithelial resistance (TER) through the Smad1/5/8 pathway. In epithelial cells isolated from the proximal tubule and intercalated cells of collecting ducts, we observed coexpression of ActRIIA, Dragon, and BMP4 but not BMPRII. Taken together, these results suggest that Dragon may enhance BMP signaling in renal tubular epithelial cells and maintain normal renal physiology.

  16. KRIT1 protein depletion modifies endothelial cell behavior via increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Kuebel, Julia M; Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-11-21

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1(+/-) mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1.

  17. Feedback signals in myelodysplastic syndromes: increased self-renewal of the malignant clone suppresses normal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Walenda, Thomas; Stiehl, Thomas; Braun, Hanna; Fröbel, Julia; Ho, Anthony D; Schroeder, Thomas; Goecke, Tamme W; Rath, Björn; Germing, Ulrich; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are triggered by an aberrant hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). It is, however, unclear how this clone interferes with physiologic blood formation. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that the MDS clone impinges on feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and thereby suppresses normal hematopoiesis. Based on the theory that the MDS clone affects feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and hence suppresses normal hematopoiesis, we have developed a mathematical model to simulate different modifications in MDS-initiating cells and systemic feedback signals during disease development. These simulations revealed that the disease initiating cells must have higher self-renewal rates than normal HSCs to outcompete normal hematopoiesis. We assumed that self-renewal is the default pathway of stem and progenitor cells which is down-regulated by an increasing number of primitive cells in the bone marrow niche--including the premature MDS cells. Furthermore, the proliferative signal is up-regulated by cytopenia. Overall, our model is compatible with clinically observed MDS development, even though a single mutation scenario is unlikely for real disease progression which is usually associated with complex clonal hierarchy. For experimental validation of systemic feedback signals, we analyzed the impact of MDS patient derived serum on hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro: in fact, MDS serum slightly increased proliferation, whereas maintenance of primitive phenotype was reduced. However, MDS serum did not significantly affect colony forming unit (CFU) frequencies indicating that regulation of self-renewal may involve local signals from the niche. Taken together, we suggest that initial mutations in MDS particularly favor aberrant high self-renewal rates. Accumulation of primitive MDS cells in the bone marrow then interferes with feedback signals for normal hematopoiesis--which then results in cytopenia.

  18. Chemokine receptor patterns and right heart failure in mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Aditi; Neill, Colin; Kormos, Robert L; Lagazzi, Luigi; Halder, Indrani; McTiernan, Charles; Larsen, Jennifer; Inashvili, Ana; Teuteberg, Jeffrey; Bachman, Timothy N; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; McNamara, Dennis M; Simon, Marc A

    2017-06-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) complicates 9% to 44% of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implants post-operatively. Current prediction scores perform only modestly in validation studies, and do not include immune markers. Chemokines are inflammatory signaling molecules with a fundamental role in cardiac physiology and stress adaptation. In this study we investigated chemokine receptor regulation in LVAD recipients who develop RVF. Expression of chemokine receptor (CCR) genes 3 to 8 were examined in the peripheral blood of 111 LVAD patients, collected 24 hours before implant. RNA was isolated using a PAXgene protocol. Gene expression was assessed using a targeted microarray (RT2 Profiler PCR Array; Qiagen). Results were expressed as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cycles to threshold and normalized to the average of 3 control genes, glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) and β2-microglobulin (B2M). Secondary outcomes studied were 1-year mortality and long-term RV failure (RVF-LT). CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR7 and CCR8 were downregulated in LVAD recipients with RVF. Within this cohort of patients, CCR4, CCR7 and CCR8 were further downregulated in those who required RV mechanical support. In addition, under-expression of CCR3 to CCR8 was independently associated with an increased risk of mortality at 1 year, even after adjusting for RVF. CCR expression did not predict RVF-LT in our patient cohort. Pre-LVAD CCR downregulation is associated with RVF and increased mortality after implant. Inflammatory signatures may play a major role in prognostication in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The chemokine receptor CXCR7 is highly expressed in human glioma cells and mediates antiapoptotic effects.

    PubMed

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Held-Feindt, Janka; Lucius, Ralph; Müerköster, Susanne Sebens; Penfold, Mark E T; Schall, Thomas J; Mentlein, Rolf

    2010-04-15

    The chemokine CXCL12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 play a major role in tumor invasion, proliferation, and metastasis. Recently, CXCR7 was identified as a novel, alternate receptor for CXCL12 and CXCL11/I-TAC. Because both chemokines are expressed abundantly in human astrocytomas and glioblastomas, we investigated the occurrence and function of both receptors in astroglial tumors. In situ, CXCR7 is highly expressed on tumor endothelial, microglial, and glioma cells whereas CXCR4 has a much more restricted localization; CXCL12 is often colocalized with CXCR7. CXCR7 transcription in tumor homogenates increased with malignancy. In vitro, CXCR7 was highly expressed in all glioma cell lines investigated whereas CXCR4 was only scarcely transcribed on one of eight lines. In contrast, a tumor stem-like cell line preferentially expressed CXCR4 which diminished upon differentiation, whereas CXCR7 increased drastically. Stimulation of CXCR7-positive glioma cells (CXCR4- and CXCR3-negative) by CXCL12 induced transient phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases Erk1/2, indicating that the receptor is functionally active. The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 effectively inhibited Erk activation and suggests that the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is activated indirectly. Whereas proliferation and migration were little influenced, chemokine stimulation prevented camptothecin- and temozolomide-induced apoptosis. The selective CXCR7 antagonist CCX733 reduced the antiapoptotic effects of CXCL12 as shown by nuclear (Nicoletti) staining, caspase-3/7 activity assays, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Thus, CXCR7 is a functional receptor for CXCL12 in astrocytomas/glioblastomas and mediates resistance to drug-induced apoptosis. Whereas CXCR7 is found on "differentiated" glioma cells, the alternate receptor CXCR4 is also localized on glioma stem-like cells.

  20. Enhanced monocyte migration to CXCR3 and CCR5 chemokines in COPD.

    PubMed

    Costa, Claudia; Traves, Suzanne L; Tudhope, Susan J; Fenwick, Peter S; Belchamber, Kylie B R; Russell, Richard E K; Barnes, Peter J; Donnelly, Louise E

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients exhibit chronic inflammation, both in the lung parenchyma and the airways, which is characterised by an increased infiltration of macrophages and T-lymphocytes, particularly CD8+ cells. Both cell types can express chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR)3 and C-C chemokine receptor 5 and the relevant chemokines for these receptors are elevated in COPD. The aim of this study was to compare chemotactic responses of lymphocytes and monocytes of nonsmokers, smokers and COPD patients towards CXCR3 ligands and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)5. Migration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes from nonsmokers, smokers and COPD patients toward CXCR3 chemokines and CCL5 was analysed using chemotaxis assays. There was increased migration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from COPD patients towards all chemokines studied when compared with nonsmokers and smokers. Both lymphocytes and monocytes contributed to this enhanced response, which was not explained by increased receptor expression. However, isolated lymphocytes failed to migrate and isolated monocytes from COPD patients lost their enhanced migratory capacity. Both monocytes and lymphocytes cooperate to enhance migration towards CXCR3 chemokines and CCL5. This may contribute to increased numbers of macrophages and T-cells in the lungs of COPD patients, and inhibition of recruitment using selective antagonists might be a treatment to reduce the inflammatory response in COPD.

  1. Observation of increased ion cyclotron resonance signal duration through electric field perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Bruce, James E

    2005-09-15

    Ion motion in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is complex and the subject of ongoing theoretical and experimental studies. Two predominant pathways for the loss of ICR signals are thought to include damping of cyclotron motion, in which ions lose kinetic energy and radially damp toward the center of the ICR cell, and dephasing of ion coherence, in which ions of like cyclotron frequency become distributed out of phase at similar cyclotron radii. Both mechanisms result in the loss of induced ion image current in FTICR-MS measurements and are normally inseparable during time-domain signal analysis. For conventional ICR measurements which take advantage of ion ensembles, maximization of the ion population size and density can produce the desired effect of increasing phase coherence of ions during cyclotron motion. However, this approach also presents the risk of coalescence of ion packets of similar frequencies. In general, ICR researchers in the past have lacked the tools necessary to distinguish or independently control dephasing and damping mechanisms for ICR signal loss. Nonetheless, the ability to impart greater phase coherence of ions in ICR measurements will allow significant advances in FTICR-MS research by improving the current understanding of ICR signal loss contributions of dephasing and damping of ion ensembles, increasing overall time-domain signal length, and possibly, resulting in more routine ultrahigh resolution measurements. The results presented here demonstrate the ability to employ a high density electron beam to perturb electric fields within the ICR cell during detection of cyclotron motion, in an approach we call electron-promoted ion coherence (EPIC). As such, EPIC reduces ICR signal degradation through loss of phase coherence, and much longer time-domain signals can be obtained. Our results demonstrate that time-domain signals can be extended by more than a factor of 4 with the implementation of EPIC, as

  2. Novel chemokine-like activities of histones in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruochan; Xie, Yangchun; Zhong, Xiao; Fu, Yongmin; Huang, Yan; Zhen, Yixiang; Pan, Pinhua; Wang, Haichao; Bartlett, David L.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Fan, Xue-Gong; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Histones are intracellular nucleosomal components and extracellular damage-associated molecular pattern molecules that modulate chromatin remodeling, as well as the immune response. However, their extracellular roles in cell migration and invasion remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that histones are novel regulators of tumor metastasis with chemokine-like activities. Indeed, exogenous histones promote both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell migration and invasion through toll-like receptor (TLR)4, but not TLR2 or the receptor for advanced glycosylation end product. TLR4-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is required for histone-induced chemokine (e.g., C-C motif ligand 9/10) production. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TLR4-ERK-NF-κB signaling impairs histone-induced chemokine production and HCC cell migration. Additionally, TLR4 depletion (by using TLR4−/− mice and TLR4-shRNA) or inhibition of histone release/activity (by administration of heparin and H3 neutralizing antibody) attenuates lung metastasis of HCC cells injected via the tail vein of mice. Thus, histones promote tumor metastasis of HCC cells through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway and represent novel targets for treating patients with HCC. PMID:27623211

  3. Engineering chemokines to develop optimized HIV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Oliver; Offord, Robin E

    2005-06-01

    Since the discovery that to enter target cells HIV uses receptors for the class of proteins known as chemokines, attempts have been made to generate anti-HIV molecules based on the chemokine ligands. A significant level of knowledge of the structure-activity relationships of chemokines has been amassed since the beginning of the 1990s. This, together with work that has elucidated the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory activity of chemokines, has guided not only the rational design of anti-HIV chemokine analogues, but also strategies by which chemokine variants with potent anti-HIV activity can be isolated from large libraries by phage display. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the structure-activity relationships and receptor biology of chemokines that is relevant to the development of analogues with anti-HIV activity. We present specific examples of engineered chemokine analogues with potent anti-HIV activity and describe the challenges that will need to be faced if these molecules are to be further developed for clinical applications. Finally, we discuss how these challenges might be met through further engineering of the molecules.

  4. Simulation study on effects of signaling network structure on the developmental increase in complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Keranen, Soile V.E.

    2003-04-02

    The developmental increase in structural complexity in multicellular life forms depends on local, often non-periodic differences in gene expression. These depend on a network of gene-gene interactions coded within the organismal genome. To better understand how genomic information generates complex expression patterns, I have modeled the pattern forming behavior of small artificial genomes in virtual blastoderm embryos. I varied several basic properties of these genomic signaling networks, such as the number of genes, the distributions of positive (inductive) and negative (repressive) interactions, and the strengths of gene-gene interactions, and analyzed their effects on developmental pattern formation. The results show how even simple genomes can generate complex non-periodic patterns under suitable conditions. They also show how the frequency of complex patterns depended on the numbers and relative arrangements of positive and negative interactions. For example, negative co-regulation of signaling pathway components increased the likelihood of (complex) patterns relative to differential negative regulation of the pathway components. Interestingly, neither quantitative differences either in strengths of signaling interactions nor multiple response thresholds to signal concentration (as in morphogen gradients) were essential for formation of multiple, spatially unique cell types. Thus, with combinatorial code of gene regulation and hierarchical signaling interactions, it is theoretically possible to organize metazoan embryogenesis with just a small fraction of the metazoan genome. Because even small networks can generate complex patterns when they contain a suitable set of connections, evolution of metazoan complexity may have depended more on selection for favourable configurations of signaling interactions than on the increase in numbers of regulatory genes.

  5. Activation of inflammatory signaling by lipopolysaccharide produces a prolonged increase of voluntary alcohol intake in mice

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Y.A.; Benavidez, J.M.; Geil, C.; Perra, S.; Morikawa, H.; Harris, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies showed that mice with genetic predisposition for high alcohol consumption as well as human alcoholics show changes in brain expression of genes related to immune signaling. In addition, mutant mice lacking genes related to immune function show decreased alcohol consumption (Blednov et al., in press), suggesting that immune signaling promotes alcohol consumption. To test the possibility that activation of immune signaling will increase alcohol consumption, we treated mice with lipopolysaccaride (LPS; 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and tested alcohol consumption in the continuous two-bottle choice test. To take advantage of the long-lasting activation of brain immune signaling by LPS, we measured drinking beginning one week or one month after LPS treatment and continued the studies for several months. LPS produced persistent increases in alcohol consumption in C57/Bl6 J (B6) inbred mice, FVBxB6F1 and B6xNZBF1 hybrid mice, but not in FVB inbred mice. To determine if this effect of LPS is mediated through binding to TLR4, we tested mice lacking CD14, a key component of TLR4 signaling. These null mutants showed no increase of alcohol intake after treatment with LPS. LPS treatment decreased ethanol-conditioned taste aversion but did not alter ethanol-conditioned place preference (B6xNZBF1 mice). Electro-physiological studies of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area showed that pretreatment of mice with LPS decreased the neuronal firing rate. These results suggest that activation of immune signaling promotes alcohol consumption and alters certain aspects of alcohol reward/aversion. PMID:21266194

  6. The Duffy Antigen Modifies Systemic and Local Tissue Chemokine Responses following Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Janet S.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Frevert, Charles W.; Rosengart, Matthew R.; Ranganathan, Mrunalini; Wong, Venus W.; Holden, Tarah; Sutlief, Steve; Richmond, Ann; Peiper, Stephen; Martin, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The Duffy blood group Ag (dfy) binds selective CXC and CC chemokines at high affinity and is expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells. However, it does not transmit a signal via G proteins, as occurs with other seven-transmembrane receptors. We hypothesized that dfy functions as a chemokine reservoir and regulates inflammation by altering soluble chemokine concentrations in the blood and tissue compartments. We determined whether Duffy Ag “loss-of-function” phenotypes (human and murine) are associated with alterations in plasma chemokine concentrations during the innate inflammatory response to LPS. Plasma CXCL8 and CCL2 concentrations from humans homozygous for the GATA-1 box polymorphism, a dfy polymorphism that abrogates erythrocyte chemokine binding, were higher than in heterozygotes following LPS stimulation of their whole blood in vitro. Similarly, dfy−/− mice showed higher plasma MIP-2 concentrations than dfy+/+ mice following LPS stimulation of whole blood in vitro. We then determined the relative contributions of erythrocyte and endothelial Duffy Ag in modifying chemokine concentrations and neutrophil recruitment in the lungs following intratracheal LPS administration in dfy−/− and dfy+/+ mice reconstituted with dfy−/− or dfy+/+ marrow. Mice lacking endothelial dfy expression had higher MIP-2 and keratinocyte chemoattractant concentrations in the airspaces. Mice lacking erythrocyte dfy had higher MIP-2 and keratinocyte chemoattractant concentrations in the lung tissue vascular space, but lower plasma chemokine concentrations associated with attenuated neutrophil recruitment into the airspaces. These data indicate that dfy alters soluble chemokine concentrations in blood and local tissue compartments and enhances systemic bioavailability of chemokines produced during local tissue inflammation. PMID:17114483

  7. Chemokines as Therapeutic Targets to Improve Healing Efficiency of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Satish, Latha

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Impaired wound healing leading to chronic wounds is an important clinical problem that needs immediate attention to develop new effective therapies. Members of the chemokine family seem to be attractive and amenable to stimulate the healing process in chronic wounds. Targeting specific chemokines and/or their receptors has the potential to modify chronic inflammation to acute inflammation, which will hasten the healing process. Recent Advances: Over the years, expression levels of various chemokines and their receptors have been identified as key players in the inflammatory phase of wound healing. In addition, they contribute to regulating other phases of wound healing making them key targets for novel therapies. Understanding the signaling pathways of these chemokines will provide valuable clues for modulating their function to enhance the wound healing process. Critical Issues: Inflammation, an important first-stage process in wound healing, is dysregulated in chronic wounds; emerging studies show that chemokines play a crucial role in regulating inflammation. The knowledge gained so far is still limited in understanding the enormous complexity of the chemokine network during inflammation not just in chronic wounds but also in acute (normal) wounds. A much better understanding of the individual chemokines will pave the way for better targets and therapies to improve the healing efficiency of chronic wounds. Future Directions: Effective understanding of the interaction of chemokines and their receptors during chronic wound healing would facilitate the design of novel therapeutic drugs. Development of chemokine-based drugs targeting specific inflammatory cells will be invaluable in the treatment of chronic wounds, in which inflammation plays a major role. PMID:26543679

  8. The Chemokine Receptor CCR1 Is Constitutively Active, Which Leads to G Protein-independent, β-Arrestin-mediated Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, C. Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L.; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation. PMID:24056371

  9. Tyrosine sulfation influences the chemokine binding selectivity of peptides derived from chemokine receptor CCR3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, John Z; Millard, Christopher J; Ludeman, Justin P; Simpson, Levi S; Clayton, Daniel J; Payne, Richard J; Widlanski, Theodore S; Stone, Martin J

    2011-03-08

    The interactions of chemokines with their G protein-coupled receptors play critical roles in the control of leukocyte trafficking in normal homeostasis and in inflammatory responses. Tyrosine sulfation is a common post-translational modification in the amino-terminal regions of chemokine receptors. However, tyrosine sulfation of chemokine receptors is commonly incomplete or heterogeneous. To investigate the possibility that differential sulfation of two adjacent tyrosine residues could bias the responses of chemokine receptor CCR3 to different chemokines, we have studied the binding of three chemokines (eotaxin-1/CCL11, eotaxin-2/CCL24, and eotaxin-3/CCL26) to an N-terminal CCR3-derived peptide in each of its four possible sulfation states. Whereas the nonsulfated peptide binds to the three chemokines with approximately equal affinity, sulfation of Tyr-16 gives rise to 9-16-fold selectivity for eotaxin-1 over the other two chemokines. Subsequent sulfation of Tyr-17 contributes additively to the affinity for eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2 but cooperatively to the affinity for eotaxin-3. The doubly sulfated peptide selectively binds to both eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-3 approximately 10-fold more tightly than to eotaxin-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift mapping indicates that these variations in affinity probably result from only subtle differences in the chemokine surfaces interacting with these receptor peptides. These data support the proposal that variations in sulfation states or levels may regulate the responsiveness of chemokine receptors to their cognate chemokines.

