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Sample records for increased dj-1 expression

  1. Expression profiles of genes in DJ-1-knockdown and L 166 P DJ-1 mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Nishinaga, Hiromi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Taira, Takahiro; Andreadis, Athena; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-12-16

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and a causative gene for the familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 has been shown to play roles in anti-oxidative stress by eliminating reactive oxygen species and in transcriptional regulation of genes. Loss of these functions of DJ-1 is thought to trigger the onset of PD. In this study, to identify genes for which expressions are regulated by DJ-1, DNA microarray analyses were carried out using two mouse NIH3T3 cell lines, DJ-1-knockdown cells and cells harboring an exogenously added L 166 P DJ-1 mutant found in PD patients. In both cell lines, drastic changes in expressions of genes, including genes related to stress, apoptosis, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity, were observed and changes in expressions were confirmed by RT-PCR. Of the genes identified, expression level of the extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD 3) gene was found to decrease in DJ-1-knockdown cells, while expressions of SOD 1 and SOD 2 genes did not change. Furthermore, expression of the tau gene, a gene whose product gives cells neurotoxicity by aggregation, was found to increase at its promoter level in L 166 P DJ-1 cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 regulates expressions of genes for which functions are thought to be related to cell death or neurodegeneration.

  2. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    PubMed

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J S

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  3. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  4. Expression and role of DJ-1 in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hang; Wang Min Li Min; Wang Donghai; Rao Qing; Wang Yang; Xu Zhifang; Wang Jianxiang

    2008-10-24

    DJ-1 is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in pathogenesis of some solid tumors. In this study, we found that DJ-1 was overexpressed in acute leukemia (AL) patient samples and leukemia cell lines, which gave the first clue that DJ-1 overexpression might be involved in leukemogenesis and/or disease progression of AL. Inactivation of DJ-1 by RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60 resulted in inhibition of the proliferation potential and enhancement of the sensitivity of leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic drug etoposide. Further investigation of DJ-1 activity revealed that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), as well as some proliferation and apoptosis-related genes, was regulated by DJ-1. Thus, DJ-1 might be involved in leukemogesis through regulating cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. It could be a potential therapeutic target for leukemia.

  5. Oxidation of DJ-1-dependent cell transformation through direct binding of DJ-1 to PTEN.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Chul; Kitaura, Hirotake; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2009-12-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also a causative gene for a familial form of Parkinson's disease. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including anti-oxidative stress reaction and cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1 is an essential amino acid for DJ-1 to exert its function. While increased expression and secretion of DJ-1 into serum in patients with various cancers and regulation of p53 and PTEN by DJ-1 have been reported, the molecular mechanism underlying oncogenicity of DJ-1 is poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the function of DJ-1 in the PI3'K signaling pathway under an oxidative stress condition, focusing on the interaction of DJ-1 with PTEN. We found that both wild-type (wt) and C106S-DJ-1, a substitution mutant of DJ-1, directly bound to PTEN and inhibited PTEN phosphatase activity but that C106S-DJ-1 more strongly inhibited the activity than did wt-DJ-1. When NIH3T3 cells were treated with H2O2, oxidation of C106 of wt-DJ-1 occurred, accompanied by increased binding of wt-DJ-1 to PTEN, decreased PTEN activity and increased phosphorylation of AKT. C106S-DJ-1 transformed cells more strongly than did wt-DJ-1 and the transforming activity of DJ-1 was enhanced by H2O2 treatment of cells in which increased binding of DJ-1 to PTEN and decreased PTEN activity were observed. Furthermore, TOF-MS analysis of the oxidative status of C106 suggested that DJ-1 activity requires the presence of the reduced form of C106, which accounts for >50% of the total form. These results suggest that the oxidative status of DJ-1 regulates PTEN activity, leading to cell proliferation and transformation.

  6. Loss of DJ-1 elicits retinal abnormalities, visual dysfunction, and increased oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Vera L.; Bell, Brent A.; Rayborn, Mary E.; Yang, Xiaoping; Kaul, Charlie; Grossman, Gregory H.; Samuels, Ivy S.; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Xie, Chengsong; Cai, Huaibin; Shadrach, Karen G.

    2015-01-01

    DJ-1/PARK7 mutations or deletions cause autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thus, DJ-1 protein has been extensively studied in brain and neurons. PD patients display visual symptoms; however, the visual symptoms specifically attributed to PD patients carrying DJ-1/PARK7 mutations are not known. In this study, we analyzed the structure and physiology of retinas of 3- and 6-month-old DJ-1 knockout (KO) mice to determine how loss of function of DJ-1 specifically contributes to the phenotypes observed in PD patients. As compared to controls, the DJ-1 KO mice displayed an increase in the amplitude of the scotopic ERG b-wave and cone ERG, while the amplitude of a subset of the dc-ERG components were decreased. The main structural changes in the DJ-1 KO retinas were found in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which were observed at 3 months and progressively increased at 6 months. RPE thinning and structural changes within the OPL were observed in the retinas in DJ-1 KO mice. DJ-1 KO retinas also exhibited disorganized outer segments, central decrease in red/green cone opsin staining, decreased labeling of ezrin, broader distribution of ribeye labeling, decreased tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic neurons, and increased 7,8- dihydro-8-oxoguanine-labeled DNA oxidation. Accelerated outer retinal atrophy was observed in DJ-1 KO mice after selective oxidative damage induced by a single tail vein injection of NaIO3, exposing increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Our data indicate that DJ-1-deficient retinas exhibit signs of morphological abnormalities and physiological dysfunction in association with increased oxidative stress. Degeneration of RPE cells in association with oxidative stress is a key hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Therefore, in addition to detailing the visual defects that occur as a result of the absence of DJ-1, our data is also relevant to AMD

  7. Absence of DJ-1 causes age-related retinal abnormalities in association with increased oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Vera L; Bell, Brent A; Rayborn, Mary E; Samuels, Ivy S; King, Anna; Hollyfield, Joe G; Xie, Chengsong; Cai, Huaibin

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress alters physiological function in most biological tissues and can lead to cell death. In the retina, oxidative stress initiates a cascade of events leading to focal loss of RPE and photoreceptors, which is thought to be a major contributing factor to geographic atrophy. Despite these implications, the molecular regulation of RPE oxidative stress under normal and pathological conditions remains largely unknown. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in regulating RPE and photoreceptors oxidative stress response is greatly needed. To this end we evaluated photoreceptor and RPE changes in mice deficient in DJ-1, a protein that is thought to be important in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Young (3 months) and aged (18 months) DJ-1 knockout (DJ-1 KO) and age-matched wild-type mice were examined. In both group of aged mice, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) showed the presence of a few autofluorescent foci. The 18 month-old DJ-1 KO retinas were also characterized by a noticeable increase in RPE fluorescence to wild-type. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging demonstrated that all retinal layers were present in the eyes of both DJ-1 KO groups. ERG comparisons showed that older DJ-1 KO mice had reduced sensitivity under dark- and light-adapted conditions compared to age-matched control. Histologically, the RPE contained prominent vacuoles in young DJ-1 KO group with the appearance of enlarged irregularly shaped RPE cells in the older group. These were also evident in OCT and in whole mount RPE/choroid preparations labeled with phalloidin. Photoreceptors in the older DJ-1 KO mice displayed decreased immunoreactivity to rhodopsin and localized reduction in cone markers compared to the wild-type control group. Lower levels of activated Nrf2 were evident in retina/RPE lysates in both young and old DJ-1 KO mouse groups compared to wild-type control levels. Conversely, higher levels of protein carbonyl derivatives and i

  8. Suppression of miR-155 Expression in IFN-γ-Treated Astrocytes and Microglia by DJ-1: A Possible Mechanism for Maintaining SOCS1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-hyeon; Jou, Ilo

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that DJ-1, encoded by a Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated gene, inhibits expression of proinflammatory mediators in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-treated astrocytes and microglia through inhibition of STAT1 activation. Here, using microglia and astrocytes cultured from wild-type (WT) and DJ-1-knockout (KO) mouse brains, we examined how DJ-1 regulates suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), a negative feedback regulator of STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription) that is also induced by STAT1. We found that IFN-γ significantly increased SOCS1 mRNA expression in WT microglia and astrocytes, but not in KO cells, although STAT1 was highly activated in these latter cells. We further found that SOCS mRNA stability was decreased in DJ-1-KO cells, an effect that appeared to be mediated by the microRNA, miR-155. IFN-γ increased the levels of miR-155 in DJ-1-KO cells but not in WT cells. In addition, an miR-155 inhibitor rescued SOCS1 expression and decreased STAT1 activation in DJ-1-KO cells. Taken together, these results suggest that DJ-1 efficiently regulates inflammation by maintaining SOCS1 expression through regulation of miR-155 levels, even under conditions in which STAT1 activation is decreased. PMID:24963279

  9. The familial Parkinson's disease gene DJ-1 (PARK7) is expressed in red cells and plays a role in protection against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiuling; Martin, Florent; Friedman, Jeffrey S

    2010-10-15

    The antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) serves as the primary defense against mitochondrial superoxide. Impaired SOD2 activity in murine hematopoietic cells affects erythroid development, resulting in anemia characterized by intra-mitochondrial iron deposition, reticulocytosis and shortened red cell life span. Gene expression profiling of normal and SOD2 deficient erythroblasts identified the Parkinson's disease locus DJ-1 (Park7) as a differentially expressed transcript. To investigate the role of DJ-1 in hematopoietic cell development and protection against oxidative stress caused by Sod2 loss, we evaluated red cell parameters, reticulocyte count, red cell turnover and reactive oxygen species production in DJ-1 knockout animals and chimeric animals lacking both SOD2 and DJ-1 in hematopoietic cells generated by fetal liver transplantation. We also investigated DJ-1 protein expression in primary murine erythroid and erythroleukemia cells (MEL). Loss of DJ-1 exacerbates the phenotype of SOD2 deficiency, increasing reticulocyte count and decreasing red cell survival. Using MEL cells, we show that DJ-1 is up-regulated at the protein level during erythroid differentiation. These results indicate that DJ-1 plays a physiologic role in protection of erythroid cells from oxidant damage, a function unmasked in the context of oxidative stress.

  10. DJ-1 deficiency impairs glutamate uptake into astrocytes via the regulation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Mo; Cha, Seon-Heui; Choi, Yu Ree; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Although the cause of PD is still poorly understood, mutations in many genes including SNCA, parkin, PINK1, LRRK2, and DJ-1 have been identified in the familial forms of PD. It was recently proposed that alterations in lipid rafts may cause the neurodegeneration shown in PD. Here, we observe that DJ-1 deficiency decreased the expression of flotillin-1 (flot-1) and caveolin-1 (cav-1), the main protein components of lipid rafts, in primary astrocytes and MEF cells. As a mechanism, DJ-1 regulated flot-1 stability by direct interaction, however, decreased cav-1 expression may not be a direct effect of DJ-1, but rather as a result of decreased flot-1 expression. Dysregulation of flot-1 and cav-1 by DJ-1 deficiency caused an alteration in the cellular cholesterol level, membrane fluidity, and alteration in lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis. Moreover, DJ-1 deficiency impaired glutamate uptake into astrocytes, a major function of astrocytes in the maintenance of CNS homeostasis, by altering EAAT2 expression. This study will be helpful to understand the role of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of PD, and the modulation of lipid rafts through the regulation of flot-1 or cav-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for PD. PMID:27346864

  11. The Expression of DJ-1 (PARK7) in Normal Human CNS and Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandopadhyay, Rina; Kingsbury, Ann E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Reid, Andrew R.; Evans, Ian M.; Hope, Andrew D.; Pittman, Alan M.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Canet-Aviles, Rosa; Miller, David W.; McLendon, Chris; Strand, Catherine; Leonard, Andrew J.; Abou-Sleiman, Patrick M.; Healy, Daniel G.; Ariga, Hiroyashi; Wood, Nicholas W.; de Silva, Rohan; Revesz, Tamas; Hardy, John A.; Lees, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    Two mutations in the DJ-1 gene on chromosome1p36 have been identified recently to cause early-onset, autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. As no information is available regarding the distribution of DJ-1 protein in the human brain, in this study we used a monoclonal antibody for DJ-1 to map its distribution in frontal cortex and substantia…

  12. The Expression of DJ-1 (PARK7) in Normal Human CNS and Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandopadhyay, Rina; Kingsbury, Ann E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Reid, Andrew R.; Evans, Ian M.; Hope, Andrew D.; Pittman, Alan M.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Canet-Aviles, Rosa; Miller, David W.; McLendon, Chris; Strand, Catherine; Leonard, Andrew J.; Abou-Sleiman, Patrick M.; Healy, Daniel G.; Ariga, Hiroyashi; Wood, Nicholas W.; de Silva, Rohan; Revesz, Tamas; Hardy, John A.; Lees, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    Two mutations in the DJ-1 gene on chromosome1p36 have been identified recently to cause early-onset, autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. As no information is available regarding the distribution of DJ-1 protein in the human brain, in this study we used a monoclonal antibody for DJ-1 to map its distribution in frontal cortex and substantia…

  13. Transcriptional Activation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene by DJ-1 and Effect of DJ-1 on Cholesterol Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato, Izumi; Niki, Takeshi; Goldberg, Matthew S.; Shen, Jie; Ishimoto, Kenji; Doi, Takefumi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease park7. DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. For transcriptional regulation, DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. Reduced expression of LDLR mRNA and protein was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells and DJ-1-knockout mice and this occurred at the transcription level. Reporter gene assays using various deletion and point mutations of the LDLR promoter showed that DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to the sterol regulatory element (SRE) with sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and that stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward LDLR promoter activity was enhanced by oxidation of DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel-mobility shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that DJ-1 made a complex with SREBP on the SRE. Furthermore, it was found that serum LDL cholesterol level was increased in DJ-1-knockout male, but not female, mice and that the increased serum LDL cholesterol level in DJ-1-knockout male mice was cancelled by administration with estrogen, suggesting that estrogen compensates the increased level of serum LDL cholesterol in DJ-1-knockout female mice. This is the first report that DJ-1 participates in metabolism of fatty acid synthesis through transcriptional regulation of the LDLR gene. PMID:22666465

  14. Transcriptional activation of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene by DJ-1 and effect of DJ-1 on cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shiori; Yamane, Takuya; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato, Izumi; Niki, Takeshi; Goldberg, Matthew S; Shen, Jie; Ishimoto, Kenji; Doi, Takefumi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease park7. DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. For transcriptional regulation, DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. Reduced expression of LDLR mRNA and protein was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells and DJ-1-knockout mice and this occurred at the transcription level. Reporter gene assays using various deletion and point mutations of the LDLR promoter showed that DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to the sterol regulatory element (SRE) with sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and that stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward LDLR promoter activity was enhanced by oxidation of DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel-mobility shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that DJ-1 made a complex with SREBP on the SRE. Furthermore, it was found that serum LDL cholesterol level was increased in DJ-1-knockout male, but not female, mice and that the increased serum LDL cholesterol level in DJ-1-knockout male mice was cancelled by administration with estrogen, suggesting that estrogen compensates the increased level of serum LDL cholesterol in DJ-1-knockout female mice. This is the first report that DJ-1 participates in metabolism of fatty acid synthesis through transcriptional regulation of the LDLR gene.

  15. The protective role of DJ-1 in ultraviolet-induced damage of human skin: DJ-1 levels in the stratum corneum as an indicator of antioxidative defense.

    PubMed

    Ishiwatari, Shioji; Takahashi, Minako; Yasuda, Chie; Nakagawa, Maho; Saito, Yoshiro; Noguchi, Noriko; Matsukuma, Shoko

    2015-12-01

    DJ-1 is a multifunctional protein associated with Parkinson's disease and plays a significant role in protecting nerve cells from oxidative stress. DJ-1 is expressed in the skin, although its function there is unknown. In this study, we investigated DJ-1 function in keratinocytes. DJ-1 was induced by H2O2 exposure and UV irradiation in keratinocytes. DJ-1 knockdown with small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after UVB irradiation, suggesting that DJ-1 reduces ROS and might protect skin cells from UV damage in vitro. To investigate the in vivo role of DJ-1 in the skin, we determined DJ-1 levels in human stratum corneum samples obtained by the tape-stripping method. DJ-1 levels in the stratum corneum (scDJ-1) correlated with total antioxidant capacity. We also examined the effect of scDJ-1 on changes in skin after UVB irradiation. DJ-1 was elevated in SC from the upper arm 1 to 2 weeks after UVB irradiation. One day after UVB irradiation, L* (brightness) and a* (redness) values, indicators of skin color, were altered regardless of scDJ-1 expression. However, these values recovered more quickly in subjects with high scDJ-1 expression than in those with low scDJ-1 expression. These data suggest that DJ-1 in skin plays a significant role in protection against UV radiation and oxidative stress, and that DJ-1 levels in the SC might be an indicator of antioxidative defense against UV-induced damage.

  16. DJ-1/PARK7 Impairs Bacterial Clearance in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Amatullah, Hajera; Shan, Yuexin; Beauchamp, Brittany L; Gali, Patricia L; Gupta, Sahil; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Speck, Edwin R; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E; Tsang, Jennifer L Y; Mei, Shirley H J; Mak, Tak W; Rocco, Patricia R M; Semple, John W; Zhang, Haibo; Hu, Pingzhao; Marshall, John C; Stewart, Duncan J; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Liaw, Patricia C; Liles, W Conrad; Dos Santos, Claudia C

    2017-04-01

    Effective and rapid bacterial clearance is a fundamental determinant of outcomes in sepsis. DJ-1 is a well-established reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. Because cellular ROS status is pivotal to inflammation and bacterial killing, we determined the role of DJ-1 in bacterial sepsis. We used cell and murine models with gain- and loss-of-function experiments, plasma, and cells from patients with sepsis. Stimulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) with endotoxin resulted in increased DJ-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cellular and mitochondrial ROS was increased in DJ-1-deficient ((-/-)) BMMs compared with wild-type. In a clinically relevant model of polymicrobial sepsis (cecal ligation and puncture), DJ-1(-/-) mice had improved survival and bacterial clearance. DJ-1(-/-) macrophages exhibited enhanced phagocytosis and bactericidal activity in vitro, and adoptive transfer of DJ-1(-/-) bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells rescued wild-type mice from cecal ligation and puncture-induced mortality. In stimulated BMMs, DJ-1 inhibited ROS production by binding to p47(phox), a critical component of the NADPH oxidase complex, disrupting the complex and facilitating Nox2 (gp91(phox)) ubiquitination and degradation. Knocking down DJ-1 (siRNA) in THP-1 (human monocytic cell line) and polymorphonuclear cells from patients with sepsis enhanced bacterial killing and respiratory burst. DJ-1 protein levels were elevated in plasma from patients with sepsis. Higher levels of circulating DJ-1 were associated with increased organ failure and death. These novel findings reveal DJ-1 impairs optimal ROS production for bacterial killing with important implications for host survival in sepsis.

  17. DJ-1 mediates paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Heo, Jun Young; Shim, Jung Hee; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Ryu, Min Jeong; Han, Jeong Su; Shong, Minho; Son, Jin H; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2011-04-25

    There are two causes of Parkinson's disease (PD): environmental insults and genetic mutations of PD-associated genes. Environmental insults and genetic mutations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and a combination of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Among the PD-associated genes, DJ-1 acts as a redox sensor for oxidative stress and has been also proposed to maintain mitochondrial complex I activity. To understand molecular functions of DJ-1 in the cell, we have generated DJ-1 null cells from the DJ-1(-/-) mouse embryos. Using these null cells, we investigated the susceptibility to an environmental toxin, paraquat, which is known to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. Interestingly, we found that DJ-1 null cells showed a resistance to paraquat-induced apoptosis, including reduced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Also DJ-1 null cells generated less superoxide than SN4741 cells by paraquat treatment. Consistent with the reduced paraquat sensitivity, DJ-1 null cells showed reduced complex I activity, which was partially rescued by ectopic DJ-I expression. In summary, our results suggest that DJ-1 is critical to maintain mitochondrial complex I and complex I could be a key target in interaction of paraquat toxicity and DJ-1 for giving rise to PD.

  18. Neuroprotective Function of DJ-1 in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato, Izumi; Maita, Hiroshi; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra, resulting in a reduced level of dopamine in the striatum. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be major causes of neurodegeneration in PD. Although genetic and environmental factors are thought to affect the onset of PD, precise mechanisms at the molecular level have not been elucidated. The DJ-1 gene is a causative gene for familial PD (park7) and also an oncogene. DJ-1 has various functions, including transcriptional regulation, antioxidative stress reaction, and chaperone, protease, and mitochondrial regulation, and its activity is regulated by its oxidative status, especially that of cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1. Excess oxidation of DJ-1, which renders DJ-1 inactive, has been observed in patients with sporadic PD and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that DJ-1 also participates in the onset and pathogenesis of sporadic PD as well as familial PD. DJ-1 is also a stress sensor and its expression is increased upon various stresses, including oxidative stress. In this review, we describe functions of DJ-1 against oxidative stress and possible roles of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:23766857

  19. Neuroprotective function of DJ-1 in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato, Izumi; Maita, Hiroshi; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra, resulting in a reduced level of dopamine in the striatum. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be major causes of neurodegeneration in PD. Although genetic and environmental factors are thought to affect the onset of PD, precise mechanisms at the molecular level have not been elucidated. The DJ-1 gene is a causative gene for familial PD (park7) and also an oncogene. DJ-1 has various functions, including transcriptional regulation, antioxidative stress reaction, and chaperone, protease, and mitochondrial regulation, and its activity is regulated by its oxidative status, especially that of cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1. Excess oxidation of DJ-1, which renders DJ-1 inactive, has been observed in patients with sporadic PD and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that DJ-1 also participates in the onset and pathogenesis of sporadic PD as well as familial PD. DJ-1 is also a stress sensor and its expression is increased upon various stresses, including oxidative stress. In this review, we describe functions of DJ-1 against oxidative stress and possible roles of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of PD.

  20. DJ-1 maintains energy and glucose homeostasis by regulating the function of brown adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rong; Liu, Xiao-meng; Sun, Jian-guang; Chen, Hong; Ma, Jun; Dong, Meng; Peng, Shengyi; Wang, Ji-qiu; Ding, Jian-qing; Li, Dong-hao; Speakman, John R; Ning, Guang; Jin, Wanzhu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2017-01-01

    DJ-1 protein is involved in multiple physiological processes, including Parkinson’s disease. However, the role of DJ-1 in the metabolism is largely unknown. Here we found that DJ-1 maintained energy balance and glucose homeostasis via regulating brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. DJ-1-deficient mice reduced body mass, increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. DJ-1 deletion also resisted high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, DJ-1 transgene triggered autonomous obesity and glucose intolerance. Further BAT transplantation experiments clarified DJ-1 regulates energy and glucose homeostasis by modulating BAT function. Mechanistically, we found that DJ-1 promoted PTEN proteasomal degradation via an E3 ligase, mind bomb-2 (Mib2), which led to Akt activation and inhibited FoxO1-dependent Ucp1 (Uncoupling protein-1) expression in BAT. Consistently, ablation of Akt1 mitigated the obesity and BAT dysfunction induced by DJ-1 transgene. These findings define a new biological role of DJ-1 protein in regulating BAT function, with an implication of the therapeutic target in the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:28224045

  1. DJ-1 maintains energy and glucose homeostasis by regulating the function of brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rong; Liu, Xiao-Meng; Sun, Jian-Guang; Chen, Hong; Ma, Jun; Dong, Meng; Peng, Shengyi; Wang, Ji-Qiu; Ding, Jian-Qing; Li, Dong-Hao; Speakman, John R; Ning, Guang; Jin, Wanzhu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2017-01-01

    DJ-1 protein is involved in multiple physiological processes, including Parkinson's disease. However, the role of DJ-1 in the metabolism is largely unknown. Here we found that DJ-1 maintained energy balance and glucose homeostasisvia regulating brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. DJ-1-deficient mice reduced body mass, increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. DJ-1 deletion also resisted high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, DJ-1 transgene triggered autonomous obesity and glucose intolerance. Further BAT transplantation experiments clarified DJ-1 regulates energy and glucose homeostasis by modulating BAT function. Mechanistically, we found that DJ-1 promoted PTEN proteasomal degradation via an E3 ligase, mind bomb-2 (Mib2), which led to Akt activation and inhibited FoxO1-dependent Ucp1 (Uncoupling protein-1) expression in BAT. Consistently, ablation of Akt1 mitigated the obesity and BAT dysfunction induced by DJ-1 transgene. These findings define a new biological role of DJ-1 protein in regulating BAT function, with an implication of the therapeutic target in the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  2. Stimulation of transforming activity of DJ-1 by Abstrakt, a DJ-1-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Aya; Taira, Takahiro; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-03-01

    DJ-1 was identified by us as a novel oncogene in cooperation with activated ras. Although over-expression of DJ-1 has been reported in several cancer cells, including cells in breast cancer, lung cancer and prostate cancer, the precise mechanism underlying transformation has not been clarified. In this study, we screened proteins by a yeast two-hybrid method and identified Abstrakt as a DJ-1-binding protein. Abstrakt is an RNA helicase, but it has not yet been characterized. Northern blot analysis showed that human Abstrakt was expressed ubiquitously in all tissues. Abstrakt was then found to bind to and to be colocalized in the nucleus with DJ-1 in human cells. Furthermore, Abstrakt was found to stimulate transforming activity of DJ-1 in rat 3Y1 cells transfected with DJ-1 with activated ras. These findings suggest that Abstrakt is a positive regulator for DJ-1.

  3. Drosophila DJ-1 Decreases Neural Sensitivity to Stress by Negatively Regulating Daxx-Like Protein through dFOXO

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Gahee; Suh, Yoon Seok; Han, Seung Yeop; Lee, Minjung; Park, Seung Hwan; Lee, Jang Ho; Lee, Soojin; Bang, Se Min; Jeong, Yuji; Chung, Won-Ju; Lee, Im-Soon; Jeong, Gilsang; Chung, Jongkyeong; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1, a Parkinson's disease (PD)–associated gene, has been shown to protect against oxidative stress in Drosophila. However, the molecular mechanism underlying oxidative stress-induced phenotypes, including apoptosis, locomotive defects, and lethality, in DJ-1-deficient flies is not fully understood. Here we showed that Daxx-like protein (DLP), a Drosophila homologue of the mammalian Death domain-associated protein (Daxx), was upregulated under oxidative stress conditions in the loss-of-function mutants of Drosophila DJ-1β, a Drosophila homologue of DJ-1. DLP overexpression induced apoptosis via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/Drosophila forkhead box subgroup O (dFOXO) pathway, whereas loss of DLP increased resistance to oxidative stress and UV irradiation. Moreover, the oxidative stress-induced phenotypes of DJ-1β mutants were dramatically rescued by DLP deficiency, suggesting that enhanced expression of DLP contributes to the DJ-1β mutant phenotypes. Interestingly, we found that dFOXO was required for the increase in DLP expression in DJ-1β mutants and that dFOXO activity was increased in the heads of DJ-1β mutants. In addition, subcellular localization of DLP appeared to be influenced by DJ-1 expression so that cytosolic DLP was increased in DJ-1β mutants. Similarly, in mammalian cells, Daxx translocation from the nucleus to the cytosol was suppressed by overexpressed DJ-1β under oxidative stress conditions; and, furthermore, targeted expression of DJ-1β to mitochondria efficiently inhibited the Daxx translocation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that DJ-1β protects flies against oxidative stress- and UV-induced apoptosis by regulating the subcellular localization and gene expression of DLP, thus implying that Daxx-induced apoptosis is involved in the pathogenesis of DJ-1-associated PD. PMID:23593018

  4. Stimulation of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 activity by DJ-1 in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Tanaka, Yuki; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2012-05-18

    Loss-of-functional mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson's disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. Dopamine is synthesized by two enzymes and then packed into synaptic vesicles by vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). In this study, we found that knockdown of DJ-1 expression reduced the levels of mRNA and protein of VMAT2, resulting in reduced VMAT2 activity. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments revealed that DJ-1 directly bound to VMAT2, and DJ-1 was co-localized with VMAT2 in cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type DJ-1, but not that of L166P, M26I and C106S mutants of DJ-1, increased mRNA and protein levels of VMAT2 and VMAT2 activity. Since VMAT2 and a portion of DJ-1 are localized in the synaptic membrane, these results suggest that DJ-1, but not pathogenically mutated DJ-1, stimulates VMAT2 activity in the synapse by transactivation of the VMAT gene and by direct binding to VMAT2 and that cysteine 106 is necessary for the stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward VMAT2.

  5. DJ-1 protects against cell death following acute cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Dongworth, R K; Mukherjee, U A; Hall, A R; Astin, R; Ong, S-B; Yao, Z; Dyson, A; Szabadkai, G; Davidson, S M; Yellon, D M; Hausenloy, D J

    2014-02-27

    Novel therapeutic targets are required to protect the heart against cell death from acute ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Mutations in the DJ-1 (PARK7) gene in dopaminergic neurons induce mitochondrial dysfunction and a genetic form of Parkinson's disease. Genetic ablation of DJ-1 renders the brain more susceptible to cell death following ischemia-reperfusion in a model of stroke. Although DJ-1 is present in the heart, its role there is currently unclear. We sought to investigate whether mitochondrial DJ-1 may protect the heart against cell death from acute IRI by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of DJ-1 in HL-1 cardiac cells conferred the following beneficial effects: reduced cell death following simulated IRI (30.4±4.7% with DJ-1 versus 52.9±4.7% in control; n=5, P<0.05); delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening (a critical mediator of cell death) (260±33 s with DJ-1 versus 121±12 s in control; n=6, P<0.05); and induction of mitochondrial elongation (81.3±2.5% with DJ-1 versus 62.0±2.8% in control; n=6 cells, P<0.05). These beneficial effects of DJ-1 were absent in cells expressing the non-functional DJ-1(L166P) and DJ-1(Cys106A) mutants. Adult mice devoid of DJ-1 (KO) were found to be more susceptible to cell death from in vivo IRI with larger myocardial infarct sizes (50.9±3.5% DJ-1 KO versus 41.1±2.5% in DJ-1 WT; n≥7, P<0.05) and resistant to cardioprotection by ischemic preconditioning. DJ-1 KO hearts showed increased mitochondrial fragmentation on electron microscopy, although there were no differences in calcium-induced MPTP opening, mitochondrial respiratory function or myocardial ATP levels. We demonstrate that loss of DJ-1 protects the heart from acute IRI cell death by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. We propose that DJ-1 may represent a novel therapeutic target for cardioprotection.

  6. Neuroprotective effect of resveratrol against brain ischemia reperfusion injury in rats entails reduction of DJ-1 protein expression and activation of PI3K/Akt/GSK3b survival pathway.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aleem, Ghada A; Khaleel, Eman F; Mostafa, Dalia G; Elberier, Lydia K

    2016-10-01

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate the mechanistic role of DJ-1/PI3K/Akt survival pathway in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced cerebral damage and to investigate if the resveratrol (RES) mediates its ischemic neuroptotection through this pathway. RES administration to Sham rats boosted glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity and downregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase expression without affecting redox levels of DJ-1 forms or components of PI3K/Akt pathway including PTEN, p-Akt or p/p-GSK3b. However, RES pre-administration to I/R rats reduced infarction area, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Concomitantly, RES ameliorated the decreased levels of oxidized forms of DJ-1 and enhancing its reduction, increased the nuclear protein expression of Nfr-2 and led to activation of PI3K/Akt survival pathway. In conclusion, overoxidation of DJ-1 is a major factor that contributes to post-I/R cerebral damage and its reduction by RES could explain the neuroprotection offered by RES.

  7. DJ-1 degrades transthyretin and an inactive form of DJ-1 is secreted in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Koide-Yoshida, Shizuyo; Niki, Takeshi; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Himeno, Shingo; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ando, Yukio; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2007-06-01

    DJ-1 plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in the onset of Parkinson's disease. DJ-1 has a protease-like structure and transthyretin (TTR), a protein causing familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), was identified as a substrate for DJ-1 protease in this study. Both TTR and DJ-1 were secreted into the culture medium under normal conditions, and secreted TTR was not aggregated. Under oxidative conditions, TTR but not DJ-1 was secreted into the culture medium, resulting in aggregation. Mirror images of both the expression patterns and solubility of DJ-1 and TTR were observed in tissues of FAP patients, and an unoxidized form of DJ-1, an inactive form, was secreted into the serum of FAP patients. These results suggest that oxidative stress to cells abrogates secretion of DJ-1 and that secreted DJ-1 degrades aggregated TTR to protect against the onset of FAP.

  8. LvDJ-1 plays an important role in resistance against Vibrio alginolyticus in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhu; Liu, Yuan; Xie, Chenying; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-05-01

    DJ-1 was first identified as an oncogene that transformed mouse NIH3T3 cells in cooperation with activated Ras. It has since exhibited a variety of functions in a range of organisms. In this study, the DJ-1 gene in Litopenaeus vannamei (LvDJ-1) was identified and characterized. A recombinant protein LvDJ-1 was produced in Pichia pastoris. LvDJ-1 expression in vivo was knocked down by dsRNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi), which led to significantly decreased levels of LvDJ-1 mRNA and protein. When the L. vannamei were challenged with RNAi and Vibrio alginolyticus, the transcription and expression of copper zinc superoxide dismutase (LvCZSOD) in the hepatopancreas were dramatically lower in shrimp with knocked down LvDJ-1 than in controls. Transcription and expression of P53 (LvP53) were significantly higher in shrimp lacking LvDJ-1 than in controls. Hepatopancreas samples were analyzed using real time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Moreover, blood samples from the shrimp, assessed with flow cytometry, showed significant increases in respiratory burst and apoptosis in those lacking LvDJ-1 compared to the controls. Cumulative mortality in the shrimp lacking LvDJ-1 was significantly different from that in the control group after challenge with V. alginolyticus. Altogether, the results prove that LvDJ-1 regulates apoptosis and antioxidant activity, and that these functions play an important role in L. vannamei resistance against V. alginolyticus.

  9. Novel association of DJ-1 with HER3 potentiates HER3 activation and signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xuejun; Salameh, Ahmad; Mujoo, Kalpana; Huang, Zhao; Li, Leike; Salazar, Georgina To'a; Zhang, Ningyan; An, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    HER3/ErbB3 has emerged as a new therapeutic target for cancer. Currently, more than a dozen anti-HER3 antibodies are in clinical trials for treatment of various cancers. However, limited understanding of the complex HER3 signaling in cancer and lack of established biomarkers have made it challenging to stratify cancer patients who can benefit from HER3 targeted therapies. In this study, we identified DJ-1/PARK7 (Parkinson Protein 7) as a novel interaction partner of HER3 and demonstrated the potential of DJ-1 as a biomarker for anti-HER3 cancer therapy. DJ-1 association with HER3 protects HER3 from ubiquitination and degradation through the proteasomal pathway in breast cancer cells. However, neuregulin 1 (NRG-1) mediated HER3 activation results in a reduced association of DJ-1 with HER3. DJ-1 shRNA knockdown in cancer cells resulted in decreased levels of HER3 and its downstream signaling through the PI3K/AKT and Ras/Raf/ERK pathways. DJ-1 shRNA knockdown cancer cells significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of DJ-1 increased HER3 levels and promoted cancer cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Notably, cancer cells with high DJ-1 expression showed more sensitivity than DJ-1 knockdown cells to anti-HER3 antibody inhibition. In addition, there was a significant co-expression of HER3 and DJ-1 in tumor tissues of breast cancer patients. Taken together, these results suggest that high DJ-1 expression in breast cancer cells predicts elevated HER3 signaling and may therefore serve as a biomarker for HER3 targeted antibody cancer therapies. PMID:27582551

  10. DJ-1 Is Upregulated in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Promotes Oral Cancer Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuaimei; Ma, Dandan; Zhuang, Rui; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Ying; Wen, Jun; Cui, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a multistep process that involves in both genetic alterations and epigenetic modifications. DJ-1, a negative regulator of tumor suppressor PTEN, functions as an oncogene in many types of cancers. However, its role in OSCC is poorly known. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the expression level of DJ-1 in oral leukoplakia (OLK) and OSCC tissues respectively. Then lentiviral mediated DJ-1 shRNA was constructed and used to infect the OSCC cell lines (Tca8113 and CAL-27). MTT, cell counting, and Matrigel invasion assay were utilized to examine the effects of DJ-1 down-regulation on proliferation and invasion capacity of oral cancer cells. Results: The immunoreactivity and expression level of DJ-1 protein was significantly increased in OLK and OSCC tissues compared with the controls. Lentiviral-delivered shRNA targeting DJ-1 could effectively knock down DJ-1 at mRNA and protein level (P<0.01). The proliferative and invasion ability of OSCC cell lines was significantly suppressed following DJ-1 inhibition (P<0.01). Conclusions: Our study indicated that DJ-1 is over-expressed in both oral precancer and cancer tissues and shRNA inhibition of DJ-1 expression led to decreased proliferation and invasion capability of oral cancer cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 might be actively involved in the development of OSCC. Future studies will investigate the potential of DJ-1 as a biomarker for early detection of OSCC. PMID:27313793

  11. [Effect of DJ-1 siRNA on biological behavior of human lung squamous carcinoma SK-MES-1 cells].

    PubMed

    Wei, Wangli; Tang, Can'e; Zhan, Xianquan; Yi, Hong; Li, Cui

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference technology (siRNA) was used to inhibit the expression of DJ-1 gene in lung squamous cell carcinoma SK-MES-1 cells, and the cell biological behaviors were investigated to explore the function of DJ-1 gene. A targeted DJ-1 siRNA lentiviral vector with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter was constructed. The constructed DJ-1 siRNA and control-siRNA vectors were infected into SK-MES-1 cells as experimental (DJ-1 siRNA) and control (Control siRNA) groups, respectively. The DJ-1 protein expression was determined by Western blot. The cell proliferation capability was measured with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. The capability of cell migration was determined by Transwell method. Compared with control-siRNA and blank-control groups, the protein expression of DJ-1 gene was down-regulated, the capability of cell proliferation was obviously inhibited (P<0.01), the cell cycle was arrested with increased number of G1- and G2-phase cells and reduced number of S-phase cells, and the capability of cell migration was significantly decreased (P<0.01) in the DJ-1 siRNA-infected cells. DJ-1 gene might play a role in promoting cell proliferation and cell migration capability in vitro in lung cancer SK-MES-1 cells.

  12. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  13. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  14. Keap1-Nrf2 Activation in the Presence and Absence of DJ-1

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Li; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease remain elusive. Deletion and mutations of DJ-1 (PARK7) have been reported to cause autosomal recessive familial Parkinson’s disease. Wildtype DJ-1 scavenges H2O2 by cysteine oxidation in response to oxidative stress, and thus confers neuroprotection. Activation of the transcription factor NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf2) has also been shown to be important for protection against oxidative stress in many models of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous data indicate that DJ-1 affects the transcriptional functions and stability of Nrf2. However, this observation has not been confirmed. In the current study, the role of DJ-1 in the regulation of Nrf2 is examined in primary cultured neurons, astrocytes and in vivo. The prototypical Nrf2 activator, tBHQ, protected primary cortical neurons derived from DJ-1 knockout (KO) as well as DJ-1 wildtype mice by activation of Nrf2-ARE pathway. Nrf2 nuclear translocation, robust increases of canonical Nrf2-driven genes and proteins, and dramatic activation of the ARE reporter gene, hPAP, were observed after tBHQ treatment. These results were further confirmed by siRNA mediated DJ-1 knockdown in primary cortical astrocytes from ARE-hPAP mice and tBHQ administration into the striatum of mouse brain. In addition, over-expression of Nrf2 with adenovirus preferentially in astrocytes from DJ-1 KO mice enhanced survival of neurons under oxidative insults. These findings indicate that activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway is independent of DJ-1, and Nrf2 activation is a potential therapeutic target to prevent neurodegeneration in sporadic and DJ-1 familial Parkinson’s disease. PMID:20377612

  15. Specific cleavage of DJ-1 under an oxidative condition.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiromasa; Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2006-10-09

    DJ-1 was initially identified by us as a novel oncogene and has recently been found to be a causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease (PD) PARK7. DJ-1 plays roles in transcriptional regulation and in oxidative stress function, and its oxidative state at cysteine residues determines activities of DJ-1. In this study, we found that recombinant DJ-1 expressed in and purified from E. coli was specifically cleaved between glycine and proline at amino acid numbers 157 and 158, respectively, by treatment of DJ-1 with H2O2. A substitution mutant of DJ-1 from cysteine to serine at amino acid number 106, a major oxidation site of DJ-1, was found not to be cleaved under an oxidative condition, suggesting oxidation-dependent cleavage of DJ-1. Cleavage of DJ-1 was also observed in human SH-SY5Y cells that had been treated with H2O2. These results suggest that oxidative stress-induced cleavage of DJ-1 regulates functions of DJ-1.

  16. Oxidized DJ-1 Inhibits p53 by Sequestering p53 from Promoters in a DNA-Binding Affinity-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Izumi; Maita, Hiroshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Saito, Yoshiro; Noguchi, Noriko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and the causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease. Although the oxidative status of DJ-1 at cysteine 106 (C106) is thought to affect all of the activities of DJ-1 and excess oxidation leads to the onset of various diseases, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of oxidation of DJ-1 on protein-protein interactions of DJ-1 remain unclear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 bound to the DNA-binding region of p53 in a manner dependent on the oxidation of C106. Of the p53 target genes, the expression level and promoter activity of the DUSP1 gene, but not those of the p21 gene, were increased in H2O2-treated DJ-1−/− cells and were decreased in wild-type DJ-1- but not C106S DJ-1-transfected H1299 cells through sequestration of p53 from the DUSP1 promoter by DJ-1. DUSP1 downregulated by oxidized DJ-1 activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and decreased apoptosis. The DUSP1 and p21 promoters harbor nonconsensus and consensus p53 recognition sequences, respectively, which have low affinity and high affinity for p53. However, DJ-1 inhibited p21 promoter activity exhibited by p53 mutants harboring low DNA-binding affinity but not by wild-type p53. These results indicate that DJ-1 inhibits the expression of p53 target genes and depend on p53 DNA-binding affinity and oxidation of DJ-1 C106. PMID:23149933

  17. Oxidized DJ-1 inhibits p53 by sequestering p53 from promoters in a DNA-binding affinity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kato, Izumi; Maita, Hiroshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Saito, Yoshiro; Noguchi, Noriko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and the causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease. Although the oxidative status of DJ-1 at cysteine 106 (C106) is thought to affect all of the activities of DJ-1 and excess oxidation leads to the onset of various diseases, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of oxidation of DJ-1 on protein-protein interactions of DJ-1 remain unclear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 bound to the DNA-binding region of p53 in a manner dependent on the oxidation of C106. Of the p53 target genes, the expression level and promoter activity of the DUSP1 gene, but not those of the p21 gene, were increased in H(2)O(2)-treated DJ-1(-/-) cells and were decreased in wild-type DJ-1- but not C106S DJ-1-transfected H1299 cells through sequestration of p53 from the DUSP1 promoter by DJ-1. DUSP1 downregulated by oxidized DJ-1 activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and decreased apoptosis. The DUSP1 and p21 promoters harbor nonconsensus and consensus p53 recognition sequences, respectively, which have low affinity and high affinity for p53. However, DJ-1 inhibited p21 promoter activity exhibited by p53 mutants harboring low DNA-binding affinity but not by wild-type p53. These results indicate that DJ-1 inhibits the expression of p53 target genes and depend on p53 DNA-binding affinity and oxidation of DJ-1 C106.

  18. Induction of reactive oxygen species by bisphenol A and abrogation of bisphenol A-induced cell injury by DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiromasa; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-11-01

    DJ-1 was first identified as an activated ras-dependent oncogene. DJ-1 is related to male fertility, and its expression in sperm decreases in response to exposure to a number of reproductive toxicants. DJ-1 has been associated with the onset of familial Parkinson's disease (PD) in humans, and has been found to have activity against oxidative damage by eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we investigated the role of DJ-1 in oxidative stresses by administration of bisphenol A (BPA), which has been reported to induce oxidative stress in rodents, to male mice and cultured cells. In male mice, we found that BPA significantly increased the expression level of DJ-1 in the sperm and brain. In cultured Neuro2a and GC1 cells, we found that BPA induced ROS production and significantly compromised mitochondrial function concomitant with elevated expression and oxidization of DJ-1. DJ-1 was found to maintain the complex I activity against BPA-induced oxidative stress after the localization in mitochondria. The results showed that DJ-1 plays a role in the prevention of mitochondrial injury-induced cell death.

  19. DJ-1 activates autophagy in the repression of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ruicong; Jiang, Jingzhou; Dong, Bin; Tan, Weiping; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Jingjing; Chen, Yili; Dong, Yugang; Liu, Chen

    2017-09-21

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the risk factor of heart failure when the heart is confronted with pressure overload or neurohumoral stimuli. Autophagy, a conserved degradative pathway, is one of the important mechanisms involved in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy. DJ-1 is a traditional anti-oxidative protein and emerging evidence suggested that DJ-1 might modulate autophagy. However, the regulation of autophagy by DJ-1 in the process of cardiac hypertrophy remains unknown. In our study, we firstly discovered that the expression of DJ-1declined in the process of pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy, and its alteration was parallel with the impairment of autophagy. Furthermore, we proved that DJ-1 knockout mice exhibited a more hypertrophied phenotype than wildtype mice in cardiac hypertrophy which indicated that DJ-1 is responsible for the repression of cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, DJ-1 knockout significantly exacerbated pulmonary edema due to cardiac hypertrophy. In the process of cardiac hypertrophy, DJ-1 knockout significantly impaired autophagy activation and enhanced mTORC1 and mTORC2 phosphorylation were found. Similarly, our in vitro study proved that DJ-1 overexpression ameliorated phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and promoted autophagy activation. Taken together, DJ-1 might repress both pressure overload and PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy via the activation of autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protection of Pancreatic β-Cells from Various Stress Conditions Is Mediated by DJ-1*

    PubMed Central

    Inberg, Alex; Linial, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are vulnerable to multiple stresses, leading to dysfunction and apoptotic death. Deterioration in β-cells function and mass is associated with type 2 diabetes. Comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis from pancreatic MIN6 cells that were maintained at varying glucose concentrations was carried out. An induced expression of a protein spot, detected in MIN6 cells experiencing high glucose concentration, was identified by mass spectrometry as the oxidized form of DJ-1. DJ-1 (park7) is a multifunctional protein implicated in familial Parkinsonism and neuroprotection in response to oxidative damage. The DJ-1 protein and its oxidized form were also induced following exposure to oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress in MIN6 and βTC-6 cells and also in mouse pancreatic islets. Suppression of DJ-1 levels by small interfering RNA led to an accelerated cell death, whereas an increase in DJ-1 levels by adenovirus-based infection attenuated cell death induced by H2O2 and thapsigargin in β-cell lines and mouse pancreatic islets. Furthermore, DJ-1 improved regulated insulin secretion under basal as well as oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions in a dose-dependent manner. We identified TFII-I (Gtf2i) as DJ-1 partner in the cytosol, whereas the binding of TFII-I to DJ-1 prevented TFII-I translocation to the nucleus. The outcome was attenuation of the stress response. Our results suggest that DJ-1 together with TFII-I operate in concert to cope with various insults and to sustain pancreatic β-cell function. PMID:20516060

  1. DJ-1 Protects Breast Cancer Cells Against 2'-Benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde-induced Oxidative Stress Independent of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ismail Ahmed; Abdel Shakor, Abo Bakr; Hong, Su-Hyung

    2015-09-01

    2'-Benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA) is a promising antitumor agent. BCA effectively inhibited proliferation of MDA-MB-435 more than in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our recent findings showed that DJ-1 protects MCF7 cells from BCA-induced oxidative stress via its mitochondrial translocation and inhibition of the mitochondrial perturbation (Ismail et al., 2012). In this study, we addressed the question of whether Nrf2 works downstream to DJ-1 in mediating differential antiproliferation effects in MCF-7 and MDAMB-435 breast cancer cells induced by BCA treatment. BCA upregulated the expression and induced nuclear translocalization of DJ-1 and Nrf2 in only MCF-7 cells. However, in MDA-MB-435, BCA increased only Nrf2 expression without inducing DJ-1 and/or Nrf2 protein translocalization to the nucleus. Furthermore, DJ-1 knockdown decreased DJ-1 expression in both cells without affecting Nrf2 and its downstream target γ-GCS, suggesting that DJ-1-induced cell protection and works independent of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  2. Tat-DJ-1 enhances cell survival by inhibition of oxidative stress, NF-κB and MAPK activation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Eun Ji; Shin, Min Jea; Choi, Yeon Joo; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2017-04-01

    To identify the protective effect of DJ-1 protein against oxidative stress-induced HepG2 cell death, we used cell-permeable wild type (WT) and a mutant (C106A Tat-DJ-1) protein. By using western blotting and fluorescence microscopy, we observed WT and C106A Tat-DJ-1 proteins were efficiently transduced into HepG2 cells. Transduced WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins increased cell survival and protected against DNA fragmentation and intracellular ROS generation levels in H2O2-exposed HepG2 cells. At the same time, transduced WT Tat-DJ-1 protein significantly inhibited NF-κB and MAPK (JNK and p38) activation as well as regulated the Bcl-2 and Bax expression levels. However, C106A Tat-DJ-1 protein did not show any protective effect against cell death responses in H2O2-exposed HepG2 cells. Oxidative stress-induced HepG2 cell death was significantly reduced by transduced WT Tat-DJ-1 protein, not by C106A Tat-DJ-1 protein. Thus, transduction of WT Tat-DJ-1 protein could be a novel strategy for promoting cell survival in situations of oxidative stress-induced HepG2 cell death.

  3. Parkinson-susceptibility gene DJ-1/PARK7 protects the murine heart from oxidative damage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Billia, Filio; Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Konecny, Filip; Rao, Vivek; Kim, Raymond H.; Mak, Tak W.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability of an organism to eliminate these toxic intermediates. Although the Parkinson-susceptibility gene, Parkinson protein 7/DJ-1 (DJ-1), has been linked to the regulation of oxidative stress, the exact mechanism by which this occurs and its in vivo relevance have remained elusive. In the heart, oxidative stress is a major contributor to the development of heart failure (HF). Therefore, we hypothesized that DJ-1 inhibits the pathological consequences of ROS production in the heart, the organ with the highest oxidative burden. We report that DJ-1 is highly expressed in normal heart tissue but is markedly reduced in end-stage human HF. DJ-1-deficient mice subjected to oxidative stress by transaortic banding exhibited exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy and susceptibility to developing HF. This was accompanied by a Trp53 (p53)-dependent decrease in capillary density, an excessive oxidation of DNA, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis, key events in the development of HF. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and progressive respiratory chain deficiency were also evident in cardiomyocytes lacking DJ-1. Our results provide compelling in vivo evidence that DJ-1 is a unique and nonredundant antioxidant that functions independent of other antioxidative pathways in the cellular defense against ROS. PMID:23530187

  4. Protective effect of planarian DJ-1 against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Jun; Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Tashiro, Natsuka; Takata, Kazuyuki; Ashihara, Eishi; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Agata, Kiyokazu; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2012-12-01

    DJ-1/PARK7 has multiple functions as an antioxidant, an oncogene, and a molecular chaperone in vertebrates, and loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 cause early onset of Parkinson's disease. However, the function of invertebrate DJ-1 remains unknown. In order to investigate the function of planarian DJ-1, we isolated the planarian DJ-1 gene Dugesia japonica DJ-1 (DjDJ-1) and analyzed its expression and function. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that DjDJ-1 mRNA was expressed throughout the body, including the central nervous system, cells surrounding the pharynx, and stem cells. Planarian DjDJ-1 protein exhibited antioxidant function, similar to human DJ-1, as evidenced by the fact that recombinant DjDJ-1 protein reduced reactive oxygen species and protected human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells from cell death. In addition, dopaminergic neurons in DjDJ-1(RNAi) planarians became susceptible to 6-hydroxydopamine, a dopaminergic neurotoxin. These results suggest that planarians have a DJ-1 ortholog, which has conserved antioxidant and neuroprotective functions.

  5. ROS removal by DJ-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang Ming

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species represent one of the principal factors that cause cell death and scavenging of reactive oxygen species by superoxide dismutase-related pathway is essential for cell survival. The Parkinson disease-related DJ-1 protein (also known as PARK7) has been implicated in resistance against oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons however, its molecular mechanism has to date been unknown. We have used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system to demonstrate that DJ-1, in both plant and mammalian cells, directly influence SOD activity in a highly conserved manner thereby preventing cell death. These data not only provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms associated with DJ-1-induced Parkinson disease but also highlight the unprecedented value of plants as a tool in understanding human disease mechanisms. PMID:20671441

  6. Mechanistic Nanotherapeutic Approach Based on siRNA-Mediated DJ-1 Protein Suppression for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Canan; Chan, Stephanie; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Khal, Shannon; Moskal, Vitaliya; Shah, Vidhi; Alani, Adam W G; Taratula, Olena; Taratula, Oleh

    2016-06-06

    We report an efficient therapeutic modality for platinum resistant ovarian cancer based on siRNA-mediated suppression of a multifunctional DJ-1 protein that is responsible for the proliferation, growth, invasion, oxidative stress, and overall survival of various cancers. The developed therapeutic strategy can work alone or in concert with a low dose of the first line chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, to elicit a maximal therapeutic response. To achieve an efficient DJ-1 knockdown, we constructed the polypropylenimine dendrimer-based nanoplatform targeted to LHRH receptors overexpressed on ovarian cancer cells. The quantitative PCR and Western immunoblotting analysis revealed that the delivered DJ-1 siRNA downregulated the expression of targeted mRNA and corresponding protein by more than 80% in various ovarian cancer cells. It was further demonstrated that siRNA-mediated DJ-1 suppression dramatically impaired proliferation, viability, and migration of the employed ovarian cancer cells. Finally, the combinatorial approach led to the most pronounced therapeutic response in all the studied cell lines, outperforming both siRNA-mediated DJ-1 knockdown and cisplatin treatment alone. It is noteworthy that the platinum-resistant cancer cells (A2780/CDDP) with the highest basal level of DJ-1 protein are most susceptible to the developed therapy and this susceptibility declines with decreasing basal levels of DJ-1. Finally, we interrogate the molecular underpinnings of the DJ-1 knockdown effects in the treatment of the ovarian cancer cells. By using various experimental techniques, it was revealed that DJ-1 depletion (1) decreases the activity of the Akt pathway, thereby reducing cellular proliferation and migration and increasing the antiproliferative effect of cisplatin on ovarian cancer cells; (2) enhances the activity of p53 tumor suppressor protein therefore restoring cell cycle arrest functionality and upregulating the Bax-caspase pathway, triggering cell death; and (3

  7. Subcellular localization of DJ-1 in human HL-60 leukemia cells in response to diallyl disulfide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingye; Tang, Yuxian; Qin, Jing; Yi, Lan; Yang, Yening; Wang, Juan; He, Jie; Su, Qi; Tan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) has been demonstrated to exert potent anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies indicate that DADS may induce the differentiation and/or apoptosis of human leukemia cells in vitro. However, the mechanisms underlying these anticancer effects remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in the subcellular localization of protein deglycase DJ-1 (also known as Parkinsonism associated deglycase-7, PARK-7) in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria of human leukemia HL-60 cells induced by DADS, in order to provide novel experimental evidence for the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer mechanisms of DADS in leukemia cells. HL-60 cells induced by DADS were collected at different time points, and proteins from the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria of the cells were isolated using specific cellular component isolation kits. The protein expression levels of DJ-1 in these subcellular fractions of HL60 cells following exposure to DADS for varying lengths of time, were determined using western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques. Following exposure of HL-60 cells to 1.25 mg/l DADS for 8 h, the protein expression levels of DJ-1 were significantly decreased in the cytoplasm, while nuclear fractions exhibited a significant increase in DJ-1 expression when compared with untreated controls. The protein expression levels of DJ-1 in mitochondria of HL-60 cells were significantly decreased following treatment with 5 and 10 mg/l DADS. These results demonstrate that exposure of HL-60 cells to low concentrations of DADS may promote DJ-1 protein translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which suggests that DJ-1 may function as a transcription factor or cofactor binding protein in the process of cell differentiation. The expression of DJ-1 in mitochondria may be associated with induction of apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated with moderate doses of DADS. PMID:27748821

  8. DJBP: a novel DJ-1-binding protein, negatively regulates the androgen receptor by recruiting histone deacetylase complex, and DJ-1 antagonizes this inhibition by abrogation of this complex.

    PubMed

    Niki, Takeshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2003-02-01

    DJ-1 was identified by us as a novel oncogene that transforms mouse NIH3T3 cells in cooperation with ras. We later identified PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT)xalpha as a DJ-1-binding protein, and found that DJ-1 restored androgen receptor (AR) transcription activity that was repressed by PIASxalpha. To further characterize the function of DJ-1, we cloned cDNA encoding a novel DJ-1-binding protein, DJBP, by a yeast two-hybrid system. DJBP mRNA was found to be specifically expressed in the testis. In addition to the binding of DJBP to the COOH-terminal region of DJ-1, DJBP was also found to bind in vitro and in vivo to the DNA-binding domain of the AR in a testosterone-dependent manner and to be colocalized with DJ-1 or AR in the nucleus. Furthermore, a co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that the formation of a ternary complex between DJ-1, DJBP, and AR occurred in cells in which DJ-1 bound to the AR via DJBP. It was found that DJBP repressed a testosterone-dependent AR transactivation activity in monkey Cos1 cells by recruiting histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex, including HDAC1 and mSin3, and that DJ-1 partially restored its repressed activity by abrogating DJBP-HDAC complex. These results suggest that AR is positively regulated by DJ-1, which antagonizes the function of negative regulators, including DJBP.

  9. DJ-1 immunoreactivity in human brain astrocytes is dependent on infarct presence and infarct age.

    PubMed

    Mullett, Steven J; Hamilton, Ronald L; Hinkle, David A

    2009-04-01

    DJ-1 is a protein with anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptotic properties that is abundantly expressed in reactive CNS astrocytes in chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Pick's disease. Genetic mutations which eliminate DJ-1 expression in humans are sufficient to produce an early-onset form of familial PD, PARK7, suggesting that DJ-1 is a critical component of the neuroprotective arsenal of the brain. Previous studies in parkinsonism/dementia brain tissues have revealed that reactive astrocytes within and surrounding incidentally identified infarcts were often robustly immunoreactive for DJ-1, especially if the infarcts showed histological features consistent with older age. Given this, we sought to evaluate astrocytic DJ-1 expression in human stroke more extensively, and with a particular emphasis on determining whether immunohistochemical DJ-1 expression in astrocytes correlates with histological infarct age. The studies presented here show that DJ-1 is abundantly expressed in reactive infarct region astrocytes in both gray and white matter, that subacute and chronic infarct region astrocytes are much more robustly DJ-1+ than are acute infarct and non-infarct region astrocytes, and that DJ-1 staining intensity in astrocytes generally correlates with that of the reactive astrocyte marker GFAP. Confocal imaging of DJ-1 and GFAP dual-labelled human brain sections were used to confirm the localization to and expression of DJ-1 in astrocytes. Neuronal DJ-1 staining was minimal under all infarct and non-infarct conditions. Our data support the conclusion that the major cellular DJ-1 response to stroke in the human brain is astrocytic, and that there is a temporal correlation between DJ-1 expression in these cells and advanced infarct age.

  10. Transcriptional Activation of the Cholecystokinin Gene by DJ-1 through Interaction of DJ-1 with RREB1 and the Effect of DJ-1 on the Cholecystokinin Level in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Takuya; Suzui, Sayaka; Kitaura, Hirotake; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation. DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found that the cholecystokinin (CCK) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. CCK is a peptide hormone and plays roles in contraction of the gallbladder and in promotion of secretion of pancreatic fluid. CCK is co-localized with dopamine in the substantia nigra to regulate release of dopamine. Reduced expression of CCK mRNA was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells. The Ras-responsive element (RRE) and Sp1 site were essential for promoter activity, and DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to RRE-binding protein 1 (RREBP1). The complex of DJ-1 with RREB1 but not with Sp1 bound to the RRE. Furthermore, the reduced CCK level in the serum from DJ-1-knockout mice compared to that from wild-type mice was observed. This is the first report showing that DJ-1 participates in peptide hormone synthesis. PMID:24348900

  11. Transcriptional activation of the cholecystokinin gene by DJ-1 through interaction of DJ-1 with RREB1 and the effect of DJ-1 on the cholecystokinin level in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takuya; Suzui, Sayaka; Kitaura, Hirotake; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation. DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found that the cholecystokinin (CCK) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. CCK is a peptide hormone and plays roles in contraction of the gallbladder and in promotion of secretion of pancreatic fluid. CCK is co-localized with dopamine in the substantia nigra to regulate release of dopamine. Reduced expression of CCK mRNA was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells. The Ras-responsive element (RRE) and Sp1 site were essential for promoter activity, and DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to RRE-binding protein 1 (RREBP1). The complex of DJ-1 with RREB1 but not with Sp1 bound to the RRE. Furthermore, the reduced CCK level in the serum from DJ-1-knockout mice compared to that from wild-type mice was observed. This is the first report showing that DJ-1 participates in peptide hormone synthesis.