  10. Expression of functional sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor-1 is reduced by B cell receptor signaling and increased by inhibition of PI3 kinase δ but not SYK or BTK in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Till, Kathleen J; Pettitt, Andrew R; Slupsky, Joseph R

    2015-03-01

    BCR signaling pathway inhibitors such as ibrutinib, idelalisib, and fostamatinib (respective inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, PI3Kδ, and spleen tyrosine kinase) represent a significant therapeutic advance in B cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). These drugs are distinctive in increasing blood lymphocytes while simultaneously shrinking enlarged lymph nodes, suggesting anatomical redistribution of CLL cells from lymph nodes into the blood. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are incompletely understood. In this study, we showed that the egress receptor, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1PR1), was expressed at low levels in normal germinal centers and CLL lymph nodes in vivo but became upregulated on normal B cells and, to a variable and lesser extent, CLL cells following in vitro incubation in S1P-free medium. Spontaneous recovery of S1PR1 expression on normal B and CLL cells was prevented by BCR cross-linking, whereas treatment of CLL cells with idelalisib increased S1PR1 expression and migration toward S1P, the greatest increase occurring in cases with unmutated IgH V region genes. Intriguingly, ibrutinib and fostamatinib had no effect on S1PR1 expression or function. Conversely, chemokine-induced migration, which requires integrin activation and is essential for the entry of lymphocytes into lymph nodes as well as their retention, was blocked by ibrutinib and fostamatinib, but not idelalisib. In summary, our results suggest that different BCR signaling inhibitors redistribute CLL cells from lymph nodes into the blood through distinct mechanisms: idelalisib actively promotes egress by upregulating S1PR1, whereas fostamatinib and ibrutinib may reduce CLL cell entry and retention by suppressing chemokine-induced integrin activation.

  11. Use of Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques for In Vivo Detection of Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Mellado, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Since the first reports on chemokine function, much information has been generated on the implications of these molecules in numerous physiological and pathological processes, as well as on the signaling events activated through their binding to receptors. As is the case for other G protein-coupled receptors, chemokine receptors are not isolated entities that are activated following ligand binding; rather, they are found as dimers and/or higher order oligomers at the cell surface, even in the absence of ligands. These complexes form platforms that can be modified by receptor expression and ligand levels, indicating that they are dynamic structures. The analysis of the conformations adopted by these receptors at the membrane and their dynamics is thus crucial for a complete understanding of the function of the chemokines. We focus here on the methodology insights of new techniques, such as those based on resonance energy transfer for the analysis of chemokine receptor conformations in living cells.

  12. Regulation of inflammatory chemokine receptors on blood T cells associated to the circulating versus liver chemokines in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; Marinho, Cíntia Ferreira; Povoa, Tiago Fajardo; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; de Souza, Luiza Assed; Barbosa, Luiza Damian Ribeiro; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Alves, Ada M B; Ávila, Carlos André Lins; de Souza, Luiz José; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Paes, Marciano Viana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chemokines/chemokines receptors on T cells in natural DENV infection. Patients from DENV-2 and -3- outbreaks were studied prospectively during the acute or convalescent phases. Expression of chemokine receptor and activation markers on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry analysis, plasma chemokine ligands concentrations were measured by ELISA and quantification of CCL5/RANTES(+) cells in liver tissues from fatal dengue cases was performed by immunochemistry. In the acute DENV-infection, T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1)-related CCR5 is significantly higher expressed on both CD4 and CD8 T cells. The Th1-related CXCR3 is up-regulated among CD4 T cells and Tc2-related CCR4 is up-regulated among CD8 T cells. In the convalescent phase, all chemokine receptor or chemokine ligand expression tends to reestablish control healthy levels. Increased CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β but decreased CCL5/RANTES levels were observed in DENV-patients during acute infection. Moreover, we showed an increased CD107a expression on CCR5 or CXCR3-expressing T cells and higher expression of CD29, CD44(HIGH) and CD127(LOW) markers on CCR4-expressing CD8 T cells in DENV-patients when compared to controls. Finally, liver from dengue fatal patients showed increased number of cells expressing CCL5/RANTES in three out of four cases compared to three death from a non-dengue patient. In conclusion, both Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 among CD4 T cells have a potential ability to exert cytotoxicity function. Moreover, Tc1-related CCR5 and Tc2-related CCR4 among CD8 T cells have a potential ability to exert effector function and migration based on cell markers evaluated. The CCR5 expression would be promoting an enhanced T cell recruitment into liver, a hypothesis that is corroborated by the CCL5/RANTES increase detected in hepatic tissue from dengue fatal cases. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune response mediated by

  13. Acute disruption of leptin signaling in vivo leads to increased insulin levels and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Levi, Jasna; Gray, Sarah L; Speck, Madeleine; Huynh, Frank K; Babich, Sandra L; Gibson, William T; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, plays an essential role in the maintenance of normal body weight and energy expenditure, as well as glucose homeostasis. Indeed, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are obese with profound hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and often hyperglycemia. Interestingly, low doses of exogenous leptin can reverse the hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia in these animals without altering body weight. The hyperinsulinemia in ob/ob mice may result directly from the absence of leptin signaling in pancreatic β-cells and, in turn, contribute to both obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we acutely attenuated endogenous leptin signaling in normal mice with a polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated mouse leptin antagonist (PEG-MLA) to determine the contribution of leptin signaling in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. PEG-MLA was either injected or continuously administered via osmotic minipumps for several days, and various metabolic parameters were assessed. PEG-MLA-treated mice had increased fasting and glucose-stimulated plasma insulin levels, decreased whole-body insulin sensitivity, elevated hepatic glucose production, and impaired insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production. Moreover, PEG-MLA treatment resulted in increased food intake and increased respiratory quotient without significantly altering energy expenditure or body composition as assessed by the lean:lipid ratio. Our findings indicate that alterations in insulin sensitivity occur before changes in the lean:lipid ratio and energy expenditure during the acute disruption of endogenous leptin signaling.

  14. Direct stimulation of bone mass by increased GH signalling in the osteoblasts of Socs2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Dobie, R; MacRae, V E; Huesa, C; van't Hof, R; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2014-10-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signalling (Socs2(-/-))-knockout mouse is characterised by an overgrowth phenotype due to enhanced GH signalling. The objective of this study was to define the Socs2(-/-) bone phenotype and determine whether GH promotes bone mass via IGF1-dependent mechanisms. Despite no elevation in systemic IGF1 levels, increased body weight in 4-week-old Socs2(-/-) mice following GH treatment was associated with increased cortical bone area (Ct.Ar) (P<0.01). Furthermore, detailed bone analysis of male and female juvenile and adult Socs2(-/-) mice revealed an altered cortical and trabecular phenotype consistent with the known anabolic effects of GH. Indeed, male Socs2(-/-) mice had increased Ct.Ar (P<0.05) and thickness associated with increased strength. Despite this, there was no elevation in hepatic Igf1 expression, suggesting that the anabolic bone phenotype was the result of increased local GH action. Mechanistic studies showed that in osteoblasts and bone of Socs2(-/-) mice, STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly increased in response to GH. Conversely, overexpression of SOCS2 decreased GH-induced STAT5 signalling. Although an increase in Igf1 expression was observed in Socs2(-/-) osteoblasts following GH, it was not evident in vivo. Igf1 expression levels were not elevated in response to GH in 4-week-old mice and no alterations in expression was observed in bone samples of 6-week-old Socs2(-/-) mice. These studies emphasise the critical role of SOCS2 in controlling the local GH anabolic bone effects. We provide compelling evidence implicating SOCS2 in the regulation of GH osteoblast signalling and ultimately bone accrual, which maybe via mechanisms that are independent of IGF1 production in vivo.

  15. CCL2-induced chemokine cascade promotes breast cancer metastasis by enhancing retention of metastasis-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Soong, Daniel; Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Sugano, Gaël; Kato, Yu; Li, Jiufeng

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer cells is promoted by a distinct population of macrophages, metastasis-associated macrophages (MAMs), which originate from inflammatory monocytes (IMs) recruited by the CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). We demonstrate here that, through activation of the CCL2 receptor CCR2, the recruited MAMs secrete another chemokine ligand CCL3. Genetic deletion of CCL3 or its receptor CCR1 in macrophages reduces the number of lung metastasis foci, as well as the number of MAMs accumulated in tumor-challenged lung in mice. Adoptive transfer of WT IMs increases the reduced number of lung metastasis foci in Ccl3 deficient mice. Mechanistically, Ccr1 deficiency prevents MAM retention in the lung by reducing MAM–cancer cell interactions. These findings collectively indicate that the CCL2-triggered chemokine cascade in macrophages promotes metastatic seeding of breast cancer cells thereby amplifying the pathology already extant in the system. These data suggest that inhibition of CCR1, the distal part of this signaling relay, may have a therapeutic impact in metastatic disease with lower toxicity than blocking upstream targets. PMID:26056232

  16. CCL2-induced chemokine cascade promotes breast cancer metastasis by enhancing retention of metastasis-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Soong, Daniel; Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Sugano, Gaël; Kato, Yu; Li, Jiufeng; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2015-06-29

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer cells is promoted by a distinct population of macrophages, metastasis-associated macrophages (MAMs), which originate from inflammatory monocytes (IMs) recruited by the CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). We demonstrate here that, through activation of the CCL2 receptor CCR2, the recruited MAMs secrete another chemokine ligand CCL3. Genetic deletion of CCL3 or its receptor CCR1 in macrophages reduces the number of lung metastasis foci, as well as the number of MAMs accumulated in tumor-challenged lung in mice. Adoptive transfer of WT IMs increases the reduced number of lung metastasis foci in Ccl3 deficient mice. Mechanistically, Ccr1 deficiency prevents MAM retention in the lung by reducing MAM-cancer cell interactions. These findings collectively indicate that the CCL2-triggered chemokine cascade in macrophages promotes metastatic seeding of breast cancer cells thereby amplifying the pathology already extant in the system. These data suggest that inhibition of CCR1, the distal part of this signaling relay, may have a therapeutic impact in metastatic disease with lower toxicity than blocking upstream targets.

  17. The Relative Effectiveness of Signaling Systems: Relying on External Items Reduces Signaling Accuracy while Leks Increase Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Gavin M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple evolutionary phenomena require individual animals to assess conspecifics based on behaviors, morphology, or both. Both behavior and morphology can provide information about individuals and are often used as signals to convey information about quality, motivation, or energetic output. In certain cases, conspecific receivers of this information must rank these signaling individuals based on specific traits. The efficacy of information transfer associated within a signal is likely related to the type of trait used to signal, though few studies have investigated the relative effectiveness of contrasting signaling systems. I present a set of models that represent a large portion of signaling systems and compare them in terms of the ability of receivers to rank signalers accurately. Receivers more accurately assess signalers if the signalers use traits that do not require non-food resources; similarly, receivers more accurately ranked signalers if all the signalers could be observed simultaneously, similar to leks. Surprisingly, I also found that receivers are only slightly better at ranking signaler effort if the effort results in a cumulative structure. This series of findings suggests that receivers may attend to specific traits because the traits provide more information relative to others; and similarly, these results may explain the preponderance of morphological and behavioral display signals. PMID:24626221

  18. Ivabradine Reduces Chemokine-Induced CD4-Positive Lymphocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Walcher, Thomas; Bernhardt, Peter; Vasic, Dusica; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Migration of CD4-positive lymphocytes into the vessel wall is a critical step in atherogenesis. Recent data suggest that ivabradine, a selective I(f)-channel blocker, reduces atherosclerotic plaque formation in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, hitherto nothing is known about the mechanism by which ivabradine modulates plaque formation. Therefore, the present study investigated whether ivabradine regulates chemokine-induced migration of lymphocytes. Methods and results. Stimulation of CD4-positive lymphocytes with SDF-1 leads to a 2.0 ± 0.1 fold increase in cell migration (P < .01; n = 7). Pretreatment of cells with ivabradine reduces this effect to a maximal 1.2 ± 0.1 fold induction at 0.1 µmol/L ivabradine (P < .01 compared to SDF-1-treated cells, n = 7). The effect of ivabradine on CD4-positive lymphocyte migration was mediated through an early inhibition of chemokine-induced PI-3 kinase activity as determined by PI-3 kinase activity assays. Downstream, ivabradine inhibits activation of the small GTPase Rac and phosphorylation of the Myosin Light Chain (MLC). Moreover, ivabradine treatment reduces f-actin formation as well as ICAM3 translocation to the uropod of the cell, thus interfering with two important steps in T cell migration. Conclusion. Ivabradine inhibits chemokine-induced migration of CD4-positive lymphocytes. Given the crucial importance of chemokine-induced T-cell migration in early atherogenesis, ivabradine may be a promising tool to modulate this effect. PMID:21188276

  19. Chemokines Associated with Pathologic Responses to Orthopedic Implant Debris

    PubMed Central

    Hallab, Nadim J.; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success in returning people to health saving mobility and high quality of life, the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after approximately 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation to implant debris compromising the bone implant interface. This local inflammatory pseudo disease state is primarily caused by implant debris interaction with innate immune cells, i.e., macrophages. This implant debris can also activate an adaptive immune reaction giving rise to the concept of implant-related metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agree the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris danger signaling (danger-associated molecular pattern) eliciting cytokine-based and chemokine inflammatory responses. This review covers implant debris-induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive) immune system and how this leads to subsequent implant failure through loosening and osteolysis, i.e., what is known of central chemokines (e.g., IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, MIP-1, CCL9, CCL10, CCL17, and CCL22) associated with implant debris reactivity as related to the innate immune system activation/cytokine expression, e.g., danger signaling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc.), toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, etc.), bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b), and hypoxia responses (HIF-1α). More study is needed, however, to fully understand these interactions to effectively counter cytokine- and chemokine-based orthopedic implant-related inflammation. PMID:28154552

  20. Dietary intervention in acne: Attenuation of increased mTORC1 signaling promoted by Western diet.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  1. In Hyperthermia Increased ERK and WNT Signaling Suppress Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Shirasawa, Senji; Lazarova, Darina L.

    2016-01-01

    Although neoplastic cells exhibit relatively higher sensitivity to hyperthermia than normal cells, hyperthermia has had variable success as an anti-cancer therapy. This variable outcome might be due to the fact that cancer cells themselves have differential degrees of sensitivity to high temperature. We hypothesized that the varying sensitivity of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to hyperthermia depends upon the differential induction of survival pathways. Screening of such pathways revealed that Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) signaling is augmented by hyperthermia, and the extent of this modulation correlates with the mutation status of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS). Through clonal growth assays, apoptotic analyses and transcription reporter assays of CRC cells that differ only in KRAS mutation status we established that mutant KRAS cells are more sensitive to hyperthermia, as they exhibit sustained ERK signaling hyperactivation and increased Wingless/Integrated (WNT)/beta-catenin signaling. We propose that whereas increased levels of WNT and ERK signaling and a positive feedback between the two pathways is a major obstacle in anti-cancer therapy today, under hyperthermia the hyperinduction of the pathways and their positive crosstalk contribute to CRC cell death. Ascertaining the causative association between types of mutations and hyperthermia sensitivity may allow for a mutation profile-guided application of hyperthermia as an anti-cancer therapy. Since KRAS and WNT signaling mutations are prevalent in CRC, our results suggest that hyperthermia-based therapy might benefit a significant number, but not all, CRC patients. PMID:27187477

  2. Altered balance of epidermis-related chemokines in epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Inkin; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Nakayama, Chihiro; Matsumura, Wakana; Suzuki, Shotaro; Shinkuma, Satoru; Nomura, Toshifumi; Abe, Riichiro; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a congenital, refractory skin disease and there are no fundamental treatments. Recently, allogenic cell therapies are beginning to be applied as potential treatments, that are based on the concept that the allogenic cells can migrate into the skin and reconstitute the skin components. Although the mechanisms of cell migration into skin are not fully understood, chemokines are regarded as key factors in recruiting bone marrow-derived cells. Our study aims to elucidate the expression of chemokines in the EB patients. We determined the expression of wound-healing related chemokines in the sera, keratinocytes, and skin tissues of EB patients and compared them to those of healthy volunteers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and immunofluorescence staining. The serum levels of CXCL12 and HMGB1 were found to be significantly elevated in the EB patients. Conversely, the serum levels of CCL21 were found to be lower in the EB patients than in healthy controls. In addition, the serum levels of CXCL12 tended to increase and the serum levels of CCL27 tended to decrease with an increase in the affected body surface areas. To detect the origin of the circulating chemokines, we performed immunofluorescence staining. CCL21, CCL27, HMGB1 and CXCL12 were stained more broadly in the EB patient tissues than those in the control tissues. These results suggest that fluctuations in chemokine levels may contribute in a coordinated way to the wound-healing process and lend clues toward efficient cell therapies for EB. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Real Diffusion-Weighted MRI Enabling True Signal Averaging and Increased Diffusion Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Cornelius; Cauley, Stephen F; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Möller, Harald E; Turner, Robert; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-01-01

    This project aims to characterize the impact of underlying noise distributions on diffusion-weighted imaging. The noise floor is a well-known problem for traditional magnitude-based diffusion-weighted MRI (dMRI) data, leading to biased diffusion model fits and inaccurate signal averaging. Here, we introduce a total-variation-based algorithm to eliminate shot-to-shot phase variations of complex-valued diffusion data with the intention to extract real-valued dMRI datasets. The obtained real-valued diffusion data are no longer superimposed by a noise floor but instead by a zero-mean Gaussian noise distribution, yielding dMRI data without signal bias. We acquired high-resolution dMRI data with strong diffusion weighting and, thus, low signal-to-noise ratio. Both the extracted real-valued and traditional magnitude data were compared regarding signal averaging, diffusion model fitting and accuracy in resolving crossing fibers. Our results clearly indicate that real-valued diffusion data enables idealized conditions for signal averaging. Furthermore, the proposed method enables unbiased use of widely employed linear least squares estimators for model fitting and demonstrates an increased sensitivity to detect secondary fiber directions with reduced angular error. The use of phase-corrected, real-valued data for dMRI will therefore help to clear the way for more detailed and accurate studies of white matter microstructure and structural connectivity on a fine scale. PMID:26241680

  4. Real diffusion-weighted MRI enabling true signal averaging and increased diffusion contrast.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Cornelius; Cauley, Stephen F; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Möller, Harald E; Turner, Robert; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-11-15

    This project aims to characterize the impact of underlying noise distributions on diffusion-weighted imaging. The noise floor is a well-known problem for traditional magnitude-based diffusion-weighted MRI (dMRI) data, leading to biased diffusion model fits and inaccurate signal averaging. Here, we introduce a total-variation-based algorithm to eliminate shot-to-shot phase variations of complex-valued diffusion data with the intention to extract real-valued dMRI datasets. The obtained real-valued diffusion data are no longer superimposed by a noise floor but instead by a zero-mean Gaussian noise distribution, yielding dMRI data without signal bias. We acquired high-resolution dMRI data with strong diffusion weighting and, thus, low signal-to-noise ratio. Both the extracted real-valued and traditional magnitude data were compared regarding signal averaging, diffusion model fitting and accuracy in resolving crossing fibers. Our results clearly indicate that real-valued diffusion data enables idealized conditions for signal averaging. Furthermore, the proposed method enables unbiased use of widely employed linear least squares estimators for model fitting and demonstrates an increased sensitivity to detect secondary fiber directions with reduced angular error. The use of phase-corrected, real-valued data for dMRI will therefore help to clear the way for more detailed and accurate studies of white matter microstructure and structural connectivity on a fine scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Desloratadine citrate disodium injection, a potent histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, inhibits chemokine production in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis guinea pig model and histamine-induced human nasal epithelial cells via inhibiting the ERK1/2 and NF-kappa B signal cascades.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiling; Xu, Shuhong; Zhou, Peipei; He, Guangwei; Jie, Qiong; Wu, Yulin

    2015-11-15

    Chemokines have chemotactic properties on leukocyte subsets whose modulation plays a pivotal role in allergic inflammatory processes. Our present study was designed to investigate the anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties of desloratadine citrate disodium injection (DLC) and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-allergic effects of DLC were evaluated based on allergic symptoms, serological marker production and histological changes of the nasal mucosa in guinea pigs model of allergic rhinitis. The anti-inflammatory properties and molecular mechanisms of DLC were explored by studying the regulation of a set of chemokines and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways, after DLC treatment in guinea pigs model of allergic rhinitis in vivo and histamine-activated human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) in vitro. In vivo model in guinea pigs, DLC alleviated the rhinitis symptoms, inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration in nasal lavage fluid (NLF) and histamine, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTEs) and interleukin (IL)-8 release in sera and P-ERK1/2 and NF-κB activation in nasal mucosa. In vitro, DLC markedly inhibited histamine-induced production of MCP-1, RANTEs and IL-8 and suppressed c-Raf, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and ERK1/2 activation in HNECs. These results provide evidence that DLC possesses potent anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties. The mechanism of action underlying DLC in allergic inflammation appears to be inhibition of the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, in addition to blocking of the NF-κB pathway.

  6. The chemokine receptors ACKR2 and CCR2 reciprocally regulate lymphatic vessel density

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kit M; Danuser, Renzo; Stein, Jens V; Graham, Delyth; Nibbs, Robert JB; Graham, Gerard J

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages regulate lymphatic vasculature development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating their recruitment to developing, and adult, lymphatic vascular sites are not known. Here, we report that resting mice deficient for the inflammatory chemokine-scavenging receptor, ACKR2, display increased lymphatic vessel density in a range of tissues under resting and regenerating conditions. This appears not to alter dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes but is associated with enhanced fluid drainage from peripheral tissues and thus with a hypotensive phenotype. Examination of embryonic skin revealed that this lymphatic vessel density phenotype is developmentally established. Further studies indicated that macrophages and the inflammatory CC-chemokine CCL2, which is scavenged by ACKR2, are associated with this phenotype. Accordingly, mice deficient for the CCL2 signalling receptor, CCR2, displayed a reciprocal phenotype of reduced lymphatic vessel density. Further examination revealed that proximity of pro-lymphangiogenic macrophages to developing lymphatic vessel surfaces is increased in ACKR2-deficient mice and reduced in CCR2-deficient mice. Therefore, these receptors regulate vessel density by reciprocally modulating pro-lymphangiogenic macrophage recruitment, and proximity, to developing, resting and regenerating lymphatic vessels. PMID:25271254

  7. Effects of cobalt chloride on nitric oxide and cytokines/chemokines production in microglia.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yan Hua; Yang, Jing Yu; Cui, Nan; Wang, Ji Ming; Hou, Yue; Song, Shuang; Wu, Chun Fu

    2012-05-01

    The involvement of microglial activation in metal neurotoxicity is becoming increasingly recognized. Some metal ions, such as zinc (II) and manganese (II), have been recently reported as microglial activators to induce the release of inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines and nitric oxide (NO) which are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Cobalt is essential for human life. However, excessive cobalt is cytotoxic and neurotoxic. In the present study, we determined cobalt-induced production of NO and cytokines/chemokines in N9 cells, a murine microglial cell line. High levels of cobalt significantly up-regulated iNOS mRNA and protein expression, which resulted in the release of NO. Cobalt induced the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in both N9 cells and primary mouse microglia and increased lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced cytokine production. Further study showed that cobalt induced cytokine production by a mechanism involving both nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microglial activation was also confirmed. These findings suggested that cobalt neurotoxicity should be attributed not only directly to neuronal damage but also indirectly to microglial activation which might potentiate neuronal injury via elevation of proinflammatory mediator levels.

  8. Testosterone increases bioavailability of carotenoids: Insights into the honesty of sexual signaling

    PubMed Central

    Blas, J.; Pérez-Rodríguez, L.; Bortolotti, G. R.; Viñuela, J.; Marchant, T. A.

    2006-01-01

    Androgens and carotenoids play a fundamental role in the expression of secondary sex traits in animals that communicate information on individual quality. In birds, androgens regulate song, aggression, and a variety of sexual ornaments and displays, whereas carotenoids are responsible for the red, yellow, and orange colors of the integument. Parallel, but independent, research lines suggest that the evolutionary stability of each signaling system stems from tradeoffs with immune function: androgens can be immunosuppressive, and carotenoids diverted to coloration prevent their use as immunostimulants. Despite strong similarities in the patterns of sex, age and seasonal variation, social function, and proximate control, there has been little success at integrating potential links between the two signaling systems. These parallel patterns led us to hypothesize that testosterone increases the bioavailability of circulating carotenoids. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated testosterone levels of red-legged partridges Alectoris rufa while monitoring carotenoids, color, and immune function. Testosterone treatment increased the concentration of carotenoids in plasma and liver by >20%. Plasma carotenoids were in turn responsible for individual differences in coloration and immune response. Our results provide experimental evidence for a link between testosterone levels and immunoenhancing carotenoids that (i) reconciles conflicting evidence for the immunosuppressive nature of androgens, (ii) provides physiological grounds for a connection between two of the main signaling systems in animals, (iii) explains how these signaling systems can be evolutionary stable and honest, and (iv) may explain the high prevalence of sexual dimorphism in carotenoid-based coloration in animals. PMID:17121984

  9. Cyclic stretch of Embryonic Cardiomyocytes Increases Proliferation, Growth, and Expression While Repressing Tgf-β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indroneal; Carrion, Katrina; Serrano, Ricardo; Dyo, Jeffrey; Sasik, Roman; Lund, Sean; Willems, Erik; Aceves, Seema; Meili, Rudolph; Mercola, Mark; Chen, Ju; Zambon, Alexander; Hardiman, Gary; Doherty, Taylor A; Lange, Stephan; del Álamo, Juan C.; Nigam, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Perturbed biomechanical stimuli are thought to be critical for the pathogenesis of a number of congenital heart defects, including Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS). While embryonic cardiomyocytes experience biomechanical stretch every heart beat, their molecular responses to biomechanical stimuli during heart development are poorly understood. We hypothesized that biomechanical stimuli activate specific signaling pathways that impact proliferation, gene expression and myocyte contraction. The objective of this study was to expose embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes (EMCM) to cyclic stretch and examine key molecular and phenotypic responses. Analysis of RNA-Sequencing data demonstrated that gene ontology groups associated with myofibril and cardiac development were significantly modulated. Stretch increased EMCM proliferation, size, cardiac gene expression, and myofibril protein levels. Stretch also repressed several components belonging to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (Tgf-β) signaling pathway. EMCMs undergoing cyclic stretch had decreased Tgf-β expression, protein levels, and signaling. Furthermore, treatment of EMCMs with a Tgf-β inhibitor resulted in increased EMCM size. Functionally, Tgf-β signaling repressed EMCM proliferation and contractile function, as assayed via dynamic monolayer force microscopy (DMFM). Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that biomechanical stimuli play a vital role in normal cardiac development and for cardiac pathology, including HLHS. PMID:25446186

  10. Root jasmonates signaling regulates folivore-induced shoot metabolites and increases Nicotiana attenuata resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fragoso, Variluska; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Summary While JA signaling is widely accepted as mediating plant resistance to herbivores, and the importance of the roots in plant defenses is recently being recognized, the function of root-JA production or perception in aboveground plant defense remains unstudied. To restrain JA impairment to the roots, we micrografted wild type Nicotiana attenuata shoots to the roots of transgenic plants impaired in JA signaling, and evaluated ecological relevant traits under glasshouse and field conditions. Root-JA synthesis, conjugation, and perception are involved in regulating nicotine production in roots. Strikingly, roots regulated leaf JA and ABA levels, which in turn, explain differences in nicotine transport from the roots to the shoot via the transpiration stream. Root-JA signaling also regulates the accumulation of other shoot metabolites; these account for plant resistance against a generalist, Spodoptera littoralis, and a specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. In N. attenuata’s native habitat, silencing root-JA synthesis increased the shoot damage inflicted by Empoasca leafhoppers, which are able to select natural jasmonate mutants. Silencing JA perception in roots also increased damage by Tupiocoris notatus. Thus, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts: root jasmonate signaling profoundly tailors leaf defense responses to aboveground attack. PMID:24580101

  11. Scopolamine rapidly increases mTORC1 signaling, synaptogenesis, and antidepressant behavioral responses

    PubMed Central

    Voleti, Bhavya; Navarria, Andrea; Liu, Rong-Jian; Banasr, Mounira; Li, Nanxin; Terwilliger, Rose; Sanacora, Gerard; Eid, Tore; Aghajanian, George; Duman, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical studies report that scopolamine, an acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant effects in depressed patients, but the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response have not been determined. The present study examines the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and synaptogenesis, which have been implicated in the rapid actions of NMDA receptor antagonists. Methods The influence of scopolamine on mTORC1 signaling was determined by analysis of the phosphorylated and activated forms of mTORC1 signaling proteins in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The numbers and function of spine synapses were analyzed by whole cell patch clamp recording and 2-photon image analysis of PFC neurons. The actions of scopolamine were examined in the forced swim test in the absence or presence of selective mTORC1 and AMPA receptor inhibitors. Results The results demonstrate that a single, low dose of scopolamine rapidly increases mTORC1 signaling and the number and function of spine synapses in layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC. Scopolamine administration also produces an antidepressant response in the forced swim test that is blocked by pretreatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor or by a glutamate AMPA receptor antagonist. Conclusions Taken together, the results demonstrate that the antidepressant actions of scopolamine require mTORC1 signaling and are associated with increased glutamate transmission, and synaptogenesis, similar to NMDA receptor antagonists. These findings provide novel targets for safer and more efficacious rapid acting antidepressant agents. PMID:23751205

  12. IL-6 signaling blockade increases inflammation but does not affect muscle function in the mdx mouse

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that modulates inflammatory responses and plays critical roles in muscle maintenance and remodeling. In the mouse model (mdx) of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, IL-6 and muscle inflammation are elevated, which is believed to contribute to the chronic inflammation and failure of muscle regeneration in DMD. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of blocking IL-6 signaling on the muscle phenotype including muscle weakness and pathology in the mdx mouse. Methods A monoclonal antibody against the IL-6 receptor (IL-6r mAb) that blocks local and systemic IL-6 signaling was administered to mdx and BL-10 mice for 5 weeks and muscle function, histology, and inflammation were examined. Results IL-6r mAb treatment increased mdx muscle inflammation including total inflammation score and ICAM-1 positive lumens in muscles. There was no significant improvement in muscle strength nor muscle pathology due to IL-6r mAb treatment in mdx mice. Conclusions These results showed that instead of reducing inflammation, IL-6 signaling blockade for 5 weeks caused an increase in muscle inflammation, with no significant change in indices related to muscle regeneration and muscle function. The results suggest a potential anti-inflammatory instead of the original hypothesized pro-inflammatory role of IL-6 signaling in the mdx mice. PMID:22716658

  13. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival.

    PubMed

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-11-13

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  14. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  15. Cytokines and chemokines as biomarkers of ethanol-induced neuroinflammation and anxiety-related behavior: role of TLR4 and TLR2.

    PubMed

    Pascual, María; Baliño, Pablo; Aragón, Carlos M G; Guerri, Consuelo

    2015-02-01

    Recent evidence supports the influence of neuroimmune system activation on behavior. We have demonstrated that ethanol activates the innate immune system by stimulating toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in glial cells, which triggers the release of inflammatory mediators and causes neuroinflammation. The present study aimed to evaluate whether the ethanol-induced up-regulation of cytokines and chemokines is associated with anxiety-related behavior, 24 h after ethanol removal, and if TLR4 or TLR2 is involved in these effects. We used WT, TLR4-KO and TLR2-KO mice treated with alcohol for 5 months to show that chronic ethanol consumption increases the levels of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17, TNF-α) and chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1α, CX3CL1) in the striatum and serum (MCP-1, MIP-1α, CX3CL1) of WT mice. Alcohol deprivation for 24 h induces IFN-γ levels in the striatum and maintains high levels of some cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17) and chemokines (MIP-1α, CX3CL1) in this brain region. The latter events were associated with an increase in anxiogenic-related behavior, as evaluated by the dark and light box and the elevated plus maze tests. Notably, mice lacking TLR4 or TLR2 receptors are largely protected against ethanol-induced cytokine and chemokine release, and behavioral associated effects during alcohol abstinence. These data support the role of TLR4 and TLR2 responses in neuroinflammation and in anxiogenic-related behavior effects during ethanol deprivation, and also provide evidence that chemokines and cytokines can be biomarkers of ethanol-induced neuroimmune response.

  16. The Role of Chemokines in Promoting Colorectal Cancer Invasion/Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Kawada, Kenji; Inamoto, Susumu; Yamamoto, Takamasa; Ogawa, Ryotaro; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-04-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Although most of the primary CRC can be removed by surgical resection, advanced tumors sometimes show recurrences in distant organs such as the liver, lung, lymph node, bone or peritoneum even after complete resection of the primary tumors. In these advanced and metastatic CRC, it is the tumor-stroma interaction in the tumor microenvironment that often promotes cancer invasion and/or metastasis through chemokine signaling. The tumor microenvironment contains numerous host cells that may suppress or promote cancer aggressiveness. Several types of host-derived myeloid cells reside in the tumor microenvironment, and the recruitment of them is under the control of chemokine signaling. In this review, we focus on the functions of chemokine signaling that may affect tumor immunity by recruiting several types of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) to the tumor microenvironment of CRC.

  17. The Role of Chemokines in Promoting Colorectal Cancer Invasion/Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Kawada, Kenji; Inamoto, Susumu; Yamamoto, Takamasa; Ogawa, Ryotaro; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Although most of the primary CRC can be removed by surgical resection, advanced tumors sometimes show recurrences in distant organs such as the liver, lung, lymph node, bone or peritoneum even after complete resection of the primary tumors. In these advanced and metastatic CRC, it is the tumor-stroma interaction in the tumor microenvironment that often promotes cancer invasion and/or metastasis through chemokine signaling. The tumor microenvironment contains numerous host cells that may suppress or promote cancer aggressiveness. Several types of host-derived myeloid cells reside in the tumor microenvironment, and the recruitment of them is under the control of chemokine signaling. In this review, we focus on the functions of chemokine signaling that may affect tumor immunity by recruiting several types of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) to the tumor microenvironment of CRC. PMID:27136535

  18. Similar pattern of chemokines after acute viral and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-27

    Read with great interest the article by Cavalcanti et al (1). Which describes the levels of chemokine such as MCP-1, RANETS, MIG and IP-10 in children with sepsis community acquired pneumonia and skin abscess. Author has found increased levels of RANETS in all infections mentioned above. Interestingly IP-10 was significantly increased in sepsis groups with low levels of MCP1. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular requirements for sorting of the chemokine interleukin-8/CXCL8 to endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Hol, Johanna; Küchler, Axel M; Johansen, Finn-Eirik; Dalhus, Bjørn; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Oynebråten, Inger

    2009-08-28

    Sorting of proteins to Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB) of endothelial cells allows rapid regulated secretion of leukocyte-recruiting P-selectin and chemokines as well as procoagulant von Willebrand factor (VWF). Here we show by domain swap studies that the exposed aspartic acid in loop 2 (Ser(44)-Asp(45)-Gly(46)) of the CXC chemokine interleukin (IL)-8 is crucial for targeting to WPB. Loop 2 also governs sorting of chemokines to alpha-granules of platelets, but the fingerprint of the loop 2 of these chemokines differs from that of IL-8. On the other hand, loop 2 of IL-8 closely resembles a surface-exposed sequence of the VWF propeptide, the region of VWF that directs sorting of the protein to WPB. We conclude that loop 2 of IL-8 constitutes a critical signal for sorting to WPB and propose a general role for this loop in the sorting of chemokines to compartments of regulated secretion.