  12. Drosophila DJ-1 mutants are sensitive to oxidative stress and show reduced lifespan and motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Lavara-Culebras, Eusebio; Paricio, Nuria

    2007-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive movement disorder caused by the selective and massive loss of dopaminergic neurons (DA) in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). DJ-1 loss-of-function mutations are involved in inherited early-onset PD forms and result in dysfunction of the oxidative stress response. In mice models, DJ-1 loss provokes sensitivity to oxidative insults but does not produce neurodegeneration. Similar results have been found when analyzing Drosophila mutants for the DJ-1 orthologous genes, DJ-1alpha and DJ-1beta. Here, we report the analysis of two new mutations for the Drosophila DJ-1 genes. Both ubiquitous induction of DJ-1alpha knockdown by RNAi and loss of function of DJ-1beta caused by an insertional mutation result in increased sensitivity to paraquat insults, reduced lifespan and motor impairments. However these mutations do not lead to DA neuron loss. Besides, we find that targeted inhibition of DJ-1alpha function in DA neuron results in certain DA neurodegeneration. Our results, together with findings in other Drosophila DJ-1 mutants, indicate that both Drosophila DJ-1 genes are implicated in the protection against the chemical induced oxidative stress response, but also in fly survival. The differences observed in DA neurodegeneration suggest that the motor impairments exhibited by the mutants could be caused by different pathways.

  13. DJ-1 deficiency attenuates expansion of liver progenitor cells through modulating the inflammatory and fibrogenic niches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Luo, M; Sun, X; Qin, J; Yu, C; Wen, Y; Zhang, Q; Gu, J; Xia, Q; Kong, X

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study suggested that DJ-1 has a critical role in initiating an inflammatory response, but its role in the liver progenitor cell (LPC) expansion, a process highly dependent on the inflammatory niche, remains elusive. The objective of this study is to determine the role of DJ-1 in LPC expansion. The correlation of DJ-1 expression with LPC markers was examined in the liver of patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively) infection, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), respectively. The role of DJ-1 in LPC expansion and the formation of LPC-associated fibrosis and inflammation was examined in a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) diet-induced liver injury murine model. We also determined the ability of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in recruiting macrophages in DJ-1 knockout (KO) mice. The expression levels of DJ-1 were upregulated in the liver of HBV, HCV, PBC and PSC patients and DDC-fed mice. Additionally, DJ-1 expression was positively correlated with LPC proliferation in patients with liver injury and mice with DDC exposure. DJ-1 has no direct effect on LPC proliferation. Reduced activation of HSCs and collagen deposition were observed in DJ-1 KO mice. Furthermore, infiltrated CD11b+Gr-1low macrophages and pro-inflammatory factors (IL-6, TNF-α) were attenuated in DJ-1 KO mice. Mechanistically, we found that HSCs isolated from DJ-1 KO mice had decreased secretion of macrophage-mobilizing chemokines, such as CCL2 and CX3CL1, resulting in impaired macrophage infiltration. DJ-1 positively correlates with LPC expansion during liver injury. DJ-1 deficiency negatively regulates LPC proliferation by impairing the formation of LPC-associated fibrosis and inflammatory niches. PMID:27277679

  14. DJ-1 Regulates Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Smooth Muscle-like Cells in Response to Sphingosylphosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Baek, Suji; Lee, Kang Pa; Jung, Seung Hyo; Cui, Long; Ko, Kinarm; Kim, Bokyung; Won, Kyung Jong

    2017-09-26

    Although multiple factors contribute to the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into various types of cells, the differentiation of hMSCs into smooth muscle cells (SMCs), one of central events in vascular remodeling, remains to be clarified. ROS participate in the differentiation of hMSCs into several cell types and were regulated by redox-sensitive molecules including a multifunctional protein DJ-1. Here, we investigated the correlation between altered proteins, especially those related to ROS, and SMC differentiation in sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC)-stimulated hMSCs. Treatment with SPC resulted in an increased expression of SMC markers, namely α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and calponin, and an increased production of ROS in hMSCs. A proteomic analysis of SPC-stimulated hMSCs revealed a distinctive alteration of the ratio between the oxidized and reduced forms of DJ-1 in hMSCs in response to SPC. The increased abundance of oxidized DJ-1 in SPC-stimulated hMSCs was validated by immunoblot analysis. The SPC-induced increase in the expression of α-SMA was stronger in DJ-1-knockdown hMSCs than in control cells. Moreover, the expression of α-SMA, and the calponin and generation of ROS in response to SPC were weaker in normal hMSCs than in DJ-1-overexpressing hMSCs. Exogenous H2 O2 mimicked the responses induced by SPC treatment. These results indicate that the ROS-related DJ-1 pathway regulates the differentiation of hMSCs into SMCs in response to SPC. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Overexpression of DJ-1 reduces oxidative stress and attenuates hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in NRK-52E cells exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zi-Ying; Sun, Qian; Xia, Zhong-Yuan; Meng, Qing-Tao; Lei, Shao-Qing; Zhao, Bo; Tang, Ling-Hua; Xue, Rui; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes are more vulnerable to renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is implicated in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. We previously reported that the hyperglycemia-induced inhibition of DJ-1, a novel oncogene that exhibits potent antioxidant activity, is implicated in the severity of myocardial I/R injury. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of DJ-1 in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury in renal cells exposed to high glucose (HG). For this purpose, NRK-52E cells were exposed to HG (30 mM) for 48 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h and reoxygenation for 2 h, which significantly decreased cell viability and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, accompanied by a decrease in DJ-1 protein expression. The overexpression of DJ-1 by transfection with a DJ-1 overexpression plasmid exerted protective effects against HG-induced H/R injury, as evidenced by increased CCK-8 levels and SOD activity, the decreased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the decreased MDA content, and increased nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Similar effects were observed following treatment with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine. These results suggest that the overexpression of DJ-1 reduces oxidative stress and attenuates H/R injury in NRK-52E cells exposed to HG. PMID:27430285

  16. Phenylbutyrate up-regulates the DJ-1 protein and protects neurons in cell culture and in animal models of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenbo; Bercury, Kathryn; Cummiskey, Jessica; Luong, Nancy; Lebin, Jacob; Freed, Curt R

    2011-04-29

    Parkinson disease is caused by the death of midbrain dopamine neurons from oxidative stress, abnormal protein aggregation, and genetic predisposition. In 2003, Bonifati et al. (23) found that a single amino acid mutation in the DJ-1 protein was associated with early-onset, autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PARK7). The mutation L166P prevents dimerization that is essential for the antioxidant and gene regulatory activity of the DJ-1 protein. Because low levels of DJ-1 cause Parkinson, we reasoned that overexpression might stop the disease. We found that overexpression of DJ-1 improved tolerance to oxidative stress by selectively up-regulating the rate-limiting step in glutathione synthesis. When we imposed a different metabolic insult, A53T mutant α-synuclein, we found that DJ-1 turned on production of the chaperone protein Hsp-70 without affecting glutathione synthesis. After screening a number of small molecules, we have found that the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate increases DJ-1 expression by 300% in the N27 dopamine cell line and rescues cells from oxidative stress and mutant α-synuclein toxicity. In mice, phenylbutyrate treatment leads to a 260% increase in brain DJ-1 levels and protects dopamine neurons against 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxicity. In a transgenic mouse model of diffuse Lewy body disease, long-term administration of phenylbutyrate reduces α-synuclein aggregation in brain and prevents age-related deterioration in motor and cognitive function. We conclude that drugs that up-regulate DJ-1 gene expression may slow the progression of Parkinson disease by moderating oxidative stress and protein aggregation.

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor-dependent Activation of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway by DJ-1 Protein through Its Direct Binding to c-Raf Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Murata, Hiroaki; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson disease. DJ-1 has various functions, and the oxidative status of cysteine at position 106 (Cys-106) is crucial for determination of the activation level of DJ-1. Although DJ-1 requires activated Ras for its oncogenic activity and although it activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, a cell growth pathway downstream of Ras, the precise mechanism underlying activation of the ERK pathway by DJ-1 is still not known. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to the kinase domain of c-Raf but not to Ras and that Cys-106 mutant DJ-1 bound to c-Raf more weakly than did wild-type DJ-1. Co-localization of DJ-1 with c-Raf in the cytoplasm was enhanced in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated cells. Knockdown of DJ-1 expression attenuated the phosphorylation level of c-Raf in EGF-treated cells, resulting in reduced activation of MEK and ERK1/2. Although EGF-treated DJ-1 knock-out cells also showed attenuated c-Raf activation, reintroduction of wild-type DJ-1, but not C106S DJ-1, into DJ-1 knock-out cells restored c-Raf activation in a DJ-1 binding activity in a c-Raf-dependent manner. DJ-1 was not responsible for activation of c-Raf in phorbol myristate acetate-treated cells. Furthermore, DJ-1 stimulated self-phosphorylation activity of c-Raf in vitro, but DJ-1 was not a target for Raf kinase. Oxidation of Cys-106 in DJ-1 was not affected by EGF treatment. These findings showed that DJ-1 is a positive regulator of the EGF/Ras/ERK pathway through targeting c-Raf. PMID:26048984

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor-dependent Activation of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway by DJ-1 Protein through Its Direct Binding to c-Raf Protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Murata, Hiroaki; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-07-17

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson disease. DJ-1 has various functions, and the oxidative status of cysteine at position 106 (Cys-106) is crucial for determination of the activation level of DJ-1. Although DJ-1 requires activated Ras for its oncogenic activity and although it activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, a cell growth pathway downstream of Ras, the precise mechanism underlying activation of the ERK pathway by DJ-1 is still not known. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to the kinase domain of c-Raf but not to Ras and that Cys-106 mutant DJ-1 bound to c-Raf more weakly than did wild-type DJ-1. Co-localization of DJ-1 with c-Raf in the cytoplasm was enhanced in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated cells. Knockdown of DJ-1 expression attenuated the phosphorylation level of c-Raf in EGF-treated cells, resulting in reduced activation of MEK and ERK1/2. Although EGF-treated DJ-1 knock-out cells also showed attenuated c-Raf activation, reintroduction of wild-type DJ-1, but not C106S DJ-1, into DJ-1 knock-out cells restored c-Raf activation in a DJ-1 binding activity in a c-Raf-dependent manner. DJ-1 was not responsible for activation of c-Raf in phorbol myristate acetate-treated cells. Furthermore, DJ-1 stimulated self-phosphorylation activity of c-Raf in vitro, but DJ-1 was not a target for Raf kinase. Oxidation of Cys-106 in DJ-1 was not affected by EGF treatment. These findings showed that DJ-1 is a positive regulator of the EGF/Ras/ERK pathway through targeting c-Raf.

  19. Cinnamon Treatment Upregulates Neuroprotective Proteins Parkin and DJ-1 and Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khasnavis, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-related beneficial proteins such as Parkin and DJ-1 in astrocytes during neurodegenerative insults may have therapeutic efficacy in PD. Cinnamon is a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material throughout the world. Here we have explored a novel use of cinnamon in upregulating Parkin and DJ-1 and protecting dopaminergic neurons in MPTP mouse model of PD. Recently we have delineated that oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder produces sodium benzoate (NaB) in blood and brain of mice. Proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β decreased the level of Parkin/DJ-1 in mouse astrocytes. However, cinnamon metabolite NaB abrogated IL-1β-induced loss of these proteins. Inability of TNF-α to produce nitric oxide (NO) and decrease the level of Parkin/DJ-1 in wild type (WT) astrocytes, failure of IL-1β to reduce Parkin/DJ-1 in astrocytes isolated from iNOS (−/−) mice, and decrease in Parkin/DJ-1 in WT astrocytes by NO donor DETA-NONOate suggest that NO is a negative regulator of Parkin/DJ-1. Furthermore, suppression of IL-1β-induced expression of iNOS in astrocytes by NaB and reversal of NaB-mediated protection of Parkin/DJ-1 by DETA-NONOate in astrocytes indicate that NaB protects Parkin/DJ-1 in activated astrocytes via suppressing iNOS. Similarly MPTP intoxication also increased the level of iNOS and decreased the level of Parkin/DJ-1 in vivo in the nigra. However, oral treatment of MPTP-intoxicated mice with cinnamon powder and NaB reduced the expression of iNOS and protected Parkin/DJ-1 in the nigra. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions by cinnamon in MPTP-intoxicated mice. These results suggest that cinnamon may be beneficial for PD patients. PMID:24946862

  20. DJ-1/Park7 Sensitive Na(+) /H(+) Exchanger 1 (NHE1) in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuetao; Shi, Xiaolong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shaqiu; Salker, Madhuri S; Mack, Andreas F; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Singh, Yogesh; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-10

    DJ-1/Park7 is a redox-sensitive chaperone protein counteracting oxidation and presumably contributing to the control of oxidative stress responses and thus inflammation. DJ-1 gene deletion exacerbates the progression of Parkinson's disease presumably by augmenting oxidative stress. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is paralleled by activation of the Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1). ROS formation in CD4(+) T cells plays a decisive role in regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study we explored whether DJ-1 is expressed in CD4(+) T cells and affects ROS production as well as NHE1 in those cells. To this end, DJ-1 and NHE1 transcript and protein levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and Western blotting respectively, intracellular pH (pHi) utilizing bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) fluorescence, NHE activity from realkalinization after an ammonium pulse, and ROS production utilizing 2',7' -dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. As a result DJ-1 was expressed in CD4(+) T cells. ROS formation, NHE1 transcript levels, NHE1 protein, and NHE activity were higher in CD4(+) T cells from DJ-1 deficient mice than in CD4(+) T cells from wild type mice. Antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor staurosporine decreased the NHE activity in DJ-1 deficient CD4(+) T cells, and blunted the difference between DJ-1(-/-) and DJ-1(+/+) CD4(+) T cells, an observation pointing to a role of ROS in the up-regulation of NHE1 in DJ-1(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, DJ-1 is a powerful regulator of ROS production as well as NHE1 expression and activity in CD4(+) T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Drosophila DJ-1 mutants show oxidative stress-sensitive locomotive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeehye; Kim, Sung Yun; Cha, Guang-Ho; Lee, Sung Bae; Kim, Sunhong; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2005-11-21

    DJ-1 is linked to an early-onset autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD) characterized primarily by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons, which results in motor disturbances. However, our understanding on how mutations in DJ-1 are related to PD is unclear. Here, we isolated the DJ-1 orthologue, DJ-1beta, in Drosophila and characterized its expression and loss-of-function mutants. We observed its strongest expression in the adult stage of development and ubiquitous expression in the larval brain. Our homozygous mutants showed severe defects in locomotor ability without loss of DA neurons, consistent with the previous mice DJ-1 mutant studies ([Goldberg, M.S., Pisani, A., Haburcak, M., Vortherms, T.A., Kitada, T., Costa, C., Tong, Y., Martella, G., Tscherter, A., Martins, A., et al., 2005. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficits and hypokinesia caused by inactivation of the familial Parkinsonism-linked gene DJ-1. Neuron 45, 489-496.]; [Kim, R.H., Smith, P.D., Aleyasin, H., Hayley, S., Mount, M.P., Pownall, S., Wakeham, A., You-Ten, A.J., Kalia, S.K., Horne, P., Westaway, D., Lozano, A.M., Anisman, H., Park, D.S., Mak, T.W., 2005. Hypersensitivity of DJ-1-deficient mice to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and oxidative stress. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 5215-5220.]; [Chen, L., Cagniard, B., Mathews, T., Jones, S., Koh, H.C., Ding, Y., Carvey, P.M., Ling, Z., Kang, U.J., Zhuang, X., 2005. Age-dependent motor deficits and dopaminergic dysfunction in DJ-1 null mice. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 21418-21426.]). The locomotor activity of DJ-1beta mutants was further decreased by paraquat-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that Drosophila DJ-1 is prominently localized in mitochondria, suggesting that DJ-1 functions as a protector against oxidative stress in mitochondria.

  2. Baicalein prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in SH-SY5Y cells via inhibition of mitochondrial oxidation and up-regulation of DJ-1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Hua; Yu, Hai-Tao; Pu, Xiao-Ping; Du, Guan-Hua

    2013-11-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons at the substantia nigra. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the mechanism of cell damage in Parkinson's disease (PD). 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a dopamine analog which specifically damages dopaminergic neurons. Baicalein has been previously reported to have potential in the treatment of PD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of action of baicalein against 6-OHDA injury in SH-SY5Y cells. The results showed that baicalein significantly alleviated alterations of mitochondrial redox activity and mitochondrial membrane potential induced by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y cells compared with vehicle group. Futhermore, baicalein decreased the production of ROS and upregulated the DJ-1 protein expression in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, baicalein also inhibited ROS production and lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 6.32 ± 0.03 μM) in rat brain mitochondia. In summary, the underlying mechanisms of baicalein against 6-OHDA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may involve inhibition of mitochondrial oxidation and upregulation of DJ-1 protein expression.

  3. DJ-1 Is a Copper Chaperone Acting on SOD1 Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Girotto, Stefania; Cendron, Laura; Bisaglia, Marco; Tessari, Isabella; Mammi, Stefano; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Bubacco, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Lack of oxidative stress control is a common and often prime feature observed in many neurodegenerative diseases. Both DJ-1 and SOD1, proteins involved in familial Parkinson disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, respectively, play a protective role against oxidative stress. Impaired activity and modified expression of both proteins have been observed in different neurodegenerative diseases. A potential cooperative action of DJ-1 and SOD1 in the same oxidative stress response pathway may be suggested based on a copper-mediated interaction between the two proteins reported here. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the antioxidative function of DJ-1 in relation to SOD1 activity, we investigated the ability of DJ-1 to bind copper ions. We structurally characterized a novel copper binding site involving Cys-106, and we investigated, using different techniques, the kinetics of DJ-1 binding to copper ions. The copper transfer between the two proteins was also examined using both fluorescence spectroscopy and specific biochemical assays for SOD1 activity. The structural and functional analysis of the novel DJ-1 copper binding site led us to identify a putative role for DJ-1 as a copper chaperone. Alteration of the coordination geometry of the copper ion in DJ-1 may be correlated to the physiological role of the protein, to a potential failure in metal transfer to SOD1, and to successive implications in neurodegenerative etiopathogenesis. PMID:24567322

  4. Oxidized DJ-1 as a possible biomarker of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a progressive, age-related, neurodegenerative disorder, and oxidative stress is an important mediator in its pathogenesis. DJ-1 is a causative gene of a familial form of Parkinson’s disease, namely PARK7, and plays a significant role in antioxidative defense to protect the cells from oxidative stress. DJ-1 undergoes preferential oxidation at the cysteine residue at position 106, Cys-106, under oxidative stress. The critical role of Cys-106 in the biological function of DJ-1 has been demonstrated, and recent studies indicate that DJ-1 acts as a sensor of oxidative stress by regulating the gene expression of antioxidative defense. Specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 have been developed, and the generation of oxidized DJ-1 in cellular and animal models of Parkinson’s disease has been investigated. This review focuses on the role of DJ-1 in antioxidative defense and the importance of oxidizable Cys-106 in its function. The significance of the identification of early-phase Parkinson’s disease biomarkers and the nature of oxidized DJ-1 as a biomarker for Parkinson’s disease are discussed here. PMID:24894116

  5. DJ-1 as a potential biomarker for the development of biocompatible multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Haniu, Hisao; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Usui, Yuki; Aoki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hara, Kazuo; Takanashi, Seiji; Okamoto, Masanori; Ishigaki, Norio; Nakamura, Koichi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Saito, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Background In the present study, we investigated whether DJ-1 could serve as a biomarker for assessing the biocompatibility of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), using the highly purified carbon nanotube, HTT2800. Methods Using Western blot analysis, we determined DJ-1 protein levels in two different types of cells (one capable and the other incapable of HTT2800 endocytosis). Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we also investigated the ability of purified nanotubes to alter DJ-1 mRNA levels. Results We demonstrated that the DJ-1 protein concentration was reduced, regardless of the cytotoxic activity of intracellular HTT2800. Furthermore, HTT2800 decreased the DJ-1 mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. This decrease in DJ-1 mRNA levels was not observed in the case of Sumi black or cup-stacked carbon nanotubes. Conclusion These data indicate that modification of DJ-1 expression is caused by the cell response to MWCNTs. We conclude that DJ-1 is a promising candidate biomarker for the development of biocompatible MWCNTs. PMID:22114499

  6. DJ-1 knock-down in astrocytes impairs astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection against rotenone.

    PubMed

    Mullett, Steven J; Hinkle, David A

    2009-01-01

    Mutations that eliminate DJ-1 expression cause a familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD). In sporadic PD, and many other neurodegenerative diseases, reactive astrocytes over-express DJ-1 whereas neurons maintain its expression at non-disease levels. Since DJ-1 has neuroprotective properties, and since astrocytes are known to support and protect neurons, DJ-1 over-expression in reactive astrocytes may reflect an attempt by these cells to protect themselves and surrounding neurons against disease progression. We used neuron-astrocyte contact and non-contact co-cultures to show that DJ-1 knock-down in astrocytes impaired their neuroprotective capacity, relative to wild-type astrocytes, against the neurotoxin rotenone. Conversely, DJ-1 over-expression in astrocytes augmented their neuroprotective capacity. Experiments using astrocyte conditioned media on neuron-only cultures suggested that astrocyte-released, soluble factors were involved in the DJ-1-dependent, astrocyte-mediated neuroprotective mechanism. Our findings support the developing view that astrocytic dysfunction, in addition to neuronal dysfunction, may contribute to the progression of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection of the gastrointestinal mucosa against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Jhang, Jhih-Jia; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-10-01

    Ketoprofen is widely used to alleviate pain and inflammation in clinical medicine; however, this drug may cause oxidative stress and lead to gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers. We previously reported that nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a crucial role in protecting cells against reactive oxygen species, and it facilitates the prevention of ketoprofen-induced GI mucosal ulcers. Recent reports suggested that Nrf2 becomes unstable in the absence of DJ-1/PARK7, attenuating the activity of Nrf2-regulated downstream antioxidant enzymes. Thus, increasing Nrf2 translocation by DJ-1 may represent a novel means for GI protection. In vitro, caffeic acid increases the nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 ratio and the mRNA expression of the downstream antioxidant enzymes, ϒ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and heme oxygenase-1, by activating the JNK/p38 pathway in Int-407 cells. Moreover, knockdown of DJ-1 also reversed caffeic acid-induced nuclear Nrf2 protein expression in a JNK/p38-dependent manner. Our results also indicated that treatment of Sprague-Dawley rats with caffeic acid prior to the administration of ketoprofen inhibited oxidative damage and reversed the inhibitory effects of ketoprofen on the antioxidant system and DJ-1 protein expression in the GI mucosa. Our observations suggest that DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage in the GI mucosa.

  8. Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and the Antioxidant Protein DJ-1 in Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Kyun; Beaven, Michael A.; Kulinski, Joseph M.; Desai, Avanti; Bandara, Geethani; Bai, Yun; Prussin, Calman; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Komarow, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic accumulation of mast cells in systemic mastocytosis (SM) associates with activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT. Constitutive activation of tyrosine kinase oncogenes has been linked to imbalances in oxidant/antioxidant mechanisms in other myeloproliferative disorders. However, the impact of KIT mutations on the redox status in SM and the potential therapeutic implications are not well understood. Here, we examined the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of the antioxidant protein DJ-1 (PARK-7), which increases with cancer progression and acts to lessen oxidative damage to malignant cells, in relationship with SM severity. ROS levels were increased in both indolent (ISM) and aggressive variants of the disease (ASM). However, while DJ-1 levels were reduced in ISM with lower mast cell burden, they rose in ISM with higher mast cell burden and were significantly elevated in patients with ASM. Studies on mast cell lines revealed that activating KIT mutations induced constant ROS production and consequent DJ-1 oxidation and degradation that could explain the reduced levels of DJ-1 in the ISM population, while IL-6, a cytokine that increases with disease severity, caused a counteracting transcriptional induction of DJ-1 which would protect malignant mast cells from oxidative damage. A mouse model of mastocytosis recapitulated the biphasic changes in DJ-1 and the escalating IL-6, ROS and DJ-1 levels as mast cells accumulate, findings which were reversed with anti-IL-6 receptor blocking antibody. Our findings provide evidence of increased ROS and a biphasic regulation of the antioxidant DJ-1 in variants of SM and implicate IL-6 in DJ-1 induction and expansion of mast cells with KIT mutations. We propose consideration of IL-6 blockade as a potential adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with advanced mastocytosis, as it would reduce DJ-1 levels making mutation-positive mast cells vulnerable to oxidative damage. PMID:27611333

  9. DJ-1 deficiency in astrocytes selectively enhances mitochondrial Complex I inhibitor-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mullett, Steven J.; Hinkle, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) brains show evidence of mitochondrial respiratory Complex I deficiency, oxidative stress, and neuronal death. Complex I-inhibiting neurotoxins, such as the pesticide rotenone, cause neuronal death and parkinsonism in animal models. We have previously shown that DJ-1 over-expression in astrocytes augments their capacity to protect neurons against rotenone, that DJ-1 knock-down impairs astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection against rotenone, and that each process involves astrocyte-released factors. To further investigate the mechanism behind these findings, we developed a high-throughput, plate-based bioassay that can be used to assess how genetic manipulations in astrocytes affect their ability to protect co-cultured neurons. We used this bioassay to show that DJ-1 deficiency-induced impairments in astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection occur solely in the presence of pesticides that inhibit Complex I (rotenone, pyridaben, fenazaquin, and fenpyroximate); not with agents that inhibit Complexes II-V, that primarily induce oxidative stress, or that inhibit the proteasome. This is a potentially PD-relevant finding because pesticide exposure is epidemiologically-linked with an increased risk for PD. Further investigations into our model suggested that astrocytic glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 anti-oxidant systems are not central to the neuroprotective mechanism. PMID:21219333

  10. DJ-1 deficiency in astrocytes selectively enhances mitochondrial Complex I inhibitor-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mullett, Steven J; Hinkle, David A

    2011-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) brains show evidence of mitochondrial respiratory Complex I deficiency, oxidative stress, and neuronal death. Complex I-inhibiting neurotoxins, such as the pesticide rotenone, cause neuronal death and parkinsonism in animal models. We have previously shown that DJ-1 over-expression in astrocytes augments their capacity to protect neurons against rotenone, that DJ-1 knock-down impairs astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection against rotenone, and that each process involves astrocyte-released factors. To further investigate the mechanism behind these findings, we developed a high-throughput, plate-based bioassay that can be used to assess how genetic manipulations in astrocytes affect their ability to protect co-cultured neurons. We used this bioassay to show that DJ-1 deficiency-induced impairments in astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection occur solely in the presence of pesticides that inhibit Complex I (rotenone, pyridaben, fenazaquin, and fenpyroximate); not with agents that inhibit Complexes II-V, that primarily induce oxidative stress, or that inhibit the proteasome. This is a potentially PD-relevant finding because pesticide exposure is epidemiologically-linked with an increased risk for PD. Further investigations into our model suggested that astrocytic GSH and heme oxygenase-1 antioxidant systems are not central to the neuroprotective mechanism. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Regulation of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum of DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Kouranova, Evguenia; Cui, Xiaoxia; Mach, Robert H.; Xu, Jinbin

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic autosomal recessive mutations in the DJ-1 (Park7) or the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (Pink1 or PARK6) genes are associated with familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is not well known regarding the pathological mechanisms involving the DJ-1 and Pink1 mutations. Here we characterized DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats both through expression profiling and using quantitative autoradiography to measure the densities of the dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum of transgenic rats and wild type controls. Expression profiling with a commercially available array of 84 genes known to be involved in PD indicated that only the target gene was significantly downregulated in each transgenic rat model. D1 receptor, VMAT2, and DAT were measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. No significant changes were observed in the density of DAT in either model. Although the densities of VMAT2 and D1 receptor were unchanged in Pink1 knockout, but both were increased in DJ-1 knockout rats. The densities of D2 and D3 receptors, determined by mathematical analysis of binding of radioligands [3H]WC-10 and [3H]raclopride, were significantly increased in both knockout models. These distinctive changes in the expression of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum may reflect different compensatory regulation of dopamine system in DJ-1 versus Pink1 knockout rat models of familial PD. PMID:24157858

  12. Overexpression of the Parkinson disease protein DJ-1 and its regulator PTEN in gestational trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Juan; Siu, Michelle Kwan-Yee; Jiang, Li-Li; Mak, Victor Chun-Yin; Ngan, Hextan Yuen-Sheung; Cheung, Annie Nga-Yin

    2010-09-01

    DJ-1 is found to be important in human neurodegenerative diseases and cancers by regulating oxidative damage and apoptosis. DJ-1 is also a regulator of PTEN, a frequently mutated tumor suppressor gene in cancers. In this study, we investigated the expression of DJ-1 and PTEN in normal placentas and gestational trophoblastic disease in relation to apoptotic indices and p53 status. A total of 95 trophoblastic samples were retrieved for immunohistochemical study whereas 79 trophoblastic samples, 3 normal trophoblastic and 2 choriocarcinoma cell lines were collected for quantitative real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection. There was a significant correlation between DJ-1 and PTEN immunostaining indices in the trophoblastic samples (P=0.013). Significantly higher DJ-1 and PTEN immunoreactivity indices were found in the complete mole (P<0.01) and choricarcinoma (P<0.01) compared with the first trimester placenta. Quantitative real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction also detected significantly higher messenger ribonucleic acid expressions of DJ-1 and PTEN in hydatidiform moles (P<0.05) and choriocarcinomas (P<0.05) compared with the first trimester placentas. A significant negative correlation was found between DJ-1 and the apoptosis resistant gene Bcl-2 (P=0.031), whereas a positive correlation was shown between PTEN and wild-type p53 (P=0.019). Significant correlations between PTEN and embryonic stem cell transcription factors, Stat3 and Nanog, were also displayed (P=0.001, 0.015). Our findings showed, for the first time, overexpression of DJ-1 at both transcriptional and protein levels in gestational trophoblastic disease. Overexpressed DJ-1 may play a role in regulating apoptotic activities of trophoblasts in relation to PTEN and p53.

  13. Oxidant-induced Interprotein Disulfide Formation in Cardiac Protein DJ-1 Occurs via an Interaction with Peroxiredoxin 2.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Caggiano, Mariana; Schröder, Ewald; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Burgoyne, Joseph; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Mayr, Manuel; Eaton, Philip

    2016-05-06

    The role and responses of the dimeric DJ-1 protein to cardiac oxidative stress is incompletely understood. H2O2 induces a 50-kDa DJ-1 interprotein homodimer disulfide, known to form between Cys-53 on each subunit. A trimeric 75-kDa DJ-1 complex that mass spectrometry shows contained 2-Cys peroxiredoxin also formed and precedes the appearance of the disulfide dimer. These observations may represent peroxiredoxin sensing and transducing the oxidant signal to DJ-1. The dimeric disulfide DJ-1 complex was stabilized by auranofin, suggesting that thioredoxin recycles it in cells. Higher concentrations of H2O2 concomitantly induce DJ-1 Cys-106 hyperoxidation (sulfination or sulfonation) in myocytes, perfused heart, or HEK cells. An oxidation-resistant C53A DJ-1 shows potentiated H2O2-induced Cys-106 hyperoxidation. DJ-1 also forms multiple disulfides with unknown target proteins during H2O2 treatment, the formation of which is also potentiated in cells expressing the C53A mutant. This suggests that the intersubunit disulfide induces a conformational change that limits Cys-106 forming heterodisulfide protein complexes or from hyperoxidizing. High concentrations of H2O2 also induce cell death, with DJ-1 Cys-106 sulfonation appearing causal in these events, as expressionof C53A DJ-1 enhanced both Cys-106 sulfonation and cell death. Nonetheless, expression of the DJ-1 C106A mutant, which fully prevents hyperoxidation, also showed exacerbated cell death responses to H2O2 A rational explanation for these findings is that DJ-1 Cys-106 forms disulfides with target proteins to limit oxidant-induced cell death. However, when Cys-106 is hyperoxidized, formation of these potentially protective heterodimeric disulfide complexes is limited, and so cell death is exacerbated. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Oxidant-induced Interprotein Disulfide Formation in Cardiac Protein DJ-1 Occurs via an Interaction with Peroxiredoxin 2*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Caggiano, Mariana; Schröder, Ewald; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Burgoyne, Joseph; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Mayr, Manuel; Eaton, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The role and responses of the dimeric DJ-1 protein to cardiac oxidative stress is incompletely understood. H2O2 induces a 50-kDa DJ-1 interprotein homodimer disulfide, known to form between Cys-53 on each subunit. A trimeric 75-kDa DJ-1 complex that mass spectrometry shows contained 2-Cys peroxiredoxin also formed and precedes the appearance of the disulfide dimer. These observations may represent peroxiredoxin sensing and transducing the oxidant signal to DJ-1. The dimeric disulfide DJ-1 complex was stabilized by auranofin, suggesting that thioredoxin recycles it in cells. Higher concentrations of H2O2 concomitantly induce DJ-1 Cys-106 hyperoxidation (sulfination or sulfonation) in myocytes, perfused heart, or HEK cells. An oxidation-resistant C53A DJ-1 shows potentiated H2O2-induced Cys-106 hyperoxidation. DJ-1 also forms multiple disulfides with unknown target proteins during H2O2 treatment, the formation of which is also potentiated in cells expressing the C53A mutant. This suggests that the intersubunit disulfide induces a conformational change that limits Cys-106 forming heterodisulfide protein complexes or from hyperoxidizing. High concentrations of H2O2 also induce cell death, with DJ-1 Cys-106 sulfonation appearing causal in these events, as expressionof C53A DJ-1 enhanced both Cys-106 sulfonation and cell death. Nonetheless, expression of the DJ-1 C106A mutant, which fully prevents hyperoxidation, also showed exacerbated cell death responses to H2O2. A rational explanation for these findings is that DJ-1 Cys-106 forms disulfides with target proteins to limit oxidant-induced cell death. However, when Cys-106 is hyperoxidized, formation of these potentially protective heterodimeric disulfide complexes is limited, and so cell death is exacerbated. PMID:26945066

  15. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1−/−) and wild-type mice (DJ-1+/+) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1−/− and DJ-1+/+ mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1−/− mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1+/+ mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice. PMID:27313379

  16. Elevation of oxidized DJ-1 in the brain and erythrocytes of Parkinson disease model animals.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Yoko Ogawa; Saito, Yoshiro; Hamakubo, Takao; Masuo, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Nishio, Keiko; Shichiri, Mototada; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Noguchi, Noriko; Niki, Etsuo

    2010-10-15

    DJ-1, the causative gene of a familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD), has been reported undergo oxidation preferentially at the 106th cysteine residue (Cys-106) under oxidative stress. Recently, it has been found that the levels of oxidized DJ-1 in erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients are markedly higher than those in medicated PD patients and healthy subjects. In the present study, we examined the changes in oxidized DJ-1 levels in the brain and erythrocytes of PD animal models using specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1. Treatment with PD model compounds such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and 6-hydroxydopamine significantly elevated the levels of oxidized DJ-1 in erythrocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis also revealed that the number of oxidized DJ-1 antibody-positive cells in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mouse increased in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the oxidative modification of DJ-1 in the brain and erythrocytes is involved in the pathogenesis of PD in animal models.

  17. DJ-1, a target protein for an endocrine disrupter, participates in the fertilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Niki, Takeshi; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2002-07-01

    DJ-1 was first identified as an activated ras-dependent oncogene product and was later also found to be an infertility-related protein affected by sperm toxicants such as ornidazole (OR) and epichlorohydrin. These findings suggest that DJ-1 has functions in both somatic cells and sperm. In this study, to determine the relationship between DJ-1 and an endocrine disrupter and to determine the functions of DJ-1 in sperm, in vitro fertilization experiments were carried out using eggs and sperm extracted from mice that had or had not been treated with OR. We found that the amount of DJ-1 in sperm and the efficiency of fertilization decreased with the increasing dose of OR to which the mice were exposed. The addition of an anti-mouse DJ-1 serum to sperm solution before the in vitro fertilization reaction with eggs resulted in a decrease in the efficiency of fertilization to about one-third of that when pre-immune serum was added to sperm solution, indicating that DJ-1 participates in the fertilization.

  18. DJ-1-Mediated protective effect of protocatechuic aldehyde against oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Wei; Yamane, Takuya; Maita, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Shizuma; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Pu, Xiao-Ping; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    DJ-1 was identified as a causal gene for a familial form of early onset Parkinson's disease (PD), park 7. DJ-1 plays roles in transcriptional regulation and the anti-oxidative stress reaction. In this study, we found that protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL), a traditional Chinese medicine compound, bound to DJ-1 in vitro and that PAL protected SH-SY5Y cells but not DJ-1-knockdown SH-SY5Y cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death, indicating that the protective effect of PAL is mediated by DJ-1. Furthermore, PAL inhibited production of reactive oxygen species and the inhibition was abated in DJ-1-knockdown cells. PAL increased and decreased phosphorylation of AKT and PTEN, respectively, in SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting that the AKT pathway is one of the specific signaling pathways in PAL-induced neuroprotection. Moreover, PAL prevented superfluous oxidation of cysteine 106 of DJ-1, an essential amino acid for DJ-1's function. The present study demonstrates that PAL has potential neuroprotective effects through DJ-1.

  19. Parkinson disease protein DJ-1 binds metals and protects against metal-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-08-02

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD.

  20. Parkinson Disease Protein DJ-1 Binds Metals and Protects against Metal-induced Cytotoxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-01-01

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD. PMID:23792957

  1. Toxoplasma DJ-1 Regulates Organelle Secretion by a Direct Interaction with Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Child, Matthew A.; Garland, Megan; Foe, Ian; Madzelan, Peter; Treeck, Moritz; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Oresic Bender, Kristina; Weerapana, Eranthie; Wilson, Mark A.; Boothroyd, John C.; Reese, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human DJ-1 is a highly conserved and yet functionally enigmatic protein associated with a heritable form of Parkinson’s disease. It has been suggested to be a redox-dependent regulatory scaffold, binding to proteins to modulate their function. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the Toxoplasma orthologue Toxoplasma gondii DJ-1 (TgDJ-1) at 2.1-Å resolution and show that it directly associates with calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1). The TgDJ-1 structure identifies an orthologously conserved arginine dyad that acts as a phospho-gatekeeper motif to control complex formation. We determined that the binding of TgDJ-1 to CDPK1 is sensitive to oxidation and calcium, and that this interaction potentiates CDPK1 kinase activity. Finally, we show that genetic deletion of TgDJ-1 results in upregulation of CDPK1 expression and that disruption of the CDPK1/TgDJ-1 complex in vivo prevents normal exocytosis of parasite virulence-associated organelles called micronemes. Overall, our data suggest that TgDJ-1 functions as a noncanonical kinase-regulatory scaffold that integrates multiple intracellular signals to tune microneme exocytosis in T. gondii. PMID:28246362

  2. Immunostaining of Oxidized DJ-1 in Human and Mouse Brains

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshiro; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Hayashi, Kojiro; Mita, Yuichiro; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Iwanari, Hiroko; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Hamakubo, Takao; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Niki, Etsuo; Murayama, Shigeo; Ihara, Yasuo; Noguchi, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract DJ-1, the product of a causative gene of a familial form of Parkinson disease, undergoes preferential oxidation of Cys106 (cysteine residue at position 106) under oxidative stress. Using specific monoclonal antibodies against Cys106 oxidized DJ-1 (oxDJ-1), we examined oxDJ-1 immunoreactivity in brain sections from DJ-1 knockout and wild-type mice and in human brain sections from cases classified into different Lewy body stages of Parkinson disease and Parkinson disease with dementia. Oxidized DJ-1 immunoreactivity was prominently observed in neuromelanin-containing neurons and neuron processes of the substantia nigra; Lewy bodies also showed oxDJ-1 immunoreactivity. Oxidized DJ-1 was also detected in astrocytes in the striatum, in neurons and glia in the red nucleus, and in the inferior olivary nucleus, all of which are related to regulation of movement. These observations suggest the relevance of DJ-1 oxidation to homeostasis in multiple brain regions, including neuromelanin-containing neurons of the substantia nigra, and raise the possibility that oxDJ-1 levels might change during the progression of Lewy body–associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24918637

  3. Monomer DJ-1 and Its N-Terminal Sequence Are Necessary for Mitochondrial Localization of DJ-1 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease (park7). DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in DJ-1-knockout mice and fry, and mitochondrial DJ-1 is more protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Although translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria is enhanced by oxidative stress that leads to oxidation of cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1, the characteristics of mitochondrial DJ-1 and the mechanism by which DJ-1 is translocated into mitochondria are poorly understood. In this study, immunostaining, co-immunoprecipitation, cell fractionation and pull-down experiments showed that mutants of glutamine 18 (E18) DJ-1 are localized in mitochondria and do not make homodimers. Likewise, DJ-1 with mutations of two cysteines located in the dimer interface, C46S and C53A, and pathogenic mutants, M26I and L166P DJ-1, were found to be localized in mitochondria and not to make homodimers. Mutant DJ-1 harboring both E18A and C106S, in which C106 is not oxidized, was also localized in mitochondria, indicating that oxidation of C106 is important but not essential for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1. It should be noted that E18A DJ-1 was translocated from mitochondria to the cytoplasm when mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced by treatment of cells with CCCP, an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation system in mitochondria. Furthermore, deletion or substitution of the N-terminal 12 amino acids in DJ-1 resulted in re-localization of E18A, M26I and L166P DJ-1 from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that a monomer and the N-terminal 12 amino acids are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants and that conformation change induced by C106 oxidation or by E18 mutation leads to translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria. PMID:23326576

  4. Monomer DJ-1 and its N-terminal sequence are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease (park7). DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in DJ-1-knockout mice and fry, and mitochondrial DJ-1 is more protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Although translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria is enhanced by oxidative stress that leads to oxidation of cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1, the characteristics of mitochondrial DJ-1 and the mechanism by which DJ-1 is translocated into mitochondria are poorly understood. In this study, immunostaining, co-immunoprecipitation, cell fractionation and pull-down experiments showed that mutants of glutamine 18 (E18) DJ-1 are localized in mitochondria and do not make homodimers. Likewise, DJ-1 with mutations of two cysteines located in the dimer interface, C46S and C53A, and pathogenic mutants, M26I and L166P DJ-1, were found to be localized in mitochondria and not to make homodimers. Mutant DJ-1 harboring both E18A and C106S, in which C106 is not oxidized, was also localized in mitochondria, indicating that oxidation of C106 is important but not essential for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1. It should be noted that E18A DJ-1 was translocated from mitochondria to the cytoplasm when mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced by treatment of cells with CCCP, an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation system in mitochondria. Furthermore, deletion or substitution of the N-terminal 12 amino acids in DJ-1 resulted in re-localization of E18A, M26I and L166P DJ-1 from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that a monomer and the N-terminal 12 amino acids are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants and that conformation change induced by C106 oxidation or by E18 mutation leads to translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria.

  5. BAG5 Interacts with DJ-1 and Inhibits the Neuroprotective Effects of DJ-1 to Combat Mitochondrial Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jie-qiong; Zhang, Hai-nan; Rizwana, Kousar; Lu, Jia-hong; Tang, Jian-guang; Jiang, Bo; Shen, Xiang-min; Guo, Ji-feng; Tang, Bei-sha; Tan, Li-ming

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in gene encoding DJ-1 contribute to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive early-onset familial forms of Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 is a multifunctional protein and plays a protective role against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage and cell death, but the exact mechanism underlying this is not yet clearly understood. Here, using coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and immunofluorescence methods, we prove that Bcl-2-associated athanogene 5 (BAG5), a BAG family member, interacts with DJ-1 in mammalian cells. Moreover, we show that BAG5 could decrease stability of DJ-1 and weaken its role in mitochondrial protection probably by influencing dimerization in stress condition. Our study reveals the relationship of BAG5 and DJ-1 suggesting a potential role for BAG5 in the pathogenesis of PD through its functional interactions with DJ-1. PMID:28348719

  6. DJ-1 Interacts with and Regulates Paraoxonase-2, an Enzyme Critical for Neuronal Survival in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Parsanejad, Mohammad; Bourquard, Noam; Qu, Dianbo; Zhang, Yi; Huang, En; Rousseaux, Maxime W. C.; Aleyasin, Hossein; Irrcher, Isabella; Callaghan, Steve; Vaillant, Dominique C.; Kim, Raymond H.; Slack, Ruth S.; Mak, Tak W.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Figeys, Daniel; Park, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) gene account for about 1% of all familial Parkinson's disease (PD). While its physiological function(s) are not completely clear, DJ-1 protects neurons against oxidative stress in both in vitro and in vivo models of PD. The molecular mechanism(s) through which DJ-1 alleviates oxidative stress-mediated damage remains elusive. In this study, we identified Paraoxonase-2 (PON2) as an interacting target of DJ-1. PON2 activity is elevated in response to oxidative stress and DJ-1 is crucial for this response. Importantly, we showed that PON2 deficiency hypersensitizes neurons to oxidative stress induced by MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium). Conversely, over-expression of PON2 protects neurons in this death paradigm. Interestingly, PON2 effectively rescues DJ-1 deficiency-mediated hypersensitivity to oxidative stress. Taken together, our data suggest a model by which DJ-1 exerts its antioxidant activities, at least partly through regulation of PON2. PMID:25210784

  7. Mutations in DJ-1 are rare in familial Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Pauciulo, Michael W.; Elsaesser, Veronika E.; Marek, Diane K.; Halter, Cheryl A.; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Clifford W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Nichols Ph.D., William C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) are one cause of early-onset autosomal-recessive parkinsonism. We screened for DJ-1 mutations in 93 affected individuals from the 64 multiplex Parkinson disease (PD) families in our sample that had the highest family-specific multipoint LOD scores at the DJ-1 locus. In addition to sequencing all coding exons for alterations, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to examine the genomic copy number of DJ-1 exons. A known polymorphism (R98Q) was found in five PD subjects, once as a homozygote and in the other four cases as heterozygotes. No additional missense mutations and no exon deletions or duplications were detected. Our results, in combination with those of previous studies, suggest that alterations in DJ-1 are not a common cause of familial PD. PMID:16997464

  8. DJ-1 contributes to adipogenesis and obesity-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Min; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Choi, Soo Youn; Park, Soo-Ah; Kim, Il Shin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Lee, Yong Hwa; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ, and the development of systemic inflammation in adipose tissue is closely associated with metabolic diseases, such as obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, the fine regulation of the inflammatory response caused by obesity has therapeutic potential for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we analyzed the role of DJ-1 (PARK7) in adipogenesis and inflammation related to obesity in vitro and in vivo. Many intracellular functions of DJ-1, including oxidative stress regulation, are known. However, the possibility of DJ-1 involvement in metabolic disease is largely unknown. Our results suggest that DJ-1 deficiency results in reduced adipogenesis and the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. Furthermore, DJ-1-deficient mice show a low-level inflammatory response in the high-fat diet-induced obesity model. These results indicate previously unknown functions of DJ-1 in metabolism and therefore suggest that precise regulation of DJ-1 in adipose tissue might have a therapeutic advantage for metabolic disease treatment. PMID:24925581

  9. High levels of DJ-1 protein and isoelectric point 6.3 isoform in sera of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawate, Takahiko; Iwaya, Keiichi; Koshikawa, Kayoko; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Yamasaki, Tamio; Hasegawa, Sho; Kaise, Hiroshi; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Takashi; Hiroi, Sadayuki; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae MM; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Murota, Keiichi; Fujimori, Minoru; Yamamoto, Junji; Matsubara, Osamu; Kohno, Norio

    2015-01-01

    In patients with cancer and Parkinson’s disease, the DJ-1 protein may be secreted into the serum during the impaired response of the underlying cell-protective mechanisms. In order to determine the clinical significance of DJ-1 protein in the sera of breast cancer patients, we examined blood samples from a breast cancer group (n = 180) and a non-cancerous control group (n = 300). Higher levels of DJ-1 were detected in the breast cancer group (mean level, 42.7 ng/mL) than the control group (28.3 ng/mL) by ELISA (P = 0.019). Higher DJ-1 levels were significantly associated with advanced clinical grade, according to the TNM classification, negative hormone receptor status, and high Ki-67 labeling index, of biopsied materials; samples showed low DJ-1 protein expression despite upregulated DJ-1 mRNA. DJ-1 isoforms could be detected clearly in 17 blood samples (from 11 breast cancer patients, and 6 non-cancerous controls) by 2-D gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis. The isoform at the pI of 6.3 showed the highest intensity in all 11 cancer cases. Conversely, in the 6 non-cancerous cases, isoforms other than the pI 6.3 isoform were highly expressed, and there was a significant difference in the isoform pattern between breast cancer cases and controls (P = 0.00025). These data indicate that high levels of DJ-1, probably of isoform at pI 6.3, is a candidate serum marker of breast cancer. PMID:25867058

  10. High levels of DJ-1 protein and isoelectric point 6.3 isoform in sera of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kawate, Takahiko; Iwaya, Keiichi; Koshikawa, Kayoko; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Yamasaki, Tamio; Hasegawa, Sho; Kaise, Hiroshi; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Takashi; Hiroi, Sadayuki; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Murota, Keiichi; Fujimori, Minoru; Yamamoto, Junji; Matsubara, Osamu; Kohno, Norio

    2015-07-01

    In patients with cancer and Parkinson's disease, the DJ-1 protein may be secreted into the serum during the impaired response of the underlying cell-protective mechanisms. In order to determine the clinical significance of DJ-1 protein in the sera of breast cancer patients, we examined blood samples from a breast cancer group (n = 180) and a non-cancerous control group (n = 300). Higher levels of DJ-1 were detected in the breast cancer group (mean level, 42.7 ng/mL) than the control group (28.3 ng/mL) by ELISA (P = 0.019). Higher DJ-1 levels were significantly associated with advanced clinical grade, according to the TNM classification, negative hormone receptor status, and high Ki-67 labeling index, of biopsied materials; samples showed low DJ-1 protein expression despite upregulated DJ-1 mRNA. DJ-1 isoforms could be detected clearly in 17 blood samples (from 11 breast cancer patients, and 6 non-cancerous controls) by 2-D gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis. The isoform at the pI of 6.3 showed the highest intensity in all 11 cancer cases. Conversely, in the 6 non-cancerous cases, isoforms other than the pI 6.3 isoform were highly expressed, and there was a significant difference in the isoform pattern between breast cancer cases and controls (P = 0.00025). These data indicate that high levels of DJ-1, probably of isoform at pI 6.3, is a candidate serum marker of breast cancer.

  11. SG2NA enhances cancer cell survival by stabilizing DJ-1 and thus activating Akt

    SciTech Connect

    Tanti, Goutam Kumar Pandey, Shweta; Goswami, Shyamal K.

    2015-08-07

    SG2NA in association with striatin and zinedin forms a striatin family of WD-40 repeat proteins. This family of proteins functions as scaffold in different signal transduction pathways. They also act as a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. We have shown that SG2NA which evolved first in the metazoan evolution among the striatin family members expresses different isoforms generated out of alternative splicing. We have also shown that SG2NA protects cells from oxidative stress by recruiting DJ-1 and Akt to mitochondria and membrane in the post-mitotic neuronal cells. DJ-1 is both cancer and Parkinson's disease related protein. In the present study we have shown that SG2NA protects DJ-1 from proteasomal degradation in cancer cells. Hence, downregulation of SG2NA reduces DJ-1/Akt colocalization in cancer cells resulting in the reduction of anchorage dependent and independent growth. Thus SG2NA enhances cancer cell survival. Reactive oxygen species enhances SG2NA, DJ-1 and Akt trimerization. Removal of the reactive oxygen species by N-acetyl-cysteine thus reduces cancer cell growth. - Highlights: • Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play potential role in cancer cell proliferation. • It enhances the association between DJ-1 and Akt mediated by SG2NA. • In cancer cells SG2NA stabilizes DJ-1 by inhibiting it from proteosomal degradation. • DJ-1 then activates Akt and cancer cells get their property of enhanced proliferation by sustained activation of Akt. • Further study on this field could lead to new target for cancer therapy.

  12. Toxoplasma DJ-1 Regulates Organelle Secretion by a Direct Interaction with Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Child, Matthew A; Garland, Megan; Foe, Ian; Madzelan, Peter; Treeck, Moritz; van der Linden, Wouter A; Oresic Bender, Kristina; Weerapana, Eranthie; Wilson, Mark A; Boothroyd, John C; Reese, Michael L; Bogyo, Matthew

    2017-02-28

    Human DJ-1 is a highly conserved and yet functionally enigmatic protein associated with a heritable form of Parkinson's disease. It has been suggested to be a redox-dependent regulatory scaffold, binding to proteins to modulate their function. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the Toxoplasma orthologue Toxoplasma gondii DJ-1 (TgDJ-1) at 2.1-Å resolution and show that it directly associates with calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1). The TgDJ-1 structure identifies an orthologously conserved arginine dyad that acts as a phospho-gatekeeper motif to control complex formation. We determined that the binding of TgDJ-1 to CDPK1 is sensitive to oxidation and calcium, and that this interaction potentiates CDPK1 kinase activity. Finally, we show that genetic deletion of TgDJ-1 results in upregulation of CDPK1 expression and that disruption of the CDPK1/TgDJ-1 complex in vivo prevents normal exocytosis of parasite virulence-associated organelles called micronemes. Overall, our data suggest that TgDJ-1 functions as a noncanonical kinase-regulatory scaffold that integrates multiple intracellular signals to tune microneme exocytosis in T. gondiiIMPORTANCE Apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma and Plasmodium are obligate intracellular parasites that require the protective environment of a host cell in order to replicate and survive within a host organism. These parasites secrete effector proteins from specialized apical organelles to select and invade a chosen host cell. The secretion of these organelles is a tightly regulated process coordinated by endogenous small molecules and calcium-dependent protein kinases. We previously identified the Toxoplasma orthologue of the highly conserved protein DJ-1 as a regulator of microneme secretion, but the molecular basis for this was not known. We have now identified the molecular mechanism for how TgDJ-1 regulates microneme secretion. TgDJ-1 interacts with the kinase responsible for the secretion of these

  13. Role of mitophagy regulated by Parkin/DJ-1 in remote ischemic postconditioning-induced mitigation of focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Xia, Z-Y; Lei, S-Q; Leng, Y; Xue, R

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the role of mitophagy controlled by Parkin/DJ-1 in remote ischemic post conditioning-induced mitigation of focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Ninety adult male rats were randomly assigned into 5 groups including a sham operation group (S) and ischemia-reperfusion group (I/R). Focal cerebral I/R was induced by right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). I/R+remote ischemic postconditioning (I/R+RIPoC), I/R+RIPoC+ mitophagy inhibitor Mdivi-1 (I/R+RIPoC+M), and I/R+RIPoC+ normal saline (I/R+RIPoC+NS) groups all received 3 cycles of 10 minutes reperfusion followed by 10 minutes ischemia in bilateral femoral arteries at the beginning of cerebral reperfusion. I/R+RIPoC+M received mitochondrial division inhibitor (Mdivi-1) before ischemia and after 24h of reperfusion, neurological deficit scores (NDSs) were measured and rats were then sacrificed. Brain was removed and size of the infarct was determined. Apoptosis index and LC3-II/I ratio, Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression, SOD activity, MDA and 15-F2t-Isoprostane content in cerebral ischemic penumbra were studied. Linear correlation between Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression and LC3-II/I ratio and cerebral infarct size were analyzed. In experimental groups the NDSs, percentage of cerebral infarct size, apoptosis index, LC3-II/I ratio, MDA and 15-F2t-Isoprostane content significantly increased and Parkin/DJ-1 proteins were up-regulated (p<0.05). In I/R+RIPoC and I/R+RIPoC+NS groups, NDSs, percentage of cerebral infarct size, apoptosis index, MDA and 15-F2t-Isoprostane content decreased significantly while LC3-II/I ratio and SOD activity increased compared to I/R group. Parkin/DJ-1 proteins were up-regulated in I/R+RIPoC, I/R+RIPoC+NS and I/R+RIPoC+M groups (p<0.05). LC3-II/I ratio and SOD activity significantly decreased (p<0.05). Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression didn't changed in I/R+RIPoC+M group (p>0.05). The Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression were positively correlated with LC3-II/I ratio

  14. Silencing DJ-1 reveals its contribution in paraquat-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    González-Polo, Rosa; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Morán, José M; Ortiz-Ortiz, Miguel A; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Soler, Germán; Fuentes, José M

    2009-05-01

    The role of autophagy as a survival strategy of cells constitutes an emerging topic in the study of the pathogenesis of several diseases with autophagic changes being described in a number of age-related neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the etiology of PD is still unknown, both environmental (for example, paraquat exposure) and genetic factors have been investigated as putative causes of the disease. In the latter case, mutations or changes in the protein DJ-1 have been reported to be associated with autosomal recessive, early-onset parkinsonism. In this paper we established a model system to study the involvement of the DJ-1 protein in paraquat-induced autophagy. When human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with DJ-1-specific small interfering RNAs and exposed to paraquat, we observed (i) sensitization additive with paraquat-induced apoptotic cell death, (ii) inhibition of the cytoplasmic accumulation of autophagic vacuoles as well as the recruitment of LC3 fusion protein to the vacuoles, (iii) exacerbation of apoptotic cell death in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, and (iv) an increase in mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings suggest an active role for DJ-1 in the autophagic response produced by paraquat, providing evidence for the role of PD-related proteins in the autophagic degradation pathway, a factor that should be considered in the design of potential therapies for the treatment of the disease.

  15. DJ-1, an oncogene and causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease, is essential for SV40 transformation in mouse fibroblasts through up-regulation of c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Chul; Kitaura, Hirotake; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2010-09-24

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a tumor virus and its early gene product large T-antigen (LT) is responsible for the transforming activity of SV40. Parkinson's disease causative gene DJ-1 is also a ras-dependent oncogene, but the mechanism of its oncogene function is still not known. In this study, we found that there were no transformed foci when fibroblasts from DJ-1-knockout mice were transfected with LT. We also found that DJ-1 directly bound to LT and that the expression level of c-Myc in transformed cells was parallel to that of DJ-1. These findings indicate that DJ-1 is essential for SV40 transformation.

  16. DJ-1 activates SIRT1 through its direct binding to SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Ganaha, Yoko; Niki, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shota; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2016-05-20

    The DJ-1 gene is a ras-dependent oncogene and also a causative gene for a familial form of Parkinson's disease park7. DJ-1 is a multi-functional protein and plays roles in regulation of cell growth, cells death, metabolism and mitochondrial homeostasis against oxidative stress. To explore various functions, DJ-1 associates with a number of proteins localized in the nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria. The oxidative status of a cysteine residue at an amino acid number 106 (C106) of DJ-1 determines the active level of DJ-1. Precise molecular mechanism of exploration of DJ-1 function is, however, not resolved. In this study, we identified Sirtuin family proteins (SIRT1, 2, and 4-6) as DJ-1-binding proteins, and DJ-1 associated with SIRT1 in cells. Sirtuins like DJ-1 also regulates growth, death and metabolism of cells and mitochondrial homeostasis. We found that DJ-1 stimulated deacetylase activity of SIRT1 and that SIRT1-suppressed transcriptional activity of SIRT1-target p53 was further decreased by DJ-1. Furthermore, SIRT1 activity was reduced in DJ-1-knockout cells, and this reduced activity was restored by re-introduction of wild-type DJ-1 but not of C106-mutant DJ-1 into DJ-1-knockout cells. It is first report showing direct connection of DJ-1 with SIRT1.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of the DJ-1 gene promoter associated with the susceptibility to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Jahantigh, Danial; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Salimi, Saeedeh

    2017-09-20

    In this study, we evaluate the relationship between genetic polymorphisms of the DJ-1 gene, g.-6_+10del, and g.168_185del with male infertility susceptibility. Four hundred and twenty-two male infertile patients and 285 fertile male controls were recruited. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction. In silico analysis was performed by EPD, ElemeNT, SNPnexus, and PROMO to predict the potential functions of rs901561484 and rs373653682 polymorphisms. The Del (D) allele carriers of DJ-1 g.-6_+10del polymorphism were significantly associated with the risk of male infertility in total infertile, asthenozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia patients. Moreover, the Del (D) allele of DJ-1 g.-6_+10del polymorphism significantly increased in total male infertile, asthenozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia groups. In addition, the frequencies of different genotypes and the Del allele and Dup allele carriers of DJ-1 g.168_185del gene polymorphisms were associated with male infertility in total infertile and four different sub-group patients. Furthermore, haplotype analysis of DJ-1 g.-6_+10del and g.168_185del polymorphisms revealed that the D-Dup and I-Del haplotype frequencies significantly increased the risk of male infertility, while I-Ins haplotypes were associated with a decreased risk of male infertility in total and sub-group patients. The in silico analysis showed that the presence of Ins and/or Dup alleles of the DJ-1 g.-6_+10del and g.168_185del polymorphisms could provide additional binding sites of more nuclear factors and probably affect transcriptional activity. Our study presents evidence of a strong association between functional polymorphisms of the DJ-1 promoter, g.-6_+10del, and g.168_185del with the risk of male infertility.