  20. The Anti-inflammatory Protein TSG-6 Regulates Chemokine Function by Inhibiting Chemokine/Glycosaminoglycan Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Douglas P.; Salanga, Catherina L.; Johns, Scott C.; Valdambrini, Elena; Fuster, Mark M.; Milner, Caroline M.; Day, Anthony J.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a multifunctional protein secreted in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli by a wide range of cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and endothelial cells. It has been shown to mediate anti-inflammatory and protective effects when administered in disease models, in part, by reducing neutrophil infiltration. Human TSG-6 inhibits neutrophil migration by binding CXCL8 through its Link module (Link_TSG6) and interfering with the presentation of CXCL8 on cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), an interaction that is vital for the function of many chemokines. TSG-6 was also found to interact with chemokines CXCL11 and CCL5, suggesting the possibility that it may function as a broad specificity chemokine-binding protein, functionally similar to those encoded by viruses. This study was therefore undertaken to explore the ability of TSG-6 to regulate the function of other chemokines. Herein, we demonstrate that Link_TSG6 binds chemokines from both the CXC and CC families, including CXCL4, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CCL19, CCL21, and CCL27. We also show that the Link_TSG6-binding sites on chemokines overlap with chemokine GAG-binding sites, and that the affinities of Link_TSG6 for these chemokines (KD values 1–85 nm) broadly correlate with chemokine-GAG affinities. Link_TSG6 also inhibits chemokine presentation on endothelial cells not only through a direct interaction with chemokines but also by binding and therefore masking the availability of GAGs. Along with previous work, these findings suggest that TSG-6 functions as a pluripotent regulator of chemokines by modulating chemokine/GAG interactions, which may be a major mechanism by which TSG-6 produces its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:27044744

  1. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of marine seismic data: A case study from offshore Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyoun; Jang, Seonghyung

    2016-11-01

    Subsurface imaging is difficult without removing the multiples intrinsic to most marine seismic data. Choosing the right multiple suppression method when working with marine data depends on the type of multiples and sometimes involves trial and error. A major amount of multiple energy in seismic data is related to the large reflectivity of the surface. Surface-related multiple elimination (SRME) is effective for suppressing free-surface-related multiples. Although SRME has some limitations, it is widely used because it requires no assumptions about the subsurface velocities, positions, and reflection coefficients of the reflector causing the multiples. The common reflector surface (CRS) stacking technique uses CRS reflectors rather than common mid-point (CMP) reflectors. It stacks more traces than conventional stacking methods and increases the signal-to-noise ratio. The purpose of this study is to address a process issue for multiple suppression with SRME and Radon filtering, and to increase the signal-to-noise ratio by using CRS stacking on seismic data from the eastern continental margin of Korea. To remove free surface multiples, SRME and Radon filtering are applied to attenuate the interbed multiples. Results obtained using synthetic data and field data show that the combination of SRME and Radon filtering is effective for suppressing free-surface multiples and peg-leg multiples. Applying CRS stacking to seismic data in which multiples have been eliminated increases the signal-to-noise ratio for the area examined, which is being considered for carbon dioxide capture and storage.

  2. Peptide YY signaling in the lateral parabrachial nucleus increases food intake through the Y1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Danielle; Hayes, Matthew R.; Grill, Harvey J.

    2015-01-01

    Although central PYY delivery potently increases food intake, the sites of action and mechanisms mediating these hyperphagic effects are not fully understood. The present studies investigate the contribution of lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) PYY-Y receptor signaling to food intake control, as lPBN neurons express Y receptors and receive PYY fibers and are known to integrate circulating and visceral sensory signals to regulate energy balance. Immunohistochemical results identified a subpopulation of gigantocellular reticular nucleus PYY-producing neurons that project monosynaptically to the lPBN, providing an endogenous source of PYY to the lPBN. lPBN microinjection of PYY-(1–36) or PYY-(3–36) markedly increased food intake by increasing meal size. To determine which receptors mediate these behavioral results, we first performed quantitative real-time PCR to examine the relative levels of Y receptor expression in lPBN tissue. Gene expression analyses revealed that, while Y1, Y2, and Y5 receptors are each expressed in lPBN tissue, Y1 receptor mRNA is expressed at fivefold higher levels than the others. Furthermore, behavioral/pharmacological results demonstrated that the hyperphagic effects of PYY-(3–36) were eliminated by lPBN pretreatment with a selective Y1 receptor antagonist. Together, these results highlight the lPBN as a novel site of action for the intake-stimulatory effects of central PYY-Y1 receptor signaling. PMID:26330345

  3. Increased arterial smooth muscle Ca2+ signaling, vasoconstriction, and myogenic reactivity in Milan hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Cristina I.; Karashima, Eiji; Raina, Hema; Zulian, Alessandra; Wier, Withrow G.; Hamlyn, John M.; Ferrari, Patrizia; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    2012-01-01

    The Milan hypertensive strain (MHS) rats are a genetic model of hypertension with adducin gene polymorphisms linked to enhanced renal tubular Na+ reabsorption. Recently we demonstrated that Ca2+ signaling is augmented in freshly isolated mesenteric artery myocytes from MHS rats. This is associated with greatly enhanced expression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger-1 (NCX1), C-type transient receptor potential (TRPC6) protein, and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) compared with arteries from Milan normotensive strain (MNS) rats. Here, we test the hypothesis that the enhanced Ca2+ signaling in MHS arterial smooth muscle is directly reflected in augmented vasoconstriction [myogenic and phenylephrine (PE)-evoked responses] in isolated mesenteric small arteries. Systolic blood pressure was higher in MHS (145 ± 1 mmHg) than in MNS (112 ± 1 mmHg; P < 0.001; n = 16 each) rats. Pressurized mesenteric resistance arteries from MHS rats had significantly augmented myogenic tone and reactivity and enhanced constriction to low-dose (1–100 nM) PE. Isolated MHS arterial myocytes exhibited approximately twofold increased peak Ca2+ signals in response to 5 μM PE or ATP in the absence and presence of extracellular Ca2+. These augmented responses are consistent with increased vasoconstrictor-evoked sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release and increased Ca2+ entry, respectively. The increased SR Ca2+ release correlates with a doubling of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 and tripling of SERCA2 expression. Pressurized MHS arteries also exhibited a ∼70% increase in 100 nM ouabain-induced vasoconstriction compared with MNS arteries. These functional alterations reveal that, in a genetic model of hypertension linked to renal dysfunction, multiple mechanisms within the arterial myocytes contribute to enhanced Ca2+ signaling and myogenic and vasoconstrictor-induced arterial constriction. MHS rats have elevated plasma levels of endogenous ouabain, which may initiate the

  4. Chemical diplomacy in male tilapia: urinary signal increases sex hormone and decreases aggression.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, João L; Keller-Costa, Tina; Hubbard, Peter C; Rato, Ana; Canário, Adelino V M

    2017-08-09

    Androgens, namely 11-ketotestosterone (11KT), have a central role in male fish reproductive physiology and are thought to be involved in both aggression and social signalling. Aggressive encounters occur frequently in social species, and fights may cause energy depletion, injury and loss of social status. Signalling for social dominance and fighting ability in an agonistic context can minimize these costs. Here, we test the hypothesis of a 'chemical diplomacy' mechanism through urinary signals that avoids aggression and evokes an androgen response in receiver males of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). We show a decoupling between aggression and the androgen response; males fighting their mirror image experience an unresolved interaction and a severe drop in urinary 11KT. However, if concurrently exposed to dominant male urine, aggression drops but urinary 11KT levels remain high. Furthermore, 11KT increases in males exposed to dominant male urine in the absence of a visual stimulus. The use of a urinary signal to lower aggression may be an adaptive mechanism to resolve disputes and avoid the costs of fighting. As dominance is linked to nest building and mating with females, the 11KT response of subordinate males suggests chemical eavesdropping, possibly in preparation for parasitic fertilizations.

  5. Floral visual signal increases reproductive success in a sexually deceptive orchid.

    PubMed

    Rakosy, Demetra; Streinzer, Martin; Paulus, Hannes F; Spaethe, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids mimic signals emitted by female insects in order to attract mate-searching males. Specific attraction of the targeted pollinator is achieved by sex pheromone mimicry, which constitutes the major attraction channel. In close vicinity of the flower, visual signals may enhance attraction, as was shown recently in the sexually deceptive orchid Ophrys heldreichii. Here, we conducted an in situ manipulation experiment in two populations of O. heldreichii on Crete to investigate whether the presence/absence of the conspicuous pink perianth affects reproductive success in two natural orchid populations. We estimated reproductive success of three treatment groups (with intact, removed and artificial perianth) throughout the flowering period as pollinaria removal (male reproductive success) and massulae deposition (female reproductive success). Reproductive success was significantly increased by the presence of a strong visual signal-the conspicuous perianth-in one study population, however, not in the second, most likely due to the low pollinator abundance in the latter population. This study provides further evidence that the coloured perianth in O. heldreichii is adaptive and thus adds to the olfactory signal to maximise pollinator attraction and reproductive success.

  6. Increasing signal amplitude in fiber Bragg grating detection of Lamb waves using remote bonding.

    PubMed

    Wee, Junghyun; Wells, Brian; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2016-07-20

    Networks of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can serve as structural health monitoring systems for large-scale structures based on the collection of ultrasonic waves. The demodulation of structural Lamb waves using FBG sensors requires a high signal-to-noise ratio because the Lamb waves are of low amplitudes. This paper compares the signal transfer amplitudes between two adhesive mounting configurations for an FBG to detect Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate: a directly bonded FBG and a remotely bonded FBG. In the directly bonded FBG case, the Lamb waves create in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, which are transferred through the adhesive bond and detected by the FBG sensor. In the remotely bonded FBG case, the Lamb waves are converted into longitudinal and flexural traveling waves in the optical fiber at the adhesive bond, which propagate through the optical fiber and are detected by the FBG sensor. A theoretical prediction of overall signal attenuation also is performed, which is the combination of material attenuation in the plate and optical fiber and attenuation due to wave spreading in the plate. The experimental results demonstrate that remote bonding of the FBG significantly increases the signal amplitude measured by the FBG.

  7. Light-load resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy signaling in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Agergaard, Jakob; Bülow, Jacob; Jensen, Jacob K; Reitelseder, Søren; Drummond, Micah J; Schjerling, Peter; Scheike, Thomas; Serena, Anja; Holm, Lars

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated whether well-tolerated light-load resistance exercise (LL-RE) affects skeletal muscle fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and anabolic intracellular signaling as a way to counteract age-related loss of muscle mass. Untrained healthy elderly (>65-yr-old) men were subjected to 13 h of supine rest. After 2.5 h of rest, unilateral LL-RE, consisting of leg extensions (10 sets, 36 repetitions) at 16% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), was conducted. Subsequently, the subjects were randomized to oral intake of 4 g of whey protein per hour (PULSE, n = 10), 28 g of whey protein at 0 h and 12 g of whey protein at 7 h postexercise (BOLUS, n = 10), or 4 g of maltodextrin per hour (placebo, n = 10). Quadriceps muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 3, 7, and 10 h postexercise from the resting and the exercised leg of each subject. Myofibrillar FSR and activity of select targets from the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1-signaling cascade were analyzed from the biopsies. LL-RE increased myofibrillar FSR compared with the resting leg throughout the 10-h postexercise period. Phosphorylated (T308) AKT expression increased in the exercised leg immediately after exercise. This increase persisted in the placebo group only. Levels of phosphorylated (T37/46) eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 increased throughout the postexercise period in the exercised leg in the placebo and BOLUS groups and peaked at 7 h. In all three groups, phosphorylated (T56) eukaryotic elongation factor 2 decreased in response to LL-RE. We conclude that resistance exercise at only 16% of 1 RM increased myofibrillar FSR, irrespective of nutrient type and feeding pattern, which indicates an anabolic effect of LL-RE in elderly individuals. This finding was supported by increased signaling for translation initiation and translation elongation in response to LL-RE.

  8. Leptin signaling in the nucleus tractus solitarii increases sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney.

    PubMed

    Mark, Allyn L; Agassandian, Khristofor; Morgan, Donald A; Liu, Xuebo; Cassell, Martin D; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2009-02-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was initially regarded as the principal site of leptin action, but there is increasing evidence for functional leptin receptors in extrahypothalamic sites, including the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). We demonstrated previously that arcuate injection of leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to brown adipose tissue and kidney. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that leptin signaling in the NTS affects sympathetic neural outflow. Using a stereotaxic device in anesthetized rats, we microinjected leptin (0.25 to 1.00 microg) or saline into the NTS while recording SNA to kidney and brown adipose tissue. Microinjection of leptin into the commissural and medial subnuclei of the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema in Sprague-Dawley rats produced a dose-related increase in renal SNA (+112+/-15% with leptin 1 microg; n=7; P<0.001) but did not increase SNA to brown adipose tissue (-15+/-12%; P value not significant). This effect depended on intact functional leptin receptors, because it was not observed in Zucker obese rats that have a missense mutation in the leptin receptor. Rostral NTS injection of leptin failed to increase SNA, indicating that leptin signaling in the NTS is probably confined to the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema. In summary, this study demonstrates that leptin signaling in the caudal NTS increases SNA to the kidney but not to the brown adipose tissue. The study strengthens the concept of a distributed brain network of leptin action and demonstrates that these distributed brain sites can mediate contrasting sympathetic responses to leptin.

  9. Effect of adhesion and chemokine presentation on T-lymphocyte haptokinesis†

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Motility is critical for the function of T-lymphocytes. Motility in T-lymphocytes is driven by the occupancy of chemokine receptors by chemokines, and modulated by adhesive interactions. However, it is not well understood how the combination of adhesion and chemokine binding affects T-lymphocyte migration. We used microcontact printing on polymeric substrates to measure how lymphocyte migration is quantitatively controlled by adhesion and chemokine ligation. Focusing only on random motion, we found that T-lymphocytes exhibit biphasic motility in response to the substrate concentration of either ICAM-1 or VCAM-1, and generally display more active motion on ICAM-1 surfaces. Furthermore, we examined how the combination of the homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 contribute to motility. By themselves, CCL19 and CCL21, ligands for CCR7, elicit biphasic motility, but their combination synergistically increases CCR7 mediated chemokinesis on ICAM-1. By presenting CCL21 with ICAM-1 on the surface with soluble CCL19, we observed random motion that is greater than what is observed with soluble chemokines alone. These data suggest that ICAM-1 has a greater contribution to motility than VCAM-1 and that both adhesive interactions and chemokine ligation work in concert to control T-lymphocyte motility. PMID:25012074

  10. Hostility is related to clusters of T-cell cytokines and chemokines in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Mommersteeg, Paula M C; Vermetten, Eric; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Geuze, Elbert; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2008-09-01

    Hostility is a risk factor for adverse health outcomes as diverse as cardiovascular disease and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cytokines have been suggested to mediate this relationship. We investigated whether in healthy men a relation existed between hostility and T-cell mitogen-induced cytokines and chemokines. Male Dutch military personnel (n=304) were included before deployment. Eleven cytokines and chemokines were measured in supernatants of T-cell mitogen-stimulated whole blood cultures by multiplex immunoassay. Factor analysis was used to identify clusters of cytokines and chemokines. In a regression analysis hostility was related to the cytokine/chemokine clusters, and the potential risk factors age, BMI, smoking, drinking, previous deployment, early life trauma and depression. Explorative factor analysis showed four functional clusters; a pro-inflammatory factor (IL-2, TNFalpha, IFNgamma), an anti-inflammatory factor (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10), IL-6/chemokine factor (IL-6, MCP-1, RANTES, IP-10), and MIF. Hostility was significantly related to decreased IL-6/chemokine secretion and increased pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. There was an inverse relation between age and hostility scores. Early life trauma and depression were positively and independently related to hostility as well. This study represents a novel way of investigating the relation between cytokines and psychological characteristics. Cytokines/chemokines clustered into functional factors, which were related to hostility in healthy males. Moreover this relation appeared to be independent of reported depression and early trauma.

  11. HMGB1/TLR Receptor Danger Signaling Increases Brain Neuroimmune Activation in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Fulton T.; Qin, Liya; Sheedy, Donna; Vetreno, Ryan P.; Zou, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background Innate immune gene expression is regulated in part through high mobility group box 1(HMGB1), an endogenous proinflammatory cytokine, that activates multiple members of the interleukin-1/Toll-like receptor (IL-1/TLR) family associated with danger signaling. We investigated expression of HMGB1, TLR2, TLR3 and TLR4 in chronic ethanol treated mouse brain, post-mortem human alcoholic brain, and rat brain slice culture to test the hypothesis that neuroimmune activation in alcoholic brain involves ethanol activation of HMGB1/TLR danger signaling. Methods Protein levels were assessed using Western blot, ELISA, immunohistochemical immunoreactivity (+IR), and mRNA levels were measured by real time PCR in ethanol-treated mice (5 g/kg/day, i.g., 10 days + 24 hr), rat brain slice culture, and post-mortem human alcoholic brain. Results Ethanol treatment of mice increased brain mRNA and +IR protein expression of HMGB1, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4. Post-mortem human alcoholic brain also showed increased HMGB1, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4+IR cells that correlated with lifetime alcohol consumption as well as each other. Ethanol treatment of brain slice culture released HMGB1 into the media and induced the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. Neutralizing antibodies to HMGB1 and small inhibitory mRNA to HMGB1 or TLR4 blunted ethanol induction of IL-1β. Conclusions Ethanol-induced HMGB1/TLR signaling contributes to induction of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. Increased expression of HMGB1, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4 in alcoholic brain and in mice treated with ethanol suggests that chronic alcohol-induced brain neuroimmune activation occurs through HMGB1/TLR signaling. PMID:23206318

  12. Involvement of chemokine receptors in breast cancer metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Anja; Homey, Bernhard; Soto, Hortensia; Ge, Nianfeng; Catron, Daniel; Buchanan, Matthew E.; McClanahan, Terri; Murphy, Erin; Yuan, Wei; Wagner, Stephan N.; Barrera, Jose Luis; Mohar, Alejandro; Verástegui, Emma; Zlotnik, Albert

    2001-03-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by a distinct metastatic pattern involving the regional lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and liver. Tumour cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 are highly expressed in human breast cancer cells, malignant breast tumours and metastases. Their respective ligands CXCL12/SDF-1α and CCL21/6Ckine exhibit peak levels of expression in organs representing the first destinations of breast cancer metastasis. In breast cancer cells, signalling through CXCR4 or CCR7 mediates actin polymerization and pseudopodia formation, and subsequently induces chemotactic and invasive responses. In vivo, neutralizing the interactions of CXCL12/CXCR4 significantly impairs metastasis of breast cancer cells to regional lymph nodes and lung. Malignant melanoma, which has a similar metastatic pattern as breast cancer but also a high incidence of skin metastases, shows high expression levels of CCR10 in addition to CXCR4 and CCR7. Our findings indicate that chemokines and their receptors have a critical role in determining the metastatic destination of tumour cells.

  13. Dynamics and thermodynamic properties of CXCL7 chemokine.

    PubMed

    Herring, Charles A; Singer, Christopher M; Ermakova, Elena A; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Zuev, Yuriy F; Jacobs, Donald J; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2015-11-01

    Chemokines form a family of signaling proteins mainly responsible for directing the traffic of leukocytes, where their biological activity can be modulated by their oligomerization state. We characterize the dynamics and thermodynamic stability of monomer and homodimer structures of CXCL7, one of the most abundant platelet chemokines, using experimental methods that include circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and computational methods that include the anisotropic network model (ANM), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the distance constraint model (DCM). A consistent picture emerges for the effects of dimerization and Cys5-Cys31 and Cys7-Cys47 disulfide bonds formation. The presence of disulfide bonds is not critical for maintaining structural stability in the monomer or dimer, but the monomer is destabilized more than the dimer upon removal of disulfide bonds. Disulfide bonds play a key role in shaping the characteristics of native state dynamics. The combined analysis shows that upon dimerization flexibly correlated motions are induced between the 30s and 50s loop within each monomer and across the dimer interface. Interestingly, the greatest gain in flexibility upon dimerization occurs when both disulfide bonds are present, and the homodimer is least stable relative to its two monomers. These results suggest that the highly conserved disulfide bonds in chemokines facilitate a structural mechanism that is tuned to optimally distinguish functional characteristics between monomer and dimer.