  18. Methylglyoxal detoxification by a DJ-1 family protein provides dual abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Prasad; Bankapalli, Kondalarao; D'Silva, Patrick; Shivaprasad, P V

    2017-07-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a key signaling molecule resulting from glycolysis and other metabolic pathways. During abiotic stress, MG levels accumulate to toxic levels in affected cells. However, MG is routinely detoxified through the action of DJ1/PARK7/Hsp31 proteins that are highly conserved across kingdoms and mutations in such genes are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we report for the first time that, similar to abiotic stresses, MG levels increase during biotic stresses in plants, likely contributing to enhanced susceptibility to a wide range of stresses. We show that overexpression of yeast Heat shock protein 31 (Hsp31), a DJ-1 homolog with robust MG detoxifying capabilities, confers dual biotic and abiotic stress tolerance in model plant Nicotiana tabacum. Strikingly, overexpression of Hsp31 in tobacco imparts robust stress tolerance against diverse biotic stress inducers such as viruses, bacteria and fungi, in addition to tolerance against a range of abiotic stress inducers. During stress, Hsp31 was targeted to mitochondria and induced expression of key stress-related genes. These results indicate that Hsp31 is a novel attractive tool to engineer plants against both biotic and abiotic stresses.

  19. Identification of the recognition sequence and target proteins for DJ-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Mitsugi, Hitomi; Niki, Takeshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Tanimura, Kyoko; Yoshizawa-Kumagaye, Kumiko; Tsunemi, Masahiko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-08-19

    DJ-1, the product of familial Parkinson's disease gene and an oncogene, is a cysteine protease which plays a role in anti-oxidative stress reaction. In this study, we identified the recognition sequence for DJ-1 protease by using recombinant DJ-1 and a peptide library. Protease activity of DJ-1 lacking C-terminal α-helix (DJ-1ΔH9) was stronger than that of full-sized DJ-1, and the most susceptible sequence digested by DJ-1ΔH9 was valine-lysine-valine-alanine (VKVA) under the optimal conditions of pH 5.5 and 0 mM NaCl. Divalent ions, especially Cu²⁺, were inhibitory to DJ-1's protease activity. c-abl oncogene 1 product (ABL1) and kinesin family member 1B (KIF1B) containing VKVA were digested by DJ-1ΔH9.

  20. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  1. Oxidative Status of DJ-1-dependent Activation of Dopamine Synthesis through Interaction of Tyrosine Hydroxylase and 4-Dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (l-DOPA) Decarboxylase with DJ-1*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Niki, Takeshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is caused by loss of dopamine, which is synthesized from tyrosine by two enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC). DJ-1 is a causative gene for the familial form of PD, but little is known about the roles of DJ-1 in dopamine synthesis. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to TH and DDC and positively regulated their activities in human dopaminergic cells. Mutants of DJ-1 found in PD patients, including heterozygous mutants, lost their activity and worked as dominant-negative forms toward wild-type DJ-1. When cells were treated with H2O2, 6-hydroxydopamine, or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, changes in activities of TH and DDC accompanied by oxidation of cysteine 106 of DJ-1 occurred. It was found that DJ-1 possessing Cys-106 with SH and SOH forms was active and that DJ-1 possessing Cys-106 with SO2H and SO3H forms was inactive in terms of stimulation of TH and DDC activities. These findings indicate an essential role of DJ-1 in dopamine synthesis and contribution of DJ-1 to the sporadic form of PD. PMID:19703902

  2. Oxidative status of DJ-1-dependent activation of dopamine synthesis through interaction of tyrosine hydroxylase and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) decarboxylase with DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Niki, Takeshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2009-10-16

    Parkinson disease (PD) is caused by loss of dopamine, which is synthesized from tyrosine by two enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC). DJ-1 is a causative gene for the familial form of PD, but little is known about the roles of DJ-1 in dopamine synthesis. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to TH and DDC and positively regulated their activities in human dopaminergic cells. Mutants of DJ-1 found in PD patients, including heterozygous mutants, lost their activity and worked as dominant-negative forms toward wild-type DJ-1. When cells were treated with H(2)O(2), 6-hydroxydopamine, or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, changes in activities of TH and DDC accompanied by oxidation of cysteine 106 of DJ-1 occurred. It was found that DJ-1 possessing Cys-106 with SH and SOH forms was active and that DJ-1 possessing Cys-106 with SO(2)H and SO(3)H forms was inactive in terms of stimulation of TH and DDC activities. These findings indicate an essential role of DJ-1 in dopamine synthesis and contribution of DJ-1 to the sporadic form of PD.

  3. Myricitrin alleviates MPP⁺-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in a DJ-1-dependent manner in SN4741 cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhibiao; Zeng, Weijun; Tao, Kai; Lu, Fangfang; Gao, Guodong; Yang, Qian

    2015-03-06

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been linked to Parkinson's disease. DJ-1 is a recessive familial PD gene involved in antioxidative function and mitochondrial maintenance. Myricitrin, a flavanoid isolated from the root bark of Myrica cerifera, has potent antioxidative properties. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of myricitrin against MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in SN4741 cells and attempted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this protection. The results showed that incubating SN4741 cells with myricitrin significantly reduced cell death induced by the neurotoxin MPP(+). Furthermore, myricitrin protected cells from MPP(+)-induced effects on mitochondrial morphology and function. However, these protective effects were lost under DJ-1-deficient conditions. Thus, our results suggest that myricitrin alleviates MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and increases cell viability via DJ-1, indicating that myricitrin is a potential beneficial agent for age-related neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease.

  4. Parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 is a bona fide deglycase.

    PubMed

    Richarme, Gilbert; Dairou, Julien

    2017-01-29

    We discovered recently that Parkinsonism-associated DJ-1 and its bacterial homologs function as protein deglycases that repair glyoxal- and methylglyoxal-glycated proteins. Protein glycation levels are 2- to 10-fold increased in deglycase-depleted cells, and deglycase mutants display up to 500-fold loss of viability in methylglyoxal or glucose-containing media, suggesting that these deglycases play important roles in protecting cells against electrophile and carbonyl stress. Although the deglycase activity of DJ-1 is well supported by extensive biochemical work, Pfaff et al. (J. Biol. Chem. in presshttp://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M116.743823) claimed in a recent study that deglycation of the hemithioacetal formed upon cysteine glycation by methylglyoxal results from a Tris buffer artefact. Here, we show that this is not the case, and that DJ-1 and its homologs are the bona fide deglycases awaited since the Maillard discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microglia-Derived Cytokines/Chemokines Are Involved in the Enhancement of LPS-Induced Loss of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in DJ-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chia-Hung; Lee, Ming-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Liou, Horng-Huei; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of DJ-1 (PARK7) has been linked to the development of early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. This study is aimed to compare the sensitivity of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge between DJ-1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice, and explore the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Our results found that the basal levels of interferon (IFN)-γ (the hub cytokine) and interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC) (a downstream mediator) were elevated in the substantia nigra of DJ-1 KO mice and in microglia cells with DJ-1 deficiency, and the release of cytokine/chemokine was greatly enhanced following LPS administration in the DJ-1 deficient conditions. In addition, direct intranigral LPS challenge caused a greater loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine content in DJ-1 KO mice than in WT mice. Furthermore, the sensitization of microglia cells to LPS challenge to release IFN-γ and I-TAC was via the enhancement of NF-κB signaling, which was antagonized by NF-κB inhibitors. LPS-induced increase in neuronal death in the neuron-glia co-culture was enhanced by DJ-1 deficiency in microglia, which was antagonized by the neutralizing antibodies against IFN-γ or I-TAC. These results indicate that DJ-1 deficiency sensitizes microglia cells to release IFN-γ and I-TAC and causes inflammatory damage to dopaminergic neurons. The interaction between the genetic defect (i.e. DJ-1) and inflammatory factors (e.g. LPS) may contribute to the development of PD. PMID:26982707

  6. DJ-1 has a role in antioxidative stress to prevent cell death

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Takahiro; Saito, Yoshiro; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Deletion and point (L166P) mutations of DJ-1 have recently been shown to be responsible for the onset of familial Parkinson's disease (PD, PARK7). The aim of this study was to determine the role of DJ-1 in PD. We first found that DJ-1 eliminated hydrogen peroxide in vitro by oxidizing itself. We then found that DJ-1 knockdown by short interfering RNA rendered SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells susceptible to hydrogen peroxide-, MPP+- or 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death and that cells harbouring mutant forms of DJ-1, including L166P, became susceptible to death in parallel with the loss of oxidized forms of DJ-1. These results clearly showed that DJ-1 has a role in the antioxidative stress reaction and that mutations of DJ-1 lead to cell death, which is observed in PD. PMID:14749723

  7. DJ-1 has a role in antioxidative stress to prevent cell death.

    PubMed

    Taira, Takahiro; Saito, Yoshiro; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2004-02-01

    Deletion and point (L166P) mutations of DJ-1 have recently been shown to be responsible for the onset of familial Parkinson's disease (PD, PARK7). The aim of this study was to determine the role of DJ-1 in PD. We first found that DJ-1 eliminated hydrogen peroxide in vitro by oxidizing itself. We then found that DJ-1 knockdown by short interfering RNA rendered SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells susceptible to hydrogen peroxide-, MPP+- or 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death and that cells harbouring mutant forms of DJ-1, including L166P, became susceptible to death in parallel with the loss of oxidized forms of DJ-1. These results clearly showed that DJ-1 has a role in the antioxidative stress reaction and that mutations of DJ-1 lead to cell death, which is observed in PD.

  8. The Parkinson disease-related protein DJ-1 counteracts mitochondrial impairment induced by the tumour suppressor protein p53 by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria tethering.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Denis; Calì, Tito; Negro, Alessandro; Brini, Marisa

    2013-06-01

    DJ-1 was first identified as an oncogene. More recently, mutations in its gene have been found causative for autosomal recessive familial Parkinson disease. Numerous studies support the DJ-1 role in the protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of mitochondria structure; however, the mechanism of its protective function remains largely unknown. We investigated whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis, a key parameter in cell physiology, could be a target for DJ-1 action. Here, we show that DJ-1 modulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients induced upon cell stimulation with an 1,4,5-inositol-tris-phosphate agonist by favouring the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria tethering. A reduction of DJ-1 levels results in mitochondria fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in stimulated cells. To functionally couple these effects with the well-recognized cytoprotective role of DJ-1, we investigated its action in respect to the tumour suppressor p53. p53 overexpression in HeLa cells impairs their ability to accumulate Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial matrix, causes alteration of the mitochondrial morphology and reduces ER-mitochondria contact sites. Mitochondrial impairments are independent from Drp1 activation, since the co-expression of the dominant negative mutant of Drp1 failed to abolish them. DJ-1 overexpression prevents these alterations by re-establishing the ER-mitochondria tethering. Similarly, the co-expression of the pro-fusion protein Mitofusin 2 blocks the effects induced by p53 on mitochondria, confirming that the modulation of the ER-mitochondria contact sites is critical to mitochondria integrity. Thus, the impairment of ER-mitochondria communication, as a consequence of DJ-1 loss-of-function, may be detrimental for mitochondria-related processes and be at the basis of mitochondrial dysfunction observed in Parkinson disease.

  9. Preparation and application of monoclonal antibodies against oxidized DJ-1. Significant elevation of oxidized DJ-1 in erythrocytes of early-stage Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Hamakubo, Takao; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Ogawa, Yoko; Hara, Yasuo; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Imai, Yasuharu; Iwanari, Hiroko; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Nishio, Keiko; Kinumi, Tomoya; Noguchi, Noriko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Niki, Etsuo

    2009-11-06

    DJ-1 was initially identified as a novel oncogene and has recently been found to be a causative gene for a familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD), viz, PARK7. Cysteine residue at position 106 (Cys-106) in DJ-1 was found to be oxidized preferentially under oxidative stress. In the present study, we developed specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 using baculovirus particles displaying the surface glycoprotein gp64-fusion protein as the immunizing agent. Western blot analysis combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that these antibodies specifically recognized oxidized DJ-1. Furthermore, we developed a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting oxidized DJ-1 and measured blood levels of oxidized DJ-1 in PD patients (n=15). It was observed that the levels of oxidized DJ-1 in erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients were markedly higher without overlap than those of medicated PD patients and healthy subjects. No significant difference was observed in DJ-1 levels between mediated and unmediated PD patient. These results suggest the oxidative modification of DJ-1 in PD patients and the potential application of the antibody for diagnosis of PD at early-stage.

  10. Cytoprotective mechanisms of DJ-1 against oxidative stress through modulating ERK1/2 and ASK1 signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Oh, Stephanie E; Mouradian, M Maral

    2017-09-18

    DJ-1 is a highly conserved multifunctional protein linked to both neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Among its various activities is an antioxidant property leading to cytoprotection under oxidative stress conditions. This is associated with the ability to modulate signal transduction events that determine how the cell regulates normal processes such as growth, senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy in order to adapt to environmental stimuli and stresses. Alterations in DJ-1 expression or function can disrupt homeostatic signaling networks and initiate cascades that play a role in the pathogenesis of conditions such as Parkinson's disease and cancer. DJ-1 plays a major role in various signaling pathways. Related to its anti-oxidant properties, it mediates cell survival and proliferation by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathway and attenuates cell death signaling by inhibiting apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) activation. Here, we review the ways through which DJ-1 regulates these pathways, focusing on how its regulation of signal transduction contributes to cellular homeostasis and the pathologic states that result from their dysregulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DJ-1 cooperates with PYCR1 in cell protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tatsuki; Kaji, Yusuke; Agatsuma, Tomohiro; Niki, Takeshi; Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Shuto, Satoshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2013-06-28

    DJ-1, a product of the DJ-1/PARK7 gene, has been suggested to play various functions involved in transcriptional regulation, protease activity, anti-oxidative stress activity, and regulation of mitochondrial complex I. Such a variety of functions of DJ-1 are supposed to be realized through interactions with different partner proteins. Among the candidates for DJ-1-partner proteins detected in TOF-MAS analyses of the cellular proteins co-immunoprecipitated with DJ-1, we focused here pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1, PYCR1, a final key enzyme for proline biosynthesis. DJ-1 directly bound to PYCR1 in vivo and in vitro. DJ-1 and PYCR1 colocalized in mitochondria, and both were suggested to be involved in regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential, but differently. DJ-1 enhanced the enzymatic activity of PYCR1 in vitro. The cells knocked down for DJ-1 and PYCR1 showed lower viability under oxidative stress conditions. No additive nor synergistic results were obtained for the cells that had been knocked down for both DJ-1 and PYCR1, suggesting that DJ-1 and PYCR1 are on the same pathway of anti-oxidative stress protection of the cells.

  12. A DJ-1 Based Peptide Attenuates Dopaminergic Degeneration in Mice Models of Parkinson's Disease via Enhancing Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Nirit; Barhum, Yael; Ben-Zur, Tali; Aharony, Israel; Trifonov, Lena; Regev, Noa; Melamed, Eldad; Gruzman, Arie; Offen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Drugs currently used for treating Parkinson's disease patients provide symptomatic relief without altering the neurodegenerative process. Our aim was to examine the possibility of using DJ-1 (PARK7), as a novel therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. We designed a short peptide, named ND-13. This peptide consists of a 13 amino acids segment of the DJ-1-protein attached to 7 amino acids derived from TAT, a cell penetrating protein. We examined the effects of ND-13 using in vitro and in vivo experimental models of Parkinson's disease. We demonstrated that ND-13 protects cultured cells against oxidative and neurotoxic insults, reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation, activated the protective erythroid-2 related factor 2 system and increased cell survival. ND-13 robustly attenuated dopaminergic system dysfunction and in improved the behavioral outcome in the 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson's disease, both in wild type and in DJ-1 knockout mice. Moreover, ND-13 restored dopamine content in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model. These findings validate DJ-1 as a promising therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease and identify a novel peptide with clinical potential, which may be significant for a broader range of neurological diseases, possibly with an important impact for the neurosciences. PMID:26024237

  13. Neuroprotective Effect of the Marine-Derived Compound 11-Dehydrosinulariolide through DJ-1-Related Pathway in In Vitro and In Vivo Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chien-Wei; Hung, Han-Chun; Huang, Shi-Ying; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yang, San-Nan; Wang, Hui-Min David; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Chen, Wu-Fu; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait impairment. In a previous study, we found that the marine-derived compound 11-dehydrosinulariolide (11-de) upregulates the Akt/PI3K pathway to protect cells against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-mediated damage. In the present study, SH-SY5Y, zebrafish and rats were used to examine the therapeutic effect of 11-de. The results revealed the mechanism by which 11-de exerts its therapeutic effect: the compound increases cytosolic or mitochondrial DJ-1 expression, and then activates the downstream Akt/PI3K, p-CREB, and Nrf2/HO-1 pathways. Additionally, we found that 11-de could reverse the 6-OHDA-induced downregulation of total swimming distance in a zebrafish model of PD. Using a rat model of PD, we showed that a 6-OHDA-induced increase in the number of turns, and increased time spent by rats on the beam, could be reversed by 11-de treatment. Lastly, we showed that 6-OHDA-induced attenuation in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a dopaminergic neuronal marker, in zebrafish and rat models of PD could also be reversed by treatment with 11-de. Moreover, the patterns of DJ-1 expression observed in this study in the zebrafish and rat models of PD corroborated the trend noted in previous in vitro studies. PMID:27763504

  14. Deficiency of DJ-1 Ameliorates Liver Fibrosis through Inhibition of Hepatic ROS Production and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingxue; Sun, Xuehua; Gu, Jinyang; Yu, Chang; Wen, Yankai; Gao, Yueqiu; Xia, Qiang; Kong, Xiaoni

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a global health problem and previous studies have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in fibrogenesis. Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, early onset) 7 (Park7) also called DJ-1 has an essential role in modulating cellular ROS levels. DJ-1 therefore may play functions in liver fibrogenesis and modulation of DJ-1 may be a promising therapeutic approach. Here, wild-type (WT) and DJ-1 knockout (DJ-1 KO) mice were administrated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to induce liver fibrosis or acute liver injury. Results showed that DJ-1 depletion significantly blunted liver fibrosis, accompanied by marked reductions in liver injury and ROS production. In the acute CCl4 model, deficiency of DJ-1 showed hepatic protective functions as evidenced by decreased hepatic damage, reduced ROS levels, diminished hepatic inflammation and hepatocyte proliferation compared to WT mice. In vitro hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation assays indicated that DJ-1 has no direct effect on the activation of HSCs in the context of with or without TGFβ treatment. Thus our present study demonstrates that in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, DJ-1 deficiency attenuates mice fibrosis by inhibiting ROS production and liver injury, and further indirectly affecting the activation of HSCs. These results are in line with previous studies that ROS promote HSC activation and fibrosis development, and suggest the therapeutic value of DJ-1 in treatment of liver fibrosis.

  15. DJ-1 interacts with HIPK1 and affects H2O2-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Aya; Koide-Yoshida, Shizuyo; Niki, Takeshi; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2006-02-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and causative gene for the familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 has multiple functions, including anti-oxidative stress by eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional regulation as a coactivator, and loss of these functions are thought to trigger the onset of PD. The mechanism underlying the prevention of cell death by DJ-1 is, however, not clear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to homeodomaininteracting protein kinase 1 (HIPK1) in vitro and in vivo and that these proteins were colocalized in the nucleus. HIPK1 was then found to be degraded in human H1299 cells transfected with wild-type DJ-1 but not with a C106S DJ-1 mutant, a DJ-1 protein disrupting a catalytic domain of the putative protease, in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, although knockdown of either DJ-1 or HIPK1 rendered H1299 cells susceptible to H2O2-induced cell death, double-knockdown of DJ-1 and HIPK1 rendered H1299 cells resistant to H2O2-induced cell death, suggesting that the elevated level of HIPK1 induced by a low level of DJ-1 inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death.

  16. Deficiency of DJ-1 Ameliorates Liver Fibrosis through Inhibition of Hepatic ROS Production and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yingxue; Sun, Xuehua; Gu, Jinyang; Yu, Chang; Wen, Yankai; Gao, Yueqiu; Xia, Qiang; Kong, Xiaoni

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a global health problem and previous studies have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in fibrogenesis. Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, early onset) 7 (Park7) also called DJ-1 has an essential role in modulating cellular ROS levels. DJ-1 therefore may play functions in liver fibrogenesis and modulation of DJ-1 may be a promising therapeutic approach. Here, wild-type (WT) and DJ-1 knockout (DJ-1 KO) mice were administrated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to induce liver fibrosis or acute liver injury. Results showed that DJ-1 depletion significantly blunted liver fibrosis, accompanied by marked reductions in liver injury and ROS production. In the acute CCl4 model, deficiency of DJ-1 showed hepatic protective functions as evidenced by decreased hepatic damage, reduced ROS levels, diminished hepatic inflammation and hepatocyte proliferation compared to WT mice. In vitro hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation assays indicated that DJ-1 has no direct effect on the activation of HSCs in the context of with or without TGFβ treatment. Thus our present study demonstrates that in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, DJ-1 deficiency attenuates mice fibrosis by inhibiting ROS production and liver injury, and further indirectly affecting the activation of HSCs. These results are in line with previous studies that ROS promote HSC activation and fibrosis development, and suggest the therapeutic value of DJ-1 in treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:27766037

  17. DJ-1 links muscle ROS production with metabolic reprogramming and systemic energy homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Sally Yu; Lu, Shun-Yan; Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Revelo, Xavier S.; Cai, Erica P.; Luk, Cynthia T.; Schroer, Stephanie A.; Patel, Prital; Kim, Raymond H.; Bombardier, Eric; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tupling, A. Russell; Mak, Tak W.; Winer, Daniel A.; Woo, Minna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies, including obesity and diabetes, but ROS also act as endogenous signalling molecules, regulating numerous biological processes. DJ-1 is one of the most evolutionarily conserved proteins across species, and mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to some cases of Parkinson's disease. Here we show that DJ-1 maintains cellular metabolic homeostasis via modulating ROS levels in murine skeletal muscles, revealing a role of DJ-1 in maintaining efficient fuel utilization. We demonstrate that, in the absence of DJ-1, ROS uncouple mitochondrial respiration and activate AMP-activated protein kinase, which triggers Warburg-like metabolic reprogramming in muscle cells. Accordingly, DJ-1 knockout mice exhibit higher energy expenditure and are protected from obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes in the setting of fuel surplus. Our data suggest that promoting mitochondrial uncoupling may be a potential strategy for the treatment of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:26077864

  18. DJ-1 binds to mitochondrial complex I and maintains its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Takuya; Ishimori, Chikako; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Taira, Takahiro; Kim, Yun-chul; Maita, Hiroshi; Maita, Chinatsu; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M.M.

    2009-12-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by neuronal cell death, and oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be responsible for onset of PD. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress. The possible mitochondrial function of DJ-1 has been proposed, but its exact function remains unclear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to NDUFA4 and ND1, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I, respectively, and was colocalized with complex I and that complex I activity was reduced in DJ-1-knockdown NIH3T3 and HEK293 cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 is an integral mitochondrial protein and that DJ-1 plays a role in maintenance of mitochondrial complex I activity.

  19. Development of a capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay to measure DJ-1 isoforms in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Besong Agbo, D; Klafki, H; Poschmann, G; Seyfarth, K; Genius, J; Janßen, C; Stühler, K; Wurst, W; Meyer, H E; Klingenspor, M; Wiltfang, J

    2013-12-15

    We report on the development of a novel assay protocol for the separation and detection of charge isoforms of DJ-1 in biological samples by automated capillary isoelectric focusing followed by immunological detection. DJ-1 (PARK7) is considered as a biomarker candidate for Parkinson's disease and may potentially support the differentiation of clinical subtypes of the disease. The new method allows for separation and subsequent relative quantitative comparison of different isoforms of DJ-1 in biological samples. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of DJ-1 isoform patterns in brains from mice subjected to normal or high-fat diet and revealed statistically significant group differences. Furthermore, in a pooled and concentrated sample of human cerebrospinal fluid that was depleted of albumin and immunoglobulin G, four different charge variants of DJ-1 could be detected. Taken together, the capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay for DJ-1 represents a promising tool that may ultimately serve in clinical biomarker studies.

  20. DJ-1 binds to mitochondrial complex I and maintains its activity.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takuya; Ishimori, Chikako; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Taira, Takahiro; Kim, Yun-chul; Maita, Hiroshi; Maita, Chinatsu; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2009-12-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by neuronal cell death, and oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be responsible for onset of PD. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress. The possible mitochondrial function of DJ-1 has been proposed, but its exact function remains unclear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to NDUFA4 and ND1, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I, respectively, and was colocalized with complex I and that complex I activity was reduced in DJ-1-knockdown NIH3T3 and HEK293 cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 is an integral mitochondrial protein and that DJ-1 plays a role in maintenance of mitochondrial complex I activity.

  1. Establishment of specific antibodies that recognize C106-oxidized DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiromasa; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2006-08-14

    DJ-1 was initially identified by us as a novel oncogene and has recently been found to be a causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease PARK7. DJ-1 plays roles in transcriptional regulation and in oxidative stress function, and its oxidative state at the cysteine residue 106 (C106) determines activities of DJ-1. Elevated levels of oxidation of DJ-1 were observed in brain tissues of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we established specific antibodies using synthetic peptide containing SO(3)H at C106 of DJ-1 as an immunogen. These antibodies were found by Western blot analysis to recognize DJ-1 specifically oxidized at C106 but not at other cysteines. These antibodies should be useful to study pathophysiologies of PD and AD.

  2. DJ-1 isoforms in whole blood as potential biomarkers of Parkinson disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiangmin; Cook, Travis J.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Leverenz, James B.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cain, Kevin C.; Pan, Catherine; Edgar, John Scott; Goodlett, David R.; Racette, Brad A.; Checkoway, Harvey; Montine, Thomas J.; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2012-12-01

    DJ-1 is a multifunctional protein that plays an important role in oxidative stress, cell death, and synucleinopathies, including Parkinson disease. Previous studies have demonstrated that total DJ-1 levels decrease in the cerebrospinal fluid, but do not change significantly in human plasma from patients with Parkinson disease when compared with controls. In this study, we measured total DJ-1 and its isoforms in whole blood of patients with Parkinson disease at various stages, Alzheimer disease, and healthy controls to identify potential peripheral biomarkers of PD. In an initial discovery study of 119 subjects, 7 DJ-1 isoforms were reliably detected, and blood levels of those with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modifications were discovered to be altered in late-stage Parkinson disease. This result was further confirmed in a validation study of another 114 participants, suggesting that, unlike total DJ-1 levels, post-translationally modified isoforms of DJ-1 from whole blood are candidate biomarkers of late-stage Parkinson disease.

  3. Melatonin rescues zebrafish embryos from the parkinsonian phenotype restoring the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 network.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Casado, María E; Lima, Elena; García, José A; Doerrier, Carolina; Aranda, Paula; Sayed, Ramy Ka; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-08-01

    Multiple studies reporting mitochondrial impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) involve knockout or knockdown models to inhibit the expression of mitochondrial-related genes, including parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 ones. Melatonin has significant neuroprotective properties, which have been related to its ability to boost mitochondrial bioenergetics. The meaning and molecular targets of melatonin in PD are yet unclear. Zebrafish are an outstanding model of PD because they are vertebrates, their dopaminergic system is comparable to the nigrostriatal system of humans, and their brains express the same genes as mammals. The exposure of 24 hpf zebrafish embryos to MPTP leads to a significant inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I and the induction of sncga gene, responsible for enhancing γ-synuclein accumulation, which is related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, MPTP inhibited the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1 expression, impeding the normal function of the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 network to remove the damaged mitochondria. This situation remains over time, and removing MPTP from the treatment did not stop the neurodegenerative process. On the contrary, mitochondria become worse during the next 2 days without MPTP, and the embryos developed a severe motor impairment that cannot be rescued because the mitochondrial-related gene expression remained inhibited. Melatonin, added together with MPTP or added once MPTP was removed, prevented and recovered, respectively, the parkinsonian phenotype once it was established, restoring gene expression and normal function of the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 loop and also the normal motor activity of the embryos. The results show, for the first time, that melatonin restores brain function in zebrafish suffering with Parkinson-like disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. DJ-1 family Maillard deglycases prevent acrylamide formation.

    PubMed

    Richarme, Gilbert; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-09-23

    The presence of acrylamide in food is a worldwide concern because it is carcinogenic, reprotoxic and neurotoxic. Acrylamide is generated in the Maillard reaction via condensation of reducing sugars and glyoxals arising from their decomposition, with asparagine, the amino acid forming the backbone of the acrylamide molecule. We reported recently the discovery of the Maillard deglycases (DJ-1/Park7 and its prokaryotic homologs) which degrade Maillard adducts formed between glyoxals and lysine or arginine amino groups, and prevent glycation damage in proteins. Here, we show that these deglycases prevent acrylamide formation, likely by degrading asparagine/glyoxal Maillard adducts. We also report the discovery of a deglycase from the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus furiosus, which prevents acrylamide formation at 100 °C. Thus, Maillard deglycases constitute a unique enzymatic method to prevent acrylamide formation in food without depleting the components (asparagine and sugars) responsible for its formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 interacts with Parkin, DJ-1 and PINK-1 in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Venderova, Katerina; Kabbach, Ghassan; Abdel-Messih, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yi; Parks, Robin J; Imai, Yuzuru; Gehrke, Stephan; Ngsee, Johnny; Lavoie, Matthew J; Slack, Ruth S; Rao, Yong; Zhang, Zhuohua; Lu, Bingwei; Haque, M Emdadul; Park, David S

    2009-11-15

    Mutations in the LRRK2 gene are the most common genetic cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). However, its physiological and pathological functions are unknown. Therefore, we generated several independent Drosophila lines carrying WT or mutant human LRRK2 (mutations in kinase, COR or LRR domains, resp.). Ectopic expression of WT or mutant LRRK2 in dopaminergic neurons caused their significant loss accompanied by complex age-dependent changes in locomotor activity. Overall, the ubiquitous expression of LRRK2 increased lifespan and fertility of the flies. However, these flies were more sensitive to rotenone. LRRK2 expression in the eye exacerbated retinal degeneration. Importantly, in double transgenic flies, various indices of the eye and dopaminergic survival were modified in a complex fashion by a concomitant expression of PINK1, DJ-1 or Parkin. This evidence suggests a genetic interaction between these PD-relevant genes.

  6. Supplementation of Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) Improves Lifespan and Locomotor Activity in Paraquat-Sensitive DJ-1β(Δ93) Flies, a Parkinson's Disease Model in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Christian, Pearl K; Panchal, Komal; Guruprasad, B R; Tiwari, Anand K

    2017-09-03

    Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) is a cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) consumed by humans and other animals because of its nutritional values and pharmacological properties. Apart from high protein contents, it also contains high levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds, such as carotenoids, β-carotene, phycocyanin, and phycocyanobilin, indicating its possible pharmaco-therapeutic utility. In the present study using DJ-1β(Δ93) flies, a Parkinson's disease model in Drosophila, we have demonstrated the therapeutic effect of spirulina and its active component C-phycocyanin (C-PC) in the improvement of lifespan and locomotor behavior. Our findings indicate that dietary supplementation of spirulina significantly improves the lifespan and locomotor activity of paraquat-fed DJ-1β(Δ93) flies. Furthermore, supplementation of spirulina and C-PC individually and independently reduced the cellular stress marked by deregulating the expression of heat shock protein 70 and Jun-N-terminal kinase signaling in DJ-1β(Δ93) flies. A significant decrease in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in spirulina-fed DJ-1β(Δ93) flies tends to indicate the involvement of antioxidant properties associated with spirulina in the modulation of stress-induced signaling and improvement in lifespan and locomotor activity in Drosophila DJ-1β(Δ93) flies. Our results suggest that antioxidant boosting properties of spirulina can be used as a nutritional supplement for improving the lifespan and locomotor behavior in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Structural Characterization of Missense Mutations Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study of the Parkinson's-Related Protein, DJ-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Chotiner, Almog; Tarnavsky, Mark; Sharon, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Missense mutations that lead to the expression of mutant proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions are the cause of numerous diseases. Unlike gene lesions, insertions, deletions, nonsense mutations, or modified RNA splicing, which affect the length of a polypeptide, or determine whether a polypeptide is translated at all, missense mutations exert more subtle effects on protein structure, which are often difficult to evaluate. Here, we took advantage of the spectral resolution afforded by the EMR Orbitrap platform, to generate a mass spectrometry-based approach relying on simultaneous measurements of the wild-type protein and the missense variants. This approach not only considerably shortens the analysis time due to the concurrent acquisition but, more importantly, enables direct comparisons between the wild-type protein and the variants, allowing identification of even subtle structural changes. We demonstrate our approach using the Parkinson's-associated protein, DJ-1. Together with the wild-type protein, we examined two missense mutants, DJ-1A104T and DJ-1D149A, which lead to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease. Gas-phase, thermal, and chemical stability assays indicate clear alterations in the conformational stability of the two mutants: the structural stability of DJ-1D149A is reduced, whereas that of DJ-1A104T is enhanced. Overall, we anticipate that the methodology presented here will be applicable to numerous other missense mutants, promoting the structural investigations of multiple variants of the same protein.

  8. DJ-1 ameliorates ischemic cell death in vitro possibly via mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Shojo, Hideki; Burns, Jack; Staples, Meaghan; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2014-02-01

    DJ-1 is an important redox-reactive neuroprotective protein implicated in regulation of oxidative stress after ischemia. However the molecular mechanism, especially the mitochondrial function, by which DJ-1 protects neuronal cells in stroke remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to reveal whether DJ-1 translocates into the mitochondria in exerting neuroprotection against an in vitro model of stroke. Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) were initially exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion injury, and thereafter, DJ-1 translocation was measured by immunocytochemistry and its secretion by hNPCs was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Exposure of hNPCs to experimental stroke injury resulted in DJ-1 translocation into the mitochondria. Moreover, significant levels of DJ-1 protein were secreted by the injured hNPCs. Our findings revealed that DJ-1 principally participates in the early phase of stroke involving the mitochondrial pathway. DJ-1 was detected immediately after stroke and efficiently translocated into the mitochondria offering a new venue for developing treatment strategies against ischemic stroke.

  9. Secretion of DJ-1 into the serum of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Maita, Chinatsu; Tsuji, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Hamada, Shinsuke; Ogata, Akihiko; Maita, Hiroyhsi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Sasaki, Hidenao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-24

    DJ-1 was initially identified by us as a novel oncogene and has later been found to be a causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease PARK7. DJ-1 plays role in transcriptional regulation and in oxidative stress function, and loss of its function is thought to be related to onset age, mode of progression and clinical severity of both familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 is localized both in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and it has been reported to be secreted into the serum or plasma of patients with breast cancer, melanoma, familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy and stroke. In this study, levels of DJ-1 secreted into the serum of healthy controls and patients with sporadic PD were examined by using a DJ-1 ELISA kit, and the level of oxidative stress in the serum was also measured. The results showed that DJ-1 was secreted into the serum of both healthy controls and PD patients. There was no significant difference between the levels of secreted DJ-1 in two groups, and correlations of levels of secreted DJ-1 with age, clinical severity of PD and level of oxidative stress were not found.

  10. DJ-1-dependent protective activity of DJ-1-binding compound no. 23 against neuronal cell death in MPTP-treated mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Inafune, Ayako; Michitani, Naruyuki; Hatakeyama, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Kotaro; Sasaki, Mai; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra, leading to a reduced level of dopamine in the striatum. Oxidative stress is one of the causes of PD. Since symptomatic PD therapies are used, identification of compounds or proteins that inhibit oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death is necessary. DJ-1 is a causative gene product of familial PD and plays a role in anti-oxidative stress reaction. We have identified various DJ-1-binding compounds, including compound-23, that restored neuronal cell death and locomotion defects observed in neurotoxin-induced PD models. In this study, wild-type and DJ-1-knockout mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg/kg of compound-23 and then with 30 mg/kg of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) at 1 h after injection. Five days after administration, the effects of compound-23 on MPTP-induced locomotion deficits, on dopaminergic cell death and on brain dopamine levels were analyzed by rotor rod tests, by staining cells with an anti-TH antibody and by an HPLC, respectively. The results showed that compound-23 inhibited MPTP-induced reduction of retention time on the rotor rod bar, neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra and striatum and dopamine content in wild-type mice but not in DJ-1-knockout mice, indicating a DJ-1-dependent effect of compound-23.

  11. Kaempferol derivatives prevent oxidative stress-induced cell death in a DJ-1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wei; Fan, Li; Kim, Yun-chul; Ishikawa, Shizuma; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Pu, Xiao-Ping; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2009-06-01

    DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD), PARK7, plays a role in anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in the onset of PD. Superfluous oxidation of cysteine at amino acid 106 (C106) of DJ-1 renders DJ-1 inactive, and such oxidized DJ-1 was observed in patients with the sporadic form of PD. In this study, we examined the relationship between DJ-1 and compounds extracted from traditional Chinese medicines possessing anti-oxidant activity. Of the 12 compounds tested, 5 were found to specifically bind to the C106 region by using a quartz crystal microbalance. Although 4 compounds prevented rat PC12 and primary neuronal cells from undergoing H2O2-induced cell death, the protective activity of 2 compounds, kaempferol 3-O-beta-rutinoside and 6-hydroxykaempferol 3,6-di-O-beta-D-glucoside, was diminished in cells transfected with siRNA targeting DJ-1, indicating DJ-1-dependent reaction of these compounds. Furthermore, these compounds reduced the level of reactive oxygen species and restored tyrosine hydroxylase activity that had been induced and compromised, respectively, by treatment of cells with H2O2. The results suggest that these compounds are useful lead compounds for PD therapy.

  12. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease, is secreted through microdomains.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Yumi; Munemoto, Haruko; Ishikawa, Shizuma; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2008-07-23

    DJ-1 is secreted into the serum and plasma of patients with various diseases. In this study, DJ-1 was found to be secreted into culture media of various cells and the amount of wild-type DJ-1 secreted was two-fold greater than that of mutant DJ-1 of cysteine at 106 (C106). Furthermore, the oxidative status of more than 90% of the DJ-1 secreted from HeLa cells was SOH and SO2H forms of C106. A portion of DJ-1 in cells was localized in microdomains of the membrane. These findings suggest that DJ-1 is secreted through microdomains and that oxidation of DJ-1 at C106 facilitates the secretion.

  13. Linking DJ-1 to neurodegeneration offers novel insights for understanding the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Vincenzo; Oostra, Ben A; Heutink, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Rare monogenic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are promoting our understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the common, non-Mendelian forms of the disease. Here, we focus on PARK7, an autosomal recessive form of early-onset parkinsonism caused by mutations in the DJ-1 gene. We first review the genetics of this form and the rapidly expanding knowledge about the structure and biochemical properties of the DJ-1 protein. We also discuss how DJ-1 dysfunction might lead to neurodegeneration, and the implications of this novel piece of information for the pathogenesis of the common PD forms. Although much work remains to be done to clarify the biology of DJ-1, its proposed activity as a molecular chaperone and/or as oxidative sensor appear intriguing in the light of the current theories on the pathogenesis of PD.

  14. DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid as biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen; Shi, Min; Chung, Kathryn A; Quinn, Joseph F; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas; Jankovic, Joseph; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Leverenz, James B; Baird, Geoffrey; Montine, Thomas J; Hancock, Aneeka M; Hwang, Hyejin; Pan, Catherine; Bradner, Joshua; Kang, Un J; Jensen, Poul H; Zhang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    Biomarkers are urgently needed for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Both DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein, two proteins critically involved in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis, have been tested as disease biomarkers in several recent studies with inconsistent results. These have been largely due to variation in the protein species detected by different antibodies, limited numbers of patients in some studies, or inadequate control of several important variables. In this study, the nature of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid was studied by a combination of western blotting, gel filtration and mass spectrometry. Sensitive and quantitative Luminex assays detecting most, if not all, species of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid were established. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein from 117 patients with Parkinson's disease, 132 healthy individuals and 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease were analysed using newly developed, highly sensitive Luminex technology while controlling for several major confounders. A total of 299 individuals and 389 samples were analysed. The results showed that cerebrospinal fluid DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein levels were dependent on age and influenced by the extent of blood contamination in cerebrospinal fluid. Both DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein levels were decreased in Parkinson's patients versus controls or Alzheimer's patients when blood contamination was controlled for. In the population aged > or = 65 years, when cut-off values of 40 and 0.5 ng/ml were chosen for DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein, respectively, the sensitivity and specificity for patients with Parkinson's disease versus controls were 90 and 70% for DJ-1, and 92 and 58% for alpha-synuclein. A combination of the two markers did not enhance the test performance. There was no association between DJ-1 or alpha-synuclein and the severity of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, this represents

  15. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Weber, Gesine; Eberhard, Daniel; Mehana, Amir E; Eglinger, Jan; Welters, Alena; Bartosinska, Barbara; Jeruschke, Kay; Weiss, Jürgen; Päth, Günter; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Seufert, Jochen; Lammert, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting.

  16. CSF levels of DJ-1 and tau distinguish MSA patients from PD patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Megan K; Eeftens, Jorine M; Aerts, Marjolein B; Esselink, Rianne A J; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2014-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) is difficult, particularly at early disease stages, but is important for therapeutic management. The protein DJ-1 is implicated in the pathology of PD but little is known about its involvement in MSA. We aimed to determine the diagnostic value of CSF DJ-1 and tau proteins for discriminating PD and MSA. DJ-1 and total tau levels were quantified in the CSF of 43 PD patients, 23 MSA patients and 30 non-neurological controls matched for age and gender. Patients were part of a study with a 3-year prospective design with extended case-review follow-up of up to 9 years, ensuring maximum accuracy of the clinical diagnosis. Our results showed that CSF DJ-1 levels could distinguish MSA from PD with a 78% sensitivity and 78% specificity (AUC = 0.84). The combination of DJ-1 and tau proteins significantly improved this discrimination to 82% sensitivity and 81% specificity to identify MSA from PD (AUC = 0.92). Our results highlight the potential benefits of a combination of DJ-1 and total tau as biomarkers for differential diagnosis of MSA and PD.

  17. Evidence Against a Role for the Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1 in Methylglyoxal Detoxification.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Daniel H; Fleming, Thomas; Nawroth, Peter; Teleman, Aurelio A

    2017-01-13

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive metabolite that forms adducts on cysteine, lysine and arginine residues of proteins, thereby affecting their function. Methylglyoxal is detoxified by the Glyoxalase system, consisting of two enzymes, Glo1 and Glo2, that act sequentially to convert MG into d-lactate. Recently, the Parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 was described in vitro to have glyoxalase activity, thereby detoxifying the MG metabolite, or deglycase activity, thereby removing the adduct formed by MG on proteins. Since Drosophila is an established model system to study signaling, neurodegeneration, and metabolic regulation in vivo, we asked whether DJ-1 contributes to MG detoxification in vivo Using both DJ-1 knockdown in Drosophila cells in culture, and DJ-1β knock-out flies, we could detect no contribution of DJ-1 to survival to MG challenge or to accumulation of MG protein adducts. Furthermore, we provide data suggesting that the previously reported deglycation activity of DJ-1 can be ascribed to a TRIS buffer artifact.

  18. High-fat diet induced isoform changes of the Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Poschmann, Gereon; Seyfarth, Katrin; Besong Agbo, Daniela; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Rozman, Jan; Wurst, Wolfgang; Wiltfang, Jens; Meyer, Helmut E; Klingenspor, Martin; Stühler, Kai

    2014-05-02

    Genetic and environmental factors mediate via different physiological and molecular processes a shifted energy balance leading to overweight and obesity. To get insights into the underlying processes involved in energy intake and weight gain, we compared hypothalamic tissue of mice kept on a high-fat or control diet for 10 days by a proteomic approach. Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis in combination with LC-MS/MS, we observed significant abundance changes in 15 protein spots. One isoform of the protein DJ-1 was elevated in the high-fat diet group in three different mouse strains SWR/J, C57BL/6N, and AKR/J analyzed. Large-scale validation of DJ-1 isoforms in individual samples and tissues confirmed a shift in the pattern of DJ-1 isoforms toward more acidic isoforms in several brain and peripheral tissues after feeding a high-fat diet for 10 days. The identification of oxidation of cysteine 106 as well as 2-succinyl modification of the same residue by mass spectrometry not only explains the isoelectric shift of DJ-1 but also links our results to similar shifts of DJ-1 observed in neurodegenerative disease states under oxidative stress. We hypothesize that DJ-1 is a common physiological sensor involved in both nutrition-induced effects and neurodegenerative disease states.

  19. DJ-1 restores p53 transcription activity inhibited by Topors/p53BP3.

    PubMed

    Shinbo, Yumi; Taira, Takahiro; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-03-01

    DJ-1 is a multi-functional protein that plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in onset of Parkinson's disease. Here, we report that DJ-1 bound to Topors/p53BP3, a ring finger protein binding to both topoisomerase I and p53, in vitro and in vivo and that both proteins were colocalized in cells. DJ-1 and p53 were then found to be sumoylated by Topors in cells. It was also found that DJ-1 bound to p53 in vitro and in vivo and that colocalization with and its binding to p53 were stimulated by UV irradiation of cells. Transcription activity of p53 was found to be abrogated by Topors concomitant with sumoylation of p53 in a dose-dependent manner, and DJ-1 restored its repressed activity by releasing the sumoylated form of p53. These findings suggest that DJ-1 positively regulates p53 through Topors-mediated sumoylation.

  20. ROS-induced nanotherapeutic approach for ovarian cancer treatment based on the combinatorial effect of photodynamic therapy and DJ-1 gene suppression.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Canan; Taratula, Olena; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Palmer, Amy L; Cronk, Lauren M; Jones, Carson V; Escalante, Cesar A; Taratula, Oleh

    2015-11-01

    This study represents a novel approach for intraoperative ovarian cancer treatment based on the combinatorial effect of a targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) associated with suppression of the DJ-1 protein, one of the key players in the ROS defense of cancer cells. To assess the potential of the developed therapy, dendrimer-based nanoplatforms for cancer-targeted delivery of near-infrared photosensitizer, phthalocyanine, and DJ-1 siRNA have been constructed. In vitro studies revealed that therapeutic efficacy of the combinatorial approach was enhanced when compared to PDT alone and this enhancement was more pronounced in ovarian carcinoma cells, which are characterized by higher basal levels of DJ-1 protein. Moreover, the ovarian cancer tumors exposed to a single dose of combinatorial therapy were completely eradicated from the mice and the treated animals showed no evidence of cancer recurrence. Thus, the developed therapeutic approach can be potentially employed intraoperatively to eradicate unresactable cancer cells. The complete clearance of microscopic residual tumor cells during excision surgery is important to improve survival of the patient. In this interesting paper, the authors developed a novel approach using targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT), combining a photosensitizer, phthalocyanine, and DJ-1 siRNA for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The data showed that this approach increased cancer cell killing and may pave way for future clinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation of endogenous antioxidants as a common therapeutic strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases: A lesson learnt from DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2015-12-01

    This review aims at presenting a new concept pertaining to the development of antioxidants, namely, to evolve from disease-oriented therapy to mechanism-oriented therapy. Using as our illustrative example is DJ-1, a homodimeric protein that is ubiquitously expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, including the brain, and is found in the matrix and the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. DJ-1 is known to be an endogenous antioxidant against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, of which oxidative stress plays a causal role. Interestingly, the mechanistic targets of DJ-1 as an antioxidant, including Daxx, Nrf2, thioredoxin, glutathione, α-synuclein, PTEN/PI3K/Akt, and Pink/Parkin are also associated with those oxidative stress-related diseases. Furthermore, activators of DJ-1 are available in the form of mortalin, phenylbutyrate and quinone oxidoreductase 1. It follows that activation of DJ-1 as a common endogenous antioxidant provides a new strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases. Since clinical trials on exogenous application of the known antioxidants have basically failed, an alternative approach would logically be to activate the endogenous antioxidants that are already present in the appropriate cellular locale where elevated oxidative stress is the culprit for the disease. At the same time, since oxidative stress is a common denominator among cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, development of antioxidant therapy should target the reduction in reactive oxygen species. Instead of focusing on disease-oriented therapy, pharmaceutical companies should concentrate on developing agents and dosing schemes for effective activation of the endogenous antioxidants that are associated with a multitude of oxidative stress-related diseases (mechanism-oriented therapy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Behavioral and Neurotransmitter Abnormalities in Mice Deficient for Parkin, DJ-1 and Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Hennis, Meghan R.; Seamans, Katherine W.; Marvin, Marian A.; Casey, Bradford H.; Goldberg, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of neurons in the substantia nigra that project to the striatum and release dopamine. The cause of PD remains uncertain, however, evidence implicates mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Although most cases of PD are sporadic, 5-10% of cases are caused by inherited mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in Parkin and DJ-1 were the first to be linked to recessively inherited Parkinsonism. Surprisingly, mice bearing similar loss-of-function mutations in Parkin and DJ-1 do not show age-dependent loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons or depletion of dopamine in the striatum. Although the normal cellular functions of Parkin and DJ-1 are not fully understood, we hypothesized that loss-of-function mutations in Parkin and DJ-1 render cells more sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. To test this hypothesis, we crossed mice deficient for Parkin and DJ-1 with mice deficient for the mitochondrial antioxidant protein Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD2) or the cytosolic antioxidant protein Cu-Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Aged Parkin-/-DJ-1-/- and Mn-superoxide dismutase triple deficient mice have enhanced performance on the rotorod behavior test. Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase triple deficient mice have elevated levels of dopamine in the striatum in the absence of nigral cell loss. Our studies demonstrate that on a Parkin/DJ-1 null background, mice that are also deficient for major antioxidant proteins do not have progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons but have behavioral and striatal dopamine abnormalities. PMID:24386432

  3. Mutation analysis of the PARKIN, PINK1, DJ1, and SNCA genes in Turkish early-onset Parkinson's patients and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Erer, Sevda; Egeli, Unal; Zarifoglu, Mehmet; Tezcan, Gulcin; Cecener, Gulsah; Tunca, Berrin; Ak, Secil; Demirdogen, Elif; Kenangil, Gulay; Kaleagası, Hakan; Dogu, Okan; Saka, Esen; Elibol, Bulent

    2016-09-01

    Variations in PARK genes (PRKN, PINK1, DJ-1, and SNCA) cause early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) in different populations. In the current study, we aimed to evaluate the frequencies of variations in PARK genes and the effects of these variations on the phenotypes of Turkish EOPD patients. All coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of the PRKN, PINK1, DJ-1, and SNCA genes were screened by heteroduplex analysis followed by direct sequencing of the detected variants in 50 Turkish EOPD patients. These variants were evaluated using SIFT, PolyPhen, HSF, and LOVD web-based programs. The frequency of EOPD-associated variations in the PRKN gene was 34%. Among these variations, p.A82E in exon 3 and p.Q409X in exon 11 was determined to be pathogenic. We also defined previously unknown cryptic variations, including c.872-35 G>A and c.872-28T>G in exon 8 of PRKN and c.252+30 T>G and c.322+4 A>G in exons 4 and 5 of DJ1, respectively, that were associated with EOPD. Although no significant association was observed between the PARK gene mutations and clinical features (P>0.05), the alterations were related to the clinical symptoms in each patient. An increasing number of studies report that PRKN, PINK1, DJ1 and SNCA mutations are associated with early-onset Parkinson's disease; however, a limited number of studies have been conducted in Turkey. Additionally, our study is the first to evaluate the frequency of SNCA mutations in a Turkish population. The aim of this study was determine the frequency distributions of the PRKN, PINK1, DJ1, and SNCA gene mutations and to analyze the relationships between these genetic variations and the clinical phenotype of EOPD in Turkish patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of DJ-1 with chaperones and enhanced association and colocalization with mitochondrial Hsp70 by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Mei; Niki, Takeshi; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-10-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and causative gene for familial form of the Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 has been shown to play a role in anti-oxidative stress by eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The onset of PD is thought to be caused by oxidative stress and mitochondrial injury, which leads to protein aggregation that results in neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism by which DJ-1 triggers the onset of PD is still not clear. In this study, we analyzed association and localization of DJ-1 and its mutants with various chaperones. The results showed that DJ-1 and its mutants were associated with Hsp70, CHIP and mtHsp70/Grp75, a mitochondria-resident Hsp70, and that L166P and M26I mutants found in PD patients were strongly associated with Hsp70 and CHIP compared to wild-type and other DJ-1 mutants. DJ-1 and its mutants were colocalized with Hsp70 and CHIP in cells. Furthermore, association and colocalization of wildtype DJ-1 with mtHsp70 in mitochondria were found to be enhanced by treatment of cells with H2O2. These results suggest that translocation of DJ-1 to mitochondria after oxidative stress is carried out in association with chaperones.

  5. DJ-1 Null Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells Exhibit Defects in Mitochondrial Function and Structure: Involvement of Mitochondrial Complex I Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jun Young; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soung Jung; Seo, Kang Sik; Han, Jeong Su; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung Kiel; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung Doo; Shong, Minho; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a Parkinson's disease-associated gene whose protein product has a protective role in cellular homeostasis by removing cytosolic reactive oxygen species and maintaining mitochondrial function. However, it is not clear how DJ-1 regulates mitochondrial function and why mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by DJ-1 deficiency. In a previous study we showed that DJ-1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells exhibit defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity. In the present article we investigated the role of DJ-1 in complex I formation by using blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 2-dimensional gel analysis to assess native complex status. On the basis of these experiments, we concluded that DJ-1 null cells have a defect in the assembly of complex I. Concomitant with abnormal complex I formation, DJ-1 null cells show defective supercomplex formation. It is known that aberrant formation of the supercomplex impairs the flow of electrons through the channels between respiratory chain complexes, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. We took two approaches to study these mitochondrial defects. The first approach assessed the structural defect by using both confocal microscopy with MitoTracker staining and electron microscopy. The second approach assessed the functional defect by measuring ATP production, O2 consumption, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, we showed that the assembly defect as well as the structural and functional abnormalities in DJ-1 null cells could be reversed by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of DJ-1, demonstrating the specificity of DJ-1 on these mitochondrial properties. These mitochondrial defects induced by DJ-1mutation may be a pathological mechanism for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22403686

  6. Mortalin and DJ-1 coordinately regulate hematopoietic stem cell function through the control of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tai-Nagara, Ikue; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Suda, Toshio

    2014-01-02

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain stemness through various mechanisms that protect against stressful conditions. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) preserve cell homeostasis during stress responses through protein quality control, suggesting that HSPs may safeguard HSCs against numerous traumas. Here, we show that mortalin, a mitochondrial HSP, plays an essential role in maintaining HSC properties by regulating oxidative stress. Mortalin is primarily localized in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) compartments. In this study, the inhibition of mortalin function caused abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation in HSCs and reduced HSC numbers. Knockdown (KD) of mortalin in HSPCs impaired their ability to repopulate and form colonies. Moreover, mortalin-KD HSCs could not maintain quiescence and showed severe downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor- and antioxidant-related genes. Conversely, HSCs that overexpressed mortalin maintained a high reconstitution capacity and low ROS levels. Furthermore, DJ-1, one of the genes responsible for Parkinson's disease, directly bound to mortalin and acted as a negative ROS regulator. Using DJ-1-deficient mice, we demonstrated that mortalin and DJ-1 coordinately maintain normal ROS levels and HSC numbers. Collectively, these results indicate that the mortalin/DJ-1 complex guards against mitochondrial oxidative stress and is indispensable for the maintenance of HSCs.

  7. Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1, potent arsenic hypertolerant bacterium isolated from the industrial effluent of India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dhaval N; Flora, S J S; Kalia, Kiran

    2009-07-30

    Arsenic hypertolerant bacterial cells were isolated from the common industrial effluent treatment plant, Vapi, India. Strain DJ-1 sustaining 400 mM, As (V) out of 16 bacterial strains was identified as Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1 through 16S rRNA ribotyping. The maximum arsenic accumulation of 9.8+/-0.5 mg g(-1) (dry weight) was observed during stationary phase of growth. Intracellular compartmentalization has shown 80% of arsenic accumulation in cytoplasm. The lack of arsC gene and arsenate reductase activity indicated that Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1 may lack classical ars operon and detoxification may be mediated through some novel mechanism. The arsenite binding protein was purified by affinity chromatography and characterized as DNA protection during starvation (DPS) protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The induction of DPS showed the adaptation of bacteria in arsenic stress condition and/or in detoxification mechanism, relies on its ability to bind with arsenic. These results indicate the hypertolerance with higher intracellular accumulation of arsenic by Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1, which could be mediated by DPS protein thus signifying this organism is a potential candidate for the removal of arsenic from industrial wastewater, which needs further study.

  8. Protection against nonylphenol-induced cell death by DJ-1 in cultured Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Mei; Taira, Takahiro; Maita, Chinatsu; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2006-12-07

    The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been used to investigate diverse aspects of toxicology, genetics and developmental biology and to monitor biological changes caused by endocrine disruptors. In this study, we analyzed a medaka homolog of human DJ-1 (meDJ-1) in cultured medaka cells into which nonylphenol (NP) was added. Like human DJ-1, meDJ-1 was found to be oxidized by treatment with H(2)O(2) and its pI was shifted to acidic points. NP was found to induce cell death with kinetics similar to that of H(2)O(2) in cultured medaka OLHE-13 cells. After OLHE-13 cells had been treated with sub-lethal concentrations of H(2)O(2) and NP, production of reactive oxygen species and oxidation of meDJ-1 were observed. meDJ-1 knockdown by short interfering RNA rendered OLHE-13 cells susceptible to H(2)O(2) and NP-induced cell death, suggesting a protective role of DJ-1 against oxidative stress-induced cell death in medaka cells. These results suggest that meDJ-1 is a suitable biomarker for oxidative stress reactions in medaka.

  9. Oxidation and interaction of DJ-1 with 20S proteasome in the erythrocytes of early stage Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Matsumura, Akihiro; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Itoh, Sayoko; Sutou, Kenta; Kobayashi, Mayuka; Mita, Yuichiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hisahara, Shin; Hara, Yasuo; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hamakubo, Takao; Kusunoki, Susumu; Shimohama, Shun; Noguchi, Noriko

    2016-07-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, age-related, neurodegenerative disorder, and oxidative stress is an important mediator in its pathogenesis. DJ-1, the product of the causative gene of a familial form of PD, plays a significant role in anti-oxidative defence to protect cells from oxidative stress. DJ-1 undergoes preferential oxidation at the cysteine residue at position 106 (Cys-106) under oxidative stress. Here, using specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 (oxDJ-1), it was found that the levels of oxDJ-1 in the erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients (n = 88) were higher than in those of medicated PD patients (n = 62) and healthy control subjects (n = 33). Elevated oxDJ-1 levels were also observed in a non-human primate PD model. Biochemical analysis of oxDJ-1 in erythrocyte lysates showed that oxDJ-1 formed dimer and polymer forms, and that the latter interacts with 20S proteasome. These results clearly indicate a biochemical alteration in the blood of PD patients, which could be utilized as an early diagnosis marker for PD.