  14. Characterisation of SNP haplotype structure in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes using CEPH pedigrees and statistical estimation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Vanessa J; Dean, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Chemokine signals and their cell-surface receptors are important modulators of HIV-1 disease and cancer. To aid future case/control association studies, aim to further characterise the haplotype structure of variation in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes. To perform haplotype analysis in a population-based association study, haplotypes must be determined by estimation, in the absence of family information or laboratory methods to establish phase. Here, test the accuracy of estimates of haplotype frequency and linkage disequilibrium by comparing estimated haplotypes generated with the expectation maximisation (EM) algorithm to haplotypes determined from Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) pedigree data. To do this, they have characterised haplotypes comprising alleles at 11 biallelic loci in four chemokine receptor genes (CCR3, CCR2, CCR5 and CCRL2), which span 150 kb on chromosome 3p21, and haplotyes of nine biallelic loci in six chemokine genes [MCP-1(CCL2), Eotaxin(CCL11), RANTES(CCL5), MPIF-1(CCL23), PARC(CCL18) and MIP-1alpha(CCL3)] on chromosome 17q11-12. Forty multi-generation CEPH families, totalling 489 individuals, were genotyped by the TaqMan 5'-nuclease assay. Phased haplotypes and haplotypes estimated from unphased genotypes were compared in 103 grandparents who were assumed to have mated at random. For the 3p21 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, haplotypes determined by pedigree analysis and haplotypes generated by the EM algorithm were nearly identical. Linkage disequilibrium, measured by the D' statistic, was nearly maximal across the 150 kb region, with complete disequilibrium maintained at the extremes between CCR3-Y17Y and CCRL2-I243V. D'-values calculated from estimated haplotypes on 3p21 had high concordance with pairwise comparisons between pedigree-phased chromosomes. Conversely, there was less agreement between analyses of haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium using estimated haplotypes when compared with

  15. Chemokines integrate JAK/STAT and G-protein pathways during chemotaxis and calcium flux responses.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Silvia F; Serrano, Antonio; Hernanz-Falcón, Patricia; Martín de Ana, Ana; Monterrubio, María; Martínez, Carlos; Rodríguez-Frade, J Miguel; Mellado, Mario

    2003-05-01

    The JAK/STAT (Janus kinase / signaling transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway is implicated in converting stationary epithelial cells to migratory cells. In mammals, migratory responses are activated by chemoattractant proteins, including chemokines. We found that by binding to seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, chemokines activate the JAK/STAT pathway to trigger chemotactic responses. We show that chemokine-mediated JAK/STAT activation is critical for G-protein induction and for phospholipase C-beta dependent Ca(2+) flux; in addition, pharmacological inhibition of JAK or mutation of the JAK kinase domain causes defects in both responses. Furthermore, G alpha(i) association with the receptor is dependent on JAK activation, and the chemokine-mediated Ca(2+) flux that requires phospholipase C-beta activity takes place downstream of JAK kinases. The chemokines thus employ a mechanism that links heterologous signaling pathways--G proteins and tyrosine kinases--in a network that may be essential for mediating their pleiotropic responses.

  16. Signaling pathways induced by serine proteases to increase intestinal epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Judie; Dion, Sébastien P.; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Changes in barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract are thought to contribute to the inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Previous work in our lab demonstrated that apical exposure of intestinal epithelial cell lines to serine proteases results in an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). However, the underlying mechanisms governing this response are unclear. We aimed to determine the requirement for proteolytic activity, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, and downstream intracellular signaling in initiating and maintaining enhanced barrier function following protease treatment using a canine intestinal epithelial cell line (SCBN). We also examined the role of phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on the serine protease-induced increase in TER through. It was found that proteolytic activity of the serine proteases trypsin and matriptase is required to initiate and maintain the protease-mediated increase in TER. We also show that MMP-independent EGFR activation is essential to the sustained phase of the protease response, and that Src kinases may mediate EGFR transactivation. PI3-K and ERK1/2 signaling were important in reaching a maximal increase in TER following protease stimulation; however, their upstream activators are yet to be determined. CK2 inhibition prevented the increase in TER induced by serine proteases. The bradykinin B(2) receptor was not involved in the change in TER in response to serine proteases, and no change in phosphorylation of MLC was observed after trypsin or matriptase treatment. Taken together, our data show a requirement for ongoing proteolytic activity, EGFR transactivation, as well as downstream PI3-K, ERK1/2, and CK2 signaling in protease-mediated barrier enhancement of intestinal epithelial cells. The pathways mediating enhanced barrier function by proteases may be novel therapeutic targets for intestinal disorders characterized by disrupted

  17. Signaling pathways induced by serine proteases to increase intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Kelcie A; Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Dion, Sébastien P; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2017-01-01

    Changes in barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract are thought to contribute to the inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Previous work in our lab demonstrated that apical exposure of intestinal epithelial cell lines to serine proteases results in an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). However, the underlying mechanisms governing this response are unclear. We aimed to determine the requirement for proteolytic activity, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, and downstream intracellular signaling in initiating and maintaining enhanced barrier function following protease treatment using a canine intestinal epithelial cell line (SCBN). We also examined the role of phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on the serine protease-induced increase in TER through. It was found that proteolytic activity of the serine proteases trypsin and matriptase is required to initiate and maintain the protease-mediated increase in TER. We also show that MMP-independent EGFR activation is essential to the sustained phase of the protease response, and that Src kinases may mediate EGFR transactivation. PI3-K and ERK1/2 signaling were important in reaching a maximal increase in TER following protease stimulation; however, their upstream activators are yet to be determined. CK2 inhibition prevented the increase in TER induced by serine proteases. The bradykinin B(2) receptor was not involved in the change in TER in response to serine proteases, and no change in phosphorylation of MLC was observed after trypsin or matriptase treatment. Taken together, our data show a requirement for ongoing proteolytic activity, EGFR transactivation, as well as downstream PI3-K, ERK1/2, and CK2 signaling in protease-mediated barrier enhancement of intestinal epithelial cells. The pathways mediating enhanced barrier function by proteases may be novel therapeutic targets for intestinal disorders characterized by disrupted epithelial

  18. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer’s disease: chemokines produced by astrocytes and chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Cui, Guohong; Zhu, Meiping; Kang, Xiangping; Guo, Haidong

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines secreted by astrocytes play multiple roles in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, a chronic inflammation disorder of central nervous system. The level of chemokines in serum, cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue and their receptors both significantly changed in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. In this review, we briefly summarized the involvement of astrocytes and chemokines in Alzheimer’s disease, and the role of chemokine/chemokine receptors in the occurrence and development of Alzheimer’s disease. Clarification of the involvement of chemokines and their receptors, such as MCP-1/CCR2, fractalkine/CX3CR1, SDF-1α/CXCR4, MIP-1α/CCR5, IP-10/CXCR3, IL-8/CXCR1, CXCR2, and RANTES/CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, will provide a new strategy and more specific targets for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25674199

  19. Increasing 14N NQR signal by 1H-14N level crossing with small magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Sauer, Karen L; Buess, Michael L; Klug, Christopher A; Miller, Joel B

    2005-11-01

    NQR detection of materials, such as TNT, is hindered by the low signal-to-noise ratio at low NQR frequencies. Sweeping small (0-26 mT) magnetic fields to shift the (1)H NMR frequency relative to the (14)N NQR frequencies can provide a significant increase of the (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio. Three effects of (1)H-(14)N level crossing are demonstrated in diglycine hydrochloride and TNT. These effects are (1) transferring (1)H polarization to one or more of the (14)N transitions, including the use of an adiabatic flip of the (1)H polarization during the field sweep, (2) shortening the effective (14)N T(1) by the interaction of (1)H with the (14)N transitions, (3) "level transfer" effect where the third (14)N (spin 1) energy level or other (14)N sites with different NQR frequency are used as a reservoir of polarization which is transferred to the measured (14)N transition by the (1)H. The (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by a factor of 2.5 for one (14)N site in diglycine hydrochloride (and 2.2 in TNT), even though the maximum (1)H frequency used in this work, 111 6 kHz, is only 30% larger than the measured (14)N frequencies (834 kHz for diglycine hydrochloride and 843 kHz for TNT).

  20. Kynurenine signaling increases DNA polymerase kappa expression and promotes genomic instability in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bostian, April C.L.; Maddukuri, Leena; Reed, Megan R.; Savenka, Tatsiana; Hartman, Jessica H.; Davis, Lauren; Pouncey, Dakota L.; Miller, Grover P.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of the translesion synthesis polymerase (TLS pol) hpol κ in glioblastomas has been linked to a poor patient prognosis; however, the mechanism promoting higher expression in these tumors remains unknown. We determined that activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway in glioblastoma cells leads to increased hpol κ mRNA and protein levels. We blocked nuclear translocation and DNA binding by the AhR in glioblastoma cells using a small-molecule and observed decreased hpol κ expression. Pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), the enzyme largely responsible for activating the AhR in glioblastomas, led to a decrease in the endogenous AhR agonist kynurenine (Kyn) and a corresponding decrease in hpol κ protein levels. Importantly, we discovered that inhibiting TDO activity, AhR signaling, or suppressing hpol κ expression with RNA interference led to decreased chromosomal damage in glioblastoma cells. Epistasis assays further supported the idea that TDO activity, activation of AhR signaling and the resulting over-expression of hpol κ function primarily in the same pathway to increase endogenous DNA damage. These findings indicate that up-regulation of hpol κ through glioblastoma-specific TDO activity and activation of AhR signaling likely contributes to the high levels of replication stress and genomic instability observed in these tumors. PMID:26651356

  1. Polarization of chemokine receptors to the leading edge during lymphocyte chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Nieto, M; Frade, J M; Sancho, D; Mellado, M; Martinez-A, C; Sánchez-Madrid, F

    1997-07-07

    Leukocyte migration in response to cell attractant gradients or chemotaxis is a key phenomenon both in cell movement and in the inflammatory response. Chemokines are quite likely to be the key molecules directing migration of leukocytes that involve cell polarization with generation of specialized cell compartments. The precise mechanism of leukocyte chemoattraction is not known, however. In this study, we demonstrate that the CC chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5, but not cytokine receptors such as interleukin (IL)-2Ralpha, IL-2Rbeta, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, or transforming growth factor betaR, are redistributed to a pole in T cells that are migrating in response to chemokines. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy studies show that the chemokine receptors concentrate at the leading edge of the cell on the flattened cell-substratum contact area, induced specifically by the signals that trigger cell polarization. The redistribution of chemokine receptors is blocked by pertussis toxin and is dependent on cell adhesion through integrin receptors, which mediate cell migration. Chemokine receptor expression on the leading edge of migrating polarized lymphocytes appears to act as a sensor mechanism for the directed migration of leukocytes through a chemoattractant gradient.

  2. Chemokines CCL2, 3, 14 stimulate macrophage bone marrow homing, proliferation, and polarization in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zheng, Yuhuan; Li, Tianshu; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Jianfei; Lu, Yong; Zhang, Mingjun; Bi, Enguang; Yang, Maojie; Reu, Frederic; Yi, Qing; Cai, Zhen

    2015-09-15

    We previously showed that macrophages (MΦs) infiltrate the bone marrow (BM) of patients with myeloma and may play a role in drug resistance. This study analyzed chemokines expressed by myeloma BM that are responsible for recruiting monocytes to the tumor bed. We found that chemokines CCL3, CCL14, and CCL2 were highly expressed by myeloma and BM cells, and the levels of CCL14 and CCL3 in myeloma BM positively correlated with the percentage of BM-infiltrating MΦs. In vitro, these chemokines were responsible for chemoattracting human monocytes to tumor sites and in vivo for MΦ infiltration into myeloma-bearing BM in the 5TGM1 mouse model. Surprisingly, we also found that these chemokines stimulated MΦ in vitro proliferation induced by myeloma cells and in vivo in a human myeloma xenograft SCID mouse model. The chemokines also activated normal MΦ polarization and differentiation into myeloma-associated MΦs. Western blot analysis revealed that these chemokines promoted growth and survival signaling in MΦs via activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK MAPK pathways and c-myc expression. Thus, this study provides novel insight into the mechanism of MΦ infiltration of BM and also potential targets for improving the efficacy of chemotherapy in myeloma.

  3. Multisegment coloboma in a case of Marfan syndrome: another possible effect of increased TGFβ signaling.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Shannon K; Taranath, Deepa; Morris, Scott; Barnett, Christopher P

    2014-02-01

    Colobomata are etiologically heterogeneous and may occur as an isolated defect or as a feature of a variety of single-gene disorders, chromosomal syndromes, or malformation syndromes. Although not classically associated with Marfan syndrome, colobomata have been described in several reports of Marfan syndrome, typically involving the lens and rarely involving other ocular structures. While colobomata of the lens have been described in Marfan syndrome, there are very few reports of coloboma involving other ocular structures. We report a newborn boy presenting with coloboma of the iris, lens, retina, and optic disk who was subsequently diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome is a disorder of increased TGFβ signaling, and recent work in the mouse model suggests a role for TGFβ signaling in eye development and coloboma formation, suggesting a causal association between Marfan syndrome and coloboma.

  4. The case for too little melatonin signalling in increased diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Bonnefond, Amélie; Froguel, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies have detected an association between type 2 diabetes risk and a non-coding SNP located in MTNR1B, the gene encoding melatonin receptor 2 (MT2). Melatonin regulates circadian rhythms and sleep and associates with metabolic disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying these actions are still unclear. Functional genomic, animal and clinical studies have not reached the same conclusions: while some studies have reported that decreased melatonin signalling increases type 2 diabetes risk, others have found the opposite. In this commentary, we have tried to provide an explanation for these contradictions and we suggest how the community may progress to reach a unified picture of the effect of melatonin and its signalling on type 2 diabetes.

  5. Circulating levels of Th1 and Th2 chemokines in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianing; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Gaoya; Yang, Chunshu; Xu, Yong; Li, Yujia; Yang, Pingting

    2016-05-01

    Although chemokines are critical elements for the selective attraction and activation of various leukocyte subsets in the inflammatory process, there are few findings concerning T helper (Th) 1 or Th2 chemokines in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study was designed to determine whether serum levels of chemokines that are preferentially chemotactic for Th1 (IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10, IP-10/CXCL10) and Th2 (thymus and activation regulated chemokine, TARC/CCL17) and (macrophage derived chemokine, MDC/CCL22) cells were elevated and whether they correlated with the clinical features in patients with AS. Forty-two patients with axial AS and 25 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. Serum levels of chemokines (IP-10, TARC and MDC) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-4) were examined using ELISA. The disease activity was evaluated by Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS). Serum levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Serum chemokine levels of IP-10, TARC and MDC were significantly higher in patients with AS than those in healthy controls. Serum cytokine levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α were also significantly increased, but the levels of IL-4 were not. Furthermore, IP-10 levels in AS patients correlated with ESP, CRP and ASDAS, while the levels of TARC and MDC did not correlate with these clinic indexes. Correlation analysis between the levels of chemokines and cytokines revealed a positive correlation between IP-10 and TNF-α. The levels of both Th1 and Th2 chemokines decreased under blockade of TNF-α. Our results suggest that both a Th1 chemoattractant IP-10 and Th2 chemoattractants, TARC and MDC, cooperatively play a role in the development of AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of Chemokine Activity – A Focus on the Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV/CD26

    PubMed Central

    Metzemaekers, Mieke; Van Damme, Jo; Mortier, Anneleen; Proost, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small, chemotactic proteins that play a crucial role in leukocyte migration and are, therefore, essential for proper functioning of the immune system. Chemokines exert their chemotactic effect by activation of chemokine receptors, which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Furthermore, the exact chemokine function is modulated at the level of posttranslational modifications. Among the different types of posttranslational modifications that were found to occur in vitro and in vivo, i.e., proteolysis, citrullination, glycosylation, and nitration, NH2-terminal proteolysis of chemokines has been described most intensively. Since the NH2-terminal chemokine domain mediates receptor interaction, NH2-terminal modification by limited proteolysis or amino acid side chain modification can drastically affect their biological activity. An enzyme that has been shown to provoke NH2-terminal proteolysis of various chemokines is dipeptidyl peptidase IV or CD26. This multifunctional protein is a serine protease that preferably cleaves dipeptides from the NH2-terminal region of peptides and proteins with a proline or alanine residue in the penultimate position. Various chemokines possess such a proline or alanine residue, and CD26-truncated forms of these chemokines have been identified in cell culture supernatant as well as in body fluids. The effects of CD26-mediated proteolysis in the context of chemokines turned out to be highly complex. Depending on the chemokine ligand, loss of these two NH2-terminal amino acids can result in either an increased or a decreased biological activity, enhanced receptor specificity, inactivation of the chemokine ligand, or generation of receptor antagonists. Since chemokines direct leukocyte migration in homeostatic as well as pathophysiologic conditions, CD26-mediated proteolytic processing of these chemotactic proteins may have significant consequences for appropriate functioning

  7. Increasing Turn Signal Use by Drivers Exiting a University Parking Garage: A Comparison of Passive and Mediated Prompting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Michael; Myers, Emily

    2008-01-01

    The present study attempted to further existing literature on increasing safe driving practices through visual prompts by targeting turn signal use at a 4-way intersection. Drivers exiting a university parking garage were presented with a visual prompt ("Please Signal and Drive Safely") and then observed for turn signal use while entering an…

  8. Is secondary lymphoid-organ chemokine (SLC/CCL21) much more than a constitutive chemokine?

    PubMed

    Serra, H M; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Eberhard, Y

    2004-11-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small cytokines with activities ranging from leukocyte traffick to hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and tissue organogenesis. Secondary lymphoid-organ chemokine (SLC/CCL21) was originally reported as a chemokine constitutively expressed by stromal cells and high endothelial venules in secondary lymphoid tissues and endothelium of afferent lymphatics, directing CCR7+ cells. More recently, others and we have demonstrated that SLC/CCL21 is up-regulated in different skin inflammatory conditions. Thereafter, this molecule is much more than a constitutive chemokine, which could play a role in effector and regulatory immune functions.

  9. Mixed lactate and caffeine compound increases satellite cell activity and anabolic signals for muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshimi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Yokokawa, Takumi; Hirotsu, Keisuke; Shimazu, Mariko; Uchida, Kenji; Tomi, Hironori; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2015-03-15

    We examined whether a mixed lactate and caffeine compound (LC) could effectively elicit proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells or activate anabolic signals in skeletal muscles. We cultured C2C12 cells with either lactate or LC for 6 h. We found that lactate significantly increased myogenin and follistatin protein levels and phosphorylation of P70S6K while decreasing the levels of myostatin relative to the control. LC significantly increased protein levels of Pax7, MyoD, and Ki67 in addition to myogenin, relative to control. LC also significantly increased follistatin expression relative to control and stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and P70S6K. In an in vivo study, male F344/DuCrlCrlj rats were assigned to control (Sed, n = 10), exercise (Ex, n = 12), and LC supplementation (LCEx, n = 13) groups. LC was orally administered daily. The LCEx and Ex groups were exercised on a treadmill, running for 30 min at low intensity every other day for 4 wk. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in the mass of the gastrocnemius (GA) and tibialis anterior (TA) relative to both the Sed and Ex groups. Furthermore, the LCEx group showed a significant increase in the total DNA content of TA compared with the Sed group. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in myogenin and follistatin expression of GA relative to the Ex group. These results suggest that administration of LC can effectively increase muscle mass concomitant with elevated numbers of myonuclei, even with low-intensity exercise training, via activated satellite cells and anabolic signals.

  10. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable. Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients. The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz-1 cm-1). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in deep

  11. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-07

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable. Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients. The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz(-1) cm(-1)). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in deep

  12. Molecular cloning of porcine chemokine CXC motif ligand 2 (CXCL2) and mapping to the SSC8

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maternal recognition of pregnancy is accompanied by inflammatory responses with leukocytosis and increased levels of cytokines and chemokines. Human trophoblast cells secrete chemokine CXC motif ligand 1 (CXCL1)/Gro-a and other chemotactic proteins, while monocytes co-cultured with trophoblast cells...

  13. Neuronal Chemokines: Versatile Messengers In Central Nervous System Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemokines are generally found under both physiological and pathological conditions. Whereas many reports describe chemokine expression in astrocytes and microglia and their role in the migration of leukocytes into the CNS, only few studies describe chemokine expression in neurons. Nevertheless, the expression of neuronal chemokines and the corresponding chemokine receptors in CNS cells under physiological and pathological conditions indicates that neuronal chemokines contribute to CNS cell interaction. In this study, we review recent studies describing neuronal chemokine expression and discuss potential roles of neuronal chemokines in neuron–astrocyte, neuron–microglia, and neuron–neuron interaction. PMID:17952658

  14. Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pang-chi; Li, Tim; Luo, Jing-Jia; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Kitoh, Akio; Zhao, Ming

    2012-03-01

    Monsoons, the most energetic tropical climate system, exert a great social and economic impact upon billions of people around the world. The global monsoon precipitation had an increasing trend over the past three decades. Whether or not this increasing trend will continue in the 21st century is investigated, based on simulations of three high-resolution atmospheric general circulation models that were forced by different future sea surface temperature (SST) warming patterns. The results show that the global monsoon area, precipitation and intensity all increase consistently among the model projections. This indicates that the strengthened global monsoon is a robust signal across the models and SST patterns explored here. The increase of the global monsoon precipitation is attributed to the increases of moisture convergence and surface evaporation. The former is caused by the increase of atmospheric water vapor and the latter is due to the increase of SST. The effect of the moisture and evaporation increase is offset to a certain extent by the weakening of the monsoon circulation.

  15. Stacked phased array coils for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dandan Liang; Hon Tat Hui; Tat Soon Yeo; Bing Keong Li

    2013-02-01

    A new concept of using a stacked phased coil array to increase the signal-to-circuit noise ratio (SCNR) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. Unlike conventional phased coil arrays, the proposed stacked phased coil array is constructed by stacking the coil elements closely together in the vertical direction. Through a proper combination of the coil terminal voltages, the SCNR is shown to increase with the square root of the number of coil elements. A prototype two-element array is constructed and an experimental method is designed to determine the combiner coefficients in a simulated MRI electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results show that the mutual coupling effect among the array coils can be totally removed and the combiner output voltage increases with the number of coil elements. This demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  16. Chemokine receptors: attractive targets for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Godessart, Nuria

    2005-06-01

    Studies of two antibodies, efalizumab and natalizumab, have recently demonstrated that the blockade of leukocyte migration is of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of diseases such as psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. The role of chemokines in the control of cell traffic led to their receptors being considered one of the most promising family of targets aimed at disrupting cell recruitment in chronic inflammatory processes. Choosing the appropriate chemokine receptor for each disease was not easy, and the interpretation of target validation studies proved to be extremely difficult. Despite an intense effort in the search for chemokine receptor antagonists in the last decade, no compounds in advanced clinical trials exist as such. The inherent complexity of the family, the differences between the chemokine system in mice and men, and the species selectivity of small-molecule compounds could account for this fact. Pharmaceutical companies still believe in chemokine receptors as therapeutic targets, as demonstrated by the number of compounds reported to be in development. In the next years, the developmental progression of these compounds will reveal which target within the chemokine family is of real therapeutic value.

  17. Borrelia burgdorferi induces chemokines in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, H; Krause, A; Kaufmann, A; Priem, S; Fabian, D; Burmester, G R; Gemsa, D; Rittig, M G

    1997-01-01

    Lyme disease is clinically and histologically characterized by strong inflammatory reactions that contrast the paucity of spirochetes at lesional sites, indicating that borreliae induce mechanisms that amplify the inflammatory response. To reveal the underlying mechanisms of chemoattraction and activation of responding leukocytes, we investigated the induction of chemokines in human monocytes exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi by a dose-response and kinetic analysis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli was used as a positive control stimulus. The release of the CXC chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and GRO-alpha and the CC chemokines MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, and RANTES was determined by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the corresponding gene expression patterns were determined by Northern blot analysis. The results showed a rapid and strong borrelia-inducible gene expression which was followed by the release of chemokines with peak levels after 12 to 16 h. Spirochetes and LPS were comparably effective in stimulating IL-8, GRO-alpha, MCP-1, and RANTES expression, whereas MIP-1alpha production preceded and exceeded chemokine levels induced by LPS. Unlike other bacteria, the spirochetes themselves did not bear or release factors with intrinsic chemotactic activity for monocytes or neutrophils. Thus, B. burgdorferi appears to be a strong inducer of chemokines which may, by the attraction and activation of phagocytic leukocytes, significantly contribute to inflammation and tissue damage observed in Lyme disease. PMID:9353009

  18. Blocking Hedgehog release from pancreatic cancer cells increases paracrine signaling potency.

    PubMed

    Damhofer, Helene; Veenstra, Veronique L; Tol, Johanna A M G; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Medema, Jan Paul; Bijlsma, Maarten F

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of morphogens play crucial roles in development but are also involved in the progression of certain types of cancer. Despite being synthesized as hydrophobic dually lipid-modified molecules, and thus being strongly membrane-associated, Hh ligands are able to spread through tissues and act on target cells several cell diameters away. Various mechanisms that mediate Hh release have been discussed in recent years; however, little is known about dispersion of this ligand from cancer cells. Using co-culture models in conjunction with a newly developed reporter system, we were able to show that different members of the ADAM family of metalloproteinases strongly contribute to the release of endogenous bioactive Hh from pancreatic cancer cells, but that this solubilization decreases the potency of cancer cells to signal to adjacent stromal cells in direct co-culture models. These findings imply that under certain conditions, cancer-cell-tethered Hh molecules are the more potent signaling activators and that retaining Hh on the surface of cancer cells can unexpectedly increase the effective signaling range of this ligand, depending on tissue context.

  19. Anabolic steroids activate calcineurin-NFAT signaling and thereby increase myotube size and reduce denervation atrophy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher

    2015-01-05

    Anabolic androgens have been shown to reduce muscle loss due to immobilization, paralysis and many other medical conditions, but the molecular basis for these actions is poorly understood. We have recently demonstrated that nandrolone, a synthetic androgen, slows muscle atrophy after nerve transection associated with down-regulation of regulator of calcineurin 2 (RCAN2), a calcineurin inhibitor, suggesting a possible role of calcineurin-NFAT signaling. To test this possibility, rat gastrocnemius muscle was analyzed at 56 days after denervation. In denervated muscle, calcineurin activity declined and NFATc4 was excluded from the nucleus and these effects were reversed by nandrolone. Similarly, nandrolone increased calcineurin activity and nuclear NFATc4 levels in cultured L6 myotubes. Nandrolone also induced cell hypertrophy that was blocked by cyclosporin A or overexpression of RCAN2. Finally protection against denervation atrophy by nandrolone in rats was blocked by cyclosporin A. These results demonstrate for the first time that nandrolone activates calcineurin-NFAT signaling, and that such signaling is important in nandrolone-induced cell hypertrophy and protection against paralysis-induced muscle atrophy.

  20. Brain-computer interfaces increase whole-brain signal to noise.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, T Dorina; Lisinski, Jonathan M; McHenry, Monica A; White, Jason P; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-08-13

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can convert mental states into signals to drive real-world devices, but it is not known if a given covert task is the same when performed with and without BCI-based control. Using a BCI likely involves additional cognitive processes, such as multitasking, attention, and conflict monitoring. In addition, it is challenging to measure the quality of covert task performance. We used whole-brain classifier-based real-time functional MRI to address these issues, because the method provides both classifier-based maps to examine the neural requirements of BCI and classification accuracy to quantify the quality of task performance. Subjects performed a covert counting task at fast and slow rates to control a visual interface. Compared with the same task when viewing but not controlling the interface, we observed that being in control of a BCI improved task classification of fast and slow counting states. Additional BCI control increased subjects' whole-brain signal-to-noise ratio compared with the absence of control. The neural pattern for control consisted of a positive network comprised of dorsal parietal and frontal regions and the anterior insula of the right hemisphere as well as an expansive negative network of regions. These findings suggest that real-time functional MRI can serve as a platform for exploring information processing and frontoparietal and insula network-based regulation of whole-brain task signal-to-noise ratio.

  1. AHNAK deficiency promotes browning and lipolysis in mice via increased responsiveness to β-adrenergic signalling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Lee, Seo Hyun; Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Il Yong; Kim, Youn Ju; Kyeong, Dong Soo; Lim, Hee Jung; Cho, Soo Young; Choi, Junhee; Wi, Young Jin; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Bae, Yun Soo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-03-18

    In adipose tissue, agonists of the β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) regulate lipolysis, lipid oxidation, and thermogenesis. The deficiency in the thermogenesis induced by neuroblast differentiation-associated protein AHNAK in white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice fed a high-fat diet suggests that AHNAK may stimulate energy expenditure via development of beige fat. Here, we report that AHNAK deficiency promoted browning and thermogenic gene expression in WAT but not in brown adipose tissue of mice stimulated with the ADRB3 agonist CL-316243. Consistent with the increased thermogenesis, Ahnak(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in energy expenditure, accompanied by elevated mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT depots in response to CL-316243. Additionally, AHNAK-deficient WAT contained more eosinophils and higher levels of type 2 cytokines (IL-4/IL-13) to promote browning of WAT in response to CL-316243. This was associated with enhanced sympathetic tone in the WAT via upregulation of adrb3 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in response to β-adrenergic activation. CL-316243 activated PKA signalling and enhanced lipolysis, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and release of free glycerol in Ahnak(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. Overall, these findings suggest an important role of AHNAK in the regulation of thermogenesis and lipolysis in WAT via β-adrenergic signalling.

  2. Cyclic exercise induces anti-inflammatory signal molecule increases in the plasma of Parkinson's patients.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Patrick; Zhu, Wei; Mantione, Kirk; Rymer, Marilyn; Dardik, Irving; Reisman, Stan; Hagberg, Sean; Stefano, George B

    2003-10-01

    It has been known for many years that immune system alterations occur with Parkinson's disease (PD). Changes in lymphocyte populations in cerebrospinal fluid and blood, immunoglobulin synthesis, and cytokine and acute phase protein production have been observed in patients with PD. Hence, there is evidence for inflammation. In this report we demonstrate that cyclic exercise over months results in a significant increase in the rise of plasma anti-inflammatory signal molecules, such as interleukin-10 and adrenocorticotropin. Additionally, endogenous plasma morphine levels increase with the duration of the cyclic exercise protocol. Morphine is identified and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection and nano electro-spray ionization double quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry. Proinflammatory cytokine, i.e., interleukin-1, interleukin-6, plasma levels did not increase. These results matched with those reported previously, demonstrating enhanced motor skills and mood elevation with this cyclic exercise protocol, suggest that this protocol induces the formation of anti-inflammatory signal molecules, which appear to be associated with alleviation of some of the clinical characteristics of PD.

  3. AHNAK deficiency promotes browning and lipolysis in mice via increased responsiveness to β-adrenergic signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Lee, Seo Hyun; Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Il Yong; Kim, Youn Ju; Kyeong, Dong Soo; Lim, Hee Jung; Cho, Soo Young; Choi, Junhee; Wi, Young Jin; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Bae, Yun Soo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In adipose tissue, agonists of the β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) regulate lipolysis, lipid oxidation, and thermogenesis. The deficiency in the thermogenesis induced by neuroblast differentiation-associated protein AHNAK in white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice fed a high-fat diet suggests that AHNAK may stimulate energy expenditure via development of beige fat. Here, we report that AHNAK deficiency promoted browning and thermogenic gene expression in WAT but not in brown adipose tissue of mice stimulated with the ADRB3 agonist CL-316243. Consistent with the increased thermogenesis, Ahnak−/− mice exhibited an increase in energy expenditure, accompanied by elevated mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT depots in response to CL-316243. Additionally, AHNAK-deficient WAT contained more eosinophils and higher levels of type 2 cytokines (IL-4/IL-13) to promote browning of WAT in response to CL-316243. This was associated with enhanced sympathetic tone in the WAT via upregulation of adrb3 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in response to β-adrenergic activation. CL-316243 activated PKA signalling and enhanced lipolysis, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and release of free glycerol in Ahnak−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. Overall, these findings suggest an important role of AHNAK in the regulation of thermogenesis and lipolysis in WAT via β-adrenergic signalling. PMID:26987950

  4. Structural And Functional Characterization of CC Chemokine CCL14

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, K.Y.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Zhao, Q.; Fleur, D.La; Naik, C.; Chun, T.-W.; Tsareva, T.; Kanakaraj, P.; Laird, M.W.; Shah, R.; George, L.; Sanyal, I.; Moore, P.A.; Demeler, B.; Choe, S.

    2009-06-02

    CC chemokine ligand 14, CCL14, is a human CC chemokine that is of recent interest because of its natural ability, upon proteolytic processing of the first eight NH{sub 2}-terminal residues, to bind to and signal through the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) co-receptor, CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5). We report X-ray crystallographic structures of both full-length CCL14 and signaling-active, truncated CCL14 [9-74] determined at 2.23 and 1.8 {angstrom}, respectively. Although CCL14 and CCL14 [9-74] differ in their ability to bind CCR5 for biological signaling, we find that the NH{sub 2}-terminal eight amino acids (residues 1 through 8) are completely disordered in CCL14 and both show the identical mode of the dimeric assembly characteristic of the CC type chemokine structures. However, analytical ultracentrifugation studies reveal that the CCL14 is stable as a dimer at a concentration as low as 100 nM, whereas CCL14 [9-74] is fully monomeric at the same concentration. By the same method, the equilibrium between monomers of CCL14 [9-74] and higher order oligomers is estimated to be of EC{sub 1,4} = 4.98 {mu}M for monomer-tetramer conversion. The relative instability of CCL14 [9-74] oligomers as compared to CCL14 is also reflected in the K{sub d}'s that are estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method to be {approx}9.84 and 667 nM for CCL14 and CCL14 [9-74], respectively. This {approx}60-fold difference in stability at a physiologically relevant concentration can potentially account for their different signaling ability. Functional data from the activity assays by intracellular calcium flux and inhibition of CCR5-mediated HIV-1 entry show that only CCL14 [9-74] is fully active at these near-physiological concentrations where CCL14 [9-74] is monomeric and CCL14 is dimeric. These results together suggest that the ability of CCL14 [9-74] to monomerize can play a role for cellular activation.

  5. VCC-1, a novel chemokine, promotes tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Edward J.; Head, Richard; Griggs, David W.; Sun Duo; Evans, Robert J.; Swearingen, Michelle L.; Westlin, Marisa M.; Mazzarella, Richard . E-mail: richard.a.mazzarella@pfizer.com

    2006-11-10

    We have identified a novel human gene by transcriptional microarray analysis, which is co-regulated in tumors and angiogenesis model systems with VEGF expression. Isolation of cDNA clones containing the full-length VCC-1 transcript from both human and mouse shows a 119 amino acid protein with a 22 amino acid cleavable signal sequence in both species. Comparison of the protein product of this gene with hidden Markov models of all known proteins shows weak but significant homology with two known chemokines, SCYA17 and SCYA16. Northern analysis of human tissues detects a 1 kb band in lung and skeletal muscle. Murine VCC-1 expression can also be detected in lung as well as thyroid, submaxillary gland, epididymis, and uterus tissues by slot blot analysis. By quantitative real time RT-PCR 71% of breast tumors showed 3- to 24-fold up-regulation of VCC-1. In situ hybridization of breast carcinomas showed strong expression of the gene in both normal and transformed mammary gland ductal epithelial cells. In vitro, human microvascular endothelial cells grown on fibronectin increase VCC-1 expression by almost 100-fold. In addition, in the mouse angioma endothelial cell line PY4.1 the gene was over-expressed by 28-fold 6 h after induction of tube formation while quiescent and proliferating cells showed no change. VCC-1 expression is also increased by VEGF and FGF treatment, about 6- and 5-fold, respectively. Finally, 100% of mice injected with NIH3T3 cells over-expressing VCC-1 develop rapidly progressing tumors within 21 days while no growth is seen in any control mice injected with NIH3T3 cells containing the vector alone. These results strongly suggest that VCC-1 plays a role in angiogenesis and possibly in the development of tumors in some tissue types.

  6. Chemokine and cytokine levels in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Udai P; Singh, Narendra P; Murphy, E Angela; Price, Robert L; Fayad, Raja; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic, relapsing, and tissue destructive lesions that are accompanied by the uncontrolled activation of effector immune cells in the mucosa. Recent estimates indicate that there are 1.3 million annual cases of IBD in the United States, 50% of which consists of CD and 50% of UC. Chemokines and cytokines play a pivotal role in the regulation of mucosal inflammation by promoting leukocyte migration to sites of inflammation ultimately leading to tissue damage and destruction. In recent years, experimental studies in rodents have led to a better understanding of the role played by these inflammatory mediators in the development and progression of colitis. However, the clinical literature on IBD remains limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate systemic concentrations of key chemokines and cytokines in forty-two IBD patients with a range of disease activity compared to levels found in ten healthy donors. We found a significant increase in an array of chemokines including macrophage migration factor (MIF), CCL25, CCL23, CXCL5, CXCL13, CXCL10, CXCL11, MCP1, and CCL21 in IBD patients as compared to normal healthy donors (P<0.05). Further, we also report increases in the inflammatory cytokines IL-16, IFN-γ, IL-1β and TNF-α in IBD patients when compared to healthy donors (P<0.05). These data clearly indicate an increase in circulating levels of specific chemokines and cytokines that are known to modulate systemic level through immune cells results in affecting local intestinal inflammation and tissue damage in IBD patients. Blockade of these inflammatory mediators should be explored as a mechanism to alleviate or even reverse symptoms of IBD.