  10. DJ-1 regulating PI3K-Nrf2 signaling plays a significant role in bibenzyl compound 20C-mediated neuroprotection against rotenone-induced oxidative insult.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Yuan, Yu-He; Shao, Qian-Hang; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhu, Cheng-Gen; Shi, Jian-Gong; Ma, Kai-Li; Yan, Xu; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2017-04-05

    Oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We previously reported that 20C, a bibenzyl compound isolated from Gastrodia elata, possesses antioxidative properties, but its in-depth molecular mechanisms against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that without intact DJ-1, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) protein becomes unstable, and the activity of Nrf2-mediated downstream antioxidant enzymes are thereby suppressed. In this study, we showed that 20C clearly protected PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells against rotenone-induced oxidative injury. Furthermore, 20C markedly up-regulated the levels of DJ-1, which in turn activated phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and inhibited glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation, eventually promoted the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and induced the expression of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). The antioxidant effects of 20C could be partially blocked by ShRNA-mediated knockdown of DJ-1 and inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathways with Akt1/2 kinase inhibitor, respectively. Conclusively, our findings confirm that DJ-1 is necessary for 20C-mediated protection against rotenone-induced oxidative damage, at least in part, by activating PI3K/Akt signaling, and subsequently enhancing the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2. The findings from our investigation suggest that 20C should be developed as a novel candidate for alleviating the consequences of PD in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. From reptilian phylogenomics to reptilian genomes: analyses of c-Jun and DJ-1 proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Y; Braun, E L; Guillette, L J; Iguchi, T

    2009-01-01

    Genome projects have revolutionized our understanding of both molecular biology and evolution, but there has been a limited collection of genomic data from reptiles. This is surprising given the pivotal position of reptiles in vertebrate phylogeny and the potential utility of information from reptiles for understanding a number of biological phenomena, such as sex determination. Although there are many potential uses for genomic data, one important and useful approach is phylogenomics. Here we report cDNA sequences for the c-Jun(JUN) and DJ-1(PARK7) proto-oncogenes from 3 reptiles (the American alligator, Nile crocodile, and Florida red-belly turtle), show that both genes are expressed in the alligator, and integrate them into analyses of their homologs from other organisms. With these taxa it was possible to conduct analyses that include all major vertebrate lineages. Analyses of c-Jun revealed an unexpected but well-supported frog-turtle clade while analyses of DJ-1 revealed a topology largely congruent with expectation based upon other data. The conflict between the c-Jun topology and expectation appears to reflect the overlap between c-Jun and a CpG island in most taxa, including crocodilians. This CpG island is absent in the frog and turtle, and convergence in base composition appears to be at least partially responsible for the signal uniting these taxa. Noise reduction approaches can eliminate the unexpected frog-turtle clade, demonstrating that multiple signals are present in the c-Jun alignment. We used phylogenetic methods to visualize these signals; we suggest that examining both historical and non-historical signals will prove important for phylogenomic analyses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. α-Synuclein and DJ-1 as potential biological fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Waragai, Masaaki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Sekigawa, Akio; Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Fujita, Masayo; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2010-10-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common form of movement disorder and affects approximately 4% of the population aged over 80 years old. Currently, PD cannot be prevented or cured, and no single diagnostic biomarkers are available. Notably, recent studies suggest that two familial PD-linked molecules, α-synuclein and DJ-1, are present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and that their levels may be altered during the progression of PD. In this regard, sensitive and accurate methods for evaluation of α-synuclein and DJ-1 levels in the CSF and blood have been developed, and the results suggest that the levels of both molecules are significantly decreased in the CSF in patients with PD compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, specific detection and quantification of neurotoxic oligometric forms of α-synuclein in the blood using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays might be expected as potential peripheral biomarkers for PD, although further validation is required. Currently, neither α-synuclein nor DJ-1 is satisfactory as a single biomarker for PD, but combinatory evaluation of these biological fluid molecules with other biomarkers and imaging techniques may provide reliable information for diagnosis of PD.

  13. α-Synuclein and DJ-1 as Potential Biological Fluid Biomarkers for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waragai, Masaaki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Sekigawa, Akio; Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Fujita, Masayo; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most common form of movement disorder and affects approximately 4% of the population aged over 80 years old. Currently, PD cannot be prevented or cured, and no single diagnostic biomarkers are available. Notably, recent studies suggest that two familial PD-linked molecules, α-synuclein and DJ-1, are present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and that their levels may be altered during the progression of PD. In this regard, sensitive and accurate methods for evaluation of α-synuclein and DJ-1 levels in the CSF and blood have been developed, and the results suggest that the levels of both molecules are significantly decreased in the CSF in patients with PD compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, specific detection and quantification of neurotoxic oligometric forms of α-synuclein in the blood using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays might be expected as potential peripheral biomarkers for PD, although further validation is required. Currently, neither α-synuclein nor DJ-1 is satisfactory as a single biomarker for PD, but combinatory evaluation of these biological fluid molecules with other biomarkers and imaging techniques may provide reliable information for diagnosis of PD. PMID:21151436

  14. Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1/Park7 Is a Major Protein Deglycase That Repairs Methylglyoxal- and Glyoxal-glycated Cysteine, Arginine, and Lysine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Richarme, Gilbert; Mihoub, Mouadh; Dairou, Julien; Bui, Linh Chi; Leger, Thibaut; Lamouri, Aazdine

    2015-01-01

    Glycation is an inevitable nonenzymatic covalent reaction between proteins and endogenous reducing sugars or dicarbonyls (methylglyoxal, glyoxal) that results in protein inactivation. DJ-1 was reported to be a multifunctional oxidative stress response protein with poorly defined function. Here, we show that human DJ-1 is a protein deglycase that repairs methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-glycated amino acids and proteins by acting on early glycation intermediates and releases repaired proteins and lactate or glycolate, respectively. DJ-1 deglycates cysteines, arginines, and lysines (the three major glycated amino acids) of serum albumin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and aspartate aminotransferase and thus reactivates these proteins. DJ-1 prevented protein glycation in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the DJ-1 homolog YajL and restored cell viability in glucose-containing media. These results suggest that DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism results from excessive protein glycation and establishes DJ-1 as a major anti-glycation and anti-aging protein. PMID:25416785

  15. Protein Aggregation in a Mutant Deficient in YajL, the Bacterial Homolog of the Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1

    PubMed Central

    Kthiri, Fatoum; Le, Hai-Tuong; Gautier, Valérie; Caldas, Teresa; Malki, Abderrahim; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Bohn, Chantal; Bouloc, Philippe; Richarme, Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    YajL is the closest prokaryotic homolog of the parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 (40% sequence identity and similar three-dimensional structure), a protein of unknown function involved in the cellular response to oxidative stress. We report here that a yajL mutant of Escherichia coli displays an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. It also exhibits a protein aggregation phenotype in aerobiosis, but not in anaerobiosis or in aerobic cells overexpressing superoxide dismutase, suggesting that protein aggregation depends on the presence of reactive oxygen species produced by respiratory chains. The protein aggregation phenotype of the yajL mutant, which can be rescued by the wild-type yajL gene, but not by the corresponding cysteine 106 mutant allele, is similar to that of multiple mutants deficient in superoxide dismutases and catalases, although intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels were not increased in the yajL mutant, suggesting that protein aggregation in this strain does not result from a hydrogen peroxide detoxification defect. Aggregation-prone proteins included 17 ribosomal proteins, the ATP synthase β subunit, flagellin, and the outer membrane proteins OmpA and PAL; all of them are part of multiprotein complexes, suggesting that YajL might be involved in optimal expression of these complexes, especially during oxidative stress. YajL stimulated the renaturation of urea-unfolded citrate synthase and the solubilization of the urea-unfolded ribosomal proteins S1 and L3 and was more efficient as a chaperone in its oxidized form than in its reduced form. The mRNA levels of several aggregated proteins of the yajL mutant were severely affected, suggesting that YajL also acts at the level of gene expression. These two functions of YajL might explain the protein aggregation phenotype of the yajL mutant. PMID:20124404

  16. DJ-1-binding compounds prevent oxidative stress-induced cell death and movement defect in Parkinson's disease model rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Shin; Yanagida, Takashi; Nunome, Kana; Ishikawa, Shizuma; Inden, Masatoshi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Taira, Takahiro; Hirota, Kosaku; Niwa, Masami; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2008-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by neuronal cell death. Although a precursor of dopamine and inhibitors of dopamine degradation have been used for PD therapy, cell death progresses during treatment. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of PD, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in the onset of PD. Superfluous oxidation of cysteine at amino acid 106 (C106) of DJ-1 renders DJ-1 inactive, and such oxidized DJ-1 has been observed in patients with the sporadic form of PD. In this study, we isolated compounds that bind to the region at C106 by a virtual screening. These compounds prevented oxidative stress-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells, embryonic stem cell-derived dopaminergic cells and primary neuronal cells of the ventral mesencephalon, but not that of DJ-1-knockdown cells of SH-SY5Y and NIH3T3 cells, indicating that the effect of the compounds is specific to DJ-1. These compounds inhibited production of reactive oxygen species and restored activities of mitochondrial complex I and tyrosine hydroxylase that had been compromised by oxidative stress. These compounds prevented dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra and restored movement abnormality in 6-hydroxyldopamine-injected PD model rats. One mechanism of action of these compounds is prevention of superfluous oxidation of DJ-1, and the compounds passed through the blood-brain barrier in vitro. Taken together, the results indicate that these compounds should become fundamental drugs for PD therapy.

  17. DJ-1 associates with lipid rafts by palmitoylation and regulates lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soo; Kim, Jin Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2013-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disease. Several genes have been associated with familial type PD, providing tremendous insights into the pathogenesis of PD. Gathering evidence supports the view that these gene products may operate through common molecular pathways. Recent reports suggest that many PD-associated gene products, such as α-synuclein, LRRK2, parkin and PINK1, associate with lipid rafts and lipid rafts may be associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we observed that DJ-1 protein also associated with lipid rafts. Palmitoylation of three cysteine residues (C46/53/106) and C-terminal region of DJ-1 were required for this association. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced the localization of DJ-1 into lipid rafts in astrocytes. The LPS-TLR4 signaling was more augmented in DJ-1 knock-out astrocytes by the impairment of TLR4 endocytosis. Furthermore, lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis including the endocytosis of CD14, which play a major role in regulating TLR4 endocytosis was also impaired, but clathrin-dependent endocytosis was not. This study provides a novel function of DJ-1 in lipid rafts, which may contribute the pathogenesis of PD. Moreover, it also provides the possibility that many PD-related proteins may operate through common molecular pathways in lipid rafts.

  18. Yeast DJ-1 superfamily members are required for diauxic-shift reprogramming and cell survival in stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Miller-Fleming, Leonor; Antas, Pedro; Pais, Teresa Faria; Smalley, Joshua L; Giorgini, Flaviano; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2014-05-13

    The yeast Hsp31 minifamily proteins (Hsp31, Hsp32, Hsp33, Hsp34) belong to the highly conserved DJ-1 superfamily. The human DJ-1 protein is associated with cancer and neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease. However, the precise function of human and yeast DJ-1 proteins is unclear. Here we show that the yeast DJ-1 homologs have a role in diauxic-shift (DS), characterized by metabolic reprogramming because of glucose limitation. We find that the Hsp31 genes are strongly induced in DS and in stationary phase (SP), and that deletion of these genes reduces chronological lifespan, impairs transcriptional reprogramming at DS, and impairs the acquisition of several typical characteristics of SP, including autophagy induction. In addition, under carbon starvation, the HSP31 family gene-deletion strains display impaired autophagy, disrupted target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) localization to P-bodies, and caused abnormal TORC1-mediated Atg13 phosphorylation. Repression of TORC1 by rapamycin in the gene-deletion strains completely reversed their sensitivity to heat shock. Taken together, our data indicate that Hsp31 minifamily is required for DS reprogramming and cell survival in SP, and plays a role upstream of TORC1. The enhanced understanding of the cellular function of these genes sheds light into the biological role of other members of the superfamily, including DJ-1, which is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in cancer and in Parkinson disease.

  19. The budding yeast orthologue of Parkinson's disease-associated DJ-1 is a multi-stress response protein protecting cells against toxic glycolytic products.

    PubMed

    Natkańska, Urszula; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Sieńko, Marzena; Skoneczny, Marek

    2016-10-27

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp31p is a DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI family protein that was previously shown to be important for survival in the stationary phase of growth and under oxidative stress. Recently, it was identified as a chaperone or as glutathione-independent glyoxalase. To elucidate the role played by this protein in budding yeast cells, we investigated its involvement in the protection against diverse environmental stresses. Our study revealed that HSP31 gene expression is controlled by multiple transcription factors, including Yap1p, Cad1p, Msn2p, Msn4p, Haa1p and Hsf1p. These transcription factors mediate the HSP31 promoter responses to oxidative, osmotic and thermal stresses, to potentially toxic products of glycolysis, such as methylglyoxal and acetic acid, and to the diauxic shift. We also demonstrated that the absence of the HSP31 gene sensitizes cells to these stressors. Overproduction of Hsp31p and its homologue Hsp32p rescued the sensitivity of glo1Δ cells to methylglyoxal. Hsp31p also reversed the increased sensitivity of the ald6Δ strain to acetic acid. Since Hsp31p glyoxalase III coexists in S. cerevisiae cells with thousand-fold more potent glyoxalase I/II system, its biological purpose requires substantiation. We postulate that S. cerevisiae Hsp31p may have broader substrate specificity than previously proposed and is able to eliminate various toxic products of glycolysis. Alternatively, Hsp31p might be effective under high concentration of exogenous methylglyoxal present in some natural environmental niches populated by budding yeast, when glyoxalase I/II system capacity is saturated.

  20. Formation of a Stabilized Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Is Critical for the Mitochondrial Function of the Parkinsonism Protein DJ-1*

    PubMed Central

    Blackinton, Jeff; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Thomas, Kelly J.; Ahmad, Rili; Greggio, Elisa; Raza, Ashraf S.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The formation of cysteine-sulfinic acid has recently become appreciated as a modification that links protein function to cellular oxidative status. Human DJ-1, a protein associated with inherited parkinsonism, readily forms cysteine-sulfinic acid at a conserved cysteine residue (Cys106 in human DJ-1). Mutation of Cys106 causes the protein to lose its normal protective function in cell culture and model organisms. However, it is unknown whether the loss of DJ-1 protective function in these mutants is due to the absence of Cys106 oxidation or the absence of the cysteine residue itself. To address this question, we designed a series of substitutions at a proximal glutamic acid residue (Glu18) in human DJ-1 that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys106 through changes in hydrogen bonding. We show that two mutations, E18N and E18Q, allow Cys106 to be oxidized to Cys106-sulfinic acid under mild conditions. In contrast, the E18D mutation stabilizes a cysteine-sulfenic acid that is readily reduced to the thiol in solution and in vivo. We show that E18N and E18Q can both partially substitute for wild-type DJ-1 using mitochondrial fission and cell viability assays. In contrast, the oxidatively impaired E18D mutant behaves as an inactive C106A mutant and fails to protect cells. We therefore conclude that formation of Cys106-sulfinic acid is a key modification that regulates the protective function of DJ-1. PMID:19124468

  1. Novel Redox-Dependent Esterase Activity (EC 3.1.1.2) for DJ-1: Implications for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Mayorga, Emmanuel; Díaz-Sánchez, Ángel G.; Dagda, Ruben K.; Domínguez-Solís, Carlos A.; Dagda, Raul Y.; Coronado-Ramírez, Cynthia K.; Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Mutations the in human DJ-1 (hDJ-1) gene are associated with early-onset autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). hDJ-1/parkinsonism associated deglycase (PARK7) is a cytoprotective multi-functional protein that contains a conserved cysteine-protease domain. Given that cysteine-proteases can act on both amide and ester substrates, we surmised that hDJ-1 possessed cysteine-mediated esterase activity. To test this hypothesis, hDJ-1 was overexpressed, purified and tested for activity towards 4-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) as µmol of pNPA hydrolyzed/min/mg·protein (U/mg protein). hDJ-1 showed maximum reaction velocity esterase activity (Vmax = 235.10 ± 12.00 U/mg protein), with a sigmoidal fit (S0.5 = 0.55 ± 0.040 mM) and apparent positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 2.05 ± 0.28). A PD-associated mutant of DJ-1 (M26I) lacked activity. Unlike its protease activity which is inactivated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase activity of hDJ-1 is enhanced upon exposure to low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (<10 µM) and plateaus at elevated concentrations (>100 µM) suggesting that its activity is resistant to oxidative stress. Esterase activity of DJ-1 requires oxidation of catalytic cysteines, as chemically protecting cysteines blocked its activity whereas an oxido-mimetic mutant of DJ-1 (C106D) exhibited robust esterase activity. Molecular docking studies suggest that C106 and L126 within its catalytic site interact with esterase substrates. Overall, our data show that hDJ-1 contains intrinsic redox-sensitive esterase activity that is abolished in a PD-associated mutant form of the hDJ-1 protein. PMID:27556455

  2. Neuroprotective effect of a new DJ-1-binding compound against neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and stroke model rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebral ischemia are chronic and acute neurodegenerative diseases, respectively, and onsets of these diseases are thought to be induced at least by oxidative stress. PD is caused by decreased dopamine levels in the substantia nigra and striatum, and cerebral ischemia occurs as a result of local reduction or arrest of blood supply. Although a precursor of dopamine and inhibitors of dopamine degradation have been used for PD therapy and an anti-oxidant have been used for cerebral ischemia therapy, cell death progresses during treatment. Reagents that prevent oxidative stress-induced cell death are therefore necessary for fundamental therapies for PD and cerebral ischemia. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of PD, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in the onset of PD. Superfluous oxidation of cysteine at amino acid 106 (C106) of DJ-1 renders DJ-1 inactive, and such oxidized DJ-1 has been observed in patients with the sporadic form of PD. Results In this study, a compound, comp-23, that binds to DJ-1 was isolated by virtual screening. Comp-23 prevented oxidative stress-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells and primary neuronal cells of the ventral mesencephalon but not that of DJ-1-knockdown SH-SY5Y cells, indicating that the effect of the compound is specific to DJ-1. Comp-23 inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by oxidative stress and prevented excess oxidation of DJ-1. Furthermore, comp-23 prevented dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra and restored movement abnormality in 6-hydroxyldopamine-injected and rotenone-treated PD model rats and mice. Comp-23 also reduced infarct size of cerebral ischemia in rats that had been induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Protective activity of comp-23 seemed to be stronger than that of previously identified compound B. Conclusions The results indicate

  3. Degradation of Redox-Sensitive Proteins including Peroxiredoxins and DJ-1 is Promoted by Oxidation-induced Conformational Changes and Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Song, In-Kang; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jihye; Shin, Dong-Hae; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key molecules regulating various cellular processes. However, what the cellular targets of ROS are and how their functions are regulated is unclear. This study explored the cellular proteomic changes in response to oxidative stress using H2O2 in dose- and recovery time-dependent ways. We found discernible changes in 76 proteins appearing as 103 spots on 2D-PAGE. Of these, Prxs, DJ-1, UCH-L3 and Rla0 are readily oxidized in response to mild H2O2 stress, and then degraded and active proteins are newly synthesized during recovery. In studies designed to understand the degradation process, multiple cellular modifications of redox-sensitive proteins were identified by peptide sequencing with nanoUPLC-ESI-q-TOF tandem mass spectrometry and the oxidative structural changes of Prx2 explored employing hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We found that hydrogen/deuterium exchange rate increased in C-terminal region of oxidized Prx2, suggesting the exposure of this region to solvent under oxidation. We also found that Lys191 residue in this exposed C-terminal region of oxidized Prx2 is polyubiquitinated and the ubiquitinated Prx2 is readily degraded in proteasome and autophagy. These findings suggest that oxidation-induced ubiquitination and degradation can be a quality control mechanism of oxidized redox-sensitive proteins including Prxs and DJ-1. PMID:27703196

  4. Degradation of Redox-Sensitive Proteins including Peroxiredoxins and DJ-1 is Promoted by Oxidation-induced Conformational Changes and Ubiquitination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, In-Kang; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jihye; Shin, Dong-Hae; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key molecules regulating various cellular processes. However, what the cellular targets of ROS are and how their functions are regulated is unclear. This study explored the cellular proteomic changes in response to oxidative stress using H2O2 in dose- and recovery time-dependent ways. We found discernible changes in 76 proteins appearing as 103 spots on 2D-PAGE. Of these, Prxs, DJ-1, UCH-L3 and Rla0 are readily oxidized in response to mild H2O2 stress, and then degraded and active proteins are newly synthesized during recovery. In studies designed to understand the degradation process, multiple cellular modifications of redox-sensitive proteins were identified by peptide sequencing with nanoUPLC-ESI-q-TOF tandem mass spectrometry and the oxidative structural changes of Prx2 explored employing hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We found that hydrogen/deuterium exchange rate increased in C-terminal region of oxidized Prx2, suggesting the exposure of this region to solvent under oxidation. We also found that Lys191 residue in this exposed C-terminal region of oxidized Prx2 is polyubiquitinated and the ubiquitinated Prx2 is readily degraded in proteasome and autophagy. These findings suggest that oxidation-induced ubiquitination and degradation can be a quality control mechanism of oxidized redox-sensitive proteins including Prxs and DJ-1.

  5. L166P MUTANT DJ-1, CAUSATIVE FOR RECESSIVE PARKINSON'S DISEASE IS DEGRADED THROUGH THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Mutations in a gene on chromosome 1, DJ-1, have been reported recently to be associated with recessive, early-onset Parkinson's disease. Whilst one mutation is a large deletion that is predicted to produce an effective knockout of the gene, the second is a point ...

  6. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 pathways of mitophagy during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianghong; Yuan, Du; Sun, Qian; Xu, Li; Lee, Emma; Lewis, Anthony J; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Rosengart, Matthew R

    2017-10-01

    During sepsis and shock states, mitochondrial dysfunction occurs. Consequently, adaptive mechanisms, such as fission, fusion, and mitophagy, are induced to eliminate damaged portions or entire dysfunctional mitochondria. The regulatory PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 pathways are strongly induced by mitochondrial depolarization, although a direct link between loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) and mitophagy has not been identified. Mitochondria also buffer Ca(2+), and their buffering capacity is dependent on ΔΨ Here, we characterize a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) I in the regulation of these mechanisms. Loss of ΔΨ with either pharmacologic depolarization or LPS leads to Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial recruitment and activation of CaMKI that precedes the colocalization of PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1. CaMKI is required and serves as both a PINK1 and Parkin kinase. The mechanisms operate in both immune and nonimmune cells and are induced in in vivo models of endotoxemia, sepsis, and hemorrhagic shock. These data support the idea that CaMKI links mitochondrial stress with the PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 mechanisms of mitophagy.-Zhang, X., Yuan, D., Sun, Q., Xu, L., Lee, E., Lewis, A. J., Zuckerbraun, B. S., Rosengart, M. R. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 pathways of mitophagy during sepsis. © FASEB.

  7. L166P MUTANT DJ-1, CAUSATIVE FOR RECESSIVE PARKINSON'S DISEASE IS DEGRADED THROUGH THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Mutations in a gene on chromosome 1, DJ-1, have been reported recently to be associated with recessive, early-onset Parkinson's disease. Whilst one mutation is a large deletion that is predicted to produce an effective knockout of the gene, the second is a point ...

  8. Oxidation and interaction of DJ-1 with 20S proteasome in the erythrocytes of early stage Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshiro; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Matsumura, Akihiro; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Itoh, Sayoko; Sutou, Kenta; Kobayashi, Mayuka; Mita, Yuichiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hisahara, Shin; Hara, Yasuo; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hamakubo, Takao; Kusunoki, Susumu; Shimohama, Shun; Noguchi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive, age-related, neurodegenerative disorder, and oxidative stress is an important mediator in its pathogenesis. DJ-1, the product of the causative gene of a familial form of PD, plays a significant role in anti-oxidative defence to protect cells from oxidative stress. DJ-1 undergoes preferential oxidation at the cysteine residue at position 106 (Cys-106) under oxidative stress. Here, using specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 (oxDJ-1), it was found that the levels of oxDJ-1 in the erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients (n = 88) were higher than in those of medicated PD patients (n = 62) and healthy control subjects (n = 33). Elevated oxDJ-1 levels were also observed in a non-human primate PD model. Biochemical analysis of oxDJ-1 in erythrocyte lysates showed that oxDJ-1 formed dimer and polymer forms, and that the latter interacts with 20S proteasome. These results clearly indicate a biochemical alteration in the blood of PD patients, which could be utilized as an early diagnosis marker for PD. PMID:27470541

  9. Detection of ligand binding hot spots on protein surfaces via fragment-based methods: application to DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, Melissa R.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Ju, Shulin; Caaveiro, Jose M.M.; Orwig, Susan D.; Kozakov, Dima; Brenke, Ryan; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Beglov, Dmitry; Vajda, Sandor; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2010-08-04

    The identification of hot spots, i.e., binding regions that contribute substantially to the free energy of ligand binding, is a critical step for structure-based drug design. Here we present the application of two fragment-based methods to the detection of hot spots for DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase (GCase), targets for the development of therapeutics for Parkinson's and Gaucher's diseases, respectively. While the structures of these two proteins are known, binding information is lacking. In this study we employ the experimental multiple solvent crystal structures (MSCS) method and computational fragment mapping (FTMap) to identify regions suitable for the development of pharmacological chaperones for DJ-1 and GCase. Comparison of data derived via MSCS and FTMap also shows that FTMap, a computational method for the identification of fragment binding hot spots, is an accurate and robust alternative to the performance of expensive and difficult crystallographic experiments.

  10. Dopamine-derived Quinones Affect the Structure of the Redox Sensor DJ-1 through Modifications at Cys-106 and Cys-53*

    PubMed Central

    Girotto, Stefania; Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Tessari, Isabella; Cappellini, Rekha; Bisaglia, Marco; Bubacco, Luigi; Mammi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of DJ-1, a protein involved in familial Parkinson disease is still controversial. One of the hypotheses proposed indicates a sensor role for oxidative stress, through oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys-106). The association of DJ-1 mutations with Parkinson disease suggests a loss of function, specific to dopaminergic neurons. Under oxidative conditions, highly reactive dopamine quinones (DAQs) can be produced, which can modify cysteine residues. In cellular models, DJ-1 was found covalently modified by dopamine. We analyzed the structural modifications induced on human DJ-1 by DAQs in vitro. We described the structural perturbations induced by DAQ adduct formation on each of the three cysteine residues of DJ-1 using specific mutants. Cys-53 is the most reactive residue and forms a covalent dimer also in SH-SY5Y DJ-1-transfected cells, but modification of Cys-106 induces the most severe structural perturbations; Cys-46 is not reactive. The relevance of these covalent modifications to the several functions ascribed to DJ-1 is discussed in the context of the cell response to a dopamine-derived oxidative insult. PMID:22431735

  11. A Two-step Protein Quality Control Pathway for a Misfolded DJ-1 Variant in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mathiassen, Søs G; Larsen, Ida B; Poulsen, Esben G; Madsen, Christian T; Papaleo, Elena; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B; Nielsen, Michael L; Kriegenburg, Franziska; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2015-08-21

    A mutation, L166P, in the cytosolic protein, PARK7/DJ-1, causes protein misfolding and is linked to Parkinson disease. Here, we identify the fission yeast protein Sdj1 as the orthologue of DJ-1 and calculate by in silico saturation mutagenesis the effects of point mutants on its structural stability. We also map the degradation pathways for Sdj1-L169P, the fission yeast orthologue of the disease-causing DJ-1 L166P protein. Sdj1-L169P forms inclusions, which are enriched for the Hsp104 disaggregase. Hsp104 and Hsp70-type chaperones are required for efficient degradation of Sdj1-L169P. This also depends on the ribosome-associated E3 ligase Ltn1 and its co-factor Rqc1. Although Hsp104 is absolutely required for proteasomal degradation of Sdj1-L169P aggregates, the degradation of already aggregated Sdj1-L169P occurs independently of Ltn1 and Rqc1. Thus, our data point to soluble Sdj1-L169P being targeted early by Ltn1 and Rqc1. The fraction of Sdj1-L169P that escapes this first inspection then forms aggregates that are subsequently cleared via an Hsp104- and proteasome-dependent pathway.

  12. Engineered disulfide bonds restore chaperone-like function of DJ-1 mutants linked to familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Logan, Todd; Clark, Lindsay; Ray, Soumya S

    2010-07-13

    Loss-of-function mutations such as L166P, A104T, and M26I in the DJ-1 gene (PARK7) have been linked to autosomal-recessive early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Cellular and structural studies of the familial mutants suggest that these mutations may destabilize the dimeric structure. To look for common dynamical signatures among the DJ-1 mutants, short MD simulations of up to 1000 ps were conducted to identify the weakest region of the protein (residues 38-70). In an attempt to stabilize the protein, we mutated residue Val 51 to cysteine (V51C) to make a symmetry-related disulfide bridge with the preexisting Cys 53 on the opposite subunit. We found that the introduction of this disulfide linkage stabilized the mutants A104T and M26I against thermal denaturation, improved their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), and restored a chaperone-like function of blocking alpha-synuclein aggregation. The L166P mutant was far too unstable to be rescued by introduction of the V51C mutation. The results presented here point to the possible development of pharmacological chaperones, which may eventually lead to PD therapeutics.

  13. Inactivation of Pink1 gene in vivo sensitizes dopamine-producing neurons to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and can be rescued by autosomal recessive Parkinson disease genes, Parkin or DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Emdadul; Mount, Matthew P; Safarpour, Farzaneh; Abdel-Messih, Elizabeth; Callaghan, Steve; Mazerolle, Chantal; Kitada, Tohru; Slack, Ruth S; Wallace, Valerie; Shen, Jie; Anisman, Hymie; Park, David S

    2012-06-29

    Mutations in the mitochondrial PTEN-induced kinase 1 (Pink1) gene have been linked to Parkinson disease (PD). Recent reports including our own indicated that ectopic Pink1 expression is protective against toxic insult in vitro, suggesting a potential role for endogenous Pink1 in mediating survival. However, the role of endogenous Pink1 in survival, particularly in vivo, is unclear. To address this critical question, we examined whether down-regulation of Pink1 affects dopaminergic neuron loss following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in the adult mouse. Two model systems were utilized: virally delivered shRNA-mediated knockdown of Pink1 and germ line-deficient mice. In both instances, loss of Pink1 generated significant sensitivity to damage induced by systemic MPTP treatment. This sensitivity was associated with greater loss of dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra pars compacta and terminal dopamine fiber density in the striatum region. Importantly, we also show that viral mediated expression of two other recessive PD-linked familial genes, DJ-1 and Parkin, can protect dopaminergic neurons even in the absence of Pink1. This evidence not only provides strong evidence for the role of endogenous Pink1 in neuronal survival, but also supports a role of DJ-1 and Parkin acting parallel or downstream of endogenous Pink1 to mediate survival in a mammalian in vivo context.

  14. Use of cysteine-reactive crosslinkers to probe conformational flexibility of human DJ-1 demonstrates that Glu18 mutations are dimers

    PubMed Central

    Prahlad, Janani; Hauser, David N.; Milkovic, Nicole M.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of a key cysteine residue (Cys106) in the parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 regulates its ability to protect against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Cys106 interacts with a neighboring protonated Glu18 residue, stabilizing the Cys106-SO2− (sulfinic acid) form of DJ-1. To study this important post-translational modification, we previously designed several Glu18 mutations (E18N, E18D, E18Q) that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys106. However, recent results suggest these Glu18 mutations cause loss of DJ-1 dimerization, which would severely compromise the protein’s function. The purpose of this study was to conclusively determine the oligomerization state of these mutants using X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, thermal stability analysis, CD spectroscopy, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and crosslinking. We found that all of the Glu18 DJ-1 mutants were dimeric. Thiol crosslinking indicates that these mutant dimers are more flexible than the wild-type protein and can form multiple crosslinked dimeric species due to the transient exposure of cysteine residues that are inaccessible in the wild-type protein. The enhanced flexibility of Glu18 DJ-1 mutants provides a parsimonious explanation for their lower observed crosslinking efficiency in cells. In addition, thiol crosslinkers may have an underappreciated value as qualitative probes of protein conformational flexibility. PMID:24832775

  15. Influence of Peptide Dipoles and Hydrogen Bonds on Reactive Cysteine pKa Values in Fission Yeast DJ-1

    PubMed Central

    Madzelan, Peter; Labunksa, Tetyana; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine residues with depressed pKa values are critical for the functions of many proteins. Several types of interactions can stabilize cysteine thiolate anions, including hydrogen bonds between thiol(ate)s and nearby residues as well as electrostatic interactions involving charged residues or dipoles. Dipolar stabilization of thiolates by peptide groups has been suggested to play a particularly important role near the N-termini of α-helices. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectroscopic methods, we show that the reactive cysteine residue (Cys111) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe DJ-1 experiences a 0.6 unit depression of its thiol pKa as a consequence of a hydrogen bond donated by a threonine sidechain (Thr114) to a nearby peptide carbonyl oxygen at the N-terminus of an α-helix. This extended hydrogen bonded interaction is consistent with a sum of dipoles model whereby the distal hydrogen bond polarizes and strengthens the direct hydrogen bond between the proximal amide hydrogen and the cysteine thiol(ate). Therefore, our results suggest that the local dipolar enhancement of hydrogen bonds can appreciably stabilize cysteine thiolate formation. However, the substitution of a valine residue with a proline at the i+3 position has only a minor effect (0.3 units) on the pKa of Cys111. As proline has a reduced peptide dipole moment, this small effect suggests that a more extended helix macrodipolar effect does not play a major role in this system. PMID:22971103

  16. Absence of the Yeast Hsp31 Chaperones of the DJ-1 Superfamily Perturbs Cytoplasmic Protein Quality Control in Late Growth Phase

    PubMed Central

    Amm, Ingo; Norell, Derrick; Wolf, Dieter H.

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat shock proteins Hsp31, Hsp32, Hsp33 and Hsp34 belong to the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily which includes the human protein DJ-1 (PARK7) as the most prominent member. Mutations in the DJ-1 gene are directly linked to autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 acts as an oxidative stress-induced chaperone preventing aggregation and fibrillation of α-synuclein, a critical factor in the development of the disease. In vivo assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the model substrate ΔssCPY*Leu2myc (ΔssCL*myc) as an aggregation-prone misfolded cytoplasmic protein revealed an influence of the Hsp31 chaperone family on the steady state level of this substrate. In contrast to the ubiquitin ligase of the N-end rule pathway Ubr1, which is known to be prominently involved in the degradation process of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins, the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family does not impair the degradation of newly synthesized misfolded substrate. Also degradation of substrates with strong affinity to Ubr1 like those containing the type 1 N-degron arginine is not affected by the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family. Epistasis analysis indicates that one function of the Hsp31 chaperone family resides in a pathway overlapping with the Ubr1-dependent degradation of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins. This pathway gains relevance in late growth phase under conditions of nutrient limitation. Additionally, the Hsp31 chaperones seem to be important for maintaining the cellular Ssa Hsp70 activity which is important for Ubr1-dependent degradation. PMID:26466368

  17. TRAF6 promotes atypical ubiquitination of mutant DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein and is localized to Lewy bodies in sporadic Parkinson's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Codrich, Marta; Marcuzzi, Federica; Pinto, Milena; Vilotti, Sandra; Biagioli, Marta; Ferrer, Isidro; Gustincich, Stefano

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra and the formation of ubiquitin- and alpha-synuclein (aSYN)-positive cytoplasmic inclusions called Lewy bodies (LBs). Although most PD cases are sporadic, families with genetic mutations have been found. Mutations in PARK7/DJ-1 have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset PD, while missense mutations or duplications of aSYN (PARK1, PARK4) have been linked to dominant forms of the disease. In this study, we identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) as a common player in genetic and sporadic cases. TRAF6 binds misfolded mutant DJ-1 and aSYN. Both proteins are substrates of TRAF6 ligase activity in vivo. Interestingly, rather than conventional K63 assembly, TRAF6 promotes atypical ubiquitin linkage formation to both PD targets that share K6-, K27- and K29- mediated ubiquitination. Importantly, TRAF6 stimulates the accumulation of insoluble and polyubiquitinated mutant DJ-1 into cytoplasmic aggregates. In human post-mortem brains of PD patients, TRAF6 protein colocalizes with aSYN in LBs. These results reveal a novel role for TRAF6 and for atypical ubiquitination in PD pathogenesis.

  18. A First Tetraplex Assay for the Simultaneous Quantification of Total α-Synuclein, Tau, β-Amyloid42 and DJ-1 in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Niels; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Vanderstichele, Hugo; El-Agnaf, Omar M; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of four distinct proteins (α-synuclein, β-amyloid1-42, DJ-1, and total tau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been proposed as a laboratory-based platform for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). While there is some clinical utility in measuring these markers individually, their usage in routine clinical testing remains challenging, in part due to substantial overlap of concentrations between healthy controls and diseased subjects. In contrast, measurement of different analytes in a single sample from individual patients in parallel appears to considerably improve the accuracy of AD or PD diagnosis. Here, we report the development and initial characterization of a first, electrochemiluminescence-based multiplex immunoassay for the simultaneous quantification of all four proteins ('tetraplex') in as little as 50 μl of CSF. In analytical performance experiments, we assessed its sensitivity, spike-recovery rate, parallelism and dilution linearity as well as the intra- and inter-assay variability. Using our in-house calibrators, we recorded a lower limit of detection for α-synuclein, β-amyloid42, DJ-1, and t-tau of 1.95, 1.24, 5.63, and 4.05 pg/ml, respectively. The corresponding, linear concentration range covered >3 orders of magnitude. In diluted CSF samples (up to 1:4), spike-recovery rates ranged from a low of 55% for β-amyloid42 to a high of 98% for DJ-1. Hillslopes ranged from 1.03 to 1.30, and inter-assay variability demonstrated very high reproducibility. Our newly established tetraplex assay represents a significant technical advance for fluid-based biomarker studies in neurodegenerative disorders allowing the simultaneous measurement of four pivotal makers in single CSF specimens. It provides exceptional sensitivity, accuracy and speed.

  19. A glutathione-independent glyoxalase of the DJ-1 superfamily plays an important role in managing metabolically generated methylglyoxal in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hasim, Sahar; Hussin, Nur Ahmad; Alomar, Fadhel; Bidasee, Keshore R; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Wilson, Mark A

    2014-01-17

    Methylglyoxal is a cytotoxic reactive carbonyl compound produced by central metabolism. Dedicated glyoxalases convert methylglyoxal to d-lactate using multiple catalytic strategies. In this study, the DJ-1 superfamily member ORF 19.251/GLX3 from Candida albicans is shown to possess glyoxalase activity, making this the first demonstrated glutathione-independent glyoxalase in fungi. The crystal structure of Glx3p indicates that the protein is a monomer containing the catalytic triad Cys(136)-His(137)-Glu(168). Purified Glx3p has an in vitro methylglyoxalase activity (Km = 5.5 mM and kcat = 7.8 s(-1)) that is significantly greater than that of more distantly related members of the DJ-1 superfamily. A close Glx3p homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YDR533C/Hsp31) also has glyoxalase activity, suggesting that fungal members of the Hsp31 clade of the DJ-1 superfamily are all probable glutathione-independent glyoxalases. A homozygous glx3 null mutant in C. albicans strain SC5314 displays greater sensitivity to millimolar levels of exogenous methylglyoxal, elevated levels of intracellular methylglyoxal, and carbon source-dependent growth defects, especially when grown on glycerol. These phenotypic defects are complemented by restoration of the wild-type GLX3 locus. The growth defect of Glx3-deficient cells in glycerol is also partially complemented by added inorganic phosphate, which is not observed for wild-type or glucose-grown cells. Therefore, C. albicans Glx3 and its fungal homologs are physiologically relevant glutathione-independent glyoxalases that are not redundant with the previously characterized glutathione-dependent GLO1/GLO2 system. In addition to its role in detoxifying glyoxals, Glx3 and its close homologs may have other important roles in stress response.

  20. Lead exposure increases blood pressure by increasing angiotensinogen expression.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiandong; Wang, Miaomiao; Wang, Yiqing; Sun, Na; Li, Chunping

    2016-01-01

    Lead exposure can induce increased blood pressure. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain lead-induced hypertension. Changes in angiotensinogen (AGT) expression levels or gene variants may also influence blood pressure. In this study, we hypothesized that AGT expression levels or gene variants contribute to lead-induced hypertension. A preliminary HEK293 cell model experiment was performed to analyze the association between AGT expression and lead exposure. In a population-based study, serum AGT level was measured in both lead-exposed and control populations. To further detect the influence of AGT gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in lead-induced hypertension, two SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) were genotyped in a case-control study including 219 lead-exposed subjects and 393 controls. Lead exposure caused an increase in AGT expression level in HEK 293 cell models (P < 0.001) compared to lead-free cells, and individuals exposed to lead had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001). Lead-exposed individuals had higher serum AGT levels compared to controls (P < 0.001). However, no association was found between AGT gene SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) and lead exposure. Nevertheless, the change in AGT expression level may play an important role in the development of lead-induced hypertension.

  1. Subcellular localization of DJ-1 in human HL-60 leukemia cells in response to diallyl disulfide treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingye; Tang, Yuxian; Qin, Jing; Yi, Lan; Yang, Yening; Wang, Juan; He, Jie; Su, Qi; Tan, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) has been demonstrated to exert potent anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies indicate that DADS may induce the differentiation and/or apoptosis of human leukemia cells in vitro. However, the mechanisms underlying these anticancer effects remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in the subcellular localization of protein deglycase DJ‑1 (also known as Parkinsonism associated deglycase-7, PARK-7) in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria of human leukemia HL‑60 cells induced by DADS, in order to provide novel experimental evidence for the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer mechanisms of DADS in leukemia cells. HL‑60 cells induced by DADS were collected at different time points, and proteins from the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria of the cells were isolated using specific cellular component isolation kits. The protein expression levels of DJ‑1 in these subcellular fractions of HL60 cells following exposure to DADS for varying lengths of time, were determined using western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques. Following exposure of HL‑60 cells to 1.25 mg/l DADS for 8 h, the protein expression levels of DJ‑1 were significantly decreased in the cytoplasm, while nuclear fractions exhibited a significant increase in DJ‑1 expression when compared with untreated controls. The protein expression levels of DJ‑1 in mitochondria of HL‑60 cells were significantly decreased following treatment with 5 and 10 mg/l DADS. These results demonstrate that exposure of HL‑60 cells to low concentrations of DADS may promote DJ‑1 protein translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which suggests that DJ‑1 may function as a transcription factor or cofactor binding protein in the process of cell differentiation. The expression of DJ‑1 in mitochondria may be associated with induction of apoptosis in HL‑60 cells treated with moderate

  2. Robust Glyoxalase activity of Hsp31, a ThiJ/DJ-1/PfpI Family Member Protein, Is Critical for Oxidative Stress Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Bankapalli, Kondalarao; Saladi, SreeDivya; Awadia, Sahezeel S.; Goswami, Arvind Vittal; Samaddar, Madhuja; D'Silva, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive metabolic intermediate generated during various cellular biochemical reactions, including glycolysis. The accumulation of MG indiscriminately modifies proteins, including important cellular antioxidant machinery, leading to severe oxidative stress, which is implicated in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, aging, and cardiac disorders. Although cells possess efficient glyoxalase systems for detoxification, their functions are largely dependent on the glutathione cofactor, the availability of which is self-limiting under oxidative stress. Thus, higher organisms require alternate modes of reducing the MG-mediated toxicity and maintaining redox balance. In this report, we demonstrate that Hsp31 protein, a member of the ThiJ/DJ-1/PfpI family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, plays an indispensable role in regulating redox homeostasis. Our results show that Hsp31 possesses robust glutathione-independent methylglyoxalase activity and suppresses MG-mediated toxicity and ROS levels as compared with another paralog, Hsp34. On the other hand, glyoxalase-defective mutants of Hsp31 were found highly compromised in regulating the ROS levels. Additionally, Hsp31 maintains cellular glutathione and NADPH levels, thus conferring protection against oxidative stress, and Hsp31 relocalizes to mitochondria to provide cytoprotection to the organelle under oxidative stress conditions. Importantly, human DJ-1, which is implicated in the familial form of Parkinson disease, complements the function of Hsp31 by suppressing methylglyoxal and oxidative stress, thus signifying the importance of these proteins in the maintenance of ROS homeostasis across phylogeny. PMID:26370081

  3. Salbutamol increases tristetraprolin expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jalonen, Ulla; Leppänen, Tiina; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Moilanen, Eeva

    2007-12-14

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a tandem zinc finger protein that can bind to AU-rich elements (AREs) in the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR) in mRNAs of transiently expressed genes, e.g. tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). TTP increases the turnover rate of the target mRNAs, thereby reducing, for example, the expression of TNF-alpha and GM-CSF. We examined the role of beta(2)-agonists, cAMP analogs, and forskolin (an activator of adenylate cyclase) on TTP mRNA and protein expression by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting in J774 murine macrophages and THP-1 human macrophages. All of these agents increased TTP expression. A nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and type IV PDE-inhibitor rolipram further enhanced the increase in TTP expression levels, suggesting a cAMP-mediated effect. A possible mediator of these effects is transcription factor activator protein 2 (AP-2), whereas nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) seemed not to play any role. This mechanism may, at least in part, explain the anti-inflammatory effects which beta(2)-agonists have been reported to have in macrophages.

  4. Increased synapsin I expression in cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Thonsranoi, Klairoong; Glaharn, Supattra; Punsawad, Chuchard; Chaisri, Urai; Krudsood, Srivicha; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen

    2015-01-01

    Synapsin I is a neuronal phosphoprotein contained in the synaptic vesicles of mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. It regulates both neurotransmitter release and synaptic formation. Variations in synapsin I expression in the brain have been reported to cause brain malfunction. In severe malaria, neurological complications, such as convulsion, delirium and coma, suggest abnormalities in the release of neurotransmitters. This study evaluated synapsin I expression in cerebral malaria (CM). An immunohistochemical method was used to study the semi-quantitative and qualitative expression of synapsin I in the brain of CM patients (10 cases) who died with Plasmodium falciparum, compared with non-cerebral malaria (NCM) (4 cases), and control brain tissues (5). Synapsin I was expressed in the gray matter of the cerebral cortex and the molecular layer of the cerebellum, as a diffusely dense precipitate pattern in the neuropil, with no immunoreactivity in the neurons, neuronal dendrites, glial cells, endothelial cells, and Purkinje cells. The findings were similarly demonstrated in CM, NCM, and control brain tissues. However, in the granular layer of the cerebellum, a significant increase in synapsin I expression was observed in the granule cells, and the glomerular synaptic complex, from the CM group, compared with the NCM, and control brain tissues (all P < 0.05). Parasitemia showed a positive correlation with synapsin I expression in the granule cells (on admission: Spearman's ρ = 0.600, P = 0.023) (before death: Spearman's ρ = 0.678, P = 0.008), and glomerular synaptic complex (before death: Spearman's ρ = 0.571, P = 0.033). It was hypothesized that CM causes pre-synaptic excitation and eventually activation of synapsin I, leading to increased neurotransmitter release. Synapsin I inhibitor should be investigated further as a target for a therapeutic intervention to alleviate neurological symptoms in severe malaria.

  5. Estrogen increases renal oxytocin receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, N L; Young, W S; Lolait, S J

    1995-04-01

    Estrogens have been implicated in the sodium and fluid imbalances associated with the menstrual cycle and late pregnancy. An estrogen-dependent role for renal oxytocin receptors in fluid homeostasis is suggested by the present findings which demonstrate that estradiol benzoate treatment increases the expression of the oxytocin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and 125I-OTA binding to oxytocin receptors in the renal cortex and medullary collecting ducts of ovariectomized female rats. Moreover, estradiol induced high levels of oxytocin receptor expression in outer stripe proximal tubules of ovariectomized female and adrenalectomized male rats. Proximal tubule induction was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the antiestrogen tamoxifen, but cortical expression of oxytocin receptors in macula densa cells was unaffected by tamoxifen. These data demonstrate cell-specific regulation of oxytocin receptor expression in macula densa and proximal tubule cells, and suggest a important role for these receptors in mediating estrogen-induced alterations in renal fluid dynamics by possibly affecting glomerular filtration and water and solute reabsorption during high estrogen states.

  6. Increased BMP expression in arthrofibrosis after TKA.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, Tilman; Geissler, Sven; Duda, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2012-09-01

    Because of the multiple possible aetiologies of painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the diagnosis and treatment of such patients are challenging. In a considerable number of patients, an intraarticular pathology is present, although not verifiable with clinical and diagnostic imaging techniques as in cases of primary arthrofibrosis. In these patients, the differentiation between intra- and extraarticular causes of pain remains difficult. Until now, little attention has been paid to changes of the synovial fluid and tissue in these knees. The objective of this study was to analyse the changes of the synovial environment in patients suffering from arthrofibrosis after TKA in comparison with knees with referred pain suffering from hip arthritis. The changes of the synovial environment probably provide additional diagnostic information to verify an intraarticular pathology. The synovial fluid of 10 consecutive knees in 10 patients presenting with a primary arthrofibrosis after TKA without signs of infection, instability, malalignment, or loosening was analysed and compared to the synovial fluid of 10 knees with referred pain serving as controls. The BMP-2 concentration was measured in the synovial fluid, and the presence of cytokines leading to an overexpression of BMP-2 was detected by measuring the change of BMP-2 expression in a synoviocyte cell line following exposing to the synovial fluid of the patients. The concentration of BMP-2 in the synovial fluid was significantly higher in arthrofibrotic TKA knees (24.3 ± 6.9 pg/mL), compared with the control group 5.9 ± 4.8 pg/mL (P < 0.001). Corresponding to this finding, BMP-2 expression in synoviocytes was upregulated 11.5-fold (P < 0.05) by synovial fluid of patients suffering from arthrofibrosis after TKA, compared with the control group with referred pain. BMP-2 is overexpressed and its concentrations are consequently higher in patients suffering from arthrofibrosis after TKA. The synovial BMP-2

  7. Codon Preference Optimization Increases Prokaryotic Cystatin C Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Mei, Cui; Zhen, Honghua; Zhu, Jess

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is closely related to optimal vector-host system pairing in many prokaryotes. Redesign of the human cystatin C (cysC) gene using the preferred codons of the prokaryotic system may significantly increase cysC expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Specifically, cysC expression may be increased by removing unstable sequences and optimizing GC content. According to E. coli expression system codon preferences, the gene sequence was optimized while the amino acid sequence was maintained. The codon-optimized cysC (co-cysC) and wild-type cysC (wt-cysC) were expressed by cloning the genes into a pET-30a plasmid, thus transforming the recombinant plasmid into E. coli BL21. Before and after the optimization process, the prokaryotic expression vector and host bacteria were examined for protein expression and biological activation of CysC. The recombinant proteins in the lysate of the transformed bacteria were purified using Ni2+-NTA resin. Recombinant protein expression increased from 10% to 46% based on total protein expression after codon optimization. Recombinant CysC purity was above 95%. The significant increase in cysC expression in E. coli expression produced by codon optimization techniques may be applicable to commercial production systems. PMID:23093857

  8. Increased glucocerebrosidase expression and activity in preeclamptic placenta.

    PubMed

    Jebbink, J M; Boot, R G; Keijser, R; Moerland, P D; Aten, J; Veenboer, G J M; van Wely, M; Buimer, M; Ver Loren van Themaat, E; Aerts, J M F G; van der Post, J A M; Afink, G B; Ris-Stalpers, C

    2015-02-01

    Lysosomal glucosidase beta acid (GBA) deficiency is inherent to Gaucher disease, Parkinsonism and Lewy-body dementia. Increased GBA expression has never been associated with human disease. We describe increased GBA expression and activity in placenta from preeclamptic pregnancies. 112 placenta biopsies were available for qPCR, analysis of GBA gene expression and activity. Microanalysis was performed on 20 placenta samples. Alternatively spliced placental GBA transcripts were cloned, expressed in HEK293 cells and analyzed by Western blot and activity assay. GBA is expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast layer of human placenta already at 5 weeks of gestation. We identified five novel GBA transcripts in placenta that enzymatically inactive when expressed in HEK293 cells. Both GBA RNA expression and enzymatic activity are upregulated in preeclamptic placenta. Microarray analysis of 20 placenta tissues identified 158 genes co-regulating with GBA expression and gene enrichment analysis highlights lysosomal function. In our micro-array data GBA expression does not correlate with FLT1 expression, currently the most powerful marker for preeclampsia. There are 89 transcripts that are negatively correlated with GBA expression of which BMP4 and TFEB are interesting as they are essential to early placenta function. Although very speculative, we hypothesize that increased GBA expression might relate to placentation through decreased BMP4 signaling or vascularization through downregulation of TFEB. Ceramide, the product of hydrolysis of glucosylceramide by GBA and involved in the regulation of cell differentiation, survival and apoptosis, is another putative candidate linking increased GBA activity to preeclampsia. Both pathways merit further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anticancer drug bortezomib increases interleukin-8 expression in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanacora, Shannon; Urdinez, Joaquin; Chang, Tzu-Pei; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-05-01

    Bortezomib (BZ) is the first clinically approved proteasome inhibitor that has shown remarkable anticancer activity in patients with hematological malignancies. However, many patients relapse and develop resistance; yet, the molecular mechanisms of BZ resistance are not fully understood. We have recently shown that in solid tumors, BZ unexpectedly increases expression of the pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8), while it inhibits expression of other NFκB-regulated genes. Since monocytes and macrophages are major producers of IL-8, the goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that BZ increases the IL-8 expression in human monocytes and macrophages. Here, we show that BZ dramatically increases the IL-8 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated U937 macrophages as well as in unstimulated U937 monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, while it inhibits expression of IL-6, IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, our results show that the underlying mechanisms involve p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is required for the BZ-induced IL-8 expression. Together, these data suggest that the BZ-increased IL-8 expression in monocytes and macrophages may represent one of the mechanisms responsible for the BZ resistance and indicate that targeting the p38-mediated IL-8 expression could enhance the BZ effectiveness in cancer treatment.

  10. Globally increased ultraconserved noncoding RNA expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Joo; Gusev, Yuriy; Allard, David; Sutaria, Dhruvitkumar S.; Badawi, Mohamed; Elgamal, Ola A.; Lerner, Megan R.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Calin, George A.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs) are a class of non-coding RNAs with 100% sequence conservation among human, rat and mouse genomes. T-UCRs are differentially expressed in several cancers, however their expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has not been studied. We used a qPCR array to profile all 481 T-UCRs in pancreatic cancer specimens, pancreatic cancer cell lines, during experimental pancreatic desmoplasia and in the pancreases of P48Cre/wt; KrasLSL-G12D/wt mice. Fourteen, 57 and 29% of the detectable T-UCRs were differentially expressed in the cell lines, human tumors and transgenic mouse pancreases, respectively. The vast majority of the differentially expressed T-UCRs had increased expression in the cancer. T-UCRs were monitored using an in vitro model of the desmoplastic reaction. Twenty-five % of the expressed T-UCRs were increased in the HPDE cells cultured on PANC-1 cellular matrix. UC.190, UC.233 and UC.270 were increased in all three human data sets. siRNA knockdown of each of these three T-UCRs reduced the proliferation of MIA PaCa-2 cells up to 60%. The expression pattern among many T-UCRs in the human and mouse pancreases closely correlated with one another, suggesting that groups of T-UCRs are co-activated in PDAC. Successful knockout of the transcription factor EGR1 in PANC-1 cells caused a reduction in the expression of a subset of T-UCRs suggesting that EGR1 may control T-UCR expression in PDAC. We report a global increase in expression of T-UCRs in both human and mouse PDAC. Commonalties in their expression pattern suggest a similar mechanism of transcriptional upregulation for T-UCRs in PDAC. PMID:27363020

  11. Increased expression of sphingosine kinase in the amnion during labor.

    PubMed

    Erkhembaatar, L O; Kotani, T; Sumigama, S; Tsuda, H; Mano, Y; Hua, L; Hasegawa, Y; Wang, J; Sugiyama, C; Nakahara, T; Iwase, A; Kikkawa, F

    2013-04-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid, has been reported to regulate inflammation processes. The onset of labor is thought to be related to inflammation. We therefore hypothesized that S1P might be involved in the onset of labor. The expression of sphingosine kinase (SPHK)-1, which produces S1P, and S1P lyase (SPL)-1, which irreversibly inactivates S1P, were examined in the fetal membranes. The expression levels were compared between amnions from cases of elective Caesarean deliveries (pre-labor) and those from vaginal deliveries (post-labor). In primary cultured human amnion cells, the expression levels of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (PTGS)-2 were examined in the presence or absence of S1P treatment. SPHK-1 and SPL-1 were both expressed in the amnion. The expression of SPHK-1 in the post-labor amnions increased compared with that in the pre-labor amnions. The expression of PTGS-2, a key regulator of labor, also increased in the post-labor amnion. However, the SPL-1 expression in the pre-labor amnion was not significantly different from that in the post-labor amnion. S1P1-3 and 5, which were coupled with Gi protein, were consistently found in the amnion cells. The treatment with S1P increased the expression of PTGS-2, and this was completely suppressed by a Gi inhibitor in the amnion cells. We are herein provide the first evidence of increased SPHK-1 expression in post-labor amnions, and that S1P increases the PTGS-2 expression in amnion cells. Our results suggest that S1P might play a role in the onset of labor via the induction of PTGS-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Random Monoallelic Gene Expression Increases upon Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Eckersley-Maslin, Mélanie A.; Thybert, David; Bergmann, Jan H.; Marioni, John C.; Flicek, Paul; Spector, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Random autosomal monoallelic gene expression refers to the transcription of a gene from one of two homologous alleles. We assessed the dynamics of monoallelic expression during development through an allele-specific RNA sequencing screen in clonal populations of hybrid mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We identified 67 and 376 inheritable autosomal random monoallelically expressed genes in ESCs and NPCs respectively, a 5.6-fold increase upon differentiation. While DNA methylation and nuclear positioning did not distinguish the active and inactive alleles, specific histone modifications were differentially enriched between the two alleles. Interestingly, expression levels of 8% of the monoallelically expressed genes remained similar between monoallelic and biallelic clones. These results support a model in which random monoallelic expression occurs stochastically during differentiation, and for some genes is compensated for by the cell to maintain the required transcriptional output of these genes. PMID:24576421

  13. Increase in ezrin expression from benign to malignant breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Natter, Camilla; Steurer, Stefan; Walter, Ingrid; Thomas, Almut; Salama, Mohamed; Singer, Christian F

    2013-12-01

    Ezrin is known to be involved in intercellular interactions, and a shift from membrane-bound to cytoplasmatic protein expression has been associated with malignant potential. This association has primarily been demonstrated in cell lines and, as yet, little is known about the distribution of ezrin in primary benign and malignant breast tissues. We have, therefore, set out to investigate ezrin protein expression in a series of primary breast lesions. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect ezrin expression in 465 samples of normal breast tissues, benign breast tumours, pre-invasive breast lesions, breast cancer tissues and metastatic lymph nodes, and the protein expression patterns observed were correlated with clinicopathological parameters. Ezrin was detected in the cytoplasm of both benign and malignant breast tissues, but its expression was significantly higher in the malignant tissues (13 % vs 60 %, p < 0.0001; χ (2) test). We also detected a statistically significant higher ezrin expression in pre-invasive lesions compared to benign lesions (15 % vs 44 %, p = 0.04; χ (2) test). We did not find such a difference in ezrin expression between pre-invasive and invasive cancer samples, nor between invasive cancer samples and lymph node metastases. Within the group of invasive cancer samples, we found a significant correlation between ezrin expression and CK14 (rs:0.38, p < 0.007) and Her2 (rs:0.25, p < 0.002) expression. No such correlation was observed between ezrin expression and nodal status, grading, patient's age, hormone receptor status, and Ki67 or p53 expression. Taken together, we found that cytoplasmatic ezrin expression increases from benign to malignant breast tumour development. We hypothesize that the tissue architectural alterations that are associated with aberrant ezrin expression may point at pathophysiological mechanisms that may be instrumental for the design of novel therapies.