  7. Metformin in vitro and in vivo increases adenosine signaling in rabbit corpora cavernosa.

    PubMed

    Vignozzi, Linda; Filippi, Sandra; Comeglio, Paolo; Cellai, Ilaria; Morelli, Annamaria; Rastrelli, Giulia; Maneschi, Elena; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2014-07-01

    In subjects with erectile dysfunction responding poorly to sildenafil, metformin was reported to improve erections. The aim of this study is to investigate metformin's mechanism of action on erectile function, particularly focusing on adenosine (ADO) and nitric oxide (NO) signaling in an animal model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic syndrome. In vitro contractility studies of penile strips. Penile expression of genes related to ADO or NO signaling was also evaluated. In vitro contractility studies were used to investigate the effect of in vivo and ex vivo metformin administration on ADO- or acetylcholine (Ach)-induced relaxation of penile strips from HFD as compared with animals fed a regular diet (RD). Expression of ADO receptor type 3 (A3 R), ADO deaminase (ADA), AMP deaminase type 1 (AMPD1), and 2 (AMPD2) was decreased in HFD as compared with RD. Accordingly, in HFD the ADO relaxant effect was potentiated as compared with RD (P < 0.02). In vivo metformin treatment in both RD and HFD significantly increased the ADO relaxing effect (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.01, respectively, vs. relative untreated groups) although to a different extent. In fact, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 )/IC50 ratio in RD increased fourfold vs. HFD (RD IC50 ratio = 13.75 ± 2.96; HFD IC50 ratio = 2.85 ± 0.52). In corpora cavernosa (CC) from HFD, in vivo metformin (i) normalized A3 R, ADA, and AMPD1; (ii) further decreased AMPD2; (iii) increased dimethylarginine dimethylamino-hydrolase; and (iv) partially restored impaired Ach-induced relaxation. Ex vivo metformin time and dose dependently increased the relaxant effect of ADO in RD. The potentiating effect of metformin on ADO-induced relaxation was significantly reduced by preincubation with NO synthase inhibitor N(ω) -Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Interestingly, in vivo testosterone supplementation in HFD rabbits (i) increased penile expression of endothelial NO

  8. Chemokine cooperativity is caused by competitive glycosaminoglycan binding

    PubMed Central

    Verkaar, Folkert; van Offenbeek, Jody; van der Lee, Miranda M.C.; van Lith, Lambertus H.C.J.; Watts, Anne O.; Rops, Angelique L.W.M.M.; Aguilar, David C.; Ziarek, Joshua J.; van der Vlag, Johan; Handel, Tracy M.; Volkman, Brian F.; Proudfoot, Amanda E.I.; Vischer, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a family of secreted proteins that activate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and thereby control the migration of leukocytes during inflammation or immune surveillance. The positional information required for such migratory behavior is governed by the binding of chemokines to membrane-tethered glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which establishes a chemokine concentration gradient. An often-observed but incompletely understood behavior of chemokines is the ability of unrelated chemokines to enhance the potency with which another chemokine subtype can activate its cognate receptor. This phenomenon has been demonstrated to occur between many chemokine combinations and across several model systems, and has been dubbed “chemokine cooperativity”. Here, we have used GAG binding-deficient chemokine mutants and cell-based functional (migration) assays to demonstrate that chemokine cooperativity is caused by competitive binding of chemokines to GAGs. This mechanistic explanation of chemokine cooperativity provides insight into chemokine gradient formation in the context of inflammation, where multiple chemokines are secreted simultaneously. PMID:24639348

  9. PKCδ localization at the membrane increases matrix traction force dependent on PLCγ1/EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Joshua; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Wang, James C-H; Wells, Alan

    2013-01-01

    During wound healing, fibroblasts initially migrate into the wound bed and later contract the matrix. Relevant mediators of transcellular contractility revealed by systems analyses are protein kinase c delta/myosin light chain-2 (PKCδ/MLC-2). PKCδ is activated by growth factor-driven PLCγ1 hydrolysis of phosphoinositide bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis when it becomes tranlocated to the membrane. This leads to MLC-2 phosphorylation that regulates myosin for contractility. Furthermore, PKCδ n-terminus mediates PKCδ localization to the membrane in relative proximity to PLCγ1 activity. However, the role this localization and the relationship to its activation and signaling of force is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated whether the membrane localization of PKCδ mediates the transcellular contractility of fibroblasts. To determine PKCδ activation in targeted membrane locations in mouse fibroblast cells (NR6-WT), two PKCδ constructs were generated; PKCδ-CaaX with farnesylation moiety targeting PKCδ to the membrane and PKCδ-SaaX a non-targeting control. Increased mean cell force was observed before and during EGF stimulation in fibroblasts expressing membrane-targeted PKCδ (PKCδ-CaaX) when analyzed with 2D cell traction force and 3D compaction of collagen matrix. This effect was reduced in cells deficient in EGFR/PLCy1 signaling. In cells expressing non-membrane targeted PKCδ (PKCδ-SaaX), the cell force exerted outside the ECM (extracellular matrix) was less, but cell motility/speed/persistence was increased after EGF stimulation. Change in cell motility and increased force exertion was also preceded by change in cell morphology. Organization of actin stress fibers was also decreased as a result of increasing membrane targeting of PKCδ. From these results membrane tethering of PKCδ leads to increased force exertion on ECM. Furthermore, our data show PLCγ1 regulation of PKCδ, at least in part, drives transcellular contractility in fibroblasts.

  10. Orexin-1 receptor signaling increases motivation for cocaine-associated cues

    PubMed Central

    Bentzley, Brandon S.; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is involved in multiple cocaine addiction processes that involve drug-associated environmental cues, including cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and expression of conditioned place preference. However, the orexin system does not play a role in several behaviors that are less cue-dependent, such as cocaine-primed reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and low-effort cocaine self-administration. We hypothesized that cocaine-associated cues, but not cocaine alone, engage signaling at orexin-1 receptors (OX1R), and this cue-engaged OX1R signaling increases motivation for cocaine. Motivation for cocaine was measured in Sprague-Dawley rats with behavioral-economic demand curve analysis after pretreatment with the OX1R antagonist SB-334867 (SB) or vehicle with and without light+tone cues. Demand for cocaine was higher when cocaine-associated cues were present, and SB only reduced cocaine demand in the presence of these cues. We then asked if cocaine demand is linked to cued-reinstatement of cocaine seeking, as both procedures are partially driven by cocaine-associated cues in an orexin-dependent manner. SB blocked cue-induced reinstatement behavior, and baseline demand predicted SB efficacy with the largest effect in high demand animals, i.e., animals with the greatest cue-dependent behavior. We conclude that OX1R signaling increases the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine-associated cues but not for cocaine alone. This supports our view that orexin plays a prominent role in the ability of conditioned cues to activate motivational responses. PMID:25754681

  11. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-02

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

  12. Orexin-1 receptor signaling increases motivation for cocaine-associated cues.

    PubMed

    Bentzley, Brandon S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2015-05-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is involved in multiple cocaine addiction processes that involve drug-associated environmental cues, including cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and expression of conditioned place preference. However, the orexin system does not play a role in several behaviors that are less cue-dependent, such as cocaine-primed reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and low-effort cocaine self-administration. We hypothesized that cocaine-associated cues, but not cocaine alone, engage signaling at orexin-1 receptors (OX1Rs), and this cue-engaged OX1R signaling increases motivation for cocaine. Motivation for cocaine was measured in Sprague-Dawley rats with behavioral-economic demand curve analysis after pretreatment with the OX1R antagonist SB-334867 (SB) or vehicle with and without light + tone cues. Demand for cocaine was higher when cocaine-associated cues were present, and SB only reduced cocaine demand in the presence of these cues. We then investigated whether cocaine demand was linked to the cued reinstatement of cocaine seeking, as both procedures are partially driven by cocaine-associated cues in an orexin-dependent manner. SB blocked cue-induced reinstatement behavior, and baseline demand predicted SB efficacy with the largest effect in high-demand animals, i.e. animals with the greatest cue-dependent behavior. We conclude that OX1R signaling increases the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine-associated cues but not that of cocaine alone. This supports our view that orexin plays a prominent role in the ability of conditioned cues to activate motivational responses. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Chemokines a hope of specific anti-inflammatory treatment].

    PubMed

    Schedvins, Per; Hjelmström, Peter

    2002-03-07

    Inflammation is a serious medical problem that causes suffering in many common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Despite the fact that the clinical signs of inflammation--rubor, tumor, calor and dolor--have been known for almost two thousand years, our knowledge of the molecular pathways that mediate inflammation is still limited. Today's anti-inflammatory drugs are non-specific and have many undesirable side effects. The discovery of chemokines as small specific regulatory proteins of the immune system has increased our understanding of the inflammatory process. We have reason to believe that chemokines and their receptors are going to be targets for a new kind of anti-inflammatory therapy.

  14. Pathogen-induced chemokine secretion from model intestinal epithelium is inhibited by lipoxin A4 analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, A T; McCormick, B; Neish, A S; Petasis, N A; Gronert, K; Serhan, C N; Madara, J L

    1998-01-01

    Enteric pathogens induce intestinal epithelium to secrete chemokines that direct movement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Mechanisms that might downregulate secretion of these proinflammatory chemokines and thus contain intestinal inflammation have not yet been elucidated. The antiinflammatory activities exhibited by the arachidonate metabolite lipoxin A4 (LXA4) suggests that this eicosanoid, which is biosynthesized in vivo at sites of inflammation, might play such a role. We investigated whether chemokine secretion could be regulated by stable analogs of LXA4. Monolayers of T84 intestinal epithelial cells were infected with Salmonella typhimurium, which elicits secretion of distinct apical (pathogen-elicited epithelial chemoattractant) and basolateral (IL-8) chemokines. Stable analogs of LXA4 inhibited S. typhimurium-induced (but not phorbol ester-induced) secretion of both IL-8 and pathogen-elicited epithelial chemoattractant. LXA4 stable analogs did not alter bacterial adherence to nor internalization by epithelia, indicating that LXA4 stable analogs did not block all signals that Salmonella typhimurium activates in intestinal epithelia, but likely led to attenuation of signals that mediate chemokine secretion. Inhibition of S. typhimurium-induced IL-8 secretion by LXA4 analogs was concentration- (IC50 approximately 1 nM) and time-dependent (maximal inhibition approximately 1 h). As a result of these effects, LXA4 stable analogs inhibited the ability of bacteria-infected epithelia to direct polymorphonuclear leukocyte movement. These data suggest that LXA4 and its stable analogs may be useful in downregulating active inflammation at mucosal surfaces. PMID:9576749

  15. Anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 augments monocyte chemotaxis towards CCR5 chemokines.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-08-28

    Innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides are a class of immunomodulators which enhance and modulate host innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. While IDR-mediated protection against a range of bacterial pathogens is dependent on enhanced monocyte recruitment to the site of infection, the mechanisms through which they increase monocyte trafficking remain unclear. In this study, anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 was shown to enhance monocyte chemotaxis towards chemokines CCL3 and CCL5. This enhancement correlated with the selective upregulation of CCR5 surface expression by peptide-treated monocytes. It was found that IDR-1002 enhancement of monocyte chemotaxis was fully dependent on CCR5 function. Furthermore, IDR-1002 enhanced chemokine-induced monocyte p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a CCR5-dependent fashion. Overall, these results indicate that peptide IDR-1002 can selectively influence monocyte recruitment by host chemokines through the regulation of chemokine receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bivalent Ligands Targeting Chemokine Receptor Dimerization: Molecular Design and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher Kent; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that chemokine receptors may form functional dimers with unique pharmacological profiles. A common practice to characterize such G protein-coupled receptor dimerization processes is to apply bivalent ligands as chemical probes which can interact with both receptors simultaneously. Currently, two chemokine receptor dimers have been studied by applying bivalent compounds: the CXCR4-CXCR4 homodimer and the CCR5-MOR heterodimer. These bivalent compounds have revealed how dimerization influences receptor function and may lead to novel therapeutics. Future design of bivalent ligands for chemokine receptor dimers may be aided with the recently available CXCR4 homodimer, and CCR5 monomer crystal structures by more accurately simulating chemokine receptors and their dimers. PMID:25159160

  17. Spatial covert attention increases contrast sensitivity across the CSF: support for signal enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasco, M.; Penpeci-Talgar, C.; Eckstein, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study is the first to report the benefits of spatial covert attention on contrast sensitivity in a wide range of spatial frequencies when a target alone was presented in the absence of a local post-mask. We used a peripheral precue (a small circle indicating the target location) to explore the effects of covert spatial attention on contrast sensitivity as assessed by orientation discrimination (Experiments 1-4), detection (Experiments 2 and 3) and localization (Experiment 3) tasks. In all four experiments the target (a Gabor patch ranging in spatial frequency from 0.5 to 10 cpd) was presented alone in one of eight possible locations equidistant from fixation. Contrast sensitivity was consistently higher for peripherally- than for neutrally-cued trials, even though we eliminated variables (distracters, global masks, local masks, and location uncertainty) that are known to contribute to an external noise reduction explanation of attention. When observers were presented with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches an external noise reduction signal detection model accounted for the cueing benefit in a discrimination task (Experiment 1). However, such a model could not account for this benefit when location uncertainty was reduced, either by: (a) Increasing overall performance level (Experiment 2); (b) increasing stimulus contrast to enable fine discriminations of slightly tilted suprathreshold stimuli (Experiment 3); and (c) presenting a local post-mask (Experiment 4). Given that attentional benefits occurred under conditions that exclude all variables predicted by the external noise reduction model, these results support the signal enhancement model of attention.

  18. Spatial covert attention increases contrast sensitivity across the CSF: support for signal enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasco, M.; Penpeci-Talgar, C.; Eckstein, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study is the first to report the benefits of spatial covert attention on contrast sensitivity in a wide range of spatial frequencies when a target alone was presented in the absence of a local post-mask. We used a peripheral precue (a small circle indicating the target location) to explore the effects of covert spatial attention on contrast sensitivity as assessed by orientation discrimination (Experiments 1-4), detection (Experiments 2 and 3) and localization (Experiment 3) tasks. In all four experiments the target (a Gabor patch ranging in spatial frequency from 0.5 to 10 cpd) was presented alone in one of eight possible locations equidistant from fixation. Contrast sensitivity was consistently higher for peripherally- than for neutrally-cued trials, even though we eliminated variables (distracters, global masks, local masks, and location uncertainty) that are known to contribute to an external noise reduction explanation of attention. When observers were presented with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches an external noise reduction signal detection model accounted for the cueing benefit in a discrimination task (Experiment 1). However, such a model could not account for this benefit when location uncertainty was reduced, either by: (a) Increasing overall performance level (Experiment 2); (b) increasing stimulus contrast to enable fine discriminations of slightly tilted suprathreshold stimuli (Experiment 3); and (c) presenting a local post-mask (Experiment 4). Given that attentional benefits occurred under conditions that exclude all variables predicted by the external noise reduction model, these results support the signal enhancement model of attention.

  19. Nutrient signaling in protein homeostasis: an increase in quantity at the expense of quality.

    PubMed

    Conn, Crystal S; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2013-04-16

    The discovery that rapamycin extends the life span of diverse organisms has triggered many studies aimed at identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) regulates cell growth and may regulate organismal aging by controlling mRNA translation. However, how inhibiting mTORC1 and decreasing protein synthesis can extend life span remains an unresolved issue. We showed that constitutively active mTORC1 signaling increased general protein synthesis but unexpectedly reduced the quality of newly synthesized polypeptides. We demonstrated that constitutively active mTORC1 decreased translation fidelity by increasing the speed of ribosomal elongation. Conversely, rapamycin treatment restored the quality of newly synthesized polypeptides mainly by slowing the rate of ribosomal elongation. We also found distinct roles for mTORC1 downstream targets in maintaining protein homeostasis. Loss of S6 kinases, but not 4E-BP family proteins, which are both involved in regulation of translation, attenuated the effects of rapamycin on the quality of newly translated proteins. Our results reveal a mechanistic connection between mTORC1 and protein quality, highlighting the central role of nutrient signaling in growth and aging.

  20. Loss of GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells increases NSAID ileal injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaonan; Gilbert, Shila; Groschwitz, Katherine; Hogan, Simon; Jurickova, Ingrid; Trapnell, Bruce; Samson, Charles; Gully, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    increases NSAID ileal injury; furthermore, GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells regulates ileal epithelial homeostasis via the STAT5 pathway. The therapeutic use of GM-CSF may therefore be beneficial in chronic ileitis associated with CD. PMID:20584783

  1. Increased Sucrose Accumulation Regulates Iron-Deficiency Responses by Promoting Auxin Signaling in Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian Yong; Ye, Yi Quan; Fan, Shi Kai; Jin, Chong Wei; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have identified that auxins acts upstream of nitric oxide in regulating iron deficiency responses in roots, but the upstream signaling molecule of auxins remains unknown. In this study, we showed that Fe deficiency increased sucrose (Suc) level in roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Exogenous application of Suc further stimulated Fe deficiency-induced ferric-chelate-reductase (FCR) activity and expression of Fe acquisition-related genes FRO2, IRT1, and FIT in roots. The opposite patterns were observed in the dark treatment. In addition, FCR activity and expression of Fe acquisition-related genes were higher in the Suc high-accumulating transgenic plant 35S::SUC2 but were lower in the Suc low-accumulating mutant suc2-5 compared with wild-type plants under Fe-deficient conditions. Consequently, Fe deficiency tolerance was enhanced in 35S::SUC2 but was compromised in suc2-5. Exogenous Suc also increased root β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in auxin-inducible reporter DR5-GUS transgenic plants under Fe deficiency. However, exogenous Suc failed to increase FCR activity and expression of Fe acquisition-related genes in the auxin transport-impaired mutants aux1-7 and pin1-1 as well as in the wild-type plants treated with an auxin transport inhibitor under Fe deficiency. In summary, we found that increased Suc accumulation is required for regulating Fe deficiency responses in plants, with auxins acting downstream in transmitting the Fe deficiency signal.