  14. WHIRLIN INCREASES TRPV1 CHANNEL EXPRESSION AND CELLULAR STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Ciardo, Maria Grazia; Andrés-Bordería, Amparo; Cuesta, Natalia; Valente, Pierluigi; Camprubí-Robles, María; Yang, Jun; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The expression and function of TRPV1 is influenced by its interaction with cellular proteins. Here, we identify whirlin, a cytoskeletal PDZ-scaffold protein implicated in hearing, vision and mechanosensory transduction, as an interacting partner of TRPV1. Whirlin associates with TRPV1 in cell lines and in primary cultures of rat nociceptors. Whirlin is expressed in 55% of mouse sensory C-fibers, including peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptors, and co-localizes with TRPV1 in 70% of them. Heterologous expression of Whirlin increased TRPV1 protein expression and trafficking to the plasma membrane, and promoted receptor clustering. Silencing Whirlin expression with siRNA or blocking protein translation resulted in a concomitant degradation of TRPV1 that could be prevented by inhibiting the proteasome. The degradation kinetics of TRPV1 upon arresting protein translation mirrored that of Whirlin in cells co-expressing both proteins, suggesting a parallel degradation mechanism. Noteworthy, Whirlin expression significantly reduced TRPV1 degradation induced by prolonged exposure to capsaicin. Thus, our findings indicate that Whirlin and TRPV1 are associated in a subset of nociceptors and that TRPV1 protein stability is increased through the interaction with the cytoskeletal scaffold protein. Our results suggest that the Whirlin-TRPV1 complex may represent a novel molecular target and its pharmacological disruption might be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of peripheral TRPV1-mediated disorders. PMID:26516054

  15. Increased expression of senescence markers in cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jessica K.; Degan, Simone; Kummarapurugu, Apparao B.; Zheng, Shuo; Haridass, Prashamsha; Voynow, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by chronic neutrophilic airway inflammation and increased levels of neutrophil elastase (NE) in the airways. We have previously reported that NE treatment triggers cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest can lead to senescence, a complete loss of replicative capacity. Importantly, senescent cells can be proinflammatory and would perpetuate CF chronic inflammation. By immunohistochemistry, we evaluated whether airway sections from CF and control subjects expressed markers of senescence, including p16INK4a (p16), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, phospho-Histone H2A.X (γH2A.X), and phospho-checkpoint 2 kinase (phospho-Chk2), which are also DNA damage response markers. Compared with airway epithelium from control subjects, CF airway epithelium had increased levels of expression of all three senescence markers. We hypothesized that the high load of NE in the CF airway triggers epithelial senescence by upregulating expression of p16, which inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, cultured in air-liquid interface were treated with NE (0, 200, and 500 nM) to induce visible injury. Total cell lysates were collected and evaluated by Western analysis for p16 protein expression and CDK4 kinase activity. NE significantly increased p16 expression and decreased CDK4 kinase activity in NHBE cells. These results support the concept that NE triggers expression of senescence markers in CF airway epithelial cells. PMID:23316069

  16. Increased TTS expression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaxi; Jun, Li; Shiyong, Chen; Li, Hou; Zhu, Ming; Shen, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Immune system activation is known to be involved in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this work was to study the imbalance expressions of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TTS) with RA patients. Forty-nine RA patients and 49 healthy controls were studied. The expressions of IDO and TTS were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The expression of TTS mRNA increased significantly in RA patients when compared with healthy controls and correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.424, P < 0.01). In addition, we found TTS increased significantly mainly in CD3(+) T cells in rheumatoid arthritis group. Increased TTS expressions from CD3(+) T cells might link to a pathogenic mechanism involved in increasing survival of autoreactive T cells in RA patients. Determination of expressions of TTS may provide a better understanding of progression of the disease.

  17. Increased Expression of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Achilles Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Emmelie; Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. Methodology Cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity (CB1IR) was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. Principal Findings CB1IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB1IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB1 receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. Conclusion Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder. PMID:21931835

  18. Climbazole increases expression of cornified envelope proteins in primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Pople, J E; Moore, A E; Talbot, D C S; Barrett, K E; Jones, D A; Lim, F L

    2014-10-01

    Dandruff is a troubling consumer problem characterized by flaking and pruritus of the scalp and is considered a multifactorial condition with sebum, individual susceptibility and the fungus Malassezia all thought to play a part. The condition is commonly treated with shampoo products containing antifungal ingredients such as zinc pyrithione and climbazole. It is hypothesized that these ingredients may be delivering additional scalp skin benefits besides their antifungal activity helping to relieve dandruff effectively. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-dandruff ingredient climbazole for potential skin benefits using genomics and in vitro assays. Microarray analysis was performed to profile gene expression changes in climbazole-treated primary human keratinocyte cells. Results were independently validated using qPCR and analysis of protein expression using ELISA and immunocytochemistry. Microarray analysis of climbazole-treated keratinocytes showed statistically significant expression changes in genes associated with the gene ontology groups encompassing epidermal differentiation, keratinization, cholesterol biosynthesis and immune response. Upregulated genes included a number encoding cornified envelope proteins such as group 3 late-cornified envelope proteins, LCE3 and group 2 small-proline-rich proteins, SPRR2. Protein analysis studies of climbazole-treated primary keratinocytes using ELISA and immunocytochemistry were able to demonstrate that the increase in gene transcripts translated into increased protein expression of these cornified envelope markers. Climbazole treatment of primary keratinocytes results in an upregulation in expression of a number of genes including those encoding proteins involved in cornified envelope formation with further studies demonstrating this did translate into increased protein expression. A climbazole-driven increase in cornified envelope proteins may improve the scalp skin barrier, which is known to be weaker

  19. Increased heat shock protein expression after stress in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, K A; Iwama, G K; Nichols, C R; Godin, D V; Cheng, K M

    1998-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been shown to provide information on the biological impact of environmental stress to organisms, yet none have investigated the HSP response to stress in birds. Japanese quail were exposed to seven different stressors (mild restraint, loud noise, inescapable irritation, cold temperature, isolation in darkness, and two stressful social situations) and expression of HSP30, 60, 70, and 90 in heart, liver, lung, kidney and gonads was examined. Tonic Immobility (TI) tests were also conducted to assess whether the stressors increased fear response. Increased expression of HSP70 was found in the myocardial tissue of birds exposed to loud noise, inescapable irritation, cold temperature, and isolation in darkness. Increased expression of other HSPs was not apparent in the heart or any of the other all tissues examined. Longer TI was observed only in birds exposed to the noise stress. Evidence is presented that a fairly wide range of stressors caused increased expression of HSP70 in the Japanese quail myocardial tissue and that HSPs may provide useful biomarkers for the study of environmental stress in birds.

  20. Increased intra- and extracellular granzyme expression in patients with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Laorden, M Isabel; Blok, Dana C; Kager, Liesbeth M; Hoogendijk, Arie J; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Lede, Ivar O; Rahman, Wahid; Afroz, Rumana; Ghose, Aniruddha; Visser, Caroline E; Md Zahed, Abu Shahed; Husain, Md Anwar; Alam, Khan Mashrequl; Chandra Barua, Pravat; Hassan, Mahtabuddin; Hossain, Ahmed; Tayab, Md Abu; Day, Nick; Dondorp, Arjen M; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Granzymes (gzms) are proteases mainly found in cytotoxic lymphocytes, but also extracellularly. While the role of gzms in target cell death has been widely characterized, considerable evidence points towards broader roles related to infectious and inflammatory responses. To investigate the expression of the gzms in TB, intracellular gzms A, B and K were measured by flow cytometry in lymphocyte populations from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 18 TB patients and 12 healthy donors from Bangladesh, and extracellular levels of gzmA and B were measured in serum from 58 TB patients and 31 healthy controls. TB patients showed increased expression of gzmA in CD8(+) T, CD4(+) T and CD56(+) T, but not NK, cells, and of gzmB in CD8(+) T cells, when compared to controls. GzmK expression was not altered in TB patients in any lymphocyte subset. The extracellular levels of gzmA and, to a lesser extent, of gzmB, were increased in TB patients, but did not correlate with intracellular gzm expression in lymphocyte subsets. Our results reveal enhanced intra- and extracellular expression of gzmA and B in patients with pulmonary TB, suggesting that gzms are part of the host response to tuberculosis.

  1. Thyroid hormone increases bulk histones expression by enhancing translational efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Alberto; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Villamuera, Raquel; Aranda, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The expression of canonical histones is normally coupled to DNA synthesis during the S phase of the cell cycle. Replication-dependent histone mRNAs do not contain a poly(A) tail at their 3' terminus, but instead possess a stem-loop motif, the binding site for the stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which regulates mRNA processing, stability, and relocation to polysomes. Here we show that the thyroid hormone can increase the levels of canonical histones independent of DNA replication. Incubation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with T3 increases the total levels of histones, and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor β induces a further increase. This is not restricted to mouse embryonic fibroblasts, because T3 also raises histone expression in other cell lines. T3 does not increase histone mRNA or SLBP levels, suggesting that T3 regulates histone expression by a posttranscriptional mechanism. Indeed, T3 enhanced translational efficiency, inducing relocation of histone mRNA to heavy polysomes. Increased translation was associated with augmented transcription of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 γ2 (EIF4G2). T3 induced EIF4G2 protein and mRNA levels and the thyroid hormone receptor bound to the promoter region of the Eif4g2 gene. Induction of EIF4G2 was essential for T3-dependent histone induction, because depletion of this factor abolished histone increase. These results point out the importance of the thyroid hormones on the posttranscriptional regulation of histone biosynthesis in a cell cycle-independent manner and also suggest the potential regulation of eukaryotic translation by the modulation of the initiation factor EIF4G2, which also operates in the translation of canonical mRNAs.

  2. Empowering Multi-Cohort Gene Expression Analysis to Increase Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Winston A; Vallania, Francesco; Liu, Charles; Bongen, Erika; Tomczak, Aurelie; Andres-Terrè, Marta; Lofgren, Shane; Tam, Andrew; Deisseroth, Cole A; Li, Matthew D; Sweeney, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    A major contributor to the scientific reproducibility crisis has been that the results from homogeneous, single-center studies do not generalize to heterogeneous, real world populations. Multi-cohort gene expression analysis has helped to increase reproducibility by aggregating data from diverse populations into a single analysis. To make the multi-cohort analysis process more feasible, we have assembled an analysis pipeline which implements rigorously studied meta-analysis best practices. We have compiled and made publicly available the results of our own multi-cohort gene expression analysis of 103 diseases, spanning 615 studies and 36,915 samples, through a novel and interactive web application. As a result, we have made both the process of and the results from multi-cohort gene expression analysis more approachable for non-technical users. PMID:27896970

  3. Aging increases CCN1 expression leading to muscle senescence.

    PubMed

    Du, Jie; Klein, Janet D; Hassounah, Faten; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Xiaonan H

    2014-01-01

    Using microarray analysis, we found that aging sarcopenia is associated with a sharp increase in the mRNA of the matricellular protein CCN1 (Cyr61/CTGF/Nov). CCN1 mRNA was upregulated 113-fold in muscle of aged vs. young rats. CCN1 protein was increased in aging muscle in both rats (2.8-fold) and mice (3.8-fold). When muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) were treated with recombinant CCN1, cell proliferation was decreased but there was no change in the myogenic marker myoD. However, the CCN1-treated MPCs did express a senescence marker (SA-βgal). Interestingly, we found CCN1 increased p53, p16(Ink4A), and pRP (hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein) protein levels, all of which can arrest cell growth in MPCs. When MPCs were treated with aged rodent serum CCN1 mRNA increased by sevenfold and protein increased by threefold suggesting the presence of a circulating regulator. Therefore, we looked for a circulating regulator. Wnt-3a, a stimulator of CCN1 expression, was increased in serum from elderly humans (2.6-fold) and aged rodents (2.0-fold) compared with young controls. We transduced C2C12 myoblasts with wnt-3a and found that CCN1 protein was increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We conclude that in aging muscle, the circulating factor wnt-3a acts to increase CCN1 expression, prompting muscle senescence by activating cell arrest proteins.

  4. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4 h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan(®) assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA.

  5. SFRP2 Is Associated with Increased Adiposity and VEGF Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Rachel K.; Bujalska, Iwona J.; Hassan-Smith, Zaki K.; Hazlehurst, Jonathan M.; Foucault, Danielle R.; Stewart, Paul M.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to assess depot-specific expression and secretion of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) by adipose tissue and its effect on adipocyte biology. We measured serum sFRP2 concentrations in 106 patients in vivo to explore its relationship to fat mass, glycaemia and insulin resistance. Methods Expression of sFRP2 in mouse and human tissues was assessed using polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Western blot confirmed secretion of sFRP2 by adipose tissue into cell culture medium. Effects of recombinant sFRP2 on lipogenesis and preadipocyte proliferation were measured. Preadipocyte expression of the angiogenic genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 3 (NFATC3) was measured after recombinant sFRP2 exposure. Complementary clinical studies correlating human serum sFRP2 with age, gender, adiposity and insulin secretion were also performed. Results sFRP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) was expressed in mouse and human adipose tissue. In humans, sFRP2 mRNA expression was 4.2-fold higher in omental than subcutaneous adipose. Omental adipose tissue secreted 63% more sFRP2 protein than subcutaneous. Treatment with recombinant sFRP2 did not impact on lipogenesis or preadipocyte proliferation but was associated with increased VEGF mRNA expression. In human subjects, circulating insulin levels positively correlated with serum sFRP2, and levels were higher in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance (34.2ng/ml) compared to controls (29.5ng/ml). A positive correlation between sFRP2 and BMI was also observed. Conclusions Circulating sFRP2 is associated with adipose tissue mass and has a potential role to drive adipose angiogenesis through enhanced VEGF expression. PMID:27685706

  6. SFRP2 Is Associated with Increased Adiposity and VEGF Expression.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Rachel K; O'Reilly, Michael W; Bujalska, Iwona J; Hassan-Smith, Zaki K; Hazlehurst, Jonathan M; Foucault, Danielle R; Stewart, Paul M; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    The aim of this study was to assess depot-specific expression and secretion of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) by adipose tissue and its effect on adipocyte biology. We measured serum sFRP2 concentrations in 106 patients in vivo to explore its relationship to fat mass, glycaemia and insulin resistance. Expression of sFRP2 in mouse and human tissues was assessed using polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Western blot confirmed secretion of sFRP2 by adipose tissue into cell culture medium. Effects of recombinant sFRP2 on lipogenesis and preadipocyte proliferation were measured. Preadipocyte expression of the angiogenic genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 3 (NFATC3) was measured after recombinant sFRP2 exposure. Complementary clinical studies correlating human serum sFRP2 with age, gender, adiposity and insulin secretion were also performed. sFRP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) was expressed in mouse and human adipose tissue. In humans, sFRP2 mRNA expression was 4.2-fold higher in omental than subcutaneous adipose. Omental adipose tissue secreted 63% more sFRP2 protein than subcutaneous. Treatment with recombinant sFRP2 did not impact on lipogenesis or preadipocyte proliferation but was associated with increased VEGF mRNA expression. In human subjects, circulating insulin levels positively correlated with serum sFRP2, and levels were higher in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance (34.2ng/ml) compared to controls (29.5ng/ml). A positive correlation between sFRP2 and BMI was also observed. Circulating sFRP2 is associated with adipose tissue mass and has a potential role to drive adipose angiogenesis through enhanced VEGF expression.

  7. Increased expression of astrocyte markers in schizophrenia: Association with neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Catts, Vibeke Sørensen; Wong, Jenny; Fillman, Stu Gregory; Fung, Samantha Jane; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2014-08-01

    While schizophrenia may have a progressive component, the evidence for neurodegenerative processes as indicated by reactive astrocytes is inconclusive. We recently identified a subgroup of individuals with schizophrenia with increased expression of inflammatory markers in prefrontal cortex, and hypothesized that this subgroup would also have reactive astrocytes. We measured glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein levels by immunoblotting in grey matter homogenate from 37 individuals with schizophrenia and 37 unaffected controls. We examined the morphology of GFAP-positive astrocytes in immunostained sections of middle frontal gyrus. We tested if GFAP expression or astrocyte morphology were altered in people with schizophrenia with increased expression of inflammatory markers. We used RNA-Seq data on a subset of patients and controls (n=20/group) to ascertain whether mRNA transcripts associated with astrogliosis were elevated in the individuals with active neuroinflammation. GFAP (mRNA and protein) levels and astrocyte morphology were not significantly different between people with schizophrenia and controls overall. However, individuals with schizophrenia with neuroinflammation had increased expression of GFAP mRNA (t(33)=2.978, p=0.005), hypertrophic astrocyte morphology (χ(2)(2)=6.281, p=0.043), and statistically significant elevated expression of three mRNA transcripts previously associated with astrogliosis. We found clear evidence of astrogliosis in a subset of people with schizophrenia. We suggest that the lack of astrogliosis reported in previous studies may be due to cohort differences in aetiopathology, illness stage, treatment exposure, or a failure to examine subsets of people with schizophrenia. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  8. Increased IL-33 expression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jie; Zhao, Junling; Shang, Jin; Li, Miao; Zeng, Zhilin; Zhao, Jianping; Wang, Jianmiao; Xu, Yongjian; Xie, Jungang

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory lung disease characterized by inflammatory cell activation and the release of inflammatory mediators. Interleukin-33 (IL-33) plays a critical role in various inflammatory and immunological pathologies, but evidence for its role in COPD is lacking. This study aimed to investigate the expression of IL-33 in COPD and to determine whether IL-33 participates in the initiation and progression of COPD. Levels of serum IL-33 and its receptors were measured by ELISA, and serum levels of IL-33, ST2, and IL-1 receptor accessory protein were elevated in patients with COPD compared with control subjects. Flow cytometry analysis further demonstrated an increase in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) expressing IL-33 in patients with COPD. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the main cellular source of IL-33 in lung tissue was human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEs). Cigarette smoke extract and lipopolysaccharide could enhance the ability of PBLs and HBEs to express IL-33. Furthermore, PBLs from patients with COPD showed greater IL-33 release in response to the stimulus. Collectively, these findings suggest that IL-33 expression levels are increased in COPD and related to airway and systemic inflammation. Therefore, IL-33 might contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of this disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Lnc-CC3 increases metastasis in cervical cancer by increasing Slug expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Binyuan; Sun, Ruili; Fang, Shujuan; Qin, Changfei; Pan, Xi; Peng, Li; Li, Yuehui; Li, Guancheng

    2016-01-01

    Although screening has reduced mortality rates, metastasis still results in poor survival and prognosis in cervical cancer patients. We compared cervical cancer ESTs libraries with other ESTs libraries to identify candidate genes and cloned a novel cervical cancer-associated lncRNA, lnc-CC3. Overexpression of lnc-CC3 promoted migration and invasion by SiHa cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, increased Slug expression, and reduced the expression of the epithelial cell marker E-cadherin. Conversely, lnc-CC3 knockdown altered SiHa cell morphology and increased the expression of E-cadherin, thereby suppressing migration and invasion. These results suggest lnc-CC3 may be a useful marker of metastasis in cervical cancer. PMID:27223436

  10. High Dietary Fat Selectively Increases Catalase Expression within Cardiac Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Rindler, Paul M.; Plafker, Scott M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a predictor of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One consequence of obesity is dyslipidemia characterized by high blood triglycerides. It has been proposed that oxidative stress, driven by utilization of lipids for energy, contributes to these diseases. The effects of oxidative stress are mitigated by an endogenous antioxidant enzyme network, but little is known about its response to high fat utilization. Our experiments used a multiplexed quantitative proteomics method to measure antioxidant enzyme expression in heart tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. This experiment showed a rapid and specific up-regulation of catalase protein, with subsequent assays showing increases in activity and mRNA. Catalase, traditionally considered a peroxisomal protein, was found to be present in cardiac mitochondria and significantly increased in content and activity during high fat feeding. These data, coupled with the fact that fatty acid oxidation enhances mitochondrial H2O2 production, suggest that a localized catalase increase is needed to consume excessive mitochondrial H2O2 produced by increased fat metabolism. To determine whether the catalase-specific response is a common feature of physiological conditions that increase blood triglycerides and fatty acid oxidation, we measured changes in antioxidant expression in fasted versus fed mice. Indeed, a similar specific catalase increase was observed in mice fasted for 24 h. Our findings suggest a fundamental metabolic process in which catalase expression is regulated to prevent damage while preserving an H2O2-mediated sensing of diet composition that appropriately adjusts insulin sensitivity in the short term as needed to prioritize lipid metabolism for complete utilization. PMID:23204527

  11. Increased expression of intelectin-1 in nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Park, Il-Ho; Park, Se-Jin; Cho, Jung-Sun; Moon, You-Mi; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag; Lee, Heung-Man

    2012-01-01

    Intelectin-1 is a new type of Ca(2+)-dependant soluble lectin in humans that has affinity for galactofuranose in carbohydrate chains of bacterial cell walls, indicating that intelectin-1 may play a role in immune defense against bacteria. The purpose of the current study was to determine the expression of intelectin-1 mRNA and protein and to localize intelectin-1 protein in nasal polyps and tissues from control subjects. Normal sphenoid sinus mucosa was obtained from 10 patients undergoing surgery for pituitary tumor. Nasal polyp samples were obtained from 10 patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic polypoid rhinosinusitis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for intelectin-1 mRNA. Immunofluorescent staining was done for localization of intelectin-1 and quantitatively analyzed using computer-based image analysis. Western blot analysis was performed. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that intelectin-1 expression in nasal polyps was increased compared with normal sinus mucosa. Using immunofluorescent staining, intelectin-1 was strongly stained in epithelium and submucosa of nasal polyps, and faint staining was found in normal sinus mucosa. Intelectin-1 is expressed in human sinus mucosa and is increased in patients with nasal polyps. These results suggest a possible contribution for intelectin-1 in the pathophysiology of nasal polyps.

  12. Cathepsin K expression is increased in oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Siponen, Maria; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Nieminen, Pentti; Salo, Tuula

    2016-11-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is an idiopathic T-cell-mediated mucosal inflammatory disease. Cathepsin K (Cat K) is one of the lysosomal cysteine proteases. It is involved in many pathological conditions, including osteoporosis and cancer. The expression and role of Cat K in OLP are unknown. Twenty-five oral mucosal specimens diagnosed histopathologically as OLP and fourteen healthy controls (HC) were used to study the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of Cat K. Colocalization of Cat K with CD1a, Melan-A, CD68, CD45, mast cell tryptase (MCT), and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 4 and 9 were studied using double IHC and/or immunofluorescence (IF) staining. Expression of Cat K was also evaluated in OLP tissue samples before and after topical tacrolimus treatment. Cat K was expressed in a higher percentage of cells in the epithelial zone, and the staining intensity was stronger in the stroma in OLP compared to controls (P < 0.001). In OLP, Cat K was present mostly in melanocytes and macrophages and sporadically in basal keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and extracellularly. Cat K was found also in some fibroblasts in HC and OLP samples. Coexpression of Cat K and TLRs 4 and 9 was seen in some dendritic cells (presumably melanocytes) and macrophages. In OLP, tacrolimus treatment reduced the expression of Cat K in the epithelium but increased it in the stroma. These results suggest that Cat K is involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. Cat K possibly takes part in the modulation of matrix molecules and cellular receptors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Increased expression of β-glucosidase A in Clostridium thermocellum 27405 significantly increases cellulase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Miranda L.; Armstrong, Lachlan; Leung, Kam Tin; Qin, Wensheng

    2013-01-01

    β-glucosidase A (bglA) in Clostridium thermocellum 27405 was increased by expression from shuttle vector pIBglA in attempts to increase cellulase activity and ethanol titer by lowering the end product inhibition of cellulase. Through a modified electrotransformation protocol C. thermocellum transformant (+MCbglA) harbouring pIBglA was produced. The β-glucosidase activity of +MCbglA was 2.3- and 1.6-fold greater than wild-type (WT) during late log and stationary phases of growth. Similarly, total cellulase activity of +MCbglA was shown to be 1.7-, 2.3- and 1.6-fold greater than WT during, log, late log and stationary phases of growth. However, there was no significant correlation found between increased cellulase activity and increased ethanol titers for +MCbglA compared with the WT. C. thermocellum has industrial potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) to make a more cost effective production of biofuels; however, the hydrolysis rate of the strain is still hindered by end product inhibition. We successfully increased total cellulase activity by increased expression of bglA and thereby increased the productivity of C. thermocellum during the hydrolysis stage in CBP. Our work also lends insights into the complex metabolism of C. thermocellum for future improvement of this strain. PMID:22922214

  14. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Horstick, Eric J; Jordan, Diana C; Bergeron, Sadie A; Tabor, Kathryn M; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A

    2015-04-20

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3' untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models.

  15. Placental matrix metalloproteinase--1 expression is increased in labor.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thanh-Danae; Yun Feng; Placido, Jessica; Reznik, Sandra E

    2008-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are now known to process a broad spectrum of cell surface molecules and to function in several important biological processes. Testing for differences in gene expression in human placental chorionic villi in the absence or presence of labor, using cDNA microarray analysis, revealed that labor was associated with increased expression of MMP-1 gene expression in 5 placentas collected after term normal spontaneous deliveries compared with 5 placentas collected after term nonlaboring cesarean deliveries. Fibronectin 1 and collagen XVII, 2 other proteins involved in the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix, were also found to be upregulated in labor. MMP-1 was further tested in individual samples and found to be consistently overexpressed in labor. While previous microarray analyses have focused on either uterine tissue or the fetal membranes, the data presented here indicate for the first time that placental chorionic villus genes are likely to affect the initiation of parturition through altered processing of cell surface molecules by MMP-1.

  16. Increased expression of PIN1 gene in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (Pin1), encoded by PIN1 gene with locus in chromosome 19p13, is an enzyme that catalytically induces conformational changes in proteins after phosphorylation on serine or threonine residues preceding proline (pSer/Thr-Pro motifs); in this way, it has an influence on protein interactions and intracellular localizations of proteins. The aim of the study were: 1) an assessment of PIN1 gene expression level in benign and malignant thyroid lesions; 2) the evaluation of possible correlations between gene expression and histopathological variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) or tumour size, classified according to TNM classification of primary tumours (in case of PTC only); 3) the estimation of possible relationships between expression of the gene in question and patients' sex or age. Methods Seventy (70) tissue samples were analyzed: 32 cases of PTC, 7 cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), 7 cases of follicular adenoma (FA), and 24 cases of nodular goitre (NG). In real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR), two-step RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) in an ABI PRISM 7500 Sequence Detection System was employed. The PIN1 gene expression level was assessed, calculating the mean relative quantification rate (RQ rate) increase for each sample. Results The level of PIN1 gene expression (compared to that in macroscopically unchanged thyroid tissue) was higher in PTC group than those in FA, MTC and/or NG groups, but the statistical significance was noted for difference between PTC and NG groups only. On the other hand, the differences of RQ rate value between different PTC variants were statistically insignificant. No correlations were found between RQ values and tumour size, as well as between RQ values and patients' sex or age in PTC group. Conclusions The PIN1 gene expression may have - in future - an important meaning in the diagnostics of PTC and in understanding its pathogenesis

  17. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  18. Thrombin Increases Expression of Fibronectin Antigen on the Platelet Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Mark H.; Painter, Richard G.; Forsyth, Jane; Birdwell, Charles; Plow, Edward F.

    1980-02-01

    Fibronectins (fn) are adhesive glycoproteins which bind to collagen and to fibrin and appear to be important in cellular adhesion to other cells or surfaces. Fn-related antigen is present in human platelets, suggesting a possible role for fn in the adhesive properties of platelets. We have studied the localization of fn in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets by immunofluorescence and quantitative binding of radiolabeled antibody. In resting fixed platelets, variable light surface staining for fn was observed. When these cells were made permeable to antibody with detergent, staining for fn was markedly enhanced and was present in a punctate distribution, suggesting intracellular localization. Stimulation with thrombin, which is associated with increased platelet adhesiveness, resulted in increased staining for fn antigen on intact platelets. These stimulated cells did not leak 51Cr nor did they stain for F-actin, thus documenting that the increased fn staining was not due to loss of plasma membrane integrity. The thrombin-induced increase in accessible platelet fn antigen was confirmed by quantitative antibody binding studies in which thrombin-stimulated platelets specifically bound 15 times as much radiolabeled F(ab')2 anti-fn as did resting cells. Thus, thrombin stimulation results in increased expression of fn antigen on the platelet surface. Here it may participate in interactions with fibrin, connective tissue, or other cells.

  19. Increased caveolin-1 expression in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Sophie B; Dea, Doris; Poirier, Judes

    2004-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol plays a central role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caveolin is a cholesterol-binding membrane protein involved in cellular cholesterol transport. We investigated the changes in the protein amount of hippocampal caveolin of autopsy-confirmed AD and aged-matched control subjects. Our results demonstrate that caveolin protein levels in the hippocampus and caveolin mRNA in the frontal cortex are up-regulated in AD by approximately two-fold, compared to control brains. These results suggest a relationship between caveolin-1 expression levels and a dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis at the plasma membrane of brain cells. In support of this hypothesis, a significant increase in caveolin protein levels has also been observed in hippocampal tissue from ApoE-deficient (knockout) and aged wild-type mice; two situations associated with modifications of transbilayer distribution of cholesterol in brain synaptic plasma membranes. These results indicate that caveolin over-expression is linked to alterations of cholesterol distribution in the plasma membrane of brain cells and are consistent with the notion of a deterioration of cholesterol homeostasis in AD.

  20. Zinc pyrithione induces apoptosis and increases expression of Bim.

    PubMed

    Mann, J J; Fraker, P J

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate herein that zinc pyrithione can induce apoptosis at nanomolar concentrations. Zinc pyrithione was a potent inducer of cell death causing greater than 40-60% apoptosis among murine thymocytes, murine splenic lymphocytes and human Ramos B and human Jurkat T cells. Conversely, the addition of a zinc chelator protected thymocytes against zinc pyrithione induced apoptosis indicating these responses were specific for zinc. Zinc-induced apoptosis was dependent on transcription and translation which suggested possible regulation by a proapoptotic protein. Indeed, zinc induced a 1.9 and 3.4 fold increase respectively in expression of the BimEL and BimL isoforms and also stimulated production of the most potent isoform, BimS. This increase in Bim isoform expression was dependent on transcription being blocked by treatment with actinomycin D. Overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL provided substantial protection of Ramos B and Jurkat T cells against zinc-induced apoptosis. Zinc also activated the caspase cascade demonstrated by cleavage of caspase 9. Addition of specific inhibitors for caspase 9 and caspase 3 also blocked zinc-induced apoptosis. The data herein adds to the growing evidence that free or unbound zinc could be harmful to cells of the immune system.

  1. Hippocampal GR expression is increased in elderly depressed females.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Joels, M; Swaab, D F; Lucassen, P J

    2012-01-01

    Hyperactivity of the Hypthalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA)-axis is common in major depression and evident from e.g., a frequently exaggerated response to combined application of dexamethasone and CRH in this disorder. HPA-axis activity and hence the secretion of glucocorticoids (GC), the endpoint of the HPA-axis, depends to some extent on GC binding to glucocorticoid receptors (GR) that are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus. To assess whether differences in hippocampal GR expression occur in association with depression, we investigated GR-alpha protein immunoreactivity (ir) in postmortem hippocampal tissue of an elderly cohort of 9 well-characterized depressed patients and 9 control subjects that were pair-wise matched for age, sex, CSF-pH and postmortem delay. Abundant nuclear GR-ir was observed in neurons of the hippocampal Ammon's horn (CA) and dentate gyrus (DG) subregions. GR-ir in the DG correlated positively with age in the depressed but not the control group. Although no significant differences were found in GR-ir between the depressed and control groups, a significant increase in GR-ir was present in depressed females compared to depressed males. Whether this sex difference in hippocampal GR-ir in depression relates to the increased incidence of depression in females awaits further study. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  2. Weight gain increases human aromatase expression in mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Zhao, Hong; Coon, John S; Ono, Masanori; Pearson, Elizabeth K; Bulun, Serdar E

    2012-05-15

    Adulthood weight gain predicts estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Because local estrogen excess in the breast likely contributes to cancer development, and aromatase is the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, we investigated the role of local aromatase expression in weight gain-associated breast cancer risk in a humanized aromatase (Arom(hum)) mouse model containing the coding region and the 5'-regulatory region of the human aromatase gene. Compared with littermates on normal chow, female Arom(hum) mice on a high fat diet gained more weight, and had a larger mammary gland mass with elevated total human aromatase mRNA levels via promoters I.4 and II associated with increased levels of their regulators TNFα and C/EBPβ. There was no difference in total human aromatase mRNA levels in gonadal white adipose tissue. Our data suggest that diet-induced weight gain preferentially stimulates local aromatase expression in the breast, which may lead to local estrogen excess and breast cancer risk.

  3. Increased expression of nestin in human pterygial epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dan; Wang, Hua; Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    AIM To investigate the distribution of nestin-positive cells in pterygium, as well as the relationship between nestin-positive cells and proliferative cells in the pathogenesis of pterygium. METHODS Nine pterygium specimens and 5 normal conjunctiva specimens were investigated. All explanted specimens were immediately immersed in 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine, and were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin staining, as well as immunostaining to detect nestin. RESULTS Small sub-populations of nestin-expressing cells in both normal and pterygial conjunctiva epithelium were found. These were located at the superficial layer of the epithelium, and were significantly increased (P=0.007) and spread out in the pterygial conjunctiva epithelium, even though these cells were mitotically quiescent. CONCLUSION In pterygium, more nestin-positive cells were present at the superficial layer of the epithelium. With growing scientific evidence that nestin plays an important role in defining various specialized cell types, such as stem cells, cancer cells and angiogenic cells, further investigations on the roles of nestin-expressing cells in pterygium may help to uncover the mechanisms of initiation, development and the prognosis of this disease. PMID:23826515

  4. BACE2 expression increases in human neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Holler, Christopher J; Webb, Robin L; Laux, Ashley L; Beckett, Tina L; Niedowicz, Dana M; Ahmed, Rachel R; Liu, Yinxing; Simmons, Christopher R; Dowling, Amy L S; Spinelli, Angela; Khurgel, Moshe; Estus, Steven; Head, Elizabeth; Hersh, Louis B; Murphy, M Paul

    2012-01-01

    β-Secretase, the rate-limiting enzymatic activity in the production of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, is a major target of Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapeutics. There are two forms of the enzyme: β-site Aβ precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 and BACE2. Although BACE1 increases in late-stage AD, little is known about BACE2. We conducted a detailed examination of BACE2 in patients with preclinical to late-stage AD, including amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and age-matched controls, cases of frontotemporal dementia, and Down's syndrome. BACE2 protein and enzymatic activity increased as early as preclinical AD and were found in neurons and astrocytes. Although the levels of total BACE2 mRNA were unchanged, the mRNA for BACE2 splice form C (missing exon 7) increased in parallel with BACE2 protein and activity. BACE1 and BACE2 were strongly correlated with each other at all levels, suggesting that their regulatory mechanisms may be largely shared. BACE2 was also elevated in frontotemporal dementia but not in Down's syndrome, even in patients with substantial Aβ deposition. Thus, expression of both forms of β-secretase are linked and may play a combined role in human neurologic disease. A better understanding of the normal functions of BACE1 and BACE2, and how these change in different disease states, is essential for the future development of AD therapeutics.

  5. Melatonin attenuates postmyocardial infarction injury via increasing Tom70 expression.

    PubMed

    Pei, Hai-Feng; Hou, Juan-Ni; Wei, Fei-Peng; Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Fan; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Yang, Yi; Tian, Yue; Feng, Juan; Du, Jin; He, Lei; Li, Xiu-Chuan; Gao, Er-He; Li, De; Yang, Yong-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload, exacerbating injury in myocardial infarction (MI). As a receptor for translocases in the outer mitochondrial membrane (Tom) complex, Tom70 has an unknown function in MI, including melatonin-induced protection against MI injury. We delivered specific small interfering RNAs against Tom70 or lentivirus vectors carrying Tom70a sequences into the left ventricles of mice or to cultured neonatal murine ventricular myocytes (NMVMs). At 48 h post-transfection, the left anterior descending coronary arteries of mice were permanently ligated, while the NMVMs underwent continuous hypoxia. At 24 h after ischemia/hypoxia, oxidative stress was assessed by dihydroethidium and lucigenin-enhanced luminescence, mitochondrial damage by transmission electron microscopy and ATP content, and cell apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling and caspase-3 assay. At 4 weeks after ischemia, cardiac function and fibrosis were evaluated in mice by echocardiography and Masson's trichrome staining, respectively. Ischemic/hypoxic insult reduced Tom70 expression in cardiomyocytes. Tom70 downregulation aggravated post-MI injury, with increased mitochondrial fragmentation and ROS overload. In contrast, Tom70 upregulation alleviated post-MI injury, with improved mitochondrial integrity and decreased ROS production. PGC-1α/Tom70 expression in ischemic myocardium was increased with melatonin alone, but not when combined with luzindole. Melatonin attenuated post-MI injury in control but not in Tom70-deficient mice. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed the adverse effects of Tom70 deficiency in mitochondria and cardiomyocytes, but at a much higher concentration than melatonin. Our findings showed that Tom70 is essential for melatonin-induced protection against post-MI injury, by breaking the cycle of mitochondrial impairment and ROS generation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  6. Iron increases HMOX1 and decreases hepatitis C viral expression in HCV-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Wei-Hong; Rossi, Lisa; Shan, Ying; Zheng, Jian-Yu; Lambrecht, Richard W; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effects of iron on oxidative stress, heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) and hepatitis C viral (HCV) expression in human hepatoma cells stably expressing HCV proteins. METHODS: Effects of iron on oxidative stress, HMOX1, and HCV expression were assessed in CON1 cells. Measurements included mRNA by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels by Western blots. RESULTS: Iron, in the form of ferric nitrilotriacetate, increased oxidative stress and up-regulated HMOX1 gene expression. Iron did not affect mRNA or protein levels of Bach1, a repressor of HMOX1. Silencing the up-regulation of HMOX1 nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by Nrf2-siRNA decreased FeNTA-mediated up-regulation of HMOX1 mRNA levels. These iron effects were completely blocked by deferoxamine (DFO). Iron also significantly decreased levels of HCV core mRNA and protein by 80%-90%, nonstructural 5A mRNA by 90% and protein by about 50% in the Con1 full length HCV replicon cells, whereas DFO increased them. CONCLUSION: Excess iron up-regulates HMOX1 and down-regulates HCV gene expression in hepatoma cells. This probably mitigates liver injury caused by combined iron overload and HCV infection. PMID:19777608

  7. Stromal p16 expression is significantly increased in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Nara; Kim, Ji-Ye; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2017-01-01

    p16 is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and is considered a tumor suppressor protein. Alterations in p16 protein expression are associated with tumor development and progression. However, the p16 expression status in the peritumoral stroma has not been investigated in the endometrium. Therefore, we evaluated stromal p16 expression in different types of endometrial lesions using immunohistochemistry. Differences in the p16 expression status according to the degree of malignancy and histological type were analyzed. This study included 62, 26, and 36 cases of benign, precancerous, and malignant endometrial lesions, respectively. Most benign lesions showed negative or weak expression, whereas precancerous lesions showed a variable degree of staining proportion and intensity. Atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (AH/EIN) and serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (SEIC) had significantly higher stromal p16 expression levels than benign lesions. Endometrioid carcinoma (EC), serous carcinoma (SC), and carcinosarcoma showed significantly elevated stromal p16 expression levels compared with benign and precancerous lesions. In addition, there were significant differences in stromal p16 expression between AH/EIN and SEIC and between EC and SC. In contrast, differences in stromal p16 expression among nonpathological endometrium, atrophic endometrium, endometrial polyp, and hyperplasia without atypia were not statistically significant. Our observations suggest that stromal p16 expression is involved in the development and progression of endometrial carcinoma, and raise the possibility that p16 overexpression in the peritumoral stroma is associated with aggressive oncogenic behavior of endometrial SC. PMID:27902476

  8. Stromal p16 expression is significantly increased in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Gun; Koh, Chang Won; Yoon, Nara; Kim, Ji-Ye; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2017-01-17

    p16 is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and is considered a tumor suppressor protein. Alterations in p16 protein expression are associated with tumor development and progression. However, the p16 expression status in the peritumoral stroma has not been investigated in the endometrium. Therefore, we evaluated stromal p16 expression in different types of endometrial lesions using immunohistochemistry. Differences in the p16 expression status according to the degree of malignancy and histological type were analyzed. This study included 62, 26, and 36 cases of benign, precancerous, and malignant endometrial lesions, respectively. Most benign lesions showed negative or weak expression, whereas precancerous lesions showed a variable degree of staining proportion and intensity. Atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (AH/EIN) and serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (SEIC) had significantly higher stromal p16 expression levels than benign lesions. Endometrioid carcinoma (EC), serous carcinoma (SC), and carcinosarcoma showed significantly elevated stromal p16 expression levels compared with benign and precancerous lesions. In addition, there were significant differences in stromal p16 expression between AH/EIN and SEIC and between EC and SC. In contrast, differences in stromal p16 expression among nonpathological endometrium, atrophic endometrium, endometrial polyp, and hyperplasia without atypia were not statistically significant. Our observations suggest that stromal p16 expression is involved in the development and progression of endometrial carcinoma, and raise the possibility that p16 overexpression in the peritumoral stroma is associated with aggressive oncogenic behavior of endometrial SC.

  9. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  10. Increased susceptibility to fundus camera-delivered light-induced retinal degeneration in mice deficient in oxidative stress response proteins.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Aredo, Bogale; Zhong, Xin; Zhao, Cynthia X; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L

    2017-06-01

    Oxidative stress is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of many retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration and retinal dystrophies. Light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) can serve as a model in which to study the response of the retina to stress. Of note, many genetic mutant mice are in a C57BL/6 J background and are thus resistant to the usual LIRD models. We recently developed a new model of fundus camera-delivered light-induced retinal degeneration (FCD-LIRD) which is effective in strains of mice expressing the light-resistant variant of RPE65 (450Met), including C57BL/6 J. In this work we investigated whether FCD-LIRD would be useful as a model in which to test the effect of genetic mutations on the response of the retina to stress. Furthermore, we tested whether oxidative stress plays an important role in the setting of this new FCD-LIRD model. FCD-LIRD was applied to C57BL/6 J mice and to mice simultaneously deficient in three proteins that are important in the response of the retina to oxidative stress (SOD1, DJ-1 and Parkin). Using fundus photography, we found that retinal damage was dramatically increased in the SOD1/DJ-1/Parkin deficient mice compared to C57BL/6 J. Outer retinal OCT volume and RPE cell morphology analysis in ZO-1-stained flat mounts added support to these findings. Gene expression analysis confirmed a strong oxidative stress response after FCD-LIRD, which was differentially altered in the SOD1/DJ1/Parkin deficient mice. We conclude that FCD-LIRD is useful to study the effect of genetic mutations on the response of the retina to light stress in light-resistant strains of mice. Furthermore, oxidative stress seems to be an important component of FCD-LIRD. Finally, we have established protocols to quantify the effect of FCD-LIRD on the retina and RPE which will be useful for future studies. Further dissection of the mechanisms by which the retina responds to light-induced oxidative stress may result in new

  11. ADAM-10 over-expression increases cortical synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen F S; Zheng, Luyu; Fahrenholz, Falk; Cuello, A Claudio

    2008-04-01

    Cortical cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals become upregulated during early stages of the transgenic amyloid pathology. Abundant evidence suggests that sAPP alpha, the product of the non-amyloidogenic alpha-secretase pathway, is neurotrophic both in vitro and when exogenously applied in vivo. The disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM-10 has been shown to have alpha-secretase activity in vivo. To determine whether sAPP alpha has an endogenous biological influence on cortical presynaptic boutons in vivo, we quantified cortical cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic presynaptic bouton densities in either ADAM-10 moderate expressing (ADAM-10 mo) transgenic mice, which moderately overexpress ADAM-10, or age-matched non-transgenic controls. Both early and late ontogenic time points were investigated. ADAM-10 mo transgenic mice display significantly elevated cortical cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic presynaptic bouton densities at the early time point (8 months). Only the cholinergic presynaptic bouton density remains significantly elevated in late-staged ADAM-10 mo transgenic animals (18 months). To confirm that the observed elevations were due to increased levels of endogenous murine sAPP alpha, exogenous human sAPP alpha was infused into the cortex of non-transgenic control animals for 1 week. Exogenous infusion of sAPP alpha led to significant elevations in the cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic cortical presynaptic bouton populations. These results are the first to demonstrate an in vivo influence of ADAM-10 on neurotransmitter-specific cortical synaptic plasticity and further confirm the neurotrophic influence of sAPP alpha on cortical synaptogenesis.

  12. Increased HOX C13 expression in metastatic melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The process of malignant transformation, progression and metastasis of melanoma is not completely understood. Recently, the microarray technology has been used to survey transcriptional differences that might provide insight into the metastatic process, but the validation of changing gene expression during metastatic transition period is poorly investigated. A large body of literature has been produced on the role of the HOX genes network in tumour evolution, suggesting the involvement of HOX genes in several types of human cancers. Deregulated paralogous group 13 HOX genes expression has been detected in melanoma, cervical cancer and odonthogenic tumors. Among these, Hox C13 is also involved in the expression control of the human keratin genes hHa5 and hHa2, and recently it was identified as a member of human DNA replication complexes. Methods In this study, to investigate HOX C13 expression in melanoma progression, we have compared its expression pattern between naevi, primary melanoma and metastasis. In addition HOXC13 profile pattern of expression has been evaluated in melanoma cell lines. Results Our results show the strong and progressive HOX C13 overexpression in metastatic melanoma tissues and cytological samples compared to nevi and primary melanoma tissues and cells. Conclusions The data presentated in the paper suggest a possible role of HOX C13 in metastatic melanoma switch. PMID:22583695

  13. Increased expression of Gem after rat sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhua; Cheng, Xinghai; Zhou, Zhengming; Wu, Hao; Long, Long; Gu, Xingxing; Xu, Guangfei

    2013-02-01

    Gem belongs to the Rad/Gem/Kir subfamily of Ras-related GTPases, whose expression is induced in several cell types upon activation by extracellular stimuli. Two functions of Gem have been demonstrated, including regulation of voltage-gated calcium channel activity and inhibition of Rho kinase-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization, such as stress fiber formation and neurite retraction. Because of the essential relationship between actin reorganization and peripheral nerve regeneration, we investigated the spatiotemporal expression of Gem in a rat sciatic nerve crush (SNC) model. After never injury, we observed that Gem had a significant up-regulation from 1 day, peaked at day 5 and then gradually decreased to the normal level. At its peak expression, Gem expressed mainly in Schwann cells (SCs) and macrophages of the distal sciatic nerve segment, but had few colocalization in axons. In addition, the peak expression of Gem was in parallel with PCNA, and numerous SCs expressing Gem were PCNA positive. Thus, all of our findings suggested that Gem may be involved in the pathophysiology of sciatic nerve after SNC.

  14. Increasing estrus expression in the lactating dairy cow.

    PubMed

    Sauls, J A; Voelz, B E; Hill, S L; Mendonça, L G D; Stevenson, J S

    2017-01-01

    Using an activity monitoring system (AMS) equipped with an accelerometer, 2 experiments were conducted to test the hypotheses that (1) enhancing progesterone before inducing luteolysis or (2) exposing cows to estradiol cypionate (ECP) or testosterone propionate (TP) after luteolysis would increase occurrence and intensity of estrus. Our goal was to determine if more cows could be detected in estrus by an AMS compared with other estrus-detection aids. In experiment 1, cows (n=154) were fitted with both an AMS collar and a pressure-sensitive, rump-mounted device (HeatWatch; HW) and assigned to 3 treatments: (1) no CL + progesterone insert (CIDR) for 5d, (2) CL only, or (3) CL + 2 CIDR inserts for 5d to achieve a range in concentrations of progesterone. Prostaglandin F2α was administered to all cows upon CIDR insert removal or its equivalent. Progesterone concentration up to 72h posttreatment was greatest in CL + 2 CIDR, followed by CL only, and no CL + CIDR cows. Estrus occurred 14 to 28h earlier in no CL + CIDR compared with CL-bearing cows. Estrus intensity was greater for CL + 2 CIDR than for CL-only cows. The AMS and HW detected 70 and 59% of cows defined to be in estrus, respectively. In experiment 2, cows (n=203) were equipped with both an AMS and a friction-activated, rump-mounted patch (Estrotect patch) and assigned to receive 1mg of ECP, 2mg of TP, or control 24h after PGF2α. Concentrations of estradiol 24 and 48h after treatment were greater in ECP cows compared with controls. Estrus expression detected by AMS or patches in cows defined to be in estrus tended to be greater or was greater for ECP compared with controls, respectively. Compared with controls and in response to TP or ECP, estrus occurred 8 to 18h earlier and was of greater intensity for ECP cows, respectively. The AMS and patches determined 73 and 76% of cows defined to be in estrus, respectively. Of cows exposed to the AMS, HW, or patches, 70, 61, and 75%, respectively, were detected in

  15. Increased FNDC5/Irisin expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaggini, Melania; Cabiati, Manuela; Del Turco, Serena; Navarra, Teresa; De Simone, Paolo; Filipponi, Franco; Del Ry, Silvia; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Basta, Giuseppina

    2017-02-01

    The fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5)/Irisin, a novel energy-regulating hormone, is associated with lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. It is produced in low amounts by normal hepatic tissue, while in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in which aberrant de novo lipogenesis (DNL) occurs, the hepatic expression of FNDC5/Irisin is still unknown. The gene expression of FNDC5/Irisin, associated to key regulators of DNL, inflammation and cancer progression was evaluated in liver tissue of 18 patients with HCC undergoing liver transplantation and of 18 deceased donors. Hepatic mRNA expression of FNDC5/Irisin and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD-1), main enzymatic regulator of DNL, were significantly higher in HCC patients than in donors (p<0.0001 and p=0.015, respectively). The hepatic mRNA expression of the neurogenic locus notch homolog protein 1 (NOTCH1) tended to be higher in HCC patients than in donors (p=0.06). Only in HCC patients, hepatic FNDC5/Irisin strongly correlated with the transcription factor sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1, SCD-1, NOTCH1, tumor necrosis factor-α and Interleukin-6 mRNA expression. Further, in HCC patients, FNDC5/Irisin mRNA tended to correlate to plasma lipid profile namely triglycerides, palmitic/linoleic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid ratios. In conclusion, HCC-liver tissue over-expressed FNDC5/Irisin in association with gene expression of mediators involved in lipogenesis, inflammation and cancer, suggesting a possible protective role of the hormone from the liver damage.

  16. Agouti expression in human adipose tissue: functional consequences and increased expression in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Janderová, Lenka; Nguyen, Taylor; Murrell, Angela; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Mynatt, Randall L

    2003-12-01

    It is well recognized that the agouti/melanocortin system is an important regulator of body weight homeostasis. Given that agouti is expressed in human adipose tissue and that the ectopic expression of agouti in adipose tissue results in moderately obese mice, the link between agouti expression in human adipose tissue and obesity/type 2 diabetes was investigated. Although there was no apparent relationship between agouti mRNA levels and BMI, agouti mRNA levels were significantly elevated in subjects with type 2 diabetes. The regulation of agouti in cultured human adipocytes revealed that insulin did not regulate agouti mRNA, whereas dexamethasone treatment potently increased the levels of agouti mRNA. Experiments with cultured human preadipocytes and with cells obtained from transgenic mice that overexpress agouti demonstrated that melanocortin receptor (MCR) signaling in adipose tissue can regulate both preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Taken together, these results reveal that agouti can regulate adipogenesis at several levels and suggest that there are functional consequences of elevated agouti levels in human adipose tissue. The influence of MCR signaling on adipogenesis combined with the well-established role of MCR signaling in the hypothalamus suggest that adipogenesis is coordinately regulated with food intake and energy expenditure.

  17. Regret Expression and Social Learning Increases Delay to Sexual Gratification

    PubMed Central

    Quisenberry, Amanda J.; Eddy, Celia R.; Patterson, David L.; Franck, Christopher T.; Bickel, Warren K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Modification and prevention of risky sexual behavior is important to individuals’ health and public health policy. This study employed a novel sexual discounting task to elucidate the effects of social learning and regret expression on delay to sexual gratification in a behavioral task. Methods Amazon Mechanical Turk Workers were assigned to hear one of three scenarios about a friend who engages in similar sexual behavior. The scenarios included a positive health consequence, a negative health consequence or a negative health consequence with the expression of regret. After reading one scenario, participants were asked to select from 60 images, those with whom they would have casual sex. Of the selected images, participants chose one image each for the person they most and least want to have sex with and person most and least likely to have a sexually transmitted infection. They then answered questions about engaging in unprotected sex now or waiting some delay for condom-protected sex in each partner condition. Results Results indicate that the negative health outcome scenario with regret expression resulted in delayed sexual gratification in the most attractive and least STI partner conditions, whereas in the least attractive and most STI partner conditions the negative health outcome with and without regret resulted in delayed sexual gratification. Conclusions Results suggest that the sexual discounting task is a relevant laboratory measure and the framing of information to include regret expression may be relevant for prevention of risky sexual behavior. PMID:26280349

  18. Increased Ubqln2 expression causes neuron death in transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Wu, Qinxue; Zhou, Hongxia; Huang, Cao; Xia, Xu-Gang

    2016-10-01

    Pathogenic mutation of ubiquilin 2 (UBQLN2) causes neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. How UBQLN2 mutations cause the diseases is not clear. While over-expression of UBQLN2 with pathogenic mutation causes neuron death in rodent models, deletion of the Ubqln2 in rats has no effect on neuronal function. Previous findings in animal models suggest that UBQLN2 mutations cause the diseases mainly through a gain rather than a loss of functions. To examine whether the toxic gain in UBQLN2 mutation is related to the enhancement of UBQLN2 functions, we created new transgenic rats over-expressing wild-type human UBQLN2. Considering that human UBQLN2 may not function properly in the rat genome, we also created transgenic rats over-expressing rat's own Ubqln2. When over-expressed in rats, both human and rat wild-type Ubqln2 caused neuronal death and spatial learning deficits, the pathologies that were indistinguishable from those observed in mutant UBQLN2 transgenic rats. Over-expressed wild-type UBQLN2 formed protein inclusions attracting the autophagy substrate sequestosome-1 and the proteasome component 26S proteasome regulatory subunit 7. These findings suggest that excess UBQLN2 is toxic rather than protective to neurons and that the enhancement of UBQLN2 functions is involved in UBQLN2 pathogenesis. Pathogenic mutation in ubiquilin 2 (UBQLN2) causes neurodegeneration in ALS and FTLD. Studies in rodent models suggest a gain of toxic function in mutant UBQLN2. We created new transgenic rats as a relevant model and examined whether enhancing wild-type UBQLN2 expression is implicated in the pathogenesis of mutant UBQLN2. We observed that over-expression of human or rat wild-type Ubqln2 caused protein aggregation and neuronal death in transgenic rats. Our findings suggest that excess UBQLN2 is toxic rather than protective to neurons and that uncontrolled enhancement of UBQLN2 function is involved in UBQLN2 pathogenesis

  19. Increased hepcidin in transferrin-treated thalassemic mice correlates with increased liver BMP2 expression and decreased hepatocyte ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiyong; Choesang, Tenzin; Li, Huihui; Sun, Shuming; Pham, Petra; Bao, Weili; Feola, Maria; Westerman, Mark; Li, Guiyuan; Follenzi, Antonia; Blanc, Lionel; Rivella, Stefano; Fleming, Robert E; Ginzburg, Yelena Z

    2016-03-01

    Iron overload results in significant morbidity and mortality in β-thalassemic patients. Insufficient hepcidin is implicated in parenchymal iron overload in β-thalassemia and approaches to increase hepcidin have therapeutic potential. We have previously shown that exogenous apo-transferrin markedly ameliorates ineffective erythropoiesis and increases hepcidin expression in Hbb(th1/th1) (thalassemic) mice. We utilize in vivo and in vitro systems to investigate effects of exogenous apo-transferrin on Smad and ERK1/2 signaling, pathways that participate in hepcidin regulation. Our results demonstrate that apo-transferrin increases hepcidin expression in vivo despite decreased circulating and parenchymal iron concentrations and unchanged liver Bmp6 mRNA expression in thalassemic mice. Hepatocytes from apo-transferrin-treated mice demonstrate decreased ERK1/2 pathway and increased serum BMP2 concentration and hepatocyte BMP2 expression. Furthermore, hepatocyte ERK1/2 phosphorylation is enhanced by neutralizing anti-BMP2/4 antibodies and suppressed in vitro in a dose-dependent manner by BMP2, resulting in converse effects on hepcidin expression, and hepatocytes treated with MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in combination with BMP2 exhibit an additive increase in hepcidin expression. Lastly, bone marrow erythroferrone expression is normalized in apo-transferrin treated thalassemic mice but increased in apo-transferrin injected wild-type mice. These findings suggest that increased hepcidin expression after exogenous apo-transferrin is in part independent of erythroferrone and support a model in which apo-transferrin treatment in thalassemic mice increases BMP2 expression in the liver and other organs, decreases hepatocellular ERK1/2 activation, and increases nuclear Smad to increase hepcidin expression in hepatocytes.

  20. Morphine-Induced Constipation Develops With Increased Aquaporin-3 Expression in the Colon via Increased Serotonin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Kon, Risako; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Hayakawa, Akio; Haga, Yusuke; Fueki, Aika; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Tajima, Masataka; Ochiai, Wataru; Machida, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a water channel that is predominantly expressed in the colon, where it plays a critical role in the regulation of fecal water content. This study investigated the role of AQP3 in the colon in morphine-induced constipation. AQP3 expression levels in the colon were analyzed after oral morphine administration to rats. The degree of constipation was analyzed after the combined administration of HgCl(2) (AQP3 inhibitor) or fluoxetine (5-HT reuptake transporter [SERT] inhibitor) and morphine. The mechanism by which morphine increased AQP3 expression was examined in HT-29 cells. AQP3 expression levels in rat colon were increased during morphine-induced constipation. The combination of HgCl(2) and morphine improved morphine-induced constipation. Treatment with morphine in HT-29 cells did not change AQP3 expression. However, 5-HT treatment significantly increased the AQP3 expression level and the nuclear translocation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) 1 h after treatment. Pretreatment with fluoxetine significantly suppressed these increases. Fluoxetine pretreatment suppressed the development of morphine-induced constipation and the associated increase in AQP3 expression in the colon. The results suggest that morphine increases the AQP3 expression level in the colon, which promotes water absorption from the luminal side to the vascular side and causes constipation. This study also showed that morphine-induced 5-HT secreted from the colon was taken into cells by SERT and activated PPARγ, which subsequently increased AQP3 expression levels.

  1. Increased hydrophobicity in Malassezia species correlates with increased proinflammatory cytokine expression in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-11-01

    Malassezia cells stimulate cytokine production by keratinocytes, although this ability differs among Malassezia species for unknown reasons. The aim of this study was to clarify the factors determining the ability to induce cytokine production by human keratinocytes in response to Malassezia species. M. furfur NBRC 0656, M. sympodialis CBS 7222, M. dermatis JCM 11348, M. globosa CBS 7966, M. restricta CBS 7877, and three strains each of M. globosa, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis, and M. furfur maintained under various culture conditions were used. Normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) (1 × 10(5) cells) and the Malassezia species (1 × 10(6) cells) were co-cultured, and IL-1α, IL-6, and IL-8 mRNA levels were determined. Moreover, the hydrophobicity and β-1,3-glucan expression at the surface of Malassezia cells were analyzed. The ability of Malassezia cells to trigger the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines in NHEKs differed with the species and conditions and was dependent upon the hydrophobicity of Malassezia cells not β-1,3-glucan expression.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of H9 cells induces increased glucose transporter expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sorbara, L R; Maldarelli, F; Chamoun, G; Schilling, B; Chokekijcahi, S; Staudt, L; Mitsuya, H; Simpson, I A; Zeichner, S L

    1996-01-01

    A clone obtained from a differential display screen for cellular genes with altered expression during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection matched the sequence for the human GLUT3 facilitative glucose transporter, a high-velocity-high-affinity facilitative transporter commonly expressed in neurons of the central nervous system. Northern (RNA) analysis showed that GLUT3 expression increased during infection. Flow cytometry showed that GLUT3 protein expression increased specifically in the HIV-infected cells; this increase correlated with increased 2-deoxyglucose transport in the HIV-infected culture. HIV infection therefore leads to increased expression of a glucose transporter normally expressed at high levels in other cell types and a corresponding increase in glucose transport activity. If HIV infection places increased metabolic demands on the host cell, changes in the expression of a cellular gene that plays an important role in cellular metabolism might provide a more favorable environment for viral replication. PMID:8794382

  3. Increased catalase expression improves muscle function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T

    2011-02-01

    It has been well established that oxidative stress contributes to pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). I hypothesized that overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme catalase would improve muscle function in the mdx mouse, the mouse model of DMD. To test this hypothesis, neonatal mdx mice were injected with a recombinant adeno-associated virus driving the catalase transgene. Animals were killed 4 or 6 weeks or 6 months following injection. Muscle function was generally improved by catalase overexpression. Four weeks following injection, extensor digitorum longus specific tension was improved twofold, while soleus was similar between groups. Resistance to contraction-induced injury was similar between groups; however, resistance to fatigue was increased 25% in catalase-treated soleus compared with control muscle. Six weeks following injection, extensor digitorum longus specific tension was increased 15%, while soleus specific tension was similar between treated and untreated limbs. Catalase overexpression reduced contraction-induced injury by 30-45% and fatigue by 20% compared with control limbs. Six months following injection, diaphragm specific tension was similar between groups, but resistance to contraction-induced injury was improved by 35% and fatigue by 25%. Taken together, these data indicate that catalase can improve a subset of parameters of muscle function in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  4. Hyperoxia increases hepatic arginase expression and ornithine production in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Malleske, Daniel T.; Rogers, Lynette K.; Velluci, Sean M.; Young, Tamara L.; Park, Min S.; Long, Donald W.; Welty, Stephen E.; Smith, Charles V.; Nelin, Leif D. . E-mail: NelinL@pediatrics.ohio-state.edu

    2006-08-15

    Hyperoxic exposure affects the levels and activities of some hepatic proteins. We tested the hypothesis that hyperoxic exposure would result in greater hepatic .NO concentrations. C3H/HeN mice were exposed to >95% O{sub 2} for 72 or 96 h and compared to room air-breathing controls. In contrast to our working hypothesis, exposure to >95% O{sub 2} for 96 h decreased hepatic nitrite/nitrate NO {sub X} concentrations (10.9 {+-} 2.2 nmol/g liver versus 19.3 {+-} 2.4 nmol/g liver in room air, P < 0.05). The hepatic levels of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) proteins were not different among the groups. The arginases, which convert L-arginine to urea and L-ornithine, may affect hepatic NOS activities by decreasing L-arginine bioavailability. Hepatic ornithine concentrations were greater in hyperoxic animals than in controls (318 {+-} 18 nmol/g liver in room air, and 539 {+-} 64, and 475 {+-} 40 at 72 and 96 h of hyperoxia, respectively, P < 0.01). Hepatic arginase I protein levels were greater in hyperoxic animals than in controls. Hepatic carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) protein levels and activities were not different among groups. These results indicate that increases in hepatic levels of arginase I in mice exposed to hyperoxia may diminish .NO production, as reflected by lower liver levels of NO {sub X}. The resultant greater hepatic ornithine concentrations may represent a mechanism to facilitate tissue repair, by favoring the production of polyamines and/or proline.

  5. Prostaglandin E2 increases fibroblast gene-specific and global DNA methylation via increased DNA methyltransferase expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven K.; Scruggs, Anne M.; Donaghy, Jake; McEachin, Richard C.; Fisher, Aaron S.; Richardson, Bruce C.; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Although alterations in DNA methylation patterns have been associated with specific diseases and environmental exposures, the mediators and signaling pathways that direct these changes remain understudied. The bioactive lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to exert a myriad of effects on cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we report that PGE2 also signals to increase global DNA methylation and DNA methylation machinery in fibroblasts. HumanMethylation27 BeadChip array analysis of primary fetal (IMR-90) and adult lung fibroblasts identified multiple genes that were hypermethylated in response to PGE2. PGE2, compared with nontreated controls, increased expression and activity (EC50∼107 M) of one specific isoform of DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3a. Silencing of DNMT3a negated the ability of PGE2 to increase DNMT activity. The increase in DNMT3a expression was mediated by PGE2 signaling via its E prostanoid 2 receptor and the second messenger cAMP. PGE2, compared with the untreated control, increased the expression and activity of Sp1 and Sp3 (EC50∼3×107 M), transcription factors known to increase DNMT3a expression, and inhibition of these transcription factors abrogated the PGE2 increase of DNMT3a expression. These findings were specific to fibroblasts, as PGE2 decreased DNMT1 and DNMT3a expression in RAW macrophages. Taken together, these findings establish that DNA methylation is regulated by a ubiquitous bioactive endogenous mediator. Given that PGE2 biosynthesis is modulated by environmental toxins, various disease states, and commonly used pharmacological agents, these findings uncover a novel mechanism by which alterations in DNA methylation patterns may arise in association with disease and certain environmental exposures.—Huang, S. K., Scruggs, A. M., Donaghy, J., McEachin, R. C., Fisher, A. S., Richardson, B. C., Peters-Golden, M. Prostaglandin E2 increases fibroblast gene-specific and global DNA methylation via

  6. Exercise increases utrophin protein expression in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bradley S; Lowe, Dawn A; Kostek, Matthew C

    2014-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene resulting in chronic muscle damage, muscle wasting, and premature death. Utrophin is a dystrophin protein homologue that increases dystrophic muscle function and reduces pathology. Currently, no treatments that increase utrophin protein expression exist. However, exercise increases utrophin mRNA expression in healthy humans. Therefore, the purpose was to determine whether exercise increases utrophin protein expression in dystrophic muscle. Utrophin protein was measured in the quadriceps and soleus muscles of mdx mice after 12 weeks of voluntary wheel running exercise or sedentary controls. Muscle pathology was measured in the quadriceps. Exercise increased utrophin protein expression 334 ± 63% in the quadriceps relative to sedentary controls. Exercise increased central nuclei 4 ± 1% but not other measures of pathology. Exercise may be an intervention that increases utrophin expression in patients with DMD. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exercise and adrenaline increase PGC-1α mRNA expression in rat adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Lindsey N; Bomhof, Marc R; Capozzi, Lauren C; Basaraba, Susan A U; Wright, David C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to explore the effects of exercise and adrenaline on the mRNA expression of PGC-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, in rat abdominal adipose tissue. We hypothesized that (1) exercise training would increase PGC-1α mRNA expression in association with increases in mitochondrial marker enzymes, (2) adrenaline would increase PGC-1α mRNA expression and (3) the effect of exercise on PGC-1α mRNA expression in white adipose tissue would be attenuated by a β-blocker. Two hours of daily swim training for 4 weeks led to increases in mitochondrial marker proteins and PGC-1α mRNA expression in epididymal and retroperitoneal fat depots. Additionally, a single 2 h bout of exercise led to increases in PGC-1α mRNA expression immediately following exercise cessation. Adrenaline treatment of adipose tissue organ cultures led to dose-dependent increases in PGC-1α mRNA expression. A supra-physiological concentration of adrenaline increased PGC-1α mRNA expression in epididymal but not retroperitoneal adipose tissue. β-Blockade attenuated the effects of an acute bout of exercise on PGC-1α mRNA expression in epididymal but not retroperitoneal fat pads. In summary, this is the first investigation to demonstrate that exercise training, an acute bout of exercise and adrenaline all increase PGC-1α mRNA expression in rat white adipose tissue. Furthermore it would appear that increases in circulating catecholamine levels may be one potential mechanism mediating exercise induced increases in PGC-1α mRNA expression in rat abdominal adipose tissue. PMID:19221126

  8. A cautionary note on cosmetics containing ingredients that increase aquaporin-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Verkman, A S

    2008-10-01

    Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a membrane transport protein that facilitates water and glycerol transport across cell plasma membranes in the basal layer of keratinocytes in normal skin. Motivated by a relation between AQP3 expression and skin water content, several companies have marketed cosmetics containing ingredients that increase AQP3 expression. However, caution seems warranted in targeting AQP3 to increase skin moisturization based on a recently discovered association in mice between epidermal AQP3 expression and skin tumor formation.

  9. Proinflammatory Cytokines Increase Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Maloney, James P; Gao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial permeability mediator that is highly expressed in lung epithelium. In nonlung cells proinflammatory cytokines have been shown to increase VEGF expression, but their effects on lung epithelium remain unclear. We hypothesized that increases in alveolar epithelial cell VEGF RNA and protein expression occur after exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. We tested this using human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) stimulated with 5 proinflammatory cytokines. VEGF RNA expression was increased 1.4-2.7-fold in response to IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, or TGF-β over 6 hours, with TGF-β having the largest response. TNF-α increased VEGF RNA as early as 1 hour. A mix of IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8 had effects similar to IL-1. TNF-α increased protein expression as early as 4 hours and had a sustained effect at 16 hours, whereas IL-1 did not increase protein expression. Only VEGF165 was present in cultured A549 cells, yet other isoforms were seen in human lung tissue. Increased expression of VEGF in alveolar epithelial cells occurs in response to proinflammatory cytokines. Increased VEGF expression likely contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases and to the angiogenic phenotype of lung cancer, a disease typically preceded by chronic inflammation.

  10. Retrograde axonal transport of LIF is increased by peripheral nerve injury: correlation with increased LIF expression in distal nerve.

    PubMed

    Curtis, R; Scherer, S S; Somogyi, R; Adryan, K M; Ip, N Y; Zhu, Y; Lindsay, R M; DiStefano, P S

    1994-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine that affects the survival and differentiation of certain neuronal populations in vitro. To identify LIF-responsive neurons in the adult rat, we have demonstrated retrograde axonal transport of 125I-LIF to sensory and motor neurons. The accumulation of 125I-LIF by both cell types was significantly increased by prior sciatic nerve crush. Retrograde transport of 125I-LIF was inhibited by excess unlabeled LIF but not by related cytokines, indicating a specific receptor-mediated mechanism. Northern blot analysis revealed LIF expression in peripheral nerve that was increased in distal segments after axotomy. The correlation between LIF expression and increased retrograde transport following injury suggests that LIF plays a role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  11. Suppression of lipin-1 expression increases monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Hiranaka, Natsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yui, Tomoo; Akanuma, Masayasu; Oka, Kazuya; Kanazawa, Kaoru; Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 affects lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose lipin-1 expression is reduced in obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 depletion using siRNA in 3T3-L1 adipocytes increased MCP-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 is involved in adipose inflammation. -- Abstract: Lipin-1 plays a crucial role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation in adipocytes. Expression of adipose lipin-1 is reduced in obesity, and metabolic syndrome. However, the significance of this reduction remains unclear. This study investigated if and how reduced lipin-1 expression affected metabolism. We assessed mRNA expression levels of various genes related to adipocyte metabolism in lipin-1-depleted 3T3-L1 adipocytes by introducing its specific small interfering RNA. In lipin-1-depleted adipocytes, mRNA and protein expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly increased, although the other genes tested were not altered. The conditioned media from the cells promoted monocyte chemotaxis. The increase in MCP-1 expression was prevented by treatment with quinazoline or salicylate, inhibitors of nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation. Because MCP-1 is related to adipose inflammation and systemic insulin resistance, these results suggest that a reduction in adipose lipin-1 in obesity may exacerbate adipose inflammation and metabolism.

  12. Increased miRNA-22 expression sensitizes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma to irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-chun; Zhang, Zhu-Bo; Wang, Yue-Ying; Wu, Hong-Ying; Li, De-Guan; Meng, Ai-Min; Fan, Fei-Yue

    2013-01-01

    miRNA-22 was previously reported to be a tumor suppressor. The aim of this study was to explore the expression and function of miRNA-22 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Expression of miRNA-22 in 100 ESCC tissues was examined by q-PCR. The correlation between miRNA-22 level and clinicopathological features was analyzed using SPSS16.0 statistical software. Moreover, the effect of miRNA-22 expression on radiosensitivity of ESCC cells was examined. miRNA-22 expression decreased in ESCC tissues, and statistical analyses showed that the expression of miRNA-22 was associated with the stage of clinical classification. No correlation was found between miRNA-22 expression and the overall survival of ESCC patients. However, significant positive correlation was found between miRNA-22 expression and the survival of patients who received radiotherapy (P < 0.05). Increased expression of miRNA-22 sensitized ESCC cells to γ-ray radiation and promoted the apoptosis of ESCC cells induced by γ-ray radiation. Increased expression level of miRNA-22 had effects on Rad51 expression after irradiation. These results demonstrate for the first time that decreased miRNA-22 expression correlates with increased radiotherapy resistance of ESCC, and that this effect is mediated, at least in part, by the Rad51 pathway. PMID:23188185

  13. Increased adipose tissue expression of Grb14 in several models of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Cariou, Bertrand; Capitaine, Nadège; Le Marcis, Véronique; Vega, Nathalie; Béréziat, Véronique; Kergoat, Micheline; Laville, Martine; Girard, Jean; Vidal, Hubert; Burnol, Anne-Françoise

    2004-06-01

    Grb14 is an effector of insulin signaling, which directly inhibits insulin receptor catalytic activity in vitro. Here, we investigated whether the expression of Grb14 and its binding partner ZIP (PKC zeta interacting protein) is regulated during insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rodents and humans. Grb14 expression was increased in adipose tissue of both ob/ob mice and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, whereas there was no difference in liver. An increase was also observed in subcutaneous adipose tissue of type 2 diabetic subjects when compared with controls. ZIP expression was increased in adipose tissue of ob/ob mice and type 2 diabetic patients, but it did not vary in GK rats. Hormonal regulation of Grb14 and ZIP expression was then investigated in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. In this model, insulin stimulated Grb14 expression, while TNF-alpha increased ZIP expression. Moreover, the insulin-sensitizing drugs thiazolidinediones (TZDs) decreased Grb14 expression in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. Finally, we investigated the dynamic regulation of Grb14 expression in ob/ob mice in several conditions improving their insulin sensitivity. Prolonged fasting and treatment with metformin significantly decreased Grb14 expression in peri-epidydimal adipose tissue, while there was only a trend to a diminution after TZD treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the regulation of Grb14 expression in adipose tissue may play a physiological role in insulin sensitivity.

  14. Decreased expression of APAF-1 and increased expression of cathepsin B in invasive pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Codrici, Elena; Calenic, Bogdan; Popescu, Ionela Daniela; Mihai, Simona; Necula, Laura; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (APAF-1) and cathepsin B are important functional proteins in apoptosis; the former is involved in the intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway, while the latter is associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Changes in the expression of apoptosome-related proteins could be useful indicators of tumor development since a priori defects in the mitochondrial pathway might facilitate the inception and progression of human neoplasms. Our aim was to evaluate the profiles of APAF-1 and cathepsin B in relation with other molecules involved in apoptosis/proliferation and to correlate them with the aggressive behavior of invasive pituitary adenomas. Materials and methods APAF-1 and cathepsin B were assessed in tissue samples from 30 patients with pituitary adenomas, of which 16 were functional adenomas and 22 were invasive adenomas. Results A positive relationship between high proliferation and invasiveness was observed in invasive pituitary adenomas when compared to their noninvasive counterparts (Ki-67 labeling index – 4.72% versus 1.75%). Decreased expression of APAF-1 was recorded in most of the invasive adenomas with a high proliferation index, while the cathepsin B level was elevated in this group. We have noticed a negative correlation between the low level of APAF-1 and invasiveness (63.63%; P<0.01); at the same time, a positive correlation between cathepsin B expression and invasiveness (59.09%; P<0.01) was found. In all, 81.25% out of the total APAF-1-positive samples were cathepsin B negative (P<0.01); 76.92% out of the total cathepsin B-positive samples were APAF-1-negative (P<0.01). These results were reinforced by an apoptosis protein array examination, which showed inhibition of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in an invasive pituitary adenoma. Conclusion A bidirectional–inverted relationship between APAF-1 and cathepsin B expressions was noticed. One might hypothesize that shifting the balance between

  15. Using probabilistic estimation of expression residuals (PEER) to obtain increased power and interpretability of gene expression analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stegle, Oliver; Parts, Leopold; Piipari, Matias; Winn, John; Durbin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We present PEER (probabilistic estimation of expression residuals), a software package implementing statistical models that improve the sensitivity and interpretability of genetic associations in population-scale expression data. This approach builds on factor analysis methods that infer broad variance components in the measurements. PEER takes as input transcript profiles and covariates from a set of individuals, and then outputs hidden factors that explain much of the expression variability. Optionally, these factors can be interpreted as pathway or transcription factor activations by providing prior information about which genes are involved in the pathway or targeted by the factor. The inferred factors are used in genetic association analyses. First, they are treated as additional covariates, and are included in the model to increase detection power for mapping expression traits. Second, they are analyzed as phenotypes themselves to understand the causes of global expression variability. PEER extends previous related surrogate variable models and can be implemented within hours on a desktop computer. PMID:22343431

  16. [Four-week simulated weightlessness increases the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Huai-Zhang; Xu, Peng-Tao; Chang, Hui; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-04-25

    One of the major circulatory changes that occur in human during space flight and simulated weightlessness is a cerebral redistribution of body fluids, which is accompanied by an increase of blood volume in the upper body. Therefore, atrial myocardium should increase the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), but the researches lack common conclusion until now. The present study was to investigate the expression level of ANP in simulated weightlessness rats, and to confirm the changes of ANP by observing the associated proteins of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate weightlessness. Western blots were carried out to examine the expression levels of ANP and SNARE proteins in atrial and left ventricular myocardium. The results showed that ANP expression in atrial myocardium showed an increase in 4-week tail-suspended rats (SUS) compared with that in the synchronous control rats (CON). We only detected a trace amount of ANP in the left ventricular myocardium of the CON, but found an enhanced expression of ANP in left ventricular myocardium of the SUS. Expression of VAMP-1/2 (vesicle associated SNARE) increased significantly in both atrial and left ventricular myocardium in the SUS compared with that in the CON. There was no difference of the expression of syntaxin-4 (target compartment associated SNARE) between the CON and SUS, but the expression of SNAP-23 showed an increase in atrial myocardium of the SUS compared with that in the CON. Synip and Munc-18c as regulators of SNAREs did not show significant difference between the CON and SUS. These results suggest that the expression of ANP shows an increase in atrial and left ventricular myocardium of 4-week tail-suspended rats. Enhanced expression of VAMP-1/2 associated with ANP vesicles confirms the increased expression of ANP in atrial and left ventricular myocardium.

  17. Reduced methylation of the thromboxane synthase gene is correlated with its increased vascular expression in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Ahmad A; Strauss, Jerome F; Walsh, Scott W

    2012-06-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by increased thromboxane and decreased prostacyclin levels, which predate symptoms, and can explain some of the clinical manifestations of preeclampsia, including hypertension and thrombosis. In this study, we examined DNA methylation of the promoter region of the thromboxane synthase gene (TBXAS1) and the expression of thromboxane synthase in systemic blood vessels of normal pregnant and preeclamptic women. Thromboxane synthase is responsible for the synthesis of thromboxane A(2), a potent vasoconstrictor and activator of platelets. We also examined the effect of experimentally induced DNA hypomethylation on the expression of thromboxane synthase in a neutrophil-like cell line (HL-60 cells) and in cultured vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. We found that DNA methylation of the TBXAS1 promoter was decreased and thromboxane synthase expression was increased in omental arteries of preeclamptic women as compared with normal pregnant women. Increased thromboxane synthase expression was observed in vascular smooth muscles cells, endothelial cells, and infiltrating neutrophils. Experimentally induced DNA hypomethylation only increased expression of thromboxane synthase in the neutrophil-like cell line, whereas tumor necrosis factor-α, a neutrophil product, increased its expression in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. Our study suggests that epigenetic mechanisms and release of tumor necrosis factor-α by infiltrating neutrophils could contribute to the increased expression of thromboxane synthase in maternal systemic blood vessels, contributing to the hypertension and coagulation abnormalities associated with preeclampsia.

  18. HOXB4 Increases Runx1 Expression to Promote the de novo Formation of Multipotent Hematopoietic Cells.

    PubMed

    Teichweyde, Nadine; Horn, Peter A; Klump, Hannes

    2017-06-01

    The de novo generation of patient-specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has become a promising approach for cell replacement therapies in the future. However, efficient differentiation protocols for producing fully functional human hematopoietic stem cells are still missing. In the mouse model, ectopic expression of the human homeotic selector protein HOXB4 has been shown to enforce the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in differentiating pluripotent stem cell cultures. However, the mechanism how HOXB4 mediates the formation of HSCs capable of long-term, multilineage repopulation after transplantation is not well understood yet. Using a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell-based differentiation model, we asked whether retrovirally expressed HOXB4 induces the expression of Runx1/AML1, a gene whose expression is absolutely necessary for the formation of definitive, adult HSCs during embryonic development. During ES cell differentiation, basal expression of Runx1 was observed in all cultures, irrespective of ectopic HOXB4 expression. However, only in those cultures ectopically expressing HOXB4, substantial amounts of hematopoietic progenitors were generated which exclusively displayed increased Runx1 expression. Our results strongly suggest that HOXB4 does not induce basal Runx1 expression but, instead, mediates an increase of Runx1 expression which appears to be a prerequisite for the formation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

  19. Calpain activity and expression are increased in splenic inflammatory cells associated with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Shields, D C; Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    1999-09-01

    Since calcium-activated neutral proteinase (calpain) activity and expression are significantly increased in activated glial/inflammatory cells in the central nervous system of animals with autoimmune demyelinating diseases, this enzyme may also play a role in peripheral organ systems in these diseases. In this study, the activity and expression of calpain and the endogenous inhibitor, calpastatin, were evaluated at transcriptional and translational levels in spleens of Lewis rats with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Calpain activity and translational expression were increased by 475.5% and 44.3% respectively, on day 4 post-induction in adjuvant controls and animals with EAE. These levels remained elevated compared to normal controls on days 8 and 12. Calpastatin translational expression was similarly increased at these time points although transcriptional expression was not significantly altered at any time following induction of EAE. Likewise, transcriptional expression of mu-calpain was unchanged following induction, while small increases in m-calpain transcriptional expression were observed on days 2 and 8. Most calpain expression was observed in activated splenic macrophages at day 8 post-induction even though activated T cells were also calpain positive. In spinal cords of animals with EAE, calpain expression was significantly increased in rats with severe disease compared to those exhibiting only mild symptoms at day 12 post-induction. Thus, prior to symptomatic EAE, increased calpain activity and expression in peripheral lymphoid organs may play an important role in T cell migration and subsequent disease progression.

  20. TNF-α increases endothelial progenitor cell adhesion to the endothelium by increasing bond expression and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Prisco, Anthony R.; Prisco, Michael R.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a rare population of cells that participate in angiogenesis. To effectively use EPCs for regenerative therapy, the mechanisms by which they participate in tissue repair must be elucidated. This study focused on the process by which activated EPCs bind to a target tissue. It has been demonstrated that EPCs can bind to endothelial cells (ECs) through the tumore necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-regulated vascular cell adhesion molecule 1/very-late antigen 4 (VLA4) interaction. VLA4 can bind in a high or low affinity state, a process that is difficult to experimentally isolate from bond expression upregulation. To separate these processes, a new parallel plate flow chamber was built, a detachment assay was developed, and a mathematical model was created that was designed to analyze the detachment assay results. The mathematical model was developed to predict the relative expression of EPC/EC bonds made for a given bond affinity distribution. EPCs treated with TNF-α/vehicle were allowed to bind to TNF-α/vehicle-treated ECs in vitro. Bound cells were subjected to laminar flow, and the cellular adherence was quantified as a function of shear stress. Experimental data were fit to the mathematical model using changes in bond expression or affinity as the only free parameter. It was found that TNF-α treatment of ECs increased adhesion through bond upregulation, whereas TNF-α treatment of EPCs increased adhesion by increasing bond affinity. These data suggest that injured tissue could potentially increase recruitment of EPCs for tissue regeneration via the secretion of TNF-α. PMID:25539711

  1. Reduced tissue osmolarity increases TRPV4 expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines in intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Walter, B A; Purmessur, D; Moon, A; Occhiogrosso, J; Laudier, D M; Hecht, A C; Iatridis, J C

    2016-07-19

    The mechanical behaviour and cellular metabolism of intervertebral discs (IVDs) and articular cartilage are strongly influenced by their proteoglycan content and associated osmotic properties. This osmotic environment is a biophysical signal that changes with disease and may contribute to the elevated matrix breakdown and altered biologic response to loading observed in IVD degeneration and osteoarthritis. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in osmo-sensation by the transient receptor potential vallinoid-4 (TRPV4) ion channel occur with disease and contribute to the inflammatory environment found during degeneration. Immunohistochemistry on bovine IVDs from an inflammatory organ culture model were used to investigate if TRPV4 is expressed in the IVD and how expression changes with degeneration. Western blot, live-cell calcium imaging, and qRT-PCR were used to investigate whether osmolarity changes or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) regulate TRPV4 expression, and how altered TRPV4 expression influences calcium signalling and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. TRPV4 expression correlated with TNFα expression, and was increased when cultured in reduced medium osmolarity and unaltered with TNFα-stimulation. Increased TRPV4 expression increased the calcium flux following TRPV4 activation and increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 gene expression in IVD cells. TRPV4 expression was qualitatively elevated in regions of aggrecan depletion in degenerated human IVDs. Collectively, results suggest that reduced tissue osmolarity, likely following proteoglycan degradation, can increase TRPV4 signalling and enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting changes in TRPV4 mediated osmo-sensation may contribute to the progressive matrix breakdown in disease.

  2. REDUCED TISSUE OSMOLARITY INCREASES TRPV4 EXPRESSION AND PRO-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES IN INTERVERTEBRAL DISC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Walter, B.A.; Purmessur, D; Moon, A.; Occhiogrosso, J.; Laudier, D.M.; Hecht, A.C.; Iatridis, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour and cellular metabolism of intervertebral discs (IVDs) and articular cartilage are strongly influenced by their proteoglycan content and associated osmotic properties. This osmotic environment is a biophysical signal that changes with disease and may contribute to the elevated matrix breakdown and altered biologic response to loading observed in IVD degeneration and osteoarthritis. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in osmo-sensation by the transient receptor potential vallinoid-4 (TRPV4) ion channel occur with disease and contribute to the inflammatory environment found during degeneration. Immunohistochemistry on bovine IVDs from an inflammatory organ culture model were used to investigate if TRPV4 is expressed in the IVD and how expression changes with degeneration. Western blot, live-cell calcium imaging, and qRT-PCR were used to investigate whether osmolarity changes or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) regulate TRPV4 expression, and how altered TRPV4 expression influences calcium signalling and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. TRPV4 expression correlated with TNFα expression, and was increased when cultured in reduced medium osmolarity and unaltered with TNFα-stimulation. Increased TRPV4 expression increased the calcium flux following TRPV4 activation and increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 gene expression in IVD cells. TRPV4 expression was qualitatively elevated in regions of aggrecan depletion in degenerated human IVDs. Collectively, results suggest that reduced tissue osmolarity, likely following proteoglycan degradation, can increase TRPV4 signalling and enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting changes in TRPV4 mediated osmo-sensation may contribute to the progressive matrix breakdown in disease. PMID:27434269

  3. Increased TRPC3 expression in vascular endothelium of patients with malignant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Berg, Erika; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin

    2009-03-01

    An increased expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) cation channels has been proposed as one of the factors contributing to the pathogenesis of hypertension. To test that hypothesis we compared the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC6 as an endogenous control in human vascular endothelium of preglomerular arterioles in kidney biopsies from six patients with malignant hypertension and from four patients with diarrhea-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Patients with malignant hypertension showed significantly higher systolic blood pressure and more prominent expression of TRPC3 in vascular endothelium of preglomerular arterioles compared to patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The expression of TRPC6 was not different between the two groups. The study supports the hypothesis that the increased expression of TRPC3 is associated with malignant hypertension in humans.

  4. Increased expression and aberrant localization of mucin 13 in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Brij K; Maher, Diane M; Ebeling, Mara C; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D; Lynch, Douglas W; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2012-11-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (p<0.001) MUC13 expression in non-metastatic colon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression compared with non-metastatic colon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer.

  5. Increased Expression and Aberrant Localization of Mucin 13 in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Brij K.; Maher, Diane M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D.; Lynch, Douglas W.; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E.; Jaggi, Meena

    2012-01-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (p<0.001) MUC13 expression in non-metastatic colon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression compared with non-metastatic colon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer. PMID:22914648

  6. Increased ERp57 Expression in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Possible Correlation and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Du, Lingyao; He, Zhiliang; Yan, Libo; Shi, Ying; Shang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Aim. ERp57 is involved in virus induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. This study aimed to find whether HBV infection altered ERp57 expression and whether ERp57 regulation was involved in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-HCC) genesis. Materials and Methods. HBV-HCC tissues, chronic hepatitis B (CHB) liver tissues, and normal liver tissues were acquired. ERp57 expressions in these tissues were detected through immunohistochemistry (IHC). And ERp57 expression in liver cell line L02, HBV replicative liver cell line L02-pHBV4.1, and HCC cell lines were detected through western blot for verification. Then medical data on patients providing HCC tissues were collected and analyzed along with ERp57 expression. Results. Higher ERp57 expression was found in HCC and CHB tissues (p < 0.001). And HCC cell lines and L02-pHBV4.1 presented higher ERp57 expression as well. In patients, ERp57 expression showed significant differences between death and survival groups (p = 0.037). And cumulative survival in patients with higher ERp57 (score ⩾ 8.75) is significantly lower (p = 0.009). Conclusion. Our study found increased expression of ERp57 in HBV-HCC. Such altered expression could be related to HBV infection and high ERp57 expression may lead to poor prognosis of HBV-HCC patients. PMID:28373975

  7. Gene expression analysis of tuberous sclerosis complex cortical tubers reveals increased expression of adhesion and inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Crino, Peter B.; Gorter, Jan A.; Nellist, Mark; Jansen, Floor E.; Spliet, Wim G.M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Wittink, Floyd R.A.; Breit, Timo M.; Troost, Dirk; Wadman, Wytse J.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are associated with disabling neurological manifestations, including intractable epilepsy. While these malformations are believed to result from the effects of TSC1 or TSC2 gene mutations, the molecular mechanisms leading to tuber formation, as well as the onset of seizures remain largely unknown. We used the Affymetrix Gene Chip platform to provide the first genome wide investigation of gene expression in surgically resected tubers, compared with histological normal perituberal tissue from the same patients or autopsy control tissue. We identified 2501 differentially expressed genes in cortical tubers compared with autopsy controls. Expression of genes associated with cell adhesion e.g., VCAM1, integrins and CD44, or with the inflammatory response, including complement factors, serpinA3, CCL2 and several cytokines, was increased in cortical tubers, whereas genes related to synaptic transmission e.g., the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1, and voltage-gated channel activity, exhibited lower expression. Gene expression in perituberal cortex was distinct from autopsy control cortex suggesting that even in the absence of tissue pathology the transcriptome is altered in TSC. Changes in gene expression yield insights into new candidate genes that may contribute to tuber formation or seizure onset, representing new targets for potential therapeutic development. PMID:19912235

  8. p16 and pRb immunohistochemical expression increases with increasing tumour grade in mammary phyllodes tumours.

    PubMed

    Karim, Rooshdiya Z; Gerega, Sebastien K; Yang, Y H; Spillane, Andrew; Carmalt, Hugh; Scolyer, Richard A; Lee, C Soon

    2010-06-01

    Control of cell cycling and proliferation is critical to the development of neoplasia and may play a role in the pathogenesis of phyllodes tumours (PTs). This study aimed to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of certain proteins from the G(1)/S transition of the cell cycle in a cohort of PTs, to determine their role in tumour pathogenesis and to identify any associations with patient outcome. Sixty-five PTs (34 benign, 23 borderline and eight malignant) diagnosed at a single institution between 1990 and 2006 were analysed. Immunohistochemistry for p16, pRb, cyclin D1 and Ki67 was performed. Expression of the following markers increased significantly with tumour grade: stromal nuclear and cytoplasmic p16 (P = 0.01 and 0.002, respectively), stromal and epithelial pRb (P = 0.000,000,06 and 0.004, respectively), and stromal and epithelial Ki67 (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Epithelial pRb scores of 7 (range 0-7) were significantly associated with reduced disease-free survival (DFS) compared with scores of <7 (P = 0.0009). No relationship was found between cyclin D1 expression in either the epithelium or the stroma, and grade or DFS. The results suggest that alterations at the G(1)/S transition of the cell cycle play an important role in the progression of PTs.

  9. Dietary psyllium fiber increases intestinal heat shock protein 25 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Miyuki; Van Hung, Tran; Tari, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Teruaki; Suzuki, Takuya

    2017-03-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect intestinal epithelial cell function, integrity and viability against many forms of stress. We hypothesized that dietary fibers (DFs) in the diet may increase HSP expression, since DFs are known to exhibit beneficial effects on intestinal health. The present study investigated the regulation of intestinal HSP expression by DFs, particularly psyllium fiber. Feeding psyllium fiber for 5 d increased HSP25 expression, but not HSP32 and HSP70 expression in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of mice at both the protein and mRNA levels. The increases in HSP25 expression did not correlate with cecal organic acid production by microbial fermentation. The water-insoluble fraction of psyllium fiber largely contributed to the induction of HSP25 expression, but feeding with other water-insoluble DFs from beet, wheat, and oats failed to induce intestinal HSP25 expression. Although the water-holding capacity of psyllium fiber was much higher than those of the other water-insoluble DFs examined, the increase in HSP25 expression induced by feeding polycarbophil, which possesses a high water-holding capacity similar to that of psyllium fiber, was much lower than that induced by psyllium fiber. Finally, induction of malondialdehyde production by hydrogen peroxide, an oxidant, in the colon of mice fed psyllium fiber was lower than that in mice fed with the control diets. Taken together, feeding psyllium fiber, especially the water-insoluble fraction, increases intestinal HSP25 expression and suppresses oxidant-induced malondialdehyde production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased NY-ESO-1 Expression and Reduced Infiltrating CD3+ T Cells in Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Muzikansky, Alona; Kalil, Jorge; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Duncan, Lyn M.

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen aberrantly expressed in melanomas, which may serve as a robust and specific target in immunotherapy. NY-ESO-1 antigen expression, tumor features, and the immune profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were assessed in primary cutaneous melanoma. NY-ESO-1 protein was detected in 20% of invasive melanomas (16/79), rarely in in situ melanoma (1/10) and not in benign nevi (0/20). Marked intratumoral heterogeneity of NY-ESO-1 protein expression was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression was associated with increased primary tumor thickness (P = 0.007) and inversely correlated with superficial spreading melanoma (P < 0.02). NY-ESO-1 expression was also associated with reduced numbers and density of CD3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P = 0.017). When NY-ESO-1 protein was expressed, CD3+ T cells were less diffusely infiltrating the tumor and were more often arranged in small clusters (P = 0.010) or as isolated cells (P = 0.002) than in large clusters of more than five lymphocytes. No correlation of NY-ESO-1 expression with gender, age, tumor site, ulceration, lymph node sentinel status, or survival was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression in melanoma was associated with tumor progression, including increased tumor thickness, and with reduced tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. PMID:25954764

  11. Increased NY-ESO-1 expression and reduced infiltrating CD3+ T cells in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Muzikansky, Alona; Kalil, Jorge; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Duncan, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen aberrantly expressed in melanomas, which may serve as a robust and specific target in immunotherapy. NY-ESO-1 antigen expression, tumor features, and the immune profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were assessed in primary cutaneous melanoma. NY-ESO-1 protein was detected in 20% of invasive melanomas (16/79), rarely in in situ melanoma (1/10) and not in benign nevi (0/20). Marked intratumoral heterogeneity of NY-ESO-1 protein expression was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression was associated with increased primary tumor thickness (P = 0.007) and inversely correlated with superficial spreading melanoma (P < 0.02). NY-ESO-1 expression was also associated with reduced numbers and density of CD3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P = 0.017). When NY-ESO-1 protein was expressed, CD3+ T cells were less diffusely infiltrating the tumor and were more often arranged in small clusters (P = 0.010) or as isolated cells (P = 0.002) than in large clusters of more than five lymphocytes. No correlation of NY-ESO-1 expression with gender, age, tumor site, ulceration, lymph node sentinel status, or survival was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression in melanoma was associated with tumor progression, including increased tumor thickness, and with reduced tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.

  12. Increased expression of dermatopontin and its implications for testicular dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    CAI, JUN; LIU, WEIJIA; HAO, JIE; CHEN, MAOXIN; LI, GANG

    2016-01-01

    An array of specific and non-specific molecules, which are expressed in the testis, have been demonstrated to be responsible for testicular function. Our previous study revealed that dermatopontin (DPT) is expressed in Sertoli cells of the testis, however, its roles in testicular function remains somewhat elusive. In the present study, CdCl2- and busulfan-induced testicular dysfunction models were used to investigate the implications of DPT expression for testicular function. The mRNA and protein expression levels of DPT were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. A negative correlation was observed between testicular damage and the expression of DPT, which suggested that an increase in DPT expression may be a marker for testicular dysfunction. This result was corroborated by the finding that transgenic mice exhibiting Sertoli cell-specific overexpression of DPT exhibited damage to their testicular morphology. Additionally, DPT overexpression in the testis affected the expression levels of claudin-11 and zonula occludens-1, which indicated that DPT may affect testicular function by affecting the integrity of the blood-testis barrier (BTB). In conclusion, the present study provided evidence to suggest that DPT may be indicative of mouse testicular dysfunction, since increased expression may be associated with damage to the BTB. PMID:26861869

  13. GLUT1 Expression Is Increased in Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Promotes Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Thomas; Maegdefrau, Ulrike; Hartmann, Arndt; Agaimy, Abbas; Marienhagen, Jörg; Weiss, Thomas S.; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Warnecke, Christina; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Oefner, Peter J.; Kreutz, Marina; Bosserhoff, Anja K.; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated glycolysis is one of the biochemical characteristics of cancer cells. The glucose transporter isoform 1 (GLUT1) gene encodes a key rate-limiting factor in glucose transport into cancer cells. However, its expression level and functional significance in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) are still disputed. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the expression and function of the GLUT1 gene in cases of HCC. We found significantly higher GLUT1 mRNA expression levels in HCC tissues and cell lines compared with primary human hepatocytes and matched nontumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis of a tissue microarray of 152 HCC cases revealed a significant correlation between Glut1 protein expression levels and a higher Ki-67 labeling index, advanced tumor stages, and poor differentiation. Accordingly, suppression of GLUT1 expression by siRNA significantly impaired both the growth and migratory potential of HCC cells. Furthermore, inhibition of GLUT1 expression reduced both glucose uptake and lactate secretion. Hypoxic conditions further increased GLUT1 expression levels in HCC cells, and this induction was dependent on the activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. In summary, our findings suggest that increased GLUT1 expression levels in HCC cells functionally affect tumorigenicity, and thus, we propose GLUT1 as an innovative therapeutic target for this highly aggressive tumor. PMID:19286567

  14. Hypermaintenance and hypofunction of aged spermatogonia: insight from age-related increase of Plzf expression.

    PubMed

    Ferder, Ianina C; Wang, Ning

    2015-06-30

    Like stem cells in other tissues, spermatogonia, including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) at the foundation of differentiation hierarchy, undergo age-related decline in function. The promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (Plzf) protein plays an essential role in spermatogonia maintenance by preventing their differentiation. To evaluate whether there is an age-related change in Plzf expression, we found that aged mouse testes exhibited a robust "Plzf overexpression" phenotype, in that they showed not only a higher frequency of Plzf-expressing cells but also an increased level of Plzf expression in these cells. Moreover, some Plzf-expressing cells in aged testes even aberrantly appeared in the differentiating spermatogonia compartment, which is usually low or negative for Plzf expression. Importantly, ectopic Plzf expression in F9 cells suppressed retinoic acid (RA)-induced Stra8 activation, a gene required for meiosis initiation. These data, together with our observation of a lack of meiosis-initiating spermatocytes associated with high Plzf-expressing spermatogonia in the aged testes, particularly in the degenerative seminiferous tubules, suggest that age-related increase in Plzf expression represents a novel molecular signature of spermatogonia aging by functionally arresting their differentiation.

  15. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell.

  16. Expression of Endometrial Receptivity Genes Increase After Myomectomy of Intramural Leiomyomas not Distorting the Endometrial Cavity.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Cihat; Celik, Onder; Celik, Nilufer; Otlu, Baris

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether endometrial receptivity genes are altered in infertile patients with intramural leiomyomas (IM) not distorting the endometrial cavity undergoing myomectomy. We measured endometrial HOXA-10, HOXA-11, LIF, ITGB3, and ITGAV messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions levels before and after myomectomy/metroplasty during mid-luteal phase in participants with IM, submucosal leiomyomas (SM), and septate uterus and fertile participants without fibroids. Initial endometrial sampling was obtained at the time of surgery, and second sampling was obtained 3 months after myomectomy/metroplasty. Expressions of each gene were evaluated using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A trend toward decreased endometrial HOXA-10, HOXA-11, and ITGAV mRNA expression was detected in both SM and IM groups before myomectomy when compared to both fertile group and septate uterus. However, the differences failed to show statistical significance. After myomectomy of IM, we have detected 12.8-fold increase in endometrial HOXA-10 mRNA expression and 9.0-fold increase in endometrial HOXA-11 mRNA expression. This increase in endometrial HOXA-10 and 11 mRNA expression was significant. Accordingly, 2 patients having intramural fibroids greater than 5 cm were able to remain pregnant after myomectomy. Conversely, submucosal myomectomy did not cause any significant effect on endometrial receptivity markers. Likewise, all markers of endometrial receptivity remained unchanged after metroplasty. Myomectomy of IM have favorable effect on endometrial HOXA-10 and 11 mRNA expression.

  17. Matrix attachment region combinations increase transgene expression in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-Peng; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Si-Jia; Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Jun-He; Chen, Shao-Nan; Jia, Yan-Long; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are cis-acting DNA elements that can increase transgene expression levels in a CHO cell expression system. To investigate the effects of MAR combinations on transgene expression and the underlying regulatory mechanisms, we generated constructs in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene flanked by different combinations of human β-interferon and β-globin MAR (iMAR and gMAR, respectively), which was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus (SV) 40 promoter. These were transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which were screened with geneticin; eGFP expression was detected by flow cytometry. The presence of MAR elements increased transfection efficiency and transient and stably expression of eGFP expression under both promoters; the level was higher when the two MARs differed (i.e., iMAR and gMAR) under the CMV but not the SV40 promoter. For the latter, two gMARs showed the highest activity. We also found that MARs increased the ratio of stably transfected positive colonies. These results indicate that combining the CMV promoter with two different MAR elements or the SV40 promoter with two gMARs is effective for inducing high expression level and stability of transgenes. PMID:28216629

  18. Increased expression of TRPS1 affects tumor progression and correlates with patients' prognosis of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun; Sun, Jie; Huang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    To detect the expression pattern of tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome-1 (TRPS1) in human colon cancer and to analyze its correlation with prognosis of patients with this disease. The expressions of TRPS1 in human colon cancer and its corresponding noncancerous colon tissues were detected at both mRNA and protein levels. The mRNA and protein expression levels of TRPS1 were both significantly higher in colon cancer than in corresponding noncancerous colon tissues (both P < 0.001). The protein level of TRPS1 in colon cancer tissues was significantly correlated with the mRNA level (r = 0.9, P < 0.001). Additionally, immunohistochemistry analysis also found increased TRPS1 expression in 63.0% (63/100) of colon cancer tissues. High TRPS1 expression was significantly associated with positive lymph node metastasis (P = 0.006) and higher pathological stage (P = 0.008) of patients with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox regression analysis further suggested that the increased expression of TRPS1 was an independent poor prognostic factor for this disease. Our data offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the increased expression of TRPS1 may be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of colon cancer. TRPS1 might be a potential marker to predict the prognosis in colon cancer.

  19. Matrix attachment region combinations increase transgene expression in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Peng; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Si-Jia; Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Jun-He; Chen, Shao-Nan; Jia, Yan-Long; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-02-20

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are cis-acting DNA elements that can increase transgene expression levels in a CHO cell expression system. To investigate the effects of MAR combinations on transgene expression and the underlying regulatory mechanisms, we generated constructs in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene flanked by different combinations of human β-interferon and β-globin MAR (iMAR and gMAR, respectively), which was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus (SV) 40 promoter. These were transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which were screened with geneticin; eGFP expression was detected by flow cytometry. The presence of MAR elements increased transfection efficiency and transient and stably expression of eGFP expression under both promoters; the level was higher when the two MARs differed (i.e., iMAR and gMAR) under the CMV but not the SV40 promoter. For the latter, two gMARs showed the highest activity. We also found that MARs increased the ratio of stably transfected positive colonies. These results indicate that combining the CMV promoter with two different MAR elements or the SV40 promoter with two gMARs is effective for inducing high expression level and stability of transgenes.

  20. Fenofibrate increases serum vaspin by upregulating its expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingwei; Deng, Datong; Fang, Zhaohui; Xu, Ming; Hu, Honglin; Luo, Li; Wang, Youmin

    2014-04-01

    Fenofibrate is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α that has been clinically used to treat dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying fenofibrate action, we investigated whether fenofibrate affects serum levels of vaspin, an adipocytokine that has recently been shown to link obesity and insulin resistance. Fenofibrate treatment significantly increased serum vaspin levels of dyslipidemic patients, which correlated with reduced body weight and increased insulin sensitivity. To elucidate the biochemical mechanisms of fenofibrate action, we investigated the effect of fenofibrate on vaspin mRNA and protein expressions in obese rats. Fenofibrate greatly increased vaspin mRNA and protein levels in visceral adipose tissue consisting of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and periepididymal adipose tissue but not in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, which correlated with increased serum vaspin levels and increased insulin sensitivity in obese rats. Consistent with a direct effect on vaspin expression, fenofibrate treatment significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of vaspin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time that fenofibrate upregulates vaspin expression in dyslipidemic human subjects and suggest that upregulation of vaspin expression in adipocytes may provide a mechanism by which fenofibrate improves insulin sensitivity in dyslipidemic patients.

  1. Increased expression of the diabetes gene SOX4 reduces insulin secretion by impaired fusion pore expansion

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Stephan C.; Do, Hyun Woong; Hastoy, Benoit; Hugill, Alison; Adam, Julie; Chibalina, Margarita V.; Galvanovskis, Juris; Godazgar, Mahdieh; Lee, Sheena; Goldsworthy, Michelle; Salehi, Albert; Tarasov, Andrei I.; Rosengren, Anders H.; Cox, Roger; Rorsman, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Sox4 has been proposed to underlie the increased type-2 diabetes risk linked to an intronic SNP in CDKAL1. In a mouse model expressing a mutant form of Sox4, glucose-induced insulin secretion is reduced by 40% despite normal intracellular Ca2+ signalling and depolarization-evoked exocytosis. This paradox is explained by a 4-fold increase in kiss-and-run exocytosis (as determined by single-granule exocytosis measurements), in which the fusion pore connecting the granule lumen to the exterior only expands to a diameter of 2 nm that does not allow the exit of insulin. Microarray analysis indicated that this correlated with an increased expression of the exocytosis-regulating protein Stxbp6. In a large collection of human islet preparations (n=63), STXBP6 expression and GIIS correlated positively and negatively with SOX4 expression, respectively. Overexpression of SOX4 in the human insulin-secreting cell EndoC-βH2 interfered with granule emptying and inhibited hormone release, the latter effect was reversed by silencing of STXBP6. These data suggest that increased SOX4 expression inhibits insulin secretion and increased diabetes risk by upregulation of STXBP6 and an increase in kiss-and-run exocytosis at the expense of full fusion. We propose that pharmacological interventions promoting fusion pore expansion may be effective in diabetes therapy. PMID:26993066

  2. C-reactive protein increases plasminogen activator inhibitor–1 expression in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyi; Nan, Bicheng; Lin, Peter; Yao, Qizhi

    2010-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker which predicts cardiovascular disease. However, it is not fully understood whether CRP has direct effects on endothelial functions and gene expression. The purpose of current study was to determine the effects and molecular mechanisms of CRP on the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in human endothelial cells. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were treated with CRP at clinically relevant concentrations for different durations. PAI-1 mRNA, protein and enzyme activities were studied. The effects of CRP on MAPK p38 phosphorylation was also studied by Bio-Plex luminex immunoassay. In addition, other types of human endothelial cells isolated from umbilical vein, skin, and lung microvessels were tested. CRP significantly increased PAI-1 mRNA levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The protein level and enzyme activity of PAI-1 in the supernatant of CRP-treated HCAEC cultures were significantly increased. Anti-CD32 antibody effectively blocked CRP-induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. In addition, CRP significantly increased CD32 mRNA levels and enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK p38. Furthermore, antioxidant curcumin dramatically inhibited CRP-induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. The effect of CRP on PAI-1 expression was also confirmed in other types of human endothelial cells. In conclusion, CRP significantly increased the expression of PAI-1 in HCAEC and other human endothelial cells. CRP also increased its receptor CD32 expression which may further enhance its action. CRP-induced PAI-1 expression may be mediated by oxidative stress and p38 signal pathway as antioxidant effectively blocks the effect of CRP on HCAEC. PMID:17949793

  3. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  4. Decreased IDO activity and increased TTS expression break immune tolerance in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Shi, Yan; Min, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Cheng-Shan; Peng, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Yuan; Qin, Ping; Sun, Jian-Zhi; Hou, Ming

    2011-08-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) can promote peripheral immune tolerance and control autoimmune responses through tryptophan catabolism. Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TTS) can protect T cells from IDO-mediated cell injury. Impaired IDO-mediated tryptophan catabolism has been observed in some autoimmune diseases. The concentrations of plasma kynurenine and tryptophan were detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The expressions of IDO and TTS were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. Compared with healthy controls, the PBMCs of patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) had significantly increased expressions of IDO and TTS, especially IDO. However, the plasma tryptophan concentration was significantly elevated, and kynurenine concentration was significantly reduced in ITP patients. In CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells of the ITP patients, IDO expressions were significantly lower than those in healthy controls, but in CD19(+) and CD14(+) cells, IDO expression significantly increased. Conversely, TTS expressions in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells of the ITP patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls, but there was no difference either in CD19(+) or CD14(+) cells. These results suggest that the activity of IDO enzyme is insufficient in ITP patients. Increased TTS expressions from CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells might link to a pathogenic mechanism involved in increasing survival of autoreactive T cells in ITP patients.

  5. Increased FasL expression correlates with apoptotic changes in granulocytes cultured with oxidized clozapine

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Zaheed; Almeciga, Ingrid; Delgado, Julio C.; Clavijo, Olga P.; Castro, Januario E.; Belalcazar, Viviana; Pinto, Clara; Zuniga, Joaquin; Romero, Viviana; Yunis, Edmond J. . E-mail: edmond_yunis@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-08-01

    Clozapine has been associated with a 1% incidence of agranulocytosis. The formation of an oxidized intermediate clozapine metabolite has been implicated in direct polymorphonuclear (PMN) toxicity. We utilized two separate systems to analyze the role of oxidized clozapine in inducing apoptosis in treated cells. Human PMN cells incubated with clozapine (0-10 {mu}M) in the presence of 0.1 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} demonstrated a progressive decrease of surface CD16 expression along with increased apoptosis. RT-PCR analysis showed decreased CD16 but increased FasL gene expression in clozapine-treated PMN cells. No change in constitutive Fas expression was observed in treated cells. In HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with retinoic acid (RA), a similar increase in FasL expression, but no associated changes in CD16 gene expression, was observed following clozapine treatments. Our results demonstrate increased FasL gene expression in oxidized clozapine-induced apoptotic neutrophils suggesting that apoptosis in granulocytes treated with clozapine involves Fas/FasL interaction that initiates a cascade of events leading to clozapine-induced agranulocytosis.

  6. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and SIRT3 expression are increased in well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Rodney; Hirsh, Sharon; Henry, Katherine; Abdel-Mageed, Asim; Kandil, Emad; Coppola, Domenico

    2013-08-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) synthesis. NAMPT expression promotes angiogenesis, DNA synthesis, cell growth and survival, and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase which functions in conjunction with mitochondrial NAMPT to promote cell survival following genotoxic stress. NAMPT expression is increased in several human malignancies, while SIRT3 levels are increased in some malignancies and suppressed in others. Based on this, we hypothesized that NAMPT and SIRT3 expression might be increased in well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas (TCs), follicular carcinomas (FC) and papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC). Immunohistochemical analysis for NAMPT and SIRT3 staining was performed on these tumors using tissue microarrays. NAMPT and SIRT3 expression was low in benign thyroid tissues, moderately increased in FC, and more highly expressed in PTC. Specifically we observed both NAMPT and SIRT3 to be highly expressed in well-differentiated TCs. The data suggest that mitochondrial alterations play a role in the development and maintenance of well-differentiated TC. Since an effective pharmacological NAMPT inhibitor is currently in clinical use, further studies of NAMPT overexpression in well-differentiated TCs may be useful in selecting patients for NAMPT inhibitor therapy, particularly for metastatic well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas refractory to other treatments.

  7. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol

  8. MiR-224 expression increases radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Upraity, Shailendra; Kazi, Sadaf; Padul, Vijay; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • MiR-224 expression in established glioblastoma cell lines and sporadic tumor tissues is low. • Exogenous miR-224 expression was found to increase radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • MiR-224 expression brought about 55–60% reduction in API5 expression levels. • Transfection with API5 siRNA increased radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • Low miR-224 and high API5 expression correlated with worse survival of GBM patients. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly aggressive primary malignant brain tumor. The intrinsic resistance of this brain tumor limits the efficacy of administered treatment like radiation therapy. In the present study, effect of miR-224 expression on growth characteristics of established GBM cell lines was analyzed. MiR-224 expression in the cell lines as well as in primary GBM tumor tissues was found to be low. Exogenous transient expression of miR-224 using either synthetic mimics or stable inducible expression using doxycycline inducible lentiviral vector carrying miR-224 gene, was found to bring about 30–55% reduction in clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells. MiR-224 expression reduced clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells by 85–90% on irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy, a dose that brought about 50% reduction in clonogenic potential in the absence of miR-224 expression. MiR-224 expression in glioblastoma cells resulted in 55–65% reduction in the expression levels of API5 gene, a known target of miR-224. Further, siRNA mediated down-regulation of API5 was also found to have radiation sensitizing effect on glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas data showed lower miR-224 expression levels in male GBM patients to correlate with poorer survival. Higher expression levels of miR-224 target API5 also showed significant correlation with poorer survival of GBM patients. Up-regulation of miR-224 or down-regulation of its target API5 in combination with radiation therapy

  9. Biglycan expression in the melanoma microenvironment promotes invasiveness via increased tissue stiffness inducing integrin-β1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Andrlová, Hana; Mastroianni, Justin; Madl, Josef; Kern, Johannes S.; Melchinger, Wolfgang; Dierbach, Heide; Wernet, Florian; Follo, Marie; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin; Has, Cristina; Mittapalli, Venugopal Rao; Idzko, Marco; Herr, Ricarda; Brummer, Tilman; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Narr, Andreas; Ihorst, Gabriele; Vennin, Claire; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Minguet, Susana; Timpson, Paul; Duyster, Justus; Meiss, Frank; Römer, Winfried; Zeiser, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Novel targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic melanoma. A better understanding of the melanoma-microenvironment, in particular the interaction of cells with extracellular matrix molecules, may help to further improve these new therapeutic strategies. We observed that the extracellular matrix molecule biglycan (Bgn) was expressed in certain human melanoma cells and primary fibroblasts when evaluated by microarray-based gene expression analysis. Bgn expression in the melanoma tissues correlated with low overall-survival and low progression-free-survival in patients. To understand the functional role of Bgn we used gene-targeted mice lacking functional Bgn. Here we observed that melanoma growth, metastasis-formation and tumor-related death were reduced in Bgn−/− mice compared to Bgn+/+ mice. In vitro invasion of melanoma cells into organotypic-matrices derived from Bgn−/− fibroblasts was reduced compared to melanoma invasion into Bgn-proficient matrices. Tissue stiffness as determined by atomic-force-microscopy was reduced in Bgn−/− matrices. Isolation of melanoma cells and fibroblasts from the stiffer Bgn+/+ matrices revealed an increase in integrin-β1 expression compared to the Bgn−/− fibroblast matrices. Overexpression of integrin-β1 in B16-melanoma cells abolished the survival benefit seen in Bgn−/− mice. Consistent with the studies performed in mice, the abundance of Bgn-expression in human melanoma samples positively correlated with the expression of integrin-β1, which is in agreement with results from the organotypic invasion-assay and the in vivo mouse studies. This study describes a novel role for Bgn-related tissue stiffness in the melanoma-microenvironment via regulation of integrin-β1 expression by melanoma cells in both mice and humans. PMID:28476030

  10. Hindlimb unloading results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alters left ventricular connexin 43 expression.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Julia A; Henry, Matthew K; Welliver, Kathryn C; Jepson, Amanda J; Garnett, Emily R

    2013-03-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) is a well-established animal model of cardiovascular deconditioning. Previous data indicate that HU results in cardiac sympathovagal imbalance. It is well established that cardiac sympathovagal imbalance increases the risk for developing cardiac arrhythmias. The cardiac gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) is predominately expressed in the left ventricle (LV) and ensures efficient cell-to-cell electrical coupling. In the current study we wanted to test the hypothesis that HU would result in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alter the expression and/or phosphorylation of LV-Cx43. Electrocardiographic data using implantable telemetry were obtained over a 10- to 14-day HU or casted control (CC) condition and in response to a sympathetic stressor using isoproterenol administration and brief restraint. The arrhythmic burden was calculated using a modified scoring system to quantify spontaneous and provoked arrhythmias. In addition, Western blot analysis was used to measure LV-Cx43 expression in lysates probed with antibodies directed against the total and an unphosphorylated form of Cx43 in CC and HU rats. HU resulted in a significantly greater total arrhythmic burden during the sympathetic stressor with significantly more ventricular arrhythmias occurring. In addition, there was increased expression of total LV-Cx43 observed with no difference in the expression of unphosphorylated LV-Cx43. Specifically, the increased expression of LV-Cx43 was consistent with the phosphorylated form. These data taken together indicate that cardiovascular deconditioning produced through HU results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and increased expression of phosphorylated LV-Cx43.

  11. Surface L-type Ca2+ channel expression levels are increased in aged hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Santana, Félix Luis; Oh, Myongsoo Matthew; Antion, Marcia Diana; Lee, Amy; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Disterhoft, John Francis

    2014-01-01

    Age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons has been hypothesized to underlie the increased Ca2+ influx and subsequent reduced intrinsic neuronal excitability of these neurons that lead to age-related cognitive deficits. Here, using specific antibodies against Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits of LTCCs, we systematically re-examined the expression of these proteins in the hippocampus from young (3 to 4 month old) and aged (30 to 32 month old) F344xBN rats. Western blot analysis of the total expression levels revealed significant reductions in both Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits from all three major hippocampal regions of aged rats. Despite the decreases in total expression levels, surface biotinylation experiments revealed significantly higher proportion of expression on the plasma membrane of Cav1.2 in the CA1 and CA3 regions and of Cav1.3 in the CA3 region from aged rats. Furthermore, the surface biotinylation results were supported by immunohistochemical analysis that revealed significant increases in Cav1.2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA3 regions of aged hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, we found a significant increase in the level of phosphorylated Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane in the dentate gyrus of aged rats. Taken together, our present findings strongly suggest that age-related cognitive deficits cannot be attributed to a global change in L-type channel expression nor to the level of phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane of hippocampal neurons. Rather, increased expression and density of LTCCs on the plasma membrane may underlie the age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:24033980

  12. Hindlimb unloading results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alters left ventricular connexin 43 expression

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Matthew K.; Welliver, Kathryn C.; Jepson, Amanda J.; Garnett, Emily R.

    2013-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) is a well-established animal model of cardiovascular deconditioning. Previous data indicate that HU results in cardiac sympathovagal imbalance. It is well established that cardiac sympathovagal imbalance increases the risk for developing cardiac arrhythmias. The cardiac gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) is predominately expressed in the left ventricle (LV) and ensures efficient cell-to-cell electrical coupling. In the current study we wanted to test the hypothesis that HU would result in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alter the expression and/or phosphorylation of LV-Cx43. Electrocardiographic data using implantable telemetry were obtained over a 10- to 14-day HU or casted control (CC) condition and in response to a sympathetic stressor using isoproterenol administration and brief restraint. The arrhythmic burden was calculated using a modified scoring system to quantify spontaneous and provoked arrhythmias. In addition, Western blot analysis was used to measure LV-Cx43 expression in lysates probed with antibodies directed against the total and an unphosphorylated form of Cx43 in CC and HU rats. HU resulted in a significantly greater total arrhythmic burden during the sympathetic stressor with significantly more ventricular arrhythmias occurring. In addition, there was increased expression of total LV-Cx43 observed with no difference in the expression of unphosphorylated LV-Cx43. Specifically, the increased expression of LV-Cx43 was consistent with the phosphorylated form. These data taken together indicate that cardiovascular deconditioning produced through HU results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and increased expression of phosphorylated LV-Cx43. PMID:23302960

  13. Tianeptine increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Lawrence P; Hendry, Robert M; Reznikov, Leah R; Piroli, Gerardo G; Wood, Gwendolyn E; McEwen, Bruce S; Grillo, Claudia A

    2007-06-22

    Chronic restraint stress affects hippocampal and amygdalar synaptic plasticity as determined by electrophysiological, morphological and behavioral measures, changes that are inhibited by some but not all antidepressants. The efficacy of some classes of antidepressants is proposed to involve increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), leading to increased expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Conversely, some studies suggest that acute and chronic stress downregulate BDNF expression and activity. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine total and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), as well as BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats subjected to chronic restraint stress in the presence and absence of the antidepressant tianeptine. In the hippocampus, chronic restraint stress increased pCREB levels without affecting BDNF mRNA or protein expression. Tianeptine administration had no effect upon these measures in the hippocampus. In the amygdala, BDNF mRNA expression was not modulated in chronic restraint stress rats given saline in spite of increased pCREB levels. Conversely, BDNF mRNA levels were increased in the amygdala of chronic restraint stress/tianeptine rats in the absence of changes in pCREB levels when compared to non-stressed controls. Amygdalar BDNF protein increased while pCREB levels decreased in tianeptine-treated rats irrespective of stress conditions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that tianeptine concomitantly decreases pCREB while increasing BDNF expression in the rat amygdala, increases in neurotrophic factor expression that may participate in the enhancement of amygdalar synaptic plasticity mediated by tianeptine.