  2. Increased Sucrose Accumulation Regulates Iron-Deficiency Responses by Promoting Auxin Signaling in Arabidopsis Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xian Yong; Ye, Yi Quan; Fan, Shi Kai

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified that auxins acts upstream of nitric oxide in regulating iron deficiency responses in roots, but the upstream signaling molecule of auxins remains unknown. In this study, we showed that Fe deficiency increased sucrose (Suc) level in roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Exogenous application of Suc further stimulated Fe deficiency-induced ferric-chelate-reductase (FCR) activity and expression of Fe acquisition-related genes FRO2, IRT1, and FIT in roots. The opposite patterns were observed in the dark treatment. In addition, FCR activity and expression of Fe acquisition-related genes were higher in the Suc high-accumulating transgenic plant 35S::SUC2 but were lower in the Suc low-accumulating mutant suc2-5 compared with wild-type plants under Fe-deficient conditions. Consequently, Fe deficiency tolerance was enhanced in 35S::SUC2 but was compromised in suc2-5. Exogenous Suc also increased root β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in auxin-inducible reporter DR5-GUS transgenic plants under Fe deficiency. However, exogenous Suc failed to increase FCR activity and expression of Fe acquisition-related genes in the auxin transport-impaired mutants aux1-7 and pin1-1 as well as in the wild-type plants treated with an auxin transport inhibitor under Fe deficiency. In summary, we found that increased Suc accumulation is required for regulating Fe deficiency responses in plants, with auxins acting downstream in transmitting the Fe deficiency signal. PMID:26644507

  3. Inhibition of central amylin signaling increases food intake and body adiposity in rats.

    PubMed

    Rushing, P A; Hagan, M M; Seeley, R J; Lutz, T A; D'Alessio, D A; Air, E L; Woods, S C

    2001-11-01

    Amylin is a 37-amino acid peptide hormone that is co-secreted with insulin by pancreatic beta cells in response to feeding. We recently reported that amylin potently reduces food intake, body weight, and adiposity when delivered into the 3rd cerebral ventricle (i3vt) of rats. We have now infused i3vt a specific antagonist (AC187) to ascertain the physiological relevance of central amylin in the control of energy balance. After establishing the ability of i3vt AC187 to block the anorexic effect of i3vt amylin, we performed an experiment to examine the impact of acute inhibition of central amylin signaling on feeding. Separate groups (n = 7/group) of ad lib-fed male Long Evans rats were given one bolus i3vt infusion of synthetic cerebrospinal fluid vehicle (CSF) or AC187 (250 or 1000 pmol). Acute infusion of AC187 tended to increase 1-h food intake and significantly elevated 4-h intake. Both the 250 and 1000 pmol doses produced significant increases as compared to CSF. In another experiment designed to tonically inhibit central amylin signaling over an extended period, two other groups of rats (n = 6/group) received continuous i3vt infusion of CSF or 100 pmol/h AC187 over 14 days via implantable osmotic pumps. Rats receiving AC187 ate significantly more food over the 14-day infusion period relative to controls (CSF = 322 +/- 6 g, AC187 = 360 +/- 12 g). Although body weight was not significantly affected, body fat was increased by about 30% in the AC187 rats, with no difference in lean tissue between the groups. Additionally, although fasting plasma glucose did not differ between the CSF and AC187 groups after 14 days of infusion, plasma insulin was significantly elevated in the AC187 rats. In summary, the present results document significant increases of food intake and body adiposity resulting from inhibition of central amylin signaling. They are consistent with our hypothesis that CNS actions of endogenous amylin contribute to the long-term regulation of energy

  4. Biologically active neutrophil chemokine pattern in tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    RUDACK, C; JÖRG, S; SACHSE, F

    2004-01-01

    To gain an insight into the mechanisms of chronic and acute inflammation, the production of neutrophil chemokines in different types of tonsillitis – hyperplastic tonsillitis (HT), recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and peritonsillar abscesses (PA) – was investigated. The chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene-α (GRO-α), epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant-78 (ENA-78) and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2) were detected and shown to have different biological activities. With respect to the biological properties of CXC chemokines, the biological activity of the chemokines was identified using a three-step high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique, a bioassay involving measurement of neutrophil chemotaxis in a single Boyden chamber in tissue of HT, RT and PA. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the chemokine concentrations were determined in the different tonsillitis entities. The chemokine pattern was dominated in PA by IL-8 and GRO-α and in RT by GRO-α. Hyperplastic tonsils of patients without a history of infection generated about five times lower IL-8 than PA. A protein concentration of GCP-2 was induced in PA and RT, whereas ENA-78 remained the same in all entities. In conclusion, it would appear that IL-8 was up-regulated in acute inflammation, whereas GRO-α dominated in chronic inflammation. ENA-78 seems not to play a pivotal role in inflammatory processes in tonsils. GCP-2 may serve as a substitute chemokine in certain inflammatory conditions as its quantity of mRNA and protein was higher in RT and PA than in HT. PMID:15008987

  5. Moderate increases in intracellular calcium activate neuroprotective signals in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bickler, P E; Fahlman, C S

    2004-01-01

    Although large increases in neuronal intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) are lethal, moderate increases in [Ca(2+)](i) of 50-200 nM may induce immediate or long-term tolerance of ischemia or other stresses. In neurons in rat hippocampal slice cultures, we determined the relationship between [Ca(2+)](i), cell death, and Ca(2+)-dependent neuroprotective signals before and after a 45 min period of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Thirty minutes before OGD, [Ca(2+)](i) was increased in CA1 neurons by 40-200 nM with 1 nM-1 microM of a Ca(2+)-selective ionophore (calcimycin or ionomycin-"Ca(2+) preconditioning"). Ca(2+) preconditioning greatly reduced cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate during the following 7 days, even though [Ca(2+)](i) was similar (approximately 2 microM) in preconditioned and control neurons 1 h after the OGD. When pre-OGD [Ca(2+)](i) was lowered to 25 nM (10 nM ionophore in Ca(2+)-free medium) or increased to 8 microM (10 microM ionophore), more than 90% of neurons died. Increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein protein kinase B (Akt) and the MAP kinase ERK (p42/44) were present in preconditioned slices after OGD. Reducing Ca(2+) influx, inhibiting calmodulin, and preventing Akt or MAP kinase p42/44 upregulation prevented Ca(2+) preconditioning, supporting a specific role for Ca(2+) in the neuroprotective process. Further, in continuously oxygenated cultured hippocampal/cortical neurons, preconditioning for 30 min with 10 nM ionomycin reduced cell death following a 4 microM increase in [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by 1 microM ionomycin. Thus, a zone of moderately increased [Ca(2+)](i) before a potentially lethal insult promotes cell survival, uncoupling subsequent large increases in [Ca(2+)](i) from initiating cell death processes.

  6. Hypothalamic Inflammation and Energy Balance Disruptions: Spotlight on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Stobbe, Katharina; Cansell, Céline; Nahon, Jean-Louis; Blondeau, Nicolas; Rovère, Carole

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance as it controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural, and nutrient-related signals and cues. Many years of research have focused on the regulation of energy balance by hypothalamic neurons, but the most recent findings suggest that neurons and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the hypothalamus actually orchestrate together several metabolic functions. Because glial cells have been described as mediators of inflammatory processes in the brain, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and the deregulations of feeding behavior, leading to involuntary weight loss or obesity for example, has been suggested. Several inflammatory pathways that could impair the hypothalamic control of energy balance have been studied over the years such as, among others, toll-like receptors and canonical cytokines. Yet, less studied so far, chemokines also represent interesting candidates that could link the aforementioned pathways and the activity of hypothalamic neurons. Indeed, chemokines, in addition to their role in attracting immune cells to the inflamed site, have been suggested to be capable of neuromodulation. Thus, they could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators involved in the maintenance of energy balance. This review discusses the different inflammatory pathways that have been identified so far in the hypothalamus in the context of feeding behavior and body weight control impairments, with a particular focus on chemokines signaling that opens a new avenue in the understanding of the major role played by inflammation in obesity.

  7. Significance of chemokine and chemokine receptors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A critical review.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Moreira Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Russo, Remo Castro; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2016-05-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic proteins that coordinate circulation of immune/inflammatory cells throughout body compartments. Because of this property chemokines and their cell surface receptors are implicated in several physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer. These molecules are expressed by neoplastic or stromal cells and have effects at tumor primary site (e.g. stimulating angiogenesis and tumor cells motility) and lymph nodes (creating a gradient to direct migration of neoplastic cells). In this article we review the current knowledge about the function(s) of chemokines and receptors in squamous cell carcinoma from the oral cavity and head and neck region. Accumulating evidence suggests some chemokine(s) and receptor(s) as potential targets in adjuvant therapies for these malignancies.

  8. Increased ghrelin signaling prolongs survival in mouse models of human aging through activation of sirtuin1

    PubMed Central

    Fujitsuka, N; Asakawa, A; Morinaga, A; Amitani, M S; Amitani, H; Katsuura, G; Sawada, Y; Sudo, Y; Uezono, Y; Mochiki, E; Sakata, I; Sakai, T; Hanazaki, K; Yada, T; Yakabi, K; Sakuma, E; Ueki, T; Niijima, A; Nakagawa, K; Okubo, N; Takeda, H; Asaka, M; Inui, A

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is known to retard aging and delay functional decline as well as the onset of diseases in most organisms. Ghrelin is secreted from the stomach in response to CR and regulates energy metabolism. We hypothesized that in CR ghrelin has a role in protecting aging-related diseases. We examined the physiological mechanisms underlying the ghrelin system during the aging process in three mouse strains with different genetic and biochemical backgrounds as animal models of accelerated or normal human aging. The elevated plasma ghrelin concentration was observed in both klotho-deficient and senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8) mice. Ghrelin treatment failed to stimulate appetite and prolong survival in klotho-deficient mice, suggesting the existence of ghrelin resistance in the process of aging. However, ghrelin antagonist hastened death and ghrelin signaling potentiators rikkunshito and atractylodin ameliorated several age-related diseases with decreased microglial activation in the brain and prolonged survival in klotho-deficient, SAMP8 and aged ICR mice. In vitro experiments, the elevated sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity and protein expression through the cAMP–CREB pathway was observed after ghrelin and ghrelin potentiator treatment in ghrelin receptor 1a-expressing cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, rikkunshito increased hypothalamic SIRT1 activity and SIRT1 protein expression of the heart in the all three mouse models of aging. Pericarditis, myocardial calcification and atrophy of myocardial and muscle fiber were improved by treatment with rikkunshito. Ghrelin signaling may represent one of the mechanisms activated by CR, and potentiating ghrelin signaling may be useful to extend health and lifespan. PMID:26830139

  9. Increase in reactive oxygen species and activation of Akt signaling pathway in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Renata P; Araújo, Alex S R; Janner, Daiane; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M; Partata, Wania A

    2008-12-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs as a result of peripheral or central nervous system injury. Its pathophysiology involves mainly a central sensitization mechanism that may be correlated to many molecules acting in regions involved in pain processing, such as the spinal cord. It has been demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signaling molecules, such as the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt, are involved in neuropathic pain mechanisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to provide evidence of this relationship. Sciatic nerve transection (SNT) was used to induce neuropathic pain in rats. Western blot analysis of Akt and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)-Michael adducts, and measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the lumbosacral spinal cord were performed. The main findings were found seven days after SNT, when there was an increase in HNE-Michael adducts formation, total and p-Akt expression, and H(2)O(2) concentration. However, one and 15 days after SNT, H(2)O(2) concentration was raised in both sham (animals that were submitted to surgery without nerve injury) and SNT groups, showing the high sensibility of this ROS to nociceptive afferent stimuli, not only to neuropathic pain. p-Akt also increased in sham and SNT groups one day post injury, but at 3 and 7 days the increase occurred exclusively in SNT animals. Thus, there is crosstalk between intracellular signaling pathways and ROS, and these molecules can act as protective agents in acute pain situations or play a role in the development of chronic pain states.

  10. Angiotensin II type 1a receptor signalling directly contributes to the increased arrhythmogenicity in cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yasuno, Shinji; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Yamada, Chinatsu; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Usami, Satoru; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Ueshima, Kenji; Harada, Masaki; Nishikimi, Toshio; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Angiotensin II has been implicated in the development of various cardiovascular ailments, including cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. The fact that inhibiting its signalling reduced the incidences of both sudden cardiac death and heart failure in several large-scale clinical trials suggests that angiotensin II is involved in increased cardiac arrhythmogenicity during the development of heart failure. However, because angiotensin II also promotes structural remodelling, including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, it has been difficult to assess its direct contribution to cardiac arrhythmogenicity independently of the structural effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We induced cardiac hypertrophy in wild-type (WT) and angiotensin II type 1a receptor knockout (AT1aR-KO) mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). The susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia (VT) assessed in an in vivo electrophysiological study was compared in the two genotypes. The effect of acute pharmacological blockade of AT1R on the incidences of arrhythmias was also assessed. KEY RESULTS As described previously, WT and AT1aR-KO mice with TAC developed cardiac hypertrophy to the same degree, but the incidence of VT was much lower in the latter. Moreover, although TAC induced an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of connexin 43, a critical component of gap junctional channels, and a reduction in ventricular levels of connexin 43 protein in both genotypes, the effect was significantly ameliorated in AT1aR-KO mice. Acute pharmacological blockade of AT1R also reduced the incidence of arrhythmias. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our findings demonstrate that AT1aR-mediated signalling makes a direct contribution to the increase in arrhythmogenicity in hypertrophied hearts independently of structural remodelling. PMID:23937445

  11. Exendin-4 Inhibits Hepatic Lipogenesis by Increasing β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seok-Woo; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Lee, Won-Young

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether the beneficial effect of exendin-4 on hepatic steatosis is mediated by β-catenin signaling. After the HepG2 human hepatoma cells were treated with PA for 24 hours, total triglycerides levels were increased in a dose-dependent manner, and the expression levels of perilipin family members were upregulated in cells treated with 400 μM PA. For our in vitro model of hepatic steatosis, HepG2 cells were treated with 400 μM palmitic acid (PA) in the presence or absence of 100 nM exendin-4 for 24 hours. PA increased the expression of lipogenic genes, such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and triglyceride synthesis-involved genes, such as diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) in HepG2 cells, whereas exendin-4 treatment significantly prevented the upregulation of SREBP-1c, PPARγ, SCD1, FAS, ACC, DGAT1 and DGAT2. Moreover, exendin-4 treatment increased the expression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) in the cytosolic fraction and the expression of β-catenin and transcription factor 4 (TCF4) in the nuclear fraction. In addition, siRNA-mediated inhibition of β-catenin upregulated the expression of lipogenic transcription factors. The protective effects of exendin-4 on intracellular triglyceride content and total triglyceride levels were not observed in cells treated with the β-catenin inhibitor IWR-1. These data suggest that exendin-4 treatment improves hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:27907035

  12. Intracrine endothelin signalling evokes IP3-dependent increases in nucleoplasmic Ca2+ in adult cardiac myocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Merlen, Clémence; Farhat, Nada; Luo, Xiaoyan; Chatenet, David; Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Villeneuve, Louis R.; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; Nattel, Stanley; Thorin, Eric; Fournier, Alain; Allen, Bruce G.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin receptors are present on the nuclear membranes in adult cardiac ventricular myocytes. The objectives of the present study were to determine 1) which endothelin receptor subtype is in cardiac nuclear membranes, 2) if the receptor and ligand traffic from the cell surface to the nucleus, and 3) the effect of increased intracellular ET-1 on nuclear Ca2+ signalling. Confocal microscopy using fluorescently-labeled endothelin analogs confirmed the presence of ETB at the nuclear membrane of rat cardiomyocytes in skinned-cells and isolated nuclei. Furthermore, in both cardiac myocytes and aortic endothelial cells, endocytosed ET:ETB complexes translocated to lysosomes and not the nuclear envelope. Although ETA and ETB can form heterodimers, the presence or absence of ETA did not alter ETB trafficking. Treatment of isolated nuclei with peptide: N-glycosidase F did not alter the electrophoretic mobility of ETB. The absence of N-glycosylation further indicating that these receptors did not originate at the cell surface. Intracellular photolysis of a caged ET-1 analog ([Trp-ODMNB21]ET-1) evoked an increase in nucleoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]n) that was attenuated by the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and prevented by pre-treatment with ryanodine. A caged cell-permeable analog of the ETB-selective antagonist IRL-2500 blocked the ability of intracellular cET-1 to increase [Ca2+]n whereas extracellular application of ETA and ETB receptor antagonists did not. These data suggest that 1) the endothelin receptor in the cardiac nuclear membranes is ETB, 2) ETB traffic directly to the nuclear membrane after biosynthesis, 3) exogenous endothelins are not ligands for ETB on nuclear membranes, and 4) ETB associated with the nuclear membranes regulate nuclear Ca2+ signalling. PMID:23756157

  13. Induction of cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 mRNAs in macrophages by Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium attachment requires different ligand-receptor systems.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1996-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to macrophages is mediated by different ligands and receptors and induces various intracellular molecular responses. In the present study, induction of cytokines and chemokines, especially granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), was examined, following bacterial attachment, with regard to the ligand-receptor systems involved. Attachment of Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages increased the steady-state levels of cellular mRNAs for the cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and GM-CSF as well as the chemokines MIP-1beta, MIP-2, and KC. However, when macrophages were treated with alpha-methyl-D-mannoside (alphaMM), a competitor of glycopeptide ligands, induction of cytokine mRNAs was inhibited, but the levels of chemokine mRNAs were not. Pretreatment of the bacteria with fresh mouse serum enhanced the level of GM-CSF mRNA but not the level of MIP-2 mRNA. In addition, serum treatment reduced the inhibitory effect of alphaMM on GM-CSF mRNA. These results indicate that bacterial attachment increases the steady-state levels of the cytokine and chemokine mRNAs tested by at least two distinct receptor-ligand systems, namely, one linked to cytokine induction and involving mannose or other sugar residues and the other linked to chemokine induction and relatively alphaMM insensitive. Furthermore, opsonization with serum engages other pathways in the cytokine response which are relatively independent of the alphaMM-sensitive system. Regarding bacterial surface ligands involved in cytokine mRNA induction, evidence is presented that the flagellum may be important in stimulating cytokine GM-CSF message but not chemokine MIP-2 message. Analysis of cytokine GM-CSF and chemokine MIP-2 signaling pathways with protein kinase inhibitors revealed the involvement of calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase in GM-CSF but not MIP-2 m

  14. Low oxygen tension increased fibronectin fragment induced catabolic activities - response prevented with biomechanical signals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The inherent low oxygen tension in normal cartilage has implications on inflammatory conditions associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Biomechanical signals will additionally contribute to changes in tissue remodelling and influence the inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of oxygen tension and fibronectin fragment (FN-f) on the inflammatory response of chondrocytes subjected to biomechanical signals. Methods Chondrocytes were cultured under free-swelling conditions at 1%, 5% and 21% oxygen tension or subjected to dynamic compression in an ex vivo 3D/bioreactor model with 29 kDa FN-f, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and/or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor for 6 and 48 hours. Markers for catabolic activity (NO, PGE2), tissue remodelling (GAG, MMPs) and cyto