  14. Aerosol-induced brucellosis increases TLR-2 expression and increased complexity in the microanatomy of astroglia in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim M.; Chiu, Kevin B.; Sansing, Hope A.; Didier, Peter J.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M.; Roy, Chad J.; MacLean, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis, a bacterial pathogen and agent of epizootic abortion causes multiple pathologies in humans as well as a number of agriculturally important animal species. Clinical human brucellosis manifests as a non-specific, chronic debilitating disease characterized by undulant fever, arthropathies, cardiomyopathies and neurological sequelae. These symptoms can occur acutely for a few weeks or persist for months to years. Within the brain, endothelial and glial cells can be infected leading to downstream activation events including matrix metalloprotease (MMP) and cytokine secretion and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. These events are likely to lead to tissue remodeling, including morphologic changes in neuronal and glial cells, which are linked to neurological complications including depressive behavior, immune activation and memory loss. Our hypothesis was that B. melitensis infection and neurobrucellosis would lead to activation of astrocytes through upregulation of TLR2 and stimulate concurrent changes in the microanatomy. All six animals were infected via inhalation route. TLR2 expression was approximately doubled in white matter astrocytes of infected rhesus macaques. There was also a 50% increase in the number of astrocytes per unit area in subcortical white matter tracts suggesting increased innate immune activation. This coincided with dramatic increases in the length and complexity of the cell arbor of hypertrophic astrocytes in both cortical gray and white matter. Thus, aerosol-induced brucellosis results in dramatically increased innate immune activation of astrocytes in the absence of widespread neuroinflammation. PMID:24350061

  15. Increased expression of the TIAR protein in the hippocampus of Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Oleana, V H; Salehi, A; Swaab, D F

    1998-05-11

    T-cell restricted intracellular antigen related protein (TIAR) is an RNA-binding protein that is supposed to be involved in the process of stress-induced apoptosis. TIAR triggers DNA fragmentation in permeabilized thymocytes and its expression diminishes in the cell nucleus and rises simultaneously in the cytoplasm during Fas-induced cell death. Using a monoclonal antibody against TIAR, we stained different areas of the hippocampus from seven controls and 14 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was a clear expression of TIAR in the hippocampus of non-demented controls. Surprisingly, a significant increase was found in the expression of TIAR in the hippocampal area in AD. The increased expression of TIAR in AD may be related to the process of neurodegeneration in the hippocampus.

  16. Increased longevity mediated by yeast NDI1 expression in Drosophila intestinal stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jae H.; Bahadorani, Sepehr; Graniel, Jacqueline; Koehler, Christopher L.; Ulgherait, Matthew; Rera, Michael; Jones, D. Leanne; Walker, David W.

    2013-01-01

    A functional decline in tissue stem cells and mitochondrial dysfunction have each been linked to aging and multiple aging-associated pathologies. However, the interplay between energy homeostasis, stem cells, and organismal aging remains poorly understood. Here, we report that expression of the single-subunit yeast alternative NADH dehydrogenase, ndi1, in Drosophila intestinal stem and progenitor cells delays the onset of multiple markers of intestinal aging and extends lifespan. In addition, expression of ndi1 in the intestine increases feeding behavior and results in organismal weight gain. Consistent with increased nutrient uptake, flies expressing ndi1 in the digestive tract display a systemic reduction in the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key cellular energy sensor. Together, these results demonstrate that ndi1 expression in the intestinal epithelium is an effective strategy to delay tissue and organismal aging. PMID:24038661

  17. Tetraspanin-8 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis by increasing ADAM12m expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanru; Chen, Guangnan; Huang, Jing; Chen, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Ruixia; Liang, Chunmin; Liu, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that tetraspanin-8 (TSPAN8) promotes tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we explored the effects of TSPAN8 and the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis using various HCC cell lines, tissues from 149 HCC patients, and animal models of HCC progression. We showed that elevated expression of TSPAN8 promoted HCC invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo, but did not influence HCC cell proliferation in vitro. Increased TSPAN8 expression in human HCC was predictive of poor survival, and multivariate analyses indicated TSPAN8 expression to be an independent predictor for both postoperative overall survival and relapse-free survival. Importantly, TSPAN8 enhanced HCC invasion and metastasis by increasing ADAM12m expression. We therefore conclude that TSPAN8 and ADAM12m may be useful therapeutic targets for the prevention of HCC progression and metastasis. PMID:27270327

  18. The transcription factor regulatory factor X1 increases the expression of neuronal glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kaiwen; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-07-28

    Glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) play an important role in maintaining extracellular glutamate homeostasis and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. However, very few studies have investigated the regulation of EAAT expression. A binding sequence for the regulatory factor X1 (RFX1) exists in the promoter region of the gene encoding for EAAT3, a neuronal EAAT, but not in the promoter regions of the genes encoding for EAAT1 and EAAT2, two glial EAATs. RFX proteins are transcription factors binding to X-boxes of DNA sequences. Although RFX proteins are necessary for the normal function of sensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, their roles in the mammalian brain are not known. We showed that RFX1 increased EAAT3 expression and activity in C6 glioma cells. RFX1 binding complexes were found in the nuclear extracts of C6 cells. The activity of EAAT3 promoter as measured by luciferase reporter activity was increased by RFX1 in C6 cells and the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. However, RFX1 did not change the expression of EAAT2 proteins in the NRK52E cells. RFX1 proteins were expressed in the neurons of rat brain. A high expression level of RFX1 proteins was found in the neurons of cerebral cortex and Purkinje cells. Knockdown of the RFX1 expression by RFX1 antisense oligonucleotides decreased EAAT3 expression in rat cortical neurons in culture. These results suggest that RFX1 enhances the activity of EAAT3 promoter to increase the expression of EAAT3 proteins. This study provides initial evidence for the regulation of gene expression in the nervous cells by RFX1.

  19. Increased expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in human pituitary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Noah F.; Du, Ziming; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Woodmansee, Whitney W.; Reardon, David A.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Fecci, Peter E.; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Dunn, Gavin P.; Dunn, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Subsets of pituitary tumors exhibit an aggressive clinical courses and recur despite surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Because modulation of the immune response through inhibition of T-cell checkpoints has led to durable clinical responses in multiple malignancies, we explored whether pituitary adenomas express immune-related biomarkers that could suggest suitability for immunotherapy. Specifically, programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) has emerged as a potential biomarker whose expression may portend more favorable responses to immune checkpoint blockade therapies. We thus investigated the expression of PD-L1 in pituitary adenomas. Methods PD-L1 RNA and protein expression were evaluated in 48 pituitary tumors, including functioning and non-functioning adenomas as well as atypical and recurrent tumors. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte populations were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Pituitary tumors express variable levels of PD-L1 transcript and protein. PD-L1 RNA and protein expression were significantly increased in functioning (growth hormone and prolactin-expressing) pituitary adenomas compared to non-functioning (null cell and silent gonadotroph) adenomas. Moreover, primary pituitary adenomas harbored higher levels of PD-L1 mRNA compared to recurrent tumors. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were observed in all pituitary tumors and were positively correlated with increased PD-L1 expression, particularly in the functional subtypes. Conclusions Human pituitary adenomas harbor PD-L1 across subtypes, with significantly higher expression in functioning adenomas compared to non-functioning adenomas. This expression is accompanied by the presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. These findings suggest the existence of an immune response to pituitary tumors and raise the possibility of considering checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in cases refractory to conventional management. PMID:27655724

  20. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  1. Mice that are fed a high-fat diet display increased hepcidin expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Gotardo, Érica Martins Ferreira; dos Santos, Aline Noronha; Miyashiro, Renan Akira; Gambero, Sheley; Rocha, Thalita; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery that hepcidin is expressed in the adipose tissue of obese subjects, attention has been increasingly focused on alterations in iron homeostasis that are associated with adiposity. We examined the production of hepcidin, the expression of hepcidin-related genes and the iron content of the adipose tissue in obesity using Swiss mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The mice were maintained on a control diet or HFD for 12 or 24 wk, and body weight, adiposity and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. The expression of several genes (hepcidin, TfR1, TfR2, DMT1, FT-heavy, ferroportin, IRP-1, IRP-2 and HIF-1) and the protein expression of hepcidin and IL-6 were quantified. The iron level was assessed using a Prussian blue reaction in paraffin-embedded tissue. After 24 wk on the HFD, we observed increases in the levels of hepcidin in the serum and the visceral adipose tissue. The IL-6 levels also increased in the visceral adipose tissue. Adipocytes isolated from the visceral adipose tissues of lean and obese mice expressed hepcidin at comparable levels; however, isolated macrophages from the stromal vascular fraction expressed higher hepcidin levels. Adipose tissues from obese mice displayed increased tfR2 expression and the presence of iron. Our results indicate that IL-6 and iron may affect the signaling pathways governing hepcidin expression. Thus, the mice fed HFD for 24 wk represent a suitable model for the study of obesity-linked hepcidin alterations. In addition, hepcidin may play local roles in controlling iron availability and interfering with inflammation in adipose tissue.

  2. TLR ligands and butyrate increase Pyy expression through two distinct but inter-regulated pathways.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Pierre; Doré, Joël; Lapaque, Nicolas; Blottière, Hervé M

    2017-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an active barrier separating the host from its microbiota. It senses microbial compounds through expression of a wide range of receptors including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs have been shown to regulate epithelium permeability or secretion of defensin by Paneth cells. However, the expression and function of TLRs in enteroendocrine L-cells, a specific subtype of intestinal cells secreting PYY and GLP-1, have not yet been assessed. PYY and GLP-1 are implicated in regulation of gut motility, food intake and insulin secretion, and are of great interest regarding obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cellular model of human L-cells and a reporter system for NF-κB activation pathway, we reported functional expression of TLRs in these cells. Stimulation with specific TLR-agonists increased expression of Pyy but not Proglucagon in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Moreover, the effect of TLR stimulation was additive to butyrate, a product of bacterial fermentation, on Pyy expression. Additionally, butyrate also increased Tlr expression, including Tlr4, and the NF-κB response to TLR stimulation. Altogether, our results demonstrated a role of TLRs in the modulation of Pyy expression and the importance of butyrate, a product of bacterial fermentation in regulation of microbial TLR-dependent sensing.

  3. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in Down's syndrome hippocampus during development: increased expression in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Iyer, A M; van Scheppingen, J; Milenkovic, I; Anink, J J; Lim, D; Genazzani, A A; Adle-Biassette, H; Kovacs, G G; Aronica, E

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is highly expressed throughout the forebrain and hippocampus. Several lines of evidence support the role of this receptor in brain development and developmental disorders, as well as in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, the expression pattern of mGluR5 was investigated by immunocytochemistry in the developing hippocampus from patients with Down's syndrome (DS) and in adults with DS and AD. mGluR5 was expressed in developing human hippocampus from the earliest stages tested (9 gestational weeks), with strong expression in the ventricular/subventricular zones. We observed a consistent similar temporal and spatial neuronal pattern of expression in DS hippocampus. However, in DS we detected increased prenatal mGluR5 expression in white matter astrocytes, which persisted postnatally. In addition, in adult DS patients with widespread ADassociated neurodegeneration (DS-AD) increased mGluR5 expression was detected in astrocytes around amyloid plaque. In vitro data confirm the existence of a modulatory crosstalk between amyloid-β and mGluR5 in human astrocytes. These findings demonstrate a developmental regulation of mGluR5 in human hippocampus and suggest a role for this receptor in astrocytes during early development in DS hippocampus, as well as a potential contribution to the pathogenesis of ADassociated pathology.

  4. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  5. Bile acid increases expression of the histamine-producing enzyme, histidine decarboxylase, in gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hye Jin; Kim, Hye Young; Kim, Hyeong Hoe; Park, Hee Ju; Cheong, Jae Hun

    2014-01-07

    To investigate the effect of bile acid on the expression of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), which is a major enzyme involved in histamine production, and gene expression of gastric transcription factors upon cooperative activation. HDC expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and promoter assay in human gastric precancerous tissues, normal stomach tissue, and gastric cancer cell lines. The relationship between gastric precancerous state and HDC expression induced by bile acid was determined. The association between the expression of HDC and various specific transcription factors in gastric cells was also evaluated. MKN45 and AGS human gastric carcinoma cell lines were transfected with farnesoid X receptor (FXR), small heterodimer partner (SHP), and caudal-type homeodomain transcription factor (CDX)1 expression plasmids. The effects of various transcription factors on HDC expression were monitored by luciferase-reporter promoter assay. Histamine production and secretion in the stomach play critical roles in gastric acid secretion and in the pathogenesis of gastric diseases. Here, we show that bile acid increased the expression of HDC, which is a rate-limiting enzyme of the histamine production pathway. FXR was found to be a primary regulatory transcription factor for bile acid-induced HDC expression. In addition, the transcription factors CDX1 and SHP synergistically enhanced bile acid-induced elevation of HDC gene expression. We confirmed similar expression patterns for HDC, CDX1, and SHP in patient tissues. HDC production in the stomach is associated with bile acid exposure and its related transcriptional regulation network of FXR, SHP, and CDX1.

  6. Histidine tag fusion increases expression levels of active recombinant amelogenin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Andersson, Christer; Reseland, Janne E; Lyngstadaas, Petter; Bülow, Leif

    2006-07-01

    Amelogenin is a dental enamel matrix protein involved in formation of dental enamel. In this study, we have expressed two different recombinant murine amelogenins in Escherichia coli: the untagged rM179, and the histidine tagged rp(H)M180, identical to rM179 except that it carries the additional N-terminal sequence MRGSHHHHHHGS. The effects of the histidine tag on expression levels, and on growth properties of the amelogenin expressing cells were studied. Purification of a crude protein extract containing rp(H)M180 was also carried out using IMAC and reverse-phase HPLC. The results of this study showed clearly that both growth properties and amelogenin expression levels were improved for E. coli cells expressing the histidine tagged amelogenin rp(H)M180, compared to cells expressing the untagged amelogenin rM179. The positive effect of the histidine tag on amelogenin expression is proposed to be due to the hydrophilic nature of the histidine tag, generating a more hydrophilic amelogenin, which is more compatible with the host cell. Human osteoblasts treated with the purified rp(H)M180 showed increased levels of secreted osteocalcin, compared to untreated cells. This response was similar to cells treated with enamel matrix derivate, mainly composed by amelogenin, suggesting that the recombinant protein is biologically active. Thus, the histidine tag favors expression and purification of biologically active recombinant amelogenin.

  7. Fusion partners can increase the expression of recombinant interleukins via transient transfection in 2936E cells

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jane; Zhang, Jue; Dang, Thien-Lan; Hasegawa, Haruki; Cheng, Janet D; Gianan, Irene; O'Neill, Jason W; Wolfson, Martin; Siu, Sophia; Qu, Sheldon; Meininger, David; Kim, Helen; Delaney, John; Mehlin, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The expression levels of five secreted target interleukins (IL-11, 15, 17B, 32, and IL23 p19 subunit) were tested with three different fusion partners in 2936E cells. When fused to the N-terminus, human serum albumin (HSA) was found to enhance the expression of both IL-17B and IL-15, cytokines which did not express at measurable levels on their own. Although the crystallizable fragment of an antibody (Fc) was also an effective fusion partner for IL-17B, Fc did not increase expression of IL-15. Fc was superior to HSA for the expression of the p19 subunit of IL-23, but no partner led to measurable levels of IL-32γ secretion. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) did not enhance the expression of any target and suppressed the production of IL-11, a cytokine which expressed robustly both on its own and when fused to HSA or Fc. Cleavage of the fusion partner was not always possible. The use of HSA or Fc as N-terminal fusions can be an effective technique to express difficult proteins, especially for applications in which the fusion partner need not be removed. PMID:20014434

  8. Expression of the RNA-binding protein TIAR is increased in neurons after ischemic cerebral injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, K; Li, W; Nagayama, T; He, X; Sinor, A D; Chang, J; Mao, X; Graham, S H; Simon, R P; Greenberg, D A

    2000-03-15

    T-cell restricted intracellular antigen-related protein (TIAR) is an RNA recognition motif-type RNA-binding protein that has been implicated in the apoptotic death of T-lymphocytes and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Western blots prepared with a monoclonal antibody against TIAR showed expression in normal rat hippocampus, and induction by 15 min of global cerebral ischemia. This increased expression was evident at 8 hr after ischemia and maximal at 24 hr, whereas expression at 72 hr was reduced below basal levels. Expression of TIAR protein was also increased in parietal cortex 6 and 24 hr after 90 min of focal cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, as well as in cultured cortical neurons and astroglia after exposure to hypoxia in vitro. Immunocytochemistry showed that increased expression of TIAR occurred mainly in the CA1 sector of hippocampus 24 hr after global ischemia, and in cortical and striatal neurons 24 hr after 20 or 90 min of focal ischemia. Double-labeling studies showed that TIAR protein expression was co-localized with DNA damage in neuronal cells. The findings suggest that TIAR may be involved in neuronal cell death after cerebral ischemic injury.

  9. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Simmler, Linda D; Blakely, Randy D; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2014-07-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for > 90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) remains unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high-affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggest that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is expressed by astrocytes, which also express dopamine receptors. Regulation of prefrontal cortical (PFC) GLT-1 potentially offers a novel treatment approach to the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Partial PFC dopamine deafferentation increased membrane expression of GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake, but did not alter levels of the other two neocortical glutamate transporters, GLAST and EAAC1.

  10. Increased expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and anomalous neurites in catecholaminergic neurons of ATF-2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masayo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toshio; Ishii, Shunsuke; Sumi-Ichinose, Chiho; Nomura, Takahide; Ichinose, Hiroshi

    2008-02-15

    ATF-2/CRE-BP1 was originally identified as a cAMP-responsive element (CRE) binding protein abundant in the brain. We previously reported that phosphorylation of ATF-2 increased the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which is the rate-limiting enzyme for catecholamine biosynthesis, directly acting on the CRE in the promoter region of the TH gene in PC12D cells (Suzuki et al. [2002] J. Biol. Chem. 277:40768-40774). To examine the role of ATF-2 on transcriptional control of the TH gene in the brain, we investigated the TH expression in ATF-2-/- mice. We found that TH expression was greatly increased in medulla oblongata and locus ceruleus of the ATF-2-deficient embryos. Ectopic expression of TH was observed in the raphe magnus nucleus, where serotonergic neural cell bodies are located. Interestingly, A10 dorsal neurons were lost in the embryos of ATF-2-/- mice. There was no difference in the TH immunoreactivity in the olfactory bulb. The data showed that alteration in TH expression by absence of ATF-2 gradually declined from caudal to rostral part of the brain. We also found anomalous neurite extension in catecholaminergic neurons of ATF-2 null mice, i.e., increased dendritic arborization and shortened axons. These data suggest that ATF-2 plays critical roles for proper expression of the TH gene and for neurite extension of catecholaminergic neurons, possibly through a repressor-like action. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Oxytocin Increases Neurite Length and Expression of Cytoskeletal Proteins Associated with Neuronal Growth.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Kiss, A; Havranek, T; Strbak, V; Bakos, J

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin acts as a growth and differentiation factor; however, its effects on neurite growth are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate time effects of oxytocin on expression of nestin and MAP2; (2) to measure the effect of oxytocin on gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, cofilin, and drebrin; and (3) to measure changes in neurite length and number in response to oxytocin/oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to 1 μM oxytocin resulted in a significant increase in gene expression and protein levels of nestin after 12, 24, and 48 h. Oxytocin treatment induced no changes in gene expression of MAP2; however, a decrease of protein levels was observed in all time intervals. Gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, and drebrin increased in response to oxytocin. Oxytocin induced significant elongation of neurites after 12, 24, and 48 h. No change in neurite length was observed in the presence of the combination of retinoic acid and oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Oxytocin treatment for 12 h increased the number of neurites. Overall, the present data suggest that oxytocin contributes to the regulation of expression of cytoskeletal proteins associated with growth of neuronal cones and induces neurite elongation mediated by oxytocin receptors at least in certain types of neuronal cells.

  12. Memory-enhancing corticosterone treatment increases amygdala norepinephrine and Arc protein expression in hippocampal synaptic fractions.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Jayme R; Donowho, Kyle; Abdi, Amin; McGaugh, James L; Roozendaal, Benno; McIntyre, Christa K

    2010-03-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that glucocorticoid hormones enhance the consolidation of memory for emotionally arousing events through interactions with the noradrenergic system of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). We previously reported that intra-BLA administration of a beta-adrenoceptor agonist immediately after inhibitory avoidance training enhanced memory consolidation and increased hippocampal expression of the protein product of the immediate early gene activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). In the present experiments corticosterone (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats immediately after inhibitory avoidance training to examine effects on long-term memory, amygdala norepinephrine levels, and hippocampal Arc expression. Corticosterone increased amygdala norepinephrine levels 15 min after inhibitory avoidance training, as assessed by in vivo microdialysis, and enhanced memory tested at 48 h. Corticosterone treatment also increased expression of Arc protein in hippocampal synaptic tissue. The elevation in BLA norepinephrine appears to participate in corticosterone-influenced modulation of hippocampal Arc expression as intra-BLA blockade of beta-adrenoceptors with propranolol (0.5 microg/0.2 microL) attenuated the corticosterone-induced synaptic Arc expression in the hippocampus. These findings indicate that noradrenergic activity at BLA beta-adrenoceptors is involved in corticosterone-induced enhancement of memory consolidation and expression of the synaptic-plasticity-related protein Arc in the hippocampus.

  13. Increased proliferation and chemosensitivity of human mesenchymal stromal cells expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Poturnajova, Martina; Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2012-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be suitable vehicles for cellular therapy in various conditions. The expression of reporter and/or effector protein(s) enabled both the identification of MSCs within the organism and the exploitation in targeted tumor therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular changes induced by retrovirus-mediated transgene expression in MSCs in vitro. Human Adipose Tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) were transduced to express (i) the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter transgene, (ii) the fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDy::UPRT) enzyme along with the expression of dominant positive selection gene NeoR or (iii) the selection marker NeoR alone (MOCK). CDy::UPRT expression resulted in increased proliferation of CDy::UPRT-MSCs versus naïve AT-MSCs, MOCK-MSCs or EGFP-MSCs. Furthermore, CDy::UPRT-MSCs were significantly more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and cytosine arabinoside as determined by increased Caspase 3/7 activation and/or decreased relative proliferation. CDy::UPRT-MSCs in direct cocultures with breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 increased tumor cell killing induced by low concentrations of 5FU. Our data demonstrated the changes in proliferation and chemoresistance in engineered MSCs expressing transgene with enzymatic function and suggested the possibilities for further augmentation of targeted MSC-mediated antitumor therapy.

  14. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Increases Aquaporin 3 Expression in Human Vaginal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Ahn, Kyuyoun; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-12-01

    Water channel aquaporin 3 (AQP3) is an aquaglyceroporin that transports small neutral solutes and water. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a member of the retinoid drug class, acts as a regulator in several biological processes. To investigate the effect of ATRA on the expression of AQP3 in human vaginal epithelial cells. Human vaginal mucosal epithelial cells (CRL2616) were treated with ATRA 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 μmol/L for 24 hours to examine the dose-dependent effects of ATRA and with ATRA 1 μmol/L for 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. The expression of AQP3 and retinoic acid receptor (RAR) was determined by western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. AQP3 was detected in the cell membrane of human vaginal epithelial cells. ATRA increased the protein expression and mRNA levels of AQP3 in a dose-dependent manner (P < .05). ATRA also increased the protein expression of RARα (P < .05). Treatment of CRL2616 cells with an RAR antagonist (Ro 41-5253) significantly decreased AQP3 protein expression (P < .05). ATRA mediated by RARα increased AQP3 gene and protein expression in human vaginal mucosal epithelial cells. These results imply that AQP3 regulated by ATRA could play an important role in the mechanism of vaginal lubrication. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Geranylgeranylacetone attenuates hepatic fibrosis by increasing the expression of heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    HE, WEI; ZHUANG, YUN; WANG, LIANGZHI; QI, LEI; CHEN, BINFANG; WANG, MEI; SHAO, DONG; CHEN, JIANPING

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene may be closely associated with tissue fibrosis; however, the association between HSP70 and liver fibrosis remains to be fully elucidated. The present study hypothesized that geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) exerts beneficial effects on liver fibrosis though upregulation of the expression of HSP70. Liver fibrosis was induced in rats using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The rats were subsequently divided into three groups: Control group, CCl4 model group and CCl4 model + GGA group. Liver fibrosis in the rats was evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Sirius red staining. The levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin were determined using an automated biochemistry analyzer. The levels of total hepatic hydroxyproline were also determined. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined using immunofluorescence staining and western blotting, and the protein expression levels of HSP70 were determined using western blotting. The CCl4-induced rats exhibited liver fibrosis, increased hydroxyproline content, impaired liver function, upregulated expression levels of the α-SMA and TGF-β1 pro-fibrogenic proteins, and increased expression of HSP70, compared with the control group. These changes were attenuated by treatment with GGA. These results demonstrated that GGA exerted beneficial effects in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis via upregulating the expression of HSP70. PMID:26165998

  16. Geranylgeranylacetone attenuates hepatic fibrosis by increasing the expression of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Zhuang, Yun; Wang, Liangzhi; Qi, Lei; Chen, Binfang; Wang, Mei; Shao, Dong; Chen, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene may be closely associated with tissue fibrosis; however, the association between HSP70 and liver fibrosis remains to be fully elucidated. The present study hypothesized that geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) exerts beneficial effects on liver fibrosis though upregulation of the expression of HSP70. Liver fibrosis was induced in rats using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The rats were subsequently divided into three groups: Control group, CCl4 model group and CCl4 model + GGA group. Liver fibrosis in the rats was evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Sirius red staining. The levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin were determined using an automated biochemistry analyzer. The levels of total hepatic hydroxyproline were also determined. The expression levels of α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA) and transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1) were determined using immunofluorescence staining and western blotting, and the protein expression levels of HSP70 were determined using western blotting. The CCl4‑induced rats exhibited liver fibrosis, increased hydroxyproline content, impaired liver function, upregulated expression levels of the α‑SMA and TGF‑β1 pro‑fibrogenic proteins, and increased expression of HSP70, compared with the control group. These changes were attenuated by treatment with GGA. These results demonstrated that GGA exerted beneficial effects in CCl4‑induced liver fibrosis via upregulating the expression of HSP70.

  17. Expression of BMP and Actin Membrane Bound Inhibitor Is Increased during Terminal Differentiation of MSCs

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Alexandra; Berner, Arne; Schmitz, Paul; Koch, Matthias; Nerlich, Michael; Mueller, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are mimicking embryonal endochondral ossification and become hypertrophic. BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) and Activin Membrane Bound Inhibitor (BAMBI) is a pseudoreceptor that regulates the activity of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and BMP signalling during chondrogenesis. Both TGF-β and BMP signalling are regulators of chondrogenic cell differentiation. Human bone marrow derived MSCs were chondrogenically predifferentiated in aggregate culture for 14 days. Thereafter, one group was subjected to hypertrophy enhancing media conditions while controls were kept in chondrogenic medium until day 28. Histological evaluation, gene expression by PCR, and Western blot analysis were carried out at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 17, 21, and 28. A subset of cultures was treated with the BMP inhibitor Noggin to test for BMP dependent expression of BAMBI. Hypertrophic differentiated pellets showed larger cells with increased collagen 10 and alkaline phosphatase staining. There was significantly increased expression of BAMBI on gene expression and protein level in hypertrophic cultures compared to the chondrogenic control and increased BMP4 gene expression. Immunohistochemistry showed intense staining of BAMBI in hypertrophic cells. BAMBI expression was dose-dependently downregulated by Noggin. The pseudoreceptor BAMBI is upregulated upon enhancement of hypertrophy in MSC chondrogenic differentiation by a BMP dependent mechanism. PMID:27843458

  18. Expression of BMP and Actin Membrane Bound Inhibitor Is Increased during Terminal Differentiation of MSCs.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Christian G; Karl, Alexandra; Berner, Arne; Zellner, Johannes; Schmitz, Paul; Loibl, Markus; Koch, Matthias; Angele, Peter; Nerlich, Michael; Mueller, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are mimicking embryonal endochondral ossification and become hypertrophic. BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) and Activin Membrane Bound Inhibitor (BAMBI) is a pseudoreceptor that regulates the activity of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and BMP signalling during chondrogenesis. Both TGF-β and BMP signalling are regulators of chondrogenic cell differentiation. Human bone marrow derived MSCs were chondrogenically predifferentiated in aggregate culture for 14 days. Thereafter, one group was subjected to hypertrophy enhancing media conditions while controls were kept in chondrogenic medium until day 28. Histological evaluation, gene expression by PCR, and Western blot analysis were carried out at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 17, 21, and 28. A subset of cultures was treated with the BMP inhibitor Noggin to test for BMP dependent expression of BAMBI. Hypertrophic differentiated pellets showed larger cells with increased collagen 10 and alkaline phosphatase staining. There was significantly increased expression of BAMBI on gene expression and protein level in hypertrophic cultures compared to the chondrogenic control and increased BMP4 gene expression. Immunohistochemistry showed intense staining of BAMBI in hypertrophic cells. BAMBI expression was dose-dependently downregulated by Noggin. The pseudoreceptor BAMBI is upregulated upon enhancement of hypertrophy in MSC chondrogenic differentiation by a BMP dependent mechanism.

  19. Growth increase of Arabidopsis by forced expression of rice 45S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Makabe, So; Motohashi, Reiko; Nakamura, Ikuo

    2017-02-01

    Forced expression of rice 45S rRNA gene conferred ca. 2-fold increase of above-ground growth in transgenic Arabidopsis . This growth increase was probably brought by cell proliferation, not by cell enlargement. Recent increase in carbon dioxide emissions is causing global climate change. The use of plant biomass as alternative energy source is one way to reduce these emissions. Therefore, reinforcement of plant biomass production is an urgent key issue to overcome both depletion of fossil energies and emission of carbon dioxide. Here, we created transgenic Arabidopsis with a 2-fold increase in above-ground growth by forced expression of the rice 45S rRNA gene using the maize ubiquitin promoter. Although the size of guard cells and ploidy of leaf-cells were similar between transgenic and control plants, numbers of stomata and pavement cells were much increased in the transgenic leaf. This data suggested that cell number, not cell expansion, was responsible for the growth increase, which might be brought by the forced expression of exogenous and full-length 45S rRNA gene. The expression level of rice 45S rRNA transcripts was very low, possibly triggering unknown machinery to enhance cell proliferation. Although microarray analysis showed enhanced expression of ethylene-responsive transcription factors, these factors might respond to ethylene induced by abiotic/biotic stresses or genomic incompatibility, which might be involved in the expression of species-specific internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences within rice 45S rRNA transcripts. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying the growth increase will contribute to understanding the regulation of the cell proliferation and the mechanism of hybrid vigor.

  20. Lung arginase expression and activity is increased in cystic fibrosis mouse models.

    PubMed

    Jaecklin, Thomas; Duerr, Julia; Huang, Hailu; Rafii, Mahroukh; Bear, Christine E; Ratjen, Felix; Pencharz, Paul; Kavanagh, Brian P; Mall, Marcus A; Grasemann, Hartmut

    2014-08-01

    The activity of arginase is increased in airway secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Downstream products of arginase activity may contribute to CF lung disease. We hypothesized that pulmonary arginase expression and activity would be increased in mouse models of CF and disproportionally increased in CF mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Expression of arginase isoforms in lung tissue was quantified with reverse transcriptase-PCR in naive cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-deficient mice and β-epithelial sodium channel-overexpressing [β-ENaC-transgenic (Tg)] mice. An isolated lung stable isotope perfusion model was used to measure arginase activity in Cftr-deficient mice before and after intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The expression of arginase-2 in lung was increased in adult Cftr-deficient animals and in newborn β-ENaC-Tg. Arginase-1 lung expression was normal in Cftr-deficient and in newborn β-ENaC-Tg mice, but was increased in β-ENaC-Tg mice at age 1, 3, and 6 wk. Arginase activity was significantly higher in lung (5.0 ± 0.7 vs. 3.2 ± 0.3 nmol·(-1)·h(-1), P = 0.016) and airways (204.6 ± 49.8 vs. 79.3 ± 17.2 nmol·(-1)·h(-1), P = 0.045) of naive Cftr-deficient mice compared with sex-matched wild-type littermate controls. Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulted in a far greater increase in lung arginase activity in Cftr-deficient mice (10-fold) than in wild-type controls (6-fold) (P = 0.01). This is the first ex vivo characterization of arginase expression and activity in CF mouse lung and airways. Our data show that pulmonary arginase expression and activity is increased in CF mice, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

  1. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase expression in mouse liver is increased in obesity- and fasting-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jialin; Kulkarni, Supriya R; Li, Liya; Slitt, Angela L

    2012-02-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugt) catalyze phase II conjugation reactions with glucuronic acid, which enhances chemical polarity and the elimination from the body. Few studies have addressed whether Ugt expression and activity are affected by liver disease, such as steatosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether steatosis induced by obesity or fasting could affect liver Ugt mRNA expression and activity. Male C57BL/6J and Lep(ob/ob) (ob/ob) mice were fed ad libitum or food was withheld for 24 h. In steatotic livers of ob/ob mice, Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a9, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression increased. Fasting, which also induced steatosis, increased hepatic Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a7, -1a9, -2b1, -2b5, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression in mouse liver. Likewise, acetaminophen glucuronidation increased by 47% in hepatic microsomes from ob/ob mice compared with that in C57BL/6J mice, but not after fasting. In both steatosis models, Ugt induction was accompanied by increased aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, pregnane X receptor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α mRNA expression. In addition, fasting increased CAR, PPAR, and Nrf2 binding activity. The work points to hepatic triglyceride concentrations corresponding with nuclear receptor and Ugt expression. The findings indicate that steatosis significantly alters hepatic Ugt expression and activity, which could have a significant impact on determining circulating hormone levels, drug efficacy, and environmental chemical clearance.

  2. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Expression in Mouse Liver Is Increased in Obesity- and Fasting-Induced Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jialin; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Li, Liya

    2012-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugt) catalyze phase II conjugation reactions with glucuronic acid, which enhances chemical polarity and the elimination from the body. Few studies have addressed whether Ugt expression and activity are affected by liver disease, such as steatosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether steatosis induced by obesity or fasting could affect liver Ugt mRNA expression and activity. Male C57BL/6J and Lepob/ob (ob/ob) mice were fed ad libitum or food was withheld for 24 h. In steatotic livers of ob/ob mice, Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a9, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression increased. Fasting, which also induced steatosis, increased hepatic Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a7, -1a9, -2b1, -2b5, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression in mouse liver. Likewise, acetaminophen glucuronidation increased by 47% in hepatic microsomes from ob/ob mice compared with that in C57BL/6J mice, but not after fasting. In both steatosis models, Ugt induction was accompanied by increased aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, pregnane X receptor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α mRNA expression. In addition, fasting increased CAR, PPAR, and Nrf2 binding activity. The work points to hepatic triglyceride concentrations corresponding with nuclear receptor and Ugt expression. The findings indicate that steatosis significantly alters hepatic Ugt expression and activity, which could have a significant impact on determining circulating hormone levels, drug efficacy, and environmental chemical clearance. PMID:22031624

  3. Deimination level and peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 expression are elevated in astrocytes with increased incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Serra, Horacio M

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes respond to environmental cues, including changes in temperatures. Increased deimination, observed in many progressive neurological diseases, is thought to be contributed by astrocytes. We determined the level of deimination and expression of peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in isolated primary astrocytes in response to changes on either side (31°C and 41°C) of the optimal temperature (37°C). We investigated changes in the astrocytes by using a number of established markers and accounted for cell death with the CellTiter-Blue assay. We found increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, ALDH1L1, and J1-31, resulting from increased incubation temperature and increased expression of TSP1, S100β, and AQP4, resulting from decreased incubation temperature vs. optimal temperature, suggesting activation of different biochemical pathways in astrocytes associated with different incubation temperatures. Mass spectrometric analyses support such trends. The PAD2 level was increased only as a result of increased incubation temperature with a commensurate increased level of deimination. Actin cytoskeleton and iso[4]LGE, a lipid peroxidase modification, also showed an increase with higher incubation temperature. Altogether, these results suggest that temperature, as an environmental cue, activates astrocytes in a different manner on either side of the optimal temperature and that increase in deimination is associated only with the higher temperature side of the spectrum.

  4. Effect of ploidy increase on transgene expression: example from Citrus diploid cybrid and allotetraploid somatic hybrid expressing the EGFP gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi-Xiao; Cai, Xiao-Dong; Tan, Bin; Li, Ding-Li; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2011-07-01

    Polyploidization is an important speciation mechanism for all eukaryotes, and it has profound impacts on biodiversity dynamics and ecosystem functioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used as an effective marker to visually screen somatic hybrids at an early stage in protoplast fusion. We have previously reported that the intensity of GFP fluorescence of regenerated embryoids was also an early indicator of ploidy level. However, little is known concerning the effects of ploidy increase on the GFP expression in citrus somatic hybrids at the plant level. Herein, allotetraploid and diploid cybrid plants with enhanced GFP (EGFP) expression were regenerated from the fusion of embryogenic callus protoplasts from 'Murcott' tangor (Citrus reticulata Blanco × Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) and mesophyll protoplasts from transgenic 'Valencia' orange (C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck) expressing the EGFP gene, via electrofusion. Subsequent simple sequence repeat (SSR), chloroplast simple sequence repeat and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence analysis revealed that the two regenerated tetraploid plants were true allotetraploid somatic hybrids possessing nuclear genomic DNA of both parents and cytoplasmic DNA from the callus parent, while the five regenerated diploid plants were cybrids containing nuclear DNA of the leaf parent and with complex segregation of cytoplasmic DNA. Furthermore, EGFP expression was compared in cells and protoplasts from mature leaves of these diploid cybrids and allotetraploid somatic hybrids. Results showed that the intensity of GFP fluorescence per cell or protoplast in diploid was generally brighter than in allotetraploid. Moreover, same hybridization signal was detected on allotetraploid and diploid plants by Southern blot analysis. By real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, GFP expression level of the diploid cybrid was revealed significantly higher than that of the allotetraploid somatic hybrid. These results suggest that ploidy

  5. Chemoresistance of CD133(+) colon cancer may be related with increased survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Ra; Ji, Sun-Young; Mia-Jan, Khalilullah; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2015-07-31

    CD133, putative cancer stem cell marker, deemed to aid chemoresistance. However, this claim has been challenged recently and we previously reported that patients with CD133(+) colon cancer have benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy incontrast to no benefit in patients with CD133(-) cancer. To elucidate the role of CD133 expression in chemoresistance, we silenced the CD133 expression in a colon cancer cell line and determined its effect on the biological characteristics downstream. We comparatively analyzed the sequential changes of MDR1, ABCG2, AKT1 and survivin expression and the result of proliferation assay (WST-1 assay) with 5-FU treatment in CD133(+) and siRNA-induced CD133(-) cells, derived from Caco-2 colon cancer cell line. 5-FU treatment induced significantly increase of the mRNA expression of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1genes, but not protein level. CD133 had little to no effect on the mRNA and protein expression of these genes. However, survivin expression at mRNA and protein level were significantly increased in CD133(+) cells compared with siRNA-induced CD133-cells and Mock (not sorted CD133(+) cells) at 96 h after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated notable increase of chemoresistance to 5-FU treatment (10 μM) in CD133(+) cells at 96 h after siRNA transfection. From this study, we conclude that CD133(+) cells may have chemoresistance to 5-FU through the mechanism which is related with survivin expression, instead of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. Therefore a survivin inhibitor can be a new target for effective treatment of CD133(+) colon cancer.

  6. Increased expression of interleukin-22 in patients with giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Zerbini, Alessandro; Muratore, Francesco; Boiardi, Luigi; Ciccia, Francesco; Bonacini, Martina; Belloni, Lucia; Cavazza, Alberto; Cimino, Luca; Moramarco, Antonio; Alessandro, Riccardo; Rizzo, Aroldo; Parmeggiani, Maria; Salvarani, Carlo; Croci, Stefania

    2017-09-07

    GCA is characterized by arterial remodelling driven by inflammation. IL-22 is an attractive cytokine which acts at the crosstalk between immune and stromal cells. We hypothesized that IL-22 might be induced in GCA and might be involved in disease pathogenesis. Patients subjected to temporal artery biopsies (TABs) naïve from therapy were enrolled: 27 biopsy-proven GCA, 8 biopsy-negative GCA, 21 biopsy-negative non-GCA patients. Expression of IL-22 was determined in TABs by immunohystochemistry, in plasma by ELISA, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Effects of IL-22 on viability and gene expression of primary cultures obtained from TABs were also evaluated. Inflamed TABs from GCA patients showed a higher expression of IL-22 and IL-22 specific receptor subunit (IL-22R1) than non-inflamed TABs. IL-22 was expressed in infiltrating immune cells and spindle shaped cells, IL-22R1 was expressed in endothelial cells. Patients with biopsy-proven GCA showed increased levels of IL-22 in plasma than patients with biopsy-negative GCA, without GCA and healthy subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from GCA patients expressed higher IL-22 transcript than healthy subjects. After stimulation in vitro with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin, the frequencies of Th22 and IL-22 + CD4 + lymphocytes were similar between patients with and without GCA. Treatment with IL-22 of primary cultures obtained from TABs increased cell viability under stress conditions and expression of B-cell activating factor. IL-22 is increased in patients with GCA and affects viability and gene expression of arterial cells, supporting a potential role in disease pathogenesis.

  7. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  8. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G; Beazely, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  9. Increased expression of multiple neurofilament mRNAs during regeneration of vertebrate central nervous system axons.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Christine; Thyagarajan, Amar; Szaro, Ben G

    2003-06-23

    Characteristic changes in the expression of neuronal intermediate filaments (nIFs), an abundant cytoskeletal component of vertebrate axons, accompany successful axon regeneration. In mammalian regenerating PNS, expression of nIFs that are characteristic of mature neurons becomes suppressed throughout regeneration, whereas that of peripherin, which is abundant in developing axons, increases. Comparable changes are absent from mammalian injured CNS; but in goldfish and lamprey CNS, expression of several nIFs increases during axon regrowth. To obtain a broader view of the nIF response of successfully regenerating vertebrate CNS, in situ hybridization and video densitometry were used to track multiple nIF mRNAs during optic axon regeneration in Xenopus laevis. As in other successfully regenerating systems, peripherin expression increased rapidly after injury and expression of those nIFs characteristic of mature retinal ganglion cells decreased. Unlike the decrease in nIF mRNAs of regenerating PNS, that of Xenopus retinal ganglion cells was transient, with most nIF mRNAs increasing above normal during axon regrowth. At the peak of regeneration, increases in each nIF mRNA resulted in a doubling of the total amount of nIF mRNA, as well as a shift in the relative proportions contributed by each nIF. The relative proportions of peripherin and NF-M increased above normal, whereas proportions of xefiltin and NF-L decreased and that of XNIF remained the same. The increases in peripherin and NF-M mRNAs were accompanied by increases in protein. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that successful axon regeneration involves changes in nIF subunit composition conducive to growth and argue that a successful injury response differs between CNS and PNS. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kotti, Angeliki Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  11. ZEB1 expression is increased in IDH1-mutant lower-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Nesvick, Cody L; Zhang, Chao; Edwards, Nancy A; Montgomery, Blake K; Lee, Michaela; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Zhu, Dongwang; Heiss, John D; Merrill, Marsha J; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2016-10-01

    Transcription factors that induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) promote invasion, chemoresistance and a stem-cell phenotype in epithelial tumors, but their roles in central nervous system tumors are not well-understood. We hypothesized these transcription factors have a functional impact in grades II-III gliomas. Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) and the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lower-Grade Glioma (LGG) data, we determined the impact of EMT-promoting transcription factors (EMT-TFs) on overall survival in grades II-III gliomas, compared their expression across common genetic subtypes and subsequently validated these findings in a set of 31 tumors using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Increased expression of the gene coding for the transcriptional repressor Zinc Finger E box-binding Homeobox 1 (ZEB1) was associated with a significant increase in overall survival (OS) on Kaplan-Meier analysis. Genetic subtype analysis revealed that ZEB1 expression was relatively increased in IDH1/2-mutant gliomas, and IDH1/2-mutant gliomas expressed significantly lower levels of many ZEB1 transcriptional targets. Similarly, IDH1/2-mutant tumors expressed significantly higher levels of targets of microRNA 200C (MIR200C), a key regulator of ZEB1. In a validation study, ZEB1 mRNA was significantly increased in IDH1-mutant grades II-III gliomas, and ZEB1 protein expression was more pronounced in these tumors. Our findings demonstrate a novel relationship between IDH1/2 mutations and expression of ZEB1 and its transcriptional targets. Therapy targeting ZEB1-associated pathways may represent a novel therapeutic avenue for this class of tumors.

  12. Absence of functional TolC protein causes increased stress response gene expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The TolC protein from Sinorhizobium meliloti has previously been demonstrated to be required for establishing successful biological nitrogen fixation symbiosis with Medicago sativa. It is also needed in protein and exopolysaccharide secretion and for protection against osmotic and oxidative stresses. Here, the transcriptional profile of free-living S. meliloti 1021 tolC mutant is described as a step toward understanding its role in the physiology of the cell. Results Comparison of tolC mutant and wild-type strains transcriptomes showed 1177 genes with significantly increased expression while 325 had significantly decreased expression levels. The genes with an increased expression suggest the activation of a cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic stress responses possibly mediated by the sigma factor RpoH1 and protein homologues of the CpxRA two-component regulatory system of Enterobacteria, respectively. Stress conditions are probably caused by perturbation of the cell envelope. Consistent with gene expression data, biochemical analysis indicates that the tolC mutant suffers from oxidative stress. This is illustrated by the elevated enzyme activity levels detected for catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. The observed increase in the expression of genes encoding products involved in central metabolism and transporters for nutrient uptake suggests a higher metabolic rate of the tolC mutant. We also demonstrated increased swarming motility in the tolC mutant strain. Absence of functional TolC caused decreased expression mainly of genes encoding products involved in nitrogen metabolism and transport. Conclusion This work shows how a mutation in the outer membrane protein TolC, common to many bacterial transport systems, affects expression of a large number of genes that act in concert to restore cell homeostasis. This finding further underlines the fundamental role of this protein in Sinorhizobium meliloti biology. PMID:20573193

  13. Epithelial Cell Damage Activates Bactericidal/Permeability Increasing-Protein (BPI) Expression in Intestinal Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2017-01-01

    As the first line of defense against invading pathogen, intestinal epithelium produces various antimicrobial proteins (AMP) that help in clearance of pathogen. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) is a 55 kDa AMP that is expressed in intestinal epithelium. Dysregulation of BPI in intestinal epithelium is associated with various inflammatory diseases like Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative colitis, and Infectious enteritis's. In this paper, we report a direct correlation between intestinal damage and BPI expression. In Caco-2 cells, we see a significant increase in BPI levels upon membrane damage mediated by S. aureus infection and pore-forming toxins (Streptolysin and Listeriolysin). Cells detect changes in potassium level as a Danger-associated molecular pattern associated with cell damage and induce BPI expression in a p38 dependent manner. These results are further supported by in vivo findings that the BPI expression in murine intestinal epithelium is induced upon infection with bacteria which cause intestinal damage (Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri) whereas mutants that do not cause intestinal damage (STM ΔfliC and STM ΔinvC) did not induce BPI expression. Our results suggest that epithelial damage associated with infection act as a signal to induce BPI expression.

  14. Cortisol increases growth hormone-receptor expression in human osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Swolin-Eide, D; Nilsson, A; Ohlsson, C

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that high levels of glucocorticoids cause osteoporosis and that physiologic levels of growth hormone (GH) are required for normal bone remodeling. It has been suggested that glucocorticoids regulate GH-responses via the regulation of GH-receptor expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether cortisol plays a role in the regulation of GH-receptor expression in cultured human osteoblasts. The effect of serum starvation and cortisol on GH-receptor expression was tested in human osteoblast (hOB)-like cells. Serum starvation for 24 h resulted in an increase in GH-receptor mRNA levels (90 +/- 1% over control culture). Cortisol increased GH-receptor mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner with a maximal effect at 10(-6)M. The stimulating effect of cortisol on GH-receptor mRNA levels was time-dependent, reaching a peak 12 h after the addition of cortisol (126 +/- 29% over control culture) and remaining up to 12 h later. The increase in GH-receptor mRNA levels was accompanied by an increase in 125I-GH binding which reached a maximum at 24 h (196 +/- 87% over control culture). In conclusion, glucocorticoids increase GH-receptor expression in hOB-like cells. Further studies are needed to clarify whether glucocorticoid-induced regulation of the GH-receptor is important in human bone physiology.

  15. Role of membrane depolarization and extracellular calcium in increased complement receptor expression during neutrophil (PMN) activation

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.; Wetzler, E.; Birx, D.L.

    1986-03-05

    During PMN activation the surface expression of receptors (R) for C3b and C3bi increases rapidly. This is necessary for optimal cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis. Following stimulation with fMLP or LTB-4, the increased expression of C3bR depends only on the Ca/sup + +/ released from intracellular stores and is not inhibited by 5mM EDTA, while the increase in C3biR also requires extracellular Ca/sup + +/. CR expression also increases when the PMN are depolarized with 140 mM K/sup +/, but with this stimulus, EDTA inhibits C3bR by 67% and C3biR 100%, suggesting that intracellular Ca/sup + +/ stores may not be released. Pertussis toxin caused dose-dependent inhibition of both CR responses to fMLP and also inhibited the increases in both CR induced by K/sup +/. Membrane depolarization (monitored by di-O-C5 fluorescence) due to fMLP was similarly inhibited by toxin but the depolarization due to K/sup +/ was not. The dose of phorbol myristate acetate that maximally increased CR expression, 0.1 ng/ml, did not depolarize the membrane. These results suggest that membrane depolarization is neither necessary nor sufficient for increased CR expression. A Ca/sup + +/ and GTP binding protein-dependent enzyme such as phospholipase C is necessary to the amplify initial signals generated either by release of Ca/sup + +/ stores or by opening voltage dependent Ca/sup + +/ channels following membrane depolarization.

  16. Heterologous viral expression systems in fosmid vectors increase the functional analysis potential of metagenomic libraries

    PubMed Central

    Terrón-González, L.; Medina, C.; Limón-Mortés, M. C.; Santero, E.

    2013-01-01

    The extraordinary potential of metagenomic functional analyses to identify activities of interest present in uncultured microorganisms has been limited by reduced gene expression in surrogate hosts. We have developed vectors and specialized E. coli strains as improved metagenomic DNA heterologous expression systems, taking advantage of viral components that prevent transcription termination at metagenomic terminators. One of the systems uses the phage T7 RNA-polymerase to drive metagenomic gene expression, while the other approach uses the lambda phage transcription anti-termination protein N to limit transcription termination. A metagenomic library was constructed and functionally screened to identify genes conferring carbenicillin resistance to E. coli. The use of these enhanced expression systems resulted in a 6-fold increase in the frequency of carbenicillin resistant clones. Subcloning and sequence analysis showed that, besides β-lactamases, efflux pumps are not only able contribute to carbenicillin resistance but may in fact be sufficient by themselves to convey carbenicillin resistance. PMID:23346364

  17. Chemoresistance of CD133{sup +} colon cancer may be related with increased survivin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Mi-Ra; Ji, Sun-Young; Mia-Jan, Khalilullah; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2015-07-31

    CD133, putative cancer stem cell marker, deemed to aid chemoresistance. However, this claim has been challenged recently and we previously reported that patients with CD133{sup +} colon cancer have benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy incontrast to no benefit in patients with CD133{sup −} cancer. To elucidate the role of CD133 expression in chemoresistance, we silenced the CD133 expression in a colon cancer cell line and determined its effect on the biological characteristics downstream. We comparatively analyzed the sequential changes of MDR1, ABCG2, AKT1 and survivin expression and the result of proliferation assay (WST-1 assay) with 5-FU treatment in CD133{sup +} and siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells, derived from Caco-2 colon cancer cell line. 5-FU treatment induced significantly increase of the mRNA expression of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1genes, but not protein level. CD133 had little to no effect on the mRNA and protein expression of these genes. However, survivin expression at mRNA and protein level were significantly increased in CD133{sup +} cells compared with siRNA-induced CD133-cells and Mock (not sorted CD133{sup +} cells) at 96 h after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated notable increase of chemoresistance to 5-FU treatment (10 μM) in CD133{sup +} cells at 96 h after siRNA transfection. From this study, we conclude that CD133{sup +} cells may have chemoresistance to 5-FU through the mechanism which is related with survivin expression, instead of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. Therefore a survivin inhibitor can be a new target for effective treatment of CD133{sup +} colon cancer. - Highlights: • We evaluate the role of CD133 in chemoresistance of colon cancer. • We compared the chemoresistance of CD133{sup +} cells and siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells. • CD133 had little to no effect on MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. • Survivin expression and chemoresistance were increased in CD133{sup +} colon cancer cells.

  18. Increased expression of the immune modulatory molecule PD-L1 (CD274) in anaplastic meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ziming; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Aizer, Ayal A.; McHenry, Allison R.; Sun, Heather H.; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Viramontes, Omar; Machaidze, Revaz; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Reardon, David A.; Dunn, Ian F.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ligon, Keith L.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Alexander, Brian M.; Agar, Nathalie Y.; Rodig, Scott J.; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Santagata, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    There are no effective medical treatments for WHO grade III (anaplastic) meningioma. Patients with this high-grade malignancy have a median survival of less than two years. Therapeutics that modulate the mechanisms that inhibit local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment are showing significant and durable clinical responses in patients with treatment refractory high-grade tumors. We examined the immune infiltrate of 291 meningiomas including WHO grade I-III meningiomas using immunohistochemistry and we examined the expression of PD-L1 mRNA by RNAscope in situ hybridization and PD-L1 protein by immunohistochemistry. In meningioma, the tumor infiltrating lymphocytes are predominantly T cells. In anaplastic meningioma, there is a sharp decrease in the number of T cells, including the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and cells expressing PD-1 and there is also an increase in the number of FOXP3 expressing immunoregulatory (Treg) cells. PD-L1 expression is increased in anaplastic meningioma – both mRNA and protein. Using patient derived meningioma cell, we confirm that PD-L1 is expressed in meningioma cells themselves, and not solely in infiltrating immune cells. This work indicates that high-grade meningioma harbor an immunosuppressive tumor microenviroment and that increased Treg cells and elevated PD-L1 may contribute to the aggressive phenotype of these tumors. PMID:25609200

  19. Increased expression of the immune modulatory molecule PD-L1 (CD274) in anaplastic meningioma.

    PubMed

    Du, Ziming; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Aizer, Ayal A; McHenry, Allison R; Sun, Heather H; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Viramontes, Omar; Machaidze, Revaz; Brastianos, Priscilla K; Reardon, David A; Dunn, Ian F; Freeman, Gordon J; Ligon, Keith L; Carpenter, Anne E; Alexander, Brian M; Agar, Nathalie Y; Rodig, Scott J; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Santagata, Sandro

    2015-03-10

    There are no effective medical treatments for WHO grade III (anaplastic) meningioma. Patients with this high-grade malignancy have a median survival of less than two years. Therapeutics that modulate the mechanisms that inhibit local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment are showing significant and durable clinical responses in patients with treatment refractory high-grade tumors. We examined the immune infiltrate of 291 meningiomas including WHO grade I-III meningiomas using immunohistochemistry and we examined the expression of PD-L1 mRNA by RNAscope in situ hybridization and PD-L1 protein by immunohistochemistry. In meningioma, the tumor infiltrating lymphocytes are predominantly T cells. In anaplastic meningioma, there is a sharp decrease in the number of T cells, including the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and cells expressing PD-1 and there is also an increase in the number of FOXP3 expressing immunoregulatory (Treg) cells. PD-L1 expression is increased in anaplastic meningioma - both mRNA and protein. Using patient derived meningioma cell, we confirm that PD-L1 is expressed in meningioma cells themselves, and not solely in infiltrating immune cells. This work indicates that high-grade meningioma harbor an immunosuppressive tumor microenviroment and that increased Treg cells and elevated PD-L1 may contribute to the aggressive phenotype of these tumors.

  20. Increased FOXP3 expression in tumour-associated tissues of horses affected with equine sarcoid disease.

    PubMed

    Mählmann, K; Hamza, E; Marti, E; Dolf, G; Klukowska, J; Gerber, V; Koch, C

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are associated with disease severity and progression in papilloma virus induced neoplasia. Bovine papilloma virus (BPV) is recognised as the most important aetiological factor in equine sarcoid (ES) disease. The aim of this study was to compare expression levels of Treg markers and associated cytokines in tissue samples of ES-affected equids with skin samples of healthy control horses. Eleven ES-affected, and 12 healthy horses were included in the study. Expression levels of forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3), interleukin 10 (IL10), interleukin 4 (IL4) and interferon gamma (IFNG) mRNA in lesional and tumour-distant samples from ES-affected horses, as well as in dermal samples of healthy control horses were measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression levels were compared between lesional and tumour-distant as well as between tumour-distant and control samples. Furthermore, BPV-1 E5 DNA in samples of ES-affected horses was quantified using quantitative PCR, and possible associations of viral load, disease severity and gene expression levels were evaluated. Expression levels of FOXP3, IL10 and IFNG mRNA and BPV-1 E5 copy numbers were significantly increased in lesional compared to tumour-distant samples. There was no difference in FOXP3 and cytokine expression in tumour-distant samples from ES- compared with control horses. In tumour-distant samples viral load was positively correlated with IL10 expression and severity score. The increased expression of Treg markers in tumour-associated tissues of ES-affected equids indicates a local, Treg-induced immune suppression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased expression of the interleukin 1 receptor on blood neutrophils of humans with the sepsis syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, M B; Cousart, S; Neal, S; McCall, C E

    1991-01-01

    Because of the potential importance of interleukin 1 (IL-1) in modulating inflammation and the observations that human blood neutrophils (PMN) express IL-1 receptors (IL-1R) and synthesize IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, we studied the IL-1R on blood PMN from a group of patients with the sepsis syndrome. We report a marked enhancement in the sites per cell of IL-1R expressed on sepsis-PMN of 25 consecutively studied patients compared to 20 controls (patient mean = 9,329 +/- 2,212 SE; control mean = 716 +/- 42 SE, respectively). There was no demonstrable difference in the Kd of IL-1R on sepsis-PMN (approximately 1 nM) as determined by saturation curves of 125I-IL-1 alpha binding and the IL-1R on sepsis-PMN had an apparent Mr approximately 68,000, a value like that of normal PMN. Cytofluorographic analysis indicated that the sepsis-PMN phenotype is a single homogeneous population with respect to IL-1R expression. In contrast, expression of the membrane complement receptor CR3 is not increased on sepsis-PMN. Similar increases in expression of IL-1R were not observed in various other inflammatory processes, including acute disseminated inflammation and organ failure not caused by infection, acute infection without organ failure, and immunopathologies such as active systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Enhanced expression of IL-1R was not related simply to the state of myeloid stimulation. Increased expression of IL-1R on normal PMN was induced in vitro by incubating cells with recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage/colony-stimulating factor for 18 h and this response was inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting the possibility that de novo synthesis of IL-1R might occur in PMN during the sepsis syndrome. Images PMID:1834697

  2. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor receptors in cryptogenic organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qiao; Dai, Huaping; Sarria, Rafael; Guzman, Josune; Costabel, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    TNF receptors (TNFR1 and TNFR2) and Fas belong to the system of apoptosis-signalling receptor molecules and may play a role in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease. Patients with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) usually respond well to corticosteroids, in contrast to those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). This may be due to the different pathogenesis. The expression of TNFR1, TNFR2 and Fas on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and lymphocytes was analysed in 9 patients with COP, 10 with IPF and 12 controls. The production of soluble TNFR1, 2 and TNF-α by alveolar macrophages was measured by ELISA. TNFR1 and Fas expression on alveolar macrophages was significantly higher in COP than in controls and IPF. The expression of TNFR2 on alveolar macrophages was also increased in COP compared to controls. The expression of TNFR2 and Fas on lymphocytes was significantly higher in COP than in IPF and controls. In addition, the expression of TNFR1, TNFR2 and Fas on BAL cells correlated positively with BAL lymphocytes (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). The production of sTNFR1 and 2 and TNF-α by macrophages in vitro was significantly increased in patients with COP compared to IPF and controls, spontaneously or with LPS stimulation (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01).There was a positive correlation between the spontaneous production of sTNFR2 and TNF-α (r = 0.494, p < 0.01). This study showed an increased expression of TNF receptors and Fas on BAL cells in COP that may be indicative of the local inflammatory activity in the lung. The biologic effects of this expression needs further investigation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased SNAIL expression and low syndecan levels are associated with high Gleason grade in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    POBLETE, CRISTIAN E.; FULLA, JUAN; GALLARDO, MARCELA; MUÑOZ, VALENTINA; CASTELLÓN, ENRIQUE A.; GALLEGOS, IVAN; CONTRERAS, HECTOR R.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a leading male oncologic malignancy wideworld. During malignant transformation, normal epithelial cells undergo genetic and morphological changes known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Several regulatory genes and specific marker proteins are involved in PC EMT. Recently, syndecans have been associated with malignancy grade and Gleason score in PC. Considering that SNAIL is mainly a gene repressor increased in PC and that syndecan promoters have putative binding sites for this repressor, we propose that SNAIL might regulate syndecan expression during PC EMT. The aim of this study was to analyze immunochemically the expression of SNAIL, syndecans 1 and 2 and other EMT markers in a tissue microarray (TMA) of PC samples and PC cell lines. The TMAs included PC samples of different Gleason grade and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) samples, as non-malignant controls. PC3 and LNCaP cell lines were used as models of PC representing different tumorigenic capacities. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed on TMAs and fluorescence immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis were conducted on cell cultures. Results show that SNAIL exhibits increased expression in high Gleason specimens compared to low histological grade and BPH samples. Accordingly, PC3 cells show higher SNAIL expression levels compared to LNCaP cells. Conversely, syndecan 1, similarly to E-cadherin (a known marker of EMT), shows a decreased expression in high Gleason grades samples and PC3 cells. Interestingly, syndecan 2 shows no changes associated to histological grade. It is concluded that increased SNAIL levels in advanced PC are associated with low expression of syndecan 1. The mechanism by which SNAIL regulates the expression of syndecan 1 remains to be investigated. PMID:24424718

  4. Increased Plin2 Expression in Human Skeletal Muscle Is Associated with Sarcopenia and Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Maria; Vasuri, Francesco; Trisolino, Giovanni; Bellavista, Elena; Santoro, Aurelia; Degiovanni, Alessio; Martucci, Ermanno; D’Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Caporossi, Daniela; Capri, Miriam; Maier, Andrea B.; Seynnes, Olivier; Barberi, Laura; Musarò, Antonio; Narici, Marco V.; Franceschi, Claudio; Salvioli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive loss of muscle mass and strength and a concomitant fat accumulation in form of inter-muscular adipose tissue, causing skeletal muscle function decline and immobilization. Fat accumulation can also occur as intra-muscular triglycerides (IMTG) deposition in lipid droplets, which are associated with perilipin proteins, such as Perilipin2 (Plin2). It is not known whether Plin2 expression changes with age and if this has consequences on muscle mass and strength. We studied the expression of Plin2 in the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle of both healthy subjects and patients affected by lower limb mobility limitation of different age. We found that Plin2 expression increases with age, this phenomenon being particularly evident in patients. Moreover, Plin2 expression is inversely correlated with quadriceps strength and VL thickness. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon, we focused on IGF-1/p53 network/signalling pathway, involved in muscle physiology. We found that Plin2 expression strongly correlates with increased p53 activation and reduced IGF-1 expression. To confirm these observations made on humans, we studied mice overexpressing muscle-specific IGF-1, which are protected from sarcopenia. These mice resulted almost negative for the expression of Plin2 and p53 at two years of age. We conclude that fat deposition within skeletal muscle in form of Plin2-coated lipid droplets increases with age and is associated with decreased muscle strength and thickness, likely through an IGF-1- and p53-dependent mechanism. The data also suggest that excessive intramuscular fat accumulation could be the initial trigger for p53 activation and consequent loss of muscle mass and strength. PMID:23977392

  5. Exercise-Mediated Increase in Nigral Tyrosine Hydroxylase Is Accompanied by Increased Nigral GFR-α1 and EAAC1 Expression in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jennifer C.; Salvatore, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise may alleviate locomotor impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) or aging. Identifying molecular responses immediately engaged by exercise in the nigrostriatal pathway and allied tissue may reveal critical targets associated with its long-term benefits. In aging, there is loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor, GFR-α1, in the substantia nigra (SN). Exercise can increase GDNF expression, but its effect on GFR-α1 expression is unknown. Infusion of GDNF into striatum or GFR-α1 in SN, respectively, can increase locomotor activity and TH function in SN but not striatum in aged rats. GDNF may also increase glutamate transporter expression, which attenuates TH loss in PD models. We utilized a footshock-free treadmill exercise regimen to determine the immediate impact of short-term exercise on GFR-α1 expression, dopamine regulation, glutamate transporter expression, and glutamate uptake in 18 month old male Brown-Norway/Fischer 344 F1 hybrid rats. GFR-α1 and TH expression significantly increased in SN but not striatum. This exercise regimen did not affect glutamate uptake or glutamate transporter expression in striatum. However, EAAC1 expression increased in SN. These results indicate that nigral GFR-α1 and EAAC1 expression increased in conjunction with increased nigral TH expression following short-term exercise. PMID:26599339

  6. Elevated PrPC expression predisposes to increased HSV-1 pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    PrPC is a ubiquitously expressed glycophos-phatidylinositol-linked cell-surface glycoprotein found primarily in neural tissue. Although its normal function has not been established, there is evidence suggesting that PrPC is involved in cell signalling and cellular homeostasis. This suggests that variation in neuronal expression levels of this protein contributes towards pathogenicity induced by neurotropic agents. We have investigated the pathological response to infection with herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) in strains of mice that express different levels of PrPC. Prnp-/- mice fail to express PrPC due to an interruption in the open reading frame of the Prnp gene, whilst tg19 and tga20 mice express approximately 5 and 10 times more PrPC protein, respectively, than wild-type animals. Mice that express normal or increased levels of PrPC protein were more susceptible to acute HSV-1 infection than Prnp-/- mice. Following ear pinna inoculation with HSV-1 SC16, the order of susceptibility was tga20>tg19>wild-type>Prnp-/-. This trend was reversed when latent virus was assessed. Prnp-/- mice expressed significantly higher levels of latency-associated transcript-positive neurons in various tissues when compared with wild-type, tg19 and tga20 mice. Collectively, our data show that acute HSV-1 replication proceeds more efficiently in neuronal tissue that expresses PrPC protein and lends support to the view that this protein is involved in regulation of neurotropic viral pathogenesis. This suggests that interference of PrPC expression, or possible biochemical pathways associated with its function, may serve as an effective means of limiting the pathogenesis of acute HSV-1 infection.

  7. Baicalin increases VEGF expression and angiogenesis by activating the ERRα/PGC-1α pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keqiang; Lu, Jianming; Mori, Taisuke; Smith-Powell, Leslie; Synold, Timothy W.; Chen, Shiuan; Wen, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Aims Baicalin is the major component found in Scutellaria baicalensis root, a widely used herb in traditional Chinese medicine. Although it has been used for thousands of years to treat stroke, the mechanisms of action of S. baicalensis have not been clearly elucidated. In this report, we studied the modulation of angiogenesis as one possible mechanism by investigating the effects of these agents on expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a critical factor for angiogenesis. Methods and results The effects of baicalin and an extract of S. baicalensis on VEGF expression were tested in several cell lines. Both agents induced VEGF expression in all cells without increasing expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). The expression of reporter genes was also activated under the control of the VEGF promoter containing either a functional or a defective HIF response element (HRE). Only minimal effects were observed on reporter activation under the HRE promoter. Instead, both agents significantly induced oestrogen-related receptor (ERRα) expression as well as the activity of reporter genes under the control of ERRα-binding element. Their ability to induce VEGF expression was suppressed once ERRα expression was knocked down by siRNA or ERRα-binding sites were deleted in the VEGF promoter. We also found that both agents stimulated cell migration and vessel sprout formation from the aorta. Conclusion Our results implicate baicalin and S. baicalensis in angiogenesis by inducing VEGF expression through the activation of the ERRα pathway. These data may facilitate a better understanding of the potential health benefits of these agents in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20851810

  8. Increased Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Gene Expression and Steatosis during Hepatitis C Virus Subgenome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Ishtiaq; Choudhury, Mahua; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Knotts, Trina A.; Janssen, Rachel C.; Schaack, Jerome; Iwahashi, Mieko; Puljak, Livia; Simon, Francis R.; Kilic, Gordan; Fitz, J. Gregory; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated transcription factors are dramatically up-regulated in Huh.8 cells, which stably express an HCV subgenome replicon. HCV increased activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and involved activation of the cAMP response element in the PEPCK promoter. Infection with dominant-negative CREB or C/EBPβ-shRNA significantly reduced or normalized PEPCK expression, with no change in PGC-1α or FOXO1 levels. Notably, expression of HCV nonstructural component NS5A in Huh7 or primary hepatocytes stimulated PEPCK gene expression and glucose output in HepG2 cells, whereas a deletion in NS5A reduced PEPCK expression and lowered cellular lipids but was without effect on insulin resistance, as demonstrated by the inability of insulin to stimulate mobilization of a pool of insulin-responsive vesicles to the plasma membrane. HCV-replicating cells demonstrated increases in cellular lipids with insulin resistance at the level of the insulin receptor, increased insulin receptor substrate 1 (Ser-312), and decreased Akt (Ser-473) activation in response to insulin. C/EBPβ-RNAi normalized lipogenic genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and liver X receptor α but was unable to reduce accumulation of triglycerides in Huh.8 cells or reverse the increase in ApoB expression, suggesting a role for increased lipid retention in steatotic hepatocytes. Collectively, these data reveal an important role of NS5A, C/EBPβ, and pCREB in promoting HCV-induced gluconeogenic gene expression

  9. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  10. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2011-10-14

    Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  11. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1

    PubMed Central

    Vollbrecht, Peter J.; Simmler, Linda D.; Blakely, Randy D.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2014-01-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for >90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggests that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. PMID:24611756

  12. Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Jedidi, Iness; Couturier, Martine; Therond, Patrice; Gardes-Albert, Monique; Legrand, Alain; Barouki, Robert; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Aggerbeck, Martine . E-mail: Martine.Aggerbeck@univ-paris5.fr

    2006-12-22

    The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The scavenger receptor CD36 is one major receptor that internalizes oxidized LDL. In differentiated human macrophages, we compared the regulation of CD36 expression by copper-oxidized LDL or their products. Only oxidized derivatives of cholesteryl ester (CEOOH) increased the amount of CD36 mRNA (2.5-fold). Both oxidized LDL and CEOOH treatment increased two to fourfold the transcription of promoters containing peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor responsive elements (PPRE) in the presence of PPAR{alpha} or {gamma}. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assays with nuclear extracts prepared from macrophages treated by either oxidized LDL or CEOOH showed increased binding of PPAR{alpha} to the CD36 gene promoter PPRE. In conclusion, CEOOH present in oxidized LDL increase CD36 gene expression in a pathway involving PPAR{alpha}.

  13. Fight or flight? - Flight increases immune gene expression but does not help to fight an infection.

    PubMed

    Woestmann, L; Kvist, J; Saastamoinen, M

    2017-03-01

    Flight represents a key trait in most insects, being energetically extremely demanding, yet often necessary for foraging and reproduction. Additionally, dispersal via flight is especially important for species living in fragmented landscapes. Even though, based on life-history theory, a negative relationship may be expected between flight and immunity, a number of previous studies have indicated flight to induce an increased immune response. In this study, we assessed whether induced immunity (i.e. immune gene expression) in response to 15-min forced flight treatment impacts individual survival of bacterial infection in the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia). We were able to confirm previous findings of flight-induced immune gene expression, but still observed substantially stronger effects on both gene expression levels and life span due to bacterial infection compared to flight treatment. Even though gene expression levels of some immunity-related genes were elevated due to flight, these individuals did not show increased survival of bacterial infection, indicating that flight-induced immune activation does not completely protect them from the negative effects of bacterial infection. Finally, an interaction between flight and immune treatment indicated a potential trade-off: flight treatment increased immune gene expression in naïve individuals only, whereas in infected individuals no increase in immune gene expression was induced by flight. Our results suggest that the up-regulation of immune genes upon flight is based on a general stress response rather than reflecting an adaptive response to cope with potential infections during flight or in new habitats.

  14. Increased expression of estrogen-related receptor β during adaptation of adult cardiomyocytes to sustained hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Kathryn F; Beeson, Gyda C; Beeson, Craig C; McDermott, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related Receptors (ERR) are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors that regulate expression of genes required for energy metabolism including mitochondrial biogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While ERRα and EPPγ isoforms are known to share a wide array of target genes in the adult myocardium, the function of ERRβ has not been characterized in cardiomyocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of ERRβ in regulating energy metabolism in adult cardiomyocytes in primary culture. Adult feline cardiomyocytes were electrically stimulated to contract in either hypoxia (0.5% O2) or normoxia (21% O2). As compared to baseline values measured in normoxia, ERRβ mRNA levels increased significantly after 8 hours of hypoxia and remained elevated over 24 h. Conversely, ERRβ mRNA decreased to normoxic levels after 4 hours of reoxygenation. Hypoxia increased expression of the α and β isoforms of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Coactivator-1 (PGC-1) mRNA by 6-fold and 3-fold, respectively. Knockdown of ERRβ expression via adenoviral-mediated delivery of ERRβ shRNA blocked hypoxia-induced increases in PGC-1β mRNA, but not PGC-1α mRNA. Loss of ERRβ had no effect on mtDNA content as measured after 24 h of hypoxia. To determine whether loss of ERRβ affected mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates (OCR) were measured in contracting versus quiescent cardiomyocytes in normoxia. OCR was significantly lower in contracting cardiomyocytes expressing ERRβ shRNA than scrambled shRNA controls. Maximal OCR also was reduced by ERRβ knockdown. In conclusion: 1) hypoxia increases in ERRβ mRNA expression in contracting cardiomyocytes; 2) ERRβ is required for induction of the PGC-1β isoform in response to hypoxia; 3) ERRβ expression is required to sustain OCR in normoxic conditions. PMID:27335690

  15. Podoplanin expression in primary brain tumors induces platelet aggregation and increases risk of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Julia; Preusser, Matthias; Nazari, Pegah Mir Seyed; Posch, Florian; Panzer, Simon; Marosi, Christine; Birner, Peter; Thaler, Johannes; Brostjan, Christine; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2017-03-30

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in patients with brain tumors, and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that podoplanin, a sialomucin-like glycoprotein, increases the risk of VTE in primary brain tumors via its ability to induce platelet aggregation. Immunohistochemical staining against podoplanin and intratumoral platelet aggregates was performed in brain tumor specimens of 213 patients (mostly high-grade gliomas [89%]) included in the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study, a prospective observational cohort study of patients with newly diagnosed cancer or progressive disease aimed at identifying patients at risk of VTE. Platelet aggregation in response to primary human glioblastoma cells was investigated in vitro. During 2-year follow-up, 29 (13.6%) patients developed VTE. One-hundred fifty-one tumor specimens stained positive for podoplanin (33 high expression, 47 medium expression, 71 low expression). Patients with podoplanin-positive tumors had lower peripheral blood platelet counts (P < .001) and higher D-dimer levels (P < .001). Podoplanin staining intensity was associated with increasing levels of intravascular platelet aggregates in tumor specimens (P < .001). High podoplanin expression was associated with an increased risk of VTE (hazard ratio for high vs no podoplanin expression: 5.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-21.26; P =010), independent of age, sex, and tumor type. Podoplanin-positive primary glioblastoma cells induced aggregation of human platelets in vitro, which could be abrogated by an antipodoplanin antibody. In conclusion, high podoplanin expression in primary brain tumors induces platelet aggregation, correlates with hypercoagulability, and is associated with increased risk of VTE. Our data indicate novel insights into the pathogenesis of VTE in primary brain tumors. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor B (TNFB) Genetic Variants and Its Increased Expression Are Associated with Vitiligo Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Laddha, Naresh C.; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Gani, Amina R.; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2013-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in TNFB are involved in the regulation of its expression and are found to be associated with various autoimmune diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TNFB +252A/G (rs909253) and exon 3 C/A (rs1041981) polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo susceptibility, and expression of TNFB and ICAM1 affects the disease onset and progression. We have earlier reported the role of TNFA in autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo, and we now show the involvement of TNFB in vitiligo pathogenesis. The two polymorphisms investigated in the TNFB were in strong linkage disequilibrium and significantly associated with vitiligo. TNFB and ICAM1 transcripts were significantly increased in patients compared to controls. Active vitiligo patients showed significant increase in TNFB transcripts compared to stable vitiligo. The genotype-phenotype analysis revealed that TNFB expression levels were higher in patients with GG and AA genotypes as compared to controls. Patients with the early age of onset and female patients showed higher TNFB and ICAM1 expression. Overall, our findings suggest that the increased TNFB transcript levels in vitiligo patients could result, at least in part, from variations at the genetic level which in turn leads to increased ICAM1 expression. For the first time, we show that TNFB +252A/G and exon 3 C/A polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo susceptibility and influence the TNFB and ICAM1 expression. Moreover, the study also emphasizes influence of TNFB and ICAM1 on the disease progression, onset and gender bias for developing vitiligo. PMID:24312346

  17. TNFα Increases RANKL Expression via PGE2-Induced Activation of NFATc1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Baek, Kyunghwa; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is known to upregulate the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). We investigated the role of the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling pathway in TNFα-induced RANKL expression in C2C12 and primary cultured mouse calvarial cells. TNFα-induced RANKL expression was blocked by the calcineurin/NFAT pathway inhibitors. TNFα increased NFAT transcriptional activity and subsequent RANKL promoter binding. Mutations in the NFAT-binding element (MT(N)) suppressed TNFα-induced RANKL promoter activity. TNFα increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, which in turn enhanced NFAT transcriptional activity and binding to the RANKL promoter. MT(N) suppressed PGE2-induced RANKL promoter activity. TNFα and PGE2 increased the expression of RANKL, NFAT cytoplasmic-1 (NFATc1), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2); which increment was suppressed by indomethacin, a COX inhibitor. Mutations in the CRE-like element blocked PGE2-induced RANKL promoter activity. PGE2 induced the binding of CREB to the RANKL promoter, whereas TNFα increased the binding of both CREB and NFATc1 to this promoter through a process blocked by indomethacin. The PGE2 receptor antagonists AH6809 and AH23848 blocked TNFα-induced expression of RANKL, NFATc1, and CREB; transcriptional activity of NFAT; and binding of NFATc1 or CREB to the RANKL promoter. These results suggest that TNFα-induced RANKL expression depends on PGE2 production and subsequent transcriptional activation/enhanced binding of NFATc1 and CREB to the RANKL promoter. PMID:28245593

  18. Increased Cx32 expression in spinal cord TrkB oligodendrocytes following peripheral axon injury.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Aminata P; Isaacson, Lori G

    2016-08-03

    Following injury to motor axons in the periphery, retrograde influences from the injury site lead to glial cell plasticity in the vicinity of the injured neurons. Following the transection of peripherally located preganglionic axons of the cervical sympathetic trunk (CST), a population of oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage cells expressing full length TrkB, the cognate receptor for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is significantly increased in number in the spinal cord. Such robust plasticity in OL lineage cells in the spinal cord following peripheral axon transection led to the hypothesis that the gap junction communication protein connexin 32 (Cx32), which is specific to OL lineage cells, was influenced by the injury. Following CST transection, Cx32 expression in the spinal cord intermediolateral cell column (IML), the location of the parent cell bodies, was significantly increased. The increased Cx32 expression was localized specifically to TrkB OLs in the IML, rather than other cell types in the OL cell lineage, with the population of Cx32/TrkB cells increased by 59%. Cx32 expression in association with OPCs was significantly decreased at one week following the injury. The results of this study provide evidence that peripheral axon injury can differentially affect the gap junction protein expression in OL lineage cells in the adult rat spinal cord. We conclude that the retrograde influences originating from the peripheral injury site elicit dramatic changes in the CNS expression of Cx32, which in turn may mediate the plasticity of OL lineage cells observed in the spinal cord following peripheral axon injury.

  19. Reduced IL-37 Production Increases Spontaneous Chemokine Expressions in Colon Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Günaltay, Sezin; Ghiboub, Mohammed; Hultgren, Olof; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2017-05-01

    Microscopic colitis, comprising collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis, is a common cause of chronic diarrhea. Previously, we showed enhanced chemokine productions in microscopic colitis patients, indicating dysregulated immune cell chemotaxis in the immunopathogenesis. We also showed decreased mRNA of IL-37, mainly regarded as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in the colonic mucosa of these patients, potentially an important factor for the chronicity of the colitis. Our aim in this study was to understand the possible role of IL-37 in chemokine production using a cell line model. A colon epithelial cell line, T84, was stimulated with the TLR5 ligand flagellin. IL-37 protein production was reduced 20% using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and the changes in chemokine mRNA and protein expressions were compared to cells transfected with empty plasmid. The 20% reduction in IL-37 protein levels spontaneously increased CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL10, and CXCL11 mRNA and protein expressions. CCL2 mRNA and protein levels were enhanced upon TLR5 stimulation. CCL3, CCL20, and CX3CL1 mRNA expressions were increased either spontaneously or following TLR5 stimulation, whereas CCL4 and CCL22 mRNA expressions were significantly decreased. Even a minor decrease in the ability of colon epithelial cells to produce IL-37 results in altered chemokine expression, mainly an increase in the production of several chemokines. Our results indicate that a decreased IL-37 expression by colon epithelial cells may be an important factor for increasing the recruitment of immune cells and subsequently developing microscopic colitis.

  20. Downregulation of glypican-3 expression increases migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zheng, Dongping; Liu, Mingming; Bai, Jiao; Zhou, Xi; Gong, Baolan; Lü, Jieyu; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Hui; Luo, Wenying; Huang, Guangrong

    2015-09-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a membrane of heparan sulfate proteoglycan family involved in cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion, and differentiation during the development of the majority of mesodermal tissues and organs. GPC3 is explored as a potential biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma screening. However, as a tumor-associated antigen, its role in ovarian cancer remains elusive. In this report, the expression levels of GPC3 in the various ovarian cancer cells were determined with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and GPC3 expression in ovarian cancer UCI 101 and A2780 cells was knocked down by siRNA transfection, and the effects of GPC3 knockdown on in vitro cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were respectively analyzed by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Transwell migration assay. Additionally, the effect of GPC3 knockdown on in vivo tumorigenesis were investigated in athymic nude mice. The results indicated that GPC3 knockdown significantly promoted cell proliferation and increased cell migration and invasion by upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression and downregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression. Additionally, GPC3 knockdown also increased in vivo tumorigenicity of UCI 101 and A2780 cells and final tumor weights and volumes after subcutaneous cell injection in the nude mice. The results of immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting both demonstrated a lower expression of GPC3 antigen in the tumors of GPC3 knockdown groups than that of negative control groups. Moreover, transforming growth factor-β2 protein expression in the tumors of GPC3 knockdown groups was significantly increased, which at least contributed to tumor growth in the nude mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that GPC3 knockdown promotes the progression of human ovarian cancer cells by increasing their migration, invasion

  1. Increased BDNF expression in fetal brain in the valproic acid model of autism.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Roby, Clinton D; Krueger, Bruce K

    2014-03-01

    Human fetal exposure to valproic acid (VPA), a widely-used anti-epileptic and mood-stabilizing drug, leads to an increased incidence of behavioral and intellectual impairments including autism; VPA administration to pregnant rats and mice at gestational days 12.5 (E12.5) or E13.5 leads to autistic-like symptoms in the offspring and is widely used as an animal model for autism. We report here that this VPA administration protocol transiently increased both BDNF mRNA and BDNF protein levels 5-6-fold in the fetal mouse brain. VPA exposure in utero induced smaller increases in the expression of mRNA encoding the other neurotrophins, NT3 (2.5-fold) and NT4 (2-fold). Expression of the neurotrophin receptors, trkA, trkB and trkC were minimally affected, while levels of the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, p75(NTR), doubled. Of the nine 5'-untranslated exons of the mouse BDNF gene, only expression of exons I, IV and VI was stimulated by VPA in utero. In light of the well-established role of BDNF in regulating neurogenesis and the laminar fate of postmitotic neurons in the developing cortex, an aberrant increase in BDNF expression in the fetal brain may contribute to VPA-induced cognitive disorders by altering brain development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  3. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  4. An Analysis of Naturalistic Interventions for Increasing Spontaneous Expressive Language in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Justin D.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca; Gast, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify naturalistic language interventions for increasing spontaneous expressive language (defined in this review as absence of verbal prompt or other verbalization from adults or peers) in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Also, the methodological rigor and effectiveness of each study were evaluated…

  5. Activation of PI3Kγ/Akt pathway increases cardiomyocyte HMGB1 expression in diabetic environment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jia; Liu, Qian; Tang, Han; Tao, Aibin; Wang, Hao; Kao, Raymond; Rui, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Background The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein mediates the cardiomyocyte–cardiac fibroblast interaction that contributes to induction of myocardial fibrosis in diabetes mellitus (DM). In the present study, we aim to investigate the intracellular signaling pathway that leads to cardiomyocyte HMGB1 expression under a diabetic environment. Results HMGB1 expression is increased in high concentration of glucose (HG)-conditioned cardiomyocytes. Challenging cardiomyocytes with HG also increased PI3Kγ and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of PI3Kγ (CRISPR/Cas9 knockout plasmid or AS605240) prevented HG-induced Akt phosphorylation and HMGB1 expression by the cardiomyocytes. In addition, inhibition of Akt (Akt1/2/3 siRNA or A6730) attenuated HG-induced HMGB1 production. Finally, challenging cardiomyocytes with HG resulted in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with an antioxidant (Mitotempo) abolished HG-induced PI3Kγ and Akt activation, as well as HMGB1 production. Materials and Methods Isolated rat cardiomyocytes were cultured with a high concentration of glucose. Cardiomyocyte phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase gamma (PI3Kγ) and Akt activation were determined by Western blot. Cardiomyocyte HMGB1 production was evaluated with Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while cardiomyocyte oxidative stress was determined with a DCFDA fluorescence probe. Conclusions Our results suggest that the cardiomyocytes incur an oxidative stress under diabetic condition, which subsequently activates the PI3Kγ/Akt cell-signaling pathway and further increases HMGB1 expression. PMID:27821807

  6. Overexpression of several Arabidopsis histone genes increases Agrobacterium-medicated transformation and transgene expression in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis histone H2A-1 is important for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. Mutation of HTA1, the gene encoding histone H2A-1, in the rat5 mutant results in decreased T-(transferred) DNA integration into the plant genome, whereas over-expression of HTA1 increases transformation freq...

  7. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain.

  8. PACAP38 increases vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression and attenuates methamphetamine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, TS; Richardson, JR; Wang, MZ; Li, YJ; Taylor, TN; Ciliax, BJ; Zachrisson, O; Mercer, A; Miller, GW

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide, 38 amino acids (PACAP38) is a brain-gut peptide with diverse physiological functions and is neuroprotective in several models of neurological disease. In this study, we show that systemic administration of PACAP38, which is transported across the blood-brain barrier, greatly reduces the neurotoxicity of methamphetamine (METH). Mice treated with PACAP38 exhibited an attenuation of striatal dopamine loss after METH exposure as well as greatly reduced markers of oxidative stress. PACAP38 treatment also prevented striatal neuroinflammation after METH administration as measured by overexpression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an indicator of astrogliosis, and glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5), a marker of microgliosis. In PACAP38 treated mice, the observed protective effects were not due to an altered thermal response to METH. Since the mice were not challenged with METH until 28 days after PACAP38 treatment, this suggests the neuroprotective effects are mediated by regulation of gene expression. At the time of METH administration, PACAP38 treated animals exhibited a preferential increase in the expression and function of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2). Genetic reduction of VMAT2 has been shown to increase the neurotoxicity of METH, thus we propose that the increased expression of VMAT2 may underlie the protective actions of PACAP38 against METH. The ability of PACAP38 to increase VMAT2 expression suggests that PACAP38 signaling pathways may constitute a novel therapeutic approach to treat and prevent disorders of dopamine storage. PMID:18533255

  9. The Effectiveness of Dialogic Reading in Increasing English Language Learning Preschool Children's Expressive Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Diana; Dauksas, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of dialogic reading in increasing the literacy interactions between English language learning parents (ELL) and their preschool aged children and children's expressive language development were studied. Twenty-one ELL parents of preschool aged children received dialogic reading training every other week for a ten-week period.…

  10. Use of CYP52A2A promoter to increase gene expression in yeast

    DOEpatents

    Craft, David L.; Wilson, C. Ron; Eirich, Dudley; Zhang, Yeyan

    2004-01-06

    A nucleic acid sequence including a CYP promoter operably linked to nucleic acid encoding a heterologous protein is provided to increase transcription of the nucleic acid. Expression vectors and host cells containing the nucleic acid sequence are also provided. The methods and compositions described herein are especially useful in the production of polycarboxylic acids by yeast cells.

  11. Increased KGF expression promotes fibroblast activation in a double paracrine manner resulting in cutaneous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Canady, Johanna; Arndt, Stephanie; Karrer, Sigrid; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2013-03-01

    Fibrotic disorders of the skin share the characteristic features of increased production and deposition of extracellular matrix components by activated fibroblasts. Their clinical course ranges from benign with localized cutaneous involvement to a systemic, life-threatening disease. The molecular cause for fibroblast activation remains unknown, yet epithelial-mesenchymal interactions draw mounting attention in the research field of fibrogenesis. We examined keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), a crucial molecule in fibroblast-keratinocyte cross talk, exemplarily in keloid and scleroderma, and found its expression to be increased in disease-derived fibroblasts and tissues compared with healthy controls. This overexpression induces fibroblast activation through a double paracrine mode of action. Upon KGF stimulation, the keratinocytes produced and secreted OSM (oncostatin M). Fibroblasts were in turn activated by OSM reacting with the increased expression of collagen type I-α1, fibroblast activation protein, and enhanced migration. The observed increase in collagen expression and fibroblast migration can be traced back to OSM-regulated STAT3 phosphorylation, leading to enhanced urokinase plasminogen activator expression. Hence, we propose a causative loop in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders of the skin mediated by the overexpression of KGF in mesenchymal cells.

  12. Methotrexate increases skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression and improves metabolic control in experimental diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term administration of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) mimics the effects of endurance exercise by activating AMP kinase and by increasing skeletal muscle expression of GLUT4 glucose transporter. AICAR is an intermediate in the purine de novo synthesis, and its tissue conc...

  13. Elevated expression of artemis in human fibroblast cells is associated with cellular radiosensitivity and increased apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ulus-Senguloglu, G; Arlett, C F; Plowman, P N; Parnell, J; Patel, N; Bourton, E C; Parris, C N

    2012-10-23

    The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular radiosensitivity in two human fibroblast cell lines 84BR and 175BR derived from two cancer patients. Clonogenic assays were performed following exposure to increasing doses of gamma radiation to confirm radiosensitivity. γ-H2AX foci assays were used to determine the efficiency of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in cells. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) established the expression levels of key DNA DSB repair genes. Imaging flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC was used to compare artemis expression and apoptosis in cells. Clonogenic cellular hypersensitivity in the 84BR and 175BR cell lines was associated with a defect in DNA DSB repair measured by the γ-H2AX foci assay. The Q-PCR analysis and imaging flow cytometry revealed a two-fold overexpression of the artemis DNA repair gene, which was associated with an increased level of apoptosis in the cells before and after radiation exposure. Overexpression of normal artemis protein in a normal immortalised fibroblast cell line NB1-Tert resulted in increased radiosensitivity and apoptosis. We conclude that elevated expression of artemis is associated with higher levels of DNA DSB, radiosensitivity and elevated apoptosis in two radio-hypersensitive cell lines. These data reveal a potentially novel mechanism responsible for radiosensitivity and show that increased artemis expression in cells can result in either radiation resistance or enhanced sensitivity.

  14. Elevated expression of artemis in human fibroblast cells is associated with cellular radiosensitivity and increased apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ulus-Senguloglu, G; Arlett, C F; Plowman, P N; Parnell, J; Patel, N; Bourton, E C; Parris, C N

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular radiosensitivity in two human fibroblast cell lines 84BR and 175BR derived from two cancer patients. Methods: Clonogenic assays were performed following exposure to increasing doses of gamma radiation to confirm radiosensitivity. γ-H2AX foci assays were used to determine the efficiency of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in cells. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) established the expression levels of key DNA DSB repair genes. Imaging flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC was used to compare artemis expression and apoptosis in cells. Results: Clonogenic cellular hypersensitivity in the 84BR and 175BR cell lines was associated with a defect in DNA DSB repair measured by the γ-H2AX foci assay. The Q-PCR analysis and imaging flow cytometry revealed a two-fold overexpression of the artemis DNA repair gene, which was associated with an increased level of apoptosis in the cells before and after radiation exposure. Overexpression of normal artemis protein in a normal immortalised fibroblast cell line NB1-Tert resulted in increased radiosensitivity and apoptosis. Conclusion: We conclude that elevated expression of artemis is associated with higher levels of DNA DSB, radiosensitivity and elevated apoptosis in two radio-hypersensitive cell lines. These data reveal a potentially novel mechanism responsible for radiosensitivity and show that increased artemis expression in cells can result in either radiation resistance or enhanced sensitivity. PMID:23093295

  15. Foetal hypoxia increases cardiac AT2R expression and subsequent vulnerability to adult ischaemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qin; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Chen, Man; Zhang, Lubo

    2011-01-01

    Aims Hypoxia is a common stress to the foetus and results in increased cardiac vulnerability to adult ischaemic injury. This study tested the hypothesis that foetal hypoxia causes programming of increased AT2 receptor (AT2R) expression in the heart, resulting in the heightened cardiac susceptibility to adult ischaemic injury. Methods and results Time-dated pregnant rats were divided between normoxic and hypoxic (10.5% O2 from days 15 to 21 of gestation) groups. Hypoxia resulted in significantly increased AT2R in the heart of adult offspring. Multiple glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were identified at the AT2R promoter, deletion of which increased the promoter activity. Consistently, ex vivo treatment of isolated foetal hearts with dexamethasone for 48 h decreased AT2R expression, which was inhibited by RU 486. Hypoxia decreased glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hearts of foetal, 3-week-old and 3-month-old offspring, resulting in decreased GR binding to the GREs at the AT2R promoter. The inhibition of AT2R improved postischaemic recovery of left ventricular function and rescued the foetal hypoxia-induced cardiac ischaemic vulnerability in male adult animals. In contrast, the inhibition of AT1 receptors decreased the postischaemic recovery. Conclusion The results demonstrate that in utero hypoxia causes programming of increased AT2R gene expression in the heart by downregulating GR, which contributes to the increased cardiac vulnerability to adult ischaemic injury caused by prenatal hypoxic exposure. PMID:20870653

  16. Dexamethasone increases aquaporin-2 protein expression in ex vivo inner medullary collecting duct suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minguang; Cai, Hui; Klein, Janet D.; Laur, Oskar; Chen, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is the vasopressin-regulated water channel that controls renal water reabsorption and plays an important role in the maintenance of body water homeostasis. Excessive glucocorticoid as often seen in Cushing's syndrome causes water retention. However, whether and how glucocorticoid regulates AQP2 remains unclear. In this study, we examined the direct effect of dexamethasone on AQP2 protein expression and activity. Dexamethasone increased AQP2 protein abundance in rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) suspensions. This was confirmed in HEK293 cells transfected with AQP2 cDNA. Cell surface protein biotinylation showed an increase of dexamethasone-induced cell membrane AQP2 expression and this effect was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486. Functionally, dexamethasone treatment of oocytes injected with an AQP2 cRNA increased water transport activity as judged by cell rupture time in a hypo-osmotic solution (66 ± 13 s in dexamethasone vs. 101 ± 11 s in control, n = 15). We further found that dexamethasone treatment reduced AQP2 protein degradation, which could result in an increase of AQP2 protein. Interestingly, dexamethasone promoted cell membrane AQP2 moving to less buoyant lipid raft submicrodomains. Taken together, our data demonstrate that dexamethasone promotes AQP2 protein expression and increases water permeability mainly via inhibition of AQP2 protein degradation. The increase in AQP2 activity promotes water reabsorption, which may contribute to glucocorticoid-induced water retention and hypertension. PMID:26578982

  17. Acetic acid increases the phage-encoded enterotoxin A expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of acetic acid, a common food preservative, on the bacteriophage-encoded enterotoxin A (SEA) expression and production in Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in pH-controlled batch cultures carried out at pH 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Also, genomic analysis of S. aureus strains carrying sea was performed to map differences within the gene and in the temperate phage carrying sea. Results The sea expression profile was similar from pH 7.0 to 5.5, with the relative expression peaking in the transition between exponential and stationary growth phase and falling during stationary phase. The levels of sea mRNA were below the detection limit at pH 5.0 and 4.5, confirmed by very low SEA levels at these pH values. The level of relative sea expression at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were nine and four times higher, respectively, in the transitional phase than in the exponential growth phase, compared to pH 7.0 and pH 6.5, where only a slight increase in relative expression in the transitional phase was observed. Furthermore, the increase in sea expression levels at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were observed to be linked to increased intracellular sea gene copy numbers and extracellular sea-containing phage copy numbers. The extracellular SEA levels increased over time, with highest levels produced at pH 6.0 in the four growth phases investigated. Using mitomycin C, it was verified that SEA was at least partially produced as a consequence of prophage induction of the sea-phage in the three S. aureus strains tested. Finally, genetic analysis of six S. aureus strains carrying the sea gene showed specific sea phage-groups and two versions of the sea gene that may explain the different sea expression and production levels observed in this study. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the increased sea expression in S. aureus caused by acetic acid induced the sea-encoding prophage, linking SEA production to the lifecycle of the phage. PMID:20487538

  18. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  19. Increased expression of CX43 on stromal cells promotes leukemia apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shijie; Wen, Qin; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Maihong; Chen, Guo; Gong, Yi; Zhong, Jiangjian; Chen, Xuelian; Stucky, Andres; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Xi

    2015-12-29

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) induced apoptosis has been reported in solid tumors, but the effect of Cx43 expressed by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in leukemia has not been fully investigated. Manipulating Cx43 expression could be a potential therapeutic strategy for leukemia. Here, we investigate the effect of Cx43 expressed by BMSCs (human Umbilical Cord Stem Cells over-expressed CX43, Cx43-hUCSC) on leukemia cells. When co-cultured with Cx43-hUCSC, leukemia cells show significant lower growth rate with increasing apoptosis activity, and more leukemia cells enter S phase. Functional assays of fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP) showed improved gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) on leukemia cells when co-cultured with Cx43-hUCSC (p < 0.01). In a mouse minimal disease model, the mean survival time and mortality rate were significantly improved in mice transplanted with Cx43-hUCSC. Our results indicate that Cx43 expressed by BMSC induces apoptosis on leukemia cells. Small molecules or other pharmaceutical approaches for modulating Cx43 expression in BMSCs could be used for delaying relapse of leukemia.

  20. Deletion of Rictor in brain and fat alters peripheral clock gene expression and increases blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Drägert, Katja; Bhattacharya, Indranil; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Seebeck, Petra; Azzi, Abdelhalim; Brown, Steven A; Georgiopoulou, Stavroula; Held, Ulrike; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Arras, Margarete; Humar, Rok; Hall, Michael N; Battegay, Edouard; Haas, Elvira

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) contains the essential protein RICTOR and is activated by growth factors. mTORC2 in adipose tissue contributes to the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. In the perivascular adipose tissue, mTORC2 ensures normal vascular reactivity by controlling expression of inflammatory molecules. To assess whether RICTOR/mTORC2 contributes to blood pressure regulation, we applied a radiotelemetry approach in control and Rictor knockout (Rictor(aP2KO)) mice generated using adipocyte protein-2 gene promoter-driven CRE recombinase expression to delete Rictor. The 24-hour mean arterial pressure was increased in Rictor(aP2KO) mice, and the physiological decline in mean arterial pressure during the dark period was impaired. In parallel, heart rate and locomotor activity were elevated during the dark period with a pattern similar to blood pressure changes. This phenotype was associated with mild cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, decreased cardiac natriuretic peptides, and their receptor expression in adipocytes. Moreover, clock gene expression was reduced or phase-shifted in perivascular adipose tissue. No differences in clock gene expression were observed in the master clock suprachiasmatic nucleus, although Rictor gene expression was also lower in brain of Rictor(aP2KO) mice. Thus, this study highlights the importance of RICTOR/mTORC2 for interactions between vasculature, adipocytes, and brain to tune physiological outcomes, such as blood pressure and locomotor activity.

  1. Comparative expression study to increase the solubility of cold adapted Vibrio proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niiranen, Laila; Espelid, Sigrun; Karlsen, Christian R; Mustonen, Milla; Paulsen, Steinar M; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Willassen, Nils P

    2007-03-01

    Functional and structural studies require gene overexpression and purification of soluble proteins. We wanted to express proteins from the psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio salmonicida in Escherichia coli, but encountered solubility problems. To improve the solubility of the proteins, we compared the effects of six N-terminal fusion proteins (Gb1, Z, thioredoxin, GST, MBP and NusA) and an N-terminal His6-tag. The selected test set included five proteins from the fish pathogen V. salmonicida and two related products from the mesophilic human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We tested the expression in two different expression strains and at three different temperatures (16, 23 and 37 degrees C). His6-tag was the least effective tag, and these vector constructs were also difficult to transform. MBP and NusA performed best, expressing soluble proteins with all fusion partners in at least one of the cell types. In some cases MBP, GST and thioredoxin fusions resulted in products of incorrect size. The effect of temperature is complex: in most cases level of expression increased with temperature, whereas the effect on solubility was opposite. We found no clear connection between the preferred expression temperature of the protein and the temperature of the original host organism's natural habitat.

  2. Bradykinin promotes vascular endothelial growth factor expression and increases angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Shan; Wang, Shih-Wei; Chang, An-Chen; Tai, Huai-Ching; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Yu-Min; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-15

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and shows a tendency for metastasis to distant organs. Angiogenesis is required for metastasis. Bradykinin (BK) is an inflammatory mediator involved in tumor growth and metastasis, but its role in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human prostate cancer remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether BK promotes prostate cancer angiogenesis via VEGF expression. We found that exogenous BK increased VEGF expression in prostate cancer cells and further promoted tube formation in endothelial progenitor cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment of prostate cancer with B2 receptor antagonist or small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced BK-mediated VEGF production. The Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways were activated after BK treatment, and BK-induced VEGF expression was abolished by the specific inhibitor and siRNA of the Akt and mTOR cascades. BK also promoted nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) activity. Importantly, BK knockdown reduced VEGF expression and abolished prostate cancer cell conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis. Taken together, these results indicate that BK operates through the B2 receptor, Akt, and mTOR, which in turn activate NF-κB and AP-1, activating VEGF expression and contributing to angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

  3. Increased expression of FLIP, an inhibitor of Fas-mediated apoptosis, in stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sug Hyung; Kim, Hong Sug; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Yun-Sil; Park, Won Sang; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin

    2003-02-01

    Despite the cell surface expression of Fas (Apo-1/CD95), many types of tumor cells, including stomach cancer cells, are resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis, indicating the presence of inactivating mechanisms of Fas signaling. Expression of FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP), one of the inhibitory proteins of Fas-mediated apoptosis, has been reported in several cancer types, but not in stomach cancer. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of Fas and FLIP in 60 advanced gastric adenocarcinomas by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray approach. Immunopositivity (defined as >/=30% of the neoplastic cells) was observed for Fas in 58 (97%) and FLIP in 54 (90%) of the 60 cancers. All of the tumors with FLIP immunostaining also showed Fas immunostaining. Loss of cell surface Fas immunostaining, another mechanism of Fas resistance, was observed in 45 tumors (75%). By contrast, normal gastric mucosal cells showed no or weak expression of both Fas and FLIP. Taken together, these results indicate that increased expression of FLIP is a frequent event in stomach carcinomas, and suggest that for evading apoptosis stomach carcinoma cells in vivo may need FLIP expression, which might contribute to tumor development.

  4. Increased expression of thyroid hormone receptor isoforms in end-stage human congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    d'Amati, G; di Gioia, C R; Mentuccia, D; Pistilli, D; Proietti-Pannunzi, L; Miraldi, F; Gallo, P; Celi, F S

    2001-05-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an important role on myocardial development and function. The local effects of thyroid hormone are mediated by the receptor isoforms ultimately driving the expression of cardiac-specific genes. Although overt and subclinical thyroid dysfunction causes well-known changes in the cardiovascular system, little is known about local thyroid hormone action in normal and failing human myocardium. With a newly developed multiplex competitive RT-PCR method, we evaluated the expression of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta-1 in normal human hearts and in end-stage congestive heart failure. A statistically significant difference in the expression of all three TR isoforms was observed among samples from normal subjects, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In DCM, compared with normal, the studied TR isoforms were significantly increased. In IHD, the increased expression was found significant only for alpha-1 and alpha-2 isoforms. No differences were observed between the pathologic groups. In conclusion, a coordinated increment in the expression of the TR isoforms was observed in both DCM and IHD by multiplex competitive RT-PCR. The observed changes could represent a compensatory mechanism to myocardial failure or to locally altered thyroid hormone action.

  5. Increased expression of nuclear envelope gp210 antigen in small bile ducts in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Minoru; Takii, Yasushi; Ito, Masahiro; Komori, Atsumasa; Yokoyama, Terufumi; Shimizu-Yoshida, Yuki; Koyabu, Makiko; Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Kamihira, Takashi; Daikoku, Manabu; Migita, Kiyoshi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Shimoda, Shinji; Ishibashi, Hiromi

    2006-03-01

    The sustained antibody response to nuclear envelope gp210 antigen indicates a group of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients at high risk for the progression to end-stage hepatic failure. To address this issue, we immunohistochemically studied the expression of gp210 antigen in needle liver biopsy specimens from PBC patients using a monoclonal antibody specific for gp210 antigen. The specimens from autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), chronic viral hepatitis B (CHB) and C (CHC) patients served as disease controls. The expression of gp210 antigen was apparently increased on the nuclear envelope of biliary epithelial cells (BECs) of small bile ducts in almost all specimens from PBC. In contrast, the expression of gp210 antigen was negative in BECs of small bile ducts in normal liver, while relatively weak anti-gp210 immunostaining was observed in AIH, CHC and CHB. In addition, the degree of gp210 expression in BECs of small bile ducts was positively correlated to that of portal inflammation, interface hepatitis and lobular inflammation in PBC. These results indicate that the increased expression of gp210 in small bile ducts, which is probably associated with damage to BECs by inflammation, is possibly involved in autoimmune response to gp210 leading to the progression to end-stage hepatic failure in PBC.

  6. Cigarette smoke extract inhibits expression of peroxiredoxin V and increases airway epithelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Serikov, Vladimir B; Leutenegger, Christian; Krutilina, Raisa; Kropotov, Andrei; Pleskach, Nadezhda; Suh, Jung H; Tomilin, Nikolay V

    2006-01-01

    Inhaled cigarette smoke induces oxidative stress in the epithelium of airways. Peroxiredoxin V (PRXV) is a potent antioxidant protein, highly expressed in cells of the airway epithelium. The goal of our study was to determine whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) influenced expression of this protein in airway epithelia in vivo and in vitro. In Sprague-Dawley rats, we determined effects of CSE on airway epithelial permeability, mRNA levels and expression of PRXV protein. Exposure of isolated tracheal segment in vitro to 20% CSE for 4 h resulted in development of increased permeability to albumin, significantly reduced mRNA levels for PRXV, and reduced amounts of PRXV protein in the epithelium. In cultures of the airway epithelial cell lines (Calu-3, JME), primary airway cell culture (cow), and alveolar epithelial cells A549, CSE also significantly decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and expression of PRXV protein, and induced glutathione and protein oxidation. To demonstrate functional importance of PRXV, we exposed clones of HeLa cells with siRNA-downregulated PRXV to hydrogen peroxide, which resulted in increased rate of cell death and protein oxidation. CSE directly downregulates expression of functionally important antioxidant enzyme PRXV in the epithelial cells of airways, which represents one pathophysiological mechanism of cigarette smoke toxicity.

  7. Increased expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome truncated lamin A transcript during cell aging.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Sofia; Coppedè, Fabio; Sagelius, Hanna; Eriksson, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Most cases of the segmental progeroid syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are caused by a de novo dominant mutation within a single codon of the LMNA gene. This mutation leads to the increased usage of an internal splice site that generates an alternative lamin A transcript with an internal deletion of 150 nucleotides, called lamin A Delta 150. The LMNA gene encodes two major proteins of the inner nuclear lamina, lamins A and C, but not much is known about their expression levels. Determination of the overall expression levels of the LMNA gene transcripts is an important step to further the understanding of the HGPS. In this study, we have performed absolute quantification of the lamins A, C and A Delta 150 transcripts in primary dermal fibroblasts from HGPS patients and unaffected age-matched and parent controls. We show that the lamin A Delta 150 transcript is present in unaffected controls but its expression is >160-fold lower than that in samples from HGPS patients. Analysis of transcript expression during in vitro aging shows that although the levels of lamin A and lamin C transcripts remain unchanged, the lamin A Delta 150 transcript increases in late passage cells from HGPS patients and parental controls. This study provides a new method for LMNA transcript analysis and insights into the expression of the LMNA gene in HGPS and normal cells.

  8. Increased Skeletal Muscle GLUT4 Expression in Obese Mice After Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise Is Posttranscriptional.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Jami M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-10-01

    Exercise promotes glucose clearance by increasing skeletal muscle GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Importantly, exercise upregulates muscle GLUT4 expression in an insulin-independent manner under conditions of insulin resistance, such as with type 2 diabetes. However, the insulin-independent mechanism responsible for rescued muscle GLUT4 expression is poorly understood. We used voluntary wheel running (VWR) in mice to test the prevailing hypothesis that insulin-independent upregulation of skeletal muscle GLUT4 protein expression with exercise is through increased Glut4 transcription. We demonstrate that 4 weeks of VWR exercise in obese mice rescued high-fat diet-induced decreased muscle GLUT4 protein and improved both fasting plasma insulin and hepatic triacylglyceride levels, but did not rescue muscle Glut4 mRNA. Persistent reduction in Glut4 mRNA suggests that a posttranscriptional mechanism regulated insulin-independent muscle GLUT4 protein expression in response to exercise in lean and obese mice. Reduction of GLUT4 protein in sedentary animals upon treatment with rapamycin revealed mTORC1-dependent GLUT4 regulation. However, no difference in GLUT4 protein expression was observed in VWR-exercised mice treated with either rapamycin or Torin 1, indicating that exercise-dependent regulation on GLUT4 was mTOR independent. The findings provide new insight into the mechanisms responsible for exercise-dependent regulation of GLUT4 in muscle.

  9. REM sleep deprivation increases the expression of interleukin genes in mice hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Won Sub; Park, Hae Jeong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Kim, Jong Woo

    2013-11-27

    Recently, evidence has suggested the possible involvement of inflammatory cytokines in sleep deprivation (SD). In this study, we assessed the patterns of inflammatory gene regulation in the hypothalamus of REM SD mice. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to two groups, SD (n=15) and control groups (n=15). Mice in the SD group were sleep-deprived for 72h using modified multiple platforms. Microarray analysis on inflammatory genes was performed in mice hypothalamus. In addition, interleukin 1 beta (IL1β) protein expression was analyzed by the immunochemistry method. Through microarray analysis, we found that expressions of IL subfamily genes, such as IL1β (2.55-fold), IL18 (1.92-fold), IL11 receptor alpha chain 1 (1.48-fold), IL5 (1.41-fold), and IL17E genes (1.31-fold), were up-regulated in the hypothalamus of SD mice compared to the control. The increase in the expression of these genes was also confirmed by RT-PCR. Among these genes, the expression of IL1β was particularly increased in the hypothalamus of SD mice. Interestingly, we found that the protein expression of endogenous IL1β was also elevated in the hypothalamus of SD mice compared to the control mice. These results implicate that IL subfamily genes, and in particular, IL1β, may play a role in sleep regulation in the hypothalamus of REM SD mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kynurenine signaling increases DNA polymerase kappa expression and promotes genomic instability in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bostian, April C.L.; Maddukuri, Leena; Reed, Megan R.; Savenka, Tatsiana; Hartman, Jessica H.; Davis, Lauren; Pouncey, Dakota L.; Miller, Grover P.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of the translesion synthesis polymerase (TLS pol) hpol κ in glioblastomas has been linked to a poor patient prognosis; however, the mechanism promoting higher expression in these tumors remains unknown. We determined that activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway in glioblastoma cells leads to increased hpol κ mRNA and protein levels. We blocked nuclear translocation and DNA binding by the AhR in glioblastoma cells using a small-molecule and observed decreased hpol κ expression. Pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), the enzyme largely responsible for activating the AhR in glioblastomas, led to a decrease in the endogenous AhR agonist kynurenine (Kyn) and a corresponding decrease in hpol κ protein levels. Importantly, we discovered that inhibiting TDO activity, AhR signaling, or suppressing hpol κ expression with RNA interference led to decreased chromosomal damage in glioblastoma cells. Epistasis assays further supported the idea that TDO activity, activation of AhR signaling and the resulting over-expression of hpol κ function primarily in the same pathway to increase endogenous DNA damage. These findings indicate that up-regulation of hpol κ through glioblastoma-specific TDO activity and activation of AhR signaling likely contributes to the high levels of replication stress and genomic instability observed in these tumors. PMID:26651356

  11. HMGA2 Moderately Increases Fetal Hemoglobin Expression in Human Adult Erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcellos, Jaira F.; Lee, Y. Terry; Byrnes, Colleen; Tumburu, Laxminath; Rabel, Antoinette; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) has therapeutic importance for patients with beta-hemoglobin disorders. Previous studies showed that let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly regulated in erythroid cells during the fetal-to-adult developmental transition, and that targeting let-7 mediated the up-regulation of HbF to greater than 30% of the total globin levels in human adult cultured erythroblasts. HMGA2 is a member of the high-mobility group A family of proteins and a validated target of the let-7 family of miRNAs. Here we investigate whether expression of HMGA2 directly regulates fetal hemoglobin in adult erythroblasts. Let-7 resistant HMGA2 expression was studied after lentiviral transduction of CD34(+) cells. The transgene was regulated by the erythroid-specific gene promoter region of the human SPTA1 gene (HMGA2-OE). HMGA2-OE caused significant increases in gamma-globin mRNA expression and HbF to around 16% of the total hemoglobin levels compared to matched control transductions. Interestingly, no significant changes in KLF1, SOX6, GATA1, ZBTB7A and BCL11A mRNA levels were observed. Overall, our data suggest that expression of HMGA2, a downstream target of let-7 miRNAs, causes moderately increased gamma-globin gene and protein expression in adult human erythroblasts. PMID:27861570

  12. A novel method for increasing the expression level of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijun; Clapper, Jonathan; Guderian, Jeffery A; Foy, Teresa M; Fanger, Gary R; Retter, Marc W; Skeiky, Yasir A W

    2003-07-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins is an important step towards elucidating the functions of many genes discovered through genomic sequencing projects. It is also critical for validating gene targets and for developing effective therapies for many diseases. Here we describe a novel method to express recombinant proteins that are extremely difficult to produce otherwise. The increased protein expression level is achieved by using a fusion partner, MTB32-C, which is the carboxyl terminal fragment of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, MTB32 (Rv0125). By fusing MTB32-C to the N-termini of target genes, we have demonstrated significant enhancement of recombinant protein expression level in Escherichia coli. The inclusion of a 6xHis tag and the 128-amino acid of MTB32-C will add 13.5 kDa to the fusion molecule. Comparison of the mRNA levels of the fusion and non-fusion proteins indicated that the increased fusion protein expression may be regulated at translational or post-translational steps. There are many potential applications for the generated fusion proteins. For example, MTB32-C fusion proteins have been used successfully as immunogens to generate both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies have been used to characterize cellular localization of the proteins and to validate gene targets at protein level. In addition, these antibodies may be useful in diagnostic and therapeutic applications for many diseases. If desired, the MTB32-C portion in the fusion protein can be removed after protein expression, making it possible to study protein structure and function as well as to screen for potential drugs. Thus, this novel fusion expression system has become a powerful tool for many applications.

  13. Gene expression associated with increased supercooling capability in xylem parenchyma cells of larch (Larix kaempferi).

    PubMed

    Takata, Naoki; Kasuga, Jun; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-01-01

    Xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in larch adapt to subfreezing temperatures by deep supercooling, while cortical parenchyma cells (CPCs) undergo extracellular freezing. The temperature limits of supercooling in XPCs changed seasonally from -30 degrees C during summer to -60 degrees C during winter as measured by freezing resistance. Artificial deacclimation of larch twigs collected in winter reduced the supercooling capability from -60 degrees C to -30 degrees C. As an approach to clarify the mechanisms underlying the change in supercooling capability of larch XPCs, genes expressed in association with increased supercooling capability were examined. By differential screening and differential display analysis, 30 genes were found to be expressed in association with increased supercooling capability in XPCs. These 30 genes were categorized into several groups according to their functions: signal transduction factors, metabolic enzymes, late embryogenesis abundant proteins, heat shock proteins, protein synthesis and chromatin constructed proteins, defence response proteins, membrane transporters, metal-binding proteins, and functionally unknown proteins. All of these genes were expressed most abundantly during winter, and their expression was reduced or disappeared during summer. The expression of all of the genes was significantly reduced or disappeared with deacclimation of winter twigs. Interestingly, all but one of the genes were expressed more abundantly in the xylem than in the cortex. Eleven of the 30 genes were thought to be novel cold-induced genes. The results suggest that change in the supercooling capability of XPCs is associated with expression of genes, including genes whose functions have not been identified, and also indicate that gene products that have been thought to play a role in dehydration tolerance by extracellular freezing also have a function by deep supercooling.

  14. Increased expressions of ADAMTS-13 and apoptosis contribute to neuropathology during Toxoplasma gondii encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a protozoan parasite with the potential of causing severe encephalitis among immunocompromised humans and animals. Our previous study showed that T. gondii induces high nitric oxide (NO) production, high glial activation (GFAP) and neurofilament expressions, leading to severe neurodegeneration in toxoplasma encephalitis (TE) in the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this experimental study was to investigate ADAMTS-13 expression and apoptosis in CNS and to identify whether they have any correlation with toxoplasmosis neuropathology and neurodegeneration. Mice were infected with ME49 strain T. gondii and the levels of ADAMTS-13, caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, TNFR1 and Bcl-xL expressions were examined in brain tissues by immunohistochemistry, during the development and establishment of chronic infections at 10, 30 and 60 days post-infection. Results of the study revealed that the levels of ADAMTS-13 (P < 0.005), caspase 3 (P < 0.05), caspase 8 (P < 0.05), caspase 9 (P < 0.005) and TNFR1 (P < 0.05) expressions in the brain markedly increased while Bcl-xL expression decreased (P < 0.005). The most prominent finding from our study was that 10, 30 and 60 days post-infection ADAMTS-13 increased significantly and this may play an important role in the regulation and protection of the blood-brain barrier integrity and CNS microenvironment in TE. These results also suggest that T. gondii-mediated apoptosis might play a pivotal role and a different type of role in the mechanism of neurodegeneration and neuropathology in the process of TE. Furthermore, expression of ADAMTS-13 might give an idea of the progress and is critical for diagnosis of this disease. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on ADAMTS-13 expression in the CNS of T. gondii-infected mice. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  15. BAFF and TACI gene expression are increased in patients with untreated very early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moura, Rita A; Canhão, Helena; Polido-Pereira, Joaquim; Rodrigues, Ana M; Navalho, Márcio; Mourão, Ana F; Resende, Catarina; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Madruga Dias, João; da Silva, José Alberto Pereira; Graca, Luis; Fonseca, João E

    2013-08-01

    B cells play important roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Given the beneficial effect of B cell depletion therapy in RA as well as the observed alterations in B cell subpopulations in this disease, we evaluated whether changes in the expression of genes related to B cell survival and activation were already present in patients with untreated very early RA (VERA; < 6 weeks of disease duration). The expression of a group of B cell-related activation and survival genes was quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with VERA by real-time PCR and compared with untreated early RA (< 1 year), established treated RA, and other untreated early arthritis conditions. Serum B cell-activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) was quantified by ELISA. BAFF gene expression and serum levels were highest in patients with VERA. The expression of BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) increased with disease progression, while transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) was elevated since the first weeks of RA onset. Paired box 5 gene expression was also increased at all RA stages. Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5 was elevated only in established RA. No differences were observed in B cell maturation antigen, activation-induced cytidine deaminase, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein, and B cell lymphoma 2 expression. Disturbances in the expression of B cell-related activation and survival genes, particularly BAFF and TACI, occur from the onset of RA and precede changes in BAFF-R. These alterations can lead to the development of autoreactive B cells from the first weeks of RA onset.

  16. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shan-Li; Sun, Ming-Rui; Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin; Xu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3

  17. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

    PubMed

    Staples, Karl J; Nicholas, Ben; McKendry, Richard T; Spalluto, C Mirella; Wallington, Joshua C; Bragg, Craig W; Robinson, Emily C; Martin, Kirstin; Djukanović, Ratko; Wilkinson, Tom M A

    2015-01-01

    Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly